WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer clinical experience

  1. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  2. Clinical trends and outcomes of male breast cancer: Experience of a tertiary oncology centre in India

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    Anindya Mukherjee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Because of its rarity in any oncology centre, the clinical trends of male breast cancer specific to its geographical distribution have remained relatively unexplored. This study was done to analyze the clinico-pathological data, treatment given and survival patterns of male breast cancer patients visiting our tertiary medical centre and compare our results with available literature. Methods: All male breast cancer patients registered at our clinic from 2003 to 2009 were included. Frequency distribution analysis of the demographic and clinico-pathological data and treatment variables was done. Treatment outcome was examined from Kaplan-Meir survival estimates. Results: Thirty-three male breast cancer patients were encountered. The median age of presentation was sixty years. Mostly (87.9% they presented with lump in breast or axilla and were clinically staged to be ‘3’ (57.6%.Obesity and alcohol were the commonest risk factors identified. Modified radical mastectomy was the commonest (69.6% definitive therapy rendered with (only for clinically staged 3 patients or without neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was identified in most cases. Twenty-two patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and twenty-four received adjuvant radiotherapy. Eighteen (54.5% patients were hormone-receptor positive and received tamoxifen. The median Overall survival (OS and Progression-free survival (PFS came out to be 14.3 months (standard error, SE of 1.185; 95% confidence interval, CI 12-16.6 and 15.7 (SE 5.35, 95% CI 5.2-26.19 months respectively.Conclusion: Male breast cancers usually carry a poor prognosis due to presentation at later stages. Most of our results correlate with previous literature. Multi-centric prospective studies are required to validate the etiological factors and prognostic determinants of survival.-----------------------------Cite this article as: Mukherjee A, Saha A, Chattopadhyay S, Sur P. Clinical trends and

  3. Clinical experience with hyperthermia in cancer radiotherapy: Special reference to in vivo thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined use of heat and ionizing radiation is a promising treatment of radioresistant tumors, because the two modalities act complementary for cell killing in vitro. Cells in S phase and chronically hypoxic cells, which as a consequence have a low pH, are vulnerable to heat. This chapter describes the authors' clinical experiences of combined localized hypethermia in cancer radiotherapy and discusses mainly problems associated with temperature measurement and its evaluation, including the effects of electromagnetic waves on the thermometer system, the difference of temperature distribution in static phantom and in vivo, and the method for evaluating the heat dose, administered under conditions of various temperatures

  4. One-Year Experience Managing a Cancer Survivorship Clinic Using a Shared-Care Model for Gastric Cancer Survivors in Korea.

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    Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyejin; Son, Ki Young; Kim, Warrick Junsuk; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Kong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Cho, Belong; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Given the rapid growth of the population of cancer survivors, increased attention has been paid to their health problems. Although gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers, empirical evidence of survivorship care is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the health care status of gastric cancer survivors and to report the experience of using the shared-care model during a one-year experience at the cancer survivorship clinic in Seoul National University Hospital. This is a descriptive, single-center study of 250 long-term gastric cancer survivors who were referred to the survivorship clinic. The status of their health behaviors, comorbid conditions, secondary cancer screenings, and survivorship care status were investigated through questionnaires and examining the medical records. Among the survivors, 7.2% were current smokers, 8.8% were at-risk drinkers, and 32.4% were physically inactive. Among the patients who did not know their bone density status, the majority were in the osteopenic (37.1%) or osteoporotic range (24.1%). Screening among the eligible population within the recommended time intervals were 76.3% for colorectal cancer, but only 13.6% for lung cancer. All of the survivors were provided with counseling and medical management at the survivorship clinic, as appropriate. In conclusion, Long-term gastric cancer survivors have various unmet needs. Shared-care through survivorship clinics can be an effective solution for providing comprehensive care to cancer survivors.

  5. Clinical experience of SIB-IMRT in anal cancer and selective literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate feasibility and outcome of our institutional SIB-IMRT schedule in patients with anal cancer and to selectively review the literature on different SIB-IMRT schedules. Between 01/08-06/13 25 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell anal cancer were treated in our institution with IMRT. Radiotherapy was delivered in two series using a SIB-IMRT schedule of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and adjacent pelvic lymph nodes and 38 Gy/1.52 Gy to elective nodes followed by an IMRT boost of 7×2 Gy = 14 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes (cumulative prescription dose: 59 Gy). Mean follow-up was 20 months (range: 4-68). The 2-year-local control, colostomy-free survival, distant metastases-free survival and overall survival rates were 92%, 92%, 92%, and 88%, respectively. Grade 3 acute skin toxicity was observed in 6 patients (24%). No high grade gastrointestinal or urinary acute toxicity occurred. Four patients required more than one day of treatment interruption due to acute toxicity. No grade 3 or higher late sequelae were observed. We present our institutional SIB-IMRT experience treating patients with anal cancer in two series using moderate single doses from 1.5-2.0 Gy. Our results, in terms of loco-regional outcome and toxicity, were comparable to other studies. The incidence of treatment interruptions was very low. Therefore this schedule appears to be safe for clinical use

  6. Clinical Experience on Colorectal Cancer%大肠癌临证心悟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程剑华

    2014-01-01

    This article would summarize the author's experience in treating colorectal cancer from aspects of the main points of colorectal cancer's syndrome differentiation, using the principle of syndrome differentiation to guide individualized treatment, make full use of the drugs' attributive channel theory and use classical prescriptions and paired herbs, advanced colorectal cancer patients should focus on conditioning and improving symptoms, develop route of administration to play advantages of Chinese medicine, pay attention to life care and match with diet therapy, psychother-apy and medication, in order to provide some references to clinical treatment.%本文将从大肠癌的辨证要点、运用辨证论治原则指导个体化治疗、充分利用药物归经理论,运用经方,使用对药、晚期肠癌患者重在调理和改善症状、拓展给药途径,发挥中医优势、重视生活调养,食疗、心理治疗与药物治疗相配合等方面对笔者治疗大肠癌的心得体会进行总结,以供临床参考。

  7. IMRT for locally advanced anal cancer: clinical experience of the Montpellier Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess outcomes of patients with carcinoma of the anal canal (CAC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). From August 2007 to January 2011, seventy-two patients suffering from CAC were treated with IMRT. Concurrent chemotherapy was added in case of locally advanced tumors. Radiation course consisted in delivering an initial plan to the PTV1 defined as the primary tumor and the risk area including pelvic and inguinal nodes. Forty-five Gy in daily 1.8 Gy-daily fractions were delivered five days a week. A second plan of 14.4-20 Gy to the primary tumor (PTV2) was administered in 1.8-2 Gy-daily fractions, 5 days a week. We present here the results of dosimetry, toxicities, and clinical outcome of the first 39 patients with a median follow-up of 24 months. Thirty-one women and eight men were included in the present analysis. Tumors were classified as stages I, II, III and IV in 2, 7, 27 and 2 patients, respectively. Median age was 59 years (range, 38-85). Radiotherapy alone (RT) or combined with chemotherapy (RCT) were delivered in 6 (15%) and 33 (85%) patients, respectively. Six patients (15%) required a treatment break ≥ 3 days, and median time for treatment break was 8 days (range, 3-14 days). Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were seen in 10 and 5% of patients, respectively. Grade 4 toxicity was only hematologic and occurred in 12% patients receiving RCT. With a median follow-up of 24 months, no patient experienced any late grade 4 toxicity. The 2-year overall survival rate was 89%, the 2-year local relapse free survival was 77% and the 2-year colostomy-free survival rate was 85%. IMRT is well tolerated with acceptable treatment interruption allowing dose escalation

  8. Clinical experience in using lenvatinib in patients with progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    P. A. Isaev; D. Yu. Semin; P O Rumyantsev; A. A. Il’in; V. V. Pol’kin; T. A. Agababyan; S. V. Vasil’kov; V.S. Medvedev; N. V. Zhelonkina

    2016-01-01

    None of the variants of therapy currently available for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTС) refracted to therapy with radioactive iodine 131I (RAI) is not radical and does not allow to obtain full complete recovery including this is related to traditional chemotherapy regimens increasing toxicity of treatment contribute to improvement of the clinical effect. With the introduction of multicinase inhibitors into clinical practice made it possible to increase improve therapeutic ou...

  9. Mutation Profiling of Clinically Advanced Cancers Using Next-Generation Sequencing for Targeted Therapy: A Lifespan Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kenneth; Resnick, Murray B; Safran, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The application of modern molecular tests such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) to human malignancies has led to better understanding of tumor biology and the design of targeted molecular therapies. In the research setting, important genomic alterations in tumors have been discovered with potential therapeutic implications but data regarding the impact of this technology in a real world oncology practice is limited. As a result, we decided to review the results of NGS in 144 advanced-stage cancer patients referred to the oncology practices of Lifespan-affiliated centers in Rhode Island. Most cancers revealed genomic alterations in genes commonly mutated in cancer. However, several unexpected genomic alterations were discovered in certain cancers with potential therapeutic intervention. Most cancers contained "actionable" genomic alterations despite being of advanced stage. Our experience demonstrates that application of NGS in the clinical setting contributes both to increasing the therapeutic armamentarium as well as our understanding of tumor biology.

  10. Mutation Profiling of Clinically Advanced Cancers Using Next-Generation Sequencing for Targeted Therapy: A Lifespan Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kenneth; Resnick, Murray B; Safran, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The application of modern molecular tests such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) to human malignancies has led to better understanding of tumor biology and the design of targeted molecular therapies. In the research setting, important genomic alterations in tumors have been discovered with potential therapeutic implications but data regarding the impact of this technology in a real world oncology practice is limited. As a result, we decided to review the results of NGS in 144 advanced-stage cancer patients referred to the oncology practices of Lifespan-affiliated centers in Rhode Island. Most cancers revealed genomic alterations in genes commonly mutated in cancer. However, several unexpected genomic alterations were discovered in certain cancers with potential therapeutic intervention. Most cancers contained "actionable" genomic alterations despite being of advanced stage. Our experience demonstrates that application of NGS in the clinical setting contributes both to increasing the therapeutic armamentarium as well as our understanding of tumor biology. PMID:26422540

  11. Recruitment of ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials: experience from the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, R P; Lord, K; Mitchell, A J; Raghavan, D

    2012-09-25

    Throughout the world there are problems recruiting ethnic minority patients into cancer clinical trials. A major barrier to trial entry may be distrust of research and the medical system. This may be compounded by the regulatory framework governing research with an emphasis on written consent, closed questions and consent documentation, as well as fiscal issues. The Leicester UK experience is that trial accrual is better if British South Asian patients are approached by a senior doctor rather than someone of perceived lesser hierarchical status and a greater partnership between the hospital and General Practitioner may increase trial participation of this particular ethnic minority. In Los Angeles, USA, trial recruitment was improved by a greater utilisation of Hispanic staff and a Spanish language-based education programme. Involvement of community leaders is essential. While adhering to national, legal and ethnical standards, information sheets and consent, it helps if forms can be tailored towards the local ethnic minority population. Written translations are often of limited value in the recruitment of patients with no or limited knowledge of English. In some cultural settings, tape-recorded verbal consent (following approval presentations) may be an acceptable substitute for written consent, and appropriate legislative changes should be considered to facilitate this option. Approaches should be tailored to specific minority populations, taking consideration of their unique characteristics and with input from their community leadership. PMID:23011540

  12. Clinical outcome of parotidectomy with reconstruction: Experience of a regional head and neck cancer unit

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    Eyituoyo Okoturo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salivary gland pathologies represent a histologically diverse group of benign and malignant neoplasms. Currently, World Health Organization recognizes 13 benign and 24 malignant variants of all salivary gland neoplasms. Surgery continues to remain the main-stay for treatment of parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study was to document our experiences of the patients treated for parotid tumors and find out if any compelling variable predicted the relative clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study, from records of parotidectomies performed at the operating theatre by the head and neck cancer division of the study institution between 2010 and 2013. Eligibility for study inclusion included cases with benign or malignant parotid neoplasms requiring surgical management with or without adjunct radiotherapy. The predictors of postoperative complications, overall survival (OS, and disease-free survival (DFS were analyzed. Results: A total of 20 patients underwent parotidectomy. The mean age was 42 years. Tumors were located on the left parotid in 13 cases (65% and the right parotid in 7 cases (35%. The surgical procedures comprised 16 superficial parotidectomies, 1 total parotidectomy, and 3 radical parotidectomy (inclusive of facial nerve sacrifice and 2 neck dissections levels II–V. The reconstructive procedures were 2 facial nerve branch cable grafts, 1 end-to-end facial-facial nerve branch anastomoses, and 2 facial re-animation surgeries (temporalis muscle suspensions. A total of five cases (33.3% had postoperative complications. 2 variables (length of surgery and neck dissection were found to have an impact on postoperative complications that were statistically significant. Additionally, length of surgery was a significant predictor on the 2 years OS and DFS. Conclusion: The result of this study showed good clinical outcome, especially in the benign cases. The comprehensive clinical outcome of the

  13. Pathotropic nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy Rexin-G IV: three-year clinical experience.

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    Gordon, Erlinda M; Lopez, Francisco F; Cornelio, Gerardo H; Lorenzo, Conrado C; Levy, John P; Reed, Rebecca A; Liu, Liqiong; Bruckner, Howard W; Hall, Frederick L

    2006-11-01

    Metastatic cancer is a life-threatening illness with a predictably fatal outcome, thereby representing a major unmet medical need. In 2003, Rexin-G became the world's first targeted injectable vector approved for clinical trials in the treatment of intractable metastatic disease. Uniquely suited, by design, to function within the context of the human circulatory system, Rexin-G is a pathotropic (disease-seeking) gene delivery system bearing a designer killer gene; in essence, a targeted nanoparticle that seeks out and selectively accumulates in metastatic sites upon intravenous infusion. The targeted delivery of the cytocidal gene to primary tumors and metastatic foci, in effective local concentrations, compels both cancer cells and tumor-associated neovasculature to self-destruct, without causing untoward collateral damage to non-target organs. In this study: i) we report the results of three distinctive clinical studies which demonstrate the initial proofs of concept, safety, and efficacy of Rexin-G when used as a single agent for advanced or metastatic cancer, ii) we introduce the quantitative foundations of an innovative personalized treatment regimen, designated the 'Calculus of Parity', based on a patient's calculated tumor burden, iii) we propose a refinement of surrogate end-points commonly used for defining success in cancer therapy, and iv) we map out a strategic plan for the accelerated approval of Rexin-G based on the oncologic Threshold of Credibility paradigm being developed by the Food and Drug Administration. PMID:17016635

  14. Clinical experience of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiromichiMaeda; TakehrioOkabayashi; KazuhiroHanazaki; MichiyaKobayashi

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome caused by ovarian metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer, which was accompanied by peritoneal dissemination. A 58-year-old female patient presented with massive right pleural effusion, ascites and a huge pelvic mass. Under the diagnosis of an advanced ovarian tumor, bilateral oophorectomy was performed and sigmoidectomy was also carried out after intraoperative diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination involving the sigmoid colon. How- ever, immunohistochemical staining revealed that the ovarian lesions were metastasis from the primary advanced colon cancer. Postoperatively, ascites and pleural effusion subsided, and the diagnosis of Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastatic ovarian tumor from colon cancer was determined. The patient is now undergoing a regimen of chemotherapy for colon cancer without recurrence of ascites or hydrothorax 10 mo after the surgery. Pseudo-Meigs' Syndrome due to a metastaticovarian tumor from colon cancer is rare but clinically important because long-term alleviation of symptoms can be achieved by surgical resection. This case report suggests that selected patients, even with peritoneal dissemination, may obtain palliation from surgical resection of metastatic ovarian tumors.

  15. Early clinical experience of radiotherapy of prostate cancer with volumetric modulated arc therapy

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    Valli Mariacarla

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial clinical experience in radiation treatment of carcinoma of prostate with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc (RA technology. Methods Forty-five patients with a median age of 72 ± 3, affected by prostate carcinoma (T1c: 22 patients, T2a-b: 17 patients, T3a-b: 6 patients. N0: 43 patients, N1-Nx: 2 patients, all M0, with initial PSA of 10.0 ± 3.0 ng/mL, were treated with RapidArc in a feasibility study. All patients were treated with single arc using 6MV photons. Dose prescription ranged between 76 (7 patients and 78 Gy (38 patients in 2Gy/fraction. Plan quality was assessed by means of Dose Volume Histogram (DVH analysis. Technical parameters of arcs and pre-treatment quality assurance results (Gamma Agreement Index, GAI are reported to describe delivery features. Early toxicity was scored (according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Effects scale, CTCAE, scale at the end of treatment together with biochemical outcome (PSA. Results From DVH data, target coverage was fulfilling planning objectives: V95% was in average higher than 98% and V107%~0.0% (D2%~104.0% in average. Homogeneity D5%-D95% ranged between 6.2 ± 1.0% to 6.7 ± 1.3%. For rectum, all planning objectives were largely met (e.g. V70Gy = 10.7 ± 5.5% against an objective of 2% = 79.4 ± 1.2Gy against an objective of 80.0Gy. Maximum dose to femurs was D2% = 36.7 ± 5.4Gy against an objective of 47Gy. Monitor Units resulted: MU/Gy = 239 ± 37. Average beam on time was 1.24 ± 0.0 minutes. Pre-treatment GAI resulted in 98.1 ± 1.1%. Clinical data were recorded as PSA at 6 weeks after RT, with median values of 0.4 ± 0.4 ng/mL. Concerning acute toxicity, no patient showed grade 2-3 rectal toxicity; 5/42 (12% patients experienced grade 2 dysuria; 18/41 (44% patients preserved complete or partial erectile function. Conclusion RapidArc proved to be a safe, qualitative and advantageous treatment modality for prostate cancer.

  16. Clinical Features of Male Breast Cancer: Experiences from Seven Institutions Over 20 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Hyung; Ha, Kyung Sun; Jung, Yun Hwa; Won, Hye Sung; An, Ho Jung; Lee, Guk Jin; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Ji Chan; Park, Sarah; Byun, Jae Ho; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Woo Chan; Jung, Sang Seol; Park, Il Young; Chung, Su-Mi; Woo, In Sook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer treatment has progressed significantly over the past 20 years. However, knowledge regarding male breast cancer (MBC) is sparse because of its rarity. This study is an investigation of the clinicopathologic features, treatments, and clinical outcomes of MBC. Materials and Methods Clinical records of 59 MBC patients diagnosed during 1995-2014 from seven institutions in Korea were reviewed retrospectively. Results Over a 20-year period, MBC patients accounted for 0.98% among total breast cancer patients, and increased every 5 years. The median age of MBC patientswas 66 years (range, 24 to 87 years). Forty-three patients (73%) complained of a palpable breast mass initially. The median symptom duration was 5 months (range, 1 to 36 months). Mastectomy was performed in 96% of the patients. The most frequent histology was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (75%). Ninety-one percent of tumors (38/43) were estrogen receptor–positive, and 28% (11/40) showed epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression. After curative surgery, 42% of patients (19/45) received adjuvant chemotherapy; 77% (27/35) received hormone therapy. Five out of ten patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors did not receive adjuvant anti–HER-2 therapy, while two out of four patients with HER-2 overexpressing tumors received palliative trastuzumab for recurrent and metastatic disease. Letrozole was used for one patient in the palliative setting. The median overall survival durations were 7.2 years (range, 0.6 to 17.0 years) in patients with localized disease and 2.9 years (range, 0.6 to 4.3 years) in those with recurrent or metastatic disease. Conclusion Anti–HER-2 and hormonal therapy, except tamoxifen, have been underutilized in Korean MBC patients compared to female breast cancer patients. With the development of precision medicine, active treatment with targeted agents should be applied. Further investigation of the unique pathobiology of MBC is clinically warranted

  17. Early Clinical Experience Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Palliation of Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer

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    Liu Lin Xiong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound for palliation of inoperable pancreatic cancer in humans. Patients Eighty-nine patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were treated with high intensity focused ultrasound. There were 4 patients with stage II, 39 patients with stage III, and 46 patients with stage IV disease. The location of the tumors was as follows: head of pancreas 34 patients, body and/or tail of pancreas 55 patients. Methods Pain relief, local tumor control rate, median survival and complications were observed after high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. Results In the clinical treatments in humans the following local tumor control was seen: complete response, 0%; partial response, 14.6%; no change, 57.3%; progressive disease, 28.1%. Pain relief was achieved in 80.6% of patients who had pain prior to high intensity focused ultrasound therapy. The median survival was 26.0 months for patients with stage II disease, 11.2 months for patients with stage III disease, and 5.4 months for patients with stage IV disease. One-year survival rate was as follows: stage II, 100%; stage III, 41.0%; and stage IV, 6.5%. Twoyear survival rate was as follows: stage II, 75.0%; stage III, 10.3%; and stage IV, 0%. Complications included superficial skin burns (3.4%, subcutaneous fat sclerosis (6.7%, and an asymptomatic pancreatic pseudocyst (1.1%. There were no severe complications or adverse events related to high intensity focused ultrasound therapy seen in any of the patients treated. Conclusions Although this retrospective study has significant limitations, preliminary results suggest that the clinical application of high intensity focused ultrasound for pancreatic cancer appears to be safe and is a promising modality of treatment for palliation of pain related to pancreatic cancer.

  18. Clinical experience in using lenvatinib in patients with progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Isaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available None of the variants of therapy currently available for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTС refracted to therapy with radioactive iodine 131I (RAI is not radical and does not allow to obtain full complete recovery including this is related to traditional chemotherapy regimens increasing toxicity of treatment contribute to improvement of the clinical effect. With the introduction of multicinase inhibitors into clinical practice made it possible to increase improve therapeutic outcomes. In December of 2015 in the Russian Federation was registered lenvantinib for therapy of patients with progressing DTC resistant to RAI therapy, which according to opinion may substantially improve the results of treatment of such patients and has a potential to change current clinical practice. The article deals with description of 5 clinical cases of inoperable patients with DTС refractory to RAI therapy receiving treatment with lenvatinib in the frameworks of the international randomized clinical trial phase III SELECT. The range of therapeutic effects varied from complete regression of the tumour to stabilization.

  19. Clinical experience in staging of lung cancer at Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, H

    1999-01-01

    Staging of lung cancer needs an accurate diagnostic programme resulting in therapeutic and prognostic consequences. A modern, articulate flow-chart is presented and discussed. As a result, the rate of exploratory thoracotomy was reduced from 15.1% in 1988 to 2.1% in 1997 and the rate of resectability raised up to 30%. Preoperative over-staging was found in about 25% and the same value for understaging. Looking to the N-values, there was concordance of clinical and postoperative data in 61.9% of cases.

  20. Clinical outcome of parotidectomy with reconstruction: Experience of a regional head and neck cancer unit

    OpenAIRE

    Eyituoyo Okoturo; Anslem Osasuyi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salivary gland pathologies represent a histologically diverse group of benign and malignant neoplasms. Currently, World Health Organization recognizes 13 benign and 24 malignant variants of all salivary gland neoplasms. Surgery continues to remain the main-stay for treatment of parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study was to document our experiences of the patients treated for parotid tumors and find out if any compelling variable predicted the relative clinical outcomes. Ma...

  1. Proton Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Review of the Clinical Experience to Date

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B.; Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org

    2014-06-01

    Proton beam radiation has been used for cancer treatment since the 1950s, but recent increasing interest in this form of therapy and the construction of hospital-based and clinic-based facilities for its delivery have greatly increased both the number of patients and the variety of tumors being treated with proton therapy. The mass of proton particles and their unique physical properties (ie, the Bragg peak) allow proton therapy to spare normal tissues distal to the tumor target from incidental irradiation. Initial observations show that proton therapy is particularly useful for treating tumors in challenging locations close to nontarget critical structures. Specifically, improvements in local control outcomes for patients with chordoma, chonodrosarcoma, and tumors in the sinonasal regions have been reported in series using proton. Improved local control and survival outcomes for patients with cancer of the head and neck region have also been seen with the advent of improvements in better imaging and multimodality therapy comprising surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, aggressive local therapy in the proximity of critical normal structures to tumors in the head and neck region may produce debilitating early and late toxic effects. Great interest has been expressed in evaluating whether proton therapy can improve outcomes, especially early and late toxicity, when used in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. This review summarizes the progress made to date in addressing this question.

  2. Testosterone therapy in men with prostate cancer: literature review, clinical experience, and recommendations

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    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For several decades any diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa has been considered an absolute contraindication to the use of testosterone (T therapy in men. Yet this prohibition against T therapy has undergone recent re-examination with refinement of our understanding of the biology of androgens and PCa, and increased appreciation of the benefits of T therapy. A reassuringly low rate of negative outcomes has been reported with T therapy after radical prostatectomy (RP, radiation treatments, and in men on active surveillance. Although the number of these published reports are few and the total number of treated men is low, these experiences do provide a basis for consideration of T therapy in selected men with PCa. For clinicians considering offering this treatment, we recommend first selecting patients with low grade cancers and undetectable prostate-specific antigen following RP. Further research is required to define the safety of T therapy in men with PCa. However, many patients symptomatic from T deficiency are willing to accept the potential risk of PCa progression or recurrence in return for the opportunity to live a fuller and happier life with T therapy.

  3. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

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    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph [Department of Otolaryngology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tuluc, Madalina [Department of Pathology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  4. Investigating the Experiences of Childhood Cancer Patients and Parents Participating in Optional Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Studies in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Julie; Malik, Ghada; Evans, Julie; Baston, Jenny; Parry, Annie; Price, Lisa; Johnstone, Hina; Peters, Selena; Oram, Victoria; Howe, Karen; Whiteley, Emma; Tunnacliffe, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background While the majority of childhood cancer clinical trials are treatment related, additional optional research investigations may be carried out that do not directly impact on treatment. It is essential that these studies are conducted ethically and that the experiences of families participating in these studies are as positive as possible. Methods A questionnaire study was carried out to investigate the key factors that influence why families choose to participate in optional nontherapeutic research studies, the level of understanding of the trials involved, and the experiences of participation. Results A total of 100 participants from six UK centers were studied; 77 parents, 10 patients >16 years, and 13 patients aged 8–15 years. Ninety‐seven percent of parents and 90% of patients felt that information provided prior to study consent was of the right length, with 52% of parents and 65% of patients fully understanding the information provided. Seventy‐four percent of parents participated in research studies in order to “do something important”, while 74% of patients participated “to help medical staff”. Encouragingly, <5% of participants felt that their clinical care would be negatively affected if they did not participate. Positive aspects of participation included a perception of increased attention from medical staff. Negative aspects included spending longer periods in hospital and the requirement for additional blood samples. Ninety‐six percent of parents and 87% of patients would participate in future studies. Conclusions The study provides an insight into the views of childhood cancer patients and their parents participating in nontherapeutic clinical research studies. Overwhelmingly, the findings suggest that participation is seen as a positive experience. PMID:26928983

  5. Clinical experience of intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer is an intractable and serious pathosis, which directly aggravates patients' Quality of Life (QOL) and prognosis. We first select the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. From April 2009 to May 2012, we encountered 5 patients who developed secondary pneumothorax during treatment for advanced lung cancer. Their average age was 60.8 years old, and 4 of them had squamous cell carcinoma, 1 had adenocarcinoma, and all had unresectable advanced lung cancer. In 4 of them, the point of air leakage could be detected by pleurography, and leakage could be stopped by the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue. All of them could receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy after treatment for secondary pneumothorax. The intrapleural administration of fibrin glue may be an effective and valid treatment for intractable secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  6. Simultaneous PET/MR head–neck cancer imaging: Preliminary clinical experience and multiparametric evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covello, M., E-mail: echoplanare@gmail.com [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Cavaliere, C.; Aiello, M.; Cianelli, M.S. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Mesolella, M.; Iorio, B. [Department of Otorhinolaryngoiatry, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Rossi, A.; Nicolai, E. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI is a suitable tool for head/neck T-staging. • No significant differences have been found for PET measures get by both PET/CT and PET/MRI. • SUV 2D and 3D measures in HN lesion offer comparable estimations. • Multiparametric evaluation allows a complete characterization of HN lesions. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the role of simultaneous hybrid PET/MR imaging and to correlate metabolic PET data with morpho-functional parameters derived by MRI in patients with head–neck cancer. Methods: Forty-four patients, with histologically confirmed head and neck malignancy (22 primary tumors and 22 follow-up) were studied. Patients initially received a clinical exam and endoscopy with direct biopsy. Next patients underwent whole body PET/CT followed by PET/MR of the head/neck region. PET and MRI studies were separately evaluated by two blinded groups (both included one radiologist and one nuclear physician) in order to define the presence or absence of lesions/recurrences. Regions of interest (ROIs) analysis was conducted on the primary lesion at the level of maximum size on metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K{sup trans}, V{sub e}, k{sub ep} and iAUC) parameters. Results: PET/MR examinations were successfully performed on all 44 patients. Agreement between the two blinded groups was found in anatomic allocation of lesions by PET/MR (Primary tumors: Cohen's kappa 0.93; Follow-up: Cohen's kappa 0.89). There was a significant correlation between CT-SUV measures and MR (e.g., CT-SUV VOI vs. MR-SUV VOI: ρ = 0.97, p < 0.001 for the entire sample). There was also significant positive correlations between the ROI area, SUV measures, and the metabolic parameters (SUV and MTV) obtained during both PET/CT and PET/MR. A significant negative correlation was observed between ADC and K{sup trans} values in the primary tumors. In addition, a significant negative correlation existed between MR SUV and ADC in

  7. Animal experiments and clinical trials of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan for various cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; Kim, E. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Park, S. Y.; Son, Y. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, C. H. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    {sup 166}Ho is a good therapeutic radionuclide because of its suitable half-life (26.8 hours), high beta energy and 6% gamma ray for imaging. Chitosan is a kind of N-glucosamine with 400 to 500 kD MW, which chelates metal ions and degrades slowly in vivo. As a preclinical studies, we performed cytotoxic effect of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in a variety of cancer cell lines derived from stomach or ovarian cancer based on MTT assay and HTCA method. To evaluated the absorbed dose to the cavitary wall from {sup 166}Ho-chitosan, intraperitoneal administration of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in the rat and simulation of energy transfer from the beta particles to the cavity wall using the Monte Carlo code EGS4 was done, and used as a standard for the planning therapy. Intracavitary {sup 166}Ho-chitosan therapy were tried in peritoneal metastatic ovarian and stomach cancers and cystic brain tumors. Intraarterial injection in inoperable primary liver cancer was also tried. As a radiation synovectomy agent, biocompatibility study in the knee joints of rabbits were performed. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan showed synergistic effects with 5-FU or cisplatin in vitro. 97-99% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan was localized within the peritoneal cavity, and more than 90% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan was attached to the peritoneal wall. Partial response were observed in 4 among 5 patients with ovarian cancer without severe toxicity. In the cystic brain tumor, 5 of 8 cysts were shrunken in size with thinning of the wall, 2 out of 8 showed growth retardation. In the primary liver cancer, radioactivity was distributed in the teritory of selected hepatic arterial branch, and partial responses were observed in 2 cases. In the knee joints of the rabbits, more than 98% of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan remained in the joint cavity and was stable upto 1 week. 49 refs., 22 tabs. (author)

  8. Transgressive first clinical experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Juul; Jeppesen, Lise Kofoed; Drachmann, Merete

    2014-01-01

    . The nursing students’ learning seems to be oriented towards socialization in the clinic as a workplace. This means that the nursing students seek to deal with overwhelming experiences concerning the naked bodies of patients and death, useful application of theoretical knowledge, the path from novice...... to advanced beginner, and adjusting to the workplace community. The conclusion is that the learning of nursing students during their first clinical in-service placement appears informal and not founded on evident best practice.......This Study seeks to comprehend learning experiences of nursing students during their first clinical in-service placement. This Paper is part of a longitudinal development project interviewing the Student Nurse after each one of the five clinical in-service placements and then one year after...

  9. Next-generation sequencing in patients with advanced cancer: are we ready for widespread clinical use? A single institute's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenader, Tal; Tauber, Rachel; Shavit, Linda

    2016-10-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay targeting cancer-relevant genes has been adopted widely for use in patients with advanced cancer. The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of commercially available NGS. We retrospectively collected demographic and clinicopathologic data, recommended therapy, and clinical outcomes of 30 patients with a variety of advanced solid tumors referred to Foundation Medicine NGS. The initial pathologic examination was performed at the pathology department of the referring hospital. The comprehensive clinical NSG assay was performed on paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified FoundationOne platform. The median number of genomic alterations was 3 (0-19). The median number of therapies with potential benefit was 2 (0-8). In 12 cases, a comprehensive clinical NGS assay did not indicate any therapy with potential benefit according to the genomic profile. Ten of the 30 patients received treatments recommended by genomic profile results. In six of the 10 cases, disease progressed within 2 months and four patients died within 3 months of treatment initiation. Three of the 30 patients benefited from a comprehensive clinical NGS assay and the subsequent recommended therapy. The median PFS was 12 weeks (95% confidence interval 10-57) in patients treated with molecularly targeted agents chosen on the basis of tumor genomic profiling versus 48 weeks (95% confidence interval 8-38) in the control group treated with physician choice therapy (P=0.12). Our study suggests that NGS can detect additional treatment targets in individual patients, but prospective medical research and appropriate clinical guidelines for proper clinical use are vital. PMID:27384593

  10. An Experimental Study of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound on Pig's Pancreas and the Early Clinical Experience on Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, LiuLin; Huang, XiaoBo; Yao, SongSen; Yu, JinSheng; Hwang, JooHa; Fei, XingBo; Yu, QiuHong; Xue, WeiCheng; Zheng, ZhuYing; Wang, XiaoFeng

    2007-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of in vivo pig pancreases, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HIFU in the clinical treatment of pancreatic cancer in humans. Methods: HIFU was performed in 12 domestic pig pancreases in vivo with varying acoustic energies. The safety of HIFU treatments was assessed by necropsy. The pathology and microstructure of the treated pancreases were evaluated using standard histology and transmission electron microscopy. Following the animal studies 62 patients with advanced pancreas cancer were treated with 250 - 420 W of acoustic power. There were 3 patients with stage II, 23 patients with stage III, and 36 patients with stage IV disease. Results: In animal studies, precise regions of coagulation necrosis were identified on pathology in 8 specimens that were treated with 420 W or 645 W acoustic power. Treatment effects were unable to be identified in 4 specimens treated with 300˜340 W acoustic power; however, damages to the cells microstructure and apoptosis were identified on electron microscopy. Damage to the stomach and colon were seen in some animals treated with 645 W. In the clinical treatments in humans the following were seen: local tumor control: complete response (CR) 0%, partial response (PR) 17.7%, no change (NC) 54.8%, progressive disease (PD) 27.5%. Pain relief was achieved in 87.1% of patients. The median survival for stage II and III patients was 11.2 months and median survival for stage IV patients was 5.6 months. The total median survival was 8.6 months. The survival rate at 1 year was as follows: stage II and III 42.3%, stage IV 5.6%. The survival rate at 2 years was as follows: stage II and III 15.4%, stage IV 0%. There were no severe complications or adverse events related to HIFU therapy seen in any of the patients treated. Conclusions: This study supports the feasibility of HIFU in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The clinical

  11. Early experiences of breast-conservation treatment without axillary dissection for breast cancer patients with clinically-negative axillary nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nineteen patients with breast cancer who had clinically negative axillary nodes were treated with breast-conservation treatment, consisting of lumpectomy, irradiation, endocrine therapy (tamoxifen), and adjuvant chemotherapy. They were all women, whose ages ranged from 35 to 84 years with a mean of 53.8 years. Preoperative UICC staging was I in 10 patients, IIA in 8, and IIB in one; and postoperative staging was I in 7 and IIA in 12. Among evaluable 13 patients, 5 (38.5%) had microscopically positive margin. Radiation therapy was started within two to three weeks after breast-conserving surgery. Patients received irradiation to the ipsilateral breast and chest wall, including the ipsilateral axillary region, using opposed tangential fields to a dose of 4400 cGy at 275 cGy per fraction. Boost irradiation using an electron beam was delivered with a dose of 1000 cGy in 2 fractions in the last week of radiotherapy in all patients. In addition, adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin or epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil) and endocrine therapy (tamoxifen) were given. With a mean follow up of 20.7 months, one patient aged 80 died of cardiac failure and pneumonia without evidence of breast cancer progression. The other 18 patients are alive without either local failure or distant metastases. Cosmetic evaluation showed each 9 patients to be 'excellent' or 'good'. No patients have serious adverse effects as of this writing. Although the follow-up period is short and the number of patients is limited, the preliminary results of breast-conservation treatment for axillary negative breast cancer seem to be sufficiently good. (N.K.)

  12. Impact of Clinical Pharmacy Services on KAP and QOL in Cancer Patients: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to evaluate the efficacy of pharmaceutical intervention (PI on chemotherapy knowledge-attitude-practice (KAP and quality of life (QOL in cancer patients. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was carried out at Oncology Ward in a tertiary hospital affiliated to Southern Medical University, China. Eligible patient was randomly assigned to pharmaceutical intervention (PI group or control group. Each patient in PI group was given information booklets and was given 30 min face-to-face medication education and psychological counseling by clinical pharmacists, 2 sessions per week for 2 months. Patients in control group only received conventional treatment. All participants were asked to complete a structured Chemotherapy KAP Questionnaire and QOL Questionnaire at pre- and poststudy time. A total of 149 cancer patients (77 in PI group and 72 in control group completed the study. The baseline scores of KAP and QOL in 2 groups were similar. At the end of study, only knowledge score was significantly increased; meanwhile no difference existed for attitude, practice, and QOL scores in control group; both KAP scores and QOL score were significantly increased in PI group. As for the between-group comparison, both KAP scores and QOL score in PI group were significantly higher than those in control group. In conclusion, pharmaceutical intervention has a positive role in increasing chemotherapy-related knowledge, improving patients’ positive emotions, dealing with chemotherapy adverse reactions, and improving the quality of life of patients.

  13. 501 men irradiated for clinically localized prostate cancer (1987 - 1995): preliminary analysis of the experience at UCSF and affiliated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the impact of the pretreatment PSA (P-PSA), Gleason Score (GS), Clinical Stage, Radiation (XRT) Dose and the use of Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy (NHT) on the freedom from PSA failure (FPF) in 501 men irradiated for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From July of 1987 to July of 1995, 501 men underwent definitive radiotherapy (XRT) for CAP at UCSF or one of three affiliated hospitals including: Mt Zion Hospital (MtZ); Martinez Veterans Administration (MVA) and; the University of California at Davis (UCD). All patients who had at least two of the most commonly recognized major prognostic factors (P-PSA, GS, CS, XRT Dose) were included in this analysis. Prior to the closure of radiation facilities at MVA in 1991, and MtZ in 1994 and the availability of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) at UCSF in 1990, patients were treated by standard treatment techniques (STD) to doses 71.5 Gy (all at UCSF or UCD). The median follow-up from completion of treatment to the last post treatment PSA for all patients was 24.5 mo. (range 6.3 to 95 mo.), while 114 patients have PSA follow up ≥3 years. The median isocenter/Dmax dose (IDMAX) within the prostate was 70.6 Gy (range 59.4 - 87.3 Gy). Eleven percent (n=57) received NHT. Fifteen percent of patients (n=73) had a P-PSA of 0-4, 31% (n=146) a PSA of 4-10, 23% (n=110) 10-20, and 31% (n=146) a PSA > 20 ng/ml. Eighteen percent (n=90) were clinically staged as T1, 56% (n=272) T2 and 26% (n=128) (T3(T4)). Fifteen percent (n=64) had a GS of 2-4, while 22% (n=96) a GS of 5, 27% (n=118) a GS of 6, 24% (n=105) a GS of 7 and 14% (n=60) a GS of 8-10. PSA failure was defined as a consistent rise to greater than 1 ng/ml on at least two occasions consecutively separated by at least 1 month or a PSA >4 ng/ml 1 year after treatment, or > 2 ng/ml 2 years after treatment. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the impact of P-PSA, GS, CS, XRT Dose and the use of

  14. Methods to recognize work-related cancer in workplaces, the general population, and by experts in the clinic, a Norwegian experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Lukas; Langård Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In most countries, the numbers of work-related cancer identified are much lower than are the estimated total burden of cancer caused by exposure at work. Therefore, there is a great need to use all available practical as well as epidemiological methods for identification as well as to develop new methods of recognizing cases of work-related cancers. Methods Primarily based on practical experiences from Norway, methods to identify cases of possible work-related cancers in t...

  15. Cancer survivors' experience of time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dorte M.; Elverdam, Beth

    2007-01-01

    time and life; (2) awareness of time increases, time is verbalized and reflected; and (3) the informants appropriate time. A diagnosis of cancer, even for a survivor, means a confrontation with death. It means a disruption of continuous clock and calendar time. Survivors appropriate time......AIM: This paper reports a study to explore how cancer survivors talk about, experience and manage time in everyday life. BACKGROUND: There is an increasing interest in specific physical and psychosocial aspects of life after cancer diagnosis and treatment, but hardly any research follows cancer...... survivors over time to explore how perceptions and experiences change. METHODS: An exploratory study was carried out in 2002-2004 with a purposive sample of adults who had experienced various forms of cancer. Data collection included 9 weeks of participant observation at a Cancer Rehabilitation Centre...

  16. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  17. A new afterloading-applicator for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer. First clinical experiences. Neuentwicklung eines Afterloading-Applikators zur primaeren Behandlung des Endometriumkarzinoms. Erster klinischer Erfahrungsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, M.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Richard, F. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Gynaekologische Radiologie); Hooft, E. van t' (Nucletron, Leersum (Netherlands))

    1991-09-01

    Presented is a new afterloading applicator used for primary brachytherapy of endometrial cancer. The advantages: The afterloading applicator holds six afterloading tubes which bundled together in a cover. After the cover is pulled back, the individual tubes expand as a result of the sleeve shape and of the inherent stress of the plastic material used and make direct contact with the endometrium and with the tumor. The applicator is 8 mm in diameter which means that the cervix has to be dilated to Hegar 8 or 9. Radiation planning is done on the basis of orthogonal localisation X-rays or MR. The newly designed applicator can be used for both HDR and LDR afterloading procedures. We have clinical experiences in 42 applications. (orig.).

  18. The clinical database and the treatment guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG); its 30-years experience and future promise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, S.; Jensen, M.B.; Ejlertsen, B.;

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Since 30 years, DBCG (Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group) has maintained a clinical database allowing the conduct of quality control studies, of randomised trials, examination of the epidemiology of breast cancer and of prognostic and predictive factors. Material and methods. The...

  19. 临床药师对肿瘤患者的药学监护%Clinical Pharmacists'Experience of Pharmaceutical Care for Cancer Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐波; 王若伦; 叶丽卡; 冯霞; 王一西

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To explore entry points for pharmacists to carry out pharmaceutical care for cancer patients.METHODS: Aimed at type cases, pharmacists carried out pharmaceutical care for cancer patients from aspects of choice of pharmacotherapy , drug interaction, dosage and administration , solvents, medication time and monitoring of adverse drug reactions etc .RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: Clinical pharmacist , as one member of treatment team, serves as a bridge between physicians/nurses and patients.Clinical pharmacists can only provide proper pharmaceutical care through gathering experience and exploring in clinical practice .%目的:探讨临床药师对肿瘤患者实施药学监护的切入点。方法:针对典型案例,临床药师从药物治疗方案的选择、药物相互作用、药物用法与用量、溶剂、用药时间及药品不良反应监测等方面提供药学服务。结果与结论:临床药师是医师、护士和患者之间的桥梁,是治疗团队中的一员。临床药师只有深入临床,在实践工作中不断地总结和探索,才能切实做好临床药学服务工作。

  20. Fifteen-Year Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival, Cause-Specific Survival, and Overall Survival Following I125 Prostate Brachytherapy in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Seattle Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report 15-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients treated with I125 brachytherapy monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer early in the Seattle experience. Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were consecutively treated from 1988 to 1992 with I125 monotherapy. They were prospectively followed as a tight cohort. They were evaluated for BRFS, CSS, and OS. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate outcomes by pretreatment clinical prognostic factors. BRFS was analyzed by the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/mL) definition. CSS and OS were evaluated by chart review, death certificates, and referring physician follow-up notes. Gleason scoring was performed by general pathologists at a community hospital in Seattle. Time to biochemical failure (BF) was calculated and compared by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire cohort was 80.4%. BRFS by D'Amico risk group classification cohort analysis was 85.9%, 79.9%, and 62.2% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively. Follow-up ranged from 3.6 to 18.4 years; median follow-up was 15.4 years for biochemically free of disease patients. Overall median follow-up was 11.7 years. The median time to BF in those who failed was 5.1 years. CSS was 84%. OS was 37.1%. Average age at time of treatment was 70 years. There was no significant difference in BRFS between low and intermediate risk groups. Conclusion: I125 monotherapy results in excellent 15-year BRFS and CSS, especially when taking into account the era of treatment effect.

  1. Clinical Assay Development Support - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and the Cancer Diagnosis Program announce a request for applications for the Clinical Assay Development Program (CADP) for investigators seeking clinical assay development and validation resources.

  2. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented. PMID:27669961

  3. Clinical experience of double sleeve lobectomy of the bronchus and the pulmonary artery in patients with central lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yukang Kuang; Changying Guo; Laiduo Zeng; Dongsheng Wang; Binglin Yin; Jiufa Wu; Jian Huang; Zhisheng He; Jianfeng Zhu; Feng Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to introduce the surgical method and evaluate the efficacy of double sleeve lobectomy of the bronchus and the pulmonary artery in treatment for the central lung cancer. Method: From March 1995 to October 2010, double sleeve lobectomy of the bronchus and the pulmonary artery was performed in 45 cases with central lung cancer that involved the bronchial opening of an upper lobe of the lungs or the main bronchus and pulmonary artery but didn't involve any lower lobes. Among them, left upper lobectomy was performed in 37 cases, right medium-upper lobectomy was performed in 6 cases and right upper lobectomy was performed in 2 cases. Results: Postoperative complications were found in 12 cases. Among them, 3 cases were arrhythmia, 1 case was acute heart failure, 6 cases were obstructive pneumonia and pulmonary atelectasis, 2 cases were bronchial anastomotic fistula. Two cases died of cerebral infarction and massive hemoptysis respectively. Thirty-one cases were squamous carcinoma, 7 cases were adenocarcinoma, 4 cases were small cell lung cancer, 1 case was adenosquamous carcinoma, 1 case was sarcomatoid carcinomas, 1 case was mucinous adenocarcinoma. Ten cases were T3N0M0, 11 cases were T3N1M0, 17 cases were T3N2M0, 2 cases were T4N1M0, 5 cases were T4N2M0. The 1-year, 3-year, 5-year survival rates were 84.4% (38/45), 51.7% (15/29), 53.8% (7/13) respectively. Conclusion: The double sleeve lobectomy of the bronchus and the pulmonary artery can maximumly reserve the normal lung tissues while removing tumors, and avoid pneumonectomy. The surgery was safe and effective, while it required a high technique.

  4. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  5. Superficial hyperthermia in the treatment of locally recurrent or advanced breast cancer - clinical experiences in Prague, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Superficial hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy represents very effective local treatment of locally recurrent breast cancer. We will present a group of patients treated in our institution since February 2003 to November 2004. The aim of this work is the evaluation of local response to the treatment in our group of patients. Since February 2003 to November 2004 we treated group of 32 women with locally recurrent breast cancer. 24 patients were treated for local recurrence, 5 patients were treated for supraclavicular lymph node metastasis and 3 patients were treated for locally advanced tumor. 27 patients were evaluable for local response and its duration. Hyperthermia was combined with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was done on 6 MeV linear accelerator, usually using 2 tangential fields with wedges. Dose of radiotherapy was usually 50 Gy/25 fractions (only in the cases of reirradiation with large volume we applied 40 Gy/20 fr). Hyperthermia was done using Lund hyperthermia system for superficial microwave hyperthermia working on 434 MHz and was applied once a week, 5 to 6 applications during the course of radiotherapy, mainly immediately after radiotherapy, for 60 min. The temperature was measured using termistor probes superficially, minimally in the six points. We tried to achieve temperatures in the range from 42 to 43.5oC, but the actually measured temperatures were limited by the tolerance of patients. The anesthetics were not used. We achieved response in 26 from 27 patients. CR on the chest wall or in the supraclavicular region was achieved in 17 cases, PR in 9 cases and in 1 case was seen only stabilization of disease. Duration of response was in range from 3 to 24 months, with median of 9 months. We did not see any serious side effects resulting from hyperthermia treatment, only in the cases of reirradiation we observed slower healing of the post irradiation skin reaction. Superficial hyperthermia represents useful tool for the

  6. On writing from clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, J S

    2000-01-01

    Papers that present the life of the analytic session offer material through which analysts can together study analytic process and therapeutic action and arrive at consensus on how to improve psychoanalytic theory and practice. But some analysts have been deterred from publishing clinical material of that kind because of concerns about preserving confidentiality, protecting the therapeutic relationship, reporting accurately, being scrutinized, worrying about losing their colleagues' support, and not feeling authorized to present their views. Here conscious, preconscious, and unconscious constraints against writing and publishing are explored, and an example is given of successful self-analysis of a writing inhibition. The debate over the ethics of writing is reviewed and an argument made that detailed clinical description is useful in advancing analytic understanding. Finally, a clinical example shows how the analysand usefully analyzes the experience of reading what the analyst has written, and how the analyst's self-analysis may be promoted in resonance with the analysand's experience.

  7. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of ≥60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60–76 Gy, 1.8–2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade ≥3 maximum TRP (TRPmax) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade ≥1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosismax) and 7% Grade ≥2 pulmonary fibrosismax. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitismax) were 3 weeks (range, 1–13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3–13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitismax later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  8. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  9. Clinical outcome and dosimetric parameters of chemo-radiation including MRI guided adaptive brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators for cervical cancer patients: A single institution experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, C.N.; Leeuw, A.A. de; Roesink, J.M.; Tersteeg, R.J.; Moerland, M.A.; Witteveen, P.O.; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Dorst, E.B. van; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate dosimetric parameters and clinical outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemo-radiation and MR-image guided adaptive brachytherapy (MR-IGABT) using tandem-ovoid applicators for intracavitary or combined intracavitary/interstitial approaches. METHOD: This retrospecti

  10. Experiences of Cancer Pain Management by Clinical Pharmacists%临床药师参与癌痛患者管理的体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 陈碧; 周艳琴; 王安发; 徐雨佳; 阳建军

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the service pattern of clinical pharmacists for patients with cancer pain. Methods As a part of the establishment of the caner pain standardized treatment demonstration ward, the clinical pharmacist carried out clinical pharmacy services for patients by participating in the evaluation of cancer pain, planning of drug pain treatment and medication guidance on patients. Results The work of clinical pharmacist in cancer pain management improved the patients’medication adherence and decreased their pain scores. Conclusions It is effective that clinical pharmacists par-ticipate in multidisciplinary management mode for caner pain patients.%目的:探索临床药师开展癌痛患者药学服务的工作模式。方法临床药师以创建癌痛规范化治疗示范病房为切入点,通过参与癌痛评估,制定药物止痛治疗方案,指导患者用药,开展面向患者的药学服务。结果临床药师参与癌痛患者的管理,提高了患者的用药依从性,降低了患者的疼痛评分;结论临床药师参与的癌痛多学科管理模式是行之有效的。

  11. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | About

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  12. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  13. Preliminary Clinical Experience of trans-1-Amino-3-(18F-fluorocyclobutanecarboxylic Acid (anti-(18F-FACBC PET/CT Imaging in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this retrospective analysis we assessed the role of [18F]-FACBC-PET/CT in the prostatic cancer staging. Procedure. 30 first [18F]-FACBC-PET/CT images of 26 patients (68.1 ± 5.8 years were analyzed. PET/CT findings were compared with PSA concentrations, with PSA doubling times (PDT, and with correlative imaging. Results. On 16 [18F]-FACBC (53.3% scans, 58 metabolically active lesions were found. 12 (20.7% lesions corresponding to the local relapse were found in prostate/prostate bed and seminal vesicles, 9 (15.5% lesions were located in regional lymph nodes, 10 (17.2% were located in distal lymph nodes, and 26 (44.8% metabolically active lesions were found in the skeleton. In one case, focal uptake was found in the brain, confirmed further on MRI as meningioma. The mean S-PSA level in patients with positive [18F]-FACBC findings was 9.5 ± 16.9 μg/L (0.54–69 μg/L and in patients with negative [18F]-FACBC findings was 1.96 ± 1.87 μg/L (0.11–5.9 μg/L, but the difference was not statistically significant. However, the PSA doubling time (PDT in patients with positive findings was significantly shorter than PDT in patients with negative findings: 3.25 ± 2.09 months (0.3–6 months versus 31.2 ± 22.02 months (8–84 months, P<0.0001. There was a strong positive correlation between PSA value and number of metabolically active lesions (R=0.74 and a negative correlation between PDT and number of metabolically active lesions (R=-0.56. There was a weak negative correlation between PDT and SUVmax⁡ (R=-0.30. Conclusion. According to our preliminary clinical experience, [18F]-FACBC-PET may play a role in in vivo restaging of an active prostate cancer, especially in patients with a short S-PSA doubling time.

  14. First Clinical Experience with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent and Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Mangafodipir as an Adjunct in Cancer Chemotherapy—A Translational Study12

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf GG; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforesee...

  15. Central review of cytogenetics is necessary for cooperative group correlative and clinical studies of adult acute leukemia: The Cancer and Leukemia Group B experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mrózek, Krzysztof; Carroll, Andrew J.; Maharry, Kati; Rao, Kathleen W.; Patil, Shivanand R.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Watson, Michael S.; Arthur, Diane C.; Tantravahi, Ramana; Heerema, Nyla A.; Koduru, Prasad R. K.; Block, AnneMarie W; Qumsiyeh, Mazin B.; Edwards, Colin G.; Sterling, Lisa J.

    2008-01-01

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B has performed central review of karyotypes submitted by institutional cytogenetics laboratories from patients with acute myeloid (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia since 1986. We assessed the role of central karyotype review in maintaining accurate, high quality cytogenetic data for clinical and translational studies using two criteria: the proportion of karyotypes rejected (i.e. inadequate), and, among accepted (i.e. adequate) cases, the proportion o...

  16. Adjuvant therapeutic vaccination in patients with non-small cell lung cancer made lymphopenic and reconstituted with autologous PBMC: first clinical experience and evidence of an immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schendel Dolores J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the considerable toxicity and modest benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, there is clearly a need for new treatment modalities in the adjuvant setting. Active specific immunotherapy may represent such an option. However, clinical responses have been rare so far. Manipulating the host by inducing lymphopenia before vaccination resulted in a magnification of the immune response in the preclinical setting. To evaluate feasibility and safety of an irradiated, autologous tumor cell vaccine given following induction of lymphopenia by chemotherapy and reinfusion of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, we are currently conducting a pilot-phase I clinical trial in patients with NSCLC following surgical resection. This paper reports on the first clinical experience and evidence of an immune response in patients suffering from NSCLC. Methods NSCLC patients stages I-IIIA are recruited. Vaccines are generated from their resected lung specimens. Patients undergo leukapheresis to harvest their PBMC prior to or following the surgical procedure. Furthermore, patients receive preparative chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 and fludarabine 20 mg/m2 on 3 consecutive days for induction of lymphopenia followed by reconstitution with their autologous PBMC. Vaccines are administered intradermally on day 1 following reconstitution and every two weeks for a total of up to five vaccinations. Granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF is given continuously (at a rate of 50 μg/24 h at the site of vaccination via minipump for six consecutive days after each vaccination. Results To date, vaccines were successfully manufactured for 4 of 4 patients. The most common toxicities were local injection-site reactions and mild constitutional symptoms. Immune responses to chemotherapy, reconstitution and vaccination are measured by vaccine site and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH skin

  17. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  18. Clinical Experience in Treatment of Cancerous Fever by Xiao Chaihu Decoction%小柴胡汤临床治疗癌性发热点滴体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申洁婷; 吴煜; 袁菊花; 王连美

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To reveal the clinical application of Xiao Chaihu decoction treats cancerous fever. Methods: Indicate the essence of Xiao Chaihu decortion treats cancerous fever by elaborating main symptoms, medication, and decoction methods of Xiao Chaihu decoction. Results: For those cancer patients who suffer from alternating chills and fever, Xiao Chaihu decoction has a good effect. Conclusion: Cancer patients who have alternating chills and fever can be pyretolysised by Xiao Chaihu decoction.%目的:揭示临床应用小柴胡汤治疗癌性发热取得较好疗效.方法:通过详细阐述小柴胡汤之主症、用药及煎煮方法,揭示小柴胡汤治疗癌性发热之根本.结果:临床中,通过辨证论治,对有往来寒热一症之癌性发热患者,小柴胡汤具有较好效果.结论:癌性发热患者,有往来寒热一症者,可应用小柴胡汤进行退热.

  19. Breast cancer and depression: issues in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thingbaijam B. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Many of breast-cancer patients experience distress and most of them experience depression which may lead to amplification of physical symptoms, increased functional impairment, and poor treatment adherence. We did a review on available literature from PubMed about prevalence, distress magnitudes, coping styles, and treatment methods of major depression in women with breast cancer from 1978 to 2010. Diagnosis and treatment of depressive episodes in women with breast cancer is challenging because of overlapping symptoms and co-morbid conditions. Major depression is often under-recognized and undertreated among breast cancer patients. This review highlighted the issues on identifying and managing depression in breast cancer patients in clinical settings. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:240-6Keywords: Breast cancer, coping, depression, distress

  20. Clinical Experiences of Bronchopleural Fistula-related Fatal Hemoptysis after 
the Resection of Lung Cancer: A Report of 7 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Massive hemoptysis was a rare but severe postoperative complication of lung cancer. The aim of the present study is to investigate the mechanisms, risk factors, early symptoms, prevention, and treatment options for fatal hemoptysis. Methods From April 2007 to May 2011, 1,737 patients with lung cancer were surgically treated in the West China Hospital of Sichuan University. Twenty patients died during the perioperative period, seven of whom died of massive hemoptysis. These seven cases were analyzed, and their clinical data, as well as related literatures, were reviewed. Results Massive hemoptysis is the second cause of death after lung cancer surgery. Six patients died directly of massive hemoptysis. One patient underwent secondary surgery because of massive hemoptysis, but eventually died because of lung infection and respiratory failure. Early symptoms of hemorrhage were observed in four cases, and the overall incidence rate of massive hemoptysis was 0.4% (7/1,737. Conclusion Bronchovascular fistula (BVF caused by bronchopleural fistula (BPF is the mechanism for massive hemoptysis. Diabetes is a high risk factor. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment of BPF or BVF can prevent the occurrence of death as a result of massive hemoptysis.

  1. Bilateral breast cancer : mammographic and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Jun, Hwang Yoon; Lee, Byung Chan; Lee, Kyong Sik; Lee, Yong Hee [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and clinical features of bilateral breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed clinical records(n=23) and mammograms (n=15) of 23 patients with bilateral breast cancer. Patients' age, location of the tumor and pathologic staging were determined from clinical records. Mammographic features were classified as spiculated mass, nonspiculated mass, mass with microcalcification, microcalcification only, asymmetric density, and normal. Of the 23 cases of bilateral breast cancer, 8(34.8%) were synchronous and 15(65.2%) were metachronous. Age at diagnosis of cancer in the first breast was between 27 and 59(mean 43) years ; there was no statistically significant difference in mean age between patients with synchronous and metachronous cancer. The mean interval between the diagnosis of each lesion of the metachronous pairs was 9.1 years. In 11 of 23 cases(48%), tumors were locaated in the same quadrant, and in the other 12 cases(52%), they were in different quadrant. At mammography, five of 15 metachronous cancers(33%) were similar in appearance and 10 pairs(67%) were different. In 4 of 23 cases(17%), cancer in the first breast was at stage 0 and stage 1, and in 13 of 23(57%), cancer in the second breast was at this same stage. In bilateral breast cancer, the two breasts frequently show different mammographic features. Cancer of the second breast was at an early stage; this suggest that regular examination and mammography are important and can allow early detection of contralateral breast cancer.

  2. Clinical experience of breast reconstruction after breast cancer operation%乳腺癌术后修复重建的临床经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴煌福; 穆兰花; 熊伟; 张洛; 韩华; 吴晓明; 陈华敏; 张亚珍; 张妍

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨国人乳腺癌术后修复重建的经验.方法 回顾性分析2009年11月至2011年1月海南省农垦总医院收治的15例乳腺癌术后自体组织修复重建患者的临床资料.结果 15例手术患者中,即刻修复5例(4例为即刻修复临床Ⅳ期乳癌术后胸壁创面),延期修复10例.单纯应用背阔肌肌皮瓣带蒂转移3例(2例为即刻修复保乳术后局部缺损),背阔肌肌皮瓣带蒂转移加乳房假体3例,乳腺瓣修复保乳术后局部缺损1例,内窥镜辅助背阔肌肌瓣带蒂转移修复保乳术后乳腺局部缺损1例,组织扩张术行局部皮瓣转移2例.随访2~15个月,皮瓣全部成活,创面愈合良好,形态满意.结论 自体组织修复保乳术后的局部缺损对于乳房普遍较小的中国患者实用方便,设计灵活,可同时修复腋窝缺损,不影响放疗和化疗的及时进行,具有良好的应用前景.%Objective To introduce the application experience of immediate and delay, total and partial breast reconstruction with latissimus daisimyocutanuous flap after surgical of breast cancer. Methods Clinical data of 15 cases of breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsimyocutanuous flap from Nov. 2009 to Jan. 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Results Five palients were received immediate breast reconstruction (4 cases were used for surface covering post mastectomy for clinical FV stage), 10 patients were received delayed breast reconstruction. Three patients were received transposition and repair of latissimus dorsimyocutaneous flap with pedicle only (2 cases received repair of partial deformity after breast conversation therapy). Three patients of breast reconstruction were used latissimus dorsimyocutaneous flap transposition with pedicle plus breast implant. Partial deformity after breast conversation therapy were repaired using skin flap of healthy breast (I patient). One patient was received transposition and repair of latissimus dorsimyocutaneous flap under the

  3. Linguistic Markers of Processing Trauma Experience in Women’s Written Narratives During Different Breast Cancer Phases: Implications for Clinical Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Martino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research into the change processes underlying the benefits of expressive writing is still incomplete. To fill this gap, we investigated the linguistic markers of change in cognitive and emotional processing among women with breast cancer, highlighting the differences and peculiarities during different treatment phases. A total of 60 writings were collected from 20 women: 10 receiving chemotherapy and 10 receiving biological therapy. We performed a series of repeated measures ANOVA for the most meaningful LIWC linguistic categories, including positive/negative emotions and cognitive processes, to assess change over three sessions. Results demonstrated a significant increase in the positive emotions category for the entire group of women, with particular relevance for the biological therapy group of women, and a marginally significant (p = .07 greater use of words indicating cognitive processes for women receiving biological therapy. For the negative emotions category time was significant for the whole group of women, showing a peak of use in the second session of writing. Peculiar differences in the linguistic markers of processing trauma were observed between the two groups. Although the writing intervention is a support for both groups of women, it seems to be beneficial when there is a large time gap since the administration of chemotherapy and, thus, when the patient can revisit the experience. The relationship of the illness with life can be rearticulated, and the writing becomes a space for resignifying the traumatic cancer experience.

  4. Unique perception of clinical trials by Korean cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su Jin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, the number of clinical trials has increased rapidly in East Asia, especially for gastric and hepatobiliary cancer that are prevalent in Asian populations. However, the actual degree of understanding or perceptions of clinical trials by cancer patients in East Asian countries have seldom been studied. Methods Between July 1st and November 30th of 2011, we conducted a prospective study to survey cancer patients regarding their awareness of, and willingness to participate in, a clinical trial. Patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary cancer who visited the Hematology-Oncology outpatient clinic at Samsung Medical Center (SMC were enrolled. A total of 21 questions were asked including four questions which used the Visual analogue scale (VAS score. Results In this survey study, 1,000 patients were asked to participate and 675 patients consented to participate (67.5%. The awareness of clinical trials was substantially higher in patients who had a higher level of education (pp=0.004, and had a higher economic status (p=0.001. However, the willingness to participate in a clinical trial was not affected by the level of education or economic status of patients. The most influential factors for patient willingness to participate were a physician recommendation (n=181, 26.8%, limited treatment options (n=178, 26.4%, and expectations of effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs (n=142, 21.0%. Patients with previous experience in clinical trials had a greater willingness to participate in clinical trials compared to patients without previous experience (p Conclusions This large patient cohort survey study showed that Korean cancer patients are more aware of clinical trials, but awareness did not translate into willingness to participate.

  5. Clinical Implications of the Cancer Genome

    OpenAIRE

    MacConaill, Laura E; Garraway, Levi A

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome. Most tumors harbor a constellation of structural genomic alterations that may dictate their clinical behavior and treatment response. Whereas elucidating the nature and importance of these genomic alterations has been the goal of cancer biologists for several decades, ongoing global genome characterization efforts are revolutionizing both tumor biology and the optimal paradigm for cancer treatment at an unprecedented scope. The pace of advance has been empow...

  6. First clinical experience with the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and superoxide dismutase mimetic mangafodipir as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy-a translational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf Gg; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P < .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. PMID:22348174

  7. Clinical experience of laparoscopic radical resection of colorectal cancer%腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术的临床体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯森

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术的临床效果.方法:回顾分析2011年3月至10月为26例结直肠癌患者行腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术的临床资料,并总结手术方式及随访结果.结果:手术时间105 ~315 min,平均185 min;术中出血量100~320 ml,平均175 ml;术后胃肠功能恢复时间1~4d,平均1.8d;标本切缘均阴性,清扫淋巴结总数10~ 22枚,平均15枚.术后未发生腹腔出血、吻合口漏及狭窄等并发症;术后住院7~10 d,平均8d.随访3~10个月,平均8个月,均无转移、复发及切口种植.结论:腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术安全可行,具有微创、安全、术后康复快、肿瘤根治彻底等优点,在肿瘤根治性、手术时间、近期疗效等方面与传统开腹手术相当,值得推广应用.%Objective;To investigate the clinical efficacy of laparoscopic radical resection of colorectal cancer. Methods: Lapa-roscopic radical resection of colon and rectal cancer was applied to 26 cases with colorectal cancer from Mar. to Oct. 201 i. The clinical data,operation methods and the follow-up outcome were summarized. Results: In the 26 cases, the time of the operation was 105-315 min,the average was 185 min.the amount of bleeding was 100-320 ml, the average was 175 ml;the recovery time of the gastrointestinal function was 1-4 d,the average was 1. 8 d. There were no positive surgery margins,the complications such as abdominal bleeding, anas-tomotic leak and stenosis did not occur. The number of harvested lymph node was 10-22,the average number was 15. The time in the hospital after the operations was 7-10 d.the average time was 8 d. The time of the follow-up visit was 3-10 months,the average time was 8 months,in the follow-up period no metastasis,recurrence or incision implantation was found. Conclusions:Laparoscopic radical resection of colon and rectal cancer is safe and feasible, has the advantages of small damage,safety,fast postoperative recovery and radical cure

  8. Predictors of enduring clinical distress in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N N; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; Aaronson, Neil K; van Abbema, Doris L; den Boer, Mathilda D; van Hezewijk, Marjan; Immink, Marcelle; Kaptein, Ad A; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B E; Reyners, Anna K L; Russell, Nicola S; Schriek, Manon; Sijtsema, Sieta; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2016-08-01

    To date, little is known about enduring clinical distress as measured with the commonly used distress thermometer. We therefore used the distress thermometer to examine: (a) the prevalence of enduring clinical distress, distress-related problems, and subsequent wish for referral of women with breast cancer, and (b) sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial predictors of enduring clinical distress. The study had a multicenter, prospective, observational design. Patients with primary breast cancer completed a questionnaire at 6 and 15 months postdiagnosis. Medical data were retrieved from chart reviews. Enduring clinical distress was defined as heightened distress levels over time. The prevalence of enduring clinical distress, problems, and wish for referral was examined with descriptive analyses. Associations between predictors and enduring clinical distress were examined with multivariate analyses. One hundred sixty-four of 746 patients (22 %) reported having enduring clinical distress at 6 and 15 months postdiagnosis. Of these, 10 % wanted to be referred for care. Fatigue was the most frequently reported problem by patients with and without clinical distress, at both time points. Lack of muscle strength (OR = 1.82, 95 % CI 1.12-2.98), experience of a low level of life satisfaction (OR = 0.77, 95 % CI 0.67-0.89), more frequent cancer worry (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI 1.05-1.89), and neuroticism (OR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.00-1.18) were predictors of enduring clinical distress. In conclusion, one in five women with breast cancer develops enduring clinical distress. Oncologists, nurse practitioners, and cancer nurses are advised to use single-item questions about distress and distress-related problems to ensure timely detection of high-risk patients. Providers should also routinely assess fatigue and its causes, as fatigue is the most frequently reported distress-related problem over time. PMID:27417105

  9. Clinical Implications of Sarcopenic Obesity in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Isabella P; Mazurak, Vera C; Prado, Carla M

    2016-10-01

    Sarcopenia has been associated with several negative clinical outcomes in cancer. However, the consequences of sarcopenic obesity, a condition of combined sarcopenia and obesity burden, have been less extensively investigated. The aim of this paper was to review the current evidence on the prevalence and clinical implications of sarcopenic obesity in cancer. A total of 14 studies linking sarcopenic obesity to a clinical outcome in cancer were included. There is considerable inconsistency in methods used to evaluate body composition as well as in the criteria used to define sarcopenic obesity, which limits comparison among studies. Therefore, the prevalence of sarcopenic obesity varied substantially: between 1 and 29 % in studies including individuals from all body mass index categories and between 15 and 36 % for those including obese individuals only. Negative clinical outcomes reported to be associated with sarcopenic obesity included higher risk of dose-limiting toxicity, surgical complications, physical disability, and shorter survival. PMID:27541923

  10. The Clinical Care Experience on Patients With Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy%乳腺癌根治术后的临床护理体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温丽萍

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical care and its efficacy of patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy are investigated further. Methods Analyzed the clinical treatment data selected from 42 patients with breast cancer who were treated and operated after radical mastectomy in hospital from January 2013 to January 2014 and what’s more,get these patients treated with comprehensive psychological attendance,elementary attendance,complication attendance,postoperative guidance and dietary nursing. Results Al of patients were cured as estimated time,their limb function was recovered wel and the surgery wound get healed. There was one case of skin flap necrosis and two cases of edema,the complication incidence was up to 7.1%,while al complications disappeared after positive symptomatic treatment. Conclusion Comprehensive and high-quality attendance is conducive to improve surgery success,reduce complication incidence and assisting recovery of patients. Therefore,such a treatment approach is quite worthwhile to be promoted.%目的:进一步探究乳腺癌根治术后的临床护理对策与效果。方法收集了2013年1月~2014年1月我院收治的42例乳腺癌根治术患者临床资料进行详细研究,并为上述患者提供全面的心理护理、一般基础护理、并发症护理、术后康复指导与饮食护理。结果患者均按时出院,肢体功能恢复良好,切口一期愈合。1例患者出现皮瓣坏死,2例患者水肿,并发症发生率为7.1%,经过积极对症治疗,并发症消失。结论全面、优质的临床护理能全面提高手术成功率、降低并发症几率,促进患者术后康复。

  11. Breast cancer early psychological intervention in the treatment of clinical experience%早期乳腺癌保乳的心理介入治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡军; 黄晓睿

    2009-01-01

    Objective Discussing the rationality of psychological intervening therapy in the treatment of early breast neoplasm. Methods By summarizing and reviewing 84 patients suffering from the early breast cancer between January of 2003 and December of 2005, we procured some information of their clinical manifes-tations, clinical therapy and statistic results of psychological assessment. Results By intervening the psycho-logical therapy, the patients' self-efficiency and living quality can be bettered. Conclusion Patients with early breast neoplasm need to have a comprehensive treatment with general or local therapy and individual psychologi-cal intervention. Nevertheless, it is rather practical to enhance the general level of prevention and therapy of breast neoplasm through the research of psychological problems after the operation.%目的 探讨心理介入治疗在早期乳腺癌治疗中的合理性.方法 总结回顾2003年1月至2005年12月间84例患者的临床特征、治疗方法 及心理评估统计结果 等资料.结果 心理介入治疗可以提高患者的自我效能及生存质量.结论 早期乳腺癌患者需要进行全身、局部疗法、心理个性化干预等的综合治疗.而重视乳腺癌术后心理问题的研究,对于提高乳腺癌整体防治水平具有一定的现实意义.

  12. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial. The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H. pylori infection. About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H. pylori infection. Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection are under way. Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H. pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer; however, a population-based H. pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora. Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  13. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruprecht Kuner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  14. Penile Cancer: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter E.; Philippe E. Spiess; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations o...

  15. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  16. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  17. Clinical Use of PPARγ Ligands in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Hatton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of PPARγ in adipocyte differentiation has fueled intense interest in the function of this steroid nuclear receptor for regulation of malignant cell growth and differentiation. Given the antiproliferative and differentiating effects of PPARγ ligands on liposarcoma cells, investigation of PPARγ expression and ligand activation in other solid tumors such as breast, colon, and prostate cancers ensued. The anticancer effects of PPARγ ligands in cell culture and rodent models of a multitude of tumor types suggest broad applicability of these agents to cancer therapy. This review focuses on the clinical use of PPARγ ligands, specifically the thiazolidinediones, for the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  18. Establishing a family risk assessment clinic for breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting European women and the leading cause of cancer-related death. A total of 15-20% of women who develop breast cancer have a family history and 5-10% a true genetic predisposition. The identification and screening of women at increased risk may allow early detection of breast cancer and improve prognosis. We established a family risk assessment clinic in May 2005 to assess and counsel women with a family history of breast cancer, to initiate surveillance, and to offer risk-reducing strategies for selected high-risk patients. Patients at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer according to NICE guidelines were accepted. Family history was determined by structured questionnaire and interview. Lifetime risk of developing breast cancer was calculated using Claus and Tyrer-Cuzick scoring. Risk of carrying a breast cancer-related gene mutation was calculated using the Manchester system. One thousand two hundred and forty-three patients have been referred. Ninety-two percent were at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer. Formal assessment of risk has been performed in 368 patients, 73% have a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and 72% a Manchester score >or=16. BRCA1\\/2 mutations have been identified in 14 patients and breast cancer diagnosed in two. Our initial experience of family risk assessment has shown there to be a significant demand for this service. Identification of patients at increased risk of developing breast cancer allows us to provide individuals with accurate risk profiles, and enables patients to make informed choices regarding their follow-up and management.

  19. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J.

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine. PMID:26776196

  20. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  1. Inquiries of discomfort: Cancer experiences in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2011-01-01

    research regarding young adults with cancer. They stress the need for more specific research, clinically and politically appropriate services to this group of cancer patients. Thanks to technology, young people living with cancer, now have an opportunity to actively participate in providing information......Abstract Young adults with cancer are regarded as an emerging field for research. Because of the particular life phase they are in they are particularly vulnerable, as they are often both marginalised and individualised and their experiences are seldom described due to their small numbers. By using...... an on-line free association narrative inquiry and an experimental writing format, the purpose of this paper is to explore the subjective perspective of what it means to be a young adult living with cancer, and to discuss whether this approach contributes something new to the emerging field. Seven...

  2. New clinical experience with tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, A

    1994-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of tramadol has been recently reassessed as part of a new clinical development programme to support an application for registration in the USA. This article reviews the results of single dose and short term studies of oral tramadol 50, 75, 100 and 150 mg in various acute pain conditions. In a double-blind single dose study conducted in 161 patients with severe pain following caesarean section, tramadol 75 and 150 mg and the combination of paracetamol 650 mg with dextropropoxyphene napsylate 100 mg were shown to be effective and statistically superior to placebo. The results from this and 17 other similar studies in patients with pain after surgery (n = 1594) or dental extraction (n = 1859) including other comparators were included in a pooled analysis. Tramadol 100 mg was the optimal single dose for acute pain and tramadol 50 mg showed similar analgesic efficacy to codeine 60 mg. Multiple dose short term studies (n = 520) with tramadol 50, 75 and 100 mg demonstrated a statistically significant and dose-dependent reduction in the consumption of either ibuprofen or morphine as escape medication. New pharmacokinetic data show that steady-state plasma tramadol concentrations reached after oral administration of 50 mg doses every 6 hours are similar to those obtained after administration of a 100 mg single oral dose (250 micrograms/L). This rationale is supported by the results of long term studies in which the average daily dose of tramadol was approximately 250 mg. PMID:7517826

  3. Natural orifice surgery: initial clinical experience

    OpenAIRE

    Horgan, Santiago; Cullen, John P; Talamini, Mark A.; Mintz, Yoav; Ferreres, Alberto; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Sandler, Bryan; Bosia, Julie; Savides, Thomas; Easter, David W.; Savu, Michelle K.; Ramamoorthy, Sonia L.; Whitcomb, Emily; Agarwal, Sanjay; Lukacz, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Background Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has moved quickly from preclinical investigation to clinical implementation. However, several major technical problems limit clinical NOTES including safe access, retraction and dissection of the gallbladder, and clipping of key structures. This study aimed to identify challenges and develop solutions for NOTES during the initial clinical experience. Methods Under an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved protocol, patients...

  4. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  5. Letter from the Director - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative is focused on developing a better understanding of cancer biology through the proteomic interrogation of genomically characterized tumors from sources such as The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  6. African American women's perceptions of cancer clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Godley, Paul; DiMartino, Lisa; White, Brandolyn; Odom, Janice; Richmond, Alan; Carpenter, William

    2014-01-01

    Cancer clinical trials are important for resolving cancer health disparities for several reasons; however, clinical trial participation among African Americans is significantly lower than Caucasians. This study engaged focus groups of 82 female African American cancer survivors or cancer caregivers, including those in better resourced, more urban areas and less resourced, more rural areas. Informed by an integrated conceptual model, the focus groups examined perceptions of cancer clinical tri...

  7. Clinical prediction rule for nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Nova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin cancer is the most frequent neoplasia in the world. Even though ultraviolet radiation is the main cause, established prevention campaigns have not proved to be effective for controlling the incidence of this disease. Objective: To develop clinical prediction rules based on medical consultation and a questionnaire to estimate the risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer. Methods: This study was developed in several steps. They were: Identifying risk factors that could be possible predictors of nonmelanoma skin cancer; their clinical validation; developing a prediction rule using logistic regression; and collecting information from 962 patients in a case and control design (481 cases and 481 controls. We developed independent prediction rules for basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Finally, we evaluated reliability for each of the variables. Results: The variables that made up the final prediction rule were: Family history of skin cancer, history of outdoor work, age, phototypes 1-3 and the presence of poikiloderma of civatte, actinic keratosis and conjunctivitis in band. Prediction rules specificity was 87% for basal cell carcinomas and 92% for squamous cell carcinomas. Inter- and intra-observer reliability was good except for the conjunctivitis in band variable. Conclusions: The prediction rules let us calculate the individual risk of developing basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. This is an economic easy-to-apply tool that could be useful in primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer.

  8. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mankoff, David A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lieberman, Frank S; Buatti, John M; Mountz, James M; Erickson, Bradley J; Fennessy, Fiona M M; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M; Gillies, Robert J; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-01-15

    As anticancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. Although traditional, anatomic CT, and MRI examinations are useful in many settings, increasing evidence suggests that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biologic and physiologic questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies.

  9. Canadian experience with structured clinical examinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Grand'Maison, P.; Lescop, J; Brailovsky, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of structured clinical examinations to improve the evaluation of medical students and graduates has become significantly more common in the past 25 years. Many Canadian medical educators have contributed to the development of this technique. The Canadian experience is reviewed from the introduction of simulated-standardized patients and objective-structured clinical examinations to more recent developments and the use of such examinations for licensure and certification.

  10. Early experiences of accredited clinical informatics fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Christopher A; Pageler, Natalie M; Palma, Jonathan P; Finnell, John T; Levy, Bruce P; Yackel, Thomas R; Mohan, Vishnu; Hersh, William R

    2016-07-01

    Since the launch of the clinical informatics subspecialty for physicians in 2013, over 1100 physicians have used the practice and education pathways to become board-certified in clinical informatics. Starting in 2018, only physicians who have completed a 2-year clinical informatics fellowship program accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education will be eligible to take the board exam. The purpose of this viewpoint piece is to describe the collective experience of the first four programs accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education and to share lessons learned in developing new fellowship programs in this novel medical subspecialty. PMID:27206458

  11. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Fred [Directorate of Radiography, School of Health Care Professions, University of Salford, Allerton Building, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  12. The clinical experiences of dyslexic healthcare students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reflects on the experiences of healthcare students with dyslexia in order to raise awareness of the potential challenges for dyslexic student radiographers and their clinical educators. With widening participation policies it is likely that the number of student radiographers with specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia will continue to increase. A review of the literature associated with dyslexia in healthcare education was performed in order to provide an overview of the current position. Although Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have embraced the support and learning opportunities for dyslexic students at university, evidence would suggest that this is not reflected in the clinical departments. The current literature strongly suggests that since the risk of errors with clinical information is far more significant within the clinical placement, there is an immediate requirement for greater understanding, robust support and risk assessment systems. This review considers the problems experienced by dyslexic students, coping strategies they employ and the possible implications for clinical radiography education.

  13. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  14. Gastric cancer-molecular and clinical dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer imposes a considerable health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. The disease is often diagnosed in advanced stages and is associated with a poor prognosis for patients. An in-depth understanding of the molecular underpinnings of gastric cancer has lagged behind many other cancers of similar incidence and morbidity, owing to our limited knowledge of germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets). A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1 and MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued clinically. Novel somatic gene targets (ARID1A, FAT4, MLL and KMT2C) have also been identified and are of interest. Variations in the therapeutic approaches dependent on geographical region are evident for localized gastric cancer-differences that are driven by preferences for the adjuvant strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, greater uniformity in approach has been noted in the metastatic cancer setting, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, momentum is building for carrying out more phase III comparative trials, with some using biomarker-based patient selection strategies. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here, we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of gastric cancer.

  15. Vitamin D and cancer: Clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data that suggest that vitamin D plays a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Numerous observational studies have shown that low blood levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (cholecalciferol), estimated by geographical location, diet and activity assessment or measured serum levels are associated with a higher risk of cancer and worse cancer-specific survival as well as numerous morbidities to e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, infection, autoimmune disease, and neuromuscular dysfunction among large populations. A considerable number of in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the most active metabolite of vitamin D – 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or calcitriol – has anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, pro-differentiating, and anti-angiogenic properties. Combined treatment of calcitriol and many types of cytotoxic agents has synergistic or at least additive effects. However, clinical trials testing these hypotheses have been less encouraging, though a number of methodological, pharmacological, and pharmaceutical issues confound all trials ever conducted. In order to properly assess the clinical value of vitamin D, its metabolites and analogs in cancer prevention and treatment, more studies are needed. PMID:21872802

  16. Contemporary Clinical Management of Endometrial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dinkelspiel, Helen E.; Wright, Jason D.; Lewin, Sharyn N.; Herzog, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the contemporary management of endometrial cancer is straightforward in many ways, novel data has emerged over the past decade that has altered the clinical standards of care while generating new controversies that will require further investigation. Fortunately most cases are diagnosed at early stages, but high-risk histologies and poorly differentiated tumors have high metastatic potential with a significantly worse prognosis. Initial management typically requires surgery, but the ...

  17. Pitfalls and Challenges to Consider before Setting up a Lung Cancer Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Service: A Review of the Reported Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, R K; Mahata, A; Reddy, G D; Franks, K N; Chatterjee, S

    2016-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), despite the absence of published randomised controlled trials. Planning studies and retrospective series have shown a decrease in known predictors of lung toxicity (V20 and mean lung dose) and the maximum spinal cord dose. Potential dosimetric advantages, accessibility of technology, a desire to escalate dose or a need to meet normal organ dose constraints are some of the factors recognised as supporting the use of IMRT. However, IMRT may not be appropriate for all patients being treated with radical radiotherapy. Unique problems with using IMRT for NSCLC include organ and tumour motion because of breathing and the potential toxicity from low doses of radiotherapy to larger amounts of lung tissue. Caution should be exercised as there is a paucity of prospective data regarding the efficacy and safety of IMRT in lung cancer when compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT data from other cancer sites should not be extrapolated. This review looks at the use of IMRT in NSCLC, addresses the challenges and highlights the potential benefits of using this complex radiotherapy technique. PMID:26329504

  18. Cancer survivors' experience of exercise-based cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Julie; Hammer, Nanna Maria; Andersen, Christina;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise training as a therapeutic and rehabilitative intervention for cancer survivors is accumulating. However, whereas the evidence for the efficacy of exercise training has been established in several meta-analyses, synthesis of qualitative...... research is lacking. In order to extend healthcare professionals' understanding of the meaningfulness of exercise in cancer survivorship care, this paper aims to identify, appraise and synthesize qualitative studies on cancer survivors' experience of participation in exercise-based rehabilitation. MATERIAL......-based rehabilitation according to cancer survivors. Accordingly, the potential of rebuilding structure in everyday life, creating a normal context and enabling the individual to re-establish confidentiality and trust in their own body and physical potential constitute substantial qualities fundamental...

  19. The benchmark analysis of gastric, colorectal and rectal cancer pathways: toward establishing standardized clinical pathway in the cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Munemasa; Hamano, Masaaki; Nakagawara, Akira; Shinoda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Miura, Takeshi; Yoshida, Isao; Nemoto, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Aki

    2011-01-01

    Most clinical pathways in treating cancers in Japan are based on individual physician's personal experiences rather than on an empirical analysis of clinical data such as benchmark comparison with other hospitals. Therefore, these pathways are far from being standardized. By comparing detailed clinical data from five cancer centers, we have observed various differences among hospitals. By conducting benchmark analyses, providing detailed feedback to the participating hospitals and by repeating the benchmark a year later, we strive to develop more standardized clinical pathways for the treatment of cancers. The Cancer Quality Initiative was launched in 2007 by five cancer centers. Using diagnosis procedure combination data, the member hospitals benchmarked their pre-operative and post-operative length of stays, the duration of antibiotics administrations and the post-operative fasting duration for gastric, colon and rectal cancers. The benchmark was conducted by disclosing hospital identities and performed using 2007 and 2008 data. In the 2007 benchmark, substantial differences were shown among five hospitals in the treatment of gastric, colon and rectal cancers. After providing the 2007 results to the participating hospitals and organizing several brainstorming discussions, significant improvements were observed in the 2008 data study. The benchmark analysis of clinical data is extremely useful in promoting more standardized care and, thus in improving the quality of cancer treatment in Japan. By repeating the benchmark analyses, we can offer truly clinical evidence-based higher quality standardized cancer treatment to our patients.

  20. Immune checkpoints in cancer clinical trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elad Sharon; Howard Streicher; Priscila Goncalves; Helen XChen

    2014-01-01

    Immunology-based therapy is rapidly developing into an effective treatment option for a surprising range of cancers. We have learned over the last decade that powerful immunologic effector cells may be blocked by inhibitory regulatory pathways controlled by specific molecules often called“immune checkpoints.” These checkpoints serve to control or turn off the immune response when it is no longer needed to prevent tissue injury and autoimmunity. Cancer cells have learned or evolved to use these mechanisms to evade immune control and elimination. The development of a new therapeutic class of drugs that inhibit these inhibitory pathways has recently emerged as a potent strategy in oncology. Three sets of agents have emerged in clinical trials exploiting this strategy. These agents are antibody-based therapies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death1 (PD-1), and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). These inhibitors of immune inhibition have demonstrated extensive activity as single agents and in combinations. Clinical responses have been seen in melanoma, renal cellcarcinoma, non-smal celllung cancer, and several other tumor types. Despite the autoimmune or inflammatory immune-mediated adverse effects which have been seen, the responses and overall survival benefits exhibited thus far warrant further clinical development.

  1. Cancer therapy with phytochemicals: evidence from clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghorbani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is still one of the major causes of mortality in both developing and developed countries. At this time, in spite of intensive interventions, a large number of patients have poor prognosis. Therefore, the effort for finding new anticancer agents with better efficacy and lesser side effects has continued. According to the traditional recommendations and experimental studies, numerous medicinal plants have been reported to have anticancer effect. Also antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antimetastatic and antiangiogenic effects of several phytochemicals have been shown with in vitro experiments or animal studies. However, only a small number of them were tested in cancerous patients and limited evidence exists on their clinical effectiveness. Also, regarding some phytochemicals, only beneficial effects on cancer-related symptoms or on quality of life have been reported and no positive results exist on their antitumor actions. In this review we focus on phytochemicals that their beneficial effects on various types of cancer are supported by clinical trials. Based our literature search, curcumin, green tea, resveratrol and Viscum album had satisfactory instances of clinical evidence for supporting their anticancer effects. The main findings on these phytochemicals are summarized and discussed.

  2. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicabil- ity of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. We propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  3. Gastrointestinal Tumor Board: An Evolving Experience in Tehran Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI cancers are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in Iran, with stomach adenocarcinoma as the most common cancer in men and the second common cancer in women. Also, some parts of Northern Iran have one of the highest incidences of esophageal cancer in the world. Multi-disciplinary organ-based joint clinics and tumor boards are a well-recognized necessity for modern treatment of cancer and are routinely utilized in developed countries, especially in major academic centres. But this concept is relatively new in developing countries, where cancer treatment centres are burdened by huge loads of patients and have to cope with a suboptimum availability of resources and facilities. Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences is the oldest and the only comprehensive cancer treatment centre in Iran, with a long tradition of a general tumor board for all cancers. But with the requirements of modern oncology, there has been a very welcome attention to sub-specialized organ-based tumor boards and joint clinics here in the past few years. Considering this, we started a multi-disciplinary tumor board for GI cancers in our institute in early 2010 as the first such endeavor here. We hereby review this 2-year evolving experience. The process of establishment of a GI tumor board, participations from different oncology disciplines and related specialties, the cancers presented and discussed in the 2 years of this tumor board, the general intents of treatment for the decisions made and the development of interest in this tumor board among the Tehran oncology community will be reviewed. The GI tumor board of Tehran Cancer Institute started its work in January 2010, with routine weekly sessions. A core group of 2 physicians from each surgical, radiation and medical oncology departments plus one gastroenterologist, GI pathologist and radiologist was formed, but participation from all interested physicians was encouraged. An

  4. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT): initial experience in a clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    false-positive findings. The side-by-side feature analysis showed higher conspicuity scores for tomosynthesis compared to conventional 2D for cancers presenting as spiculated masses and distortions. Conclusion: Tomosynthesis is a promising new technique. Our preliminary clinical experience shows that there is a potential for increasing the sensitivity using this new technique, especially for cancers manifesting as spiculated masses and distortions

  5. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression

  6. Percutaneous Lung Thermal Ablation of Non-surgical Clinical N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Eight Years’ Experience in 87 Patients from Two Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: J.Palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Lagarde, Philippe, E-mail: P.Lagarde@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology Department (France); Aupérin, Anne, E-mail: auperin@igr.fr [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Unit of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (France); Deschamps, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.deschamps@igr.fr [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Chomy, François, E-mail: F.Chomy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of medical oncology (France); Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: debaere@igr.fr [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the survival outcomes of percutaneous thermal ablation (RFA + microwaves) for patients presenting N0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ineligible for surgery.Materials and MethodsEighty-seven patients from two comprehensive cancer centers were included. Eighty-two patients were treated with RFA electrodes and five with microwave antenna. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated and predictive factors of local tumor progression, OS and DFS identified and compared by univariate and multivariate analysesResultsMedian follow-up was 30.5 months (interquartile range 16.7–51) and tumor size was 21 mm (range 10–54 mm). Treatment was incomplete for 14 patients with a local tumor progression of 11.5, 18.3, and 21.1 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Two patients presented with neurological (grade III or IV) complications, and one died of respiratory and multivisceral failure as a result of the procedure at 29 days. In univariate analysis, increasing tumor size (P = 0.003) was the only predictive factor related to risk of local tumor progression. 5-year OS and DFS were 58.1 and 27.9 %, respectively. Sex (P = 0.044), pathology (P = 0.032), and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.046) were prognostic factors for DFS. In multivariate analysis, pathology (P = 0.033) and tumor size >2 cm (P = 0.032) were independent prognostic factors for DFS.ConclusionsOversized and overlapping ablation of N0 NSCLC was well tolerated, effective, with few local tumor progressions, even over long-term follow-up. Increasing tumor size was the main prognostic factor linked to OS, DFS, and local tumor progression.

  7. Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprile G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Aprile,1 Francesco Leone,2,3 Riccardo Giampieri,4 Mariaelena Casagrande,1 Donatella Marino,2,3 Luca Faloppi,4 Stefano Cascinu,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Mario Scartozzi5,6 1Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Department, University of Turin, 3Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin, Italy; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5Medical Oncology Department, University of Cagliari, 6General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: The 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (San Francisco, CA, USA; January 15–17 is the world-class conference co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, and the Society of Surgical Oncology, in which the most innovative research results in digestive tract oncology are presented and discussed. In its twelfth edition, the meeting has provided new insights focusing on the underpinning biology and clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies. More than 3,400 health care professionals gathered from all over the world to share their experiences on how to bridge the recent novelties in cancer biology with everyday medical practice. In this article, the authors report on the most significant advances, didactically moving on three different anatomic tracks: gastroesophageal malignancies, pancreatic and biliary cancers, and colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, target therapy, onartuzumab, AMG 337

  8. Clinical outcome of intermediate risk prostate cancer treated with iodine 125 mono-therapy: The Hotel-Dieu of Quebec experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose To describe the biochemical failure-free survival (B.F.F.S.), G.U. toxicity and erectile dysfunction in intermediate risk prostate cancer treated with iodine 125 mono-therapy (125I). Patients and methods Between October 1994 and October 2007, 1282 patients were treated with 125I at the Hotel Dieu de Quebec. Two hundred patients were intermediate risk prostate cancer. One hundred and fifty-seven had enough follow-up to be evaluated in this study. Biochemical failure-free survival is reported using Phoenix definition. Acute and late G.U. toxicity was described using the International Prostate Symptoms Score (I.P.S.S.) as well as with the rate of bladder catheter. Erectile dysfunction was also reported. Results The mean age of the patients was 65.6 years (S.D. = 6 years) and the mean pretreatment P.S.A. was 8.7 ng/ml. About half of the patients (51%) were T2b/T2c. About 44.6% had a P.S.A. greater than 10 and 4.5% had Gleason score of 7/10. More than half of the patients received a short course of hormones of less than 6 months for cyto-reduction (57.4%). The median follow-up was 60 months. Biochemical failure-free survival at 60-month and 96-month were 87.1% and 81% according to Phoenix definition. The mean I.P.S.S. rose from 5 immediately after the implant to 15 1 month after and then slowly decreased to 8 at 24 months. Acute urinary retention with bladder catheter occurred in 10.9% of patients. Only 4.3% presented erectile dysfunction at 5 months post-implant. Conclusion 125I mono-therapy for intermediate risk prostate implant gives biochemical failure-free survivals at 5 years and 8 years comparable to those obtained with high dose external beam radiotherapy. G.U. toxicity and erectile dysfunction were low and acceptable. Therefore, the use of 125I alone in this group of patients could be presented and discussed with the patient in the waiting of phase III validation. (authors)

  9. Lung Cancer Screening and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. van 't Westeinde (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed major cancer worldwide and the leading cause of death from cancer. Lung cancer is divided into two subgroups: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting for 10-20% and 75% of lung cancer cases, respectivel

  10. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Provost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the impact of patients’ experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada. Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n=307, 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06–1.46, as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p=0.05, while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p<0.01.  Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients’ perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care.

  11. First year clinical tutorials: students’ learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Annette Burgess,1 Kim Oates,2 Kerry Goulston,2 Craig Mellis1 1Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Bedside teaching lies at the heart of medical education. The learning environment afforded to students during clinical tutorials contributes substantially to their knowledge, thinking, and learning. Situated cognition theory posits that the depth and breadth of the students' learning experience is dependent upon the attitude of the clinical teacher, the structure of the tutorial, and the understanding of tutorial and learning objectives. This theory provides a useful framework to conceptualize how students' experience within their clinical tutorials impacts their knowledge, thinking, and learning. Methods: The study was conducted with one cohort (n=301 of students who had completed year 1 of the medical program at Sydney Medical School in 2013. All students were asked to complete a three-part questionnaire regarding their perceptions of their clinical tutor's attributes, the consistency of the tutor, and the best features of the tutorials and need for improvement. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 88% (265/301. Students perceived that their tutors displayed good communication skills and enthusiasm, encouraged their learning, and were empathetic toward patients. Fifty-two percent of students reported having the same communications tutor for the entire year, and 28% reported having the same physical examination tutor for the entire year. Students would like increased patient contact, greater structure within their tutorials, and greater alignment of teaching with the curriculum. Conclusion: Situated cognition theory provides a valuable lens to view students' experience of learning within the

  12. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  13. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Scientific Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  14. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Characterization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  15. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Reagent Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  16. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  17. Director's Update - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) has recently begun the proteomic interrogation of genomically-characterized tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  18. Progress through Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the areas of sharing proteomics reagents and protocols and also in regulatory science.

  19. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  20. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mangoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  1. Main clinical epidemiological features of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and cross-sectional study of 95 patients with lung cancer, discharged from Neumology Service at 'Dr Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso' General Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, was carried out from January, 2008 to December, 2008 in order to identify the main clinical epidemiological features of the aforementioned disease. A malignancy predominance among men aged between 56 and 65 years old, belonging to urban areas and being heavy smoker (out of 30 cigarettes per day over 30 years ), was found. Those affected without a confirmed histological type and IV clinical stage epidermoid carcinoma were predominant. Most of them had the opportunity to be treated. Increasing and intensifying health promotion and disease prevention campaigns were recommended so as to achieve the population to avoid or quit the smoking habit. (author)

  2. Swiss clinical practice guidelines on field cancerization of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Günther; Anliker, Mark; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Brand, Christoph; Braun, Ralph; Gaide, Olivier; Hafner, Jürg; Hunger, Robert; Itin, Peter; Kaeuper, Gina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Mainetti, Carlo; Streit, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence continues to increase. AK lesions are caused by chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure, and the presence of two or more AK lesions along with photodamage should raise the consideration of a diagnosis of field cancerization. Effective treatment of individual lesions as well as field cancerization is essential for good long-term outcomes. The Swiss Registry of Actinic Keratosis Treatment (REAKT) Working Group has developed clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of field cancerization in patients who present with AK. These guidelines are intended to serve as a resource for physicians as to the most appropriate treatment and management of AK and field cancerization based on current evidence and the combined practical experience of the authors. Treatment of AK and field cancerization should be driven by consideration of relevant patient, disease, and treatment factors, and appropriate treatment decisions will differ from patient to patient. Prevention measures and screening recommendations are discussed, and special considerations related to management of immunocompromised patients are provided. PMID:25539459

  3. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  4. Targeting inflammation in pancreatic cancer: Clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Colin William; Kaur Gill, Nina Angharad; Jamieson, Nigel Balfour; Carter, Christopher Ross

    2016-04-15

    Preclinical modelling studies are beginning to aid development of therapies targeted against key regulators of pancreatic cancer progression. Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive, stromally-rich tumor, from which few people survive. Within the tumor microenvironment cellular and extracellular components exist, shielding tumor cells from immune cell clearance, and chemotherapy, enhancing progression of the disease. The cellular component of this microenvironment consists mainly of stellate cells and inflammatory cells. New findings suggest that manipulation of the cellular component of the tumor microenvironment is possible to promote immune cell killing of tumor cells. Here we explore possible immunogenic therapeutic strategies. Additionally extracellular stromal elements play a key role in protecting tumor cells from chemotherapies targeted at the pancreas. We describe the experimental findings and the pitfalls associated with translation of stromally targeted therapies to clinical trial. Finally, we discuss the key inflammatory signal transducers activated subsequent to driver mutations in oncogenic Kras in pancreatic cancer. We present the preclinical findings that have led to successful early trials of STAT3 inhibitors in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27096033

  5. Biospecimen Solicitation - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A funding opportunity in support of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) seeks to prospectively procure tumor samples, collected for proteomics investigation.

  6. Rotational radiotherapy for prostate cancer in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Logadottir, Ashildur;

    2010-01-01

    at risk, requiring less than 2min of beam-on time per treatment fraction. Materials and methods We report herein our experience from the first 46 patients treated for prostate cancer, clinical stage T1–3 with rotational therapy (“RapidArc®”, Varian Medical systems) (RA). This patient group is compared...... to a group of 50 patients treated with a 5-field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) technique over the same period. The comparison parameters include target coverage, dose to OAR, treatment time and number of monitor units. Daily-IGRT using implanted gold markers is used before and after treatment......Background and purpose Radiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced prostate cancer. The latest technological improvement is modulated rotational radiotherapy, where one single rotation of the treatment machine is used to conform the dose delivery to the target and spare organs...

  7. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Santos Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide, were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  8. Metformin and breast cancer: basic knowledge in clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuti, Laura; Vici, Patrizia; Di Lauro, Luigi; Sergi, Domenico; Della Giulia, Marina; Marchetti, Paolo; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Giordano, Antonio; Barba, Maddalena

    2015-05-01

    Although preclinical work is vital in unraveling the molecular tenets which apply to metformin action in breast cancer, it is by nature unable to capture the host's response to metformin in terms of insulin-mediated effects and related changes in the hormonal and metabolic asset at the systemic level. The latter might sound seemingly paradoxical when considering the inveterate use of metformin in dysmetabolisms and pathologic conditions with underlying hormonal disruption. Bridging the gap between the molecular target and characteristics of breast cancer patients may help lab-based experiments and clinical work converge into one or more well characterized sub-populations instead of a sub optimally selected one. An appropriate patient selection is the main key to the most suitable outcome interpretation and amelioration, in an attempt to meet our patients needs midway between overestimation of benefits and efficacy dilution for any given intervention and/or co-intervention. PMID:25816698

  9. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  10. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  11. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Vecchi, S.; Ciarmiello, A.; Salvatore, M. [Naples Univ. Federico 2. (Italy). Medicina Nucleare. Dipt. di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali

    1999-06-01

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure.

  12. Using the Internet to search for cancer clinical trials: a comparative audit of clinical trial search tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nancy L; Saperstein, Sandra L; Massett, Holly A; Leonard, Colleen Ryan; Grama, Lakshmi; Manrow, Rick

    2008-07-01

    Advancing the clinical trial research process to improve cancer treatment necessitates helping people with cancer identify and enroll in studies, and researchers are using the power of the Internet to facilitate this process. This study used a content analysis of online cancer clinical trial search tools to understand what people with cancer might encounter. The content analysis revealed that clinical trial search tools were easy to identify using a popular search engine, but their functionality and content varied greatly. Most required that users be fairly knowledgeable about their medical condition and sophisticated in their web navigation skills. The ability to search by a specific health condition or type of cancer was the most common search strategy. The more complex tools required that users input detailed information about their personal medical history and have knowledge of specific clinical trial terminology. Search tools, however, only occasionally advised users to consult their doctors regarding clinical trial decision-making. This, along with the complexity of the tools suggests that online search tools may not adequately facilitate the clinical trial recruitment process. Findings from this analysis can be used as a framework from which to systematically examine actual consumer experience with online clinical trial search tools.

  13. Development and Pilot Evaluation of Native CREST – a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Christine A; Bauer, Mark C.; Horazdovsky, Bruce F.; Garrison, Edward R.; Patten, Christi A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates’ interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience & Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program provi...

  14. Prof.Zhou Yiqiang'S Experience in Treatment of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范宏宇; 王黎军

    2004-01-01

    @@ Bronchogenic carcinoma, the dominant form of malignant lung cancers, refers to canceration of the bronchial mucosa. Prof. Zhou accumulated a wealth of experience in treating complicated diseases with TCM measures and was especially skillful in treating lung cancers. His understandings about the art of treating lung cancers often brought about excellent results.

  15. Computational Omics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and the NVIDIA Foundation are pleased to announce funding opportunities in the fight against cancer. Each organization has launched a request for proposals (RFP) that will collectively fund up to $2 million to help to develop a new generation of data-intensive scientific tools to find new ways to treat cancer.

  16. How Have Cancer Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria Evolved Over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Anil; Chakrabarti, Shreya; Sen, Anando; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge reuse of cancer trial designs may benefit from a temporal understanding of the evolution of the target populations of cancer studies over time. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the trends of cancer trial eligibility criteria between 1999 and 2014. The yearly distributions of eligibility concepts for chemicals and drugs, procedures, observations, and medical conditions extracted from free-text eligibility criteria of 32,000 clinical trials for 89 cancer types were analyzed. We identified the concepts that trend upwards or downwards in all or selected cancer types, and the concepts that show anomalous trends for some cancers. Later, concept trends were studied in a disease-specific manner and illustrated for breast cancer. Criteria trends observed in this study are also validated and interpreted using evidence from the existing medical literature. This study contributes a method for concept trend analysis and original knowledge of the trends in cancer clinical trial eligibility criteria.

  17. How Have Cancer Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria Evolved Over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Anil; Chakrabarti, Shreya; Sen, Anando; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge reuse of cancer trial designs may benefit from a temporal understanding of the evolution of the target populations of cancer studies over time. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the trends of cancer trial eligibility criteria between 1999 and 2014. The yearly distributions of eligibility concepts for chemicals and drugs, procedures, observations, and medical conditions extracted from free-text eligibility criteria of 32,000 clinical trials for 89 cancer types were analyzed. We identified the concepts that trend upwards or downwards in all or selected cancer types, and the concepts that show anomalous trends for some cancers. Later, concept trends were studied in a disease-specific manner and illustrated for breast cancer. Criteria trends observed in this study are also validated and interpreted using evidence from the existing medical literature. This study contributes a method for concept trend analysis and original knowledge of the trends in cancer clinical trial eligibility criteria. PMID:27570681

  18. Clinical significance of MET in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikito; Inokuchi; Sho; Otsuki; Yoshitaka; Fujimori; Yuya; Sato; Masatoshi; Nakagawa; Kazuyuki; Kojima

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer(GC),although outcomes remain unfavorable.Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed,and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 have become standard therapy for GC.Hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor,c-MET(MET),play key roles in tumor growth through activated signaling pathways from receptor in GC cells.Genomic amplification of MET leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC.This review discusses the clinical significance of MET in GC and examines MET as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC.Preclinical studies in animal models have shown that MET antibodies or smallmolecule MET inhibitors suppress tumor-cell proliferation and tumor progression in MET-amplified GC cells.These drugs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatments for metastatic or unresectable GC.

  19. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Prostate and Urologic Cancer Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Clinical Experience in TCM Treatment of Insomnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Insomnia is a sleeping disorder that affects 1 in 10 Americans and around 50% of the seniors. It is often more prevalent in women. Since September 11, 2005 these estimations have increased. Insomnia can affect not only your energy level and mood, but your health as well because sleep helps bolster your immune system. Insomnia is characterized by: 1) difficulty in falling asleep; 2) waking up frequently during the night with difficulty of returning to sleep; 3) waking up too early in the morning; and 4) with unrefreshing sleep, the patient has a low spirit, palpation, poor memory, viscera function disorder. All these seriously affect the patient's life and work. The following is an account of the authors' clinical TCM experience in treating insomnia.

  2. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  3. Clinical Characteristics and Awareness of Skin Cancer in Hispanic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Syed A; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer in darker skin is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the clinical characteristics of cutaneous malignancy amongst Hispanic skin cancer patients and compare them to age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians.  In this retrospective study, 150 Hispanic skin cancer patients were identified from electronic medical records and age-matched to 150 non-Hispanic Caucasian controls with skin cancer.  The incidence of actinic keratoses (AKs) in Hispanic skin c...

  4. Clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J J; Walls, J T; Demmy, T L; Boley, T M; Schmaltz, R A; Goss, C F; Wagner-Mann, C C

    1993-07-01

    Since October 1986, we have had experience with 96 Sarns centrifugal pumps in 72 patients (pts). Heparinless left atrial to femoral artery or aorta bypass was used in 14 pts undergoing surgery on the thoracic aorta with 13 survivors (93%). No paraplegia or device-related complications were observed. In 57 patients, the Sarns centrifugal pump was used as a univentricular (27 pts) or biventricular (30 pts) cardiac assist device for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock. In these patients, cardiac assist duration ranged from 2 to 434 h with a hospital survival rate of 29% in those requiring left ventricular assist and 13% in those requiring biventricular assist. Although complications were ubiquitous in this mortally ill patient population, in 5,235 pump-hours, no pump thrombosis was observed. Hospital survivors followed for 4 months to 6 years have enjoyed an improved functional class. We conclude that the Sarns centrifugal pump is an effective cardiac assist device when used to salvage patients otherwise unweanable from cardiopulmonary bypass. Partial left ventricular bypass using a centrifugal pump has become our procedure of choice for unloading the left ventricle and for maintenance of distal aortic perfusion pressure when performing surgery on the thoracic aorta. This clinical experience with the Sarns centrifugal pump appears to be similar to that reported with other centrifugal assist devices.

  5. Nurses' experiences of clinical commissioning group boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Helen; O'Driscoll, Mike; Savage, Jan; Lee, Gay; Dixon, Roz

    2016-06-15

    Aim To explore the experience of governing body nurses appointed to clinical commissioning group (CCG) boards; how they perform their responsibilities; and their perceived effectiveness in ensuring safe, patient-centred care and the factors that influence their effectiveness. Method This was a small pilot study using a mixed methods approach. There were four phases of the study: literature review, qualitative data collection (interviews), quantitative data collection (survey), and final data analysis. Findings In the early stages of the formation of CCGs, few governing body nurses had relevant experience to meet the needs of a strategic role, and many of these nurses had no proper job description, too little time to carry out their responsibilities, little management support, and unequal access to training, development, formal support or supervision compared to GP colleagues. Two working patterns or models of work of governing body nurses emerged: the full-time integrated executive statutory role and the part-time non-executive statutory role. Quality and quality assurance were the most frequently cited roles or responsibilities of governing body nurses in CCGs, and their highest priority was to improve the population's health. Conclusion The role of governing body nurse has emerged at a time of organisational change, and following extensive criticism of nursing and nurses in the media. Nurses' roles and experiences are affected by these contextual events and by the emerging structures and diversity of CCGs. Further research is required into the leadership role of governing body nurses, succession planning, and the effectiveness of their relationships with other senior nurses. PMID:27305258

  6. Current Status and Challenges of Cancer Clinical Trials in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Byoung Yong; Park, Se Hoon; Lee, Soonil; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancer clinical trials in Korea have rapidly progressed in terms of quantity and quality during the last decade. This study evaluates the current status of cancer clinical trials in Korea and their associated problems. Materials and Methods We analyzed the clinical trials approved by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) between 2007 and 2013. A nationwide on-line survey containing 22 questions was also performed with several cooperative study groups and individual researchers...

  7. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program (Consortia) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five cancer research centers lead multiple collaborative networks to assess potential cancer preventive agents and to conduct early clinical development of promising preventive agents. Also called the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, the studies require extensive biomarker analysis, investigation of the biologic effects of the cancer preventive agents on their intended molecular targets and on multiple endpoints associated with carcinogenesis, and correlation with clinically relevant endpoints.  | Systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents through five major medical research centers.

  8. Adult cancer clinical trials that fail to complete: an epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensland, Kristian D; McBride, Russell B; Latif, Asma; Wisnivesky, Juan; Hendricks, Ryan; Roper, Nitin; Boffetta, Paolo; Hall, Simon J; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-09-01

    The number and diversity of cancer therapeutics in the pipeline has increased over the past decade due to an enhanced understanding of cancer biology and the identification of novel therapeutic targets. At the same time, the cost of bringing new drugs to market and the regulatory burdens associated with clinical drug development have progressively increased. The finite number of eligible patients and limited financial resources available to evaluate promising new therapeutics represent rate-limiting factors in the effort to translate preclinical discoveries into the next generation of standard therapeutic approaches. Optimal use of resources requires understanding and ultimately addressing inefficiencies in the cancer clinical trials system. Prior analyses have demonstrated that a large proportion of trials initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Group system are never completed. While NCI Cooperative Group trials are important, they represent only a small proportion of all cancer clinical trials performed. Herein, we explore the problem of cancer clinical trials that fail to complete within the broader cancer clinical trials enterprise. Among 7776 phase II-III adult cancer clinical trials initiated between 2005-2011, we found a seven-year cumulative incidence of failure to complete of approximately 20% (95% confidence interval = 18% to 22%). Nearly 48000 patients were enrolled in trials that failed to complete. These trials likely contribute little to the scientific knowledge base, divert resources and patients from answering other critical questions, and represent a barrier to progress.

  9. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  10. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation.

  11. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation. PMID:26272183

  12. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  13. The Clinical Genetics of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kommu Sashi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second highest cause of cancer-related mortality in the U.K. A genetic component in predisposition to prostate cancer has been recognized for decades. One of the strongest epidemiological risk factors for prostate cancer is a positive family history. The hunt for the genes that predispose to prostate cancer in families has been the focus of many research groups worldwide for the past 10 years. Both epidemiological and twin studies support a role for genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. Familial cancer loci have been found, but the genes that cause familial prostate cancer remain largely elusive. Unravelling the genetics of prostate cancer is challenging and is likely to involve the analysis of numerous predisposition genes. Current evidence supports the hypothesis that excess familial risk of prostate cancer could be due to the inheritance of multiple moderate-risk genetic variants. Although research on hereditary prostate cancer has improved our knowledge of the genetic aetiology of the disease, a lot of questions still remain unanswered. This article explores the current evidence that there is a genetic component to the aetiology of prostate cancer and attempts to put into context the diverse findings that have been shown to be possibly associated with the development of hereditary prostate cancer. Linkage searches over the last decade are summarised. It explores issues as to why understanding the genetics of prostate cancer has been so difficult and why despite this, it is still a major focus of research. Finally, current and future management strategies of men with Hereditary Prostate Cancer (HPC are discussed.

  14. Experiencing existential changes: the lived experience of having cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, S; Hamrin, E

    1996-02-01

    This phenomenological study was designed to explore the lived experience of having cancer, as perceived by people who have been diagnosed and treated for cancer. The aim of the study was to add to the knowledge and understanding of this complex human phenomenon. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with nine people who were in the remission or recovery phase of cancer. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim for each participant. Through intersubjective interactions and thematic analysis, the essential description of the lived experience of having cancer was constructed. The overriding theme of the lived experience of having cancer is "experiencing existential changes." Five basic subthemes were identified in the participants accounts, all of which are part of the existential changes involved in the lived experience of having cancer. These are: uncertainty, vulnerability, isolation, discomfort, and redefinition. The study can increase the understanding of what it is like to have cancer.

  15. A brain cancer pathway in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Emilie Lund; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2012-01-01

    Danish healthcare seeks to improve cancer survival through improved diagnostics, rapid treatment and increased focus on cancer prevention and early help-seeking. In neuro-oncology, this has resulted in the Integrated Brain Cancer Pathway (IBCP). The paper explores how the pathway works...

  16. A brain cancer pathway in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Emilie Lund; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2012-01-01

    Danish healthcare seeks to improve cancer survival through improved diagnostics, rapid treatment and increased focus on cancer prevention and early help-seeking. In neuro-oncology, this has resulted in the Integrated Brain Cancer Pathway (IBCP). The paper explores how the pathway works in the...

  17. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants.

  18. Transmyocardial laser revascularization. Early clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Sérgio Almeida de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the initial clinical experience of transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR in patients with severe diffuse coronary artery disease. METHODS: Between February, 1998 and February, 1999, 20 patients were submitted to TMLR at the Heart Institute (InCor, University of São Paulo Medical School, Brazil, isolated or in association with conventional coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. All patients had severe diffuse coronary artery disease, with angina functional class III/IV (Canadian Cardiovascular Society score unresponsive to medical therapy. Fourteen patients were submitted to TMLR as the sole therapy, whereas 6 underwent concomitant CABG. Fifty per cent of the patients had either been previously submitted to a CABG or to a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA. Mean age was 60 years, ranging from 45 to 74 years. RESULTS: All patients had three-vessel disease, with normal or mildly impaired left ventricular global function. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 13 months (mean 6.6 months, with no postoperative short or long term mortality. There was significant symptom improvement after the procedure, with 85% of the patients free of angina, and the remaining 15 % of the patients showing improvement in functional class, as well as in exercise tolerance. CONCLUSION: This novel technique can be considered a low risk alternative for a highly selected group of patients not suitable for conventional revascularization procedures.

  19. Practice and Experience of Clinical Pharmacists Participating in Drug Therapy of Ovarian Cancer Patient%临床药师参与1例卵巢癌患者药物治疗的实践与体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋倩; 蒋刚

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨肿瘤专科医院临床药师病房工作方法.方法:参与1例卵巢癌患者的治疗,在实践中与医护人员协作,最终使患者顺利完成本周期治疗,并通过实践总结出目前的工作模式.结果与结论:临床药师参与临床药物治疗实践,有利于提高药物治疗水平.%OBJECTIVE: To investigate the work methods of clinical pharmacist in cancer hospital. METHODS: Clinical pharmacists participated in the treatment for 1 case of ovarian cancer and cooperated with doctors and nurses so that the patient succeeded in finishing this cycle of therapy, the working mode can be summarized by practicing.. RESULTS&CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacists participating in drug therapy could improve the level of treatment.

  20. Update on clinical trials: genetic targets in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bora; Cream, Leah V; Harvey, Harold A

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women in United States. From data of American Cancer Society from 2007 reported total of 178,480 women diagnosed with breast cancer. The death rate from breast cancer has decreased in North America over time, but still accounts for second highest cancer death, following lung cancer. Breast cancer is staged based on tumor size, nodal involvement, and distant metastasis like any other solid tumors. However clinical staging is not the only important factor in management of breast cancer. Various molecular features divides breast cancer into many subgroups - that act differently, and respond differently from therapy. Thus the focus of breast cancer treatment has evolved focusing on specific targets. The most important biologic markers in subtyping of breast cancer so far are hormone receptor positivity and HER2/neu protein expression. Five molecular subtypes using intrinsic gene set include Basal mRNA, HER2 + mRNA, Luminal AmRNA, Luminal B mRNA, and Normal-like mRNA. In addition, better understanding of genetic target of breast cancer has given us arsenal of personalized, and more effective treatment approach.This review will focus on examples that highlight several mechanism of tumorigenesis, giving us not just understanding of gene pathways and the molecular biology, that could lead us to therapeutic target. Several important molecular targets have been investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, others are yet to be explored. We will also describe genetic mechanisms discovery related to overcoming resistance to current targeted therapies in breast cancer, including hormone receptor expression and HER 2- neu amplification. We will also review other exciting developments in understanding of breast cancer, the tumor microenvironment and cancer stem cells, and targeting agents in that area. PMID:23288634

  1. [Experience of stroke prevention-Enlightenment for cancer research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Weicheng

    2015-08-01

    Cancer, stroke and heart diseases are most common causes of death. This paper summarized the experience of stroke prevention, which is an enlightenment for cancer research. In addition, this paper also described the progress of cancer epidemiological research, particular the primary and second preventions in China. PMID:26733022

  2. Prostate cancer treated with HIFU: A 10-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Curiel, Laura; Gelet, Albert

    2001-05-01

    Objectives: To evaluate our overall experience in HIFU in the prostate cancer application, for its two main indications: as a primary care and as a salvage therapy after radiation. Material and method: Group 1: patients treated with HIFU as primary care for localized prostate cancer, with a baseline PSA level lower than 30 ng/ml, and with at least 1 year of follow-up were included in this analysis. Group 2: patients with a local recurrence after radiation. They were all treated using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP S.A., France). Results: Group 1: n=242 patients. The mean nadir PSA was 0.63 sd 1.30 ng/ml, and further follow-up evidenced a 81% negative biopsy rate. These results are influenced by the usual prognostic factors (clinical stage, baseline PSA, Gleason score), and, as for the other treatment option, the nadir allows prediction of the patient outcome. Group 2: n=71 patients. After HIFU treatment, 80% of the patients presented negative biopsies, and 61% had a nadir PSA level lower than 0.5 ng/ml, obtained within 3 months. No rectal injury occurred since the use of specific parameters. Conclusion: Transrectal HIFU is a valuable option for prostate cancer, for primary care as well as for salvage therapy.

  3. Vitamin D and cancer: Clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    There are substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data that suggest that vitamin D plays a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Numerous observational studies have shown that low blood levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (cholecalciferol), estimated by geographical location, diet and activity assessment or measured serum levels are associated with a higher risk of cancer and worse cancer-specific survival as well as numerous morbidities to e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, infection, a...

  4. Next generation sequencing in cancer research and clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Shyr, Derek; Liu, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The wide application of next-generation sequencing (NGS), mainly through whole genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing, provides a high-resolution and global view of the cancer genome. Coupled with powerful bioinformatics tools, NGS promises to revolutionize cancer research, diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the recent advances in NGS-based cancer genomic research as well as clinical application, summarize the current integrative oncogenomic projects, resources and computatio...

  5. A Review of Barriers to Minorities' Participation in Cancer Clinical Trials: Implications for Future Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ali; Nguyen, Claire; Lee, Yi-Hui; Cooksey-James, Tawna

    2016-04-01

    To enhance nurses' awareness and competencies in practice and research by reporting the common barriers to participation of minorities in cancer clinical trials and discussing facilitators and useful strategies for recruitment. Several databases were searched for articles published in peer reviewed journals. Some of the barriers to minorities' participation in clinical trials were identified within the cultural social-context of cancer patients. The involvement of community networking was suggested as the most effective strategy for the recruitment of minorities in cancer clinical trials. Using culturally sensitive approaches to enhance ethnic minorities' participation is important for advancing cancer care and eliminating health disparities. Awareness of barriers and potential facilitators to the enrollment of ethnic minority cancer patients may contribute to enhancing nurses' competencies of recruiting ethnic minorities in nursing research, playing efficient roles in cancer clinical trials team, and providing culturally competent quality care. PMID:25822567

  6. A meta-analysis of qualitative studies on living with oesophageal and clinically similar forms of cancer, seen from the perspective of patients and family members

    OpenAIRE

    Andreassen, Sissel; Randers, Ingrid; Ternulf Nyhlin, Kerstin; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    This study is part of a research programme of which the aim is to generate knowledge about patients' and family members' experiences of living with oesophageal cancer from their perspective. The aim of the present study was to extend this knowledge by adding other forms of cancer: other upper gastrointestinal cancer, and head and neck cancer. These cancer forms have clinical similarities with oesophageal cancer and the survival rates are similar. This study is a qualitative metaanalysis that ...

  7. Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  8. Black raspberries in cancer clinical trials: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Stoner, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Black raspberries (BRB) inhibit a broad range of cancers in preclinical models, including in vivo models of oral, esophageal, colon, breast and skin cancer. Promising preclinical results have led to clinical evaluations in cancer patients or patients at increased risk for cancer development. OBJECTIVE To summarize clinical investigations targeting cancer or precancerous lesions with BRB and discuss future directions. METHODS A thorough literature search was conducted through December 1, 2015 to identify all published studies evaluating BRB in cancer focused clinical trials. RESULTS Research investigating BRB in clinical settings report positive effects on preneoplastic lesions or cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus and colon. BRB treatment resulted in: histologic regression of oral intraepithelial neoplasia associated with improved histologic grade and significantly reduced loss of heterozygosity at tumor suppressor gene loci, modulated genes linked to RNA processing and growth factor recycling; in the colon, BRB inhibited FAP-associated polyp progression, demethylated tumor suppressor genes and improved plasma cytokine profiles; in Barrett’s patients, BRB consumption increased tissue levels of GST-pi and decreased 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS The precise dose, duration and optimum mode of BRB delivery for cancer inhibition remains to be fully elucidated. Common themes across studies support that BRB are anti-proliferative, anti- inflammatory, reduce oxidative stress and restore tumor suppressive activity. Future directions are included in the conclusions section.

  9. Journey through the clinics - The experience of a woman with BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    Being told that you carry the gene abnormality for breast cancer is hard enough, then being told that you need surgery that will render you menopausal at a young age makes life even harder. Trying to navigate through the NHS, the genetics service, the gynaecology clinics, the gynaecology surgery, primary care services and finally menopause clinics has highlighted the need for cohesive and consistent advice for such women. This woman reports on her personal, generally positive, experience of this journey. PMID:26612439

  10. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine. PMID:26498010

  11. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate. PMID:19835869

  12. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  13. feature - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Cancer is a disease of the genome," noted Lynda Chin, M.D., professor of dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "And understanding the impact of genomic changes in the proteome is critically important for converting genomic knowledge into something that a clinician can use on their patients."

  14. Venous thromboembolism and occult cancer: impact on clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheshmy, Afshan; Carrier, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be the first manifestation of cancer. Given this relationship between unprovoked VTE and cancer, it is appealing for clinicians to screen their patients with a first episode of acute unprovoked VTE for a potential occult malignancy. Five different studies have compared a limited (thorough history and physical exam, basic bloodwork) to a more extensive occult cancer screening strategy (e.g. computed tomography, fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, etc.). Most of these studies have failed to show that an extensive occult cancer screening strategy diagnoses more occult cancer (including early cancers), misses fewer cancers during follow-up or improves overall and/or cancer-related mortality suggesting that extensive occult cancer screening should not be performed routinely. Therefore, patients with a first unprovoked VTE should undergo a limited cancer screening only and clinicians should ensure that their patients are up to date regarding age- and gender- specific cancer screening (colon, breast, cervix and prostate) as per their national recommendations. Current evidence does not support a net clinical benefit to perform an extensive occult cancer screening on all patients, and a decision to do additional testing should be made on a case by case basis.

  15. Palliative low dose fortnightly methotrexate in oral cancers: Experience at a rural cancer centre from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santam Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Palliative fortnightly chemotherapy in oral cancers. Aims: We present our experience with a regimen employing fortnightly (once in 2 weeks injectable methotrexate (MTX (40 mg/m 2 in a predominantly elderly cohort of patients with carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx. Settings and Design: Retrospective chart review conducted at a rural cancer center in India. Materials and Methods: All patients with oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers started on treatment with fortnightly injectable MTX (40 mg/m 2 between 01/01/2011 and 31/12/2011. Statistical Analysis Used: The factors analyzed included the duration of disease control, pain control, overall survival and progression free survival which were evaluated using the Kaplan Meier method. Results: A total of 60 patients with a median age of 66.5 years were analyzed. Majority of the patients had poor nutritional status, performance status or co-morbidities. MTX was given for recurrent disease in 19 patients and after initial palliative radiotherapy in 41 patients. The median number of cycles delivered was nine. Grade 3/4 toxicities were seen in 2 patients only. Disease control rate at the end of treatment was seen in 33 (55% patients. Median overall survival was 34 weeks (interquartile range: 17-50 weeks. Conclusions: The fortnightly regimen of MTX was well-tolerated and showed a good clinical activity in this elderly cohort of patients with advanced oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers.

  16. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  17. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  18. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA). PMID:26382040

  19. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-09-08

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA).

  20. Clinical Outcomes of TP53 Mutations in Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Ana I; Jen, Jin; Harris, Curtis C

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of cancer genomes is increasingly becoming an essential tool of clinical oncology that facilitates target identification and targeted therapy within the context of precision medicine. The cumulative profiles of somatic mutations in cancer yielded by comprehensive molecular studies also constitute a fingerprint of historical exposures to exogenous and endogenous mutagens, providing insight into cancer evolution and etiology. Mutational signatures that were first established by inspection of the TP53 gene somatic landscape have now been confirmed and expanded by comprehensive sequencing studies. Further, the degree of granularity achieved by deep sequencing allows detection of low-abundance mutations with clinical relevance. In tumors, they represent the emergence of small aggressive clones; in normal tissues, they signal a mutagenic exposure related to cancer risk; and, in blood, they may soon become effective surveillance tools for diagnostic purposes and for monitoring of cancer prognosis and recurrence. PMID:27449973

  1. 结直肠癌性梗阻48例临床诊治体会%Clinical Experiences in Diagnosis and Treatment of Intestinal Obstruction of 48 Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨义明; 杨家成; 吴春波; 方晓岩; 王灿; 梁伟纲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features and the diagnosis and treatment of roloreotal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Method The clinical data of 48 patients (2002.9-2010.9) with colorectal cancer and intestinal obstruction were retrospectively analyzed. Results All of the 48 cases of colorectal cancer and intestinal obstruction underwent surgery. 25 cases were incomplete preoperative obstruction before surgery, including I resection anastomosis in 22 cases (right colon cancer obstruction in 8 cases, left colorectal cancer obstruction in 14 cases) , short-circuit operation in 1 case, palliative colostomy in 2 cases; 23 cases were complete preoperative obstruction before surgery, including I resection anastomosis in 5 cases (both right colon cancer obstruction) , a proximal stoma after I resection in 12 patients (six months after stoma back satisfied in 6 cases) , palliative stoma in 6 cases. Postoperative anastomotic leakage occurred in 2 cases, 1 case recovered after unobstructed drainage and parenteral nutrition suppor, 1 gave up treatment, and died at five days after left the hospital; pulmonary infection was fund in 6 cases; wound infection in was 8 cases. Conclusion Strengthening the understanding of colorectal cancer and intestinal obstruction, and choosing the timing of surgery and the surgical approach according to patients with specific conditions are the keys to improve the efficacy.%目的 探讨结直肠癌性肠梗阻的临床特点和诊治方法.方法 对2002年9月至2010年9月间收治的48例结直肠癌性肠梗阻患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 48例结直肠癌性肠梗阻均行手术治疗.术前表现为不全性梗阻25例,一期切除后吻合22例(右半结肠癌梗阻8例,左半结直肠癌梗阻14例),短路手术1例,姑息造口2例;术前表现为完全性梗阻23例,一期切除后吻合5例(均为右半结肠癌梗阻),一期切除后近端造口12例(半年后造口回纳6例),姑息造口6

  2. Clinical significance of T cell metabolic reprogramming in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Christoph; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Seth, Pankaj; Weaver, Jessica D; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-12-01

    Conversion of normal cells to cancer is accompanied with changes in their metabolism. During this conversion, cell metabolism undergoes a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, also known as Warburg effect, which is a hallmark for cancer cell metabolism. In cancer cells, glycolysis functions in parallel with the TCA cycle and other metabolic pathways to enhance biosynthetic processes and thus support proliferation and growth. Similar metabolic features are observed in T cells during activation but, in contrast to cancer, metabolic transitions in T cells are part of a physiological process. Currently, there is intense interest in understanding the cause and effect relationship between metabolic reprogramming and T cell differentiation. After the recent success of cancer immunotherapy, the crosstalk between immune system and cancer has come to the forefront of clinical and basic research. One of the key goals is to delineate how metabolic alterations of cancer influence metabolism-regulated function and differentiation of tumor resident T cells and how such effects might be altered by immunotherapy. Here, we review the unique metabolic features of cancer, the implications of cancer metabolism on T cell metabolic reprogramming during antigen encounters, and the translational prospective of harnessing metabolism in cancer and T cells for cancer therapy. PMID:27510264

  3. Nanoshell-enabled photothermal cancer therapy: impending clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Surbhi; Clare, Susan E; Halas, Naomi J

    2008-12-01

    nanoparticle dosage information, thermal response, and tumor outcomes for these experiments. Using immunonanoshells, infrared diagnostic imaging contrast enhancement and photothermal therapy have been integrated into a single procedure. Finally, we examine a novel "Trojan horse" strategy for nanoparticle delivery that overcomes the challenge of accessing and treating the hypoxic regions of tumors, where blood flow is minimal or nonexistent. The ability to survive hypoxia selects aggressive cells which are likely to be the source of recurrence and metastasis. Treatment of these regions has been incredibly difficult. Ultimately, we look beyond the current research and assess the next challenges as nanoshell-based photothermal cancer therapy is implemented in clinical practice.

  4. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...

  5. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  6. Dr. Wu Liangcun's Experience in Treating Primary Liver Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Having been engaged in clinical treatment of tumors and cancers for more than 40 years, Dr. Wu Liangcun (吴良村),professor of Zhejiang Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has put forward a unique method for treatment of liver cancer. His academic thought is to nourish yin, clear away heat, soothe the liver and strengthen the spleen, and clinically, he has obtained good therapeutic results as introduced in the following.

  7. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107 (2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107 (37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107 (63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-105 degreeC (mean 101 degree C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1 (0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count 40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection, the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by molecular studies or dengue specific IgM. (author)

  8. Analysis of clinical characteristics of 950 cases of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-li ZHU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the clinical features of the patients suffering from cervical cancer who visited Daping Hospital affiliated to Third Military Medical University in recent 10 years. Methods The clinical data of the patients who were pathologically diagnosed as invasive cervical cancer in Daping Hospital of TMMU from Jan. 2004 to Dec. 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into different age groups and analyzed according to age, clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approach. Results Clinical data of 950 patients with invasive cervical cancer were reviewed in this study. The mean age of the patients was 46.9 years. The clinical features, pathological type, and surgical approaches were different in different age groups. Analysis of the age structure of the patients, the onset age of cervical cancer seemed to increase year by year. Conclusion The clinical features of cervical cancer are diversity in different age, and the strategy for controlling its development should be varied according to age. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.09

  9. Profiling critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E MacConaill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor specimens may predict patient outcomes and inform treatment options; however, high-throughput mutation profiling remains underdeveloped as a diagnostic approach. We report the implementation of a genotyping and validation algorithm that enables robust tumor mutation profiling in the clinical setting. METHODOLOGY: We developed and implemented an optimized mutation profiling platform ("OncoMap" to interrogate approximately 400 mutations in 33 known oncogenes and tumor suppressors, many of which are known to predict response or resistance to targeted therapies. The performance of OncoMap was analyzed using DNA derived from both frozen and FFPE clinical material in a diverse set of cancer types. A subsequent in-depth analysis was conducted on histologically and clinically annotated pediatric gliomas. The sensitivity and specificity of OncoMap were 93.8% and 100% in fresh frozen tissue; and 89.3% and 99.4% in FFPE-derived DNA. We detected known mutations at the expected frequencies in common cancers, as well as novel mutations in adult and pediatric cancers that are likely to predict heightened response or resistance to existing or developmental cancer therapies. OncoMap profiles also support a new molecular stratification of pediatric low-grade gliomas based on BRAF mutations that may have immediate clinical impact. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the clinical feasibility of high-throughput mutation profiling to query a large panel of "actionable" cancer gene mutations. In the future, this type of approach may be incorporated into both cancer epidemiologic studies and clinical decision making to specify the use of many targeted anticancer agents.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Li; Yong Du; Hanfeng Yang; Yayong Huang; Jun Meng; Dongmei Xiao

    2013-01-01

    As prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease for which a variety of treatment options are available,the major objective of prostate cancer imaging is to achieve more precise disease characterization.In clinical practice,magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the imaging tools for the evaluation of prostate cancer,the fusion of MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is improving the evaluation of cancer location,size,and extent,while providing an indication of tumor aggressiveness.This review summarizes the role of MRI in the application of prostate cancer and describes molecular MRI techniques (including MRSI and DCE-MRI)for aiding prostate cancer management.

  11. Molecular biomarkers of colorectal cancer: prognostic and predictive tools for clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-qin JIANG; Fang-fang FU; Yang-xia LI; Wei-bin WANG; Hao-hao WANG; Hai-ping JIANG; Li-song TENG

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide.Although we have made steady progress in chemotherapy and targeted therapy,evidence suggests that the majority of patients undergoing drug therapy experience severe,debilitating,and even lethal adverse drug events which considerably outweigh the benefits.The identification of suitable biomarkers will allow clinicians to deliver the most appropriate drugs to specific patients and spare them ineffective and expensive treatments.Prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been the subjects of many published papers,but few have been widely incorporated into clinical practice.Here,we want to review recent biomarker data related to colorectal cancer,which may have been ready for clinical use.

  12. Targeting hedgehog signaling in cancer: research and clinical developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jingwu Xie, Christopher M Bartels, Scott W Barton, Dongsheng GuWells Center for Pediatric Research, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Since its first description in Drosophila by Drs Nusslein-Volhard and Wieschaus in 1980, hedgehog (Hh signaling has been implicated in regulation of cell differentiation, proliferation, tissue polarity, stem cell maintenance, and carcinogenesis. The first link of Hh signaling to cancer was established through studies of Gorlin syndrome in 1996 by two independent teams. Later, it was shown that Hh signaling may be involved in many types of cancer, including skin, leukemia, lung, brain, and gastrointestinal cancers. In early 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the clinical use of Hh inhibitor Erivedge/vismodegib for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinomas. With further investigation, it is possible to see more clinical applications of Hh signaling inhibitors. In this review, we will summarize major advances in the last 3 years in our understanding of Hh signaling activation in human cancer, and recent developments in preclinical and clinical studies using Hh signaling inhibitors.Keywords: hedgehog, smoothened, PTCH1, cancer, signal transduction, clinical trials, animal model

  13. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Wilson, Katheryne E; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-08-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429141

  14. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    disease was present in 6% of GP consultations, and the suspicion was associated with an increased use referrals and diagnostic imaging. The suspicion was associated with an increased risk of being diagnosed with serious disease including cancer and had a positive predictive value for a new diagnosis...... to reduce patients’ mortality and morbidity from cancer, but also because it probably pays to do so from a cost-effectiveness perspective. The findings in Study II underscore that the current guidelines regarding PSA testing for general practice should be followed to avoid inflicting iatrogenic harm...

  15. PALB2 and breast cancer: ready for clinical translation!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southey MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Melissa C Southey,1 Zhi L Teo,1 Ingrid Winship2 1Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 2The Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Abstract: For almost two decades, breast cancer clinical genetics has operated in an environment where a heritable cause of breast cancer susceptibility is identified in the vast minority of women seeking advice about their personal and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. A new wave of genetic information is upon us that promises to provide an explanation for the greater proportion of current missing heritability of breast cancer. Whilst researchers refine bioinformatic and analytic methodology necessary to interpret the new genetic data, attention needs to be paid to defining appropriate and coordinated pathways for the translation of this information so that it can be applied in clinical genetic services for the benefit of the majority of women who currently have no explanation for their breast cancer susceptibility. The search for additional breast cancer susceptibility genes remains a very active area of research. Exhausting the power of linkage studies that identified BRCA1 and BRCA2, the research community moved to candidate gene studies that led to the identification of ATM, BRIP1, CHEK2, and PALB2 as so-called "moderate-risk" breast cancer susceptibility genes. Mutations in these genes are rare and although early reports suggested that, on average, they are associated with moderate risks of breast cancer; population-based studies have demonstrated that at least some mutations in these genes are associated with breast cancer risks that are comparable to the average risk associated with BRCA2 mutations. The search for additional breast cancer susceptibility genes has now moved onto research platforms applying massively parallel

  16. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Clinical usefulness of cancer markers in primary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Verring, A.; A. Clouth; Ziolkowski, P; Oremek, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic power of CA 549, MSA and CA 15-3 in identifying breast cancer. The study included 232 patients of which 56 were healthy, 43 had benign breast cancer and 191 with other growths. The results were obtained using a specific immunoassay and using producers' cut offs. The following sensitivity and specificity of markers were found: CA 549 (sen.: 40%/spec.: 90%), MSA (sen.: 22%/spec.: 96%), and CA 15-3 (sen.: 33%/spec.: 86%). Ideal cut offs wer...

  18. Clinical significance of PHPT1 protein expression in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU An-jian; XIA Xiang-hou; DU Song-tao; GU Jun-chao

    2010-01-01

    Background in our previous studies, we found the expression of 14-kD phosphohistidine phosphatase (PHPT1) was associated with lung cancer cells migration and invasion, and PHPT1 mRNA expression level in lung cancer tissues clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis. in the present study, we aimed to further investigate the expression of PHPT1 protein in lung cancer.Methods Expression of PHPT1 protein in tissue samples from 146 lung cancers and 30 normal tissues adjacent to lung cancers was assessed using immunohistochemical method. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze expression patterns of PHPT1 protein in these tissue types. Meanwhile, we studied the correlation between expression of PHPT1 protein and clinicopathological features in lung cancer.Results Significantly higher expression levels of PHPT1 protein were found in lung cancer samples (53.42%) than in normal tissues adjacent to lung cancer (23.33%) (P=0.003). Fisher's exact test showed that lung cancer stage positively correlated with expression of PHPT1 protein (P=0.02), and lung cancer samples with lymph node metastasis showed higher PHPT1 protein expression (P=0.016) than the samples without lymph node metastasis.Conclusions The results of this study agree with findings from our previous study of PHPT1 mRNA expression in lung cancer tissues, and strongly suggest that PHPT1 protein is closely associated with the carcinogenesis and metastasis of lung cancer. Thus, therapy targeting PHPT1 (inhibition or silencing) could be potentially benefited for lung cancer patients.

  19. Active surveillance for clinically localized prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Brasso, Klaus; Klotz, Laurence H;

    2014-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) has been introduced as an observational strategy to delay or avoid curative treatment without compromising long-term cancer-specific survival. The 10 studies included in this review, published between 2008 and 2013, generally agreed upon patients selection...

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells: from experiment to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto William R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is currently much interest in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and their ability to differentiate into other cell types, and to partake in the anatomy and physiology of remote organs. It is now clear these cells may be purified from several organs in the body besides bone marrow. MSCs take part in wound healing by contributing to myofibroblast and possibly fibroblast populations, and may be involved in epithelial tissue regeneration in certain organs, although this remains more controversial. In this review, we examine the ability of MSCs to modulate liver, kidney, heart and intestinal repair, and we update their opposing qualities of being less immunogenic and therefore tolerated in a transplant situation, yet being able to contribute to xenograft models of human tumour formation in other contexts. However, such observations have not been replicated in the clinic. Recent studies showing the clinical safety of MSC in several pathologies are discussed. The possible opposing powers of MSC need careful understanding and control if their clinical potential is to be realised with long-term safety for patients.

  1. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, the major killer disease of the century requires a multi-pronged approach and among the latest modalities of treatments, Immunotherapy occupies a promising role. Immunotherapy for cancer was first started to be practised in the NIH and cell based immunotherapy for cancer is in practice for the past three decades. [1, 2] There are several literatures from various countries on the successful application of cell based Immunotherapies for various solid tumours and haematological malignancies. [3-8] Our team’s association with immune cells started when I was working on RNA transcriptome analysis to understand the immune system in HIV carriers which in turn required in vitro expansion of human Natural Killer (NK cells. [9] This led to the customization of protocols which has resulted in successful in vitro expansion, activation of NK cells and T cells for Immunotherapy. The purpose of Biotherapy institute of Japan (BIJ is to support research and clinical application of immune cells like NK cells, γδT cells, αβT cells, Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and Dendritic cells (DC for application as Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET to fight against cancer. AIET using NK cells, CTLs, DCs etc have been administered for more than 5000 patients since 2004 till date by BIJ. Principle of AIET: For AIET using NK cells, the process involves separation of lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of the patient followed by selective NK cell expansion using the expansion kit (BINKIT, BIJ, JAPAN without feeder layers and then infusion of the expanded-activated NK cells. [10,11] As reports suggest that the activity of peripheral blood NK cells are lower in cancer patients compared to normal individuals [12] and as in vitro expansion of NK cells increases the cytotoxic ability 5 to 10 fold, [13] the NK cells are expanded in vivo and then infused to the patient in AIET. We are also working on combination immunotherapy using NK cells and CTLs and also NK

  2. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg; Duffy, Michael J; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher;

    2016-01-01

    for secondary cytoreductive surgery. CONCLUSIONS: At present, CA125 remains the most important biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer, excluding tumors of mucinous origin.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4...

  3. Use of crowdsourcing for cancer clinical trial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Amanda; Sablinski, Tomasz; Diefenbach, Michael; Foster, Marc; Greenberg, Alex; Holland, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Patient and physician awareness and acceptance of trials and patient ineligibility are major cancer clinical trial accrual barriers. Yet, trials are typically conceived and designed by small teams of researchers with limited patient input. We hypothesized that through crowdsourcing, the intellectual and creative capacity of a large number of researchers, clinicians, and patients could be harnessed to improve the clinical trial design process. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and utility of using an internet-based crowdsourcing platform to inform the design of a clinical trial exploring an antidiabetic drug, metformin, in prostate cancer. Over a six-week period, crowd-sourced input was collected from 60 physicians/researchers and 42 patients/advocates leading to several major (eg, eligibility) and minor modifications to the clinical trial protocol as originally designed. Crowdsourcing clinical trial design is feasible, adds value to the protocol development process, and may ultimately improve the efficiency of trial conduct.

  4. Gastric cancer - clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Link, Alexander; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) ranks fifth for cancer incidence and second for cancer deaths. Epidemiological data showed that survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and patients with pernicious anemia etiologically linked to autoimmune gastritis are at increased risk of GC. Screening of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease by means of pepsinogen (PG) I and PG I/II detected autoimmune gastritis with oxyntic gastric atrophy in one of four patients and may be recommended for GC prevention purposes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer reported a positive association between consumption of processed meet and increased GC risk. A new GC risk prediction model based on biological markers, age, gender, smoking status, family history of GC, and consumption of highly salted food showed good predictive performance, and might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programs. A novel GC classification based on gene expression of primary resected cancers correlated with clinicopathological features. Noncoding RNA for GC screening remains the focus of multiple studies. Patients with early GC undergoing endoscopic resection are more likely to develop metachronous lesions than patients undergoing surgery and endoscopic surveillance is warranted in this special cohort. The addition of gastrectomy to chemotherapy did not improve survival of patients with advanced GC and a single noncurable factor. Apatinib, a novel oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved the median overall survival of patients with advanced GC and progressive disease after two or more lines of prior chemotherapy of nearly 3 months. PMID:27531538

  5. Early clinical cancer trials: Proof of concept and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Konings, Inge

    2011-01-01

    textabstractOver the last few decades clinical cancer research has developed at accelerating speed, resulting in a tremendous increase of knowledge with regard to tumour biology, hypotheses to interfere with tumour growth and the subsequent development of anticancer therapies. Obviously, the ultimate aim of cancer research is to identify treatment approaches improving overall survival with a good quality of life. Novel anticancer therapies mostly arise from scientifi c insights in preclinical...

  6. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  7. Belonging to a peer support group enhance the quality of life and adherence rate in patients affected by breast cancer: A non-randomized controlled clinical trial*

    OpenAIRE

    Tehrani, Afsaneh Malekpour; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Rajabi, Fariborz Mokarian; Zamani, Ahmad Reza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It seems that breast cancer patients benefit from meeting someone who had a similar experience. This study evaluated the effect of two kinds of interventions (peer support and educational program) on quality of life in breast cancer patients. METHODS: This study was a controlled clinical trial on women with non-metastatic breast cancer. The patients studied in two experimental and control groups. Experimental group took part in pee...

  8. Targeting cancer epigenetics: Linking basic biology to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence that epigenetic dysregulation is involved in almost every step of tumor development and progression. Differences in tumor behavior, which ultimately reflects clinical outcome, can be explained by variations in gene expression patterns generated by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation. Therefore, epigenetic abnormalities are considered potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. DNA methylation is stable at certain specific loci in cancer cells and predominantly reflects the characteristic clinicopathological features. Thus, it is an ideal biomarker for cancer screening, classification and prognostic purposes. Epigenetic treatment for cancers is based on the pharmacologic targeting of various core transcriptional programs that sustains cancer cell identity. Therefore, targeting aberrant epigenetic modifiers may be effective for multiple processes compared with using a selective inhibitor of aberrant single signaling pathway. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic alterations in human cancers and discusses about novel therapeutic strategies targeting epigenetic alterations.

  9. Clinical management of gastric cancer: results of a multicentre survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Feng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines in oncology-gastric cancer guidelines have been widely used to provide appropriate recommendations for the treatment of patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists' to the recommended guidelines. Methods A questionnaire asking the treatment options for gastric cancer cases was sent to 394 Chinese oncology specialists, including surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists working in hospitals joined in The Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of China. The questionnaire involved a series of clinical scenarios regarding the interpretation of surgery, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and advanced treatment planning of gastric cancer. Results Analysis of 358 respondents (91% showed variations between each specialization and from the recommended guidelines in the management approaches to specific clinical scenarios. The majority of specialists admitted that less than 50% of patients received multidisciplinary evaluation before treatment. The participants gave different responses to questions involving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and advanced settings, compared to the recommended guidelines. Conclusions These results highlight the heterogeneity of the treatment of gastric cancer. Surgical oncologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists are not adhering to the recommended guidelines.

  10. Phase I and II clinical trials for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushalani, Nikhil I

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a global public health problem with considerable heterogeneity in pathogenesis and clinical presentation across geographic regions. Improved understanding of the molecular biology of this disease has opened avenues for targeted intervention. An individualized treatment approach is required for optimal management of this cancer. Overcoming resistance to therapy requires combining targeted agents with the traditional options of chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and also targeting more than 1 pathway of carcinogenesis at a time. Encouraging molecular hypothesis and biomarker-driven trials will lead to improved patient outcomes and may eventually enable the therapeutic nihilism associated with gastric cancer to be overcome. PMID:22098835

  11. Clinical tumor sequencing: opportunities and challenges for precision cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Berger, Michael F; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-01-01

    Advances in tumor genome sequencing have enabled discovery of actionable alterations leading to novel therapies. Currently, there are approved targeted therapies across various tumors that can be matched to genomic alterations, such as point mutations, gene amplification, and translocations. Tools to detect these genomic alterations have emerged as a result of decreasing costs and improved throughput enabled by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. NGS has been successfully utilized for developing biomarkers to assess susceptibility, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cancers. However, clinical application presents some potential challenges in terms of tumor specimen acquisition, analysis, privacy, interpretation, and drug development in rare cancer subsets. Although whole-genome sequencing offers the most complete strategy for tumor analysis, its present utility in clinical care is limited. Consequently, targeted gene capture panels are more commonly employed by academic institutions and commercial vendors for clinical grade cancer genomic testing to assess molecular eligibility for matching therapies, whereas whole-exome and transcriptome (RNASeq) sequencing are being utilized for discovery research. This review discusses the strategies, clinical challenges, and opportunities associated with the application of cancer genomic testing for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25993170

  12. Psychological aspects of prostate cancer: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, A; Sonavane, S; Mehta, J

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men. It is fraught with both physical and psychological symptomatology. Depression, anxiety, stress, fatigue, pain and psychosocial factors all affect the patient with prostate cancer. Impotence, erectile dysfunction, sexual issues and incontinence in these patients complicate matters further. Anxiety may exist both before testing and while awaiting test results. Confusion over choosing from various interventions often adds to anxiety and depression in these patients. Various demographic factors and the developmental stage of the couple affect these psychological symptoms. The caregiver may undergo significant psychological turmoil while caring for a patient diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is addressed. The role of nurses in the management of prostate cancer is discussed. The present review looks at psychological issues in patients with prostate cancer from a clinical perspective, with the aim of highlighting these issues for the clinical urologist dealing with these patients. It also explores the consultation-liaison relationship between psychiatrists, psychologists and urologists as a team for the multimodal management of prostate cancer. PMID:22212706

  13. Breast cancer stem cells: current advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Clouthier, Shawn G; Deol, Yadwinder; Liu, Suling; Nagrath, Sunitha; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, are driven by a population of cells that display stem cell properties. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells, not only drive tumor initiation and growth but also mediate tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. In this chapter, we summarize current advances in CSC research with a major focus on breast CSCs (BCSCs). We review the prevailing methods to isolate and characterize BCSCs and recent evidence documenting their cellular origins and phenotypic plasticity that enables them to transition between mesenchymal and epithelial-like states. We describe in vitro and clinical evidence that these cells mediate metastasis and treatment resistance in breast cancer, the development of novel strategies to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that contain CSCs and the use of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in preclinical breast cancer research. Lastly, we highlight several signaling pathways that regulate BCSC self-renewal and describe clinical implications of targeting these cells for breast cancer treatment. The development of strategies to effectively target BCSCs has the potential to significantly improve the outcomes for patients with breast cancer.

  14. Cancer Cachexia:Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Donohoe, Claire L.; Ryan, Aoife M.; John V. Reynolds

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Cachexia is amultifactorial process of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue atrophy resulting in progressive weight loss. It is associated with poor quality of life, poor physical function, and poor prognosis in cancer patients. It involves multiple pathways: procachectic and proinflammatory signals from tumour cells, systemic inflammation in the host, and widespread metabolic changes (increased resting energy expenditure and alterations in metabolism of protein, fat, and ...

  15. Comparison of total nodal irradiation versus combined sequence of mantle irradiation with mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone in clinical stages I and II Hodgkin's disease: experience of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carde, P.; Hayat, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Somers, R.; Burgers, J.M.; Sizoo, W.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; Hagenbeek, A.; Monconduit, M.; van der Schueren, E.

    1988-01-01

    The H5 study of supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease in clinical stages I-II consisted of two controlled trials adapted to patients considered to have either favorable or unfavorable characteristics, based on prognostic factors identified in two former studies by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Of 494 patients, 257 who were classified as having unfavorable prognosis qualified for the more intensive treatment and consequently were spared a staging laparotomy. They were randomized either to total nodal irradiation (TNI) (132 patients) or to treatment with mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP) alternated with mantle irradiation (MOPP X 3-mantle irradiation-MOPP X 3; 3M) (125 patients). In complete responders (96%), the 6-year relapse-free survival was 77% in the TNI arm and 91% in the 3M arm (P = .02). Relapses in the initially involved and irradiated mantle area were less frequent in patients started on MOPP. The 6-year actuarial total survival (TS) (TNI, 82%, and 3M, 89%; P = .05) appeared to favor the 3M arm, but this difference disappeared when patients dying from causes unrelated to cancer were excluded from analysis. In men less than or equal to 40 years old, there was no difference in relapse-free survival, freedom from disease progression, or TS between the groups receiving TNI and 3M. Thus, TNI is a short and appealing treatment, especially because it preserves fertility. The same observation was true in women less than or equal to 40 years old. In addition, even irradiation less than TNI, which is meant to spare the ovaries, provided a TS similar to that for 3M.

  16. Clinical experience of oxycontin in treating 78 cases of patients with moderate-severe cancer pain%奥施康定治疗中重度癌痛患者78例的临床体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷学惠

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察奥施康定治疗中重度癌痛患者的临床效果与不良反应。方法:使用奥施康定治疗78例中重度癌痛患者,初始剂量5 mg/12 h,根据患者的疼痛程度来调整其给药剂量,连续用药4周,观察患者止痛效果、生活质量及不良反应。结果:78例患者总有效率93.59%,QOL得分(16.25±2.17)分,较治疗前的(9.17±1.68)分有所提高(P<0.05);用药后主要不良反应有便秘(16.67%)、恶心(6.41%)及厌食口干(3.85%)。结论:使用奥康施定通过个体化给药途径治疗中重度的癌痛患者,镇痛疗效显著、不良反应发生率低,患者生活质量得到明显改善。%Objective:To observe clinical effects and adverse reactions of oxycontin in treating patients with moderate-severe cancer pain.Methods:Using oxycontin through dose titration treated 78 cases of patients with moderate-severe cancer pain,the initial dose was 5 mg/12 h.The administration dosage was adjusted according to the pain degree of patients,continuous administration 4 weeks.The analgesic effect,life quality and adverse reactions of patients were observed.Results:The total effective rate of 78 patients was 93.59%;the QOL score was (16.25±2.17)scores,which increased when were compared with those before treatment (9.17±1.68) increased(P<0.05).The main adverse reaction after medication:constipation(16.67%),nausea(6.41%) and anorexia,dry mouth(3.85%).Conclusion:The analgesic effect of using oxycontin through individualized administration route treated patients with moderate-severe cancer pain is significantly.The incidence rate of adverse reaction is low.The life quality of the patients improves significantly.

  17. Insomnia: clinical experience with zolpidem (sanval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakov Iosifovich Levin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the present view of the problem of insomnia and gives a classification of sleep disorders and basic methods for their drug and non-drug therapy. Emphasis is placed on the role of the objective sleep study - polysomnography. The use of the current hypnotics belonging to a three Zs group and the minimization of administration of benzodiazepines are most important in pharmacotherapy for insomnia. The results of a clinical polysomnographic study of the effect of Zolpidem (Sanval in patients with insomnia are presented. The subjective evaluation of the beneficial effect of a 10-day course of Sanval is confirmed by the objective studies of the sleep pattern undergoing positive changes in the most important indicators, such as the process of falling asleep, the time of intrasleep awakenings, and the duration of Δ-sleep. The high safety and good tolerability of Sanval permit the latter to be assessed as an effective agent for the treatment of insomnia.

  18. Digital mammography: Experiences in clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Target: In 1989 in the Kantonal Hospital of Lucerne conventional film-screen mammography was replaced by digital mammography. With the support of a retrospective study, it was checked whether or not digital mammography represents an equally valid diagnostic procedure in daily routine. Methods: 1204 patients were examined using digital mammography. A reevaluation of these patients was carried out using clinical and r[iological routine controls. [ditionally a r[iological and histological examination was performed in 127 cases in which excisional biopsies h[ been done, paying particular attention to detail perception. Results: The sensitivity of digital mammography achieved a total of 85%, whereas the accuracy was 81%. With [ditional use of ultrasound and galactography the sensitivity attained 91%. By reevaluation the sensitivity amounted to 87%, the accuracy remaining at 81%. The positive predictive value was especially high with 76% and 77%. Conclusion: Digital mammography offers satisfactory diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  19. Hoping for the Best, Preparing for the Worst: The lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibæk, L.; Petersen, L.; Blaakaer, J.;

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the lived experiences of women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery were explored, aiming to provide a patient perspective on being newly diagnosed and starting treatment for ovarian cancer. The study period ran from the first visit in the outpatient clinic, till 8 weeks later, when t....... By offering targeted family counselling and taking good care of the women's general health and well-being, hope could be sustained and early cancer rehabilitation initiated....

  20. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  1. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  2. A qualitative investigation of cancer survivorship experiences among rural Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livaudais, Jennifer C; Thompson, Beti; Godina, Ruby; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Coronado, Gloria D

    2010-01-01

    Cancer survivorship experiences were explored among Hispanic men and women with cancer and family members of cancer survivors, recruited from two rural Washington communities in the Lower Yakima Valley. Five focus groups were conducted from February 2006 to October 2007 with 31 women and 10 men. Disbelief, fear, sadness, strength, courage, faith, and hope were common reactions to diagnosis. Concerns about family/children, losing medical coupons, and feelings of depression/isolation were identified as challenges faced after diagnosis. Participants identified smoking and environmental exposures as causes of cancer, but many believed operating on tumors caused cancer to spread. Participants used conventional treatments but identified herbal/natural remedies as cures. Most participants reported negative experiences with physicians and believed their community would benefit from language-appropriate information regarding prevention and treatment. The importance of linking survivors through support groups was emphasized and information elicited from sessions has been used to organize survivor support groups in these two communities. PMID:20623413

  3. Association of eHealth literacy with cancer information seeking and prior experience with cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Moon, Mikyung; Baeg, Jung Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a critical disease with a high mortality rate in the US. Although useful information exists on the Internet, many people experience difficulty finding information about cancer prevention because they have limited eHealth literacy. This study aimed to identify relationships between the level of eHealth literacy and cancer information seeking experience or prior experience with cancer screening tests. A total of 108 adults participated in this study through questionnaires. Data covering demographics, eHealth literacy, cancer information seeking experience, educational needs for cancer information searching, and previous cancer screening tests were obtained. Study findings show that the level of eHealth literacy influences cancer information seeking. Individuals with low eHealth literacy are likely to be less confident about finding cancer information. In addition, people who have a low level of eHealth literacy need more education about seeking information than do those with a higher level of eHealth literacy. However, there is no significant relationship between eHealth literacy and cancer screening tests. More people today are using the Internet for access to information to maintain good health. It is therefore critical to educate those with low eHealth literacy so they can better self-manage their health.

  4. “It stays with me”: The experiences of second- and third-year Student Nurses when caring for patients with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    King-Okoye, M; Arber, A

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about student nurses experiences of nursing patients with cancer in the UK. With the increasing survival of people with cancer and with cancer no longer seen as a terminal illness it is useful to understand student nurses clinical experience when nursing those with cancer. This study takes a phenomenological approach involving three focus group interviews with twenty student nurses from the second and third year of their course in one centre in the UK. All the students had exp...

  5. MicroRNA signatures as clinical biomarkers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markou A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Athina Markou, Martha Zavridou, Evi S Lianidou Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells, Lab of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Even if early lung cancer detection has been recently significantly improved, the invasive nature of current diagnostic procedures, and a relatively high percentage of false positives, is limiting the application of modern detection tools. The discovery and clinical evaluation of novel specific and robust non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of lung cancer at an early stage, as well as for better prognosis and prediction of therapy response, is very challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs can play an important role in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients, as important and reliable biomarkers for cancer detection and prognostic prediction, and even as promising as novel targets for cancer therapy. miRNAs are important in cancer pathogenesis, and deregulation of their expression levels has been detected not only in lung cancer but in many other human tumor types. Numerous studies strongly support the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer, and there is increasing evidence that altered miRNA expression is associated with tumor progression and survival. It is worth mentioning also that detection of miRNAs circulating in plasma or serum has enormous potential, because miRNAs serve as non-invasive biomarkers not only for the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease, but also as novel response and sensitivity predictors for cancer treatment. In this review, we summarize the current findings on the critical role of miRNAs in lung cancer tumorigenesis and highlight their potential as circulating biomarkers in lung cancer. Our review is based on papers that have been published after 2011, and includes the key words “miRNAs” and “lung cancer”. Keywords: non-small-cell lung carcinoma, miRNAs, tumor biomarkers, circulating miRNAs, liquid

  6. Cartap hydrochloride poisoning: A clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari K Boorugu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartap hydrochloride, a nereistoxin analog, is a commonly used low toxicity insecticide. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with alleged history of ingestion of Cartap hydrochloride as an act of deliberate self-harm. The patient was managed conservatively. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Cartap hydrochloride suicidal poisoning. Cartap toxicity has been considered to be minimal, but a number of animal models have shown significant neuromuscular toxicity resulting in respiratory failure. It is hypothesized that the primary effect of Cartap hydrochloride is through inhibition of the [ 3 H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca 2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a dose-dependent manner and promotion of extracellular Ca 2+ influx and induction of internal Ca 2+ release. This results in tonic diaphragmatic contraction rather than paralysis. This is the basis of the clinical presentation of acute Cartap poisoning as well as the treatment with chelators namely British Anti Lewisite and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate.

  7. Cancer and the African American Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the many factors that lead to inequalities in cancer care outcomes for African Americans.

  8. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 1 - kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice, and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  9. Clinical Cancer Registries - Are They Up for Health Services Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical cancer registries are a valuable data source for health services research (HSR). HSR is in need of high quality routine care data for its evaluations. However, the secondary use of routine data - such as documented cancer cases in a disease registry - poses new challenges in terms of data quality, IT-management, documentation processes and data privacy. In the clinical cancer registry Heilbronn-Franken, real-world data from the Giessen Tumor Documentation System (GTDS) was utilized for analyses of patients' disease processes and guideline adherence in follow-up care. A process was developed to map disease state definitions to fields of the GTDS database and extract patients' disease progress information. Thus, the disease process of sub-cohorts could be compared to each other, e.g., comparison of disease free survival of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-positive and -negative women who were treated with Trastuzumab, a targeted therapy applied in breast cancer. In principle, such comparisons are feasible and of great value for HSR as they depict a routine care setting of a diverse patient cohort. Yet, local documentation practice, missing flow of information from external health care providers or small sub-cohorts impede the analyses of clinical cancer registries data bases and usage for HSR. PMID:27577380

  10. Ionizing radiation-induced cancers. Experimental and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work attempts to give an idea of radiocarcinogenesis, both experimental and clinical. Experimentally the possibility of radio-induced cancer formation has considerable doctrinal importance since it proves without question the carcinogenetic effect of radiations, and also yields basis information on the essential constants implicated in its occurrence: need for a latency time varying with the animal species and technique used, but quite long in relation to the specific lifetime of each species; importance of a massive irradiation, more conducive to cancerisation as long as it produces no necroses liable to stop the formation of any subsequent neoplasia; finally, rarity of is occurrence. Clinically although the cause and effect relationship between treatment and cancer is sometimes difficult to establish categorically, the fact is that hundreds of particularly disturbing observations remain and from their number often emerges under well-defined circumstances, an undeniable clinical certainty. Most importantly these observation fix the criteria necessary for the possibility of a radioinduced cancer to arise, i.e: the notion of a prior irradiation; the appearance of a cancer in the irradiation area; serious tissue damage in relation with an excessive radiation dose; a long latency period between irradition and appearance of the cancer

  11. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis: Clinical experience with 15 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jen Chen; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Shee-Chan Lin; Shou-Chuan Shih; Tsang-En Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinic features of eosinophilicgastroenteritis and to examine the diagnosis, treatment,long-term outcome of this disease.METHODS: Charts with a diagnosis of eosinophilicgastroenteritis from 1984 to 2002 at Mackay Memorial Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. There were 15 patients diagnosed with eosinophilic gastroenteritis. The diagnosis was established in 13 by histologic evaluation of endoscopic biopsy or operative specimen and in 2 by radiologic imaging and the presence of eosinophilic ascites.RESULTS: All the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms and 12 (80 %) had hypereosinophilia (absolute eosinophil count 1 008 to 31 360/cm3). The most common symptoms were abdominal pain and diarrhea. Five of the 15 patients had a history of allergy. Seven patients had involvement of the mucosa, 2 of muscularis, and 6 of subserosa. One with a history of seafood allergy was successfully treated with an elimination diet. Another patient improved spontaneously after fasted for several days. The remaining 13 patients were treated with oral prednisolone, 10 to 40 mg/day initially,which was then tapered. The symptoms in all the patients subsided within two weeks. Eleven of the 15 patients were followed up for more than 12 months (12 to 104 months,mean 48.7), of whom 5 had relapses after discontinuing steroids (13 episodes). Two of these patients required longterm maintenance oral prednisolone (5 to 10 mg/day).CONCLUSION: Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare condition of unclear etiology characterized by relapses and remissions. Short courses of corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, although some patients with relapsing disease require long-term low-dose steroids.

  12. Ameloblastoma: Our clinical experience with 68 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Fomete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this environment, previous workers have reported on the challenges of managing large sized ameloblastoma of the jaws with less than adequate facilities. The aim of this review is to present the management of 68 cases of ameloblastoma with emphasis on surgical care. Materials and Methods: Retrospective survey of case notes of patients with histopathologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma (using the criteria of Barnes et al., 2005 seen between January 2006 and August 2010 at the Maxillofacial Unit, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Shika-Zaria, Nigeria was undertaken. Data collected includes histopathological diagnosis, age, gender, clinical information on site of lesion, form of intubation and surgical procedure performed. Results: Out of 94 patients, 68 with histological diagnosis of ameloblastoma (59 mandibular and 9 maxillary were operated within the study period. The remainder (26 was not treated in hospital. Among 68 patients treated, more were males (38 than females (30, giving a male to female ratio of 1.3:1. The age range was between 14 and 74 years (mean-standard deviation. The duration of the symptoms ranged from 7 months to 24 years, most were follicular ameloblastoma (n = 13 followed by acanthomatous type (n = 7. Endotracheal intubation was the most common (n = 55 followed by fiber optic laryngoscopy (n = 8. The surgical approach most used was extended Risdon with intraoral (n = 24 followed by extended Risdon with lip split and intraoral (n = 17. Segmental resection (en block formed the bulk of our procedures (n = 22 followed by subtotal mandibulectomy (n = 16. Conclusion: The treatment of ameloblastoma remains controversial. Its destructive nature has left patients with wide defects difficult to reconstruct.

  13. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH METABOLIC THERAPY FOR BRAIN ISCHEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kh. Shurdumova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes clinical experience with metabolic therapy, including neuroprotective drugs and antioxidants, for cerebrovascular diseases.It gives the results of basic Russian and foreign clinical studies of ethylmethylhydroxypyridoxine succinate and choline alfoscerate and discusses their efficacy and routes of administration.

  14. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH METABOLIC THERAPY FOR BRAIN ISCHEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kh. Shurdumova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes clinical experience with metabolic therapy, including neuroprotective drugs and antioxidants, for cerebrovascular diseases.It gives the results of basic Russian and foreign clinical studies of ethylmethylhydroxypyridoxine succinate and choline alfoscerate and discusses their efficacy and routes of administration.

  15. Formalized prediction of clinically significant prostate cancer: is it possible?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carvell T Nguyen; Michael W Kattan

    2012-01-01

    Greater understanding of the biology and epidemiology of prostate cancer in the last several decades have led to significant advances in its management.Prostate cancer is now detected in greater numbers at lower stages of disease and is amenable to multiple forms of efficacious treatment.However,there is a lack of conclusive data demonstrating a definitive mortality benefit from this earlier diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.It is likely due to the treatment of a large proportion of indolent cancers that would have had little adverse impact on health or lifespan if left alone.Due to this overtreatment phenomenon,active surveillance with delayed intervention is gaining traction as a viable management approach in contemporary practice.The ability to distinguish clinically insignificant cancers from those with a high risk of progression and/or lethality is critical to the appropriate selection of patients for surveillance protocols versus immediate intervention.This chapter will review the ability of various prediction models,including risk groupings and nomograms,to predict indolent disease and determine their role in the contemporary management of clinically localized prostate cancer.

  16. Lagged Syndesmotic Fixation: Our Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Salmon, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures are very common, and although algorithms are in place for osseous management, consensus has not been reached regarding treatment of associated ligamentous injuries. Although tibiofibular syndesmotic stabilization can be done using different forms of fixation, the biomedical literature has long emphasized the risk of long-term restriction of ankle mobility with the use of lagged transfixation. However, when reduction cannot be maintained with positional fixation, we found that lagging the syndesmotic screw helped to maintain the reduction without causing functional restriction. In this report, we describe our experience with patients who had undergone lagged tibiofibular transfixation and were available for short- to intermediate-term follow-up to assess ankle function. A total of 31 patients (32.63% of 95 consecutive patients) were available at a mean of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months to complete the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot questionnaire. The mean score was 88.38 (range 42 to 100) points at a mean follow-up interval of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months. Of 31 patients, 19 had an AOFAS score of 90 points, 9 an AOFAS score of 80 to 89 points, 2 an AOFAS score of 60 to 69 points, and 1 an AOFAS score of ankle kinematics than positional syndesmotic fixation. PMID:25736445

  17. Improving cervical cancer screening rates in an urban HIV clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sara L; Suharwardy, Sanaa H; Bodavula, Phani; Schechtman, Kenneth; Overton, E Turner; Onen, Nur F; Lane, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer; however, screening rates remain low. The objectives of this study were to analyze a quality improvement intervention to increase cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic and to identify factors associated with inadequate screening. Barriers to screening were identified by a multidisciplinary quality improvement committee at the Washington University Infectious Diseases clinic. Several strategies were developed to address these barriers. The years pre- and post-implementation were analyzed to examine the clinical impact of the intervention. A total of 422 women were seen in both the pre-implementation and post-implementation periods. In the pre-implementation period, 222 women (53%) underwent cervical cancer screening in the form of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing. In the post-implementation period, 318 women (75.3%) underwent cervical cancer screening (p screening included fewer visits attended (pre: 4.2 ± 1.5; post: 3.4 ± 1.4; p screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic.

  18. Tumor Cold Ischemia - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recently published manuscript in the journal of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers from the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigated the effect of cold ischemia on the proteome of fresh frozen tumors.

  19. Measuring, comparing and improving clinical outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Henneman, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, hospital variation concerning various surgical outcomes is illustrated, thereby exploring the usability of these outcomes for hospital comparisons, both from a clinical and methodological point of view. Moreover, the studies provide insight in risk factors for adverse events in colorectal and oesophageal cancer surgery, focusing on the mechanism behind postoperative complications leading to mortality or not.

  20. Cancer of unknown primitive metastatic. About two clinical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the two clinical cases about the unknown primitive metastatic cancer. The main techniques used for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of different s carcinomas are: Electronic microscope, molecular biology and genetics, especially histopathological study, topographic survey, ultrasound, radiography, chemotherapy, radiotherapy

  1. Biomolecular features of clinical relevance in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daidone, M.G.; Paradiso, A.; Gion, M.; Harbeck, N.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Schmitt, M.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and its consequent complexity is a major challenge for physicians and biologists. Notwithstanding its potential curability due to the availability of treatment modalities which are effective in the presence of favourable clinical or pathobiological features,

  2. The global experience of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jeannine M

    2010-01-01

    Pain is a significant problem in patients with cancer. Pain occurs in approximately 50% of patients at some point during the disease process and in up to 75% of patients with advanced cancer. Total pain impacts quality of life domains including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual realms. Unfortunately, pain is underappreciated and undermanaged throughout the world. Lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals, inadequate pain assessment, fears of addiction, and beliefs that pain is an inevitable component of cancer are common barriers. Education about comprehensive pain assessment and optimal management strategies and discussions about belief systems regarding pain can assist to bridge the gap between suffering and comfort. Self-report is the gold standard for pain assessment. Gathering information about the location(s), intensity, quality and temporal factors is essential. Intensity should be quantified on a rating scale to determine the amount of pain and the degree of relief from interventions. Quality can be used to diagnose the specific pain syndrome. Temporal factors provide input about how the pain is experienced over time and can offer input into the pain management plan of care. For patients who cannot self-report pain, non-verbal assessment tools are available to aid in assessment. The World Health Organization's Analgesic Ladder provides a template for the management of cancer pain. For step 1, pain can be managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and other nonopioid analgesics. As pain persists or increases, step 2 involves managing pain with select opioids for mild to moderate pain along with NSAIDS and nonopioid analgesics. Step 3 of the ladder is applicable to many cancer pain syndromes, and includes opioids for moderate to severe pain in conjunction with NSAIDS and nonopioids. This 3 step approach can be 80-90% effective. This polypharmaceutical employed with behavioral complimentary techniques are often employed to

  3. 'It stays with me': the experiences of second- and third-year student nurses when caring for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Okoye, M; Arber, A

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about student nurses experiences of nursing patients with cancer in the UK. With the increasing survival of people with cancer and with cancer no longer seen as a terminal illness it is useful to understand student nurses clinical experience when nursing those with cancer. This study takes a phenomenological approach involving three focus group interviews with 20 student nurses from the second and third year of their course in one centre in the UK. All the students had experience of caring for patients with cancer. The key themes emerging from the study were: Communication, Impact on Self, Lack of Support and End-of-Life-Care. Students emphasised the need to have more knowledge and support in relation to cancer care. They describe how they lack communication skills and found it difficult to handle their emotions. A number of students found the whole experience of caring for patients with cancer emotionally distressing and draining and they describe avoiding contact with these patients by using distancing and avoidance strategies. Student nurses need additional support through demystifying cancer, using reflective practice and good mentoring in the clinical area to enable students to feel supported, and develop confidence in their capacity for care for people with cancer. PMID:24134475

  4. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  5. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  6. The biology and clinical development of MEK inhibitors for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; Ott, Patrick A; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2014-12-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK) MEK1 and MEK2 are integral members of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and are of interest in the development of anti-cancer therapeutics. The MAPK/ERK pathway is dysregulated in more than 30 % of cancers, predominately by mutations in RAS and BRAF proteins, and MEK serves as a potential downstream target for both of these. The biology of MEK inhibition is complex, as the molecule is differentially regulated by upstream RAS or RAF. This has impacted on the past development of MEK inhibitors as treatments for cancer and may be exploited in more rational, molecularly selected drug development plans in the future. The role of MEK in cancer and the mechanism of action of MEK inhibitors is reviewed. Furthermore, MEK inhibitors that are available in standard practice, as well as those most advanced in clinical development, are discussed. Finally, next steps in the development of MEK inhibitors are considered.

  7. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Rene; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-03-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews were held with clinicians, oncology nurses, and managers from fifteen general hospitals that participated in three rounds of peer review over a period of 16 years. Interviewees reflected on the goals and expectations, experiences, perceived impact, and future role of external peer review. Transcriptions of the interviews were coded to discover recurrent themes. Improving clinical care and organization were the main motives for participation. Positive impact was perceived on multiple aspects of care such as shared responsibilities, internal prioritization of cancer care, improved communication, and a clear structure and position of cancer care within general hospitals. Establishing a direct relationship between the external peer review and organizational or clinical impact proved to be difficult. Criticism was raised on the content of the program being too theoretical and organization-focussed after three rounds. According to most stakeholders, external peer review can improve multidisciplinary team work in cancer care; however, the acceptance is threatened by a perceived disbalance between effort and visible clinical impact. Leaner and more clinically focused programs are needed to keep repeated peer reviews challenging and worthwhile. PMID:26714788

  8. [The Nutritional Care Experience of a Post-Operative Periampullary Cancer Patient With Cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yan-Ting; Chiang, Pin-Yi; Shun, Shiow-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Cachexia is one of the most widely overlooked of the syndromes that are experienced by cancer patients. This syndrome is especially prevalent among patients with gastroenterology tract cancer. Although the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) issued palliative-care practice guidelines for cachexia in 2015, guidelines have yet to be issued for the clinical setting. The authors reviewed the literature and applied their clinical experience to create an approach for identifying the degree of cachexia in a post-operative patient with periampullary cancer. This approach assesses the nutritional status, physical status, laboratory results, and gastrointestinal system functions of the patient using the Cachexia Assessment Scale (CAS) and NCCN Practice Guidelines for Cachexia. The patient improved under nursing care with an increase in nutritional intake and physical activity facilitating their process of post-surgical physical recovery. The authors hope that this experience using the combined CAS-NCCN Practice Guidelines will help clinical caregivers better understand how to apply the relevant guidelines in clinical settings. The developed approach may help nurses assess the comprehensive nutrition status of patients and related factors in order to provide interventions that will decrease the progression of cachexia effectively and promote quality of life. PMID:27026565

  9. Patterns of caregiver experiences among partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Mulder, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    2000-01-01

    This study describes patterns of caregiving experiences in partners of patients with cancer (N=148) over a 6-month period. Caregiving experiences were assessed by means of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment Scale (CRA), which consists of four negative dimensions and one positive subscale: Disrupted S

  10. Colorectal Cancer Through Simulation and Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Kershaw, S. K.; Byrne, H.M.; Gavaghan, D. J.; Osborne, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has continued to generate a huge amount of research interest over several decades, forming a canonical example of tumourigenesis since its use in Fearon and Vogelstein’s linear model of genetic mutation. Over time, the field has witnessed a transition from solely experimental work to the inclusion of mathematical biology and computer-based modelling. The fusion of these disciplines has the potential to provide valuable insights into oncologic processes, but also presents the...

  11. Colorectal cancer through simulation and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Kershaw, Sophie K.

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has formed a canonical example of tumourigenesis ever since its use in Fearon and Vogelstein\\'s linear model of genetic mutation, and continues to generate a huge amount of research interest. Over time, the field has witnessed a transition from solely experimental work to the inclusion of mathematical and computational modelling. The fusion of these disciplines has the potential to provide valuable insights into oncologic processes, but also presents the challenge of uniting many diverse perspectives. Furthermore, the cancer cell phenotype defined by the \\'Hallmarks of Cancer\\' has been extended in recent times and provides an excellent basis for future research. The authors present a timely summary of the literature relating to CRC, addressing the traditional experimental findings, summarising the key mathematical and computational approaches, and emphasising the role of the Hallmarks in current and future developments. The authors conclude with a discussion of interdisciplinary work, outlining areas of experimental interest which would benefit from the insight that theoretical modelling can provide. © The institution of engineering and technology 2013.

  12. Inflammatory breast cancer: A decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Nascimento, Vinicius C; Rajan, Ruben; Redfern, Andrew; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and rare form of breast cancer. At present, there are no established diagnostic, radiological, pathological or molecular diagnostic criteria for this entity. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of presentation, treatment and outcomes of IBC in this institution over the course of a decade. This is a retrospective observational study using data from the Royal Perth Hospital from January 2001 to December 2010. Our results identified 57 women with IBC, representing 1.9% of all new breast cancer presentations. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple negative tumors were overrepresented (41% and 18%, respectively). Forty-four (77%) patients had early disease at diagnosis, of whom 35 underwent surgery and 16 are relapse-free. All six patients achieving complete pathological response were relapse-free in contrast to 11 (38%) with lesser responses at a median follow-up of 59 months. Median survival in 13 patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis was 21.7 months, with two patients still in remission. Clearly, this small but important group continues to offer management challenges and warrants ongoing study, including better molecular and pathological profiling of tumors to allow improved diagnostic clarity and more effective targeted therapy. PMID:26899402

  13. Bispecific antibody and its clinical applications in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bispecific antibody (BsAb) usually consists of two different antigen-binding arms, by which it is capable of simultaneously binding to target cells and effector cells, and can directly mediate the killing of target cells by retargeting and activating effector cells. The development of BsAb re-search goes through three main stages: chemical cross- linking of murine-derived monoclonal antibody, hybrid hy-bridomas and engineered BsAb. Among them, engineered BsAb has more formats than the other two, such as diabody, ScdHLX, ScZip, ScCH3, ScFab and BsIgG, etc. Compared with former murine-derived BsAbs, engineered BsAb has lower immunogenicity and stronger penetrating capacity, and currently, some of them appear suitable for clinical ap-plication in yields and qualities. Up to now, several phase Ⅰand phase Ⅱ clinical studies of BsAb, for instance, some (Fab')2 and Diabodies, have been performed. Among those BsAbs, anti-CD3/anti-tumor BsAbs is most common, they not only can activate T cell and induce CD3AK cytotoxic activity in in vitro experiment, and inhibit the growth of tumor on tumor-bearing mouse by retargeting T cells to lyse tumor cells, but also offer great promise in the therapy of some malignancies in clinic, especially of some advanced cancers as well as elimination of minimal residual tumors, indicated by increasing the tumor/blood ratio of antibody in patients and improving the natural killer cell (NK) anti-tumor activity in tumor sites, and also presenting of an in-crease level in TNF-a,INF-g, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and soluble CD25, etc. The responses are also shown via improving the quality of life and prolonging the survival of partial patients. The "Knobs into Holes" technology is a new strategy emerging during research on engineered BsAb, it is likely to be useful for heterodimerization and can improve the quan-tity, purity and stability of BsAb, it is also anticipated to increase the clinical potential of BsAb in the future.

  14. Clinical and Applied Experience in Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Molly K.; Chronister, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Applied training of pre-practicum, practicum, and internship are important gateway experiences for rehabilitation counselors-in-training. Counselor educators and supervisors must be aware of requirements and expectations of counselor-in-training supervision and common ethical issues specific to these clinical experiences of rehabilitation…

  15. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  16. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liechtenstein, Therese, E-mail: t.liechtenstein.12@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Navarrabiomed Fundacion Miguel Servet, 3 Irunlarrea St., Hospital Complex of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2013-07-02

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  17. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells

  18. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Escors

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(g-retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and b-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  20. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  1. Lifetime Increased Cancer Risk in Mice Following Exposure to Clinical Proton Beam–Generated Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the life span and risk of cancer following whole-body exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a passively scattered clinical spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam. Methods and Materials: Three hundred young adult female FVB/N mice, 152 test and 148 control, were entered into the experiment. Mice were placed in an annular cassette around a cylindrical phantom, which was positioned lateral to the mid-SOBP of a 165-MeV, clinical proton beam. The average distance from the edge of the mid-SOBP to the conscious active mice was 21.5 cm. The phantom was irradiated with once-daily fractions of 25 Gy, 4 days per week, for 6 weeks. The age at death and cause of death (ie, cancer and type vs noncancer causes) were assessed over the life span of the mice. Results: Exposure of mice to a dose of 600 Gy of proton beam–generated neutrons, reduced the median life span of the mice by 4.2% (Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival, P=.053). The relative risk of death from cancer in neutron exposed versus control mice was 1.40 for cancer of all types (P=.0006) and 1.22 for solid cancers (P=.09). For a typical 60 Gy dose of clinical protons, the observed 22% increased risk of solid cancer would be expected to decrease by a factor of 10. Conclusions: Exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a proton dose that exceeds a typical course of radiation therapy by a factor of 10, resulted in a statistically significant increase in the background incidence of leukemia and a marginally significant increase in solid cancer. The results indicate that the risk of out-of-field second solid cancers from SOBP proton-generated neutrons and typical treatment schedules, is 6 to 10 times less than is suggested by current neutron risk estimates

  2. Clinical Positioning Space: Residents' Clinical Experiences in the Outpatient Oncology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lars H; Christensen, Mette K; Rytter, Carsten; Musaeus, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we present a case study of residents' clinical experiences and communication in outpatient oncology consultations. We apply positioning theory, a dynamic alternative to role theory, to investigate how oncology residents and patients situate themselves as persons with rights and duties. Drawing from seven qualitative interviews and six days of observation, we investigate the residents' social positioning and their conversations with patients or supervisors. Our focus is on how (a) relational shifts in authority depend on each situation and its participants; (b) storylines establish acts and positions and narratively frame what participants can expect from a medical consultation viewed as a social episode; and (c) the positioning of rights and duties can lead to misunderstandings and frustrations. We conclude that residents and patients locate themselves in outpatient conversations as participants who jointly produce and are produced by patients' and nurses' storylines about who should take responsibility for treatment. PMID:25288406

  3. Clinical and pathological response rates of docetaxel-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer and comparison with anthracycline-based chemotherapies: Eight-year experience from single centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT prior to local therapy is advantageous for women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC, since it can render inoperable tumors resectable and can increase rates of breast conservative surgeries. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed LABC patients who received NACT from January 2000 to December 2007. Out of 3000 case records screened, 570 (19% were LABC and 110/570 (19% treatment-naïve patients started on NACT were analyzed. Ninety-one (37 docetaxel [D], 54 anthracycline [A] patients were eligible for response and survival analysis. Pathological complete remission (pCR was defined as no evidence of malignancy in both breast and axilla. Results: Median age of the whole cohort was 45 years (range 25-68 years. Premenopausal were 42% and estrogen receptor + 49.5%. Most (90% were T4 tumors and 70% were Stage IIIB. Median numbers of preoperative cycles were six and three in the D and A group respectively. Overall clinical response rates for breast primary were 74.3% and 53.7% (CR 28.6% vs. 16.7%, P=0.58 while for axilla ORR were 75.7% vs. 54.8% (51.4% vs. 40.4% CR, P=0.77 respectively for D and A. Corresponding pCR rates were 19% vs. 13% respectively. There was no significant difference in disease-free (three-year 56.84% vs. 61.16%, P=0.80 and overall survival (three-year 70% vs. 78.5%, P=0.86 between the two groups. Conclusions: Although pCR rates were higher with docetaxel-based NACT, it did not translate into superior disease-free survival / overall survival compared to anthracycline-based chemotherapies.

  4. Patient and primary care provider experience using a family health history collection, risk stratification, and clinical decision support tool: a type 2 hybrid controlled implementation-effectiveness trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, R. Ryanne; Orlando, Lori A.; Himmel, Tiffany L; Buchanan, Adam H; Powell, Karen P; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Agbaje, Astrid B; Henrich, Vincent C.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Family health history (FHH) is the single strongest predictor of disease risk and yet is significantly underutilized in primary care. We developed a patient facing FHH collection tool, MeTree©, that uses risk stratification to generate clinical decision support for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, hereditary cancer syndromes, and thrombosis. Here we present data on the experience of patients and providers after integration of MeTree© into 2 primary care practices. ...

  5. Survival of breast cancer patients. Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrazzoa, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Casà, Luigi; Catalano, Filippo; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Noto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with breast carcinoma has changed in Europe over the last two decades. In Italy, the overall survival rate is about 77% at 5 years. When considering the situation in Sicily, the EUROCARE 2 study examined survival data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry, showing that the curves are worse than in other regions of Italy. Starting from these considerations we decide to evaluate whether these data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry corresponded to Palermo data. So we analysed data from 575 consecutive patients with breast cancer, treated in our Breast Unit from 1990 to 2003 according to the St. Gallen Recommendations and followed for a median period of 5 years. The prognostic role of age, tumour size, nodal status, TNM, stage, grading and hormonal receptors (OR, PR) were analysed and survival curves at 5 and 10 years were produced using the actuarial survival methods. All causes of death were considered. The median follow-up was 33 months. The Log rank test and univariate cox proportional model were used to demonstrate the association between prognostic factors and outcome. When considering T and N status, the curves showed an inverse correlation between survival and increases in these parameters. Overall survival was 92.9% at 5 years and 81.4% at 10 years for T1, 78.4% at 5 years and 61.4% at 10 years for T2 and 40.8% for T3-T4 at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival for NO was 92.1% and 78.2%, respectively, at 5 and 10 years, but decreased to 72.0% and 59.9% at 5 and 10 years for N1. In N2 patients we found that only about 50% of patients were still alive at 5 and 10 years, while for N3 patients the figures were 57.2% and 40%, respectively. PMID:17663369

  6. Breast Cancer Survivors’ Experiences of Lymphedema-Related Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Mei Rosemary; Rosedale, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe breast cancer survivors’ lymphedema-related symptom experiences. As a serious chronic condition from breast cancer treatment, lymphedema, or persistent swelling, is caused by chronic accumulation of lymph fluid in the interstitial spaces of the affected limb or surrounding areas. While significant prevalence of ongoing multiple symptoms have been reported, little is known about how survivors with lymphedema perceive and respond to lymphede...

  7. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN EXPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI En-xiao; LI Rong; ZHANG Zhen-hua; WANG Jian-bo

    1999-01-01

    Objective: to study the clinical significance of Pglycoprotein (P-gp) in breast cancer. Methods: Expression of P-gp in 60 cases of breast cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. P-gp expression and response to chemotherapy were comparatively investigated in 19 patients with metastatic breast cancer. Results: The P-gp was positive in 48.3% of the 60 cases of breast cancer. P-gp expression was not related to patients' age, menstruation status, number of axillary lymph nodes involved, clinical stage, histological type, and hormonal receptor status (P>0.05). The frequency of metastasis (62.1%) and mortality (51.7%) were higher in P-gp positive cases than in negative cases (16.1% vs 12.9%, P<0.005). The 5-year survival rate of P-gp positive cases (48.3%) was significantly lower than that of negative cases (87.1%) (P<0.05). In patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy distant metastasis occurred more frequently in the P-gp positive cases (94.7%) than in the P-gp negative cases (57.1%) (P=0.0468). More P-gp negative patients (7/9) than positive patients (1/10) were responsive to chemotherapy (P=0.0055).Conclusion: Immunohistochemical examination of P-gp expression is useful in predicting response to chemotherapy and prognosis in breast cancer patients. P-gp positivity is associated with poor prognosis.

  8. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  9. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  10. Clinical analysis of 47 primary parotid cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawana, Masahiro; Sato, Katsuro; Sato, Yuichiro; Hanazawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Sugata [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 47 patients with primary malignant neoplasms of the parotid gland treated in our department between 1982 and 1999. Most of the patients were male and over age 40, and 23 patients were of stage IV in clinical classification. The most frequently observed histological type was adenocarcinoma (12 patients), and the next was adenoid cystic carcinoma (11 patients). A radical parotidectomy with postoperative radiation therapy was administered in 38 patients, and palliative treatment in 9. The global survival rate was 74.1% at 5 years, and 89.4% in the patients treated with the radical procedure. Radical operative treatment and subsequent over 50-Gy of irradiation supposed to be the important factor to improve the prognosis. (author)

  11. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant treatment of cancer: experimental evidence and first clinical results

    OpenAIRE

    I.J. Diel; Mundy, G R; ,

    2000-01-01

    Several animal models, as well as a number of cell culture experiments, indicate a prophylactic effect of bisphosphonates in respect of subsequent bone metastasis. Moreover, in preliminary clinical trials involving patients with advanced breast cancer and local or remote metastases, biophosphonates produced a reduction in new skeletal metastases. This overview summarizes and discusses the results of the latest investigations. It opens with a section on the pathophysiology of bone metastasis, ...

  12. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Saba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods: First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results: Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions: Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics.

  13. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  14. Clinical Needs Finding: Developing the Virtual Experience, A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Vaishali; Thompson, Megan; Altman, Stuart M; Taylor, Peter; Summers, Alexander; Goodwin, Kelsey; Louie, Angelique Y

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative program at the University of California, Davis for students to engage in clinical needs finding. Using a team-based approach, students participated in clinical rotations to observe firsthand the needs of clinicians at the university affiliated medical center. The teams were asked to develop documentary-style videos to capture key experiences that would allow future viewers to use the videos as “virtual” clinical rotations. This was conceived as a strategy to allow students in prohibitively large classes, or students in programs at institutions without associated medical or veterinary school programs, to experience clinical rotations and perform needs assessments. The students' perspectives on the experience as well as instructor analysis of best practices for this type of activity are presented and discussed. We found that the internship experience was valuable to the students participating, by not only introducing the practice of needs finding but for increasing the students' confidence in the practice of engineering design and their ability to work independently. The videos produced were of such high quality that instructors from other institutions have requested copies for instructional use. Virtual clinical rotations through video experiences may provide a reasonable substitute for students who do not have the ability to participate in rotations in person. PMID:23483373

  15. Yoga & cancer interventions: a review of the clinical significance of patient reported outcomes for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culos-Reed, S Nicole; Mackenzie, Michael J; Sohl, Stephanie J; Jesse, Michelle T; Zahavich, Ashley N Ross; Danhauer, Suzanne C

    2012-01-01

    Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004-2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies. PMID:23125870

  16. Yoga & Cancer Interventions: A Review of the Clinical Significance of Patient Reported Outcomes for Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Culos-Reed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited research suggests yoga may be a viable gentle physical activity option with a variety of health-related quality of life, psychosocial and symptom management benefits. The purpose of this review was to determine the clinical significance of patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions conducted with cancer survivors. A total of 25 published yoga intervention studies for cancer survivors from 2004–2011 had patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, psychosocial or symptom measures. Thirteen of these studies met the necessary criteria to assess clinical significance. Clinical significance for each of the outcomes of interest was examined based on 1 standard error of the measurement, 0.5 standard deviation, and relative comparative effect sizes and their respective confidence intervals. This review describes in detail these patient-reported outcomes, how they were obtained, their relative clinical significance and implications for both clinical and research settings. Overall, clinically significant changes in patient-reported outcomes suggest that yoga interventions hold promise for improving cancer survivors' well-being. This research overview provides new directions for examining how clinical significance can provide a unique context for describing changes in patient-reported outcomes from yoga interventions. Researchers are encouraged to employ indices of clinical significance in the interpretation and discussion of results from yoga studies.

  17. Hereditary cancer predisposition in children: genetic basis and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahm, Brigitte; Malkin, David

    2006-11-01

    Although cancer predisposition syndromes are rare and malignancies arising in this context account for only 1-10% of childhood tumors, studies performed in affected patients and their families have been of unique value for the understanding of cancer development. Three classes of genes (tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes and stability genes) have been identified and shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of familial, as well as sporadic tumors. Cancer has long been recognized as a genetic disease of somatic cells. Despite improved understanding of the molecular basis of predisposition to cancer and better diagnostic tools, the care of these patients and their families remains a major challenge for the clinician. Medical, psychological, ethical and legal issues have to be considered. This review focuses on examples of each class of inherited cancer predisposition syndromes with special implications for patients in the pediatric age group, including retinoblastoma predisposition, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia disorders and Fanconi anemia. The genetic basis of cancer predisposition is discussed as well as the major concepts and controversies in the clinical management of these patients and their families. PMID:16642469

  18. Pancreatic cancer: Translational research aspects and clinical implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Ansari; Bi-Cheng Chen; Lei Dong; Meng-Tao Zhou; Roland Andersson

    2012-01-01

    Despite improvements in surgical techniques and adjuvant chemotherapy,the overall mortality rates in pancreatic cancer have generally remained relatively unchanged and the 5-year survival rate is actually below 2%.This paper will address the importance of achieving an early diagnosis and identifying markers for prognosis and response to therapy such as genes,proteins,microRNAs or epigenetic modifications.However,there are still major hurdles when translating investigational biomarkers into routine clinical practice.Furthermore,novel ways of secondary screening in high-risk individuals,such as artificial neural networks and modern imaging,will be discussed.Drug resistance is ubiquitous in pancreatic cancer.Several mechanisms of drug resistance have already been revealed,including human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 status,multidrug resistance proteins,aberrant signaling pathways,microRNAs,stromal influence,epithelial-mesenchymal transition-type cells and recently the presence of cancer stem cells/cancer-initiating cells.These factors must be considered when developing more customized types of intervention ("personalized medicine").In the future,multifunctional nanoparticles that combine a specific targeting agent,an imaging probe,a cell-penetrating agent,a biocompatible polymer and an anti-cancer drug may become valuable for the management of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  19. BRIEF REVIEW ON DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUE AND NOVEL MOLECULES IN CLINICAL TRIALS FOR TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VISHAL KUMAR S. MODI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in both developed and undeveloped countries, and the second most frequent cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. Although there have been many chemotherapeutic agents like 5-fluorouracil, taxol, tamoxifen, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and camptothecin and hormones are used to treat breast cancer. This review focuses on the causes of breast cancer, latest diagnostic techniques and various molecules under clinical trials for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  1. The Effect of Educational-Spiritual Intervention on The Burnout of The Parents of School Age Children with Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    , Nooshin Beheshtipour; Parisa Nasirpour; Shahrzad Yektatalab; Mehran Karimi; Najaf Zare

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parents of children with cancer experience high levels of stress and discomfort. Religious beliefs are important sources of comfort and support for many cancer patients and their families. The present study aimed to assess the effect of educational-spiritual intervention on burnout of the parents of the children with cancer. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 135 parents of children with cancer were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. Data were collect...

  2. The impact of the Oncotype DX Recurrence Score on treatment decisions and clinical outcomes in patients with early breast cancer: the Maccabi Healthcare Services experience with a unified testing policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegelmann-Danieli, Nava; Silverman, Barbara; Zick, Aviad; Beit-Or, Anat; Katzir, Itzhak; Porath, Avi

    2013-01-01

    The Oncotype DX Recurrence Score is a validated prognosticator in oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Our retrospective analysis of a prospectively defined cohort summarises the clinical implications associated with Oncotype DX testing according to the Maccabi Healthcare Services (MHS) policy. The MHS eligibility criteria for testing included ER+ N0/pN1mic invasive tumours, discussion of test implications with an oncologist, ductal carcinoma 0.6–1 cm Grade 2–3, HER2 negative ductal carcinomas with 1.1–4.0 cm Grade 1–2, or lobular carcinoma. Large (> 1 cm) Grade 3 tumours could have grade reassessed. We linked Recurrence Score results with patients’ information and used chi-squared tests to assess the associations thereof. Between January 2008 and December 2011, tests were performed on 751 patients (MHS-eligible, 713); 54%, 38%, and 8% of patients had low, intermediate, and high Recurrence Score results, respectively. Recurrence Score distribution varied significantly with age (P = 0.002), with increasing Recurrence Score values with decreasing age. The proportion of patients with high Recurrence Score results varied by grade/size combination and histology, occurring in 32% of small (≤ 1 cm) Grade 3 and 3% of larger (1.1–4 cm) Grade 1 ductal tumours and only in 2% of lobular carcinomas. Chemotherapy was administered to 1%, 13%, and 61% of patients with low, intermediate, and high Recurrence Score results, respectively (P < 0.0001), but only to 2% of intermediate score patients ≥ 65 years. Luteinising-hormone-releasing hormone agonists with tamoxifen were used in 27% of low Recurrence Score patients ≤ 50 years. With a median follow-up of 26 months, no systemic recurrences were documented, whereas four patients exhibited locoregional recurrences. In summary, in this low-to-moderate risk patient population, testing identified 46% of patients as intermediate/high risk. Treatment decisions were influenced by Recurrence Score results and

  3. Community based clinical program: the Medunsa physiotherapy students` experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Taukobong

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The aim of community based clinical training is tproduce graduates who are responsive to the health needs of their communit It is envisaged that upon completion of training graduates would go back an serve their respective communities following exposure to community need Program evaluation should therefore allow students to express the inadequacie and strengths of the program.Aim: To evaluate the community-based clinical program through student's experiences.Methodology: A qualitative research design was used. End of block students reports for both third (8 and fourth (15 year physiotherapy students (n = 23 were used to collect the data. Responses in the reports were grouped into the following categories for purpose of data analysis: feeling about the block, suggestion/s and supervision.Results: The students described the community based clinical program as an unique learning experience which equipped them with the understanding of life within communities. Sixty five percent (65% expressed satisfaction with the supervision given. The main complaints were amounts of paper work involved and clinical workload.Conclusion: The student's experiences indicated that the community-based clinical program within the MEDUNSA physiotherapy department realizes the goal of community-based clinical training as determined by WHO, except for inclusion of some multi-professional approaches and adaptation of the supervision provided.

  4. Therapeutic vaccines for cancer: an overview of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Ignacio; Gaudernack, Gustav; Gerritsen, Winald; Huber, Christoph; Parmiani, Giorgio; Scholl, Suzy; Thatcher, Nicholas; Wagstaff, John; Zielinski, Christoph; Faulkner, Ian; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic potential of host-specific and tumour-specific immune responses is well recognized and, after many years, active immunotherapies directed at inducing or augmenting these responses are entering clinical practice. Antitumour immunization is a complex, multi-component task, and the optimal combinations of antigens, adjuvants, delivery vehicles and routes of administration are not yet identified. Active immunotherapy must also address the immunosuppressive and tolerogenic mechanisms deployed by tumours. This Review provides an overview of new results from clinical studies of therapeutic cancer vaccines directed against tumour-associated antigens and discusses their implications for the use of active immunotherapy.

  5. Model Comparison for Breast Cancer Prognosis Based on Clinical Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Boughorbel

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of several prediction techniques for breast cancer prognosis, based on AU-ROC performance (Area Under ROC for different prognosis periods. The analyzed dataset contained 1,981 patients and from an initial 25 variables, the 11 most common clinical predictors were retained. We compared eight models from a wide spectrum of predictive models, namely; Generalized Linear Model (GLM, GLM-Net, Partial Least Square (PLS, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Random Forests (RF, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN and Boosted Trees. In order to compare these models, paired t-test was applied on the model performance differences obtained from data resampling. Random Forests, Boosted Trees, Partial Least Square and GLMNet have superior overall performance, however they are only slightly higher than the other models. The comparative analysis also allowed us to define a relative variable importance as the average of variable importance from the different models. Two sets of variables are identified from this analysis. The first includes number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, cancer grade and estrogen receptor, all has an important influence on model predictability. The second set incudes variables related to histological parameters and treatment types. The short term vs long term contribution of the clinical variables are also analyzed from the comparative models. From the various cancer treatment plans, the combination of Chemo/Radio therapy leads to the largest impact on cancer prognosis.

  6. Avenzoar's (1091-1162) clinical description of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanou, Marianna; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Saridaki, Zenia; Iavazzo, Christos; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    In the 11(th) and 12(th) century the Western caliphate flourished, making Cordoba the capital of physicians and philosophers. During that period lived and practised the famous physician Ibn Zuhr or Avenzoar. In his monumental treatise Al Taysir, Avenzoar provided the first clinical description of a polypoid colorectal tumour as well as the case of a uterine cancer and a basal cell carcinoma. His medical work remained popular through middle ages, influencing the development of western medicine. PMID:26416074

  7. Combined clinical and genetic testing algorithm for cervical cancer diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Liou, Yu-Ligh; Zhang, Tao-Lan; Yan, Tian; Yeh, Ching-Tung; Kang, Ya-Nan; Cao, Lanqin; Wu, Nayiyuan; Chang, Chi-Feng; Wang, Huei-Jen; Yen, Carolyn; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Background Opportunistic screening in hospitals is widely used to effectively reduce the incidence rate of cervical cancer in China and other developing countries. This study aimed to identify clinical risk factor algorithms that combine gynecologic examination and molecular testing (paired box gene 1 (PAX1) or zinc finger protein 582 (ZNF582) methylation or HPV16/18) results to improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods The delta Cp of methylated PAX1 and ZNF582 was obtained via quantitative methy...

  8. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  9. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  10. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF METACHRONOUS TESTICULAR CANCER: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalpinsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of bilateral testicular cancer is 5% in the total cohort of patients. Synchronous and metachronous testicular cancers are detected in 1-2 and 3% of cases, respectively. The standard treatment for testicular cancer is orchifuniculectomy and that for synchronous or metachronous cancer is organ-saving treatment, testectomy.The paper describes a clinical case of multiple primary metachronous testicular cancer. A 24-year-old patient underwent surgery (orchifuniculectomy and received 4 courses of BEP polychemotherapy for embryonal carcinoma of the left testicle at the P.A. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute. After 55 months, a dynamic control examination diagnosed a 9-mm tumor in his single right testis that was thereafter resected. Its histological examination revealed embryonal carcinoma with solitary structures in the immature teratoma. Following 22 months, a control examination showed a recurrence of the disease, for which orchifuniculectomy of the single right testis, followed by hormone replacement therapy, was performed. The follow-up period was 80 months; no recurrence is now observed.

  11. Rare clinical experiences for surgical treatment of melanoma with osseous metastases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Rong-Sen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant melanoma occurs infrequently in Taiwan. Once it has progressed into osseous metastases, the prognosis is poor. There are no reported clinical experiences of surgical management in this area. Methods To improve our understanding of the rare clinical experiences, we retrospectively investigated clinical characteristics, radiological findings, treatment modalities, survival outcomes and prognoses of 11 Taiwanese patients with osseous metastasis of melanoma treated surgically at two national medical centers, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Cheng Kung University Hospital from January 1983 to December 2006. Results Six patients suffered from acral-lentiginous melanoma. Nine patients sustained multiple osseous metastases and most lesions were osteolytic. Nine patients also had sustained metastases to other organs including liver, lungs, lymph nodes, brain and spleen. Second malignancies including lung cancer, thyroid papillary carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and cervical cancer co-existed in four patients. The interval from the initial diagnosis of melanoma to the clinical detection of osseous metastases varied from 0–37.8 months (mean 9.75 months. Metastatic melanoma was invariably fatal; the mean survival time from bone metastases to death was 5.67 months. Conclusion Due to the high morbidity and poor survival of Taiwanese patients with osseous metastases of melanoma, surgical treatment should be directed towards pain relief and the prevention of skeletal debilitation in order to maintain their quality of life.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  13. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  14. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: where are we lacking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, R J; Patil, A G; Gota, V S

    2012-01-01

    Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals) for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  15. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: Where are we lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Poojari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  16. Early clinical experience: do students learn what we expect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, E.; Bolhuis, S.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Early clinical experience is thought to contribute to the professional development of medical students, but little is known about the kind of learning processes that actually take place. Learning in practice is highly informal and may be difficult to direct by predefined learning outcomes.

  17. A qualitative study of constructive clinical learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hem-Stokroos, H H; Daelmans, H E M; van der Vleuten, C P M; Haarman, H J Th M; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2003-03-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of clinical education. A more educational structure is considered to be potentially beneficial. The following structured components were added to a surgical clerkship: logbooks, an observed student-patient encounter, individual appraisals, feedback on patient notes, and (case) presentations by students. The authors organized two focus-group sessions in which 19 students participated to explore their perceptions about effective clinical learning experiences and the newly introduced structured components. The analysis of the transcripts showed that observation and constructive feedback are key features of clinical training. The structured activities were appreciated and the results show the direction to be taken for further improvement. Learning experiences depended vastly on individual clinicians' educational qualities. Students experienced being on call, assisting in theatre and time for self-study as instructive elements. Recommended clerkship components are: active involvement of students, direct observation, selection of teachers, a positive learning environment and time for self-study. PMID:12745517

  18. Ethical challenges in conducting clinical research in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines ethical challenges that arise with clinical lung cancer research focusing on design, recruitment, conduct and dissemination. Design: problems related to equipoise can arise in lung cancer studies. Equipoise is an ethics precondition for RCTs and exists where there is insufficient evidence to decide which of two or more treatments is best. Difficulties arise in deciding what level of uncertainty constitutes equipoise and who should be in equipoise, for example, patients might not be even where clinicians are. Patient and public involvement (PPI) can reduce but not remove the problems. Recruitment: (I) lung cancer studies can be complex, making it difficult to obtain good quality consent. Some techniques can help, such as continuous consent. But researchers should not expect consent to be the sole protection for participants’ welfare. This protection is primarily done elsewhere in the research process, for example, in ethics review; (II) the problem of desperate volunteers: some patients only consent to a trial because it gives them a 50/50 option of the treatment they want and can be disappointed or upset if randomised to the other arm. This is not necessarily unfair, given clinical equipoise. However, it should be avoided where possible, for example, by using alternative trial designs; (III) the so-called problem of therapeutic misconception: this is the idea that patients are mistaken if they enter trials believing this to be in their clinical best interest. We argue the problem is misconceived and relates only to certain health systems. Conduct: lung cancer trials face standard ethical challenges with regard to trial conduct. PPI could be used in decisions about criteria for stopping rules. Dissemination: as in other trial areas, it is important that all results, including negative ones, are reported. We argue also that the role of PPI with regard to dissemination is currently under-developed.

  19. Clinical application of radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel in treating non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the clinical application of radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel in treating non-small cell lung cancer and to summarize the experience of using this therapy in clinical practice. Methods: Radiofrequency ablation was performed in twenty-one patients with lung cancer. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy or bronchoscopic biopsy in all patients. One week after radiofrequency ablation treatment, bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel was conducted. The therapeutic results were observed and evaluated. Results: After the treatment, the lesion's size was markedly reduced and the clinical symptoms were dramatically improved in all patients. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel is a safe, effective and simple technique with excellent therapeutic results for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. It is really worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  20. The Lived Experience of Iranian Women Confronting Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmat Mehrabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The populations who survive from breast cancer are growing; nevertheless, they mostly encounter with many cancer related problems in their life, especially after early diagnosis and have to deal with these problems. Except for the disease entity, several socio-cultural factors may affect confronting this challenge among patients and the way they deal with. Present study was carried out to prepare clear understanding of Iranian women's lived experiences confronting breast cancer diagnosis and coping ways they applied to deal with it. Methods: This study was carried out by using qualitative phenomenological design. Data gathering was done through purposive sampling using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 women who survived from breast cancer. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using Van Manen’s thematic analysis approach. Results: Two main themes were emerged from the interviews including "emotional turbulence" and "threat control". The first, comprised three sub themes including uncertainty, perceived worries, and living with fears. The second included risk control, recurrence control, immediate seeking help, seeking support and resource to spirituality. Conclusion: Emotional response was the immediate reflection to cancer diagnosis. However, during post-treatment period a variety of emotions were not uncommon findings, patients' perceptions have been changing along the time and problem-focused coping strategies have replaced. Although women may experience a degree of improvement and adjustment with illness, the emotional problems are not necessarily resolved, they may continue and gradually engender positive outcomes.

  1. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other.

  2. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  3. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  4. Clinical, tomographic and pathological consistency in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 55 patients admitted to the Internal Medicine Service of 'Conrado Benitez Garcia' University Oncology Hospital in Santiago de Cuba with clinical diagnosis of lung cancer, from December 2008 to November 2009, to characterize them according to variables of interest for research. Among the main results were predominance of male sex, age group between 60-69 years, smoking habit, and chronic bronchitis as past medical history, and acute bronchopneumonia as clinical form, lung infiltrative peripheral image as tomographic finding and adenocarcinoma in stages IIIa and IIIb as tissue confirmation, among others. There was an excellent consistency among clinical, imagenological and pathological findings.(author)

  5. Rapid Arc for heat and Neck cancer (200 patients experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Triana, G.; Gesto, C.; Diaz, I.; Candal, A.; Fernandez, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Poncet, M.; Silva, M. C.; Soto, M.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy is increasingly standard for head and neck cancer. These advances have resulted in longer treatment times when compared to 3D Conformal Radiotherapy. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy potentially enables shorter treatment time, achieving similar dose results. We report feasibility and acute toxicity profile of patients treated with moderate hypo fractionation and simultaneous integrated boost by means of Image Guided- Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy technique in the first two years from its clinical implementation at COG. (Author)

  6. Clinical Analysis of Lung Cancer Patients Younger Than 30 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjie HOU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It is common recognized that young patients of lung cancer have poor prognosis due to relatively higher malignancy and more invasive growth. In the past most studies on young patients of lung cancer selected patients younger than 40 or 45 years old, and there were few clinical materials for younger patients under 30 years. This study retrospectively described the the disease history, stage, treatment and pathology features of lung cancer patients younger than 30 years and aimed to provide references for these patients. Methods Those patients younger than 30 years, once admitted in the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army for lung cancer from 1993 to date, were sought in medical record system, and 53 patients were found in total. In this group, there were 34 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and 19 small cell lung cacer (SCLC patients. The male/female ratio was 1.5:1. In the NSCLC patients, there were 27 adenocarcinomas, 6 squamous carcinomas and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma, with no large cell carcinoma involved. In these patients, 12 patients received operations while 38 patients got chemo- and/or radiotherapy and 3 quited any treatment. Results There was no death in hospital, however, in the 12 patients who got operation, only 8 patients got complete resection while 4 patients got palliative resection. Conclusion Lung cancer patients younger than 30 years had a high fraction of adenocarcinoma and small cell type pathologically and most of them were in late stage when presenting with symptoms in hospital and would have a dismal prognosis. The routine health examination and early diagnosis should be emphasized to improve the prognosis of these patients.

  7. Clinical effects of laser immunotherapy on metastatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Lam, Anh K.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials of late-stage breast cancer patients and late-stage melanoma patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT) have shown promising results. In a 2010 study of Li et al, eleven late-stage melanoma patients received LIT in one or multiple 6-week treatment cycles applied to a 200-cm2 treatment site, which usually contained multiple cutaneous metastases. Long-term, positive response was observed in six patients. All lesions in the treatment area of the patients responded to LIT, eight of which achieved complete local response (CLR). CLR was observed in the non-treatment site (regional) lesions in four patients. Five patients were still alive at the time of last follow-up. The probability of 12-month overall survival was 70%.2 In 2011, Li et al, treated ten late stage breast cancer patients with LIT.1 In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%.1 This review demonstrates that LIT is safe and well tolerated, so it can be easily applied on an outpatient basis and can be combined with other pharmaceutical modalities to improve the therapeutic response of metastatic cancers.

  8. Psychosocially Influenced Cancer: Diverse Early-Life Stress Experiences and Links to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Linda A.; Auger, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    This perspective on Boyd et al. (beginning on page XXX in this issue of the journal) discusses recent published research examining the interplay between social stress and breast cancer. Cross-disciplinary studies using genetically defined mouse models and established neonatal and peripubertal paradigms of social stress are illuminating biological programming by diverse early-life experiences for the risk of breast cancer. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this programming can lead to id...

  9. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  10. Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer (Cancer Care Ontario Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, RC; Rumble, RB; Loblaw, DA; Finelli, A.; Ehdaie, B; Cooperberg, MR; Morgan, SC; Tyldesley, S; Haluschak, JJ; Tan, W.; Justman, S; Jain, S

    2016-01-01

    To endorse Cancer Care Ontario's guideline on Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations.The Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and the recommenda...

  11. Experience of 2 dental clinics registered to ISO 9002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Michael J; Kenny, David J; Johnston, Douglas H

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the 3-year experience of managing 2 hospital-based dental clinics registered to ISO 9002:1994; it also examines the revision of previous quality management standards in 2 separate institutions to prepare for registration under the new ISO 9001:2000 standard. Daily equipment and process checks, combined with internal audits, were the backbone of the quality system at both locations. Corrective and protective actions had been underused, because of the partial duplication produced by 2 different institutionally mandated risk management and incident reporting systems. ISO 9002 registration provided both dental clinics with responsive quality systems, emphasizing patient satisfaction and providing measurable continuous quality improvement.

  12. A Panel of Cancer Testis Antigens and Clinical Risk Factors to Predict Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramyar Molania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third common carcinoma with a high rate of mortality worldwide and several studies have investigated some molecular and clinicopathological markers for diagnosis and prognosis of its malignant phenotypes. The aim of this study is to evaluate expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer testis antigen (CTA genes as well as some clinical risk markers to predict liver metastasis of colorectal cancer patients. The expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer/testis antigen (CTA genes was obtained using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay in 90 colorectal tumor samples including both negative and positive liver metastasis tumors. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the association of three studied genes and clinical risk factors with CRC liver metastasis. The frequency of PAGE4 and SCP-1 genes expression was significantly higher in the primary tumours with liver metastasis when statistically compared with primary tumors with no liver metastasis (P<0.05. Among all clinical risk factors studied, the lymph node metastasis and the depth of invasion were statistically correlated with liver metastasis of CRC patients. In addition, using multiple logistic regression, we constructed a model based on PAGE4 and lymph node metastasis to predict liver metastasis of CRC.

  13. Clinical studies of lung cancer of atomic bomb survivors, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study was made on complications of lung cancer in 188 A-bomb survivors (group 1) and 327 non-exposed patients (group 2) treated from 1972 through 1982. The incidence of complications was higher in group 1 (32 %) than in group 2 (20 %). Complications occurred most frequently in the respiratory system, followed by those in the circulatory system and diabetes mellitus in both groups. Patients with complications in the respiratory, circulatory, or nervous system tended to be inoperable. For patients with clinical stage I or II developing complications, the prognosis was worse as compared with those without complications. Long-term survival can be achieved in two patients with early stage lung cancer in whom surgical treatment was impossible because of the association of severe complications. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. EGFR signaling in colorectal cancer: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saletti P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piercarlo Saletti,1 Francesca Molinari,2 Sara De Dosso,1 Milo Frattini2 1Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, Locarno, Switzerland Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains a formidable health burden worldwide, with up to 50% of patients developing metastases during the course of their disease. This group of CRC patients, characterized by the worst prognosis, has been extensively investigated to improve their life expectancy. Main efforts, focused on the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR, which plays a pivotal role in CRC pathogenesis, have led to the development and introduction in clinical practice of specific targeted therapies (ie, monoclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the scientific community has tried to identify molecular predictors of the efficacy of such therapies. However, it has become clear that EGFR alterations occurring in CRC are difficult to investigate, and therefore their predictive role is unclear. In contrast, the clinical role of two downstream members (KRAS and NRAS has been clearly demonstrated. Currently, EGFR-targeted therapies can be administered only to patients with wild-type KRAS and NRAS genes. Our review addresses the medical management of metastatic CRC. Specifically, we describe in detail the molecular biology of metastatic CRC, focusing on the EGFR signaling pathway, and we discuss the role of current and emerging related biomarkers and therapies in this field. We also summarize the clinical evidence regarding anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and examine potential future perspectives. Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR, gene mutations, cetuximab, panitumumab

  15. Clinical and pathological response rates of docetaxel-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer and comparison with anthracycline-based chemotherapies: Eight-year experience from single centre

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, D.; Raina, V.; Rath, G. K.; N K Shukla; Mohanti, B. K.; D N Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) prior to local therapy is advantageous for women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), since it can render inoperable tumors resectable and can increase rates of breast conservative surgeries. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed LABC patients who received NACT from January 2000 to December 2007. Out of 3000 case records screened, 570 (19%) were LABC and 110/570 (19%) treatment-naïve patients started on NA...

  16. Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Hellström-Hyson, Eva; Persson, Elisabeth; Mårtensson, Gunilla

    2014-08-01

    Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors. PMID:24512652

  17. The Experience of Caregivers Living with Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSeure, Peeranuch; Chongkham-ang, Supaporn

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this meta-synthesis were to: (1) explore the experience of caregivers who were caring for cancer patients, including their perceptions and responses to the situation; and (2) describe the context and the phenomena relevant to the experience. Five databases were used: CINAHL, MEDLINE, Academic Search, Science Direct, and a Thai database known as the Thai Library Integrated System (ThaiLIS). Three sets of the context of the experience and the phenomena relevant to the experience were described. The contexts were (1) having a hard time dealing with emotional devastation; (2) knowing that the caregiving job was laborious; and (3) knowing that I was not alone. The phenomenon showed the progress of the caregivers’ thoughts and actions. A general phenomenon of the experience—balancing my emotion—applied to most of the caregivers; whereas, more specific phenomenon—keeping life as normal as possible and lifting life above the illness—were experienced by a lesser number of the caregivers. This review added a more thorough explanation of the issues involved in caregiving for cancer patients. A more comprehensive description of the experience of caregiving was described. The findings of this review can be used to guide clinical practice and policy formation in cancer patient care. PMID:26610573

  18. Accessibility and Quality of Online Cancer-Related Clinical Trial Information for Naïve Searchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Earles, Kristofer; Gray, Stacy W

    2015-10-01

    Although the Internet may help to increase cancer patients' awareness of clinical trials, little is known about the accessibility and quality of online clinical trial information. We simulated the experience of a naïve cancer patient without clinical trial knowledge by searching three popular search engines for treatment information for breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two coders independently evaluated website content for accessibility and quality. We screened 120 websites and identified 40 unique sites for analysis. Overall, 85% [95% confidence interval (CI), 70%-94%] of sites mentioned clinical trials on the landing page and 68% (51%-81%) included links to specific trials. Overall readability was poor. Approximately half of websites (36%-68%) included information on the potential benefits and risks of clinical trials and 40% provided information about when the site had been updated (25%-57%). Among sites with links to specific clinical trials, only 44% (25%-65%) provided an interactive interface that would allow patients to customize search results; breast (100%) and prostate (50%) sites were more interactive than lung (25%) and MDS (14%; P = 0.007). Although cancer clinical trial information is widely available on the Internet, its quality is highly variable. Given the fact that many emerging cancer therapeutics are personalized based on disease or genomic characteristics, interactive web-based interfaces could serve as powerful vehicles to help patients locate appropriate clinical trials. Without enhanced efforts to ensure greater interactivity of cancer treatment websites, patient awareness of relevant clinical trials may remain low. PMID:26265204

  19. Radionuclide liver cancer therapies: from concept to current clinical status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vente, Maarten A D; Hobbelink, Monique G G; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; Nijsen, Johannes F W

    2007-07-01

    Primary and secondary liver cancer have longtime been characterized by an overall poor prognosis since the majority of patients are not candidates for surgical resection with curative intent, systemic chemotherapy alone has rarely resulted in long-term survival, and the role of conventional external beam radiation therapy has traditionally been limited due to the relative sensitivity of the liver parenchyma to radiation. Therefore, a host of new treatment options have been developed and clinically introduced, including radioembolization techniques, which are the main topic of this paper. In these locoregional treatments liver malignancies are passively targeted because, unlike the normal liver, the blood supply of intrahepatic tumors is almost uniquely derived from the hepatic artery. These internal radiation techniques consist of injecting either yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres, or iodine-131 ((131)I) or rhenium-188 ((188)Re) labeled lipiodol into the hepatic artery. Radioactive lipiodol is used exclusively for treatment of primary liver cancer, whereas (90)Y microsphere therapy is applied for treatment of both primary and metastatic liver cancers. Favorable clinical results have been achieved, particularly when (90)Y microspheres were used in conjunction with systemic chemotherapy. The main advantages of radiolabeled lipiodol treatment are that it is relatively inexpensive (especially (188)Re-HDD-lipiodol) and that the administration procedure is somewhat less complex than that of the microspheres. Holmium-166 ((166)Ho) loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres have also been developed and are about to be clinically introduced. Since (166)Ho is a combined beta-gamma emitter and highly paramagnetic as well, it allows for both (quantitative) scintigraphic and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:17630919

  20. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William H. D. Hallett; William J. Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  1. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WilliamH.D.Hallett; WilliamJ.Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  2. Intelligent Application of Breast Cancer Trials Data in the Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne Frankli; Sunil Verma; Sibylle Loibl; Pierfranco Conte; Peter Schmid; Christos Sotiriou

    2015-01-01

    This meeting commenced with a talk from Prof Loibl on neoadjuvant and adjuvant strategies for HER2positive (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive) early breast cancer (EBC), which featured a précis on the most pertinent, recent trial data and how these data may shape future treatment decisions in clinical practice. Prof Conte moved the discussion forward by addressing how recent studies may lead towards a new standard of care (SoC) and treatment paradigms in patients with metastat...

  3. Clinical outcome of intermediate risk prostate cancer treated with iodine 125 mono-therapy: The Hotel-Dieu of Quebec experience;Evolution clinique des patients atteints d'un cancer prostatique de risque intermediaire traites par implants permanents d'iode-125: l'experience de l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebentout, O.; Apardian, R.; Beaulieu, L.; Harel, F.; Martin, A.G.; Vigneault, E. [Departement de radiotherapie, CHUQ Hotel-Dieu, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, L.; Harel, F. [Centre de recherche en cancerologie, CHUQ Hotel-Dieu, universite de Laval, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, L. [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, universite de Laval, QC (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose To describe the biochemical failure-free survival (B.F.F.S.), G.U. toxicity and erectile dysfunction in intermediate risk prostate cancer treated with iodine 125 mono-therapy ({sup 125}I). Patients and methods Between October 1994 and October 2007, 1282 patients were treated with {sup 125}I at the Hotel Dieu de Quebec. Two hundred patients were intermediate risk prostate cancer. One hundred and fifty-seven had enough follow-up to be evaluated in this study. Biochemical failure-free survival is reported using Phoenix definition. Acute and late G.U. toxicity was described using the International Prostate Symptoms Score (I.P.S.S.) as well as with the rate of bladder catheter. Erectile dysfunction was also reported. Results The mean age of the patients was 65.6 years (S.D. = 6 years) and the mean pretreatment P.S.A. was 8.7 ng/ml. About half of the patients (51%) were T2b/T2c. About 44.6% had a P.S.A. greater than 10 and 4.5% had Gleason score of 7/10. More than half of the patients received a short course of hormones of less than 6 months for cyto-reduction (57.4%). The median follow-up was 60 months. Biochemical failure-free survival at 60-month and 96-month were 87.1% and 81% according to Phoenix definition. The mean I.P.S.S. rose from 5 immediately after the implant to 15 1 month after and then slowly decreased to 8 at 24 months. Acute urinary retention with bladder catheter occurred in 10.9% of patients. Only 4.3% presented erectile dysfunction at 5 months post-implant. Conclusion {sup 125}I mono-therapy for intermediate risk prostate implant gives biochemical failure-free survivals at 5 years and 8 years comparable to those obtained with high dose external beam radiotherapy. G.U. toxicity and erectile dysfunction were low and acceptable. Therefore, the use of {sup 125}I alone in this group of patients could be presented and discussed with the patient in the waiting of phase III validation. (authors)

  4. Clinical Experience of Medical Students at University Sains Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Quah, Ban Seng; Malik, Alam Sher; Simpson, Hamish

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteri...

  5. Influence of light source and clinical experience on shade matching

    OpenAIRE

    GÁSPÁRIK, CRISTINA; TOFAN, ALINA; CULIC, BOGDAN; BADEA, MÎNDRA; DUDEA, DIANA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Shade is one of the most important attributes when evaluating the success of a restoration. Several factors can influence the visual shade matching process, and therefore the outcome of the final restoration. Objectives 1. to assess the importance of clinical experience on shade matching accuracy; 2. to assess the influence of two standard light sources on the ability to match shade tabs; 3. to identify the area in a VITA Classical shade guide where matching errors are most likel...

  6. DNA-abzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T E Naumova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-abzymes enzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment T.E. Naumova, O.M. Durova, A.G. Gabibov, Z.S. Alekberova, S. V. Suchkov DNA-hydrolyzing autoantibodies (AAB or DNA-abzymes can be found in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment. Technology of serum express screening for presence of DNA abzymes is described. Comparative study of DNA-hydrolising activity in patients with different forms of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases was performed. Blood of clinically healthy donors was usually free of IgG DNA-abzymes. DNA-abzymes were most often revealed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA less often in patients with organ-specific forms of autoimmune disturbances. The results of the study confirm the hypothesis of autoimmune origin of IgG DNA abzymes and demonstrate the possibility to use them in clinical practice for monitoring to disease activity in SLE and RA.

  7. Clinical decision-making: physicians' preferences and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Martha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared decision-making has been advocated; however there are relatively few studies on physician preferences for, and experiences of, different styles of clinical decision-making as most research has focused on patient preferences and experiences. The objectives of this study were to determine 1 physician preferences for different styles of clinical decision-making; 2 styles of clinical decision-making physicians perceive themselves as practicing; and 3 the congruence between preferred and perceived style. In addition we sought to determine physician perceptions of the availability of time in visits, and their role in encouraging patients to look for health information. Methods Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. physicians. Results 1,050 (53% response rate physicians responded to the survey. Of these, 780 (75% preferred to share decision-making with their patients, 142 (14% preferred paternalism, and 118 (11% preferred consumerism. 87% of physicians perceived themselves as practicing their preferred style. Physicians who preferred their patients to play an active role in decision-making were more likely to report encouraging patients to look for information, and to report having enough time in visits. Conclusion Physicians tend to perceive themselves as practicing their preferred role in clinical decision-making. The direction of the association cannot be inferred from these data; however, we suggest that interventions aimed at promoting shared decision-making need to target physicians as well as patients.

  8. Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data.

  9. Clinical study of liver cancer (Hepatocellular carcinoma) by 166 Ho-CHICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. T.; Yoo, H. S.; Lee, J. D.; Lee, D. Y.; Kim, E. K.; Yoo, N. C.; Shin, S. J.; Han, K. H. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Park, K. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    As having used Ho-166 Chitosan complex, this study was designed for the development of new therapeutic agent in the treatment of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma). During the period of 3 years from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 2000, this project was successfully performed on the base of clinical experience with percutaneous Ho-166 CHICO injection in the treatment of liver cancer'. In order to evaluate the biodistribution and effect of Ho-166 CHICO was performed in 50 patients, who had the progressed liver cancer with range of 3-10cm in diameter. After the administration of the complex materials, we evaluated the therapeutic effect as well as complication by the follow-up study that included laboratory examination, radioactivity counting and various imaging modalities. 1) In animal experiment, radioactivity of target liver was ranged between 27-33% of total body one, urine excretion between 0.17-0.24 %. White blood cell and platelet counts start diminishing within 7 days and at maximum within 4 weeks after administration of complex materials. In tissue changes of target liver was revealed no significant change in the tumor dose of Ho-166, but periportal fibrosis and massive tissue necrosis in the high ones. 2) In clinical study, total necrosis of tumor is 66%, partial 10% and non-response 24% among 50 patients' liver cancer. The most important complication were leukopenia and thrombocytopenia (82%), the remained was abdominal pain(34%), skin reaction(12%), bile duct obstruction(10%), liver abscess(6%) etc. Conclusively intraarterial injection of Ho-166 CHICO was effective in the treatment of larger and progressed liver cancer. 19 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  10. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere.

  11. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. PMID:25922881

  12. Self evaluation of communication experiences after laryngeal cancer – A longitudinal questionnaire study in patients with laryngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finizia Caterina

    2008-03-01

    suitable instrument than the EORTC QLQ-C30 with QLQ-H&N35 when measuring communication experiences in patients with laryngeal cancer; it is more sensitive, shorter and can be used on an individual basis. As a routine screening instrument the S-SECEL could be a valuable tool for identifying patients at risk for psychosocial problems and to help plan rehabilitation. It is therefore recommended for clinical use in evaluation of communication dysfunction for all patients with laryngeal cancer irrespective of treatment.

  13. Clinical trials update of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Breast Cancer Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present clinical trial update consists of a review of two of eight current studies (the 10981-22023 AMAROS trial and the 10994 p53 trial) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Breast Cancer Group, as well as a preview of the MIND-ACT trial. The AMAROS trial is designed to prove equivalent local/regional control for patients with proven axillary lymph node metastasis by sentinel node biopsy if treated with axillary radiotherapy instead of axillary lymph node dissection, with reduced morbidity. The p53 trial started to assess the potential predictive value of p53 using a functional assay in yeast in patients with locally advanced/inflammatory or large operable breast cancer prospectively randomised to a taxane regimen versus a nontaxane regimen

  14. Clinical overview of metronomic chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzone, Elisabetta; Colleoni, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Over 15 years ago, low-dose metronomic chemotherapy was shown to induce disease control in patients with advanced-stage breast cancer with a lower incidence of adverse events compared with conventional maximum tolerated dose chemotherapy. Good response rates have been seen in heavily pre-treated patients for whom limited treatment options are available. Most patients prefer oral therapy and metronomic chemotherapy is a convenient alternative in patients with advanced-stage disease in which minimal toxicity and good tumour control are the overall aims of treatment. The addition of metronomic protocols to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens has produced promising pathological complete response rates. Ongoing trials including the SYSUCC-001 trial in patients with triple-negative breast cancer and the IBCSG 22-00 trial that is assessing a cyclophosphamide-methotrexate maintenance regimen after standard adjuvant therapy in hormone receptor-negative disease, will clarify the value of adding this approach to conventional therapies. The low cost associated with metronomic chemotherapy represents an opportunity for the utilization of this treatment option, especially in developing countries, and poses a challenge for the launch of large trials sponsored by industry. Using breast cancer as the principal example, we discuss the key clinical advances in this area, including new trial design, appropriate patient and end point selection, as well as the evolving rationale for metronomic chemotherapy combinations.

  15. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    to a standardized scheme. 2. The prognostic value of HIF-1α is investigated by SNP analysis and HIF-1α expression in tissue from 300 patients operated for colorectal cancer and the results is validated in a prospectively population of 200 patients. 3. The predictive value of HIF-1α will be investigated in patients......Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer   Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc. 1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... Hospital, Vejle, Denmark 4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Denmark Background Prognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor...

  16. Clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy" as a form of hormonal manipulation for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown in in-vitro experiments that "withdrawal" of tamoxifen inhibits growth of tumor cells. However, evidence is scarce when this is extrapolated into clinical context. We report our experience to verify the clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy". Methods Breast cancer patients since 1998 who fulfilled the following criteria were selected from the departmental database and the case-notes were retrospectively reviewed: (1 estrogen receptor positive, operable primary breast cancer in elderly (age > 70 years, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer; (2 disease deemed suitable for treatment by hormonal manipulation; (3 disease assessable by UICC criteria; (4 received "withdrawal" from a prior endocrine agent as a form of therapy; (5 on "withdrawal therapy" for ≥ 6 months unless they progressed prior. Results Seventeen patients with median age of 84.3 (53.7-92.5 had "withdrawal therapy" as second to tenth line of treatment following prior endocrine therapy using tamoxifen (n = 10, an aromatase inhibitor (n = 5, megestrol acetate (n = 1 or fulvestrant (n = 1. Ten patients (58.8% had clinical benefit (CB (complete response/partial response/stable disease ≥ 6 months with a median duration of Clinical Benefit (DoCB of 10+ (7-27 months. Two patients remain on "withdrawal therapy" at the time of analysis. Conclusion "Withdrawal therapy" appears to produce sustained CB in a significant proportion of patients. This applies not only to "withdrawal" from tamoxifen, but also from other categories of endocrine agents. "Withdrawal" from endocrine therapy is, therefore, a viable intercalating option between endocrine agents to minimise resistance and provide additional line of therapy. It should be considered as part of the sequencing of endocrine therapy.

  17. Translating colorectal cancer genetics into clinically useful biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley-Bunker, A; Walker, L C; Currie, M J; Pearson, J; Eglinton, T

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem worldwide accounting for over a million deaths annually. While many patients with Stage II and III CRC can be cured with combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this is morbid costly treatment and a significant proportion will suffer recurrence and eventually die of CRC. Increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC has the potential to identify high risk patients and target therapy more appropriately. Despite increased understanding of the molecular events underlying CRC development, established molecular techniques have only produced a limited number of biomarkers suitable for use in routine clinical practice to predict risk, prognosis and response to treatment. Recent rapid technological developments, however, have made genomic sequencing of CRC more economical and efficient, creating potential for the discovery of genetic biomarkers that have greater diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic capabilities for the management of CRC. This paper reviews the current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC, and summarizes molecular biomarkers that surgeons will encounter in current clinical use as well as those under development in clinical and preclinical trials. New molecular technologies are reviewed together with their potential impact on the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC and their potential clinical utility in classification, diagnosis, prognosis and targeting of therapy. PMID:26990814

  18. Clinical Significance of CK19 Negative Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisue, Mamiko, E-mail: nishimura.reiki@cityhosp-kumamoto.jp; Nishimura, Reiki; Okumura, Yasuhiro [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kumamoto City Hospital, 1-1-60 Kotoh, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 862-8505 (Japan); Tashima, Rumiko [Department of Surgery, Kumamoto City Hospital, 1-1-60 Kotoh, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 862-8505 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Osako, Tomofumi [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Kumamoto City Hospital, 1-1-60 Kotoh, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 862-8505 (Japan); Toyozumi, Yasuo; Arima, Nobuyuki [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto City Hospital, 1-1-60 Kotoh, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto 862-8505 (Japan)

    2012-12-21

    Analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is gaining widespread use as a quick and accurate method. This assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) which is present in some but not all breast tumors. In this study, the clinical significance of negative CK19 was investigated in 219 cases of primary breast cancer. In 179 patients with clinically negative nodes, OSNA and imprint smear cytology of SLN were performed simultaneously. The OSNA revealed a node-positive rate of 24.6%. Negative CK19 correlated significantly with negative ER/PgR and higher Ki-67 values, and marginally with higher nuclear grade and p53 overexpression. The triple negative subtype showed lower CK19 expression. OSNA revealed that one of the negative CK19 cases was actually a false negative but this was corrected with the use of the imprint smear cytology. In conclusion, CK19 negativity reflected the aggressiveness of primary breast cancer. OSNA assay used to analyze SLN was useful, but there is a possibility that it will mistakenly detect false negatives in CK19 negative tumors. Therefore, in tumors with negative CK19, the imprint smear cytology may be more useful in cases with macrometastasis.

  19. Clinical Significance of CK19 Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Arima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA is gaining widespread use as a quick and accurate method. This assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19 which is present in some but not all breast tumors. In this study, the clinical significance of negative CK19 was investigated in 219 cases of primary breast cancer. In 179 patients with clinically negative nodes, OSNA and imprint smear cytology of SLN were performed simultaneously. The OSNA revealed a node-positive rate of 24.6%. Negative CK19 correlated significantly with negative ER/PgR and higher Ki-67 values, and marginally with higher nuclear grade and p53 overexpression. The triple negative subtype showed lower CK19 expression. OSNA revealed that one of the negative CK19 cases was actually a false negative but this was corrected with the use of the imprint smear cytology. In conclusion, CK19 negativity reflected the aggressiveness of primary breast cancer. OSNA assay used to analyze SLN was useful, but there is a possibility that it will mistakenly detect false negatives in CK19 negative tumors. Therefore, in tumors with negative CK19, the imprint smear cytology may be more useful in cases with macrometastasis.

  20. Clinical and prognostic significance of plasma fibrinogen in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hyperfibrinogenemia is a common problem associated with various carcinomas. The recent studies have shown that high plasma fibrinogen concentration is associated with invasion, growth and metastases of cancer. Furthermore, the recent studies focus on the prognostic significance of fibrinogen in the patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IIIB -IV. However, the prognostic significance of the plasma fibrinogen levels in early stage NSCLC patients (stage I -IIIA still remains unclear. In addition, it remains unclear whether or not chemotherapy-induced changes in fibrinogen level relate to the prognosis. The aims of this study were to 1 further explore the relationship between the plasma fibrinogen concentration and the stage and metastases of lung cancer 2 evaluate the prognostic significance of the basal plasma fibrinogen level in patients with lung cancer 3 explore the prognostic value of the change in fibrinogen levels between pre and post-chemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, the data from 370 patients with lung cancer were enrolled into this study. The plasma fibrinogen levels were compared with the clinical and prognostic significance of lung cancer. The association between the plasma fibrinogen level and clinical-prognostic characteristics were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 software. Results: 1 The median pre-treatment plasma fibrinogen levels were 4.20g/L. Pre-treatment plasma fibrinogen levels correlated significantly with gender (p = 0.013. A higher plasma fibrinogen concentration was associated with squamous cell carcinoma versus adenocarcinoma (4.83±1.50 g/L versus 4.15±1.30 g/L; P<0.001, there was a significant association between plasma fibrinogen level and metastases of lung cancer, pointing a higher plasma fibrinogen level in lymph nodes or distant organ metastases (p < 0.001. 2 Patients with low plasma fibrinogen concentration demonstrates higher overall survival compared with those with high plasma fibrinogen

  1. Radical cystectomy for the treatment of T1 bladder cancer: the Canadian Bladder Cancer Network experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Venu; Kassouf, Wassim; Chin, Joseph L.; Fradet, Yves; Aprikian, Armen G.; Fairey, Adrian S.; Estey, Eric; Lacombe, Louis; Rendon, Ricardo; Bell, David; Cagiannos, Ilias; Drachenberg, Darrell; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Izawa, Jonathan I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Radical cystectomy may provide optimal survival outcomes in the management of clinical T1 bladder cancer. We present our data from a large, multi-institutional, contemporary Canadian series of patients who underwent radical cystectomy for clinical T1 bladder cancer in a single-payer health care system. Methods: We collected a pooled database of 2287 patients who underwent radical cystectomy between 1993 and 2008 in 8 different centres across Canada; 306 of these patients had clinical T1 bladder cancer. Survival data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis. Results: The median age of patients was 67 years with a mean follow-up time of 35 months. The 5-year overall, disease-specific and disease-free survival was 71%, 77% and 59%, respectively. The 10-year overall and disease-specific survival were 60% and 67%, respectively. Pathologic stage distribution was p0: 32 (11%), pT1: 78 (26%), pT2: 55 (19%), pT3: 60 (20%), pT4: 27 (9%), pTa: 16 (5%), pTis: 28 (10%), pN0: 215 (74%) and pN1-3: 78 (26%). Only 12% of patients were given adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, only margin status and pN stage were independently associated with overall, disease-specific and disease-free survival. Interpretation: These results indicate that clinical T1 bladder cancer may be significantly understaged. Identifying factors associated with understaged and/or disease destined to progress (despite any prior intravesical or repeat transurethral therapies prior to radical cystectomy) will be critical to improve survival outcomes without over-treating clinical T1 disease that can be successfully managed with bladder preservation strategies. PMID:21470529

  2. Prostate cancer risk and recurrence: the role of nutrition and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, D.E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in Western countries. Knowledge on prostate cancer aetiology is required for identification of high-risk groups, optimization of treatment strategies, and development of prevention programs. The aim of this thesis was toobtain insight into nutritional and clinical factors relevant to different stages of prostate cancer. Methods and results First, an inventory of potential risk factors for prostate cancer was made by asking 956 pat...

  3. Clinical pathological evaluation and risk factors of oral cancer cases of east coast of peninsular Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Farini, M. S.; Azlina, A; Rushdan, I.; Manoharan, M; Zain, R. B.; Samsudin, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Oral cancer is one of the common cancers m Malaysia. Tile population of east coast of Peninsular Malaysia has a different hfestyle and Malay is the predominant race. Oral cancer research in this area started since the Malaysian National Oral Cancer group was established. The am: of this study is to evaluate the clinical pathological findings and to investigate the role of tobacco smoking, alcohol consurnption and betel quid chewing as tile risk factors among oral cancer cases m ...

  4. Breast cancer stem cell markers – the rocky road to clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dontu, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Lately, understanding the role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation and progression became a major focus in stem cell biology and in cancer research. Considerable efforts, such as the recent studies by Honeth and colleagues, published in the June issue of Breast Cancer Research, are directed towards developing clinical applications of the cancer stem cell concepts. This work shows that the previously described CD44+CD24- stem cell phenotype is associated with basal-type breast cancers in ...

  5. Clinical value of cancer cells joint detection in peripheral blood plasma of thyroid cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqiong Ni; Qinjiang Liu ; Youxin Tian

    2014-01-01

    Objective:We aimed to detect cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and polymorphic epithelial mucin 1 (MUC1) expression in peripheral blood of thyroid cancer patients, and investigate the clinical value of it as a diagnostic marker for circulating blood micrometastases. Methods:The flow cytometry (FCM) was used to detect and analyze CK19 and MUC1-expressing cel s in peripheral blood of 491 thyroid cancer patients. Results:CK19 and MUC1 expression showed no statistical y significant dif-ference with gender and age in thyroid cancer patients (P>0.05), while had statistical y significant dif erence with tumor size, lymph node stage and distant metastasis (P<0.01). The expression of CK19 and MUC1 were positively correlated (r=0.628, P=0.00). Conclusion:CK19 is closely related to MUC1 expression, tumor size, extent of invasion and distant metastasis in peripheral blood of thyroid cancer patients. The circulating blood CK19 and MUC1 tests can help predict thyroid cancer micrometastases and prognosis.

  6. Imaging tissue hypoxia: clinical and pre-clinical experience with {sup 123}IAZA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L.I. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underline the selective binding of iodazomycin arabinoside, IAZA, and related nitromidazoles are reviewed as a basis for interpretation of preclinical and clinical data for hypoxic binding of radioiodinated IAZA. Clinical data are presented for {sup 123}IAZA uptake in a number of pathologies including metastatic tumours, peripheral vascular disease in diabetes, muscle stress and rheumatoid arthritis. The results of studies to determine the influence of tumour type on uptake of {sup 123} I-IAZA in patients with a variety of deep-seated solid tumours will be presented. Correlations of hypoxia-dependent binding with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO perfusion images will be reviewed and early correlations of uptake to treatment response in cancer will be presented. Unusual features of {sup 123}I-IAZA biodistribution will also be discussed together with detailed pharmacokinetic and radiation dosimetry data for `2{sup 123}I- IAZA in normal volunteers 27 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Imaging tissue hypoxia: clinical and pre-clinical experience with 123IAZA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular mechanisms that underline the selective binding of iodazomycin arabinoside, IAZA, and related nitromidazoles are reviewed as a basis for interpretation of preclinical and clinical data for hypoxic binding of radioiodinated IAZA. Clinical data are presented for 123IAZA uptake in a number of pathologies including metastatic tumours, peripheral vascular disease in diabetes, muscle stress and rheumatoid arthritis. The results of studies to determine the influence of tumour type on uptake of 123 I-IAZA in patients with a variety of deep-seated solid tumours will be presented. Correlations of hypoxia-dependent binding with 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion images will be reviewed and early correlations of uptake to treatment response in cancer will be presented. Unusual features of 123I-IAZA biodistribution will also be discussed together with detailed pharmacokinetic and radiation dosimetry data for '2123I- IAZA in normal volunteers

  8. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkatout I

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Alkatout,1 Melanie Schubert,1 Nele Garbrecht,2 Marion Tina Weigel,1 Walter Jonat,1 Christoph Mundhenke,1 Veronika Günther1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Institute for Pathology, University Hospitals Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany Epidemiology: Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Histology: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%. Clinical features: Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. Therapy: The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1. A sentinel lymph node (SLN biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. Prognosis: The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Keywords: vulvar cancer, HPV infection, radical vulvectomy, groin dissection, sentinel lymph node biopsy, overall survival

  9. Lobular breast cancer: Clinical, molecular and morphological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christgen, Matthias; Steinemann, Doris; Kühnle, Elna; Länger, Florian; Gluz, Oleg; Harbeck, Nadia; Kreipe, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Infiltrating lobular breast cancer (ILBC) is the most common special breast cancer subtype. This review provides a comprehensive description of ILBC characteristics, including epidemiology, clinical features, molecular genetics and histomorphology. Twenty detailed supplemental data tables guide through primary data of more than 200 original studies. Meta-analyses indicate that ILBC is at least twice as common in the Western world as it is in other geographic regions. ILBC is over-represented in so-called interval carcinomas and in primary metastatic breast cancer. ILBC is also associated higher age, higher pT stage and hormone receptor (ER/PR) positivity. Pathological complete response rates after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are low, ranging between 0% and 11%. Positive resection margins after breast-conserving surgery are comparatively frequent and 17% to 65% of patients undergo a second surgical intervention. Depending on the morphological stringency in the diagnosis of ILBC, lack of E-cadherin expression is observed in 55% to 100% of cases. CDH1/E-cadherin mutation detection rates vary between 12% and 83%. Various additional molecular factors, including PIK3CA, TP53, FOXA1, FGFR1, ZNF703 and BCAR4, have been implicated in ILBC or progression of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) to invasive cancer and are discussed in detail. Eight instructive figure plates recapitulate the histomorphology of ILBC and its variants. Furthermore, we draw attention to rarely addressed histological details, such as two-sided nuclear compression and fat-avoiding growth at the invasion front. Last but not least, we discuss future translational research directions and emphasize the concept of synthetic lethality, which promises new options for targeted ILBC therapy.

  10. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  11. Laparoscopy Versus Robotic Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Center Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Scheiterle, Maximilian; Di Mare, Giulio; Gnoni, Pasquale; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco

    2016-08-01

    Background Minimally invasive approach has gained interest in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences between laparoscopy and robotics for colorectal cancer in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes in an initial experience of a single center. Materials and Methods Clinico-pathological data of 100 patients surgically treated for colorectal cancer from March 2008 to April 2014 with laparoscopy and robotics were analyzed. The procedures were right colonic, left colonic, and rectal resections. A comparison between the laparoscopic and robotic resections was made and an analysis of the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups was performed. Results Forty-two patients underwent robotic resection and 58 underwent laparoscopic resection. The postoperative mortality was 1%. The number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in robotics. The conversion rate was 7.1% for robotics and 3.4% for laparoscopy. The operative time was lower in laparoscopy for all the procedures. No differences were found between the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups. Conclusions This initial experience has shown that robotic surgery for the treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma is a feasible and safe procedure in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes, although an appropriate learning curve is necessary. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate real advantages of robotics over laparoscopy. PMID:26721500

  12. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups. PMID:25904313

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer at Okayama University Hospital: A Review of 10 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Takao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer by our group at Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences began in June 2001, and in the present report, we review our 10-year experience with this treatment modality at Okayama University Hospital. The local efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer depends on tumor size and the type of electrode used, but not on tumor type. An important factor for the prevention of local failure may be the acquisition of an adequate ablative margin. The combination of embolization and radiation therapy enhances the local efficacy. Local failure may be salvaged by repeating the radiofrequency ablation, particularly in small tumors. Survival rates after radiofrequency ablation are quite promising for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastasis from colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. The complications caused by radiofrequency ablation can be treated conservatively in the majority of cases. However, attention should be paid to rare but serious complications. This review shows that radiofrequency ablation is a promising treatment for patients with lung cancer.

  14. Research methods to change clinical practice for patients with rare cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, Lucinda; Malottki, Kinga; Steven, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Rare cancers are a growing group as a result of reclassification of common cancers by molecular markers. There is therefore an increasing need to identify methods to assess interventions that are sufficiently robust to potentially affect clinical practice in this setting. Methods advocated for clinical trials in rare diseases are not necessarily applicable in rare cancers. This Series paper describes research methods that are relevant for rare cancers in relation to the range of incidence levels. Strategies that maximise recruitment, minimise sample size, or maximise the usefulness of the evidence could enable the application of conventional clinical trial design to rare cancer populations. Alternative designs that address specific challenges for rare cancers with the aim of potentially changing clinical practice include Bayesian designs, uncontrolled n-of-1 trials, and umbrella and basket trials. Pragmatic solutions must be sought to enable some level of evidence-based health care for patients with rare cancers.

  15. Teledermatology with an integrated nurse - Led clinic on the Faroe Islands - 7 years' experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryld, L.E.; Heidenheim, M.; Dam, T.N.;

    2011-01-01

    with photographs. Objectives To describe the patient population of the Faroe Islands dermatology clinic with respect to distribution of diagnoses, treatment, duration, response time and patient flow. Methods Case notes were drawn from all dermatology consultations managed during 2003-2009 through the national...... apart for an over-representation of the female gender in younger years. The disease spectrum is comparable with what has been reported in other outpatient clinics, except for the relative absence of skin cancer and pigmented lesions, for which regular outpatient consultation is reserved. Limitations...... The study is descriptive. Conclusions The experience derived suggests that teledermatology may serve as a near-adequate alternative to a regular private practice, if abstaining from treating minor common skin conditions and purely cosmetic conditions is acceptable. © 2010 The Authors....

  16. Developing a leadership pipeline: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Caryl A; Barss, Christina; Stoller, James K

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of health care requires excellent leadership to address the challenges of access, quality, and cost of care. Because competencies to lead differ from clinical or research skills, there is a compelling need to develop leaders and create a talent pipeline, perhaps especially in physician-led organizations like Cleveland Clinic. In this context, we previously reported on a cohort-based physician leadership development course called Leading in Health Care and, in the current report, detail an expanded health care leadership development programme called the Cleveland Clinic Academy (CCA). CCA consists of a broad suite of offerings, including cohort-based learning and 'a la carte' half- or full-day courses addressing specific competencies to manage and to lead. Academy attendance is optional and is available to all physicians, nurses, and administrators with the requisite experience. Course selection is guided by competency matrices which map leadership competencies to specific courses. As of December 2012, a total of 285 course sessions have been offered to 6,050 attendees with uniformly high ratings of course quality and impact. During the past 10 years, Cleveland Clinic's leadership and management curriculum has successfully created a pipeline of health care leaders to fill executive positions, search committees, board openings, and various other organizational leadership positions. Health care leadership can be taught and learned. PMID:25082312

  17. Belonging to a peer support group enhance the quality of life and adherence rate in patients affected by breast cancer: A non-randomized controlled clinical trialFNx01

    OpenAIRE

    Afsaneh Malekpour Tehrani; Ziba Farajzadegan; Fariborz Mokarian Rajabi; Ahmad Reza Zamani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It seems that breast cancer patients benefit from meeting someone who had a similar experience. This study evaluated the effect of two kinds of interventions (peer support and educational program) on quality of life in breast cancer patients. Methods: This study was a controlled clinical trial on women with non-metastatic breast cancer. The patients studied in two experimental and control groups. Experimental group took part i...

  18. Epidemiological and clinical profile of triple negative breast cancer at a cancer hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a recent concept and the burning topic of research today. Various studies have been reported in western literature on TNBCs or the similar group of basal like cancers, all highlighting the poor prognostic features of this molecular subtype in comparison to the other types of breast cancers. However extensive data from India is lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical profile of TNBcs at our institute. Materials and Methods: Data on 171 patients of TNBCs registered at this hospital between 2005 and 2008 and followed up until December 2010 was collected and reviewed for epidemiological and clinical features. Results: The median age at presentation was 49 years (22-75 years. Sixty eight patients (40% had lump in the breast of less than 1 month duration. Fourteen (8% were nulliparous and 10 (7% patients had crossed the age of 30 years at first full-term pregnancy, 89 (52% were pre or peri-menopausal at presentation. Only 8 (5% patients had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. One hundred and six (62% patients were stage II, 26 (15% stage III, 21 (12% stage I and 18 (10% stage IV at presentation. One hundred and twenty eight patients (75% had early breast cancer eligible for surgery at presentation, 25 (15% were locally advanced and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT and 18 (10% were found to be metastatic. Modified radical mastectomy was the preferred surgical option by most patients (76% who underwent upfront surgery in our study. The pathological overall response rates (complete and partial response after NACT was 75% with complete response rate of 25% and there were no relapses in the complete responders. The median follow-up was 30 months (9-70 months. One hundred and twenty two patients (71% were alive at last follow-up, 34 (22% had relapsed, 18 (11% had died due to progressive disease. Thirty one patients (18% were lost to follow-up. Most of

  19. Female Breast Cancer: Epidemiological And Clinical Study Of Some Risk Factors Among Egyptian Females- Multi Clinics Study

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. El-Moselhy; M. A. S. Ahmed*; A. M. Abdel-Fattah

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted on 390 female breast cancer patients and an equal number of females as controls. The patients were attending some University and Teaching Hospitals in Cairo and Assuit. Ninety of them were newly operated. A retrospective, case-control, clinic based study was chosen to carry out this research. The aim of the study was to describe the sociodemographic, characteristics and clinical features of female breast cancer and to determine its risk factors among Egyptian women. A...

  20. CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer: latest evidence and clinical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Anitha B; Pal, Sumanta K; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Since androgen signaling plays a pivotal role in the proliferation and metastasis of prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or castration therapy is considered the backbone of treatment for newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer. However, almost all men experience disease progression on ADT to a state known as metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), which continues to be driven by intratumoral androgen synthesis or androgen receptor signaling. Hence, the extragonadal ablation of androgen synthesis from pregnane precursors holds much promise. An inhibitor of cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (CYP17) enzymes, abiraterone acetate, has already been approved for men with mCRPC. Newer CYP17 inhibitors continue to be developed which are either more selective or have concomitant inhibitory actions on AR signaling. These include VT-464, orteronel, and galeterone. Herein, we focus on the molecular mechanism of action, efficacy, latest evidence, and clinical potential of CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer. PMID:27482286

  1. Radio-guided surgery in vulvar cancer - first experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    stage vulvar cancer with clinically uninvolved lymph nodes

  2. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Post-Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Colonoscopy provides incomplete protection from colorectal cancer (CRC), but determinants of post-colonoscopy CRC are not well understood. We compared clinical features and molecular characteristics of CRCs diagnosed at different time intervals after a previous colonoscopy....... METHODS: We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study of incident CRC cases in Denmark (2007-2011), categorized as post-colonoscopy or detected during diagnostic colonoscopy (in patients with no prior colonoscopy). We compared prevalence of proximal location and DNA mismatch repair deficiency (d......MMR) in CRC tumors, relative to time since previous colonoscopy, using logistic regression and cubic splines to assess temporal variation. RESULTS: Of 10,365 incident CRCs, 725 occurred after colonoscopy examinations (7.0%). These were more often located in the proximal colon (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; 95% CI, 1...

  3. Clinical, mammographic, and pathologic concordance in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An observational descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 100 patients with breast cancer, who attended the Breast Care Department at 'Conrado Benitez' Teaching Oncology Hospital in Santiago de Cuba from August 2009 to July 2010, to characterize them according to imaging, pathological, clinical, and general variables. Percentage as summary measure to statically validate the results and Kappa index to determine diagnostic concordance were used. Women between 40-49 years with history of fibrocystic breast disease and palpable lesions, as well as lump in the right breast, upper outer quadrant and periphery of the breast, tumor greater than one centimeter in diameter and infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the stages III-b and IV prevailed in the case material.(author)

  4. Breast cancer patients' narratives about positive and negative communication experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Dorthe K; Pedersen, Anette F; Johansen, Mikael B;

    2007-01-01

    Health staff-patient communication is increasingly considered an important issue in cancer research. However, questionnaires addressing satisfaction with communication limit the issues patients can raise, do not address the context of communication and often show a strong positive skew in responses...... research while at the same time being sensitive to new elaborations and categories. The participants reported both positive and negative communication-related experiences from a wide range of treatment situations. Two major themes emerged: Information giving as professional care-giving and meeting...

  5. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  6. Running a postmortem service - a business case and clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. (orig.)

  7. Running a postmortem service - a business case and clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Marta C.; Whitby, Elspeth; Fink, Michelle A.; Collett, Jacquelene M.; Offiah, Amaka C. [Western Bank, Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. (orig.)

  8. Clinical outcomes of chemoradiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jae Hwan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the clinical outcome of chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC and to find useful and significant prognostic factors for a clinical situation. Methods Between January 2001 and February 2009, 67 LRRC patients, who entered into concurrent chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery, were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 67 patients, 45 were treated with chemoradiotherapy plus surgery, and the remaining 22 were treated with chemoradiotherapy alone. The mean radiation doses (biologically equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions were 54.6 Gy and 66.5 Gy for the chemoradiotherapy with and without surgery groups, respectively. Results The median survival duration of all patients was 59 months. Five-year overall (OS, relapse-free (RFS, locoregional relapse-free (LRFS, and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS were 48.9%, 31.6%, 66.4%, and 40.6%, respectively. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of symptoms was an independent prognostic factor influencing OS, RFS, LRFS, and DMFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS (p = 0.181, RFS (p = 0.113, LRFS (p = 0.379, or DMFS (p = 0.335 when comparing clinical outcomes between the chemoradiotherapy with and without surgery groups. Conclusions Chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery could be a potential option for an LRRC cure, and the symptoms related to LRRC were a significant prognostic factor predicting poor clinical outcome. The chemoradiotherapy scheme for LRRC patients should be adjusted to the possibility of resectability and risk of local failure to focus on local control.

  9. Genomic Testing and Therapies for Breast Cancer in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jennifer S.; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Liang, Su-Ying; Hassett, Michael J.; Keohane, Carol; Elkin, Elena B.; Armstrong, Joanne; Toscano, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Given the likely proliferation of targeted testing and treatment strategies for cancer, a better understanding of the utilization patterns of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing and trastuzumab and newer gene expression profiling (GEP) for risk stratification and chemotherapy decision making are important. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: We performed a medical record review of women age 35 to 65 years diagnosed between 2006 and 2007 with invasive localized breast cancer, identified using claims from a large national health plan (N = 775). Results: Almost all women received HER2 testing (96.9%), and 24.9% of women with an accepted indication received GEP. Unexplained socioeconomic differences in GEP use were apparent after adjusting for age and clinical characteristics; specifically, GEP use increased with income. For example, those in the lowest income category (< $40,000) were less likely than those with an income of $125,000 or more to receive GEP (odds ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.73). A majority of women (57.7%) with HER2-positive disease received trastuzumab; among these women, differences in age and clinical characteristics were not apparent, although surprisingly, those in the lowest income category were more likely than those in the high-income category to receive trastuzumab (P = .02). Among women who did not have a positive HER2 test, 3.9% still received trastuzumab. Receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy increased as GEP score indicated greater risk of recurrence. Conclusion: Identifying and eliminating unnecessary variation in the use of these expensive tests and treatments should be part of quality improvement and efficiency programs. PMID:21886507

  10. CLINICAL, NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES OF CANCER PATIENTS WITH LESIONS OF THE PERIPHERAL NERVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Korolyova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical electrophysiological and immunological studies of 88 cancer patients showed that in breast cancer and small lung cancer takes place symmetric, distal, sensory-motor, axonal-demyelinating polyneuropathy. Autoimmune nature of the disease confirmed onconeural antigens detected in the serum of more than half of the study participants. 

  11. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  12. The need for hospital care of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by noncurative intent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Friis, S; Juel, K;

    2000-01-01

    We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy.......We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy....

  13. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spehar Ivan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers

  14. A systems approach to clinical oncology: Focus on breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyland-Jones Brian

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past decade, genomic microarrays have been applied with some success to the molecular profiling of breast tumours, which has resulted in a much more detailed classification scheme as well as in the identification of potential gene signature sets. These gene sets have been applied to both the prognosis and prediction of outcome to treatment and have performed better than the current clinical criteria. One of the main limitations of microarray analysis, however, is that frozen tumour samples are required for the assay. This imposes severe limitations on access to samples and precludes large scale validation studies from being conducted. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, on the other hand, can be used with degraded RNAs derived from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumour samples, the most important and abundant source of clinical material available. More recently, the novel DASL (cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation assay has been developed as a high throughput gene expression profiling system specifically designed for use with FFPE tumour tissue samples. However, we do not believe that genomics is adequate as a sole prognostic and predictive platform in breast cancer. The key proteins driving oncogenesis, for example, can undergo post-translational modifications; moreover, if we are ever to move individualization of therapy into the practical world of blood-based assays, serum proteomics becomes critical. Proteomic platforms, including tissue micro-arrays (TMA and protein chip arrays, in conjunction with surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS, have been the technologies most widely applied to the characterization of tumours and serum from breast cancer patients, with still limited but encouraging results. This review will focus on these genomic and proteomic platforms, with an emphasis placed on the utilization

  15. Results from phase III clinical trials with radachlorine for photodynamic therapy of pre-cancer and early cancer of cervix

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Filonenko; L. G. Serova; V. I. Ivanova-Radkevich

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical study for efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with radachlorine in patients with pre-cancer and cancer of cervix are represented. The study enrolled 30 patients including 4 patients with cervical erosion, 5 patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia II, 13 patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III, 4 patients with carcinoma in situ and 4 patients with cervical cancer stage Ia. Radachlorine was administrated as single 30 minute intravenous injection ...

  16. The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN: Increasing access to cancer clinical trials in low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita eSuneja

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN, a subsidiary of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG, is a multi-national, multi-institutional consortium of physicians and scientists focused on improving cervical cancer outcomes worldwide by making cancer clinical trials available in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Standard operating procedures for participation in CCRN include a pre-qualifying questionnaire to evaluate clinical activities and research infrastructure, followed by a site visit. Once a site is approved, they may choose to participate in one of four currently accruing clinical trials.Results: To date, 13 different CCRN site visits have been performed. Of these 13 sites visited, 10 have been approved as CCRN sites including Tata Memorial Hospital, India; Bangalore, India; Trivandrum, India; Ramathibodi, Thailand; Siriaj, Thailand; Pramongkutklao, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center; the Hertzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute; and the Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenoradiology. The four currently accruing clinical trials are TACO, OUTBACK, INTERLACE, and SHAPE.Discussion: The CCRN has successfully enrolled 10 sites in developing countries to participate in four randomized clinical trials. The primary objectives are to provide novel therapeutics to regions with the greatest need and to improve the validity and generalizability of clinical trial results by enrolling a diverse sample of patients.

  17. [How Can We Cuddle Up to Dying Patients? Attempts of Cancer Philosophy Clinic and Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    What is needed to treat problems about how can we cuddle up to dying patients is not scientific thinking but philosophical thinking. Cancer philosophy clinic is a place where both patients and medical staffs think about death and how to live until death. The author tries to manage cancer philosophy clinic with the idea of logotherapy and terminal art. The author also tries to educate medical students and other medical staffs in cancer philosophy.

  18. [How Can We Cuddle Up to Dying Patients? Attempts of Cancer Philosophy Clinic and Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    What is needed to treat problems about how can we cuddle up to dying patients is not scientific thinking but philosophical thinking. Cancer philosophy clinic is a place where both patients and medical staffs think about death and how to live until death. The author tries to manage cancer philosophy clinic with the idea of logotherapy and terminal art. The author also tries to educate medical students and other medical staffs in cancer philosophy. PMID:27097505

  19. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    OpenAIRE

    Noriyuki Horiguchi; Tomomitsu Tahara; Tomohiko Kawamura; Masaaki Okubo; Takamitsu Ishizuka; Yoshihito Nakagawa; Mitsuo Nagasaka; Tomoyuki Shibata; Naoki Ohmiya

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. C...

  20. General Practitioners’ responses to global climate change - lessons from clinical experience and the clinical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blashki Grant

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climate change is a global public health problem that will require complex thinking if meaningful and effective solutions are to be achieved. In this conceptual paper we argue that GPs have much to bring to the issue of climate change from their wide-ranging clinical experience and from the principles underpinning their clinical methods. This experience and thinking calls forth particular contributions GPs can and should make to debate and action. Discussion We contend that the privileged experience and GP way of thinking can make valuable contributions when applied to climate change solutions. These include a lifetime of experience, reflection and epistemological application to first doing no harm, managing uncertainty, the ability to make necessary decisions while possessing incomplete information, an appreciation of complex adaptive systems, maintenance of homeostasis, vigilance for unintended consequences, and an appreciation of the importance of transdisciplinarity and interprofessionalism. Summary General practitioners have a long history of public health advocacy and in the case of climate change may bring a way of approaching complex human problems that could be applied to the dilemmas of climate change.

  1. Considerations for Implementation of Cancer Molecular Diagnostics Into Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Physicians have provided personalized care with as much precision as possible for several centuries. However, increasingly sophisticated understanding of the human genome and of cancer biology has permitted identification of genetic and phenotypic distinctions that might permit development of new tumor biomarker tests for risk categorization, screening, differential diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and monitoring. Both commercial and academic laboratories are offering tests for single analytes, panels of tests of single analytes, multiparameter assays coalesced into a signature, and total genomic, transcriptomic, or proteomic analyses. However, the absence of a consistent regulatory environment has led to marketing of assays without proven analytic validity or clinical utility. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval or clearance does not necessarily imply that use of the test will improve patient outcomes, and FDA discretion to permit laboratory-developed tests results in unknown benefit, or harm, of others. In this regard, a "bad tumor marker is as bad as a bad drug." Caveat emptor is not a satisfactory approach to delivering high-quality care. Rather, adoption of tumor biomarker tests should be based on high levels of evidence generated in scientifically rigorous studies that demonstrate both analytical validity and clinical utility. Doing so will ensure that clinicians and patients are confident that a tumor biomarker test is likely to improve their outcomes. PMID:27249708

  2. Clinical significance of Phosphatidyl Inositol Synthase overexpression in oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported increased levels of Phosphatidyl Inositol synthase (PI synthase), (enzyme that catalyses phosphatidyl inositol (PI) synthesis-implicated in intracellular signaling and regulation of cell growth) in smokeless tobacco (ST) exposed oral cell cultures by differential display. This study determined the clinical significance of PI synthase overexpression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and premalignant lesions (leukoplakia), and identified the downstream signaling proteins in PI synthase pathway that are perturbed by smokeless tobacco (ST) exposure. Tissue microarray (TMA) Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, Confocal laser scan microscopy, RT-PCR were performed to define the expression of PI synthase in clinical samples and in oral cell culture systems. Significant increase in PI synthase immunoreactivity was observed in premalignant lesions and OSCCs as compared to oral normal tissues (p = 0.000). Further, PI synthase expression was significantly associated with de-differentiation of OSCCs, (p = 0.005) and tobacco consumption (p = 0.03, OR = 9.0). Exposure of oral cell systems to smokeless tobacco (ST) in vitro confirmed increase in PI synthase, Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and cyclin D1 levels. Collectively, increased PI synthase expression was found to be an early event in oral cancer and a target for smokeless tobacco

  3. Clinical application of FDG-PET for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography using 18F-FDG is accepted in clinical medicine as an imaging tool for the diagnosis and assessment of a large variety of cancers. Medicare reimbursement for these studies has been accepted in Japan since 2002. The number of requests for FDG-PET examinations has been increasing in institutions where a PET device is installed. PET is considered to be especially effective in re-staging and detecting recurrence of disease. In order to evaluate PET images properly, it is important to be familiar with the various physiological uptake patterns of FDG, and also to be alert to the possibility of false-positive and false-negative findings. Quantitative values obtained in PET images are widely used for the differentiation of benign and malignant tumors and for monitoring treatment; however, it should be kept in mind that these values may be influenced by many factors. To complement the poorer spatial resolution of PET, a combined PET/CT scanner has been created and its clinical application has begun. It is expected that this imaging tool will be useful and have a great effect on patient management. (author)

  4. Improving the clinical impact of biomaterials in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Joshua M; Dold, Neil M; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-29

    Immunotherapies for cancer have progressed enormously over the past few decades, and hold great promise for the future. The successes of these therapies, with some patients showing durable and complete remission, demonstrate the power of harnessing the immune system to eradicate tumors. However, the effectiveness of current immunotherapies is limited by hurdles ranging from immunosuppressive strategies employed by tumors, to inadequate specificity of existing therapies, to heterogeneity of disease. Further, the vast majority of approved immunotherapies employ systemic delivery of immunomodulators or cells that make addressing some of these challenges more difficult. Natural and synthetic biomaterials - such as biocompatible polymers, self-assembled lipid particles, and implantable biodegradable devices - offer unique potential to address these hurdles by harnessing the benefits of therapeutic targeting, tissue engineering, co-delivery, controlled release, and sensing. However, despite the enormous investment in new materials and nanotechnology, translation of these ideas to the clinic is still an uncommon outcome. Here we review the major challenges facing immunotherapies and discuss how the newest biomaterials and nanotechnologies could help overcome these challenges to create new clinical options for patients.

  5. Targeting bone metastases in prostate cancer: improving clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body, Jean-Jacques; Casimiro, Sandra; Costa, Luís

    2015-06-01

    Bone metastases develop in most patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). They affect the structural integrity of bone, manifesting as pain and skeletal-related events (SREs), and are the primary cause of patient disability, reduced quality of life (QOL) and death. Understanding the pathophysiology of bone metastases resulted in the development of agents that improve clinical outcome, suggesting that managing both the systemic disease and associated bone events is important. Historically, the treatment of CRPC bone metastases with early radiopharmaceuticals and external beam radiation therapy was largely supportive; however, now, zoledronic acid and denosumab are integral to the therapeutic strategy for mCRPC. These agents substantially reduce skeletal morbidity and improve patient QOL. Radium-223 dichloride is the first bone-targeting agent to show improved survival and reduced pain and symptomatic skeletal events in patients with mCRPC without visceral disease. Five other systemic agents are currently approved for use in mCRPC based on their ability to improve survival. These include the cytotoxic drugs docetaxel and cabazitaxel, the hormone-based therapies, abiraterone and enzalutamide, and the immunotherapeutic vaccine sipuleucel-T. Abiraterone and enzalutamide are able to reduce SREs and improve survival in this setting. Novel agents targeting tumour and bone cells are under clinical development. PMID:26119830

  6. Psychometric validation of satisfaction with simulated clinical learning experience evaluation – corrections (SSCLEE-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiree A. Díaz

    2016-03-01

    Originality/value: The Satisfaction with Simulated Clinical Learning Experience Evaluation – Corrections (SSCLEE-C is the only instrument available for ongoing assessment of correctional nurse satisfaction with simulated clinical learning experiences.

  7. Nutritional Science Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Clinical PET-MR Imaging in Breast Cancer and Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Samuel L; Friedman, Kent P

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid imaging systems have dramatically improved thoracic oncology patient care over the past 2 decades. PET-MR imaging systems have the potential to further improve imaging of thoracic neoplasms, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic advantages compared with current MR imaging and PET-computed tomography systems. Increasing soft tissue contrast and lesion sensitivity, improved image registration, reduced radiation exposure, and improved patient convenience are immediate clinical advantages. Multiparametric quantitative imaging capabilities of PET-MR imaging have the potential to improve understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer and treatment effects, potentially guiding improvements in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27593245

  9. Surviving breast cancer: women's experiences with their changed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M; Burke, Shaunna

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we explored women's experiences with their bodies following treatment for breast cancer. Eleven women who had been treated for the disease (M(time since treatment)=4.45 years) were interviewed. Data were collected and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith et al., 2009). Four main themes emerged from the data: changing visibly and invisibly; experiencing intense thoughts and emotions; meaning of the body: a vehicle of health, well-being, and social expression; and managing and dealing with physical changes. Overall, the women experienced various physical changes that shaped, mostly in a negative way, their perceptions, thoughts, attitudes, feelings, and beliefs about their bodies. The women described attempts to make positive lifestyle behavior choices (e.g., diet, participate in physical activity), and used other strategies (e.g., wigs, make-up, clothes) to manage their appearances and restore positive body-related experiences. Based on these findings, it is important to be cognizant of women's body image concerns following breast cancer given the poignant and lasting effects they can have on their psychosocial and emotional well-being.

  10. Biological and clinical significance of epigenetic silencing of MARVELD1 gene in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Shi; Shan Wang; Yuanfei Yao; Yiqun Li; Hao Zhang; Fang Han; Huan Nie; Jie Su; Zeyu Wang; Lei Yue; Jingyan Cao; Yu Li

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic silence in cancer frequently altered signal-transduction pathways during the early stages of tumor development. Recent progress in the field of cancer epigenetics has led to new opportunities for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. We previously demonstrated that novel identified nuclear factor MARVELD1 was widely expressed in human tissues, but down-regulated by promoter methylation in multiple cancers. This study was carried out to determine the biological and clinical significanc...

  11. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of compl...

  12. Genetic testing for young-onset colorectal cancer: case report and evidence-based clinical guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yaolin; Boardman, Lisa A; Miller, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Young-onset colorectal cancer is clinicopathologically different from older-onset colorectal cancer and tends to occur in patients with hereditary germline conditions such as Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis. Case report. We describe the case of a 44-year-old man with a paternal history of colon polyps, a personal 2-year history of hematochezia, and a diagnosis of rectal cancer. Further clinical evaluation of the patient at our institution determined the cancer to ...

  13. Sociodemographic Characteristics, Distance to the Clinic, and Breast Cancer Screening Results

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seijeoung; Chukwudozie, Beverly; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Timely detection and follow-up of abnormal cellular changes can aid in early diagnosis of breast cancer, thus leading to better treatment outcomes. However, despite substantial breast cancer screening initiatives, the proportion of female breast cancer cases diagnosed at late stages remains high. Distance to screening clinics may affect access to care, particularly for women living in impoverished areas with limited means of reliable transportation. Utilizing breast cancer screening data coll...

  14. Prevention of Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Clinical Trials and Future Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Ian; Kristal, Alan; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is an excellent target for prevention, to reduce both mortality and the burden of overdetection of potential inconsequential disease whose diagnosis increases cost, morbidity, and anxiety. The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial has demonstrated that finasteride significantly reduces the risk of prostate cancer but only low-grade disease; overall survival is unaffected. In the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) clinical trial, selenium had no effect on prosta...

  15. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    OpenAIRE

    Yap Timothy A; Swanton Charles; de Bono Johann S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vacc...

  16. The evolving role of oestrogen receptor beta in clinical breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Speirs, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the potential clinical importance of oestrogen receptor (ER)β in breast cancer, and three recent papers have sought to resolve this. In the present issue of Breast Cancer Research Novelli and colleagues explored the significance of ERβ1 expression in 936 breast cancer patients, and they showed diverse relationships according to lymph node status. A second paper examined 442 breast cancers in which ERβ1 was an independent predictor of recurrence, disease-free survival and...

  17. Clinical trial designs for rare diseases: studies developed and discussed by the International Rare Cancers Initiative.

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaerts, Jan; Sydes, Matthew R; Keat, Nicola; McConnell, Andrea; Benson, Al; Ho, Alan; Roth, Arnaud; Fortpied, Catherine; Eng, Cathy; Peckitt, Clare; Coens, Corneel; Pettaway, Curtis; Arnold, Dirk; Hall, Emma; Marshall, Ernie

    2015-01-01

    Background The past three decades have seen rapid improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of most cancers and the most important contributor has been research. Progress in rare cancers has been slower, not least because of the challenges of undertaking research. Settings The International Rare Cancers Initiative (IRCI) is a partnership which aims to stimulate and facilitate the development of international clinical trials for patients with rare cancers. It is focused on interven...

  18. Nutrition and cancer: Review of epidemiological studies and clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Demosthenes Panagiotakos; Georgia Georgiou; Niki Kontou

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors of cancer include unhealthy dietary habits, physical inactivity, smoking, various genetic and environmental factors. Cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases with increased incidence; moreover, 80% of gastrointestinal, breast and prostate cancers are attributed to unhealthy eating habits. Many surveys have investigated the role of diet in cancer prevention. Here we summarized current knowledge about dietary factors associated with cancer incidence. There ...

  19. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  20. Clinical experience of medical students at university sains malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, B S; Malik, A S; Simpson, H

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteritis, coma, and snake bite. Less than 33% had witnessed acute psychosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, acute hepatic failure, status epilepticus, near drowning, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute haemolysis or child abuse.Acute surgical/obstetrics cases, seen by >90% students, included fracture of long bones, head injury, acute abdominal pain, malpresentation and foetal distress. Less than 33% had observed epistaxis, sudden loss of vision, peritonitis or burns. Among operations only herniorrhaphy, Caesarian section, internal fixation of fracture and cataract extraction were seen by >80% students. The main deficits in clinical procedures are in rectal and vaginal examinations, urine collection and microscopic examinations. The performance of individual students, assessed by a scoring system, showed 15 students had unacceptably low scores (181.4/230, 70%) and 5 had superior scores (197.6/230, 80%). PMID:22844212

  1. Dabigatran in Secondary Stroke Prevention: Clinical Experience with 106 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia DeFelipe-Mimbrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Our aim was to analyze our clinical experience with dabigatran etexilate in secondary stroke prevention. Methods. We retrospectively included patients starting dabigatran etexilate for secondary stroke prevention from March 2010 to December 2012. Efficacy and safety variables were registered. Results. 106 patients were included, median follow-up of 12 months (range 1–31. Fifty-six females (52.8%, mean age 76.4 (range 50–95, SD 9.8, median CHADS2 4 (range 2–6, CHA2DS2-VASc 5 (range 2–9, and HAS-BLED 2 (range 1–5. Indication for dabigatran etexilate was ischemic stroke in 101 patients and acute cerebral hemorrhage (CH due to warfarin in 5 (4.7%. Dabigatran etexilate 110 mg bid was prescribed in 71 cases (67% and 150 mg bid was prescribed in the remaining. Seventeen patients (16% suffered 20 complications during follow-up. Ischemic complications (10 were 6 transient ischemic attacks (TIA, 3 ischemic strokes, and 1 acute coronary syndrome. Hemorrhagic complications (10 were CH (1, gastrointestinal bleeding (6, mild hematuria (2, and mild metrorrhagia (1, leading to dabigatran etexilate discontinuation in 3 patients. Patients with previous CH remained uneventful. Three patients died (pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and acute cholecystitis and 9 were lost during follow-up. Conclusions. Dabigatran etexilate was safe and effective in secondary stroke prevention in clinical practice, including a small number of patients with previous history of CH.

  2. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  3. New concepts and challenges in the clinical translation of cancer preventive therapies: the role of pharmacodynamic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen; Rufini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of therapeutic cancer prevention strategies has enormous potential for reducing cancer incidence and related mortality. Trials of drugs including tamoxifen and aspirin have led the way in demonstrating proof-of-principle that prevention of breast and colorectal cancer is feasible. Many other compounds ranging from drugs in widespread use for various indications, including metformin, bisphosphonates, and vitamin D, to dietary agents such as the phytochemicals resveratrol and curcumin, show preventive activity against several cancers in preclinical models. Notwithstanding the wealth of opportunities, major challenges have hindered the development process and only a handful of therapies are currently approved for cancer risk reduction. One of the major obstacles to successful clinical translation of promising preventive agents is a lack of pharmacodynamic biomarkers to provide an early read out of biological activity in humans and for optimising doses to take into large scale randomised clinical trials. A further confounding factor is a lack of consideration of clinical pharmacokinetics in the design of preclinical experiments, meaning results are frequently reported from studies that use irrelevant or unachievable concentrations. This article focuses on recent findings from investigations with dietary-derived agents to illustrate how a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of action, using models that mimic the clinical scenario, together with the development of compound-specific accompanying pharmacodynamic biomarkers could accelerate the developmental pipeline for preventive agents and maximise the chances of success in future clinical trials. Moreover, the concept of a bell-shaped dose-response curve for therapeutic cancer prevention is discussed, along with the need to rethink the traditional 'more is better' approach for dose selection. PMID:26635905

  4. An Experience with Managing Cancer Patients Reportedly Previously Informed of the Absence of Additional Available Antineoplastic Therapeutic Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George River

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 5 years, a small group of cancer patients who stated their physicians had determined there were no additional available antineoplastic therapeutic options (including potential investigational strategies were seen for a ‘second opinion' in a cancer hospital-based oncology program and subsequently experienced what can reasonably be characterized as having achieved meaningful ‘clinical benefit' (functioning at a fairly high level for a minimum 1 year in the work, home, and/or family environments following the further delivery of a variety of treatment approaches. While recognized to be limited (or even simply ‘anecdotal', this experience emphasizes several clinically relevant conclusions, including the overall utility of a ‘second-opinion' strategy and the potential that the reported statement of an individual practitioner or cancer program that all rational options have been attempted may be inaccurate.

  5. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Usefulness and limitations in clinical reality''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review will provide an overview of the literature concerning the FDG PET diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and a summary from our experience of 231 cases of pancreatic lesions. FDG PET can effectively differentiate pancreatic cancer from benign lesion with high accuracy. Newly-developed PET scanners can detect small pancreatic cancers, up to 7 mm in diameter, by their high resolution, which could make a great contribution to the early detection of resectable and potentially curable pancreatic cancers. FDG PET is useful and cost-beneficial in the pre-operative staging of pancreatic cancer because an unexpected distant metastasis can be detected by whole-body PET in about 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. However, there are some drawbacks in PET diagnosis. A relatively wide overlap has been reported between semiquantitative uptake values obtained in cancers and those in inflammatory lesions. As for false-positive cases, active and chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes show high FDG accumulation and mimic pancreatic cancer with a shape of focal uptake. There were 8 false negative cases in the detection of pancreatic cancer by FDG PET, up to 33 mm in diameter, mainly because of their poor cellularity in cancer tissues. In addition, there are 19% of cancer cases with a decline in FDG uptake from 1 hr to 2 hr scan. FDG PET was recently applied to and was shown to be feasible in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions, such as intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Further investigations are required to clarify the clinical value of FDG PET in predicting prognosis of the pancreatic patients. (author) 124 refs

  6. The Genomic Landscape and Clinical Relevance of A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, but its genomic landscape and clinical relevance in cancer have not been investigated systematically. We characterized the global A-to-I RNA editing profiles of 6,236 patient samples of 17 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and revealed a striking diversity of altered RNA-editing patterns in tumors relative to normal tissues. We identified an appreciable number of clinically relevant editing events, many of which are in noncoding regions.

  7. Nutrition and cancer: Review of epidemiological studies and clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demosthenes Panagiotakos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors of cancer include unhealthy dietary habits, physical inactivity, smoking, various genetic and environmental factors. Cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases with increased incidence; moreover, 80% of gastrointestinal, breast and prostate cancers are attributed to unhealthy eating habits. Many surveys have investigated the role of diet in cancer prevention. Here we summarized current knowledge about dietary factors associated with cancer incidence. There is a strong correlation of the protective effect of fruits and vegetables with colon cancer and the negative effect of red meat and the protective effect of milk on colorectal cancer. High alcohol consumption is related to higher incidence of mouth and esophageal cancers, with hot drinks playing a role in mouth or even gastrointestinal cancers. High fat consumption seems to play a negative role in colorectal cancer, where sugar and salt might be negatively related to stomach cancer. Beyond nutrition, physical inactivity and body fat seems to play an important role in cancer, where there are strong evidence that the first protects against colorectal cancer and the second increases the incidence of breast cancer after menopause. Data for the role of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals lead to the suggestion that dietary supplements should be avoided and all nutritional needs should be covered through a well balanced diet.

  8. Clinical profile of gastric cancer in Khuzestan, southwest of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajiani Eskandar; Sarmast Shoshtari Mohammad Hossein; Masjedizadeh Rahim; Hashemi Jalal; Azmi Mehrdad; Tahereh Rajabi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the characteristics of epidemiological, clinical and survival patterns among patients with carcinoma of the stomach. METHODS: We retrospectively studied the characteristics of 186 gastric adenocarcinoma patients at Ahwaz Jundishapur University Hospitals (AJSUH) from September 1, 1996 to September 1, 2002. All the patients had histopathologicallyconfirmed malignancy. Demographic variables, family history of gastric cancer (GC), clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment-related variables were analyzed. Univariate analysis was performed with the log-rank test and multivariate analysis with Cox regression. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Male to female ratio was 2.6:1. The meanage was 60.6 years and 14% of the patients were younger than 40 years. Adenocarcinoma, gastric lymphoma, and gastric metastasis were found in 94.5%,2.3%, and 3% patients, respectively. There was an average of 6-mo delay between the initial symptoms and the diagnosis. Among adenocarcinoma groups, intestinal type was the commonest (55.9%) and the distal third was the most common localization (88.4%). One hundred and thirty-four patients (72.1%) were males. Thirty-one patients (17%) had a family history of GC. Surgery was performed in 90% of patients (non-curative).CONCLUSION: The epidemiological features of GC in south Iran mimic those in high-risk areas. There is a higher frequency of GC in young patients at our institution. Patients are detected and treated after a relatively long delay. Most patients present in advanced stages, which favors a poor overall survival. Family history of GC has a significant problem in our area. Studying the etiology of this cancer in south Iran and earlier diagnosis and subsequent better cares are recommended.

  9. Clinic-Genomic Association Mining for Colorectal Cancer Using Publicly Available Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Liu; Yaning Feng; Zhenye Li; Chao Pan; Yuncong Su; Rui Yang; Liying Song; Huilong Duan; Ning Deng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a growing number of researchers began to focus on how to establish associations between clinical and genomic data. However, up to now, there is lack of research mining clinic-genomic associations by comprehensively analysing available gene expression data for a single disease. Colorectal cancer is one of the malignant tumours. A number of genetic syndromes have been proven to be associated with colorectal cancer. This paper presents our research on mining clinic-genomic assoc...

  10. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Sakorafas, George H; Vasileios Smyrniotis

    2012-01-01

    Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular bio...

  11. Prostate Cancer: Prognostic factors, markers of outcome and design of clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Collette, Lau

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPhase III clinical trials to assess the clinical benefit of new treatment options often require large patient numbers and long follow-up, in particular in diseases with a long natural history, such as prostate cancer. In this thesis, we argue that in order to improve the efficiency of phase III prostate cancer clinical trials, a thorough understanding of prognostic factors of outcome is needed, as well as an exploration of potential predictive factors that might affect treatment b...

  12. PSA testing without clinical indication for prostate cancer in relation to socio-demographic and clinical characteristics in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Randi V; Larsen, Signe B; Christensen, Jane;

    2013-01-01

    associations between socio-demographic or clinical characteristics and PSA testing without clinical indication. Material and methods. In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Cohort, we identified 1051 men with PC diagnosed in 1993-2008. Diagnostic and clinical characteristics were obtained from medical records......, and socio-demographic information was retrieved from administrative registers. We used general logistic regression analysis to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between socio-demographic or clinical characteristics and PSA testing without clinical indication. Cox......Background. Social differences in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality might be related to testing for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Although routine PSA screening is not recommended in Denmark, testing without clinical indication increased during the past decade. We evaluated...

  13. Traumatic effects of political repression in Chile: a clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordal, Margarita Díaz

    2005-10-01

    The author examines psychic trauma resulting from human rights violations in Chile. Starting from trauma theories developed by authors such as Ferenczi, Winnicott and Stolorow, she posits the relevance of the subject's emotionally significant environment in the production of the traumatic experience. She describes the characteristics of the therapeutic process on the basis of a clinical case. She emphasizes the need to recognize the damage that may be produced within the reliable link between patient and analyst, pointing out the risk of retraumatization if analysts distance themselves and apply 'technique' rigorously, leaving out their own subjective assessments. Therapists must maintain their focus on the conjunction of the patient's intersubjective context and inner psychic world both when exploring the origin of the trauma and when insight is produced. The author posits repetition in the transference as an attempt at reparation, at finding the expected response from the analyst that will help patients assemble the fragments of their history and achieve, as Winnicott would put it, a feeling of continuity in the experience of being.

  14. EPID based in vivo dosimetry system: clinical experience and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Sofia; Costa, Emilie; Wessels, Claas; Mazal, Alejandro; Fourquet, Alain; Francois, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mandatory in several countries, in vivo dosimetry has been recognized as one of the next milestones in radiation oncology. Our department has implemented clinically an EPID based in vivo dosimetry system, EPIgray, by DOSISOFT S.A., since 2006. An analysis of the measurements per linac and energy over a two-year period was performed, which included a more detailed examination per technique and treat-ment site over a six-month period. A comparison of the treatment planning system doses and the doses estimated by EPIgray shows a mean of the differences of 1.9% (± 5.2%) for the two-year period. The 3D conformal treatment plans had a mean dose difference of 2.0% (± 4.9%), while for intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy treatments the mean dose difference was -3.0 (± 5.3%) and -2.5 (± 5.2%), respectively. In addition, root cause analyses were conducted on the in vivo dosimetry measurements of two breast cancer treatment techniques, as well as prostate treatments with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. During the breast study, the dose differences of breast treatments in supine position were correlated to patient setup and EPID positioning errors. Based on these observations, an automatic image shift correc-tion algorithm is developed by DOSIsoft S.A. The prostate study revealed that beams and arcs with out-of-tolerance in vivo dosimetry results tend to have more complex modulation and a lower exposure of the points of interest. The statistical studies indicate that in vivo dosimetry with EPIgray has been successfully imple-mented for classical and complex techniques in clinical routine at our institution. The additional breast and prostate studies exhibit the prospects of EPIgray as an easy supplementary quality assurance tool. The validation, the automatization, and the reduction of false-positive results represent an important step toward adaptive radiotherapy with EPIgray. PMID:27167283

  15. Clinical spectrum and outcome of pulmonary nocardiosis: 5-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akashdeep; Chhina, Deepinder; Soni, RK; Kakkar, Chandan; Sidhu, US

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary nocardiosis is a rare but a life-threatening infection caused by Nocardia spp. The diagnosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus higher mortality. Aim: In this study, we aim to evaluate the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis. Methods: A retrospective, 5-year (2009–2014) review of demographic profile, risk factors, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Results: The median age of the study subjects was 54 years (range, 16–76) and majority of them (75%) were males. The risk factors for pulmonary nocardiosis identified in our study were long-term steroid use (55.6%), chronic lung disease (52.8%), diabetes (27.8%), and solid-organ transplantation (22.2%). All the patients were symptomatic, and the most common symptoms were cough (91.7%), fever (78%), and expectoration (72%). Almost two-third of the patients were initially misdiagnosed and the alternative diagnosis included pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 7), community-acquired pneumonia (n = 5), lung abscess (n = 4), invasive fungal infection (n = 3), lung cancer (n = 2), and Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 2). The most common radiographic features were consolidation (77.8%) and nodules (56%). The mortality rate for indoor patients was 33% despite treatment. Higher mortality rate was observed among those who had brain abscess (100.0%), HIV positivity (100%), need for mechanical ventilation (87.5%), solid-organ transplantation (50%), and elderly (age > 60 years) patients (43%). Conclusion: The diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus high mortality. A lower threshold for diagnosing pulmonary nocardiosis needs to be exercised, in chest symptomatic patients with underlying chronic lung diseases or systemic immunosuppression, for the early diagnosis

  16. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low (<3 mm Hg) range. Hemoglobin level is a strong independent prognostic factor for tumor control by radiation therapy. The hemoglobin level at the end of radiation therapy is a stronger prognostic factor than is the hemoglobin level at the start of therapy. Numerous clinical trials have utilized rHuEPO during radiation with or without concurrent chemotherapy. All 4 trials which enrolled patients with low hemoglobin levels (<12 to 13.5 g/dl) found that rHuEPO significantly increased hemoglobin within 2 weeks and that hemoglobin levels continued to rise until the end of rHuEPO treatment. rHuEPO was efficacious in limiting the decrease in hemoglobin and use of packed red blood cell transfusion in the one reported trial in which it was used in patients with initially normal hemoglobin levels during intensive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. One trial found a statistically significant improvement in complete pathologic response rate after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with the use of rHuEPO. rHuEPO has a potentially large role to play in the care of the cancer patient. (orig.)

  17. Cancer-related fatigue. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    These guidelines propose a treatment algorithm in which patients are evaluated regularly for fatigue using a brief screening instrument, and are treated as indicated by their fatigue level. The algorithm's goal is to identify and treat all patients with fatigue that causes distress or interferes with their daily activities or functioning. Management of fatigue begins with primary oncology team members who perform the initial screening and either provide basic education and counseling or expand the initial screening to a more focused evaluation for moderate or higher levels of fatigue. At this point the patient is assessed for current disease and treatment status, a review of body systems, and an in-depth fatigue evaluation. In addition, the patient is assessed for the presence of seven treatable factors known to contribute to fatigue: pain, emotional distress, sleep disturbance, anemia, alterations in nutrition, deconditioning, and comorbidities. If any of these conditions are present, they should be treated according to practice guidelines, with referral to other care professionals as appropriate, and the patient's fatigue should be reevaluated regularly. If none of the seven factors are present or the fatigue is unresolved, selection of appropriate fatigue management and treatment strategies is considered within the context of the patient's clinical status: receiving active cancer treatment, receiving disease-free long-term follow-up, or receiving care at the end of life. Management of fatigue is cause-specific when conditions known to cause fatigue can be identified and treated. When specific causes, such as infection, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, or cardiac dysfunction, cannot be identified and corrected, nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment of the fatigue should be considered. Nonpharmacologic interventions may include a moderate exercise program to improve functional capacity and activity tolerance, psychosocial programs to manage stress and

  18. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 2 - prostate and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  19. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  20. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3–88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4–6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  1. Smoking Behaviors Among Cancer Survivors: An Observational Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Lola; Miller, Lesley-Ann; Saad, Ayman; Abraham, Jame

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown that smoking can adversely affect the outcomes of different modalities of cancer treatment. This study looks at smoking behaviors among cancer survivors to collect necessary information to create successful smoking cessation interventions.

  2. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. ...

  3. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. Main outcome measure...

  4. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were…

  5. Clinical outcomes after sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically node-negative breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hee Ji; Keun Ki Chang; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Yong Bae [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ju Ree [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Hee Rim [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate non-sentinel lymph node (LN) status after sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) in patients with breast cancer and to identify the predictive factors for disease failure. From January 2006 to December 2007, axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection after SNB was performed for patients with primary invasive breast cancer who had no clinical evidence of LN metastasis. A total of 320 patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. The median age of patients was 48 years, and the median follow-up time was 72.8 months. Close resection margin (RM) was observed in 13 patients. The median number of dissected SNB was two, and that of total retrieved ALNs was 11. Sentinel node accuracy was 94.7%, and the overall false negative rate (FNR) was 5.3%. Eleven patients experienced treatment failure. Local recurrence, regional LN recurrence, and distant metastasis were identified in 0.9%, 1.9%, and 2.8% of these patients, respectively. Sentinel LN status were not associated with locoregional recurrence (p > 0.05). Close RM was the only significant factor for disease-free survival (DFS) in univariate and multivariate analysis. The 5-year overall survival, DFS, and locoregional DFS were 100%, 96.8%, and 98.1%, respectively. In this study, SNB was performed with high accuracy and low FNR and high locoregional control was achieved.

  6. Patient-Derived Prostate Cancer: from Basic Science to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbridger, Gail P; Taylor, Renea A

    2016-08-01

    Systems that model cancer form the backbone of research discovery, and their accuracy and validity are a key determinant to ensure successful translation. In many tumour types, patient-derived specimens are an important model of choice for pre-clinical drug development. In this review, we consider why this has been such a challenge for prostate cancer, resulting in relatively few patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of prostatic tumours compared to breast cancers, for example. Nevertheless, with only a few patient specimens and PDXs, we exemplify in three vignettes how important new clinical insights were obtained resulting in benefit for future men with prostate cancer. PMID:27177552

  7. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  8. A Short Version of the Revised ‘Experience of Close Relationships Questionnaire’: Investigating Non-Clinical and Clinical Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Wongpakaran, Nahathai

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study seeks to investigate the psychometric properties of the short version of the revised ‘Experience of Close Relationships’ questionnaire, comparing non-clinical and clinical samples. Methods: In total 702 subjects participated in this study, of whom 531 were non-clinical participants and 171 were psychiatric patients. They completed the short version of the revised ‘Experience of Close Relationships’ questionnaire (ECR-R-18), the Perceived Stress Scale-10(PSS-10), the Rosenberg ...

  9. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C; German, Massiell L; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Bruggers, Carol S

    2015-10-01

    Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a "fighting spirit" in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases. PMID:26287927

  10. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C.; German, Massiell L.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a “fighting spirit” in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases. PMID:26287927

  11. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C; German, Massiell L; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Bruggers, Carol S

    2015-10-01

    Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a "fighting spirit" in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases.

  12. Non-invasive prenatal chromosomal aneuploidy testing--clinical experience: 100,000 clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron M McCullough

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: As the first laboratory to offer massively parallel sequencing-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT for fetal aneuploidies, Sequenom Laboratories has been able to collect the largest clinical population experience data to date, including >100,000 clinical samples from all 50 U.S. states and 13 other countries. The objective of this study is to give a robust clinical picture of the current laboratory performance of the MaterniT21 PLUS LDT. STUDY DESIGN: The study includes plasma samples collected from patients with high-risk pregnancies in our CLIA-licensed, CAP-accredited laboratory between August 2012 to June 2013. Samples were assessed for trisomies 13, 18, 21 and for the presence of chromosome Y-specific DNA. Sample data and ad hoc outcome information provided by the clinician was compiled and reviewed to determine the characteristics of this patient population, as well as estimate the assay performance in a clinical setting. RESULTS: NIPT patients most commonly undergo testing at an average of 15 weeks, 3 days gestation; and average 35.1 years of age. The average turnaround time is 4.54 business days and an overall 1.3% not reportable rate. The positivity rate for Trisomy 21 was 1.51%, followed by 0.45% and 0.21% rate for Trisomies 18 and 13, respectively. NIPT positivity rates are similar to previous large clinical studies of aneuploidy in women of maternal age ≥ 35 undergoing amniocentesis. In this population 3519 patients had multifetal gestations (3.5% with 2.61% yielding a positive NIPT result. CONCLUSION: NIPT has been commercially offered for just over 2 years and the clinical use by patients and clinicians has increased significantly. The risks associated with invasive testing have been substantially reduced by providing another assessment of aneuploidy status in high-risk patients. The accuracy and NIPT assay positivity rate are as predicted by clinical validations and the test demonstrates improvement in the

  13. Centralization of a Regional Clinical Microbiology Service: The Calgary Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre L Church

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL. Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service.

  14. Non-immune hydrops fetalis: Clinical experience in newborn infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Non-immune hydrops fetalis is a condition of excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid without identifiable circulating antibody to erythrocytes membrane antigens. In newborn infants it is characterized by skin oedema and pleural, pericardial or peritoneal effusion. In the era of routine Rh immunization for the prevention of foetal erythroblastosis, non-immune pathophysiologic mechanisms are presented in 76-87% of all hydropic newborns. Non-immune hydrops fetalis can be associated with numerous and various disorders. The mortality rate may exceed 50%. This study was aimed at presenting our clinical experience in treating newborn infants with non-immune hydrops fetalis. Material and methods. A retrospective-prospective study included newborn infants with non-immune hydrops fetalis, who were treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mother and Child Health Institute of Serbia between January 1, 2001 and October 31, 2010. All valid data about aetiology, diagnosis, clinical course and outcome were recorded. Results. The diagnosis of non-immune hydrops fetalis was made in 11 newborns. The etiologic diagnosis was established in 8 patients: anaemia due to fetomaternal transfusion in 4 patients and conatal cytomegalovirus infection, intracranial haemorrhage, isolated pulmonary lymphangiectasia and diffuse skin and mediastinal lymphangiomatosis in the remaining 4 patients. Conclusion. Non-immune hydrops of newborn infant is associated with a high mortality rate and requires complex diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. An optimal management of neonates with non-immune hydrops fetalis demands a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  15. Choosing relevant endpoints for older breast cancer patients in clinical trials: an overview of all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glas, N A; Hamaker, M E; Kiderlen, M; de Craen, A J M; Mooijaart, S P; van de Velde, C J H; van Munster, B C; Portielje, J E A; Liefers, G J; Bastiaannet, E

    2014-08-01

    With the ongoing ageing of western societies, the proportion of older breast cancer patients will increase. For several years, clinicians and researchers in geriatric oncology have urged for new clinical trials that address patient-related endpoints such as functional decline after treatment of older patients. The aim of this study was to present an overview of trial characteristics and endpoints of all currently running clinical trials in breast cancer, particularly in older patients. The clinical trial register of the United States National Institutes of Health Differences was searched for all current clinical trials on breast cancer treatment. Trial characteristics and endpoints were retrieved from the register and differences in characteristics between studies in older patients specifically (defined as a lower age-limit of 60 years or older) and trials in all patients were assessed using χ(2) tests. We included 463 clinical trials. Nine trials (2 %) specifically investigated breast cancer treatment in older patients. Ninety-one breast cancer trials included any patient-related endpoint (20 %), while five trials specifically addressing older patients included any patient-related endpoint (56 %, P = 0.02). Five of the trials in older patients incorporated a geriatric assessment (56 %). Clinical trials still rarely incorporate patient-related endpoints, even in trials that specifically address older patients. Trials that are specifically designed for older patients do not often incorporate a geriatric assessment in their design. This implicates that current clinical studies are not expected to fill the gap in knowledge concerning treatment of older breast cancer patients in the next decade.

  16. Exploring masculinity and marginalization of male undergraduate nursing students' experience of belonging during clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Monique G; Kellett, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive recruitment strategies used in Canadian undergraduate nursing programs have enjoyed only moderate success, given that male students represent a small percentage of the student population. To determine whether there were gender differences in their sense of belonging, undergraduate nursing students (n = 462) in southern Alberta were surveyed using the Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience questionnaire. No significant gender differences were found on two of the subscales. However, male students demonstrated significantly lower scores on the efficacy subscale (p = 0.02). This finding suggests that some men experience feelings of marginalization and discrimination. Nurse educators and students are encouraged to explore their worldviews related to gendered performances and teaching practices that create bias. Practice environments are encouraged to deinstitutionalize policies and procedures that accentuate femininities of care. Finally, men entering into the nursing profession are encouraged to reflect on how their gender performance may facilitate or detract from their feelings of belonging.

  17. Fostering Growth in the Survivorship Experience: Investigating Breast Cancer Survivors' Lived Experiences Scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a Posttraumatic Growth Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Shaunna M.; Sabiston, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use an ethnographic case study approach to explore breast cancer survivors' experiences scaling Mt. Kilimanjaro from a posttraumatic growth perspective. Three breast cancer survivors who participated in interviews and observations during a nine-day climb on the mountain were included in this study. Findings are…

  18. Survival after radical prostatectomy for clinically localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe survival and cause of death in a nationwide cohort of Danish patients with prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). To describe risk factors associated with prostate cancer mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Observational study of 6489 men with localised prostate...... cancer treated with RP at six different hospitals in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. Survival was described using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Causes of death were obtained from the national registry and cross-checked with patient files. Cumulative incidence of death, any cause and prostate cancer...... cancer and 219 (66.8%) from other causes. Six patients (0.09%) died ≤30 days of RP. In multivariate analysis, cT-category was a predictor of prostate cancer death (P prostate cancer...

  19. Differences between men with screening-detected versus clinically diagnosed prostate cancers in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone S Noell

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of prostate specific antigen (PSA testing in the United States of America (USA has led to a dramatic increase in the incidence of prostate cancer in the United States as well as the number of men undergoing aggressive treatment with radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy. We compared patient characteristics and treatment selection between American men with screening-detected versus clinically diagnosed prostate cancers. Methods We evaluated 3,173 men with prostate cancer in the USA. Surveys and medical records provided information on demographics, socioeconomic status, comorbidities, symptoms, tumor characteristics, and treatment. We classified men presenting with symptoms of advanced cancer – bone pain, weight loss, or hematuria – as "clinically diagnosed"; asymptomatic men and those with only lower urinary tract symptoms were considered "screening-detected." We used multivariate analyses to determine whether screening predicted receiving aggressive treatment for a clinically localized cancer. Results We classified 11% of cancers as being clinically diagnosed. Men with screening-detected cancers were more often non-Hispanic white (77% vs. 65%, P Conclusion Most cancers were detected by screening in this American cohort. Appropriately, younger, healthier men were more likely to be diagnosed by screening. Minority status and lower socio-economic status appeared to be screening barriers. Screening detected earlier-stage cancers and was associated with receiving aggressive treatment.

  20. Radiochemotherapy of malignant glioma in adults. Clinical experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, R.D.; Jeremic, B.; Plasswilm, L.; Bamberg, M. [Dept. for Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Weller, M. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Background: Standard treatment in patients with malignant glioma consists of surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. A high early recurrence rate, particularly in glioblastoma, has led to the investigation of additional chemotherapy. Material and Methods: Recent results of radiochemotherapy published in the literature were reviewed with respect to outcome in phase II and III trials. Based on these experiences, aspects of future strategies were discussed. Results: 3 decades of intensive research had, unfortunately, little impact on the overall results. While early prospective studies established adjuvant nitrosoureas, particularly BCNU, as suitable adjuvant to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, further studies largely concentrated on combined chemotherapeutic protocols, mostly procarbazine, CCNU and vincristine (PCV), which was shown to prolong survival in anaplastic astrocytoma. The recent MRC study, however, showed no effect for adjuvant PCV in grade III and IV malignant glioma. Only in high-grade glioma with an oligodendroglial component, additional chemotherapy may be of a decisive benefit. The introduction of newer drugs such as paclitaxel, temozolomide, or gemcitabine demonstrated no decisive advantage. Different modes of application and sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are presently actively investigated, but failed to substantially improve outcome. Conclusions: Therefore, search for newer and more effective drugs continues, as well as for ''optimal'' administration and sequencing, especially from the standpoint of accompanying acute and late toxicity. Finally, recent endeavors focused on basic research such as angiogenesis, migration and invasion, or induction of cell differentiation, but these strategies are still away from broader clinical investigation. (orig.)

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography: A clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has evolved from an experimental technique used only in academic settings to a routine clinical examination performed in many community hospitals. Responding to reports of increased diagnostic efficacy, many nuclear medicine physicians have chosen to make SPECT imaging a routine technique for bone, liver, spleen, heart, and brain imaging. However, the enthusiasm for SPECT is not universal. Most nuclear medicine physicians continue to rely primarily on planar imaging, with little or no routine use of SPECT. This milieu has left many physicians asking themselves the following practical questions: Can SPECT be done easily in my hospital? Will not doing SPECT reduce the competitiveness of my nuclear medicine laboratory? The authors' experience at an institution heavily committed to SPECT for over 5 years may be helpful in answering these types of questions. The first rotating gamma camera at the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center was installed in late 1981. At present the authors have eight gamma cameras, of which four routinely perform SPECT examinations. Between 1981 and 1986, over 4,000 SPECT examinations have been performed

  2. Normothermic donor heart perfusion: current clinical experience and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Simon; Ardehali, Abbas; Tsui, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Following the first successful heart transplant in 1967, more than 100,000 heart transplants have been carried out worldwide. These procedures have mostly relied on cold ischaemic preservation of the donor heart because this simple technique is inexpensive and relatively reliable. However, the well-known limitations of cold ischaemic preservation imposes significant logistical challenges to heart transplantation which put a ceiling on the immediate success on this life-saving therapy, and limits the number of donor hearts that can be safely transplanted annually. Although the theoretical advantages of normothermic donor heart perfusion have been recognised for over a century, the technology to transport donor hearts in this state has only been developed within the last decade. The Organ Care System (OCS) which is designed and manufactured by TransMedics Inc. is currently the only commercially available device with this capability. This article reviews the history of normothermic heart perfusion and the clinical experience with the TransMedics OCS to date. We have also attempted to speculate on the future possibilities of this innovative and exciting technology. PMID:24853906

  3. New Memorandum of Understanding in Clinical Proteogenomics Between the United States and Australia - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The White House Office of the Vice President has announced the signing of three Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) that will make available an unprecedented international dataset to advance cancer research and care. An MOU between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States, and Macquarie University (MU), Children's Medical Research Institute (CMRI), Garvan Institute of Medical Research (GIMR), and Bioplatforms Australia Limited (BPA) in Australia will facilitate scientific collaborations in the field of clinical proteogenomic studies and their translation to cancer care.

  4. Molecular profiling of patients with colorectal cancer and matched targeted therapy in phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Serpico, Danila; Rodon, Jordi; Saura, Cristina; Macarulla, Teresa; Elez, Elena; Alsina, Maria; Capdevila, Jaume; Perez-Garcia, Jose; Sánchez-Ollé, Gessamí; Aura, Claudia; Prudkin, Ludmila; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Vivancos, Ana; Tabernero, Josep

    2012-09-01

    Clinical experience increasingly suggests that molecular prescreening and biomarker enrichment strategies in phase I trials with targeted therapies will improve the outcomes of patients with cancer. In keeping with the exigencies of a personalized oncology program, tumors from patients with advanced chemorefractory colorectal cancer were analyzed for specific aberrations (KRAS/BRAF/PIK3CA mutations, PTEN and pMET expression). Patients were subsequently offered phase I trials with matched targeted agents (MTA) directed at the identified anomalies. During 2010 and 2011, tumor molecular analysis was conducted in 254 patients: KRAS mutations (80 of 254, 31.5%), BRAF mutations (24 of 196, 12.2%), PIK3CA mutations (15 of 114, 13.2%), KRAS and PIK3CA mutations (9 of 114, 7.9%), low PTEN expression (97 of 183, 53.0%), and high pMET expression (38 of 64, 59.4%). In total, 68 patients received 82 different MTAs: phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway inhibitor (if PIK3CA mutation, n = 10; or low PTEN, n = 32), PI3K pathway inhibitor plus MEK inhibitor (if KRAS mutation, n = 10; or BRAF mutation, n = 1), second-generation anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibodies (if wild-type KRAS, n = 11), anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal antibody (if high pMET, n = 10), mTOR inhibitor plus anti-insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor monoclonal antibody (if low PTEN, n = 5), and BRAF inhibitor (if BRAF mutation, n = 3). Median time-to-treatment failure on MTA was 7.9 versus 16.3 weeks for their prior systemic antitumor therapy (P 16 weeks in 10 cases (12.2%). These results suggest that matching chemorefractory patients with colorectal cancer with targeted agents in phase I trials based on the current molecular profile does not confer a significant clinical benefit.

  5. PD-L1 expression in human cancers and its association with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Teng, Feifei; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    PD-L1 is an immunoinhibitory molecule that suppresses the activation of T cells, leading to the progression of tumors. Overexpression of PD-L1 in cancers such as gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and bladder cancer is associated with poor clinical outcomes. In contrast, PD-L1 expression correlates with better clinical outcomes in breast cancer and merkel cell carcinoma. The prognostic value of PD-L1 expression in lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and melanoma is controversial. Blocking antibodies that target PD-1 and PD-L1 have achieved remarkable response rates in cancer patients who have PD-L1-overexpressing tumors. However, using PD-L1 as an exclusive predictive biomarker for cancer immunotherapy is questionable due to the low accuracy of PD-L1 immunohistochemistry staining. Factors that affect the accuracy of PD-L1 immunohistochemistry staining are as follows. First, antibodies used in different studies have different sensitivity. Second, in different studies, the cut-off value of PD-L1 staining positivity is different. Third, PD-L1 expression in tumors is not uniform, and sampling time and location may affect the results of PD-L1 staining. Therefore, better understanding of tumor microenvironment and use of other biomarkers such as gene marker and combined index are necessary to better identify patients who will benefit from PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27574444

  6. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yap Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vaccine sipuleucel-T, the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone, the novel androgen receptor antagonist MDV-3100 and the radionuclide alpharadin. The management and therapeutic landscape of prostate cancer has now been transformed with this growing armamentarium of effective antitumor agents. This review discusses strategies for the prevention and personalization of prostate cancer therapy, with a focus on the development of predictive and intermediate endpoint biomarkers, as well as novel clinical trial designs that will be crucial for the optimal development of such anticancer therapeutics.

  7. Clinical experience with the first combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W F Eddie; Binns, David S; Ware, Robert E; Ramdave, Shakher; Cachin, Florent; Pitman, Alexander G; Hicks, Rodney J

    2005-02-21

    Metabolic imaging with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is increasing rapidly worldwide because of superior accuracy compared with conventional non-invasive techniques used for evaluating cancer. Limited anatomical information from FDG-PET images alone dictates that complementary use with structural imaging is required to optimise benefit. Recently, combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners have overtaken standalone PET scanners as the most commonly purchased PET devices. We describe our experience of over 5500 scans performed since the first PET/CT scanner in Australia was commissioned at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC), Melbourne, in January 2002. Clinical indications for PET/CT scans performed at PMCC largely reflect current Medicare reimbursement policy. Advantages of PET/CT include greater patient comfort and higher throughput, greater diagnostic certainty and accuracy, improved biopsy methods, and better treatment planning. We believe PET/CT will underpin more effective and efficient imaging paradigms for many common tumours, and lead to a decrease in imaging costs. PMID:15720173

  8. Cultural awareness: Enhancing clinical experiences in rural Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Chaundel

    2013-01-01

    Students often work with clients from a cultural group different than their own. This is especially true for students completing clinical practica in Appalachia, where there is a culture unique to that geographic area. To prepare for this unique setting, common cultural scenarios experienced in the clinical setting must be addressed to help provide culturally appropriate patient care while developing required clinical competencies. Although applicable to most nursing students, the author discusses culturally specific approaches to clinical care of clients from Appalachia, specifically applied to nurse practitioner students, preceptors, and clinical faculty.

  9. Proposal for a Group Counseling Experience for Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linda S.

    A model for using group counseling with cancer patients is proposed in this document. The literature on the psychological effects of cancer and the effects of social support are summarized. It is concluded that the literature shows cancer patients are subjected to intense psychological distress and that at the same time their social supports may…

  10. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  11. CPTAC Contributes to Healthdata.gov - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, proteomic data generated by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) funded by National Cancer Institute (NCI) was highlighted to the wider research community at Healthdata.gov. Healthdata.gov aims to make health data more acces

  12. Computational Omics Pre-Awardees - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce the pre-awardees of the Computational Omics solicitation. Working with NVIDIA Foundation's Compute the Cure initiative and Leidos Biomedical...

  13. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Beckers, M.; Baglin, C.; Bauersachs, R. M.; Brenner, B.; Brilhante, D.; Falanga, A.; Gerotzafias, G. T.; Haim, N.; Kakkar, A. K.; Khorana, A. A.; Lecumberri, R.; Mandala, M.; Marty, M.; Monreal, M.; Mousa, S. A.; Noble, S.; Pabinger, I.; Prandoni, P.; Prins, M. H.; Qari, M. H.; Streiff, M. B.; Syrigos, K.; Bounameaux, H.; Buller, H. R.

    2013-01-01

    . Background: Guidelines addressing the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients are heterogeneous and their implementation has been suboptimal worldwide. Objectives: To establish a common international consensus addressing practical, clinically relevant questions in this settin

  14. [Evidence and recommendations for oncologic clinical exercise - a personalized treatment concept for cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Freerk Theeagnus; Hallek, Michael; Meyer, Janika; Galvão, Daniel Abido; Bloch, Wilhelm; Elter, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Oncological treatments can lead to acute and chronic cancer related toxicities. In recent years, a large number of clinical studies have reported positive effects of exercise to the bio-psycho-social regeneration of cancer patients. However, very few evidence-based programs have been implemented into practice with little opportunity for cancer patients to engage in such programs. Reviews and RCT studies on exercise and cancer are showing that specific exercise programs have a positive impact on fatigue syndrome, urinary incontinence, lymphedema, polyneuropathy, arthralgia, and androgen deprivation related toxicities. With the increasing evidence for exercise oncology interventions, recommendations arising from clinical trials should be translated into clinical practice and this should be viewed as an important next step in this fast moving field of exercise oncology. For that the personalized treatment concept "Oncologic clinical exercise" (OTT) was developed. PMID:26402184

  15. Clinical Evaluation and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Serum Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Wang; Guoqing Wang; Nan Zhang; Xue Li; Yunde Liu

    2013-01-01

    The detection of serum tumor markers is valuable for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers are frequently used for the management of cancer patients. However, single markers are less efficient but marker combinations increase the cost, which is troublesome for clinics. To find an optimal serum marker combination panel that benefits the patients and the medical management system as well, four routine lung cancer serum markers (SCCA, NSE, CEA, and CYFRA21-1) were evaluated individua...

  16. A nomogram to predict Gleason sum upgrading of clinically diagnosed localized prostate cancer among Chinese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-You Wang; Yao Zhu; Chao-Fu Wang; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Ding-Wei Ye

    2014-01-01

    Although several models have been developed to predict the probability of Gleason sum upgrading between biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens, most of these models are restricted to prostate-specific antigen screening-detected prostate cancer. This study aimed to build a nomogram for the prediction of Gleason sum upgrading in clinically diagnosed prostate cancer. The study cohort comprised 269 Chinese prostate cancer patients who underwent prostate biopsy with a minimum of 10 cores and w...

  17. Barrett’s Esophagus and Cancer Risk: How Research Advances Can Impact Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    di Pietro, Massimiliano; Alzoubaidi, Durayd; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), whose incidence has increased sharply in the last 4 decades. The annual conversion rate of BE to cancer is significant, but small. The identification of patients at a higher risk of cancer therefore poses a clinical conundrum. Currently, endoscopic surveillance is recommended in BE patients, with the aim of diagnosing either dysplasia or cancer at early stages, both of which are curable with minimally inv...

  18. Recommendations for Collection and Handling of Specimens From Group Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Leyland-Jones, Brian R.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bartlett, John; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Enos, Rebecca A.; Raji, Adekunle; Pins, Michael R.; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Forbes, John F.; Abramovitz, Mark; Braga, Sofia; Cardoso, Fatima; Harbeck, Nadia; Denkert, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Recommendations for specimen collection and handling have been developed for adoption across breast cancer clinical trials conducted by the Breast International Group (BIG)-sponsored Groups and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored North American Cooperative Groups. These recommendations are meant to promote identifiable standards for specimen collection and handling within and across breast cancer trials, such that the variability in collection/handling practices that currently exist...

  19. Barriers to Recruitment of Rural Patients in Cancer Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Virani, Shamsuddin; Burke, Lola; Remick, Scot C.; Abraham, Jame

    2011-01-01

    Rates of clinical trial participation are lower among patients in rural areas. Oncologists should be trained to address patient concerns regarding clinical trial availability, utility, and accessibility.

  20. Ovarian Cancer: A Clinical Challenge That Needs Some Basic Answers

    OpenAIRE

    CRIJNS, ANNE P.G.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Steven de Jong; Frans Gerbens; Gert Jan Meersma; Klip, Harry G.; Harry Hollema; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G.E.; Ate G J van der Zee

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Ovarian cancer kills more than 100,000 women every year and is one of the most frequent causes of cancer death in women in Western countries. Most ovarian cancers develop when an epithelial cell in one of the ovaries (two small organs in the pelvis that produce eggs) acquires genetic changes that allow it to grow uncontrollably and to spread around the body (metastasize). In its early stages, ovarian cancer is confined to the ovaries and can often be treated succe...

  1. Integrating microarray gene expression object model and clinical document architecture for cancer genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ju Han

    2005-01-01

    Systematic integration of genomic-scale expression profiles with clinical information may facilitate cancer genomics research. MAGE-OM (Microarray Gene Expression Object Model) defines standard objects for genomic but not for clinical data. HL7 CDA (Clinical Document Architecture) is a document model for clinical information, describing syntax (generic structure) but not semantics. We designed a document template in XML Schema with additional constraints for CDA to define content semantics, enabling data model-level integration of MAGE-OM and CDA for cancer genomics research. PMID:16779360

  2. CDH1-related hereditary diffuse gastric cancer syndrome : Clinical variations and implications for counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, Irma; Siemerink, Ester J. M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A. M.; de Jong, Daphne; Simoes-Correia, Joana; van Krieken, J. Han; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Figueiredo, Joana; van Riel, Els; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Plukker, John T. M.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Dekker, Evelien; Oliveira, Carla; Cats, Annemieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2012-01-01

    CDH1 mutation carriers have a strongly increased risk of developing gastric cancer (GC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). Clinical data of GC cases and surgical and histological data of prophylactic gastrectomies and mastectomies of all 10 Dutch CDH1 mutation families were collected. In vitro functio

  3. New Funding Opportunity: Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  4. CLINICAL VALUE OF DETECTING T LYMPHOCYTE SUBSET AND NK CELL ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长安; 管增伟; 孙武; 邵玉霞; 李卓; 贾廷珍

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study on the expression and clinical significance of T lymphocyte subset and NK cell activity (NKA) in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods Fifty-seven cancer patients and 33 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. T lymphocyte subset was measured by SAP technique and NKA by LDH release assay based on K562 cells, which served as target cells.

  5. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk : implications for clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schroeder, Fritz H.; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    A family history of prostate cancer has long been identified as an important risk factor for developing the disease. This risk factor can be easily assessed in clinical practice and current guidelines recommend to initiate prostate cancer early detection 5 years earlier (i.e. around the age of 40 ye

  6. Slow-growing lung cancer as an emerging entity : from screening to clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Infante, Maurizio; Berghmans, Thierry; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2013-01-01

    The current paradigm is that untreated lung cancer is invariably and rapidly fatal, therefore the medical community normally dismisses the idea that a patient could live with such a disease for years without any therapy. Yet evidence from lung cancer screening research and from recent clinical serie

  7. Council Clinical Perspective: Cardiovascular Health of Patients with Cancer and Cancer Survivors: A Roadmap to the Next Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barac, Ana; Murtagh, Gillian; Carver, Joseph R.; Chen, Ming Hui; Freeman, Andrew M.; Herrmann, Joerg; Iliescu, Cezar; Ky, Bonnie; Mayer, Erica L.; Okwuosa, Tochi M.; Plana, Juan Carlos; Ryan, Thomas D.; Rzeszut, Anne K.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Many existing and emerging cancer therapies have significant impact on the cardiovascular (CV) health of patients with cancer and cancer survivors. This manuscript examines current aspects of interdisciplinary cardio-oncology clinical care delivery and education in the United States and outlines how these data provide a platform for future development of the field. We present the results of the nationwide survey on cardio-oncology services, practices and opinions, conducted among Chiefs of Cardiology and Program Directors, that demonstrate ranges of clinical activities and identify significant interest for increased educational opportunities and expert training of CV physicians in this field. The survey respondents recognized clinical relevance, but emphasized lack of national guidelines, lack of funds, and limited awareness and infrastructure as the main challenges for development and growth of cardio-oncology. We discuss potential solutions to unmet needs through interdisciplinary collaboration and the active roles of professional societies and other stakeholders. PMID:26112199

  8. Integrating Microarray Gene Expression Object Model and Clinical Document Architecture for Cancer Genomics Research

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yu Rang; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ju Han

    2005-01-01

    Systematic integration of gene expression profiling with clinical information may facilitate cancer genomics research. MAGE-OM (MicroArray Gene Expression Object Model) defines standard objects for genomic but not for clinical data. HL7 CDA (Clinical Document Architecture) is a document model for clinical information, describing syntax but not semantics. We designed a document template and common data elements in XML Schema with additional constraints for CDA to define conte...

  9. Metaplastic breast cancer: clinical overview and molecular aberrations for potential targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouharb, Sausan; Moulder, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Metaplastic breast cancer is a rare subtype of invasive mammary carcinoma, with an aggressive behavior and usually poor outcome. Responses to systemic chemotherapy are suboptimal compared to patients with standard invasive ductal carcinoma. Limited data are available in regards to best treatment modalities, including chemotherapy. This review gives an overview of metaplastic breast cancer and its clinical and pathologic characteristics, in addition to treatment strategies, clinical trials, and future directions.

  10. Clinical endpoints for developing pharmaceuticals to manage patients with sporadic or genetic risk of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rial, Nathaniel S; Zell, Jason A.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    To reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer, current clinical practice focuses on screening for early detection and polypectomy as a form of secondary prevention, complemented with surgical interventions when appropriate. No pharmaceutical agent is currently approved for use in clinical practice for the management of patients with risk of colorectal cancer. This article will review earlier attempts to develop pharmaceuticals for use in managing patients with sporadic or genet...

  11. Clinical Nomogram for Predicting Survival of Esophageal Cancer Patients after Esophagectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Jinlin Cao; Ping Yuan; Luming Wang; Yiqing Wang; Honghai Ma; Xiaoshuai Yuan; Wang Lv; Jian Hu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an effective clinical nomogram for predicting the survival of esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy. We identified esophageal cancer patients (n = 4,281) who underwent esophagectomy between 1988 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 registries database. Clinically significant parameters for survival were used to construct a nomogram based on Cox regression analyses. The model was validated using bootstrap resamp...

  12. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  13. The importance of biopsy in clinically diagnosed metastatic lesions in patients with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Qing; Zong, Yu; Fei, Xiao-Chun; Chen, Xiao-Song; Xu, Cheng; Lou, Gu-yin; Shen, Kun-wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Receptor status discordance, such as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status between primary breast cancer and metastatic lesions has been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biopsy of clinically diagnosed metastatic lesions and to determine the changes in hormonal receptor and HER2 status of the metastatic lesions. Methods Sixty-three patients with clinically diagnosed metastatic breast cancer un...

  14. Clinical study of imaging skin cancer margins using polarized light imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Lee, Ken; Jacques, Steven L.

    2012-02-01

    Skin cancer is most commons type of cancer in United States that occur on sun-exposed cosmetically sensitive areas like face, neck, and forearms. Surgical excision of skin cancer is challenging as more than one-third the actual margins extend beyond the clinically determined margins. Polarized light camera (polCAM) provides images of the superficial layers of the tissue with enhanced contrast which was used to image skin cancer margins. In a NIH-funded pilot study polCAM was used to image skin cancer in patients undergoing Mohs micrographic surgery for skin cancer. Polarized light imaging utilizes the polarization properties of light to create an image of a lesion comprised only of light scattering from the superficial layers of the skin which yields a characteristic "fabric pattern" of the putative lesion and the surrounding normal tissue. In several case studies conducted with a system developed for the clinic, we have found that skin cancer disrupts this fabric pattern, allowing the doctor a new means of identifying the margins of the lesion. Data is acquired before the patient underwent surgery. The clinically determined skin cancer margins were compared with margins determined by examination of the polCAM images. The true margins were provided by the dermatophathologist on examination of the frozen sections. Our initial data suggests that the contrast due to polarization changes associated with cancerous lesions can elucidate margins that were not recognized by the surgeon under normal conditions but were later confirmed by the pathologist.

  15. Intra-tumour signalling entropy determines clinical outcome in breast and lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R S Banerji

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis, that a small population of tumour cells are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer progression, is becoming widely accepted and recent evidence has suggested a prognostic and predictive role for such cells. Intra-tumour heterogeneity, the diversity of the cancer cell population within the tumour of an individual patient, is related to cancer stem cells and is also considered a potential prognostic indicator in oncology. The measurement of cancer stem cell abundance and intra-tumour heterogeneity in a clinically relevant manner however, currently presents a challenge. Here we propose signalling entropy, a measure of signalling pathway promiscuity derived from a sample's genome-wide gene expression profile, as an estimate of the stemness of a tumour sample. By considering over 500 mixtures of diverse cellular expression profiles, we reveal that signalling entropy also associates with intra-tumour heterogeneity. By analysing 3668 breast cancer and 1692 lung adenocarcinoma samples, we further demonstrate that signalling entropy correlates negatively with survival, outperforming leading clinical gene expression based prognostic tools. Signalling entropy is found to be a general prognostic measure, valid in different breast cancer clinical subgroups, as well as within stage I lung adenocarcinoma. We find that its prognostic power is driven by genes involved in cancer stem cells and treatment resistance. In summary, by approximating both stemness and intra-tumour heterogeneity, signalling entropy provides a powerful prognostic measure across different epithelial cancers.

  16. An eight-year clinic experience with clozapine use in a Parkinson's disease clinic setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Hack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine our eight year clinic-based experience in a Parkinson's disease expert clinical care center using clozapine as a treatment for refractory psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD. METHODS: The study was a retrospective chart review which covered eight years of clozapine registry use. Statistical T-tests, chi-square, correlations and regression analysis were used to analyze treatment response for potential associations of age, disease duration, and Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y score, and degree of response to clozapine therapy. RESULTS: There were 36 participants included in the analysis (32 PD, 4 parkinsonism-plus. The characteristics included 30.6% female, age 45-87 years (mean 68.3±10.15, disease duration of 17-240 months (mean 108.14±51.13 and H&Y score of 2 to 4 (mean 2.51±0.51. The overall retention rate on clozapine was 41% and the most common reasons for discontinuation were frequent blood testing (28%, nursing home (NH placement (11% and leucopenia (8%. Responses to clozapine across the cohort were: complete (33%, partial (33%, absent (16%, and unknown (16%. Age (r = -0.36, p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This single-center experience highlights the challenges associated with clozapine therapy in PD psychosis. Frequent blood testing remains a significant barrier for clozapine, even in patients with therapeutic benefit. Surprisingly, all patients admitted to a NH discontinued clozapine due to logistical issues of administration and monitoring within that setting. Consideration of the barriers to clozapine therapy will be important to its use and to its continued success in an outpatient setting.

  17. The road to clinical use of high-intensity focused ultrasound for liver cancer: technical and clinical consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Aubry, Jean-Francois; Pauly, Kim,; Moonen, Chrit; Haar, Gail Ter; Ries, Mario; Salomir, Rares; Sokka, Sham; Sekins, Kevin,; Shapira, Yerucham; Ye, Fangwei; Huff-Simonin, Heather; Eames, Matt; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal; Napoli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    International audience Clinical use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) under ultrasound or MR guidance as a non-invasive method for treating tumors is rapidly increasing. Tens of thousands of patients have been treated for uterine fibroid, benign prostate hyperplasia, bone metastases, or prostate cancer. Despite the methods' clinical potential, the liver is a particularly challenging organ for HIFU treatment due to the combined effect of respiratory-induced liver motion, partial b...

  18. Laser Ablation Of Atrial Fibrillation: Mid-term Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Poa, MD

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrial Fibrillation is known to account for one third of all the strokes caused in the US in the population above the age of 70. Patients treated with the surgical Cox MAZE operation have been shown to have a 150 fold decrease in the incidence of stroke over an 18 year period. However, the original Cox MAZE although extremely successful in treating atrial fibrillation and decreasing the incidence of strokes was not performed widely because of complexity and invasiveness of the procedure. A variety of alternative energy based curative ablation strategies are now available for more minimally invasive therapeutic management of atrial fibrillation (AF. In this communication, we report our clinical experience in AF therapy utilizing laser energy ablation technology. Methods: Fifty two consecutive AF patients underwent concomitant or isolated ablation prior to any coexisting cardiac procedures that included CABG (coronary artery bypass surgery, MV (mitral valve or AV (aortic valve repairs. All patients had an epicardially based ablation pattern with basic lesions being en bloc box type pulmonary vein isolation which included the antral surface of the left atrium, directed ganglionectomies of the the right anterior and inferior ganglions, posteriomedial ablation of the IVC ( inferior vena cava, and a right isthmus ablation. Twenty seven patients had ligation of their left atrial appendage, 14 patients had resection of the ligament of Marshall, and three patients had endocardial placed lesions of a mitral annular connecting type lesion. In order to maintain the patients in normal sinus rhythm (NSR, electrical cardioversion and anti-arrhythmic drugs were employed as required. Results: At a median follow-up of 250 days, 44 of the total 52 patients (84.6% exhibited NSR.. No complications or mortality were reported due to the laser procedure. Conclusion: Laser ablation was successfully and safely used for endocardial and epicardial AF ablation

  19. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Enhancing quantity and quality of clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Kathleen; Levin, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Nursing programs encounter barriers to clinical education, which may include limited clinical capacity for nursing students. Congestion of clinical placements compounded by multiple external influences prompted a need to develop an alternative approach for meeting program standards pertaining to clinical education. A curriculum improvement project was implemented within a school of nursing with the primary goal of expanding clinical learning opportunities while maintaining program quality. The unique aspect of this project was a comprehensive evaluative design, including qualitative responses from students, faculty, and clinical site stakeholders, as well as standardized student test scores. Augmenting the tools and processes for evaluation of clinical learning required collaboration from the faculty. Project outcomes include expanded clinical capacity, increased variety of clinical learning experiences, and improved quality of the clinical experiences. Collaborative partnerships yielded valuable lessons, which have implications for other nursing programs challenged with clinical placements. PMID:25205733

  1. PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy: two modes of attack on the cancer cell widening the clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Yvette; Plummer, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The abundant nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) represents an important novel target in cancer therapy. PARP-1 is essential to the repair of single strand DNA breaks via the base excision repair pathway. Inhibitors of PARP-1 have been shown to enhance the cytotoxic effects of ionising radiation and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents such as the methylating agents and topoisomerase-I inhibitors. There are currently at least eight PARP inhibitors in clinical trial development. In vitro data, in vivo preclinical data and most recently early clinical trial data suggests that PARP inhibitors could be used not only as chemo/radiotherapy sensitizers but also as single agents to selectively kill cancers defective in DNA repair, specifically cancers with mutations in the breast cancer associated (BRCA)1 and BRCA2 genes. This theory of selectively exploiting cells defective in one DNA repair pathway by inhibiting another is a major breakthrough in the treatment of cancer. The current clinical data are discussed within this review with reference to the preclinical models which predicted activity and also future directions and the possible dangers/pitfalls of this clinical strategy are explored.

  2. Prostate Cancer Specificity of PCA3 Gene Testing: Examples from Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leonard S; Bostwick, David G

    2008-01-01

    A specific marker for early prostate cancer would fill an important void. In initial evaluations of the prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) gene vis-à-vis serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, the gene offers great promise. At the cellular level, PCA3 specificity for cancer is nearly perfect because of the gross overexpression of the gene by cancer cells. As a clinical test for early prostate cancer, heightened specificity is also seen in urine containing prostate cells from men with the disease. PCA3 gene testing holds valuable potential in PSA quandary situations: (1) men with elevated PSA levels but no cancer on initial biopsy; (2) men found to have cancer despite normal levels of PSA; (3) men with PSA elevations associated with varying degrees of prostatitis; and (4) men undergoing active surveillance for presumed microfocal disease. PMID:18836536

  3. Clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer and colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal cancer is still difficult to treat even using the particle therapy. However, because of their excellent dose distribution, cancer surrounded by gastrointestinal tract such as pancreatic cancer and local recurrence of colorectal cancer after surgery becomes to be treated by particle beam with curative intent. The usefulness of particle beam is reported in the patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and patents who received preoperative irradiation with resectable pancreatic cancer. In addition, the postoperative recurrence of rectal cancer is reported to achieve more than 90 percent of local control by particle beam. (author)

  4. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic and...

  5. Integrating Genomics with Proteomics - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 60 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer present as early stage disease (Stage I and II). Despite the favorable prognosis associated with treatment intervention of such early stage disease (typically surgical excision), there are a small, but significant, fraction of these cancers that appear to be hardwired for aggressive metastatic behavior and ultimately lethal outcome.

  6. Bioanalysis and clinical pharmacology of tamoxifen in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, N.G.L.

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator, is widely used in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer. It has been used for over 40 years and has dramatically reduced recurrence and mortality rates of ER-positive breast cancer patients. However, not all patients benefit from tamoxife

  7. Breast cancer in pregnancy: A brief clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sven

    2016-05-01

    As global wealth increases and demographic changes similar to Europe and North America start affecting other societies, the global breast cancer epidemic will coincide with a delayed maternal age during first and subsequent pregnancies. Breast cancer in pregnancy will continue to increase, and standardized treatment strategies are required to be developed. This study will review current diagnostic and treatment approaches.

  8. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic...

  9. Translational Research on Esophageal Cancer: From Cell Line to Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Boonstra (Jurjen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide esophageal cancer is a signifi cant and an increasing health problem. In 2005, there were 497,700 new cases, and the prevalence is expected to increase by approximately 140% by 2025. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most of the cases of esophageal cancer w

  10. Expression and Clinical Significance of REGy in Gastric Cancer Tissue and Variously Differentiated Gastric Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Li; Tian Tian; Xiaoyi Wang; Fan Li; Guosheng Ren

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the REGy expression in gastric cancer tissue and gastric cancer cell lines of various differentiation levels and its clinical significance.METHODS Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of REGy protein in 70 specimens of gastric cancer and 30 specimens of normal gastric mucosa. The relationship between the expression of REGy protein and the biological behaviors of gastric cancer was analyzed. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA level and the protein expression of REGγ in normal gastric cell line GES-1, well differentiated gastric cancer cell line MKN-28, moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 and poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line BGC-823.RESULTS The expression rate of REGγprotein in gastric cancer tissue (52/70, 74.29%) was significantly higher than that in normal gastric tissue (12/30, 40%) (P<0.01). The expression rate of REGywas correlated with tumor size (P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), differentiation degree (P<0.01), infiltration depth (P<0.01)and distant metastasis (P<0.05). RT-PCR analysis showed that theexpression of REGγ mRNA was 0.459±0.079 in the normal gastric mucosa cell line, 0.588±0.118 in the well differentiated gastric cancer cell line, 0.715±0.066 in the moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line, and 0.873±0.099 in the poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line, showing a negative correla- tion between REGγmRNA expression and differentiation level (P <0.05). Western blot analysis showed that the expression of REGy protein was 0.712±0.065 in the normal gastric mucosa cell line, 1.176±0.185 in the well differentiated gastric cancer cell line, 1.533 ±0.127 in the moderately differentiated gastric cancer cell line, and 2.061±0.398 in the poorly differentiated gastric cancer cell line, showing a negative correlation between REGγprotein expression and differentiation level (P<0.05).CONCLUSION REGγ is expressed in gastric cancer

  11. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavey, R.S. [Radiation Oncology Program, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Univ. of Southern California, CA, Los Angeles (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low (<3 mm Hg) range. Hemoglobin level is a strong independent prognostic factor for tumor control by radiation therapy. The hemoglobin level at the end of radiation therapy is a stronger prognostic factor than is the hemoglobin level at the start of therapy. Numerous clinical trials have utilized rHuEPO during radiation with or without concurrent chemotherapy. All 4 trials which enrolled patients with low hemoglobin levels (<12 to 13.5 g/dl) found that rHuEPO significantly increased hemoglobin within 2 weeks and that hemoglobin levels continued to rise until the end of rHuEPO treatment. rHuEPO was efficacious in limiting the decrease in hemoglobin and use of packed red blood cell transfusion in the one reported trial in which it was used in patients with initially normal hemoglobin levels during intensive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. One trial found a statistically significant improvement in complete pathologic response rate after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with the use of rHuEPO. rHuEPO has a potentially large role to play in the care of the cancer patient. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der Onkologie bestehen zahlreiche Gruende, die Haemoglobinkonzentration der Patienten waehrend der Therapie zu halten oder sogar anzuheben. Als anerkannte Indikation gilt hierbei die Besserung anaemiebedingter Symptome wie Muedigkeit und Dyspnoe, wobei jedoch neuere Ergebnisse darauf hinweisen, dass auch die Effizienz der Strahlen- und

  12. Molecular Biology of Pancreatic Cancer: How Useful Is It in Clinical Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George H Sakorafas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Context During the recent two decades dramatic advances of molecular biology allowed an in-depth understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is currently accepted that pancreatic cancer has a genetic component. The real challenge is now how these impressive advances could be used in clinical practice. Objective To critically present currently available data regarding clinical application of molecular biology in pancreatic cancer. Methods Reports about clinical implications of molecular biology in patients with pancreatic cancer were retrieved from PubMed. These reports were selected on the basis of their clinical relevance, and the data of their publication (preferentially within the last 5 years. Emphasis was placed on reports investigating diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Results Molecular biology can be used to identify individuals at high-risk for pancreatic cancer development. Intensive surveillance is indicated in these patients to detect pancreatic neoplasia ideally at a preinvasive stage, when curative resection is still possible. Molecular biology can also be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, with molecular analysis on samples of biologic material, such as serum or plasma, duodenal fluid or preferentially pure pancreatic juice, pancreatic cells or tissue, and stools. Molecular indices have also prognostic significance. Finally, molecular biology may have therapeutic implications by using various therapeutic approaches, such as antiangiogenic factors, purine synthesis inhibitors, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, factors modulating tumor-stroma interaction, inactivation of the hedgehog pathway, gene therapy, oncolytic viral therapy, immunotherapy (both passive as well as active etc. Conclusion Molecular biology may have important clinical implications in patients with pancreatic cancer and represents one of the most active areas on cancer research. Hopefully clinical applications of molecular biology

  13. HDR intralumenal brachytherapy in bronchial cancer: review of our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main indications for brachytherapy in the treatment of endobronchial cancer are dyspnea. postobstructive pneumonia and atelectasis, cough and hemoptysis resulting from broncus obstruction by exophytic intralumenal tumor growth. High Dose Rate intralumenal brachytherapy (HDRBT) may be combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in particular as almost all tumors are too large for HDRBT alone. From January 1992 to September 1995 we treated 268 patients affected by bronchial cancer, with EBRT combined with HDRBT. All patients were staged as IIIa-IIIb-IV but KPS was >60 and expectancy of life > than 3 months. After bronchoscopy and Tc simulation we found that almost 10% of patients were downstaged. Treatment was always realized delivering 60 Gy to the tumour volume and 50 Gy to the mediastinal structures with EBRT. Brachytherapy was performed during the radiotherapy course. In 38 patients HDRBT was realized just one time, at the beginning of EBRT, with a dose of 10 Gy calculated at 1cm from the central axis of the catheter. In 47 HDRBT was performed twice (at the beginning and at the end of EBRT) with a dose of 7 Gy calculated at 1 cm from the central axis. From 1994 we started a 3 fractions protocol (Timing: days 1.15.30) with a dose of 5 Gy calculated at 0.5 cm from the axis. Of the 183 patients introduced in the protocol 170 received the three fractions of HDRBT and 13 were excluded from the study for personal or clinical reasons. In 97% of cases the application did not need general anesthesia; local anesthesia has been sufficient supplemented by some drug for sedation and coughing. Anyway both bronchoscopy and HDRBT (with anterior-posterior and lateral chest X-ray) are performed in the same shielded room without the necessity of displacing the patient. In almost 60% of treatments we used just one endobronchial applicator. In case of tumor involvement of the carina, two applicators were introduced. By this a larger tumor volume can be treated with adequate

  14. Toward Integrated Clinical and Gene- Expression Profiles For Breast Cancer Prognosis: A Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Kabir Ahmad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients with the same diagnostic and clinical prognostics profilecan have markedly different clinical outcomes. This difference is possibly causedby the limitation of current breast cancer prognostic indices, which groupmolecularly distinct patients into similar clinical classes based mainly on themorphology of diseases. Traditional clinical-based prognosis models werediscovered to contain some restrictions to address the heterogeneity of breastcancer. The invention of microarray technology and its ability to simultaneouslyinterrogate thousands of genes has changed the paradigm of molecularclassification of human cancers as well as shifting clinical prognosis models to abroader prospect. Numerous studies have revealed the potential value of geneexpressionsignatures in examining the risk of disease recurrence. However,most of these studies attempted to implement genetic-marker based prognosticmodels to replace the traditional clinical markers, yet neglecting the richinformation contained in clinical information. Therefore, this research took theeffort to integrate both clinical and microarray data in order to obtain accuratebreast cancer prognosis, by taking into account that these data complement eachother. This article presents a review of the development of breast cancerprognosis models, concentrating precisely on clinical and gene-expressionprofiles. The literature is reviewed in an explicit machine-learning framework,which includes the elements of feature selection and classification techniques.

  15. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience.

  16. CLINICAL-MORPHOLOGICAL CORRELATIONS IN ADVANCED COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Bălan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: During 2000-2007 we have selected and supervised a lot of 279 cases operated for colorectal cancer in Clinic no.1 Surgery from “St. Spiridon” Hospital. The sex repartition during the entire study period shows the preponderance of male cases (61.29% in comparison to the female cases of 38.7 %. In our study the operated colorectal carcinomas have a higher incidence at patients over 60 years old, 71.67%. There is as well a higher percent for the age group 60-70 years old and 70-80 years old which percent reaches 34.76% respectively 32.97% out of the total number of cases. When comparing the average age of the two analyzed lots there we can notice that the average age of the female patients does not differ significantly from the age of the male patients. The average age of the female patients was of 64,3±8,58 with minimum values of 51 years and maximum of 78 years and the average age of male patients was of 67,9±10,5 with minim of 44 years and maximum of 86 years. The on segments distribution of the colorectal cancer is presented as follows: rectum 108 cases (38,7%, sigmoid 96 cases (34,40%, descendent 19 cases (6,81%, hepatic angle 17 cases (6.09%, transverse 17 cases (6.09%, ascending 12 cases (4,3% % the rest of the localizations being in a smaller number. In the case of males the colorectal cancer is met most often at the level of the rectum (32.74% and the case of females at the level of the sigmoid (41.66%. Regarding the microscopic results they were: well differentiated adenocarcinoma 45.83%, moderate differentiated 43.75% and weak differentiated 10.42%. The Chi-square analysis shows that there is no association between the macroscopic aspects of the tumours and their histological aspect. Analyzing the microscopic aspect according to the location of the tumour there is observed that 86.95% of the tumours that were located at the level of the rectum have a vegetative aspect. There was not observed any link between the gender

  17. Effectiveness and adverse effects of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: Japanese experience and perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Satoru Ueno; Yasuhide Kitagawa; Takashi Fukagai; Hideyuki Akaza

    2012-01-01

    Recently,novel anti-androgens and inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis have been developed through the elucidation of mechanisms of castration resistance of prostate cancer.We believe that these new developments will improve hormonal therapy.On the other hand,there has been an increase in criticism of hormonal therapy,because hormonal therapy is supposed to induce adverse effects such as cardiovascular disease.In this review,we have introduced the Japanese experience of hormonal therapy,because we believe that there may be ethnic differences between Caucasians and Asian people in the efficacy and adverse effects of hormonal therapy.First,we showed that primary hormonal therapy can achieve long-term control of localized prostate cancer in some cases and that quality of life of patients receiving hormonal therapy is rather better than previously thought.Neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in cases undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very useful for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer.Further clinical trials are required to confirm the efficacy of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy.We showed that the death from cardiovascular diseases in Japanese patients receiving hormonal therapy was not higher than that in the general population.However,efforts should be made to decrease the adverse effects of hormonal therapy,because life-style change may increase the susceptibility to adverse effects by hormonal therapy even in Japan.Managements of endocrine and metabolic dysfunction,such as diabetes mellitus,are essential.New hormonal compounds such as selective androgen receptor modulators capable of specifically targeting prostate cancer are expected to be developed.

  18. Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection in Patients With Nonseminomatous Testicular Cancer: A Single Center Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowroozi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Testicular cancer accounts for about 1 - 1.5% of all malignancies in men. Radical orchiectomy is curative in 75% of patients with stage I disease, but advance stage with retroperitoneal lymph node involvement needs chemotherapy. All patients who have residual masses ≥ 1 cm after chemotherapy should undergo postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND. Objectives Treatment of advanced nonseminomatous testicular cancer is usually a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. We described our experience about postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND in our center. Patients and Methods In a retrospective cross-sectional study between 2006 and 2011, patients with a history of postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND in Imam Khomeini hospital were evaluated. All patients had normal postchemotherapy serum tumor markers and primary nonseminomatous cancer. We reviewed retrospectively clinical, pathological, and surgical parameters associated with PC-RPLND in our center. Results Twenty-one patients underwent bilateral PC-RPLND. Mean age was 26.3 years (ranged 16 - 47. Mean size of retroperitoneal mass after chemotherapy was 7.6 cm. Mean operative time was 198 minutes (120 - 246 minutes. Mean follow-up time was 38.6 months. Pathologic review showed presence of fibrosis/necrosis, viable germ cell tumor and teratoma in 8 (38.1%, 10 (47.6% and 3 (14.28% patients, respectively. One patient in postoperative period of surgery and three patients in two first years after surgery were expired. Of 17 alive patients, only two (11.8% had not retrograde ejaculation. Conclusions PC-RPLND is one the major operations in the field of urology, which is associated with significant adjunctive surgeries. In appropriate cases, PC-RPLND was associated with good cancer specific survival in tertiary oncology center.

  19. The expanding role of metformin in cancer: an update on antitumor mechanisms and clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Kelekar, Gauri; Shen, James; Shen, John; Kaur, Sukhpreet; Mita, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Metformin has been used for nearly a century to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiologic studies first identified the association between metformin and reduced risk of several cancers. The anticancer mechanisms of metformin involve both indirect or insulin-dependent pathways and direct or insulin-independent pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated metformin's broad anticancer activity across a spectrum of malignancies. Prospective clinical trials involving metformin in the chemoprevention and treatment of cancer now number in the hundreds. We provide an update on the anticancer mechanisms of metformin and review the results thus far available from prospective clinical trials investigating metformin's efficacy in cancer.

  20. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.