WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer centers program

  1. Integrative Medicine Program- MD Anderson Cancer Center

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    The Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson Cancer Center was first established in 1998.  Our mission is to empower patients with cancer and their families to become active partners in their own physical, psycho-spiritual, and social health through personalized education and evidenced-based clinical care to optimize health, quality of life, and clinical outcomes across the cancer continuum.  The program consists of three main components: clinical care, research, and education.  The Integr...

  2. Integrative Medicine Program- MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson Cancer Center was first established in 1998.  Our mission is to empower patients with cancer and their families to become active partners in their own physical, psycho-spiritual, and social health through personalized education and evidenced-based clinical care to optimize health, quality of life, and clinical outcomes across the cancer continuum.  The program consists of three main components: clinical care, research, and education.  The Integrative Medicine Center provides clinical services to patients through individual and group programs.  The clinical philosophy of the center is to work collaboratively with the oncology teams to build comprehensive and integrative care plans that are personalized, evidence-based, and safe with the goal of improving clinical outcomes.  The individual services comprise of integrative oncology consultation, acupuncture, meditation, music therapy, nutrition, and oncology massage.  The center also provides a variety of group programs including meditation, yoga, tai chi, cooking classes and others.  Over the past 13 years, over 70,000 patients and families have participated in services and programs offered by the center.  The research portfolio focuses on three main areas: mind-body interventions, acupuncture, and meditation.  This lecture will focus on providing an overview of the Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson with a focus on the clinical services provided.  Participants will learn about the integrative clinical model and how this is applied to the care of cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  Current and future research topics will be discussed as well as patient cases.

  3. Children's cancer centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  4. Helping cancer patients across the care continuum: the navigation program at the Queen's Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Amanda L; Ishihara-Wong, Debra D M; Domingo, Jermy B; Nishioka, Jocelyn; Wilburn, Andrea; Tsark, JoAnn U; Braun, Kathryn L

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that cancer patient navigation improves care, but few reports describe the variety of patients managed by a hospital-based navigation program. Differences in navigated patients by the intensity (low, medium, or high) of navigation services they received were examined. The 835 clients seen by the navigators in a hospital-based cancer center were first stratified by quarter and by four ethnic groups. Randomized selection from each group assured there would be equal representation for analysis of Hawaiians, Filipinos, Japanese, and Whites and even numbers over all time intervals. Five professionals extracted data from these case records on demographics, type/stage of cancer, diagnosis and treatment dates, barriers, and navigator actions. Clients had breast (30.0%), lung (15.8%), esophageal (6.7%), colon (5.8%), ovarian (4.2%), prostate (3.3%), and other cancers (34.2%). The median number of actions taken on behalf of a client was 4 (range 1-83), and the median number of days a case was open was 14 (range 1-216). High intensity cases (those receiving more assistance over longer periods of time) were more likely than low-intensity cases to need help with education and reassurance, transportation, care coordination, and covering costs. Although there were no demographic differences across intensity groups, Neighbor Island patients from Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka'i, Lana'i and Kaua'i were more likely to need help with arranging travel, care coordination, and costs associated with getting treatment (all at P=.05), and patients on public insurance were more likely to have stage 4 cancer (P=.001) and to need help with costs (P=.006). Findings suggest that this hospital-based navigation program is filling a real need of patients across the cancer care continuum. A triage protocol and an integrated data capture system could help improve the targeting and documentation of cancer patient navigation services. PMID:23795311

  5. Cancer patients’ use of pharmaceutical patient assistance programs in the outpatient pharmacy at a large tertiary cancer center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Tisha M.; Lal, Lincy S.; Bennett, Charles L.; Hung, Frank; Franzini, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report on the use of pharmaceutical patient assistance programs (PAPs) in the outpatient pharmacy at the largest tertiary cancer center in the United States. Methods We conducted a retrospective (July 1, 2006–Dec 31,2007) cross-sectional analysis of outpatient pharmacy, medical, and cancer registry records at the cancer center. The cancer center identified 104 medications available through PAPs. Study-eligible patients received at least one of these medications, either as a PAP case patient or as a PAP control non-user. Binary logit regression models predicted PAP use, and descriptive statistics compared PAP user and non-user medication fills. Results Of 25,552 cancer patients at who received an outpatient medication during the study period, 1,929 met study criteria (n=950 PAP users, 979 PAP non-users). In comparison to controls, PAP users were more likely to be uninsured (odds ratio (OR)=4.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.118, 9.970), indigent (OR=16.95, 95% CI: 6.845, 41.960), and < 65 years old (OR=2.31, 95% CI: 1.517, 3.509). Of the most frequently dispensed medications to PAP users from PAPs (n=5,271), 88% (n=4,936) were for supportive care (e.g., nausea/vomiting). PAPs provided 35% (n=842) of the most common anticancer agents administered to PAP users (n=1,296), accounting for a monthly mean of $55,000 in pharmaceutical expenditures. Conclusions In the cancer center’s outpatient pharmacy, PAPs provided financial support for about a third of the most commonly used therapies, primarily for supportive care indications, for a small percentage of eligible cancer patients. PMID:22879815

  6. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  7. Quality Improvement in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program: The Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert D.; Castro, Kathleen M.; Eisenstein, Jana; Stallings, Holley; Hegedus, Patricia D.; Bryant, Donna M.; Kadlubek, Pam J.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007; it is a network of community-based hospitals funded by the NCI. Quality of care is an NCCCP priority, with participation in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) playing a fundamental role in quality assessment and quality improvement (QI) projects. Using QOPI methodology, performance on quality measures was analyzed two times per year over a 3-year period to enhance our implementation of quality standards at NCCCP hospitals. Methods: A data-sharing agreement allowed individual-practice QOPI data to be electronically sent to the NCI. Aggregated data with the other NCCCP QOPI participants were presented to the network via Webinars. The NCCCP Quality of Care Subcommittee selected areas in which to focus subsequent QI efforts, and high-performing practices shared voluntarily their QI best practices with the network. Results: QOPI results were compiled semiannually between fall 2010 and fall 2013. The network concentrated on measures with a quality score of ≤ 0.75 and planned voluntary group-wide QI interventions. We identified 13 measures in which the NCCCP fell at or below the designated quality score in fall 2010. After implementing a variety of QI initiatives, the network registered improvements in all parameters except one (use of treatment summaries). Conclusion: Using the NCCCP as a paradigm, QOPI metrics provide a useful platform for group-wide measurement of quality performance. In addition, these measurements can be used to assess the effectiveness of QI initiatives. PMID:25538082

  8. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  9. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Rebeca E. Giacinto; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targ...

  10. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  11. A Woman-centered Educational Program for Primary Prevention of Lung Cancer in a Cuban Municipality, 2012--2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Abel; Castillo, Zeida; Pérez, Julia; Abeledo, Ahyní

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer educational programs seek the involvement of different groups in efforts to promote healthier habits and lifestyles. Women are primary agents for targeting prevention actions because of their ability to foster healthy lifestyles within their families. The purpose of this study was to develop a woman-centered educational program to strengthen knowledge and promote responsible behavior aimed at primary prevention of lung cancer. Based on identified learning needs in 133 female participants concerning lung cancer self care, healthy habits and communication skills about self care, a ten-workshop series was designed and validated by specialists and users. Before intervention, 82% of participants were highly aware of smoking-related harm, but only 26% were highly aware of healthy environmental management practices at home and 14% were knowledgeable about self care. Differences in both awareness and practice of health-promoting behaviors were observed by the end of the training: those highly aware of smoking-related harm rose to 86.5%, and those highly aware of environmental management and self care increased to 66.2% and 83.5%, respectively. The proportions reporting acceptable levels of environmental management and self-care practices increased to 86.5% (from 0%) and 91% (from 3.8%), respectively. One year later, a positive impact on families was confirmed, predominantly on children. We conclude that such a woman-centered educational program can increase awareness and promote healthy behaviors aimed at lung cancer prevention. Women's ability to communicate and share lessons learned within their families should be considered in designing community health education programs. KEYWORDS Lung cancer, health education, disease prevention, primary prevention, health promotion, Cuba. PMID:26947281

  12. 78 FR 22794 - World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC Responders and Survivors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... linked total and congener-specific PCB levels in serum and adipose tissue with breast cancer, although... Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related Health..., and provide advice on whether to add cancer, or a certain type of cancer, to the List specified in...

  13. 77 FR 62167 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... the region for cancer of the breast is clarified to state ``Female Breast,'' and a note is added to... male and female breast cancers, whereas ICD-9 code 174 is specific to females. Urinary System The ICD-9... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 RIN 0920-AA49 World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain...

  14. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  15. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  16. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  17. Center Innovation Fund Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To stimulate and encourage creativity and innovation within the NASA Centers. The activities are envisioned to fall within the scope of NASA Space Technology or...

  18. Records Center Program Billing System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — RCPBS supports the Records center programs (RCP) in producing invoices for the storage (NARS-5) and servicing of National Archives and Records Administration’s...

  19. 78 FR 57505 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Markowitz SB, Moline J, Niu X, Sacks H, Shukla G, Udasin I, Lucchini RG, Boffetta P, Landrigan PJ . Cancer... Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use) J. Plain Writing Act of... rulemaking (78 FR 39670) proposing to add prostate cancer (malignant neoplasm of the prostate) to the List...

  20. The revised Bethesda guidelines: extent of utilization in a university hospital medical center with a cancer genetics program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Aparna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop to develop criteria to identify patients with colorectal cancer who should be offered microsatellite instability (MSI testing due to an increased risk for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. These criteria were further modified in 2004 and became known as the revised Bethesda Guidelines. Our study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the percentage of patients diagnosed with HNPCC tumors in 2004 who met revised Bethesda criteria for MSI testing, who were referred for genetic counseling within our institution. Methods All HNPCC tumors diagnosed in 2004 were identified by accessing CoPath, an internal database. Both the Tumor Registry and patients' electronic medical records were accessed to collect all relevant family history information. The list of patients who met at least one of the revised Bethesda criteria, who were candidates for MSI testing, was then cross-referenced with the database of patients referred for genetic counseling within our institution. Results A total of 380 HNPCC-associated tumors were diagnosed at our institution during 2004 of which 41 (10.7% met at least one of the revised Bethesda criteria. Eight (19.5% of these patients were referred for cancer genetic counseling of which 2 (25% were seen by a genetics professional. Ultimately, only 4.9% of patients eligible for MSI testing in 2004 were seen for genetic counseling. Conclusion This retrospective study identified a number of barriers, both internal and external, which hindered the identification of individuals with HNPCC, thus limiting the ability to appropriately manage these high risk families.

  1. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approach

  2. 77 FR 56138 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... rate. An alternative analysis considers the impact on costs if the Program enrolls additional persons...) Childhood Cancers [any type of cancer occurring in a person less than 20 years of age] (Method 4) Rare....e., occurring at an incidence rate less than 0.08 percent of the U.S. population] (Method 4)...

  3. Innovative Program Aims to Improve Support for Cancer Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    An article about an educational program at the City of Hope Cancer Center intended to provide health professionals with the tools and information needed to help family caregivers care for themselves and their loved ones with cancer.

  4. Programs | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    OCG facilitates cancer genomics research through a series of highly-focused programs. These programs generate and disseminate genomic data for use by the cancer research community. OCG programs also promote advances in technology-based infrastructure and create valuable experimental reagents and tools. OCG programs encourage collaboration by interconnecting with other genomics and cancer projects in order to accelerate translation of findings into the clinic. Below are OCG’s current, completed, and initiated programs:

  5. The Goddard Space Flight Center ergonomics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Eileen; Unite, Theodore

    1993-01-01

    Since the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Screening Program started in 1984, we have made many changes to accommodate the growing number of participants. As a result of these changes, screening of KSC employees has become more efficient and productive. Various aspects of the program are covered.

  6. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists.

  7. Implementation of a Theory-based, Non-clinical Patient Navigator Program to Address Barriers in an Urban Cancer Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Linda; Miller, Suzanne M; Crookes, Danielle; Kandadai, Venk; Wen, Kuang Yi; Slamon, Rachel E; Chaivous, Jeanne

    2012-06-01

    Cancer patients face a myriad of psychosocial and practical issues. Especially challenging is the time from an initial diagnosis to the onset of treatment and patient navigation services are important to guide patients, especially underserved populations, through this maze of uncertainty. Here we report on the Pennsylvania Patient Navigator Demonstration Project (PaPND) designed to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, and impact of a culturally and linguistically appropriate non-clinical navigator program. The development of the project, based on behavioral theory and community-based participatory research principles, is described. Forty-four cancer patients from diverse backgrounds participated, which included a baseline assessment, navigation services, and a four week and twelve week follow-up assessment. On average, participants experienced 1.8 barriers with transportation and insurance issues the most common barriers. The majority (56%) of the barriers required more than an hour of the navigator's time to address, with insurance, transportation and caregiver/support issues requiring the most time. Overall patients were fairly satisfied with the navigation services. The findings showed improvement patient's stress-related thoughts, cognition (understanding of their disease), expectancies and beliefs or values/goals, as well as self-efficacy of managing cancer related issues from the baseline to follow-up assessments. The evaluation results suggest that providing and connecting cancer patients to appropriate information to improve their understanding of their diagnosis and recommended treatments needs to be addressed, and where the integration of non-clinical and clinical navigation is essential. In addition, more attention to the assessment of psychosocial issues, such as the patients' emotional worries, and more comprehensive training in these areas would enhance navigation programs.

  8. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  9. Fusion Research Center, theory program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Texas FRC theory program is directed primarily toward understanding the initiation, heating, and confinement of tokamak plasmas. It supports and complements the experimental programs on the TEXT and PRETEXT devices, as well as providing information generally applicable to the national tokamak program. A significant fraction of the Center's work has been carried out in collaboration with, or as a part of, the program of the Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS). During the past twelve months, 14 FRC theory reports and 12 IFS reports with partial FRC support have been issued

  10. Phase 2 N01 Program - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Phase 2 N01 Program is a CTEP-CIP collaboration includes 7 contractors, most of whom consist of multi-institutional consortia, and includes a total of 22 NCI-designated Cancer Centers. These sites carry out early clinical trials with CTEP and CIP-held IND agents, with an emphasis on phase 2 trials, but including phase 1 trials as well. These trials include the evaluation of novel imaging agents and methods to enhance the evaluation of novel therapeutics.

  11. IND Regulatory & Manufacturing Resources - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Imaging Program has been creating Investigational New Drug Applications (IND) for imaging agents in order to engage in multi-center clinical trials of these materials. A subset of the documents filed is being made available to the research community to implement routine synthesis of tracers at their own facilities and to assist investigators with the filing of their own INDs. The first of these document sets is for F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT).

  12. Splicing Programs and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Germann; Lise Gratadou; Martin Dutertre; Didier Auboeuf

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report splicing alterations in a multitude of cancers by using gene-by-gene analysis. However, understanding of the role of alternative splicing in cancer is now reaching a new level, thanks to the use of novel technologies allowing the analysis of splicing at a large-scale level. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing...

  13. [Certified prostate cancer centers and second opinion centers for testicular cancer: successful models of uro-oncology cancer care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, J E; Albers, P; Schrader, M

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of organ site-specific cancer centers by the German Cancer Society (GCS) is part of the basic politically driven reform of oncology care in Germany. Since 2007 an increasing number of prostate cancer centers have been guided toward certification by the OnkoZert GmbH of the GCS. Currently 68 centers are certified and together with ongoing certification proceedings will amount to 81 prostate cancer centers, which cover about one fourth of cases of primary prostate cancer. Urology is of particular importance in the management of these centers. For the most part, urologists belonging to a clinical unit are the initiators of the certification process, thus ensuring that uro-oncology is firmly entrenched in the specialty with involvement of outpatient service providers. Fears that authority will be lost are unfounded as long as responsibility for this task is taken seriously and active use is made of the possibilities for creativity. A similarly important function is fulfilled by the testicular cancer centers that offer second opinion services, which were initiated by urology conjointly with German Cancer Aid to pursue the goal of quality assurance for this tumor entity and therefore likewise secure the position of this tumor in the realm of urologists. By applying such strategic approaches, urologists will succeed in sustainably safeguarding their future importance in a very competitive environment and in counteracting the encroachments of other specialties by exhibiting clear orientation.

  14. 77 FR 35573 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). http://monographs.iarc.fr/ . Accessed May 8, 2012. In July...\\ See IARC http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/PDFs/index.php . 2. Cancers arising from regions of... study, who note that `` ite-specific cancer SIR ratios (exposed versus non- exposed) were...

  15. Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) seeks to improve the lives of cancer patients by finding better treatments, control mechanisms, and cures for cancer. CTEP funds a national program of cancer research, sponsoring clinical trials to evaluate new anti-cancer agents.

  16. The Arecibo Remote Command Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Jenet, Fredrick; Siemens, Xavier; Dolch, Timothy; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    The Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) is a multi-institution research and education program that introduces undergraduates to the field of pulsar research. Specifically, the program trains students to work in small teams to operate several of the world's largest radio telescopes (both Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope). Students conduct survey observations for the PALFA Galactic plane pulsar survey and conduct timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) for the NANOGrav search for gravitational waves using these telescopes. In addition, ARCC students search pulsar candidates generated from processed survey data in order to find both new radio MSPs and non-recycled pulsars. The ARCC program currently operates at four U.S. institutions and involves more than 50 undergraduate students each year. To date, ARCC students have discovered 64 new pulsars in this program.

  17. Cancer Incidence in Egypt: Results of the National Population-Based Cancer Registry Program

    OpenAIRE

    Amal S. Ibrahim; Khaled, Hussein M.; Nabiel NH Mikhail; Hoda Baraka; Hossam Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Background. This paper aims to present cancer incidence rates at national and regional level of Egypt, based upon results of National Cancer Registry Program (NCRP). Methods. NCRP stratified Egypt into 3 geographical strata: lower, middle, and upper. One governorate represented each region. Abstractors collected data from medical records of cancer centers, national tertiary care institutions, Health Insurance Organization, Government-Subsidized Treatment Program, and death records. Data ...

  18. Suborbital Science Program: Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelFrate, John

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the suborbital science program at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The Program Objectives are given in various areas: (1) Satellite Calibration and Validation (Cal/val)--Provide methods to perform the cal/val requirements for Earth Observing System satellites; (2) New Sensor Development -- Provide methods to reduce risk for new sensor concepts and algorithm development prior to committing sensors to operations; (3) Process Studies -- Facilitate the acquisition of high spatial/temporal resolution focused measurements that are required to understand small atmospheric and surface structures which generate powerful Earth system effects; and (4) Airborne Networking -- Develop disruption-tolerant networking to enable integrated multiple scale measurements of critical environmental features. Dryden supports the NASA Airborne Science Program and the nation in several elements: ER-2, G-3, DC-8, Ikhana (Predator B) & Global Hawk and Reveal. These are reviewed in detail in the presentation.

  19. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University's College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor's assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  20. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy at a comprehensive cancer center

    OpenAIRE

    Connors, Shahnjayla K.; Goodman, Melody S.; Myckatyn, Terence; Margenthaler, Julie; Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is an integral part of breast cancer treatment that positively impacts quality of life in breast cancer survivors. Although breast reconstruction rates have increased over time, African American women remain less likely to receive breast reconstruction compared to Caucasian women. National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, specialized institutions with more standardized models of cancer treatment, report higher breast r...

  1. 7 CFR 226.11 - Program payments for centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Payment Provisions § 226.11 Program... approved child care centers, at-risk afterschool care centers, adult day care centers, emergency...

  2. Accreditation for excellence of cancer research institutes: recommendations from the Italian Network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deriu, Pier Luigi; La Pietra, Leonardo; Pierotti, Marco; Collazzo, Raffaele; Paradiso, Angelo; Belardelli, Filippo; De Paoli, Paolo; Nigro, Aldo; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, Piergiuseppe; Pierotti, Marco; Roli, Anna; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Scala, Stefania; Amadori, Alberto; Chiusole, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino; Fusco, Vincenzo; Storto, Giovanni; De Maria, Ruggero; Canitano, Stefano; Apolone, Giovanni; Ravelli, Maria; Mazzini, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Bernabini, Marna; Ancarani, Valentina; Lombardo, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    A panel of experts from Italian Comprehensive Cancer Centers defines the recommendations for external quality control programs aimed to accreditation to excellence of these institutes. After definition of the process as a systematic, periodic evaluation performed by an external agency to verify whether a health organization possesses certain prerequisites regarding structural, organizational and operational conditions that are thought to affect health care quality, the panel reviews models internationally available and makes final recommendations on aspects considered of main interest. This position paper has been produced within a special project of the Ministry of Health of the Italian Government aimed to accredit, according to OECI model, 11 Italian cancer centers in the period 2012-2014. The Project represents the effort undertaken by this network of Comprehensive Cancer Centers to find a common denominator for the experience of all Institutes in external quality control programs. Fourteen shared "statements" are put forth, designed to offer some indications on the main aspects of this subject, based on literature evidence or expert opinions. They deal with the need for "accountability" and involvement of the entire organization, the effectiveness of self-evaluation, the temporal continuity and the educational value of the experience, the use of indicators and measurement tools, additionally for intra- and inter-organization comparison, the system of evaluation models used, the provision for specific requisites for oncology, and the opportunity for mutual exchange of evaluation experiences. PMID:24503807

  3. Center Innovation Fund: KSC CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Each individual NASA Center has full discretion on the use of the funds and the Center Chief Technologists coordinates a competitive process at their Center for the...

  4. Center Innovation Fund: JPL CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Funds are distributed to each NASA Center to support emerging technologies and creative initiatives that leverage Center talent and capabilities. NASA scientists...

  5. Development of a Federally Funded Demonstration Colorectal Cancer Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Royalty, MS

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among U.S. adults. In 2004, treatment costs for colorectal cancer were $8.4 billion.There is substantial evidence that colorectal cancer incidence and mortality are reduced with regular screening. The natural history of this disease is also well described: most colorectal cancers develop slowly from preexisting polyps. This slow development provides an opportunity to intervene with screening tests, which can either prevent colorectal cancer through the removal of polyps or detect it at an early stage. However, much less is known about how best to implement an effective colorectal cancer screening program. Screening rates are low, and uninsured persons, low-income persons, and persons who have not visited a physician within a year are least likely to be screened.Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has 15 years of experience supporting the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program for the underserved population, a similar national program for colorectal cancer is not in place. To explore the feasibility of implementing a national program for the underserved U.S. population and to learn which settings and which program models are most viable and cost-effective, CDC began a 3-year colorectal cancer screening demonstration program in 2005.This article describes briefly this demonstration program and the process CDC used to design it and to select program sites. The multiple-methods evaluation now under way to assess the program’s feasibility and describe key outcomes is also detailed. Evaluation results will be used to inform future activities related to organized screening for colorectal cancer.

  6. Center Innovation Fund: AFRC CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Armstrong Flight Research Center is NASA’s primary center for atmospheric flight research and operations, with a vision “to fly what others...

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  8. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  9. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  10. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program Grantee; Exception to Competition AGENCY: Health... Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program Grantee--University of... University of Guam School of Nursing, an Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program grantee, to...

  11. Treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: Experience from a tertiary Indian cancer center

    OpenAIRE

    Sirohi, B; S Dawood; S. Rastogi; Pandey, A.; Bal, M; N Shetty; Shrikhande, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to look at the outcome of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer treated at a tertiary cancer center in India. Patients And Methods: A total of 101 patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer diagnosed between May 2012 and July 2013 were identified from a prospectively maintained database at the tertiary cancer center. Overall survival (OS) was computed using the Kaplan–Meir product limit method and compared across groups using the...

  12. Preventing cervical cancer : overviews of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and 2 US immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kris; Curtis, C Robinette; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Stokley, Shannon; Walker, Chastity; Roland, Katherine; Benard, Vicki; Saraiya, Mona

    2008-11-15

    Three federal programs with the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, especially among underserved populations, are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, and the Section 317 immunization grant program. The NBCCEDP provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to uninsured and underinsured women. The VFC program and the Section 317 immunization grant program provide vaccines, including human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, to targeted populations at no cost for these vaccines. This article describes the programs, their histories, populations served, services offered, and roles in preventing cervical cancer through HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Potential long-term reduction in healthcare costs resulting from HPV vaccination is also discussed. As an example of an initiative to vaccinate uninsured women aged 19-26 years through a cancer services program, a state-based effort that was recently launched in New York, is highlighted.

  13. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Prevention Fellowship provides a strong foundation for scientists and clinicians to train in the field of cancer prevention and control. This structured, multidisciplinary program offers early career scientists from different health disciplines a variety of postdoctoral training opportunities . | Training to form a strong foundation in cancer prevention and control for scientists and clinicians.

  14. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  15. The Early Prostate Cancer program: bicalutamide in nonmetastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Roder, Martin Andreas; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer program is investigating the addition of bicalutamide 150 mg to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer. The third program analysis, at 7.4 years' median follow-up, has shown that bicalutamide 150 mg does not benefit patients...

  16. Center Independent Research & Developments: JSC IRAD Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The center...

  17. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    . For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

  18. Adaptation of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Chinese Immigrant Cancer Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the study is to modify a type of counseling called "Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy" to meet the needs of Chinese cancer patients. Many cancer patients use counseling or other resources to help cope with the emotional burden of their illnesses. Counseling often helps them cope with cancer by giving them a place to express their feelings. "Meaning-Centered" counseling aims to teach cancer patients how to maintain or even increase a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives, despite cancer. |

  19. Start-Up of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy DeGroff, MPH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded five sites to implement the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP. An evaluation is being conducted that includes a multiple case study. Case study results for the start-up period, the time between initial funding and screening initiation, provide details about the program models and start-up process and reveal important lessons learned.MethodsThe multiple case study includes all five CRCSDP sites, each representing a unique case. Data were collected from August 2005 through September 2006 from documents, observations, and more than 70 interviews with program staff and stakeholders.ResultsSites differed by geographic service area, screening modality selected, and service delivery structure. Program models were influenced by two factors: preexisting infrastructure and the need to adapt programs to fit local service delivery structures. Several sites modeled program components after their National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Medical advisory boards convened by all sites provided clinical support for developing program policies and quality assurance plans. Partnerships with comprehensive cancer control programs facilitated access to financial and in-kind resources.ConclusionThe program models developed by the CRCSDP sites offer a range of prototypes. Case study results suggest benefits in employing a multidisciplinary staff team, assembling a medical advisory board, collaborating with local partners, using preexisting resources, designing programs that are easily incorporated into existing service delivery systems, and planning for adequate start-up time.

  20. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is the tenth supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the document are as follows: preface; history and acknowledgements; abstract format; recommended program package contents; program classification guide and thesaurus; and abstract collection

  1. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.; Harrison, C. Jr.; Hughes, C.E.; Jorgensen, R.; Legan, M.; Menozzi, T.; Ranzini, L.; Strecok, A.J.

    1977-08-01

    This publication is the eleventh supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the complete document ANL-7411 are as follows: preface, history and acknowledgements, abstract format, recommended program package contents, program classification guide and thesaurus, and the abstract collection. (RWR)

  2. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.

    1976-08-01

    This publication is the tenth supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the document are as follows: preface; history and acknowledgements; abstract format; recommended program package contents; program classification guide and thesaurus; and abstract collection. (RWR)

  3. A Patient-Centered Perspective on Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Zebrack

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients’ physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people’s experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  4. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  5. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements

  6. The development of a telemedical cancer center within the Veterans Affairs Health Care System: a report of preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Kevin G; Schwartz, David L; Lentz, Susan; Vallières, Eric; Montgomery, R Bruce; Schubach, William; Penson, David; Yueh, Bevan; Chansky, Howard; Zink, Claudia; Parayno, Darla; Starkebaum, Gordon

    2002-01-01

    In order to optimize the delivery of multidisciplinary cancer care to veterans, our institution has developed a regional cancer center with a telemedical outreach program. The objectives of this report are to describe the organization and function of the telemedical cancer center and to report our early clinical results. The Veterans Affairs Health Care System is organized into a series of integrated service networks that serve veterans within different areas throughout the United States. Within Veterans Integrated Service Network 20 (Washington, Alaska, Idaho, Oregon) we have developed a regional cancer center with telemedicine links to four outlying facilities within the service area. The telemedical outreach effort functions through the use of a multidisciplinary telemedicine tumor board. The tumor board serves patients in outlying facilities by providing comprehensive, multidisciplinary consultation for the complete range of malignancies. For individuals who do require referral to the cancer center, the tumor board serves to coordinate the logistical and clinical details of the referral process. This program has been in existence for 1 year. During that time 85 patients have been evaluated in the telemedicine tumor board. Sixty-two percent of the patients were treated at their closest facility; 38% were referred to the cancer center for treatment and/or additional diagnostic studies. The patients' diagnoses included the entire clinical spectrum of malignant disease. Preliminary clinical results demonstrate the program is feasible and it improves access to multidisciplinary cancer care. Potential benefits include improved referral coordination and minimization of patient travel and treatment delays. PMID:12020412

  7. The Puente Learning Center: A Building and a Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the People United To Enrich the Neighborhood through Education (Puente) Learning Center, a nonprofit center in Los Angeles (California) providing programs in literacy, English-as-a-Second-Language, study skills, job training, and computer skills for people who traditionally have had limited access to education and technology. (SLD)

  8. 77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... development programs, technology transfer capability, the use of peer review, and effective partnerships to... technology ] transfer activities; to provide for a critical transportation knowledge base outside of the... the stated research, technology transfer, education, and outreach goals; and ``(ix) the ability of...

  9. 75 FR 32169 - Comprehensive Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... 13110) proposing waivers of 34 CFR 75.250 and 34 CFR 75.261(c)(2) of EDGAR in order to give early notice... collection requirements. Intergovernmental Review This program is subject to Executive Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. One of the objectives of the Executive Order is to foster an...

  10. Quality assessments for cancer centers in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A.; Rajan, A.; Harten, van W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer centers are pressured to deliver high-quality services that can be measured and improved, which has led to an increase of assessments in many countries. A critical area of quality improvement is to improve patient outcome. An overview of existing assessments can help stakeholders

  11. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  12. Cancer survivorship research: a review of the literature and summary of current NCI-designated cancer center projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, J Phil; Dean, Julie A; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-10-01

    The number of cancer survivors and the amount of cancer survivorship research have grown substantially during the past three decades. This article provides a review of interventional and observational cancer survivorship research efforts as well as a summary of current cancer survivorship research projects being conducted by National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in an effort to identify areas that need further attention.

  13. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  14. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  15. Single Institution Feasibility Trials - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the CIP program, the current R21 mechanism provides potential funding for small, single institution feasibility trials. The current announcement is titled In Vivo Cancer Imaging Exploratory/Developmental Grants.

  16. A Ten-Year Assessment of a Biomedical Engineering Summer Research Internship within a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. S.; Wu, X.; Frye, C. A.; Mathur, A. B.; Patrick, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A Biomedical Engineering Internship Program conducted within a Comprehensive Cancer Center over a 10 year period was assessed and evaluated. Although this is a non-traditional location for an internship, it is an ideal site for a multidisciplinary training program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. We made a…

  17. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  18. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

  19. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  20. Epidemiology of breast cancer at the shaukat khanum memorial cancer hospital and research center, lahore, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the demographic and clinical features of females presenting with breast malignancies at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Center (SKMCH and RC), Lahore, Pakistan. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: SKMCH and RC, Lahore, from January 2008 to December 2012. Methodology: Demographic and clinical features of female breast cancer patients, registered at SKMCH and RC, were studied. Mean values, counts, and percentages were obtained. Results: Four-thousand, three-hundred and sixty-six female breast malignancies were recorded. Nearly 80.4% of the patients belonged to Punjab. Mean age at presentation was 48.6 ± 12.2 years, at menarche was 13.2 ± 1.2 years, and at first childbirth was 23.7 ± 4.8 years. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 29.0 ± 5.7 kg/m2. In 60.1%, history of breast feeding was positive. In 55.7%, there was no history of use of any Oral Contraceptive Pills (OCP)/Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Nearly 42.7% were postmenopausal, 85.2% had infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 49.6% had grade 3 tumor, 60.7% had stage II disease, and 37.3% were Estrogen Receptor (ER)/Progesterone Receptor (PR)+, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-. Family history of breast cancer was positive in 16.9% of the cases. Conclusion: The mean presenting age is lower than what has been recorded in the West. It may be worthwhile collating results from different institutions in order to study the epidemiology of the disease more extensively and develop cancer control and early detection programs. (author)

  1. Assessment of diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer cases at two cancer centers in Egypt and Tunisia

    OpenAIRE

    Schairer, Catherine; Soliman, Amr S; Omar, Sherif; Khaled, Hussein; Eissa, Saad; Ayed, Farhat Ben; Khalafallah, Samir; Ayoub, Wided Ben; Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Merajver, Sofia; Swain, Sandra M; Gail, Mitchell; Brown, Linda Morris

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is largely clinical and therefore inherently somewhat subjective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnosis of IBC at two centers in North Africa where a higher proportion of breast cancer is diagnosed as IBC than in the United States (U.S.). Physicians prospectively enrolled suspected IBC cases at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) – Cairo, Egypt, and the Institut Salah Azaiz (ISA), Tunisia, recorded extent and duration of si...

  2. 77 FR 40590 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability... Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects--Burn Model... Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

  3. 77 FR 40601 - Final Priority: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Final Priority: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability...)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research... Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and...

  4. 77 FR 34363 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Traumatic Brain Injury Model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems... Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)-- Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers... for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by...

  5. 77 FR 37022 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Rehabilitation Engineering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Rehabilitation Engineering Research... and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERC). SUMMARY: The Assistant... populations; (3) determine ] the best strategies and programs to improve rehabilitation outcomes...

  6. The bicalutamide Early Prostate Cancer Program. Demography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, W A.; McLeod, D; Iversen, P;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment for early prostate cancer has yet to be established. A well-tolerated hormonal therapy such as bicalutamide could be a useful treatment option in this setting, either as adjuvant or immediate therapy. A major collaborative clinical trials program was set up to...... investigate bicalutamide as a treatment option for local prostate cancer (localized or locally advanced disease). METHODS: The bicalutamide Early Prostate Cancer program comprises three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of similar design that are being conducted in distinct geographical...... areas (North America; Australia, Europe, Israel, South Africa and Mexico; and Scandinavia). Men with T1b-4N0-1M0 (TNM 1997) prostate cancer have been randomized on a 1:1 basis to receive bicalutamide 150 mg daily or placebo. Recruitment to the program closed in July 1998, and follow-up is ongoing. Study...

  7. Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center: Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center was created as part of an ongoing federal effort to provide technologies and methods that protect human health and welfare and environment from hazardous wastes. The Center was established by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) to develop and adapt innovative technologies and methods for assessing the impacts of and remediating inactive hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste sites. The Superfund legislation authorized $10 million for Pacific Northwest Laboratory to establish and operate the Center over a 5-year period. Under this legislation, Congress authorized $10 million each to support research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) on hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste problems in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, including the Hanford Site. In 1987, the Center initiated its RD and D activities and prepared this Program Plan that presents the framework within which the Center will carry out its mission. Section 1.0 describes the Center, its mission, objectives, organization, and relationship to other programs. Section 2.0 describes the Center's RD and D strategy and contains the RD and D objectives, priorities, and process to be used to select specific projects. Section 3.0 contains the Center's FY 1988 operating plan and describes the specific RD and D projects to be carried out and their budgets and schedules. 9 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Program Success of Mental Health Clients in Day Reporting Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Brian; Brown, Eleanor; Yan, Fengxia; Mitchell, Crystal; Robinson, Charles; DeGroot, James; Braithwaite, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Day-reporting centers (DRCs) provide programming for probationers with a history of non-compliant behavior related to substance abuse, who are overrepresented among justice-involved men and women. While evaluations of DRCs demonstrate some effectiveness, results are mixed and less is known about predictors of program success. This evaluation compared indicators of program success between adult offenders with a substance use disorder (n = 144) and those with co-morbid mental illness (n = 113) at three DRCs. Analyses examined differences between and within groups on program completion, personal characteristics and subjective measures of well-being. Results indicated that program completers were more likely to be participants with substance use disorders only and to have a drug-related referring charge. No significant differences between groups on most measures of well-being were observed. Future investigations should consider tracking program dropouts to better understand program attrition and explore readiness to change in treatment programming.

  9. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers

  10. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers.

  11. METHOD OF CENTERS ALGORITHM FOR MULTI-OBJECTIVE PROGRAMMING PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tarek Emam

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a method of centers for solving multi-objective programming problems, where the objective functions involved are concave functions and the set of feasible points is convex. The algorithm is defined so that the sub-problems that must be solved during its execution may be solved by finite-step procedures. Conditions are given under which the algorithm generates sequences of feasible points and constraint multiplier vectors that have accumulation points satisfying the KKT conditions. Finally, we establish convergence of the proposed method of centers algorithm for solving multiobjective programming problems.

  12. ICMIC Institutions - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICMIC grants facilitate interaction among scientists from a variety of fields to conduct multidisciplinary research on cellular and molecular imaging related to cancer. Pre-ICMIC planning grants have provided time and funds for investigators and institutions to prepare themselves, organizationally and scientifically, to establish ICMICs.

  13. User-Centered Design of GPU-Based Shader Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2012-01-01

    to explore and exploit the full potential of shader programs. To this end, we develop principles and guidelines for the design of usercentered graphical interfaces for shaders. With the help of several examples, we show how the requirements of a user-centered interface design influence the choice of widgets...

  14. Health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours in women who applied to cancer early detection center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting women in Turkey. The early detection methods for breast cancer have been associated with health belief variables. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine women's health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours. Methods: This study was designed as descriptive and cross-sectional survey and was performed on 344 women who applied the Nigde Cancer Early Diagnosis, Screening and Education Center between May and October 2009. The data were collected using a questionnaire which consists of socio-demographic characteristics and breast cancer risk factors and Health Belief Model Scale. Data analysis was performed using frequency and Mann-Whitney U Test. All values of p0.05. According to study results, the rate of regular BSE performance rate for women was found low. Therefore, KETEM was planned to the training programs related to breast cancer screening methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(3.000: 265-271

  15. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melissa A; Samaras, Athena T; Nonzee, Narissa J; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients' interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus-community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  16. 76 FR 32971 - Proposed Priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... Proposed Priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program AGENCY... Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability... Services proposes a priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers...

  17. A rehabilitation program for lung cancer patients during postthoracotomy chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman AJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Amy J Hoffman,1 Ruth Ann Brintnall,2 Alexander von Eye,3 Lee W Jones,4 Gordon Alderink,5 Lawrence H Patzelt,6 Jean K Brown7 1College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA; 2Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI, USA; 3Psychology Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA; 4Duke Center for Cancer Survivorship Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 5Frederik Meijer Honors College, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI, USA; 6Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids, MI, USA and College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA; 7School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Objective: The objective of this pilot study was to describe the effects of a 16-week home-based rehabilitative exercise program on cancer-related fatigue (CRF, other symptoms, functional status, and quality of life (QOL for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after thoracotomy starting within days after hospital discharge and continuing through the initiation and completion of chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Five patients with NSCLC completed the Brief Fatigue Inventory (measuring CRF severity and the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (measuring symptom severity before and after thoractomy, and at the end of each week of the 16-week exercise program. Additionally, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (measuring physical and mental functional status and the Quality of Life Index (measuring QOL were completed before and after thoracotomy, after weeks 3, 6, 12, and 16 (the end of the exercise program. Further, the 6-minute walk test (measuring functional capacity was administered before thoracotomy, prior to the initiation of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, and at the end of the 16-week exercise program, after completion of chemotherapy. Results: Participants had a

  18. Science Communication Fellowship Program at the Pacific Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, E. M.; Vukajlovich, D.; Fitzwater, S.; Selvakumar, M.

    2011-12-01

    With funding from an NSF Informal Science Education grant, the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington began the Science Communication Fellowship program in 2009 as part of the Portal to the Public initiative. The purpose of the Science Communication Fellowship program is to train scientists and engineers to communicate more effectively with the general public regarding their research and to assist with the development of hands-on activities that can be used by the scientists and engineers for outreach activities. The program came out of a collaboration to develop a model for effectively communicating current science research at informal science education organizations. The program model has undergone in-depth research and evaluation to assess its effectiveness and impact. To become Science Communication Fellows, researchers participate in four three-hour professional development sessions, where they learn communication techniques through role-playing and hands-on activities. The workshops are supplemented with additional one-on-one meetings with Science Center staff to help the new Fellows develop activities for use at outreach events. These activities are then used by the Fellows at public events that highlight current research taking place in the region. To date over 80 scientists and engineers have gone through the training sessions to become Science Communication Fellows. The Pacific Science Center holds approximately 12 events a year in which Fellows can facilitate their activity. Public programs range from small, monthly programs to large, annual Research Weekends. Funding for this program continues through support from NIH, IMLS, NSF, and NASA grants. For more information, please contact the current program administrator Dana Vukajlovich at DVukajlovich@pacsci.org.

  19. Development and Pilot Evaluation of Native CREST – a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Christine A; Bauer, Mark C.; Horazdovsky, Bruce F.; Garrison, Edward R.; Patten, Christi A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates’ interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience & Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program provi...

  20. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  1. Establishing and Sustaining a Prospective Screening Program for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema at the Massachusetts General Hospital: Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Brunelle, Cheryl; Skolny, Melissa; Ferguson, Chantal; Swaroop, Meyha; O’Toole, Jean; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within ...

  2. German Bowel Cancer Center: An Attempt to Improve Treatment Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Jannasch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancies, but treatment results show high diversity. Certified bowel cancer centres (BCC are the basis of a German project for improvement of treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze if certification would enhance short-term outcome in rectal cancer surgery. Material and Methods. This quality assurance study included 8197 patients with rectal cancer treated between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2010. We compared cohorts treated in certified and noncertified hospitals regarding preoperative variables and perioperative outcomes. Outcomes were verified by matched-pair analysis. Results. Patients of noncertified hospitals had higher ASA-scores, higher prevalence of risk factors, more distant metastases, lower tumour localization, lower frequency of pelvic MRI, and higher frequencies of missing values and undetermined TNM classifications (significant differences only. Outcome analysis revealed more general complications in certified hospitals (20.3% versus 17.4%, p=0.03. Both cohorts did not differ significantly in percentage of R0-resections, intraoperative complications, anastomotic leakage, in-hospital death, and abdominal wall dehiscence. Conclusions. The concept of BCC is a step towards improving the structural and procedural quality. This is a good basis for improving outcome quality but cannot replace it. For a primary surgical disease like rectal cancer a specific, surgery-targeted program is still needed.

  3. An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griest, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

  4. NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

  5. 77 FR 480 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Field.... Overview Information Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-- Field Initiated...) Projects program is to develop methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the...

  6. 76 FR 38134 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability...; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research... populations; (3) determine the best strategies and programs to improve rehabilitation outcomes for...

  7. 77 FR 21547 - Proposed Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Proposed Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program AGENCY: Office of... Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program... underserved populations; (3) determine best strategies and programs to improve rehabilitation outcomes...

  8. 76 FR 15964 - Funding Priorities: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Funding Priorities: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program AGENCY: Office of... funding priorities for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program... best strategies and programs to improve rehabilitation outcomes for underserved populations;...

  9. 76 FR 17396 - Proposed Priorities: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Proposed Priorities: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program AGENCY: Office of... Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by NIDRR. Specifically, this... programs to improve rehabilitation outcomes for underserved populations; (4) identify research gaps;...

  10. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mellor-Crummey

    2008-02-29

    Rice University's achievements as part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing include: (1) design and implemention of cafc, the first multi-platform CAF compiler for distributed and shared-memory machines, (2) performance studies of the efficiency of programs written using the CAF and UPC programming models, (3) a novel technique to analyze explicitly-parallel SPMD programs that facilitates optimization, (4) design, implementation, and evaluation of new language features for CAF, including communication topologies, multi-version variables, and distributed multithreading to simplify development of high-performance codes in CAF, and (5) a synchronization strength reduction transformation for automatically replacing barrier-based synchronization with more efficient point-to-point synchronization. The prototype Co-array Fortran compiler cafc developed in this project is available as open source software from http://www.hipersoft.rice.edu/caf.

  11. Center of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment launched in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On 24 August, a center of nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and treatment was officially inaugurated in Tianjin. The center was jointly established by the CAS Institute of High-energy Physics, the CAS affiliated National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, and the Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital.

  12. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a summary of Plasma Fusion Center research activities. Particular emphasis is placed on describing (a) technical progress during the past year, (b) future plans, and (c) research programs and objectives at the individual research group level. In particular, the report covers the following: (1) applied plasma physics, (2) toroidal confinement experiments, (3) mirror confinement experiments, (4) fusion technology and engineering, and (5) fusion systems

  13. Breast cancer. National Center for Radiation Therapy. Trinidad and Tobago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was performed a retrospective study of cases registered at the Center National Radiotherapy of Trinidad and Tobago, with histologically or cytological breast cancer in the period from January 1 to July 31, 2007. It 125 cases studied. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of breast cancer in these patients, the different treatments used in order to improve prevention, treatment regimens, quality of life and increase survival rates of women suffering from this disease. The risk of cancer increases with age in the age group of 50-59 years was the highest incidence of the disease, an important group of patients suffer disease after 70 years. 64% of the cases were diagnosed in stage 0-II, carcinoma in situ was diagnosed in 4% of the patients, 52.8% of cases had positive lymph nodes. Surgery and chemotherapy were treatments used, the surgery was done in 92.8% of patients, being the the most common radical surgery, chemotherapy was used in 76% of cases, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and taxol were the most used drugs. The hormone receptors were positive in 65% of cases and Her 2 negative in 82.02%, the third generation aromatase inhibitors were hormones most used. Our results were compared with other studies. (Author)

  14. Treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: Experience from a tertiary Indian cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sirohi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to look at the outcome of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer treated at a tertiary cancer center in India. Patients And Methods: A total of 101 patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer diagnosed between May 2012 and July 2013 were identified from a prospectively maintained database at the tertiary cancer center. Overall survival (OS was computed using the Kaplan–Meir product limit method and compared across groups using the log-rank statistics. Cox proportional hazards model, adjusted for a number of patient and tumor characteristics, was then used to determine factors prognostic for OS. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 55 years (range: 21–81 years. 57.4% (n = 58 of patients were male, 22% (n = 22 had performance status (PS of <2 at diagnosis and 89% received first-line chemotherapy, while the rest received best supportive care. For the whole cohort, 6 month and 1-year OS was 57% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 46–66% and 47% (95% CI: 35–57%, respectively. In a multivariable model, PS <2 and oligometastatic disease were associated with a significantly decreased risk of death. Conclusion: Results from our analysis indicate that the prognostic outcome among Indian patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer is poor with survival outcomes similar to those reported in North America and Europe.

  15. Using lessons from breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening to inform the development of lung cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Katrina; Kim, Jane J; Halm, Ethan A; Ballard, Rachel M; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Multiple advisory groups now recommend that high-risk smokers be screened for lung cancer by low-dose computed tomography. Given that the development of lung cancer screening programs will face many of the same issues that have challenged other cancer screening programs, the National Cancer Institute-funded Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium was used to identify lessons learned from the implementation of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening that should inform the introduction of lung cancer screening. These lessons include the importance of developing systems for identifying and recruiting eligible individuals in primary care, ensuring that screening centers are qualified and performance is monitored, creating clear communication standards for reporting screening results to referring physicians and patients, ensuring follow-up is available for individuals with abnormal test results, avoiding overscreening, remembering primary prevention, and leveraging advances in cancer genetics and immunology. Overall, this experience emphasizes that effective cancer screening is a multistep activity that requires robust strategies to initiate, report, follow up, and track each step as well as a dynamic and ongoing oversight process to revise current screening practices as new evidence regarding screening is created, new screening technologies are developed, new biological markers are identified, and new approaches to health care delivery are disseminated. Cancer 2016;122:1338-1342. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26929386

  16. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  17. 76 FR 82286 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training (ARRT) Projects AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.... Overview Information Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--...

  18. Coordinating centers in cancer epidemiology research: the Asia Cohort Consortium coordinating center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Betsy; Smith, Briana R; Potter, John D

    2011-10-01

    Although it is tacitly recognized that a good coordinating center (CC) is essential to the success of any multisite collaborative project, very little study has been done on what makes a CC successful, why some CCs fail, or how to build a CC that meets the needs of a given project. Moreover, very little published guidance is available, as few CCs outside the clinical trial realm write about their work. The Asia Cohort Consortium (ACC) is a collaborative cancer epidemiology research project that has made strong scientific and organizational progress over the past 3 years by focusing its CC on the following activities: collaboration development; operations management; statistical and data management; and communications infrastructure and tool development. Our hope is that, by sharing our experience building the ACC CC, we can begin a conversation about what it means to run a CC for multi-institutional collaboration in cancer epidemiology, help other collaborative projects solve some of the issues associated with collaborative research, and learn from others. PMID:21803842

  19. A reliability-centered maintenance program for primary reactor pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor coolant and recirculation pumps require significant outage times to repair and, as a consequence, are a major contributor to plant downtime and lost capacity. To improve reliability of these primary reactor pumps, a comprehensive preventative maintenance program has been developed using the principles of reliability-centered maintenance. This method establishes the frequency of past failures, estimates the probability of future occurrences, and assesses the effect of all potential functional failures of the pump. Maintenance tasks are then defined to address those specific failure modes that have the largest probability of occurrence and the greatest impact on plant availability. Benefits include: improved reliability, a maintenance program that satisfies the industry initiative on maintenance, prudence documentation in support of unforeseen outages, and documented justification for rate-base increases for maintenance costs

  20. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  1. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  2. Tomsk Cardiology Center program on lasers in cardiovascular: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Eugeni P.; Karpov, Rostislav S.; Dudko, Victor A.; Shipulin, Vladimir M.

    1994-12-01

    Recent progress in biomedical optics resulted in increased activity in this area at a number of different centers. Reported are the first results of the program directed to incorporate at Tomsk Cardiology Center experience gained in Tomsk optical profile research institutions in areas of light-matter interaction, high resolution spectroscopy, laser physics and relevant software and their usage in cardiac therapy, surgery, and diagnostics. To coordinate research work in this direction the special unit-laboratory of laser medicine is organized at the Center. Laboratory activity goes in the following directions: study of spectral properties of vessel walls in norm and atherosclerosis, comparative study of different wavelength laser radiation action on normal and atherosclerotically damaged tissues, novel approach to intravascular imaging, and usage of high sensitive laser spectroscopy for early diagnosis of cardiac diseases. The spectroscopic study of AP and normal tissue is aimed at understanding of differences in internal energy structures and ways of energy migration which are of critical importance for reaching selective laser action on normal and deceased tissues. To compare thermal, mechanical, and photo-chemical variations of tissues caused by laser radiation the XeCl excimer laser with Raman shifting cell and Nd:YAG laser with second, third, and fourth harmonic converters are employed. Fine influence of pulse duration, intensity, and repetition rates on AP removal is considered in laboratory experiments with vessel samples. Preliminary results on theoretical consideration for determination of spectroscopically detectable markers of some cardiac diseases are reported as well.

  3. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  4. 77 FR 40596 - Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers program published in the Federal Register on April 28, 2006 (71 FR... Applications for New Awards: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Disability... Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects...

  5. Management and performance features of cancer centers in Europe: A fuzzy-set analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke; Lobo, Mariana Fernandes; Dijk, van Joris; Lepage-Nefkens, Isabelle; Laranja-Pontes, Jose; Conceicao Goncalves, da Vitor; Harten, van Wim; Rocha-Goncalves, Francisco Nuno

    2016-01-01

    The specific aim of this study is to identify the performance features of cancer centers in the European Union by using a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The fsQCA method represents cases (cancer centers) as a combination of explanatory and outcome conditions. This study uses dat

  6. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; van Harten, Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to critically appraise translational research models for suitability in performance assessment of cancer centers. Process models, such as the Process Marker Model and Lean and Six Sigma applications, seem to be suitable for performance assessment of cancer centers. However, they must be thoroughly tested in practice.

  7. Stewardship and cancer screening programs in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Marie Novinskey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As one of the four major functions of health systems, Stewardship is on the health agenda of several countries worldwide. There is, however, little empirical evidence to support or guide its implementation. To help bridge this gap, the paper aims to contribute to the empirical evidence for health system stewardship and, importantly, to offer implementers an explanatory example of what it could mean in practice. It achieves this by analyzing the experience of the Italian Cancer Screening Programs (from 2004-2009 within a comprehensive framework for health system stewardship. The analysis is largely based on primary and secondary qualitative data, using information collected from an in-depth interview, official documents, and scientific and grey literature. We describe the framework and sub-functions of stewardship, identify the stewardship activities that were carried out by the Programs, and reflect upon the operability of the framework as well as the activities that the Programs have not implemented but would benefit from doing so. The general experience and activities of the Italian Cancer Screening Programs fit well into the stewardship framework, despite not having followed it a priori. Overall, the Programs managed to implement most activities under each sub-function. As an empirical case study, they corroborated the theoretical framework and demonstrated how it could be translated into certain activities on an operational platform. Ultimately, the analysis showed that the framework of stewardship is useful for structuring and prioritizing the most important activities of a steward and, thus, provides a good benchmark for implementers.

  8. The National Program of Cancer Registries: Explaining State Variations in Average Cost per Case Reported

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah K. Weir, PhD

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Program of Cancer Registries is a federally funded surveillance program that provides support and assistance to state and territorial health departments for the operation of cancer registries. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s costs to report cancer cases during the first 5 years of the National Program of Cancer Registries. Methods Information on expenditures and number of cases reported through the National Program of Cancer Registries was used to estimate the average cost per case reported for each state program. Additional information was obtained from other sources, and regression analyses were used to assess the contribution of each factor. Results Average costs of the National Program of Cancer Registries differed substantially among programs and were inversely associated with the number of cases reported (P < .001. The geographic area of the state was positively associated with the cost (P = .01, as was the regional cost of living (P = .08, whereas the program type (i.e., enhancement or planning was inversely associated with cost (P = .08. Conclusion The apparent existence of economies of scale suggests that contiguous state programs might benefit from sharing infrastructure and other fixed costs, such as database management resources, depending on the geographic area and population size served. Sharing database management resources might also promote uniform data collection and quality control practices, reduce the information-sharing burden among states, and allow more resources to be used for other cancer prevention and control activities.

  9. Relative dose intensity of systemic chemotherapy in an outpatient cancer center

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Uptigrove; Kari Vavra; Claire Saadeh; Gordan Srkalovic

    2010-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to determine the average relative dose intensity (RDI) of chemotherapy administered to patients in a community-based outpatient cancer center. Methods. A retrospective review of medical records in an outpatient cancer center was conducted for patients initiating systemic chemotherapy in 2007 for a diagnosis of lymphoma, breast, lung, ovary, or colon cancer. Eighty-four records meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed for demographi...

  10. Administrative Problem-Solving for Writing Programs and Writing Centers: Scenarios in Effective Program Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers-Breslin, Linda

    Addressing the issues and problems faced by writing program administrators (WPAs) and writing center directors (WCDs), and how they can most effectively resolve the political, pedagogical, and financial questions that arise, this book presents essays from experienced WPAs and WCDs at a wide variety of institutions that offer scenarios and case…

  11. National Energy Software Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.M.; Butler, M.K.; De Bruler, M.M.

    1979-05-01

    This is the third complete revision of program abstracts undertaken by the Center. Programs of the IBM 7040, 7090, and CDC 3600 vintage have been removed. Historical data and information on abstract format, program package contents, and subject classification are given. The following subject areas are included in the library: cross section and resonance integral calculations; spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems; static design studies; depletion, fuel management, cost analysis, and power plant economics; space-independent kinetics; space--time kinetics, coupled neutronics--hydrodynamics--thermodynamics and excursion simulations; radiological safety, hazard and accident analysis; heat transfer and fluid flow; deformation and stress distribution computations, structural analysis and engineering design studies; gamma heating and shield design; reactor systems analysis; data preparation; data management; subsidiary calculations; experimental data processing; general mathematical and computing system routines; materials; environmental and earth sciences; electronics, engineering equipment, and energy systems studies; chemistry; particle accelerators and high-voltage machines; physics; magnetic fusion research; data. (RWR)

  12. National Energy Software Center: compilation of program abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third complete revision of program abstracts undertaken by the Center. Programs of the IBM 7040, 7090, and CDC 3600 vintage have been removed. Historical data and information on abstract format, program package contents, and subject classification are given. The following subject areas are included in the library: cross section and resonance integral calculations; spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems; static design studies; depletion, fuel management, cost analysis, and power plant economics; space-independent kinetics; space--time kinetics, coupled neutronics--hydrodynamics--thermodynamics and excursion simulations; radiological safety, hazard and accident analysis; heat transfer and fluid flow; deformation and stress distribution computations, structural analysis and engineering design studies; gamma heating and shield design; reactor systems analysis; data preparation; data management; subsidiary calculations; experimental data processing; general mathematical and computing system routines; materials; environmental and earth sciences; electronics, engineering equipment, and energy systems studies; chemistry; particle accelerators and high-voltage machines; physics; magnetic fusion research; data

  13. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) to support participation in the ETCTN

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Accreditation Program for Breast Centers About NAPBC Accreditation Education Patient Resources Center Resources NAPBC Standards News Cancer ... Program for Hospitals Trauma Systems Consultation Program Trauma Education Publications and Posters Injury Prevention and Control Education ...

  15. The Cost analysis of cervical cancer screening services provided by Damavand health center in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Chouhdari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, the health sector in many countries is facing with severe resource constraints; hence it is absolutely necessary that cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessment have a major role in design of health services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-benefit and effectiveness of cervical cancer screening service (Pap smear test done by the health centers in Damavand County in 2013.  Methods: This is a descriptive study with cross-sectional method. All data was extracted from existing documents in Damavand health network.Cost of service screening for doing Pap smear test (manpower costs of performing the service, the cost of transferring samples, water, electricity, telephone and gas was estimated in all health centers then results, were compared with the incomes of this service.  Results: Screening program coverage was 22.3%, 6.9% and 6.05% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively. All costs and incomes of units performing Pap smear screening test were calculated. Entire costs and incomes of this service during 2013 were respectively 303,009,000 and 11,640,000 RLS equal $12,227 and $496.73. Therefore, the cost-benefit ratio of this screening test was approximately 0.040.  Conclusion: The costs of units performing cervical cancer screening test in Damavand Health Center were much more than this benefit and because of a none-positive Pap smear test in spite of high cost, performing this test in Damavand health centers was not cost effective.

  16. The Computational Physics Program of the national MFE Computer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Since June 1974, the MFE Computer Center has been engaged in a significant computational physics effort. The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generations of supercomputers. The Computational Physics Group has been involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to tokamaks and compact toroids. A third area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code; this work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence have been under examination, with the hope of being able to explain anomalous transport. Also, we are collaborating in an international effort to evaluate fully three-dimensional linear stability of toroidal devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers. A summary of these programs are included in this paper. 6 tabs.

  17. The Computational Physics Program of the national MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since June 1974, the MFE Computer Center has been engaged in a significant computational physics effort. The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generations of supercomputers. The Computational Physics Group has been involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to tokamaks and compact toroids. A third area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code; this work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence have been under examination, with the hope of being able to explain anomalous transport. Also, we are collaborating in an international effort to evaluate fully three-dimensional linear stability of toroidal devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers. A summary of these programs are included in this paper. 6 tabs

  18. Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer Program Project | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the world. One out of three new cancers is a skin cancer. More than 1 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) (basal cell carcinoma [BCC] and squamous cell cancers [SCC]) occur annually. While the incidence rates for non-melanoma skin cancers continue to rise, there continues to be a substantial impact on morbidity, health and health care costs. |

  19. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  20. University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Risk: Our Expert Weighs In Using the Internet to Help Men With Cancer-Related Sexual Problems ... Laboratory Abe Laboratory Home Research Lab Members Publications Addiction Psychophysiology Laboratory Addiction Psychophysiology Laboratory Addiction Psychophysiology Laboratory ...

  1. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program (Consortia) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five cancer research centers lead multiple collaborative networks to assess potential cancer preventive agents and to conduct early clinical development of promising preventive agents. Also called the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, the studies require extensive biomarker analysis, investigation of the biologic effects of the cancer preventive agents on their intended molecular targets and on multiple endpoints associated with carcinogenesis, and correlation with clinically relevant endpoints.  | Systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents through five major medical research centers.

  2. A Review of School Reintegration Programs for Children with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances F.; Heffer, Robert W.; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Descriptive articles on school reintegration programs for children with cancer are reviewed to synthesize the information of best practices for program development. Suggestions are given for school psychologists working with chronically ill children. (Author/JDM)

  3. German Bowel Cancer Center: An Attempt to Improve Treatment Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Olof Jannasch; Andrej Udelnow; Stefanie Wolff; Hans Lippert; Pawel Mroczkowski

    2015-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancies, but treatment results show high diversity. Certified bowel cancer centres (BCC) are the basis of a German project for improvement of treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze if certification would enhance short-term outcome in rectal cancer surgery. Material and Methods. This quality assurance study included 8197 patients with rectal cancer treated between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2010....

  4. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in Women Referred to Urban Healthcare Centers in Kerman, Iran, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadipour, Habibeh; Sheikhizade, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Breast and cervical cancers are among leading causes of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide. Regular screening is very important for early detection of these cancers, but studies indicate low rates of screening participation. In this survey we studied the rate of screening participation among women 18-64 years old referred to urban health centers in Kerman, Iran in 2015. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 240 women who were selected using a multistage sampling method. Data collected using a questionnaire covered demographics and questions about common cancer screening status in women. Analysis was by SPSS 19. The mean age of participants was 31.7± 7. Most (97.1%) were married, housewives (83.3%), had high school diploma (43.8%) and a monthly income more than ten million Rls. The frequency of the Pap test performance was higher in women who were employed and with a university degree (pperformance in women over 40 years was also higher in women with university degree (p0.05). Our study found that the rate of screening participation among women is low. Investigation of the barriers, increasing the awareness of women about the importance and advantages of screening and also more incentives for health personnel especially family physicians to pay more attention to preventive programs could be effective. PMID:27165219

  5. Bone marrow and stem cell transplantation at King Hussein cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, F; Hussein, Aa; Rihani, R; Hlalah, Oa; El Taani, H; Sharma, S; Nserat, T; Sarhan, Mm

    2008-08-01

    Bone marrow and stem cell transplantation in Jordan has been performed since the 1990s, but the first comprehensive program was established at King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC) in March 2003. The program, in addition to other health care institutions in Amman, serves approximately 5.6 million Jordanians. Also, we treat several patients per year from neighboring Arab countries. The program at KHCC performs an average of 80 transplants per year. During the past 4 years 320 patients received transplants at KHCC; 26% of them received an autologous graft and 74% allogeneic grafts. Of the allogeneic grafts 91% were taken from matched family members, 6.7% were haploidentical from one of the parents, and 2.3% were from an unrelated donor or umbilical cord blood. The actuarial overall survival among all patients has been around 65%. The most common indication for transplantation at KHCC was leukemia/MDS followed by benign nonmalignant hematological/immune deficiency/metabolic disorders, with thalassemia major being the most common among this group. The cost of SCT is variable and depends on many factors including the type of transplant and the attending post-transplant complications. The average charge for autologous transplant (both adults and pediatrics) is 24,695 JD (one JD equals 1.42 USD), and the average charge for allogeneic transplant (both adults and pediatrics) excluding haploidentical transplant is 46,787 JD. We have not noticed any peculiar patterns of complications following BMT; however, we have seen a high incidence of chronic GVHD following minitransplant with fludarabine and single-dose TBI (Seattle protocol). At the inception of the program, invasive fungal infection mainly related to building construction, and central line complications were significant. Measures implemented to control such complications were successful to a large extent. We report our results to the EBMT group and we are accredited as an unrelated transplantation center. Although from a

  6. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  7. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. BE ACTIVE: an Education Program for Chinese Cancer Survivors in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Sandy; Bedard, Angela

    2016-09-01

    The needs of cancer survivors have been well documented and tend to be higher in immigrant populations. In order to help address unmet needs of Chinese-speaking cancer survivors, we have developed a structured psycho-educational program for this group. The program development was informed by both cultural values of the population and published recommendations for cancer survivorship education and support. The program, entitled BE ACTIVE, includes topics related to key domains in cancer survivorship: psychosocial aspects, general medical management and follow up for late effects, complementary medicine, and lifestyle management through fitness and nutrition. We studied the program delivery in 2012 and 2013, where a total of 124 individuals took part. Participants reported high satisfaction, learning gains, and the willingness to recommend the program to others; they rated their understanding of the behaviors needed for wellness and their motivation for change as high. A facilitator toolkit, which includes topic content development guides and presentation examples, was developed to assist with delivery of the program by other centers. This type of program can improve access and delivery to underserved populations with unmet needs and may also benefit cancer survivors in other jurisdictions with similar concerns. PMID:26386593

  9. 76 FR 37090 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program in the Federal Register on March 29, 2011 (76 FR 17396... Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program AGENCY: Office of... and programs to improve rehabilitation outcomes for underserved populations; (4) identify...

  10. Managing Multi-Center Recruitment in the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohagan, John K; Broski, Karen; Gren, Lisa H; Fouad, Mona N; Higgins, Darlene; Lappe, Karen; Ogden, Sheryl; Shambaugh, Vicki; Pinsky, Paul F; O'Brien, Barbara; Yurgalevich, Susan; Riley, Tom; Wright, Patrick; Prorok, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    There were significant recruitment challenges specific to the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial. Large numbers of participants were to be randomized from ten catchment areas nationwide within time and budgetary constraints. The eligible population was elderly and had to meet health and behavioral thresholds. Informed consent was required to participate and be randomized to screening for three cancers at periodic clinic visits or to a usual care arm that included no clinical visits. Consenting required special efforts to fully explain the trial and its potential scientific benefit to future patients with potentially no benefits but possible harms to PLCO participants. Participation would include continued follow-up for at least 13 years after randomization. Strong collaborative investments were required by the NCI and screening centers (SCs) to assure timely recruitment and appropriate racial participation. A trial-wide pilot phase tested recruitment and protocol follow through at SCs and produced a vanguard population of 11,406 participants. NCI announced the trial nationally in advance of the pilot and followed with an even more intense collaborative role with SCs for the main phase to facilitate trial-wide efficient and timely recruitment. Special efforts to enhance recruitment in the main phase included centralized and local monitoring of progress, cross-linking SCs to share experiences in problem solving, centralized training, substantial additional funding dedicated to recruitment and retention, including specialized programs for minority recruitment, obtaining national endorsement by the American Cancer Society, launching satellite recruitment and screening centers, including minority focused satellites, and adding a new SC dedicated to minority recruitment.

  11. Radiation Injury Treatment Network®: Preparedness Through a Coalition of Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Cullen

    2016-08-01

    This article provides an overview of Radiation Injury Treatment Network® (RITN), its preparedness activities and capabilities, including training and educating over 11,500 hospital staff, coordinating over 500 exercises, developing treatment guidelines, developing standard operating procedures, and being recognized by the U.S. federal government as a national response asset. The RITN provides comprehensive evaluation and treatment for victims with marrow toxic injuries. Many of the casualties from the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) (a.k.a. terrorist nuclear bomb) with only radiation injuries will be salvageable; however, they would require outpatient and/or inpatient care. Recognizing this, the U.S. National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), U.S. Navy, and American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) collaboratively developed RITN, which comprises medical centers with expertise in the management of bone marrow failure. The medical community will undoubtedly be taxed by the resulting medical surge from an IND despite the well-defined United States emergency medical system, the National Disaster Medical System; however, one area that is unique for radiological disasters is the care for casualties with acute radiation syndrome. Hematologists and oncologists purposefully expose their cancer patients to high doses of radiation and toxic chemicals for chemotherapy as they treat their patients, resulting in symptoms not unlike casualties with exposure to ionizing radiation from a radiological disaster. This makes the staff from cancer centers ideal for the specialized care that will be required for thousands of casualties following a mass casualty radiological incident. The RITN is a model for how a collaborative effort can fill a readiness gap-through its network of 76 hospitals, blood donor centers, and cord blood banks, the RITN is preparing to provide outpatient care and specialized supportive care to up to 63,000 radiological casualties

  12. Nurse-midwives in federally funded health centers: understanding federal program requirements and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Midwives are working in federally funded health centers in increasing numbers. Health centers provide primary and preventive health care to almost 20 million people and are located in every US state and territory. While health centers serve the entire community, they also serve as a safety net for low-income and uninsured individuals. In 2010, 93% of health center patients had incomes below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 38% were uninsured. Health centers, including community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless programs, and public housing primary care programs, receive grant funding and enjoy other benefits due to status as federal grantees and designation as federally qualified health centers. Clinicians working in health centers are also eligible for financial and professional benefits because of their willingness to serve vulnerable populations and work in underserved areas. Midwives, midwifery students, and faculty working in, or interacting with, health centers need to be aware of the regulations that health centers must comply with in order to qualify for and maintain federal funding. This article provides an overview of health center regulations and policies affecting midwives, including health center program requirements, scope of project policy, provider credentialing and privileging, Federal Tort Claims Act malpractice coverage, the 340B Drug Pricing Program, and National Health Service Corps scholarship and loan repayment programs.

  13. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne-Katrine; Hansson, Helena;

    2016-01-01

    , depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical......PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety...

  14. Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future. PMID:23317516

  15. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  16. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; Harten, van Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations. P

  17. Prevention program of cervical cancer - Enrique Pouey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the first basic objectives in the prevention of cervical cancer in Uruguay. The Papanicolaou test, the biopsia, and the colposcopy are important studies for the early cervical cancer detection

  18. Radiology Network (ACRIN) - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACRIN is funded to improve the quality and utility of imaging in cancer research and cancer care through expert, multi-institutional clinical evaluation of discoveries and technological innovations relevant to imaging science as applied in clinical oncology.

  19. The National Cancer Program: Driving Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of NCI’s role in driving cancer research discoveries: conducting and funding research in challenging areas and providing resources and leadership to national infrastructures for cancer research.

  20. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing: Future Programming Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Guang, R.

    2008-07-24

    The mission of the pmodel center project is to develop software technology to support scalable parallel programming models for terascale systems. The goal of the specific UD subproject is in the context developing an efficient and robust methodology and tools for HPC programming. More specifically, the focus is on developing new programming models which facilitate programmers in porting their application onto parallel high performance computing systems. During the course of the research in the past 5 years, the landscape of microprocessor chip architecture has witnessed a fundamental change – the emergence of multi-core/many-core chip architecture appear to become the mainstream technology and will have a major impact to for future generation parallel machines. The programming model for shared-address space machines is becoming critical to such multi-core architectures. Our research highlight is the in-depth study of proposed fine-grain parallelism/multithreading support on such future generation multi-core architectures. Our research has demonstrated the significant impact such fine-grain multithreading model can have on the productivity of parallel programming models and their efficient implementation.

  1. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices.

  2. Developing a longitudinal cancer nursing education program in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Wise, Barbara; Carlson, Julie R; Dowds, Cynthia; Sarchet, Vanessa; Sanchez, Jose Angel

    2013-12-01

    The present paper is a longitudinal study which aims to develop and deliver cancer nursing education conferences in Honduras using volunteer nurse educators. This program intends to (1) perform site assessments of work environments and resources for cancer care in Honduras, (2) develop cancer nursing education programs, (3) survey conference participants continuing education needs, (4) deliver cancer nursing education conferences, and (5) share data with local and global partners for future cancer programs. The study draws on a longitudinal program development with site assessments, data collection, and educational conferences at two time points. Assessments and surveys were used for conference development and delivery by volunteer nurse educators. Site assessments and conferences were delivered twice. Data were collected regarding assessments and surveys to inform program development. Survey data revealed that 65 % had internet access. Participants desired more information about handling of chemotherapy, symptom management, and palliative care. Volunteer nurse educators perform site assessments and develop educational programming for cancer nurses. Local and global partners should explore internet-based programs between site visits to create sustainable education programs.

  3. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy: A Form of Psychotherapy for Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Emily A.; Irwin, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed “meaning-centered psychotherapy.” In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas. PMID:25182513

  4. New organizational and funds flow models for an academic cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahlinger, David A; Pai, Chih-Wen; Waldinger, Marcy B; Billi, John E; Wicha, Max S

    2004-07-01

    The clinical impetus to develop cancer centers has been the recognition that many cancer patients require a comprehensive treatment plan coordinated across multiple specialties. Developing an effective organizational and financial structure among the multiple entities that comprise an academic cancer center has, however, been a challenge. The authors describe an effort to realize a sustainable clinical operation at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) by developing an appropriate management structure and financial model. The modified organizational structure established a clear line of administrative authority and held faculty members accountable for their effort in the UMCCC. A unified budget aligned financial incentive among all stakeholders to increase efficiency, revenue, and margin. The authors report preliminary financial evidence of the success of the new managerial structure.

  5. A multidimensional cancer rehabilitation program for cancer survivors - Effectiveness on health-related quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E; Hoekstra-Weebers, J; Grol, B; Otter, R; Arendzen, HJ; Postema, K; Sanderman, R; van der Schans, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A multidimensional rehabilitation program for cancer survivors was developed to overcome cancer-related problems and to improve quality of life. The two purposes of the study were to describe the effectiveness of the program and to obtain information about patient preferences for multi or

  6. 77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... health professions schools to recruit, retain, and graduate URMs to increase the supply and quality of... Systems Reporting Requirements. The Centers of Excellence Program application is approved under OMB No... American, and (3) ``Other'' health professions schools that meet the program requirements. Centers...

  7. Advancing Cancer Systems Biology: Introducing the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Martin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrative cancer biology research relies on a variety of data-driven computational modeling and simulation methods and techniques geared towards gaining new insights into the complexity of biological processes that are of critical importance for cancer research. These include the dynamics of gene-protein interaction networks, the percolation of subcellular perturbations across scales and the impact they may have on tumorigenesis in both experiments and clinics. Such innovative ‘systems’ research will greatly benefi t from enabling Information Technology that is currently under development, including an online collaborative environment, a Semantic Web based computing platform that hosts data and model repositories as well as high-performance computing access. Here, we present one of the National Cancer Institute’s recently established Integrative Cancer Biology Programs, i.e. the Center for the Development of a Virtual Tumor, CViT, which is charged with building a cancer modeling community, developing the aforementioned enabling technologies and fostering multi-scale cancer modeling and simulation.

  8. Innovative fertility preservation strategies and programs for young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson RH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca H Johnson Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Mary Bridge Hospital, MultiCare Health System, Tacoma, WA, USA Abstract: Preservation of fertility is a key issue for young adults newly diagnosed with cancer. Up to 90% of cancer patients under the age of 45 are at risk for fertility impairment following cancer therapy. Cancer patients who are not offered fertility preservation (FP and those who become infertile following therapy may experience long-term psychosocial distress. This review summarizes the numerous effective strategies for preserving fertility, including sperm banking, electroejaculation, and testicular sperm extraction in males and cryopreservation of embryos or oocytes in females. This paper also highlights novel methods currently in development, such as gonadal tissue cryopreservation and in vitro maturation of gametes. In women, anti-Mullerian hormone is emerging as an accurate marker of ovarian reserve, and the use of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogs to protect fertility is increasingly well validated. Although national guidelines mandate FP counseling and referral prior to the start of cancer therapy for patients with reproductive potential, only a minority of young cancer patients in the USA currently take steps to preserve fertility prior to the start of therapy. Some cancer centers across the USA are developing institutional strategies to support FP, resulting in increased utilization of fertility services by newly diagnosed cancer patients. Keywords: young adult, cancer, fertility preservation, program, oocyte, sperm

  9. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): A Quality Improvement Collaborative for Weight Management Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkes, Abigail E.; John, Priya M.; Vable, Anusha M.; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L.; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians’ Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians’ Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with wei...

  10. The provision of staff development programs in Virginia adult day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Hensley, A. Dawn

    1994-01-01

    This study examined a neglected area in long term care and adult day care research: staff development. The specific purposes of this study were to describe the provision of a comprehensive staff development program in adult day care centers in Virginia in order to (a) differentiate those centers providing only the minimum required inservice training from those centers providing more comprehensive staff development programs and (b) define what meaning is placed upon sta...

  11. Establishing and Sustaining a Prospective Screening Program for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema at the Massachusetts General Hospital: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Brunelle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing call to prospectively screen patients with breast cancer for the development of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL following their breast cancer treatment. While the components of a prospective screening program have been published, some centers struggle with how to initiate, establish, and sustain a screening program of their own. The intent of this manuscript is to share our experience and struggles in establishing a prospective surveillance program within the infrastructure of our institution. It is our hope that by sharing our history other centers can learn from our mistakes and successes to better design their own prospective screening program to best serve their patient population.

  12. Natural Resource Program Center FY 2011 Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report describes implementation of the Natural Resource Program Center’s Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) program during FY 2011. The introduction...

  13. The NASA radar entomology program at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    NASA contribution to radar entomology is presented. Wallops Flight Center is described in terms of its radar systems. Radar tracking of birds and insects was recorded from helicopters for airspeed and vertical speed.

  14. Center Innovation Fund: JSC CIF (also includes JSC IRAD) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The Center...

  15. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  16. Implementing the American Cancer Society breast cancer awareness program in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, J; Alexander, E J

    1989-05-01

    1. The goal of the American Cancer Society and of the National Cancer Institute is to increase the survival of women with breast cancer through early detection. 2. The key ingredients in promoting any program are enthusiasm and a rationale that identifies need, cost-containment, and program responsibility. 3. Utilizing nursing skills that allay fears but encourage thorough evaluation, engenders confidence in the department and the program. 4. Employees have more confidence in a program when results are communicated, and administrative support is more likely when justification is documented. PMID:2712881

  17. Major Programs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations, research networks, investigator-initiated grants, postdoctoral training, and specialized resources across the United States. |

  18. A research on the enhancement of research management efficiency for the division of research, Korea cancer center hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of Korea Cancer Center Hospital have increased for the past a few years just in proportion to the increase of research budget, but the assisting manpower of the office of research management has never been increased and the indications are that the internal and external circumstances will not allow the recruitment for a fairly long time. It has, therefore, become inevitable to enhance the work efficiency of the office by analyzing the administrative research assistance system, finding out problems and inefficiency factors, and suggesting possible answers to them. The office of research management and international cooperation has conducted this research to suggest possible ways to facilitate the administrative support for the research activities of Korea Cancer Center Hospital By analyzing the change of research budget, organization of the division of research and administrative support, manpower, and the administrative research supporting system of other institutes, we suggested possible ways to enhance the work efficiency for administrative research support and developed a relative database program. The research report will serve as a data for the organization of research support division when the Radiation Medicine Research Center is established. The database program has already been used for research budget management

  19. Connecting the Dots: Linking the National Program of Cancer Registries and the Needs of Survivors and Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, A Blythe; Eheman, Christie; Styles, Timothy; Rycroft, Randi; Snyder, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors, the medical community, public health professionals, researchers, and policymakers all need information about newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths to better understand and address the disease burden. CDC collects cancer data on 96% of the U.S. population through the National Program of Cancer Registries. The National Program of Cancer Registries routinely collects data on all cancer occurrences, deaths, and the types of initial treatment received by the patients, and recently CDC has made advances in its cancer surveillance activities that have direct applicability to cancer survivorship research and care. This article examines CDC's innovative uses of the National Program of Cancer Registries infrastructure and data as a recruitment source for survivorship research studies and behavioral interventions; comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research; and the collection, consolidation, and dissemination of treatment summaries for cancer survivors and their providers. This paper also discusses long-term, idealistic plans for additional data linkages and sharing among public health, providers, and the cancer survivor through innovative concepts such as patient portals and rapid-learning health care. PMID:26590648

  20. What Are Cancer Centers Advertising to the Public? A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B.; Donohue, Julie M.; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Background Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, the content of these advertisements has not been analyzed. Objective To characterize the informational and emotional content of cancer center advertisements. Design Systematic analysis of all cancer center advertisements in top U.S. consumer magazines (N=269) and television networks (N=44) in 2012. Measurements Using a standardized codebook, we assessed (1) types of clinical services promoted; (2) information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, and costs; (3) use of emotional advertising appeals; and (4) use of patient testimonials. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti. Kappa values ranged from 0.77 to 1.0. Results A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%; pBenefits of advertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%; padvertisements mentioned insurance coverage or costs (5%). Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), most often evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and evoking fear (30%). Nearly half of advertisements included patient testimonials, usually focused on survival or cure. Testimonials rarely included disclaimers (15%) and never described the results a typical patient might expect. Limitations Internet advertisements were not included. Conclusions Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy using emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, or costs. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. PMID:24863081

  1. Orbital Metastases from Breast Cancer: Retrospective Analysis at an Academic Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Tiffany M; Tebit, Emaculate V; El Sayed, Ali; Smolkin, Mark E; Dillon, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    Orbital metastases from breast cancer (BC) are rare, but often debilitating. BC accounts for nearly half of metastases to the orbit. Orbital metastases may be discovered years after the initial diagnosis of BC, and are rare at initial presentation. A search of the institutional data base at an academic cancer center identified BC patients who developed or presented with orbital metastases from 2000 to 2013. Baseline characteristics, treatment modalities, survival and treatment responses were collected from the electronic medical record. There were 20 patients identified with orbital metastases (0.7% of all BC cases). The median age at diagnosis of BC was 49 years; 80% had estrogen positive disease. The interval between the initial diagnosis of BC and the presentation of orbital metastases was 8.5 years (0-19 years). Orbital disease was the initial presentation of BC in two cases. Three patients developed bilateral orbital metastases and seven had accompanying brain metastases. The most common presentation was decreased vision (55%), followed by diplopia (25%). The median survival after orbital metastases was 24 months. Thirteen patients (65%) received local radiation therapy. Of those radiated, 90% reported improvement of orbital symptoms. Other treatments included intraocular bevacizumab, surgery, and systemic therapy. Orbital metastases tend to occur in estrogen receptor positive disease and are often found years after BC onset. Orbital metastases may be associated with the development of brain metastases. Radiotherapy is the preferred local therapy and had high symptom control in this cohort. Oncologists should be aware of the signs of orbital metastases and the treatment options. PMID:27143519

  2. Simulation of reduced breast cancer mortality in breast cancer screening programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breast cancer screening programs are an essential tool in the fight against breast cancer. Currently, many questions concerning the setup of these programs are open, namely: age range of women who undergo the same, frequency of mammography, ... The effectiveness of a program should be evaluated in terms of mortality reduction is its systematic implementation in the population. In this sense, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to assess that these reductions.

  3. National Center for Standards and Certification Information: Service and programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Joanne

    1994-01-01

    The National Center for Standards and Certification Information (NCSCI) provides information on U.S., foreign and international voluntary standards, government regulations, and conformity assessment procedures for non-agricultural products. The Center serves as a referral service and focal point in the United States for information on standards and standards-related information. NCSCI staff respond to inquiries, maintain a reference collection of standards and standards-related documents, and serve as the U.S. inquiry point for information to and from foreign countries.

  4. The Prevention of Liver Cancer by HBV Vaccine Program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Xiong

    2002-01-01

    Objective To recognize the HBV vaccine program for prevention of the hepatic cancer.Methods To discuss the relation between the HBV and hepatic cancer arising, and to discuss the immunology respond of the HBV vaccine (HBV surface antigen protein) in our patient group. Result Our data indicates that the predisposing of the HBV infection is required for the hepatic cancer arising and for the high expression of the AFP gene, and our data indicates that the HBV vaccine can induce highly immuno respond in about 78.8 % of the adult for achieving the HBV prevention status and the hepatic cancer prevention status.

  5. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  6. A survey of head and neck cancer curriculum in United States speech language pathology masters programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K; Fallis, Michelle; Martin-Harris, Bonnie

    2010-12-01

    We surveyed speech language pathology (SLP) programs for head and neck cancer (HNC) training. Program directors of 242 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association accredited masters programs for SLP were contacted regarding curricular HNC material. Directors (n = 120) responded online: six included a required course in HNC, and all but two programs with no required HNC course included HNC topics in other required courses. Thirty-two programs were affiliated with a medical center and/or a teaching hospital. Programs that offered either a required course in HNC or elective courses on HNC were more likely to be affiliated with a medical center and/or a teaching hospital than programs that did not offer a required course in HNC (P = 0.043) or elective courses on HNC (P = 0.007), respectively. Few programs offer a required HNC course but most programs integrate HNC content into the required coursework. Potential strategies to incorporate HNC exposure into formal SLP programs are identified.

  7. [Operational Management of Multidisciplinary Organ-Based Tumor Units in Our Cancer Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Tsujie, Masanori; Ichimura, Noriko; Yukawa, Masao; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the advances in diagnosis and treatment, it is imperative to develop a multidisciplinary approach for the management of cancer patients. In our cancer center, multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units have been organized for team medical care. These units consist of cancer specialists from multiple departments including medical oncology, surgery, radiology, histopathology, and nursing. Members of each unit regularly conduct meetings to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, as well as to report the progress of cancer patients. Co-operation with the counseling and support center, utilization of the computerized medical record system, and using brochures for advertisement, all play important roles in adequate management of multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units. PMID:27210090

  8. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  9. Houston Community College (HCC)-Mobile Go Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniel; Sterling, Cheryl; Grays, Shantay R.

    2010-01-01

    The Houston Community College Mobile Go Center brings college enrollment assistance to the doorstep of our community. It operates in a variety of settings, offering college-going material and person-to-person assistance at numerous city events. Services include assistance with academic advising, completing the FAFSA, college application process,…

  10. The program of the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984 the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set up a Center to monitor dose-reduction efforts in the US and abroad and to focus the industry's attention on ALARA. The paper summarizes the main work of the ALARA Center between 1984 and 1992. The Center maintains nine data bases for the NRC and the Nuclear Power Industry. These databases are constantly updated and access to them is provided through a personal computer and a modem and by periodic publications in the form of a newsletter and NUREG reports. Also described briefly are eight other projects related to dose-reduction at nuclear power plants that the Center has carried out for the NRC. Among these are projects that analyze the cost-effectiveness of engineering modifications, look at worldwide activities at dose reduction and compare US and foreign dose experience, examine high-dose worker groups and high-dose jobs, develop optimum techniques to control contamination at nuclear plants, and look at the doses being received by men and women in all sectors of the nuclear industry

  11. The Albuquerque City Center Schools. Program Evaluation, 1984-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Jennifer S.; Panofsky, Carolyn

    The Albuquerque City Center Schools (ACCS) project, begun in 1983, was designed to increase the effectiveness of 12 schools in the Albuquerque High School cluster by creating a climate of high expectations, improving academic achievement, encouraging a climate of positive discipline, promoting student, community and private sector participation,…

  12. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  13. Program Evaluation of Community College Learning Assistance Centers: What Do LAC Directors Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Doug; Blankenberger, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks to determine the nature of current program evaluation practices for learning assistance centers (LACs), the practices being used for program evaluation, and whether LAC directors believe their practices are appropriate for evaluating program effectiveness. Method: We conducted a survey (n = 61) of community college LAC…

  14. Results and Analysis of a Computer Assisted Instructional Program in Basic Skills in a Detention Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Richard A.

    An evaluation of a computer assisted educational (CAE) program using the PLATO system at a Texas detention center included an examination of attitudes and perceptions from (1) inmates participating and not participating in jail education programs, (2) trustees, (3) educational program staff, (4) chaplaincy staff, (5) guards assigned to the…

  15. Cardiorespiratory fitness and digestive cancer mortality: findings from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS)

    OpenAIRE

    Peel, J. Brent; Sui, Xuemei; Matthews, Charles E.; Adams, Swann A; Hébert, James R; Hardin, James W.; Timothy S Church; Blair, Steven N.

    2009-01-01

    Although higher levels of physical activity are inversely associated with risk of colon cancer, few prospective studies have evaluated overall digestive system cancer mortality in relation to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). The authors examined this association among 38,801 men aged 20−88 years and who performed a maximal treadmill exercise test at baseline in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (Dallas, Texas) during 1974−2003. Mortality was assessed over 29 years of follow-up (1974−2003...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer and Cancer Screening Programs: From Nihilism to Hope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The most common incipit of papers published regarding exocrine pancreatic neoplasms is that pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers, with a rate of incidence equal to that of mortality. Pancreatic cancer is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms in which pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common. For the most part, the problems related to the early diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are three: 1 to better understand the biology of this tumor; 2 to better investigate the precursors of this tumor; and 3 to plan projects for pancreatic cancer screening in high-risk individuals. Recently, Yachida et al. [1] performed rapid autopsies on seven individuals with Stage IV pancreatic cancer and they found that the clonal populations which give rise to distant metastases are represented within the primary carcinoma, but these clones are genetically evolved from the original parental, non-metastatic clone. Thus, the genetic heterogeneity of the metastases reflects that of the primary carcinoma. Most important, when the authors performed a quantitative analysis of the timing of the genetic evolution of pancreatic cancer, they found that there was at least a decade between the occurrence of the initial mutation and the birth of the parental, non-metastatic founder cell. At least five more years are required for the acquisition of metastatic ability and patients die an average two years thereafter. As underscored by the authors, these data have an important implication in planning population screening for the purpose of preventing pancreatic cancer deaths: in fact, quantitative analysis indicated a large window, of at least a decade, in which the disease could be diagnosed while it is still in the curative stage. This model also predicts an average of 6.8 years between the birth of the cell giving rise to the parental clone and the seeding of the index metastasis.

  17. 45 CFR 1306.32 - Center-based program option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... made to schedule makeup classes using existing resources if planned class days fall below the number... previous years. Grantees must make provisions in their budgets and program plans to operate makeup...

  18. Radiologic aspects of breast cancers detected through a breast cancer screening program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early detection in breast cancer and reduced mortality in women with this disease is today attributed to widespread use of mammography. High-quality performance is essential in all steps of breast cancer screening programs in order to avoid unnecessary anxiety and surgery in the women concerned. This report presents radiologic aspects of screening cancers. A total of 8370 asymptomatic women aged 50-69 years were screened with 2-view mammography, of which only 70 (0.84 percent) were selected for surgery after a thorough work-up. Cancers were verified histologically in 61 women and 9 showed non-malignant histology, giving a cancer detection rate of 7.3 cancers per thousand screened asymptomatic women. The benign/malignant ratio in the operated cases is thus approximately 1:7. The cancers detected showed all existing types of mammographic features where 77 percent (47 cases) showed rather typical findings, such as spiculated densities both with and without microcalcifications. The results indicate that surgery can be minimized without impairing the breast cancer detection rate. Radiologists in screening programs should be aware that a large proportion of non-palpable breast cancers present in rather unconventional forms. This point is important in order to maintain a high cancer detection rate and thereby justify the widespread use of mammography as a screening tool for breast cancer in asymptomatic women. (author). 20 refs.; 1 tab

  19. Development and Current Status of National Cancer Center for Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; LIN Hong-sheng; HOU Wei; ZHANG Pei-tong; HUA Bao-jin

    2011-01-01

    @@ Chinese medicine (CM) is an important feature of cancer treatment in China.Especially in the last 10years, the effect of CM in cancer treatment has been of high concern and has been accepted by experts and patients locally and overseas.The oncology department (OD) of Guang'anmen Hospital (GAMH) of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences (CATCM),which will mark its 50th anniversary in 2013, is one of China's most-respected centers devoted exclusively to cancer patient care, research, education, and prevention through CM.It is located at the campus of GAMH,central Beijing.

  20. Factors influencing childhood cancer patients to participate in a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program : Quality of Life in Motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk-Lokkart, Elisabeth M.; Braam, Katja I.; Huisman, Jaap; Kaspers, Gertjan Jl; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; Bierings, MB; Merks, Hans; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Eibrink, Marry; Streng, Isabelle C.; Van Dulmen-Den Broeder, Eline

    2015-01-01

    Background For a multi-center randomized trial investigating the effects of a 12-week physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, we invited 174 patients (8-18 years old) on treatment or within 1 year after treatment; about 40% participated. Reasons for non-participation

  1. Program strategy document for the nuclear materials. Transportation Technology Center (FY 80)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TTC's program is divided into four principal areas, Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues. These areas are broken into activities, elements, and subelements which are delineated in this document

  2. Retrospective Analysis of Cancer with Behcets Disease: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Bozkurt Duman

    2014-02-01

    Results: One of our 105 patients with BD was found to have solid tumor in the rate of 0.9 %. The remaining 104 patients with BD were in follow up without any malignancy in this period. The malignancy that we reported was invasive right breast carcinoma in a 55-year-old woman with BD. A radically modified right mastectomy and axillary lymphadenectomy were performed and postoperative doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide therapy for four cycles and hormonal therapy with tamoxifen and leuprolide acetate was administered as adjuvant therapy. This patient had a history of 16 years colchicine usage as medication for BD. Conclusion:The rheumatologic diseases can predispose malignancy, the autoimmune nature of BD or the immunosupressive medicines could be possible causes of this carcinoma. However, in our study only one patient had malignancy. The another point of view; management and also prevention of cancer with BD is important entity.

  3. Health promotion programs within the Navy Environmental Health Center : evolution and impact

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Mary S.

    1998-01-01

    In 1986, DoD established aformal health promotion policy,but it was not until 1992 that DoN components began to comply and implement health promotion programs. In 1994, Navy Medicine appointed the Navy Environmental Health Center (NEHC) as the Health Promotion Program Manager. In 1998, due primarily to their population-based approach to health care delivery, NEHC was appointed the Program Manager for the Clinical Epidemiology Program (CEP). This study examines the resource and programmatic ro...

  4. Combined MTX{center_dot}5-FU{center_dot}CDGP for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakoda, Takema; Kitano, Hiroya [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Saitoh, Yuko; Ikeda, Hiroki; Dake, Yoshihiro; Enomoto, Tadao [Japanese Red Cross Society Wakayama Medical Center (Japan); Seno, Satoshi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan); Kawano, Atsushi [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Combination chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and nedaplatin (CDGP) with methotrexate (MTX) and leucovorin (LV) was administered for modulation in patients with head and neck cancer. We treated 19 patients with MTX{center_dot}5-FU{center_dot}CDGP consisting of 150 mg/body of MTX on day 1 followed by a 3-day continuous infusion of 5-FU at 3,500 mg/m{sup 2} and 17 injections of LV at 15 mg and infusion of CDGP at 100 mg/m{sup 2}. Six patients had recurrent head and neck cancer, and 13 had newly diagnosed disease. Eleven of the new patients were concurrently treated with radiation therapy. Treatment-associated toxicity was significant, including mucositis and myelosuppression, but acceptable. Sixteen patients were eligible for evaluation of response. The overall complete response rate was 75.0% (12/16). Patients treated with radiotherapy had a 90.0% (9/10) overall complete response rate. (author)

  5. The Breast Cancer Screening Program. The first year of activity on the territory of Pomeranian Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. The Breast Cancer Screening Program (BCSP) has been launched in January 2007. There are 16 Regional Coordinating Centers. The headquarters are located the the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center - Institute of Oncology, in Warsaw. In Poland breast cancer (BC) accounts for a 20.5% morbidity rate and causes 13% of deaths. Women between 50 and 69 years of age make up half of the breast cancer morbidity group. There is a tendency towards an increase in BC morbidity. Of all the 13385 registered in Poland throughout 2005 641 occurred in the Pomeranian Voivodeship. Material and Methods. There are 31 mammography units in the Pomeranian region. Mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 69 is performed free of charge and financed by the governmental health insurance. In 2007 over 57,500 mammographies were performed in the Pomeranian Voivodeship accounting for some 33.1% of all the women eligible for the BCSP. Results. 298 cases of BC were detected. BCSP increased the likelihood of detecting early BC (T1). T1 BCs were detected in 61.1% and were described by radiologists as stages BIRADS 4 and BIRADS 5. Conclusions. The main aim of the BCSP is reducing the coefficient of BC mortality. The results of BCSP confirmed the need for the continuation of such a program. (authors)

  6. 77 FR 47913 - The National Center for Mobility Management Under FTA's National Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Federal Transit Administration The National Center for Mobility Management Under FTA's National Research... management--a customer-focused approach to transportation service delivery. FTA, under its National Research Program, plans to fund a National Center for Mobility Management (NCMM) which will carry-out activities...

  7. 75 FR 79072 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... as Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE) and the development of programs to encourage, stimulate.... Department of Commerce's Minority Business Development Centers (MBDCs), Small Business Development Centers... proof of tax-exempt status; (B) Have at least one year of documented and continuous experience prior...

  8. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... (76 FR 28988). This third and final ADLS will combine the third and fourth sessions called for in the... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation November 17 and...

  9. 78 FR 40152 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    .../Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates This notice supersedes the following documents... Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (the STAC or the Committee), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department...

  10. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  11. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Survivorship care planning in a comprehensive cancer center using an implementation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sofia F; Kircher, Sheetal M; Oden, Megan; Veneruso, Aubri; McKoy, June M; Pearman, Timothy; Penedo, Frank J

    2016-05-01

    Cancer survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been recommended to improve clinical care and patient outcomes. Research is needed to establish their efficacy and identify best practices. Starting in 2015, centers accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer must deliver SCPs to patients completing primary cancer treatment with curative intent. We describe how we established routine SCP delivery at the Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago, Illinois, using the Quality Implementation Framework. We evaluated local practices, gathered clinician and patient stakeholder input, developed customized SCP templates within the electronic health record (EHR), and implemented 2 complementary delivery models. Clinician interviews (n = 41) and survey responses (n = 12), along with input from patients (n = 68) and a patient advisory board (n = 15), indicated support for SCPs and survivorship services. To promote feasible implementation and leverage existing workflows, we harmonized 2 SCP delivery models: integrated care within clinics where patients received treatment, and referral to a centralized survivorship clinic. We are implementing SCP delivery with prominent disease sites and will extend services to survivors of other cancers in the future. We developed four electronic disease-specific SCP templates for breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancers and a fifth, generic template that can be used for other malignancies. The templates reduced free-text clinician entry by auto-populating 20% of the fields from existing EHR data, and using drop-down menus for another 65%. Mean SCP completion time is 12 minutes (range, 10-15; n = 64). We designed our framework to facilitate ongoing evaluation of implementation and quality improvement. Funding/sponsorship Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Coleman Foundation, and the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation. PMID:27258051

  13. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer

  14. A Description of the Hawthorn Center Early Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovinsky, Ira; Keller, Jackie

    An early intervention project for preschool handicapped children is described. Specific program goals (including improved functioning in social, emotional, communication, and preacademic areas) are listed, and roles of the interdisciplinary staff members are considered. Among evaluation approaches discussed are psychological measures, family…

  15. 78 FR 55731 - Health Workforce Research Center Cooperative Agreement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... cooperative agreement program. Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) HRSA-13-185, issued on November 26, 2012... assistance (TA). The FOA identified five broad areas of focus for research in HWRCs: Allied health, long-term... workforce policy and planning questions. Though the FOA indicated the intent to fund only one...

  16. Computational Physics Program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of the computational physics group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. A summary of the groups activities is presented, including computational studies in MHD equilibria and stability, plasma transport, Fokker-Planck, and efficient numerical and programming algorithms. References are included

  17. Defining a standard set of patient-centered outcomes for men with localized prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.E. Martin (Neil E.); L. Massey (Laura); C. Stowell (Caleb); C.H. Bangma (Chris); A. Briganti (Alberto); A. Bill-Axelson (Anna); M. Blute (Michael); J.W.F. Catto (James); R.C. Chen (Ronald C.); A.V. D'Amico (Anthony V.); G. Feick (Günter); J.M. Fitzpatrick (John); S.J. Frank (Steven J.); M. Froehner (Michael); M. Frydenberg (Mark); A. Glaser (Adam); M. Graefen (Markus); D. Hamstra (Daniel); A. Kibel (Adam); N. Mendenhall (Nancy); K. Moretti (Kim); J. Ramon (Jacob); I. Roos (Ian); H. Sandler (Howard); F.J. Sullivan (Francis J.); D. Swanson (David); A. Tewari (Ashutosh); A.J. Vickers (Andrew); T. Wiegel (Thomas); H. Huland (Hartwig)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Value-based health care has been proposed as a unifying force to drive improved outcomes and cost containment. Objective To develop a standard set of multidimensional patient-centered health outcomes for tracking, comparing, and improving localized prostate cancer (PCa) treatm

  18. Development of a community cancer education program: the Forsyth County, NC cervical cancer prevention project.

    OpenAIRE

    Michielutte, R; Dignan, M B; Wells, H B; Young, L. D.; Jackson, D S; Sharp, P C

    1989-01-01

    The authors outline the development and implementation of a public health education program for cervical cancer screening among black women in Forsyth County, NC. The educational program includes distributing electronic and printed information media messages, a program of direct education for women, and providing information on current issues in cervical screening to primary-care physicians. Program development was based on social marketing principles, the PRECEDE model, and the communication...

  19. Vaginal Radical Trachelectomy for early stage cervical cancer. Results of the Danish National Single Center Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, L; Høgdall, C; Loft, A;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present and evaluate an unselected national single center strategy with fertility preserving trachelectomy in cervical cancer. In 2003 nationwide single-center referral of women for trachelectomies was agreed upon between all Danish departments performing cervical cancer surgery...... with the purpose of increasing volume, to increase surgical safety and facilitate follow-up. METHODS: Prospective data were recorded in the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database of all Vaginal Radical Trachelectomies (VRT) performed in Denmark between 2002 and 2013. Oncologic, fertility and obstetrical outcomes...... of 120 unselected consecutive VRTs were assessed. To obtain complete follow-up about fertility treatment, pregnancy and obstetric outcome the women filled out an electronic questionnaire. Median follow-up: 55.7 months. RESULTS: 85.8% of the patients had stage IB1 disease, 68.3% squamous cell carcinomas...

  20. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, technical research programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-02-01

    Research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature fusion plasmas (plasma theory, RF heating, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator A and C tokamaks, including pioneering investigations of the equilibrium, stability, transport and radiation properties of fusion plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of a new and innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experimental facility scheduled for 1983; and (4) a broadly based program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced gyrotron development for RF heating, preconceptual design studies of torsatrons and stellarators, and advanced tokamak design and reactor studies).

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, technical research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature fusion plasmas (plasma theory, RF heating, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator A and C tokamaks, including pioneering investigations of the equilibrium, stability, transport and radiation properties of fusion plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of a new and innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experimental facility scheduled for 1983; and (4) a broadly based program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas

  2. Spousal Caregiver Perspectives on a Person-Centered Social Program for Partners With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Areum; Radel, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    This qualitative study explored spousal caregiver perspectives on the experience and impact of a person-centered social program for partners with dementia. Interviews with 5 caregivers and the spouses with dementia were conducted 7 to 8 months after the program ended to explore the sustained impact of the program. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to support in-depth exploration of interviews. Three themes emerged including benefits of the program for caregivers, initial expectations and later perspectives of caregivers about the program, and conflicting values and perspectives between caregivers and the spouses. These findings suggest participation in a person-centered social program by people with dementia benefits their caregivers, by meeting the caregivers' desire for their spouses to increase social participation and engagement in meaningful activities. Participation in the program provided a sustained benefit to one couple in particular, by encouraging the caregiver to resume arranging activities the couple once enjoyed but now had difficulty pursuing.

  3. 76 FR 13404 - Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Intellectual Property Option to Collaborator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, is announcing the final revision of the NCI Cancer Therapy Evaluation... Register of April 6, 2010 (FR Vol. 65, No. 65), the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment..., Associate Director, Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and......

  4. Network for Translational Research - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperative agreement (U54) awards to establish Specialized Research Resource Centers that will participate as members of a network of inter-disciplinary, inter-institutional research teams for the purpose of supporting translational research in optical imaging and/or spectroscopy in vivo, with an emphasis on multiple modalities.

  5. Cancer Imaging at the Crossroads of Precision Medicine: Perspective From an Academic Imaging Department in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Krajewski, Katherine M; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fennessy, Fiona M; DiPiro, Pamela J; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Harris, Gordon J; Jacene, Heather A; Lefever, Greg; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-04-01

    The authors propose one possible vision for the transformative role that cancer imaging in an academic setting can play in the current era of personalized and precision medicine by sharing a conceptual model that is based on experience and lessons learned designing a multidisciplinary, integrated clinical and research practice at their institution. The authors' practice and focus are disease-centric rather than imaging-centric. A "wall-less" infrastructure has been developed, with bidirectional integration of preclinical and clinical cancer imaging research platforms, enabling rapid translation of novel cancer drugs from discovery to clinical trial evaluation. The talents and expertise of medical professionals, scientists, and staff members have been coordinated in a horizontal and vertical fashion through the creation of Cancer Imaging Consultation Services and the "Adopt-a-Radiologist" campaign. Subspecialized imaging consultation services at the hub of an outpatient cancer center facilitate patient decision support and management at the point of care. The Adopt-a-Radiologist campaign has led to the creation of a novel generation of imaging clinician-scientists, fostered new collaborations, increased clinical and academic productivity, and improved employee satisfaction. Translational cancer research is supported, with a focus on early in vivo testing of novel cancer drugs, co-clinical trials, and longitudinal tumor imaging metrics through the imaging research core laboratory. Finally, a dedicated cancer imaging fellowship has been developed, promoting the future generation of cancer imaging specialists as multidisciplinary, multitalented professionals who are trained to effectively communicate with clinical colleagues and positively influence patient care. PMID:26774886

  6. Epidemiology of cancers among adolescents and young adults from a tertiary cancer center in Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Randeep Singh; Rashmi Shirali; Sonali Chatterjee; Arun Adhana; Ramandeep Singh Arora

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Although cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is increasingly an area of focus, there is a paucity of clinical and epidemiological data from developing countries. Our objective was to analyze the geographical distribution, sex ratio, histology, and disease patterns of cancers in AYA. Materials and Methods: All patients aged 15-29 years with the diagnosis of cancer who were registered with two hospitals in New Delhi during a 12-month period from January 2014...

  7. A survey of program evaluation practices in family-centered pediatric rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Cousins, J Bradley

    2014-04-01

    Program evaluation is becoming increasingly important in pediatric rehabilitation settings that adhere to the family-centered service (FCS) philosophy. However, researchers know little about the specific evaluation activities occurring in these settings or the extent to which evaluators/service providers uphold FCS in their program evaluation activities. Through a questionnaire survey, this study aimed to document evaluators/service providers' perceptions of the level of program evaluation occurring in their Canadian pediatric rehabilitation centers. It also investigated the extent to which evaluators/service providers perceive program evaluation practices at their centers to be consistent with the FCS context of Canadian pediatric rehabilitation settings. The findings suggested that the amount of evaluation activities occurring within the respondents' centers is variable; that the majority of individuals working in program evaluation do not have formal training in it; and that the respondents' centers have limited resources for evaluation. The study also showed that staff members believe their centers' evaluation activities are somewhat consistent with FCS philosophy, but that improvements are needed.

  8. Stewardship and cancer screening programs in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Cristine Marie Novinskey; Antonio Federici

    2011-01-01

    As one of the four major functions of health systems, Stewardship is on the health agenda of several countries worldwide. There is, however, little empirical evidence to support or guide its implementation. To help bridge this gap, the paper aims to contribute to the empirical evidence for health system stewardship and, importantly, to offer implementers an explanatory example of what it could mean in practice. It achieves this by analyzing the experience of the Italian Cancer Screening Progr...

  9. Evaluating and Auditing a Community College Learning Skills Center Program: Second Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Benjamin, Barbara; Olson, Gerald T.

    An evaluation of Los Angeles City College's Learning Skills Center (LSC) was conducted in order to ascertain the nature of the LSC's outcomes. The LSC offers students an opportunity to participate in diagnostic and prescriptive open-entry open-exit programs in an individualized setting. Types of programs available through the LSC include…

  10. Report of Retail Sales Training Program for Clackamas Town Center, January 19, 1981-March 6, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clackamas Community Coll., Oregon City, OR.

    In late 1980, a retail sales training program was implemented at Clackamas Community College to meet the training needs of business tenants of the new Clackamas Town Center. The program consisted of 20 hours of intensified training in customer relations, sales, cashiering, job readiness, and interviewing. A total of 416 students completed the…

  11. The Larry Jarret House Program at the Helen Beebe Speech and Hearing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Donald M.; Talbot, Pamela J.

    1993-01-01

    The Larry Jarret House is a one-week in-residence program of the Helen Beebe Speech and Hearing Center in Easton, Pennsylvania, for parents of children with hearing impairments. The program is designed to help parents maximize their child's use of residual hearing in daily life situations to develop spoken language. (JDD)

  12. Evaluation of a Career Development and Assessment Center Program for Professional Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melber, Barbara D.; McLaughlin, Steven D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the impact of the Career Development and Assessment Center for Librarians on the professional position of program participants (assessees) and on the managerial level librarians serving as assessors for the program. Changes over time in nonparticipant applicants (control group) and assessee groups are compared.…

  13. Immunologic checkpoints in cancer therapy: focus on the programmed death-1 (PD-1 receptor pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momtaz P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Parisa Momtaz,1,2 Michael A Postow1,2 1Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: T-lymphocytes have the potential to recognize cancer antigens as foreign and therefore eliminate them. However, immune checkpoints such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA-4 and programmed cell death (PD-1 receptor and its ligands (PD-L1, PD-L2 suppress the activity of T-lymphocytes. Advances in the understanding of immunology and its role in cancer have led to the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors that block CTLA-4 and PD-1 and result in durable responses in patients with a wide range of cancers. PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors are currently in many stages of clinical investigation, and the anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Many questions remain to be answered, such as the optimal administration schedule, biomarkers that associate with benefit, and potential for use of PD-1 agents in combination approaches. Nonetheless, immunotherapy with PD-1 blocking antibodies is now becoming an integral part in the management of cancer. Keyword: immune checkpoints, immunotherapy, programmed cell death protein-1, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4

  14. A Tale of Two Community Networks Program Centers: Operationalizing and Assessing CBPR Principles and Evaluating Partnership Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Johnson, Cassandra; Allen, Michele L.; Colditz, Graham A.; Hurtado, G. Ali; Davey, Cynthia S.; Sanders Thompson, Vetta L.; Drake, Bettina F.; Svetaz, Maria Veronica; Rosas-Lee, Maira; Goodman, Melody S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community Networks Program (CNP) centers are required to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach within their specific priority communities. Not all communities are the same and unique contextual factors and collaborators’ priorities shape each CBPR partnership. There are also established CBPR and community engagement (CE) principles shown to lead to quality CBPR in any community. However, operationalizing and assessing CBPR principles and partnership outcomes to understand the conditions and processes in CBPR that lead to achieving program and project level goals is relatively new in the science of CBPR. Objectives We sought to describe the development of surveys on adherence to and implementation of CBPR/CE principles at two CNP centers and examine commonalities and differences in program- versus project-level CBPR evaluation. Methods A case study about the development and application of CBPR/CE principles for the Missouri CNP, Program for the Elimination of Cancer Disparities, and Minnesota CNP, Padres Informados/Jovenes Preparados, surveys was conducted to compare project versus program operationalization of principles. Survey participant demographics were provided by CNP. Specific domains found in CBPR/CE principles were identified and organized under an existing framework to establish a common ground. Operational definitions and the number of survey items were provided for each domain by CNP. Conclusion There are distinct differences in operational definitions of CBPR/CE principles at the program and project levels of evaluation. However, commonalities support further research to develop standards for CBPR evaluation across partnerships and at the program and project levels. PMID:26213405

  15. Epidemiology of cancers among adolescents and young adults from a tertiary cancer center in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Although cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs is increasingly an area of focus, there is a paucity of clinical and epidemiological data from developing countries. Our objective was to analyze the geographical distribution, sex ratio, histology, and disease patterns of cancers in AYA. Materials and Methods: All patients aged 15-29 years with the diagnosis of cancer who were registered with two hospitals in New Delhi during a 12-month period from January 2014 to December 2014 were included. Basic demographic information on age, sex, location of stay, and nationality was available. Using cancer site and morphology codes, the cancers were grouped by the Birch classification of AYA cancers. Clinical information on disease and treatment status, was retrospectively studied. Results: There were 287 patients (57.5% male, 85.4% Indian origin registered with 54 (18.8%, 97 (33.8%, and 136 (47.4% patients in the 15-19, 20-24, and 25-29 years age groups, respectively. The three most common cancer groups were carcinomas (40.8%, lymphomas (12.9%, and leukemias (10.4%. The three most common sites in carcinomas were gastrointestinal tract (GIT, genitourinary tract, and breast. The most prevalent cancers in younger AYA (15-19 years were leukemias, lymphomas, central nervous system neoplasms, and in contrast, older AYA (25-29 years suffered mainly from GIT Carcinomas, lymphomas. The leading cancers were breast and GIT carcinomas in females and lymphomas and GIT carcinomas in males. Conclusion: The occurrence of cancer in AYA in India has been described. The distribution differs from the only previous report from India as well as the US Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, which can be attributed to a referral bias along with the factual difference in cancer etiology and genetics.

  16. National Heart Attack Alert Program position paper: chest pain centers and programs for the evaluation of acute cardiac ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalenski, R J; Selker, H P; Cannon, C P; Farin, H M; Gibler, W B; Goldberg, R J; Lambrew, C T; Ornato, J P; Rydman, R J; Steele, P

    2000-05-01

    The National Heart Attack Alert Program (NHAAP), which is coordinated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), promotes the early detection and optimal treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction and other acute coronary ischemic syndromes. The NHAAP, having observed the development and growth of chest pain centers in emergency departments with special interest, created a task force to evaluate such centers and make recommendations pertaining to the management of patients with acute cardiac ischemia. This position paper offers recommendations to assist emergency physicians in EDs, including those with chest pain centers, in providing comprehensive care for patients with acute cardiac ischemia. PMID:10783408

  17. The Asian Grocery Store-Based Cancer Education Program: Creating New Education Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Linh; Tat, John; Booy, Molly; Le, Annie; Marasigan, Jeanne Marie; Yuan, Christine; Zeng, Athena; Panchal, Anand; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2016-06-01

    Operating since 1994, the UCSD Moores Cancer Center's Asian Grocery Store-Based Cancer Education Program (the Program) is a proven and sustainable strategy for disseminating cancer and poison control information to Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. This paper describes the process taken to identify health topics that can be readily addressed within the Program's infrastructure and reports results of the pilot testing of the educational module that was developed by following that process. The development of each new module is guided by the Health Belief Model and the Tipping Point Model. The process starts with the selection of a health topic demonstrating pressing need and treatment options in the API community. Then, using the Pareto principle, reasonably modifiable risk factors are chosen to be addressed in the module. "Sticky messaging" for the modifiable risk factors is developed to package the health information as memorable and transmissible calls-to-action. Finally, grocery store outreaches were used to pilot test the new module to assess its effectiveness at facilitating health care information to API community members. By adhering to the steps described in this paper, the authors were able to: (1) select liver cancer as a pressing API health issue that could be positively impacted by the Program; (2) identify reasonably modifiable risk factors for the chosen health issue; (3) generate compelling call-to-action messages to decrease risk of exposure; and (4) demonstrate the cultural and linguistic alignment of the liver cancer control module. The development and testing of new health education modules follow a methodical process guided by scientific principles. Understanding and employing the elements of an existing evidence-based and sustainable health education program can increase the likelihood of success in addressing the health needs of the API community. PMID:25971431

  18. Feasibility of an acceptance and commitment therapy adjunctive web-based program for counseling centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Hayes, Steven C; Seeley, John R; Levin, Crissa

    2015-07-01

    Web-based adjunctive tools provide a promising method for addressing the challenges college counseling centers face in meeting the mental health needs of students. The current study tested an initial adjunctive prototype based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in a pre-post open trial with 30 counselors and 82 student clients across 4 counseling centers. Results indicated high ratings of program satisfaction and usability with counselors and students. The majority of students completed at least part of the program. Significant improvements were found across almost all outcome and ACT process measures with student clients. Improvements in student outcomes were predicted by both changes in psychological inflexibility and how often counselors discussed the program with students. Results are discussed in relation to support for and future development of a flexible, adjunctive ACT program for counseling centers.

  19. CT Lung Cancer Screening Program Development: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Radiology administrators must use innovative strategies around clinical collaboration and marketing to ensure that patients access the service in sufficient numbers. Radiology Associates of South Florida in collaboration with Baptist Health South Florida have developed a successful lung cancer screening program. The biggest factors in their success have been the affordability of their service and the quality of the program. Like mammography, lung cancer screening programs serve as an entry point to other services that generate revenue for the hospital. Patients may require further evaluation in the form of more imaging or surgical services for biopsy. Part 1 provided background and laid out fundamentals for starting a program. Part 2 focuses on building patient volume, marketing, and issues related to patient management after the screen is performed. PMID:26314180

  20. Referral pattern for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the head and neck cancers in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V M Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of any treatment modality in cancer depends not only on the effectiveness of the modality, but also on other factors such as local expertise, tolerance of the modality, cost and prevalence of the disease. Oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer are the major subsites in which majority of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT literature in the head and neck cancers is available. However, oral cancers form a major subsite in India. Materials And Methods: This is an analysis of a prospectively maintained data on NACT in the head and neck cancers from 2008 to 2012. All these patients were referred for NACT for various indications from a multidisciplinary clinic. Descriptive analysis of indications for NACT in this data base is presented. Results: A total of 862 patients received NACT within the stipulated time period. The sites where oral cavity 721 patients (83.6%, maxilla 41 patients (4.8%, larynx 33 patients (3.8%, laryngopharynx 8 patients (0.9% and hypopharynx 59 patients (8.2%. Out of oral cancers, the major indication for NACT was to make the cancer resectable in all (100% patients. The indication in carcinoma of maxilla was to make the disease resectable in 29 patients (70.7% of maxillary cancers and in 12 patients (29.3% of maxillary cancers it was given as an attempt to preserve the eyeball. The indication for NACT in laryngeal cancers was organ preservation in 14 patients (42.4% of larnyngeal cancer and to achieve resectability in 19 patients (57.6% of larnyngeal cancer. The group with laryngopharynx is a cohort of eight patients in whom NACT was given to prevent tracheostomy, these patients had presented with early stridor (common terminology criteria for adverse events Version 4.02. The reason for NACT in hypopharyngeal cancers was for organ preservation in 24 patients (40.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer and for achievement of resectability in 35 patients (59.3% of hypopharyngeal cancer. Conclusion: The major indication for NACT is to

  1. Planting the Seeds for Data Literacy: Lessons Learned from a Student-Centered Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    Jake Carlson; Marianne Stowell Bracke

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need for graduate students to acquire competencies in managing and curating their data sets as a part of their education. Librarians and other information professionals are beginning to respond to this need by developing programming, but as of yet there are few models to follow and the impact on the practices of students is under-explored. This case study presents a student-centered pilot program on data literacy offered at Purdue University. The program was offered thr...

  2. Evolution of the Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Thomas C., III; Brumfield, Mark D.; Jamison, Donald E.; Granata, Raymond L.; Casey, Carolyn A.; Heller, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center develops systems engineers from existing discipline engineers. The program has evolved significantly since the report to INCOSE in 2003. This paper describes the SEED Program as it is now, outlines the changes over the last year, discusses current status and results, and shows the value of human systems and leadership skills for practicing systems engineers.

  3. Clinical imaging centers: The role of state radiation control programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Protection is mandated in all 50 states. Regulatory control over naturally occurring and accelerator produced radioactive materials use is exclusively by state government. Although states are independent bodies there are many similarities in their regulatory approaches. Differences in the degree of regulatory control are minimized through use of the Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation and other guidance documents provided by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. This paper discusses the general requirements to obtain a license and/or registration to produce radioactive material in an accelerator, prepare an imaging agent and/or operate an imaging clinic. These requirements include minimum standards for training and experience of all principal users, equipment specifications, facilities design and construction, specific operating and emergency procedures, radiation protection surveys and monitoring of personnel exposures, ongoing training of staff, and a commitment to ALARA (the philosophy of keeping radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable). The nature and frequency of routine inspections to ensure adequate protection of workers and the public is also covered

  4. The computational physics program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generation of supercomputers. The computational physics group is involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to compact toroids. Another major area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code. This work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence are being examined. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers

  5. Cancer Prevention Programs in the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Michael P.

    When employees develop cancer, businesses bear not only the direct medical costs of the disease, but also the indirect costs associated with lost work time, disability payments, loss of a trained employee, and retraining. Research has confirmed that aggressive prevention and screening programs can be, and indeed are, effective in limiting the…

  6. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population. PMID:21997455

  7. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population.

  8. Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center: Program Plan. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    The Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center was created as part of an ongoing federal effort to provide technologies and methods that protect human health and welfare and environment from hazardous wastes. The Center was established by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) to develop and adapt innovative technologies and methods for assessing the impacts of and remediating inactive hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste sites. The Superfund legislation authorized $10 million for Pacific Northwest Laboratory to establish and operate the Center over a 5-year period. Under this legislation, Congress authorized $10 million each to support research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) on hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste problems in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, including the Hanford Site. In 1987, the Center initiated its RD and D activities and prepared this Program Plan that presents the framework within which the Center will carry out its mission. Section 1.0 describes the Center, its mission, objectives, organization, and relationship to other programs. Section 2.0 describes the Center's RD and D strategy and contains the RD and D objectives, priorities, and process to be used to select specific projects. Section 3.0 contains the Center's FY 1988 operating plan and describes the specific RD and D projects to be carried out and their budgets and schedules. 9 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. De novo cancers following liver transplantation: a single center experience in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songfeng Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: De novo cancers are a growing problem that has become one of the leading causes of late mortality after liver transplantation. The incidences and risk factors varied among literatures and fewer concerned the Eastern population. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and clinical features of de novo cancers after liver transplantation in a single Chinese center. METHODS: 569 patients who received liver transplantation and survived for more than 3 months in a single Chinese center were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: A total of 18 de novo cancers were diagnosed in 17 recipients (13 male and 4 female after a mean of 41 ± 26 months, with an overall incidence of 3.2%, which was lower than that in Western people. Of these, 8 (3.32% cases were from 241 recipients with malignant liver diseases before transplant, while 10 (3.05% cases were from 328 recipients with benign diseases. The incidence rates were comparable, p = 0.86. Furthermore, 2 cases developed in 1 year, 5 cases in 3 years and 11 cases over 3 years. The most frequent cancers developed after liver transplantation were similar to those in the general Chinese population but had much higher incidence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplant recipients were at increased risk for developing de novo cancers. The incidence rates and pattern of de novo cancers in Chinese population are different from Western people due to racial and social factors. Pre-transplant malignant condition had no relationship to de novo cancer. Exact risk factors need further studies.

  10. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  11. Patient profile and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients treated with multimodality therapy at a regional cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deo Suryanarayana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Incidence of rectal cancer has wide geographical variation. Disease pattern in developing countries is different from developed countries as majority of the patients present in advanced stage because of delayed referral and lack of uniform treatment practices. AIMS : Present study describes the patient profile and treatment results from a tertiary care cancer center in India. SETTING AND DESIGN : Tertiary care Regional cancer center. Retrospective analysis 89 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma treated between 1995 and 2002 were analyzed. METHODS: Patients with adenocarcinoma rectum were evaluated in a G.I. Oncology clinic and were treated using multimodality protocols involving surgery, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : A descriptive analysis of patient and disease profile,treatment patterns and out come was performed. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS : Mean age of the patients was 45.4 years and majority of them had tumor in lower third of rectum with evidence of extrarectal spread. Seventy five percent of the patients underwent curative resection with abdominoperineal resection being the commonest procedure. Forty seven percent of patients were given short course preoperative radiotherapy and the remaining received postoperative radiotherapy. Sixty four percent of patients could complete planned adjuvant chemotherapy. Operative mortality was 2% and 23% had morbidity. Local recurrence rate was 8.9%. 5-year disease free and overall survival was 54% and 58% respectively. CONCLUSION : Majority of rectal cancer patients present with locally advanced and low rectal growths leading to low sphincter salvage rates. Despite the advanced stage of presentation optimal oncologic results can be obtained by using a good surgical techniques in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Short course preoperative radiotherapy seems to be more feasible in Indian context

  12. Cyberknife fractionated radiotherapy for adrenal metastases: Preliminary report from a multispecialty Indian cancer care center

    OpenAIRE

    Trinanjan Basu; Tejinder Kataria; Ashu Abhishek; Deepak Gupta; Shikha Goyal; Shyam S. Bisht; Karthick K Payaliappan; Vikraman Subhramani

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Metastasis to adrenal gland from lung, breast, and kidney malignancies are quite common. Historically radiotherapy was intended for pain palliation. Recent studies with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) including Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery aiming at disease control brings about encouraging results. Here we represent the early clinical experience with Cyberknife stereotactic system from an Indian cancer care center. The main purpose of this retrospective review is to serve as...

  13. National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems: program summaries for 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This Center, founded in January 1976, is one of four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major ongoing activities of the Center concern integrated, quantitative analyses of technological, economic, and environmental aspects of energy at the regional, national, and international levels. The objectives, activities, and sources of support of each of the programs are described and the major accomplishments during the year are outlined. Some of the planned future activities of the Center are indicated, and recent publications are listed.

  14. Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher’s work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher’s approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

  15. Be smart against cancer! A school-based program covering cancer-related risk behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Stölzel, Friederike; Seidel, Nadja; Uhmann, Stefan; Baumann, Michael; Berth, Hendrik; Hoyer, Jürgen; Ehninger, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies suggest that most school-age children are poorly informed about cancer risk factors. This study examines the effectiveness of the ‘Be smart against cancer’ (BSAC) program in promoting cancer awareness and intentions to engage in health-promoting behavior. Methods: 235 seventh-grade students were randomized to either the intervention (N = 152) or the wait-control group (N = 83). The intervention included the modules: “What is cancer?,” “Sun protection,” “Non smoking...

  16. A human-centered framework for innovation in conservation incentive programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Michael G; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-12-01

    The promise of environmental conservation incentive programs that provide direct payments in exchange for conservation outcomes is that they enhance the value of engaging in stewardship behaviors. An insidious but important concern is that a narrow focus on optimizing payment levels can ultimately suppress program participation and subvert participants' internal motivation to engage in long-term conservation behaviors. Increasing participation and engendering stewardship can be achieved by recognizing that participation is not simply a function of the payment; it is a function of the overall structure and administration of the program. Key to creating innovative and more sustainable programs is fitting them within the existing needs and values of target participants. By focusing on empathy for participants, co-designing program approaches, and learning from the rapid prototyping of program concepts, a human-centered approach to conservation incentive program design enhances the propensity for discovery of novel and innovative solutions to pressing conservation issues.

  17. Experience on breast cancer with brain metastasis in Kanagawa Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the relationship between clinicopathologic findings and effect of adjuvant therapy on brain metastasis in breast cancer in order to clarify risk factors for brain metastasis in breast cancer patients. We divided patients into a group treated up until December 1999 (Group 1) and a group treated after January 2000 (Group 2), in whom adjuvant therapy was not generalized. Estrogen receptor-negative patients and cases more advanced than T2 showed a high risk of brain metastasis. The time interval to brain metastasis in Group 1 and 2 were 25 and 49.6 months, respectively, showing a significant difference. Taxan derivatives were used in 1.6% of Group 1 and 76% of Group 2. Estrogen receptor negativity, cancer more advanced than T2, and adjuvant therapy are risk factors for brain metastasis. (author)

  18. Cardiorespiratory fitness and digestive cancer mortality: findings from the aerobics center longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, J Brent; Sui, Xuemei; Matthews, Charles E; Adams, Swann A; Hébert, James R; Hardin, James W; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N

    2009-04-01

    Although higher levels of physical activity are inversely associated with risk of colon cancer, few prospective studies have evaluated overall digestive system cancer mortality in relation to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). The authors examined this association among 38,801 men ages 20 to 88 years who performed a maximal treadmill exercise test at baseline in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (Dallas, TX) during 1974 to 2003. Mortality was assessed over 29 years of follow-up (1974-2003). Two hundred eighty-three digestive system cancer deaths occurred during a mean 17 years of observation. Age-adjusted mortality rates per 10,000 person-years according to low, moderate, and high CRF groups were 6.8, 4.0, and 3.3 for digestive system cancer (P(trend) < 0.001). After adjustment for age, examination year, body mass index, smoking, drinking, family history of cancer, personal history of diabetes, hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for overall digestive cancer deaths for those in the middle and upper 40% of the distribution of CRF relative to those in the lowest 20% were 0.66 (0.49-0.88) and 0.56 (0.40-0.80), respectively. Being fit (the upper 80% of CRF) was associated with a lower risk of mortality from colon [0.61 (0.37-1.00)], colorectal [0.58 (0.37-0.92)], and liver cancer [0.28 (0.11-0.72)] compared with being unfit (the lowest 20% of CRF). These findings support a protective role of CRF against total digestive tract, colorectal, and liver cancer deaths in men. PMID:19293313

  19. Cardiorespiratory fitness and digestive cancer mortality: findings from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, J. Brent; Sui, Xuemei; Matthews, Charles E.; Adams, Swann A.; Hébert, James R.; Hardin, James W.; Church, Timothy S.; Blair, Steven N.

    2009-01-01

    Although higher levels of physical activity are inversely associated with risk of colon cancer, few prospective studies have evaluated overall digestive system cancer mortality in relation to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). The authors examined this association among 38,801 men aged 20−88 years and who performed a maximal treadmill exercise test at baseline in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (Dallas, Texas) during 1974−2003. Mortality was assessed over 29 years of follow-up (1974−2003). 283 digestive system cancer deaths occurred during a mean 17-year of observation. Age-adjusted mortality rates per 10,000 person-yrs according to low, moderate, and high CRF groups were 6.8, 4.0, and 3.3 for digestive system cancer (trend p < 0.001). After adjustment for age, examination year, body mass index, smoking, drinking, family history of cancer, personal history of diabetes, hazard ratios for overall digestive cancer deaths (95% confidence interval) for those in the middle and upper 40% of the distribution of CRF relative to those in the lowest 20% were 0.66 (0.49, 0.88) and 0.56 (0.40, 0.80), respectively. Being fit (the upper 80% of CRF) was associated with a lower risk of mortality from colon (0.61 [0.37, 1.00]), colorectal (0.58 [0.37, 0.92]), and liver cancer (0.28 [0.11, 0.72]), compared with being unfit (the lowest 20% of CRF). These findings support a protective role of CRF against total digestive tract, colorectal, and liver cancer deaths in men. PMID:19293313

  20. The Activities and Impact of State Programs to Address Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer, 2011–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina F. Trivers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC, at the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, released a three-year funding opportunity announcement (FOA for a competitive, non-research cooperative agreement. The agreement enhanced the capacities of state health departments to promote the application of best practices for evidence-based breast cancer genomics through education, surveillance, and policy activities. The FOA required that applicants focus on activities related to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. The DCPC funded three states: Georgia, Michigan, and Oregon. Georgia was a first-time recipient of cancer genomics funding, whereas Michigan and Oregon had long standing activities in cancer genomics and had received CDC funding in the past. By the end of the funding period, each state had well-functioning and impactful state-based programs in breast cancer genomics. This article highlights the impact of a few key state activities by using CDC’s Science Impact Framework. There were challenges to implementing public health genomics programs, including the need to develop relevant partnerships, the highly technical nature of the subject matter, a lack of genetic services in certain areas, and the difficulty in funding genetic services. Georgia, Michigan, and Oregon have served as models for others interested in initiating or expanding cancer genomics programs, and they helped to determine what works well for promoting and integrating public health genomics into existing systems.

  1. Nonstandard Programs: the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's next frontier in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Frank J; Zerega, W Dennis; Patel, Rita M; Barnes, Barbara E; Webster, Marshall W

    2011-02-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has seen continuous growth in the number and types of graduate training programs not accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Board of Medical Specialties, or the American Osteopathic Association. For the purposes of ensuring best educational products and of controlling unrecognized competition with our accredited programs, a sequential process of centralized oversight of these nonstandard programs was undertaken. The first step involved programs whose fellows were hired and tracked like accredited fellows (i.e., not instructors). The basic process began with consensus among leadership, writing of policy with consultation as necessary, establishment of a registry of programs and graduates, and a committee to allow sharing of best practices and dissemination of policy. The second step applied the same process to instructor-level programs. Whereas the previous group of programs was made subject to ACGME regulations, more latitude in duty hours and progressive responsibility were allowed for instructor programs. The final step, in progress, is extending a similar but modified approach to short-duration clinical experiences and observerships. The outcomes of these efforts have been the creation of a centralized organizational structure, policies to guide this structure, an accurate registry of a surprising number of training programs, and a rolling record of all graduates from these programs. Included in the process is a mechanism that ensures that core program directors and department chairs specifically review the impact of new programs on core programs before allowing their creation. PMID:21169779

  2. Indicators of malnutrition in children with cancer: A study of 690 patients from a tertiary care cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large data pertaining to indicators of malnutrition in children with cancer is lacking from India. In view of this, we prospectively analyzed consecutive de novo childhood patients with cancer presenting at a tertiary care center. Materials And Methods: Height and weight of each child (n = 690 were compared with World Health Organization child growth standards-2006 for that particular age and sex to get weight-for-age, height-for-age, and weight-for-height indices and below 2SD of the reference median on these indices were considered as underweight, stunted, and wasted, respectively. Body mass index (BMI for age was also analyzed for thinness and obesity. Results: Prevalence of malnutrition based on Z-score for weight-for-age, height-for-age, weight-for-height, and BMI-for-age was 30%, 31%, 35%, and 41%, respectively. Weight-for-age (underweight was significantly associated (P = 0.018 with solid tumors. Height-for-age, weight-for-age, and BMI-for-age were significantly associated (P = 0.007, P = 0.016, and P ≤ 0.001, respectively with rural community. Conclusion: Malnutrition was observed in approximately one-third of children with cancer. Malnutrition is associated with solid tumors and those coming from rural community. Wasting has a higher prevalence in children with cancer in <5 years of age group.

  3. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea practice guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC.

  4. Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Neri, MD, MPH; Sherri L. Stewart, PhD; William Angell, MS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends that every home be tested for radon. Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs develop cancer coalitions that coordinate funding and resources to focus on cancer activities that are recorded in cancer plans. Radon tests, remediation, and radon mitigation techniques are relatively inexpensive, but it is unclear whether coalition...

  5. Quality of life and disease understanding: impact of attending a patient-centered cancer symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrnos, Leslie; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn; Glassley, Pamela; Stigge, Rachel; Northfelt, Donald; Mikhael, Joseph; Aguirre, Annette; Bennett, Robert M; Mesa, Ruben A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a patient-centered symposium as an educational intervention on a broad population of cancer patients. We developed a comprehensive patient symposium. Through voluntary questionnaires, we studied the impact of this cancer symposium on quality of life, cancer-specific knowledge, and symptom management among cancer patients. Symposium attendees were provided surveys prior to and 3 months following the educational intervention. Surveys included (1) EORTC-QLQ-C30; (2) disease understanding tool developed for this conference; (3) validated disease-specific questionnaires. Changes over time were assessed using McNemar's tests and paired t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 158 attendees completed the pre-convention survey. Most respondents reported at least "quite a bit" of understanding regarding treatment options, screening modalities, symptomatology, and cancer-related side effects. Attendees endorsed the least understanding of disease-related stress, risk factors, fatigue management, and legal issues related to disease/treatment. At 3 months, there was improvement in understanding (12 of 14 areas of self-reported knowledge especially regarding nutrition, and stress/fatigue management). However, no significant change was seen in QLQ-C30 functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. A patient symposium, as an educational intervention improves a solid knowledge base amongst attendees regarding their disease, increases knowledge in symptom management, but may be insufficient to impact QoL as a single intervention. PMID:25641947

  6. Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection in Patients With Nonseminomatous Testicular Cancer: A Single Center Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowroozi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Testicular cancer accounts for about 1 - 1.5% of all malignancies in men. Radical orchiectomy is curative in 75% of patients with stage I disease, but advance stage with retroperitoneal lymph node involvement needs chemotherapy. All patients who have residual masses ≥ 1 cm after chemotherapy should undergo postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND. Objectives Treatment of advanced nonseminomatous testicular cancer is usually a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. We described our experience about postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND in our center. Patients and Methods In a retrospective cross-sectional study between 2006 and 2011, patients with a history of postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND in Imam Khomeini hospital were evaluated. All patients had normal postchemotherapy serum tumor markers and primary nonseminomatous cancer. We reviewed retrospectively clinical, pathological, and surgical parameters associated with PC-RPLND in our center. Results Twenty-one patients underwent bilateral PC-RPLND. Mean age was 26.3 years (ranged 16 - 47. Mean size of retroperitoneal mass after chemotherapy was 7.6 cm. Mean operative time was 198 minutes (120 - 246 minutes. Mean follow-up time was 38.6 months. Pathologic review showed presence of fibrosis/necrosis, viable germ cell tumor and teratoma in 8 (38.1%, 10 (47.6% and 3 (14.28% patients, respectively. One patient in postoperative period of surgery and three patients in two first years after surgery were expired. Of 17 alive patients, only two (11.8% had not retrograde ejaculation. Conclusions PC-RPLND is one the major operations in the field of urology, which is associated with significant adjunctive surgeries. In appropriate cases, PC-RPLND was associated with good cancer specific survival in tertiary oncology center.

  7. PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PREVENT program provides a structure for the introduction of new agents, drugs and vaccines to inhibit, retard or reverse the cancer process. The program was designed to optimize translational opportunities from discovery to the clinic, and provide a mechanism to identify and study efficacy and pharmacodynamics biomarkers that will help in phase II trials to evaluate drug effects.  | Research pipeline for new prevention interventions and biomarkers headed toward clinical trials.

  8. 75 FR 39953 - Modification to the Basic Center Program Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    .... This is a Modification to the Basic Center Program Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), HHS-2010-ACF.../grants/open/foa/view/HHS-2010-ACF-ACYF-CY-0002 . A modified FOA that incorporates the following changes... application formatting and point deduction for noncompliance with FOA instructions. Modification to...

  9. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  10. Program in Anthropology and Education: Research Center in Anthropology and Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this program was to discover and to help bring about a more effective articulation between anthropologists and the research and development needs of the schools. To that end, a number of crucial activities were undertaken coincident with the creation of university-based centers. A national conference was organized to assess the…

  11. 77 FR 33573 - Final Priorities, Requirements, and Selection Criteria-Comprehensive Centers Program (CFDA Number...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... factors that affect student achievement. While we identify some non-academic factors (social, emotional... (NPP) for this program in the Federal Register on January 23, 2012 (77 FR 3242). The NPP contained... culturally and linguistically gifted students by using the Comprehensive Centers to develop a cadre...

  12. The University of California Area Health Education Center Biomedical Library Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lynette G.

    This paper describes the University of California's Central San Joaquin Valley Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Biomedical Library Program, which is intended to improve library services in hospitals and other medical care institutions in the region and to coordinate future development of these services. A summary of the San Joaquin Valley AHEC…

  13. The 10 Pillars of Lung Cancer Screening: Rationale and Logistics of a Lung Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintelmann, Florian J; Bernheim, Adam; Digumarthy, Subba R; Lennes, Inga T; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Gilman, Matthew D; Sharma, Amita; Flores, Efren J; Muse, Victorine V; Shepard, Jo-Anne O

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the National Lung Screening Trial data released in 2011, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force made lung cancer screening (LCS) with low-dose computed tomography (CT) a public health recommendation in 2013. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) currently reimburse LCS for asymptomatic individuals aged 55-77 years who have a tobacco smoking history of at least 30 pack-years and who are either currently smoking or had quit less than 15 years earlier. Commercial insurers reimburse the cost of LCS for individuals aged 55-80 years with the same smoking history. Effective care for the millions of Americans who qualify for LCS requires an organized step-wise approach. The 10-pillar model reflects the elements required to support a successful LCS program: eligibility, education, examination ordering, image acquisition, image review, communication, referral network, quality improvement, reimbursement, and research frontiers. Examination ordering can be coupled with decision support to ensure that only eligible individuals undergo LCS. Communication of results revolves around the Lung Imaging Reporting and Data System (Lung-RADS) from the American College of Radiology. Lung-RADS is a structured decision-oriented reporting system designed to minimize the rate of false-positive screening examination results. With nodule size and morphology as discriminators, Lung-RADS links nodule management pathways to the variety of nodules present on LCS CT studies. Tracking of patient outcomes is facilitated by a CMS-approved national registry maintained by the American College of Radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. A Wellness Program for Cancer Survivors and Caregivers: Developing an Integrative Pilot Program with Exercise, Nutrition, and Complementary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutenberg, Mark; Sogor, Alyssa; Arheart, Kris; Cutrono, Stacy E; Kornfeld, Julie

    2016-03-01

    The Integrative Wellness Program (IWP) at the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC) sought to provide integrative wellness education to cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by offering instruction in exercise, nutrition, and complementary and alternative medicine. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the IWP on the overall wellness of the individuals participating in the program. Three different 10-week versions of the IWP were conducted over a 1-year period. Each session focused on a different wellness topic presented through interactive lectures and applied activities. A series of self-report questionnaires were administered at baseline and again at the completion of the program to assess improvements in physical activity levels, dietary habits, sleep hygiene, and quality of life. Participants were generally older, Caucasian, female, had higher levels of education, and still currently receiving treatment. Significant changes were observed in two measures: Starting the Conversation (-2.0 ± 2.40, p = .037) and the Sticking To It subscale of the Self-Efficacy and Eating Habits Survey (1.7 ± 1.22, p = .0013). A trend for improvement in the Reducing Fat subscale of the Self-Efficacy Eating Habits (0.44 ± 0.60, p = .056) was also observed. Participant satisfaction surveys indicated high levels of satisfaction and applicability of the material presented. The significant improvements detected related to dietary habits, combined with the responses from the participant satisfaction surveys, suggest that the IWP was well received and can positively impact the overall wellness of cancer patients, survivors, and their caregivers. PMID:25663357

  15. General aviation internal combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs underway at the NASA-Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. Its three major thrusts are: (a) reduced SFC's; (b) improved fuels tolerance; and (c) reducing emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to late 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  16. 77 FR 41188 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young... Temeika L. Fairley, Ph.D., Designated Federal Officer, Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Advisory Committee on...

  17. Relative dose intensity of systemic chemotherapy in an outpatient cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Uptigrove

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was undertaken to determine the average relative dose intensity (RDI of chemotherapy administered to patients in a community-based outpatient cancer center. Methods. A retrospective review of medical records in an outpatient cancer center was conducted for patients initiating systemic chemotherapy in 2007 for a diagnosis of lymphoma, breast, lung, ovary, or colon cancer. Eighty-four records meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed for demographic information, primary tumor type, chemotherapy regimen, staging at diagnosis, presence of disease progression, and mortality status. Regimen data included: chemotherapeutic agents used, dosages administered, dates of administration, treatment intent (adjuvant vs. metastatic, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF usage per cycle. Mean summary statistics were calculated and average RDI was analyzed. Results. The overall RDI at our institution was 83% (n=65. The RDI for those receiving adjuvant chemotherapy was 85% (n=51, whereas for those receiving chemotherapy for metastatic disease the RDI was 76% (n=14. Fifty-four percent (n=35 of the regimens met or exceeded the recommended minimum goal RDI of > 85%. Conclusions. Overall the average RDI at our institution was 83%, slightly below the goal of ≥ 85%. Patients with potentially curable malignancies receiving adjuvant chemotherapy reached the threshold RDI; however, areas for quality improvement exist at our institution.

  18. Improving breast cancer survivors’ knowledge using a patient-centered intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Jesus G.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Viveros, Lori; Odele, Patience; Feldman, Nancy R.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-income, minority women with breast cancer experience a range of barriers to receiving survivorship information. Our objective was to test a novel, patient-centered intervention aimed at improving communication about survivorship care. Methods We developed a wallet card to provide oncologic and follow-up care survivorship information to breast cancer patients. We used a prospective, pre–post design to assess the intervention at a safety net hospital. The intervention was given by a patient navigator or community health worker. Results Patient knowledge (n = 130) of personal cancer history improved from baseline pretest to 1 week after the intervention for stage (66–93%; P < .05), treatment (79–92%; P < .05), and symptoms of recurrence (48–89%; P <.05), which was retained at 3 months. The intervention reduced the number of patients who were unsure when their mammogram was due (15–5% at 1 week and 6%at 3 months; P <.05). Nearly 90% reported they would be likely to share their survivorship card with their providers. Conclusion A patient-centered survivorship card improved short-term recall of key survivorship care knowledge and seems to be effective at reducing communication barriers for this population. Further studies are warranted to assess long-term retention and the impact on receipt of appropriate survivorship follow-up care. PMID:26032819

  19. Pathological complete response in breast cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: The natural history of an elusive prognosticator

    OpenAIRE

    Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M.; NWAOGU, IHEOMA; Jeffe, Donna B.; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    Given the prognostic significance of pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we sought to chronicle the clinical course of breast cancer patients whose tumors exhibited pCR at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed 5,533 cancer center patients treated for a first primary breast cancer between March, 1999 and September, 2010 to identify those who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy that resulted in pCR (i.e., no residual invasive malignancy in the breast or axilla...

  20. An analysis of current treatment practice in uterine papillary serous and clear cell carcinoma at two high volume cancer centers

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Tilley Jenkins; Knickerbocker, Abhay; Shah, Chirag A.; Schiff, Melissa A.; Isacson, Christina; Garcia, Rochelle L; Goff, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the rarity of uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and uterine clear cell carcinoma (UCCC), they contribute disproportionately to endometrial cancer deaths. Sufficient clinical information regarding treatment and prognosis is lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate treatment outcomes in a rare cancer cohort based on the experience at two tertiary care cancer centers. Methods Clinicopathologic data were retrospectively collected on 279 patients with UPSC and UCCC t...

  1. Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Program Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Allison M; Esplin, Andrea; Baldwin, Laura-Mae

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) provide primary care to low-income and uninsured patients in the United States. FQHCs are required to report annual measurements and provide evidence of improvement for quality measures; effective methods to improve quality in FQHCs are needed. Systems of Support (SOS) is a proactive, mail-based, colorectal cancer screening program that was developed and tested in an integrated health care system. The objective of this study was to adapt...

  2. Cervical cancer screening: A never-ending developing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparetto, Ciro; Borruto, Franco

    2015-07-16

    the screening service with Pap test is organized in an efficient manner. Cervical cancer screening protocols are directed to sexually active women aged 25-64 years: they provide the Pap test performed by examining under a microscope or by staining with a specific "thin prep" the material taken from the cervix with a small spatula and a brush. It is recommended to repeat the test every two or three years. It is important to emphasize that women vaccinated against HPV must continue the screening with Pap test. Although some screening programs (e.g., Pap smears) have had remarkable success in reducing mortality from a specific cancer, any kind of screening is free from inherent limitations. The screening methods are in fact applied to large parts of the apparently healthy population. In particular, the limits for certain cancers may be as obvious as to prohibit the introduction of an organized screening program. Potential limitations of organized screenings are basically of two types: organizational and medical. The limits of organizational type relate to the ability of a program to recruit the whole target population. Although well organized, a screening program will hardly be able to exceed a coverage of 70%-80% of the target population, and in fact the results of the current programs are often much smaller. The limits of medical type are represented by the possibility of reducing the overall mortality, or specific mortality, using a specific screening campaign. PMID:26244153

  3. Evaluation of a Worksite Diabetes Education Program at a Large Urban Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Susan; Baernholdt, Marianne; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes education can be delivered at the worksite to better support employees' diabetes self-management and improve productivity and health care costs. This study was conducted to address the feasibility of a diabetes worksite education program for employees at a large urban academic health care institution. The diabetes education program was delivered in the diabetes center at the institution, a resource that was previously underutilized by employees. Through collaboration with groups in the institution, 20 employees of diverse ethnicity participated in the worksite diabetes education program with positive outcomes: improved glycemic control measured (HbA1c), attainment of self-management goals, and satisfaction with the program. Work absences trended downward, but numbers of hospitalizations and emergency department visits were unchanged in the 3 months following education. Recommendations include replication of the study with more employee participation and program evaluation over a longer period of time to continue assessment of employees' educational needs.

  4. Evaluation of a Worksite Diabetes Education Program at a Large Urban Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Susan; Baernholdt, Marianne; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes education can be delivered at the worksite to better support employees' diabetes self-management and improve productivity and health care costs. This study was conducted to address the feasibility of a diabetes worksite education program for employees at a large urban academic health care institution. The diabetes education program was delivered in the diabetes center at the institution, a resource that was previously underutilized by employees. Through collaboration with groups in the institution, 20 employees of diverse ethnicity participated in the worksite diabetes education program with positive outcomes: improved glycemic control measured (HbA1c), attainment of self-management goals, and satisfaction with the program. Work absences trended downward, but numbers of hospitalizations and emergency department visits were unchanged in the 3 months following education. Recommendations include replication of the study with more employee participation and program evaluation over a longer period of time to continue assessment of employees' educational needs. PMID:26458409

  5. Primary breast cancer: The experience of the joint center for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While radiation therapy began to be administered in the treatment of breast cancer shortly after the discovery of X rays in 1895, the efficacious use of external beam radiation for early breast cancer required supervoltage radiation in order to get effective doses to the tumor, as well as the skin sparing, required for satisfactory cosmetic results. The use of interstitial radiation began shortly after the discovery of radium by the Curies. The first systematic report of such an approach was presented by Goeffrey Keynes, who reported equivalent results with radium implants as compared to those with mastectomy. These two techniques, supervoltage and interstitial radiation, have been used in the modern era of radiotherapy and reported by a number of centers, some of which are presented in this symposium

  6. NASA Lunar Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo rocks and regolith soils first hand. Lunar samples embedded in plastic are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks has revealed the early history of our Earth-Moon system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet as well as connections to the basic lunar surface processes - impact and volcanism. With these samples educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by missions to Moon. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections of the rocks to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the violent impact history of the Moon. The disks also include two regolith soils and

  7. The Bone Marrow Transplantation Center of the National Cancer Institute - its resources to assist patients with bone marrow failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the bone marrow transplantation center of the brazilian National Cancer Institute, which is responsible for the cancer control in Brazil. The document also describes the resources available in the Institute for assisting patients presenting bone marrow failures. The Center provides for allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplants, peripheral stem cell transplants, umbilical cord collections and transplants, and a small experience with unrelated bone marrow transplants. The Center receives patient from all over the country and provides very sophisticated medical care at no direct cost to the patients

  8. Conservative Surgery and Primary Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer; Yonsei Cancer Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Chang Ok; Lee, Hy De; Lee, Kyung Sik; Jung, Woo Hee; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    Breast conserving surgery and irradiation is now accepted as preferable treatment method for the patients with stage I and II breast cancer. Our institution activated team approach for breast conservation 1991 and treated on hundred and forty patients during the next three years. Purpose: To present our early experience with eligibility criteria, treatment techniques, and the morbidities of primary radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty four patients with early stage breast cancer who received breast conserving treatment between January 1991 and December 1992 were evaluated. All patients received partial mastectomy(wide excision to quadrantectomy) and axillary node dissection followed by radiotherapy. Total dose of 4500-5040 cGy in 5-5 1/2 weeks was given to entire involved breast and boost dose of 1000-2000 cGy in 1-2 weeks was given to the primary tumor site. Linac 4 MV X-ray was used for breast irradiation and electron beam was used for boost. Thirty five patients received chemotherapy before or after radiotherapy. Patients characteristics, treatment techniques, and treatment related morbidities were analyzed. Results: Age distribution was ranged from 23 to 59 year old with median age of 40. Twenty-seven patients had T1 lesions and 34 patients had T2 lesions. In three patients, pathologic diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ. Thirty-seven patients were N0 and 27 patients were N1. There were three recurrences, one in the breast and two distant metastases during follow-up period(6-30 months, median 14 months). Only one breast recurrence occurred at undetected separate lesion with microcalcifications on initial mammogram. There was no serious side reaction which interrupted treatment courses or severe late complication. Only one symptomatic radiation pneumonitis and one asymptomatic radiation peumonitis were noted. Conclusions: Conservative surgery and primary radiotherapy for early breast cancer in proven to be safe and comfortable treatment method without

  9. Epidemiologic characteristics of oral cancer:single-center analysis of 4097 patients from the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhang; Ming Song; Fan Gao; AnKui Yang; WenKuan Chen; ShuWei Chen; Huan Li; Xing Zhang; ZhongYuan Yang; XinLin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer is a common type of head and neck cancers. Knowing its epidemiologic characteristics is crucial to preventing, diagnosing, and treating this cancer. This study aimed to explore the epidemiologic characteris‑tics of oral cancer in South China. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 4097 oral cancer patients treated at the Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center between 1960 and 2013. We compared the age of onset, sex ratio, pathologic type, and primary tumor location among three subcultural areas (Guangfu, Hakka, and Chaoshan) and between an economically developed region and a less‑developed one in Guangdong. Results: Overall, oral cancer had a male‑to‑female ratio of approximately 2:1, and this ratio decreased over time. Oral cancer occurred mostly in patients of 45–64 years old (54.5%), and the percentage of older patients gradually increased over time. The most common tumor location was the tongue. Squamous cell carcinoma was the predomi‑nant pathologic type. The percentage of blood type O in oral cancer patients was lower than that in the healthy pop‑ulation. The male‑to‑female ratio in the Chaoshan area was higher than that in the Guangfu and Hakka areas, whereas the age of disease onset in Guangfu was higher than that in Hakka and Chaoshan. The male‑to‑female ratio was lower and the age of disease onset was higher in the economically developed region than in the less‑developed region. Conclusion: The incidence of oral cancer in South China presents typical characteristics to which doctors should pay attention when diagnosing and treating oral cancer patients.

  10. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  11. 77 FR 4820 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... line when possible. Please note that the public comment periods end at the times indicated above or... scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC)...

  12. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  13. Knowledge discovery for pancreatic cancer using inductive logic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yushan; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Maeshiro, Kensei; Ching, Wai-Ki; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Furuta, Koh

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease and predicting the status of the patients becomes an important and urgent issue. The authors explore the applicability of inductive logic programming (ILP) method in the disease and show that the accumulated clinical laboratory data can be used to predict disease characteristics, and this will contribute to the selection of therapeutic modalities of pancreatic cancer. The availability of a large amount of clinical laboratory data provides clues to aid in the knowledge discovery of diseases. In predicting the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer, using the ILP model, three rules are developed that are consistent with descriptions in the literature. The rules that are identified are useful to detect the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer and therefore contributed significantly to the decision of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the proposed method is compared with the other typical classification techniques and the results further confirm the superiority and merit of the proposed method.

  14. First breast cancer mammography screening program in Mexico: initial results 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Guisa-Hohenstein, Fernando; Labastida-Almendaro, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasia worldwide. In emergent countries as Mexico, an increase has been shown in frequency and mortality, unfortunately, most cases in advanced loco-regional stages developed in young women. The success of breast screening in mortality reduction has been observed since 1995 in Western Europe and the United States, where as many as 40% mortality reduction has been achieved. Most countries guidelines recommends an annual or biannual mammography for all women >40 years of age. In 2005, FUCAM, a nonlucrative civil foundation in Mexico join with Mexico City government, initiated the first voluntary mammography screening program for women >40 years of age residing in Mexico City's Federal District. Mammographies were carried out with analogical mammographs in specially designed mobile units and were performed in the area of women's domiciles. This report includes data from the first 96,828 mammographies performed between March 2005 and December 2006. There were 1% of mammographies in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 0, 4, or 5 and 208 out of 949 women with abnormal mammographies (27.7%) had breast cancer, a rate of 2.1 per thousand, most of them in situ or stage I (29.4%) or stage II (42.2%) nevertheless 21% of those women with abnormal mammography did not present for further clinical and radiologic evaluation despite being personally notified at their home addresses. The breast cancer rate of Mexican women submitted to screening mammography is lower than in European or North American women. Family history of breast cancer, nulliparity, absence of breast feeding, and increasing age are factors that increase the risk of breast cancer. Most cancers were diagnosed in women's age below 60 years (68.5%) with a mean age of 53.55 corroborating previous data published. It is mandatory to sensitize and educate our population with regard to accepting to visit the Specialized Breast Centers.

  15. The Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program in China and its impact on Chinese cancer patients:the SYSUCC experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Peng Yang; Yu-Xiang Ma; Yan Huang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Fei Xu; Ying Tian; Ben-Yan Zou; Rui-Zhen Gao; Li Zhang

    2014-01-01

    To improve cancer pain management, the Medical Oncology Department of Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC) launched the Good Pain Management (GPM) Ward Program, which has been recognized by the Chinese Ministry of Health and promoted throughout the nation. This retrospective case-control study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Patients diagnosed with malignant solid tumors with bone metastasis were eligible. Patients who were admitted 6 months before the initiation of the GPM program were used as the control group, and patients admitted 6 months after the initiation of the program were used as the GPM group. The pain-reporting rate and pain management index (PMI) were calculated. The pain levels before and after pain management were compared. A total of 475 patients (244 in the control group and 231 in the GPM group) were analyzed. The pain-reporting rate of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (62.8% vs. 37.7%,P< 0.001). The PMI of the GPM group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.083 vs. -0.261,P< 0.001). Therefore, the GPM Ward Program improved the pain management of cancer patients and provided experience for improving cancer pain management in the future.

  16. Promoting Breast Cancer Screening Among Asian American Women: the Asian Grocery Store-Based Cancer Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Beerman, Paula R.; Lee, Kathy; Hung, Jenny; Nguyen, Helene; Cho, Janet; Huang, Wennie

    2012-01-01

    Asian American women's historically low breast cancer mortality rate has remained constant as rates decreased for all other races. From 2000 to 2004, a randomized controlled trial explored the Asian grocery store-based breast cancer education program's impact on Chinese, Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese women (n=1,540). Women aged 40 and older and non-adherent for annual screening mammograms were more likely to schedule a mammogram after receiving the breast cancer education program than wome...

  17. A knowledge continuity management program for the energy, infrastructure and knowledge systems center, Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, David F.

    2006-07-01

    A growing recognition exists in companies worldwide that, when employees leave, they take with them valuable knowledge that is difficult and expensive to recreate. The concern is now particularly acute as the large ''baby boomer'' generation is reaching retirement age. A new field of science, Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM), is designed to capture and catalog the acquired knowledge and wisdom from experience of these employees before they leave. The KCM concept is in the final stages of being adopted by the Energy, Infrastructure, and Knowledge Systems Center and a program is being applied that should produce significant annual cost savings. This report discusses how the Center can use KCM to mitigate knowledge loss from employee departures, including a concise description of a proposed plan tailored to the Center's specific needs and resources.

  18. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  19. Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Poppito, Shannon; Rosenfeld, Barry; Vickers, Andrew J.; Li, Yuelin; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Pessin, Hayley; Lichtenthal, Wendy; Sjoberg, Daniel; Cassileth, Barrie R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Spiritual well-being and sense of meaning are important concerns for clinicians who care for patients with cancer. We developed Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy (IMCP) to address the need for brief interventions targeting spiritual well-being and meaning for patients with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with stage III or IV cancer (N = 120) were randomly assigned to seven sessions of either IMCP or therapeutic massage (TM). Patients were assessed before and after completing the intervention and 2 months postintervention. Primary outcome measures assessed spiritual well-being and quality of life; secondary outcomes included anxiety, depression, hopelessness, symptom burden, and symptom-related distress. Results Of the 120 participants randomly assigned, 78 (65%) completed the post-treatment assessment and 67 (56%) completed the 2-month follow-up. At the post-treatment assessment, IMCP participants demonstrated significantly greater improvement than the control condition for the primary outcomes of spiritual well-being (b = 0.39; P <.001, including both components of spiritual well-being (sense of meaning: b = 0.34; P = .003 and faith: b = 0.42; P = .03), and quality of life (b = 0.76; P = .013). Significantly greater improvements for IMCP patients were also observed for the secondary outcomes of symptom burden (b = −6.56; P < .001) and symptom-related distress (b = −0.47; P < .001) but not for anxiety, depression, or hopelessness. At the 2-month follow-up assessment, the improvements observed for the IMCP group were no longer significantly greater than those observed for the TM group. Conclusion IMCP has clear short-term benefits for spiritual suffering and quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. Clinicians working with patients who have advanced cancer should consider IMCP as an approach to enhance quality of life and spiritual well-being. PMID:22370330

  20. Cancer Therapy Directed by Comprehensive Genomic Profiling: A Single Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Li, Yali; Stephen, Bettzy; Zinner, Ralph; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Karp, Daniel; Falchook, Gerald S; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Anderson, Roosevelt; Ke, Danxia; Miller, Vincent; Yelensky, Roman; Lee, J Jack; Hong, David S; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-07-01

    Innovative molecular diagnostics deployed in the clinic enable new ways to stratify patients into appropriate treatment regimens. These approaches may resolve a major challenge for early-phase clinical trials, which is to recruit patients who, while having failed previous treatments, may nevertheless respond to molecularly targeted drugs. We report the findings of a prospective, single-center study conducted in patients with diverse refractory cancers who underwent comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP; next-generation sequencing, 236 genes). Of the 500 patients enrolled, 188 (37.6%) received either matched (N = 122/188, 65%) or unmatched therapy (N = 66/188, 35%). The most common reasons that patients were not evaluable for treatment included insufficient tissue, death, or hospice transfer. The median number of molecular alterations per patient was five (range, 1-14); median number of prior therapies, four. The most common diagnoses were ovarian cancer (18%), breast cancer (16%), sarcoma (13%), and renal cancer (7%). Of the 339 successfully profiled patients, 317 (93.5%) had at least one potentially actionable alteration. By calculating matching scores, based on the number of drug matches and genomic aberrations per patient, we found that high scores were independently associated with a greater frequency of stable disease ≥6 months/partial/complete remission [22% (high scores) vs. 9% (low scores), P = 0.024], longer time-to-treatment failure [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.36-0.74; P = 0.0003], and survival (HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.43-1.0; P = 0.05). Collectively, this study offers a clinical proof of concept for the utility of CGP in assigning therapy to patients with refractory malignancies, especially in those patients with multiple genomic aberrations for whom combination therapies could be implemented. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3690-701. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197177

  1. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, Caribbean Marine Research Center, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Undersea Research Center for the Caribbean Marine Research Center, Perry Institure for Marine Science, for the Caribbean region explores and studies...

  2. A decade of offering a Healing Enhancement Program at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Rodgers, Nancy J; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Thomley, Barbara S; Do, Alexander; Wood, Christina; Pronk, Susan C; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-11-01

    An increased focus has been given to improving the patient experience in health care. This focus has included placing value in a patient-centric, holistic approach to patient care. In the past decade, the Healing Enhancement Program was developed at 1 large medical center to address this focus through implementation of such integrative medicine services as massage, acupuncture, and music therapy to holistically address the pain, anxiety, and tension that hospitalized patients often experience. We describe the development and growth of this program over the past decade. PMID:26573445

  3. Alternative Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program. Volume IV. International Fuel Service Center evaluation. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, L D [comp.

    1979-11-01

    This Alternative Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program (AFCEP) study presents the technical, economic and social aspects of the International Fuel Service Center (IFSC) as an institutional approach to nuclear fuel cycle development and is provided in support of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment program (NASAP). Four types of IFSCs are described and evaluated in terms of three different twenty-year nuclear growth scenarios. Capital costs for each IFSC and comparable dispersed facility costs are discussed. Finally, the possible impact of each scenario and IFSC on the environmental and socio-economic structure is examined. 14 refs., 33 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Marketing the rural hospital-based laboratory: building a customer-centered outreach program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, M F

    2001-01-01

    Rural hospital laboratories, which operate 24 hours/day, 7 days/week to meet inpatient and emergency-room care requirements, are situated uniquely to provide outpatient laboratory services for their communities. Laboratory managers looking to augment current services should consider implementing an outreach program. This article will explore the marketing aspects involved with developing a customer-centered outreach program, including finding a market niche, developing a business plan using elements of the consumption chain, addressing customer service issues, and business plan testing and validation. PMID:11236189

  5. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program Among Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik eJohansson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally-funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are Congressionally-mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-hour field placement program at an established Public Health Training Center. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to an evidence base on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  6. Strengthening breast and cervical cancer control through partnerships: American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, David; Castro, Georgina; Flagg, T'Ronda; Landis, Kate; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Benard, Vicki B; Royalty, Janet E

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) has played a critical role in providing cancer screening services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/ANs) women and strengthening tribal screening capacity. Since 1991, the NBCCEDP has funded states, tribal nations, and tribal organizations to develop and implement organized screening programs. The ultimate goal is to deliver breast and cervical cancer screening to women who do not have health insurance and cannot afford to pay for these services. The delivery of clinical services is supported through complementary program efforts such as professional development, public education and outreach, and patient navigation. This article seeks to describe the growth of NBCCEDP's tribal commitment and the unique history and aspects of serving the AI/AN population. The article describes: 1) how this program has demonstrated success in improving screening of AI/AN women; 2) innovative partnerships with the Indian Health Service, state programs, and other organizations that have improved tribal public health infrastructure; and 3) the evolution of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work with tribal communities. PMID:25099898

  7. A workshop on asthma management programs and centers in Brazil: reviewing and explaining concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Stelmach; Alcindo Cerci Neto; Ana Cristina de Carvalho Fernandez Fonseca; Eduardo Vieira Ponte; Gerardo Alves; Ildely Niedia Araujo-Costa; Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury Lasmar; Luci Keiko Kuromoto de Castro; Maria Lucia Medeiros Lenz; Paulo Silva; Alberto Cukier; Alexssandra Maia Alves; Aline Silva Lima-Matos; Amanda da Rocha Oliveira Cardoso; Ana Luisa Godoy Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report the results of a workshop regarding asthma management programs and centers (AMPCs) in Brazil, so that they can be used as a tool for the improvement and advancement of current and future AMPCs. Methods: The workshop consisted of five presentations and the corresponding group discussions. The working groups discussed the following themes: implementation of asthma management strategies; human resources needed for AMPCs; financial resources needed for AMPCs; and operational ...

  8. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  9. USAGE OF DIGITAL LOYALTY PROGRAMS IN THE CITY CENTER AREA IN JYVÄSKYLÄ

    OpenAIRE

    Liukkonen, Niko

    2012-01-01

    This research is conducted for Arena Interactive Ltd, which is a leading vendor of mobile solutions for the media industry in Scandinavia. The goal of this research is to gain information about the usage of digital loyalty programs in the city center area of Jyväskylä and help Arena Interactive Ltd. in their strategic planning. The research is conducted by utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods – triangulation. The primary data for this research was collected by conducting a ...

  10. Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

  11. Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

  12. A quality assurance program for radiotherapy centers in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognizing the importance of quality assurance in radiotherapy and the need to make access to radiation standards traceable to the international measurement system to every radiotherapy center, the KFDA, as a national secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL), has started a quality assurance program from 1999. This program was initiated by tele-survey to all radiotherapy centers regarding general information about their radiotherapists, medical physicists, type of equipment, dosimeters, etc. This provided the KFDA with a data file and led to links between the KFDA and the clinics. In 1999 a national quality assurance program for ensuring dosimetry accuracy has been performed by on-site dosimetry for 4 60Co γ ray, 47 high-energy photon beams used in 43 centers. During the audits, the procedure followed by the KFDA was to measure the outputs of the LINAC(6 MV) and Co-60 teletherapy units in terms of absorbed dose to water for fixed dose (2 Gy) in water phantom (only one phantom used in this on-site visit). For all the case, the measurements are carried out in a water phantom according to the IAEA recommended code of practice. The distributions of deviations in total audit are given. The results showed deviations varying between -7.11% and 8.38%. KFDA follow up the large deviated radiotherapy centers. The traceability to SSDL is a major factor of deviation between KFDA measurement dose and clinics quoted dose. The correction for air density (temperature and pressure) is a factor that sometimes introduces errors. Most of the clinics do not calibrate their own barometers and sometimes rely on the air pressure that is quoted during measurements by local metrological offices. In one case, the barometer and thermometer of the clinic were deviating from KFDA instruments by about 10 mmHg and 2, respectively even if the temperature was measured in air. In one case, about 4% of output variation with gantry head angle (horizontal vs. vertical). In the past two years the

  13. Location Selection of Chinese Modern Railway Logistics Center Based on DEA-Bi-level Programming Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenling Feng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Properly planning the modern railway logistics center is a necessary step for the railway logistics operation, which can effectively improve the railway freight service for a seamless connection between the internal and external logistic nodes. The study, from the medium level and depending on the existing railway freight stations with the railway logistics node city, focuses on the site-selection of modern railway logistics center to realize organic combination between newly built railway logistics center and existing resources. Considering the special features of modern railway logistics center, the study makes pre-selection of the existing freight stations with the DEA assessment model to get the alternative plan. And further builds a Bi-level plan model with the gross construction costs and total client expenses minimized. Finally, the example shows that the hybrid optimization algorithm combined with GA, TA, SA can solve the Bi-level programming which is a NP-hard problem and get the railway logistics center number and distribution. The result proves that our method has profound realistic significance to the development of China railway logistics.

  14. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer: Single center experience after 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the Department of Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery of the Hospital for Digestive Surgery in Belgrade, hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (hMIE has been a standard of care for patients with resectable esophageal cancer since 2009. As a next and final step in the change management, from January 2015 we utilized total minimally invasive esophagectomy (tMIE as a standard of care. Objective. The aim of the study was to report initial experiences in hMIE (laparoscopic approach for cancer and analyze surgical technique, major morbidity and 30-day mortality. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 44 patients who underwent elective hMIE for esophageal cancer at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Hospital for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2009 to December 2014. Results. There were 16 (36% middle thoracic esophagus tumors and 28 (64% tumors of distal thoracic esophagus. Mean duration of the operation was 319 minutes (approximately five hours and 20 minutes. The average blood loss was 173.6 ml. A total of 12 (27% of patients had postoperative complications and mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 days. Mean hospital stay after surgery was 16 days. The average number of harvested lymph nodes during surgery was 31.9. The overall 30-day mortality rate within 30 days after surgery was 2%. Conclusion. As long as MIE is an oncological equivalent to open esophagectomy (OE, better relation between cost savings and potentially increased effectiveness will make MIE the preferred approach in high-volume esophageal centers that are experienced in minimally invasive procedures.

  15. Laparoscopy Versus Robotic Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Center Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Scheiterle, Maximilian; Di Mare, Giulio; Gnoni, Pasquale; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco

    2016-08-01

    Background Minimally invasive approach has gained interest in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences between laparoscopy and robotics for colorectal cancer in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes in an initial experience of a single center. Materials and Methods Clinico-pathological data of 100 patients surgically treated for colorectal cancer from March 2008 to April 2014 with laparoscopy and robotics were analyzed. The procedures were right colonic, left colonic, and rectal resections. A comparison between the laparoscopic and robotic resections was made and an analysis of the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups was performed. Results Forty-two patients underwent robotic resection and 58 underwent laparoscopic resection. The postoperative mortality was 1%. The number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in robotics. The conversion rate was 7.1% for robotics and 3.4% for laparoscopy. The operative time was lower in laparoscopy for all the procedures. No differences were found between the first and the last procedures in the 2 groups. Conclusions This initial experience has shown that robotic surgery for the treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma is a feasible and safe procedure in terms of oncologic and clinical outcomes, although an appropriate learning curve is necessary. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate real advantages of robotics over laparoscopy. PMID:26721500

  16. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified form of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT). EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer

  17. Prospective multi-center trial utilizing electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thropay John P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified form of high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy has been developed called Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT. EBT uses a kilovolt X-ray source and does not require treatment in a shielded vault or a HDR afterloader unit. A multi-center clinical study was carried out to evaluate the success of treatment delivery, safety and toxicity of EBT in patients with endometrial cancer. Methods A total of 15 patients with stage I or II endometrial cancer were enrolled at 5 sites. Patients were treated with vaginal EBT alone or in combination with external beam radiation. Results The prescribed doses of EBT were successfully delivered in all 15 patients. From the first fraction through 3 months follow-up, there were 4 CTC Grade 1 adverse events and 2 CTC Grade II adverse events reported that were EBT related. The mild events reported were dysuria, vaginal dryness, mucosal atrophy, and rectal bleeding. The moderate treatment related adverse events included dysuria, and vaginal pain. No Grade III or IV adverse events were reported. The EBT system performed well and was associated with limited acute toxicities. Conclusions EBT shows acute results similar to HDR brachytherapy. Additional research is needed to further assess the clinical efficacy and safety of EBT in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  18. An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2003-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5

  19. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  20. Community-based cancer prevention--the Stockholm Cancer Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, L E

    1991-01-01

    The Stockholm Cancer Prevention Program (SCPP) is among the first comprehensive community intervention programs in the world aimed at reducing cancer incidence and mortality. The program began in 1987 in an urban area with more than 1.6 million inhabitants. In its work, SCPP utilizes a community-based approach focusing on (1) reduction in tobacco consumption, (2) reduction in dietary fat consumption and increase in dietary fiber consumption, and (3) changing sunbathing behavior in order to reduce the incidence of malignant melanoma. The overall philosophy of the program is to initiate activities capable of affecting the life style of the Stockholm population in these directions. SCPP intends to influence behavior through individual face-to-face contact. The tool for this contact is collaboration with independent organizations which are already active in the target communities. Food supply to the general public will be influenced through food producers, wholesalers, retailers, and caterers. Tobacco use, food habits, and sunbathing habits will be influenced via occupational health services; public health services including primary care, schools and municipal social services; voluntary organizations; and mass media. A model for possible ways of evaluating the program has been designed. PMID:1782634

  1. Assessment of diabetic teleretinal imaging program at the Portland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace L. Tsan, OD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a retrospective chart review of 200 diabetic patients who had teleretinal imaging performed between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, at Portland Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Medical Center outpatient clinics to assess the effectiveness of the diabetic teleretinal imaging program. Twenty patients (10% had diabetic retinopathy. Ninety percent of the available teleretinal imaging studies were of adequate quality for interpretation. In accordance with local VA policy at that time, all teleretinal imaging patients should have been referred for a dilated retinal examination the following year. Image readers referred 97.5% of the patients to eye clinics for subsequent eye examinations, but the imagers scheduled appointments for only 80% of these patients. The redundancy rate, i.e., patients who had an eye examination within the past 6 mo, was 11%; the duplicate recall rate, i.e., patients who had a second teleretinal imaging performed within 1 yr of the eye examination, was 37%. Rates of timely diabetic eye examinations at clinics with teleretinal imaging programs, particularly when teleretinal imaging and eye clinics were colocated at the same community-based outpatient clinic, were higher than at those without a teleretinal imaging program. We concluded that the Portland VA Medical Center's teleretinal imaging program was successful in increasing the screening rate for diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Kankam, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    During the summer of 2004, a 10-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is a companion program to the highly successful NASA Faculty Fellowship Program and its predecessor, the NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program that operated for 38 years at Glenn. The objectives of CFP parallel those of its companion, viz., (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty,(2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA, (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions, and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of Glenn. However, CFP, unlike the NASA program, permits faculty to be in residence for more than two summers and does not limit participation to United States citizens. Selected fellows spend 10 weeks at Glenn working on research problems in collaboration with NASA colleagues and participating in related activities of the NASA-ASEE program. This year's program began officially on June 1, 2004 and continued through August 7, 2004. Several fellows had program dates that differed from the official dates because university schedules vary and because some of the summer research projects warranted a time extension beyond the 10 weeks for satisfactory completion of the work. The stipend paid to the fellows was $1200 per week and a relocation allowance of $1000 was paid to those living outside a 50-mile radius of the Center. In post-program surveys from this and previous years, the faculty cited numerous instances where participation in the program has led to new courses, new research projects, new laboratory experiments, and grants from NASA to continue the work initiated during the summer. Many of the fellows mentioned amplifying material, both in

  3. Exercise in clinical cancer care: a call to action and program development description

    OpenAIRE

    Santa Mina, D.; Alibhai, S.M.H.; Matthew, A.G.; Guglietti, C.L.; Steele, J.; Trachtenberg, J; Ritvo, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    A large and convincing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of exercise for cancer survivors during and after treatment. Based on that literature, more cancer survivors should be offered exercise support and programming. Unfortunately, exercise programs remain an exception rather than the norm in cancer care. Not surprisingly, common barriers to the implementation of exercise programs in oncology include limited resources, expertise, and awareness of benefits on the part of patients and...

  4. International programs for the detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Smith

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of early breast cancer detection is the foundation for programs around the globe to reduce morbidity and mortality related to breast cancer. These programs range from educational programs targeted to women and health professionals to organized or opportunistic screening programs that target specific age groups of women.Modern mammography programs tend to follow the protocols from the randomized clinical trials, but there is variation in key program elements such as the age groups invited to screening, the screening interval, performance indicators, and the uptake rate. Until recently, the emphasis on early breast cancer detection was limited to mammography, but the steady rise in incidence and mortality in low and medium resource countries, where mammography may be unaffordable, has led to a renewal in emphasizing the incremental value of downsizing palpable tumors through physical exams. There is consensus that programs should be designed based on disease burden and available resources, but that even in low resource countries there are opportunities to reduce breast deaths through earlier diagnosis and effective treatment. Screening programs are most effective when they are organized, and program planners should consider WHO criteria and local input data as a basis for tailoring screening programs to the needs of their population.El beneficio de la detección temprana del cáncer de mama es el fundamento para programas alrededor del mundo que buscan reducir la morbilidad y mortalidad relacionada con este padecimiento. Estos programas abarcan desde los de tipo educativo, orientados a mujeres y profesionales de la salud, hasta programas de monitoreo organizados u oportunistas que tienen como objetivo grupos específicos de edad. Los programas modernos de mastografía tienden a seguir protocolos para estudios clínicos aleatorios,pero hay una variación en elementos clave como los grupos de edad invitados a participar, el intervalo

  5. Breast Conserving Surgery and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Sezer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients with locally advanced breast cancer may undergo breast conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of the study is to evaluate the results of locally advanced breast cancer patients who underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection and sentinel lymph node biopsy in a single center. Material and Methods: 12 patients with locally advanced breast cancer stage IIIA/IIIB were included in the study between 2002-2009. The patients were given anthracycline-based regimen before surgery. Patients underwent breast conserving surgery, axillary dissection, and sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by radiotherapy. Results: There were five patients in stage IIIA, six in stage IIIB, and one in stage IIIC. Patients had received 3-6 regimen of FAC/FEC. Eight had partial and four had complete response. Five positive axilla were detected. The median value of the lymph nodes was 12 (n:8-19. Five patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. The biopsy has failed in one patient and the median value of dissected sentinel node was 3.5 (n:3-4. Locoregional recurrence was not observed in any patients. The mean follow-up of the patients was 29.8 months and median time was 16 (n:2-80 months.Of the 12 patients 10 are alive and 2 were deceased. Conclusion: In selected locally advanced patients, breast conserving surgery and sentinel lymph node biopsy may be applied by a multidisciplinary approach, and excellent success may be achieved in those patients as in early breast cancer patients.

  6. A retrospective analysis of survival and prognostic factors of male breast cancer from a single center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Less than 1% of all breast cancer cases are found in men, who reportedly have inferior outcomes compared with matched women patients. Ethnic differences may also affect their prognosis. Here, we investigated overall survival (OS) and major prognostic factors for male breast cancer (MBC) in a cohort of Egyptian patients. We retrospectively analyzed OS in a cohort of 69 male patients with MBC who were surgically treated at the Mansoura Cancer Center, Egypt between 2000 and 2007. We registered demographic data, age, height, weight and body mass index, tumor size, histology, number of infiltrated axillary lymph nodes, hormone receptor (HR) status and metastatic presence, and TNM staging. Patients’ OS was the primary endpoint. Patients received treatment to the medical standards at the time of their diagnosis. In the 69 patients who met the inclusion criteria and had complete stored patient data, tumors ranged from T1c to T3. We could gather cancer-related survival data from only 56 patients. The collective 5-year survival in this cohort was 46.4%. Only five patients had distant metastasis at diagnosis, but they showed a null percent 5-year survival, whereas those with no lymph node infiltration showed a 100% 5-year survival. Lymph node status and tumor grading were the only prognostic factors that significantly affected OS. Lymph node status and tumor grade are the most important prognostic factors for overall survival of MBC in Egyptian male patients; whereas even remarkably low HR expression in MBC did not significantly affect OS. Further research is needed to understand the factors that affect this disease

  7. Development and status of data quality assurance program at NASA Langley research center: Toward national standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to re-engineer the wind tunnel testing process, a comprehensive data quality assurance program is being established at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The ultimate goal of the program is routing provision of tunnel-to-tunnel reproducibility with total uncertainty levels acceptable for test and evaluation of civilian transports. The operational elements for reaching such levels of reproducibility are: (1) statistical control, which provides long term measurement uncertainty predictability and a base for continuous improvement, (2) measurement uncertainty prediction, which provides test designs that can meet data quality expectations with the system's predictable variation, and (3) national standards, which provide a means for resolving tunnel-to-tunnel differences. The paper presents the LaRC design for the program and discusses the process of implementation.

  8. Planting the Seeds for Data Literacy: Lessons Learned from a Student-Centered Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Carlson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for graduate students to acquire competencies in managing and curating their data sets as a part of their education. Librarians and other information professionals are beginning to respond to this need by developing programming, but as of yet there are few models to follow and the impact on the practices of students is under-explored. This case study presents a student-centered pilot program on data literacy offered at Purdue University. The program was offered through the College of Agriculture and was structured to be flexible enough to incorporate each student’s particular field of study. Exercises and assignments were designed to incorporate the student’s own research data to create meaningful, authentic learning experiences. Formative and summative assessment was a critical component of the program, which included interviews with students six months after completion of the program to determine the extent to which the data competencies covered had taken root in students’ research practices. The structure of the pilot program, its strengths and weakness, its impact on students, and lessons learned by the instructors are discussed.

  9. [Psychosocial Situation and Patient Satisfaction among Clients of Cancer Counselling Centers in Saxony].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Röder, Heiko; Frenschkowski, Sandra; Mehnert, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Outpatient psychosocial counselling (OPC) centers for those affected by cancer fulfill 2 main purposes: (a) to offer low-threshold psychological, social and legal counselling, and (b) to refer clients to other services. Here we report findings from a user-based assessment of OPC in the state of Saxony, Germany. This study was funded in part by the Saxon State Ministry of Social Affairs and Consumer Protection. We used a paper-based questionnaire to survey 213 clients of OPC in Saxony at 2 points (t1: up to one week after first contact, t2: 4 months after t1). All participants were cancer patients. The survey assessed utilization of services, depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), quality of life (SF-8) as well as clients' satisfaction with the counselling service (ZUF-8). The majority of clients (81%) were referred to the OPC from a hospital or rehabilitation center. 46% of patients only had one contact. 78% of counselling sessions treated matters of social law. Patients suffered from 13 problems on average, the most common being fatigue and exhaustion, worries, anxiety, uncertainty about the future, and pain. Half the patients (49%) reported moderate to severe anxiety and 68% showed elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Psychosocial distress did not change significantly over time (GAD-7: p=0.580, PHQ-9: p=0.101). Patients' quality of life was low overall (cut-offquality of life had particularly increased in physical aspects, but overall quality of life remained lower than in the general population (all subscales: pquality of life. Patients were very satisfied with the counselling they received, 9% reported to be dissatisfied. Our results show that psychosocial distress remains high over a longer period of time at least for some patients. This illustrates the persisting need for long-term support regarding physical, mental and social impairments as a consequence of cancer and its treatments. It also shows the challenging demands which OPC centers are faced

  10. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John; Cox, James

    2003-08-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  11. The Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center: An independent program for community information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was designed and built as a research and development facility to obtain data to demonstrate the safe management, storage, and disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The WIPP facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is scheduled to receive its first shipment of TRU waste in 1992. The citizens of Carlsbad requested the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide them with an independent organization that would monitor the entire area with state-of-the-art monitoring techniques and publish the data. As a follow-up, the DOE approved a proposal from the Waste-management Education and Research Consortium of New Mexico to develop and implement this program. The purpose of this paper is to (1) describe this innovative program to establish the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, an independent university based center to study health and environmental impacts associated with technological development; (2) present the Center's mission and objectives; and (3) give an overview of the progress. (author)

  12. Development and evaluation of a learner-centered educational summer camp program on soft skills for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ying; Wang, Wenru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a learner-centered educational camp program for nursing students and to evaluate 4 areas of soft skills, communication ability, clinical interaction, interpersonal relationships, and social problem solving, before and after the program. The results showed that the summer camp program was effective in improving nursing students' soft skills. PMID:24978015

  13. Development and evaluation of a learner-centered educational summer camp program on soft skills for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ying; Wang, Wenru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a learner-centered educational camp program for nursing students and to evaluate 4 areas of soft skills, communication ability, clinical interaction, interpersonal relationships, and social problem solving, before and after the program. The results showed that the summer camp program was effective in improving nursing students' soft skills.

  14. Colorectal cancer: A case control study of dietary factors, King Faisal specialist hospital and researh center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Nashar, Reem M.; Khalid S Almurshed

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to assess various dietary factors and the nutritional status of hospitalized patients with colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods: A case-controlled study of fifty newly-admitted patients at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia diagnosed with colorectal cancer were interviewed to collect data on various dietary factors and their nutritional status. Their data were compared with a sex-matched control group aged fifty. ...

  15. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin chemotherapy programs as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer after surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of 5-fluorouracil and calcium folinatc combined with oxaliplatin(FOLFOX) program with capecitabine regimen combined oxaliplatin(XELOX) program as adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer after surgery.

  16. Ecological Impacts of the Space Shuttle Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Carlton R.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Breininger, David R.; Duncan, Brean W.; Drese, John H.; Scheidt, Doug A.; Lowers, Russ H.; Reyier, Eric A.; Holloway-Adkins, Karen G.; Oddy, Donna M.; Cancro, Naresa R.; Provancha, Jane A.; Foster, Tammy E.; Stolen, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program was one of NASAs first major undertakings to fall under the environmental impact analysis and documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Space Shuttle Program activities at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) contributed directly and indirectly to both negative and positive ecological trends in the region through the long-term, stable expenditure of resources over the 40 year program life cycle. These expenditures provided support to regional growth and development in conjunction with other sources that altered land use patterns, eliminated and modified habitats, and contributed to cultural eutrophication of the Indian River Lagoon. At KSC, most Space Shuttle Program related actions were conducted in previously developed facilities and industrial areas with the exception of the construction of the shuttle landing facility (SLF) and the space station processing facility (SSPF). Launch and operations impacts were minimal as a result of the low annual launch rate. The majority of concerns identified during the NEPA process such as potential weather modification, acid rain off site, and local climate change did not occur. Launch impacts from deposition of HCl and particulates were assimilated as a result of the high buffering capacity of the system and low launch and loading rates. Metals deposition from exhaust deposition did not display acute impacts. Sub-lethal effects are being investigated as part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory process. Major positive Space Shuttle Program effects were derived from the adequate resources available at the Center to implement the numerous environmental laws and regulations designed to enhance the quality of the environment and minimize impacts from human activities. This included reduced discharges of domestic and industrial wastewater, creation of stormwater management

  17. Quality of life assessment in advanced cancer patients treated at home, an inpatient unit, and a day care center

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Forycka, Maria; Mess, Eleonora; Zdun-Ryzewska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To assess quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients treated at home, at an in-patient palliative care unit (PCU), and at a day care center (DCC). Patients and methods QoL was assessed in advanced cancer patients at baseline and after 7 days of symptomatic treatment using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative Care (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Karnofsky Perfor...

  18. Outcomes of a culturally responsive health promotion program for elderly Korean survivors of gastrointestinal cancers: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Eunyoung E; Kim, Hyewon; Kang, Jiyoung; Kim, Hyunsun; Park, Kwi Ock; Jeong, Bo Lam; Park, Sang Min; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Lee, Kwangho; Jekal, Munwoo

    2013-01-01

    This single-blind, prospective, randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the effects of a culturally responsive health promotion program for elderly Korean (CHP-K) survivors of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. The program consisted of 8 weeks of Qi exercise and face-to-face counseling on physical and psychological factors. A total of 63 Korean GI cancer survivors, aged ≥65 years, who had completed their active cancer treatment, were recruited from a cancer center in South Korea. Outcomes included the amount of exercise, body weight, BMI, the Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment scale, the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, and self-efficacy and self-esteem scales. Repeated measures MANCOVA revealed a significant difference over time between the groups (Wilks' Lambda F1,62 = 5.361, p = 0.007). Univariate RM-ANCOVA for each outcome measure revealed statistically significant differences between groups. These results suggested that the participation in the CHP-K may have enhanced the health of elderly Korean GI cancer survivors. PMID:24156925

  19. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  20. Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program: Implementing Effective Public-Private Partnerships to Assure Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Arden S; Henderson, Vida A; Rosenfeld, Amy; Rankin, Kristin; Jones, Brenda; Issel, L Michele

    2015-01-01

    With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is essential for the public health sector to elucidate its role with respect to its mission of assuring population health, and to clarify its role with respect to the private health care system. To that end, we examined the value added to the population health enterprise of successful public-private partnerships (PPPs) such as those found in the Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Program (IBCCP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) in Illinois. Key Informant (KI) interviews focused on IBCCP implementation were conducted with IBCCP lead agency (LA) program coordinators (n = 35/36) in winter 2012-2013. Analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software. The KI interviews revealed the existence of highly developed PPPs between the IBCCP LAs and individual medical providers and hospitals across Illinois. The data suggest that the small amount of funding provided by IBCCP to each LA in Illinois has been used to build and sustain robust PPPs in the majority of the IBCCP communities. The PPPs developed through the IBCCP can be seen as an unplanned benefit of CDC's investment in breast and cervical health through the NBCCEDP. While the IBCCP/NBCCEDP might be considered a "boutique" categorical program which some may consider no longer necessary as individuals gain insurance under the ACA, the KI data underscore the critical role of public sector dollars, not only to serve individuals and communities directly but also to mobilize the private health care sector to act in partnership with public entities and become advocates for underserved communities. PMID:25470661

  1. Opportunities for Cancer Prevention Using Employee Wellness Programs: The Case of Kansas State Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Siu-kuen Azor; Engelman, Kimberly; Shireman, Theresa I.; Hunt, Suzanne; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The utility of employee wellness programs (EWPs) in cancer prevention and control is not well established. Purpose: This project is to determine the potential value of EWPs in preventing cancer by examining the characteristics of EWP participants and their prevalence of cancer risk factors. Methods: A secondary data analysis of health…

  2. Programmed death-1 : Therapeutic success after more than 100 years of cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, Alexander; Holak, Tad A

    2014-01-01

    No other cancer therapy target class caused more excitement than the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway related. Antibodies against PD-1 and PD-1 ligands represent a therapeutic breakthrough and are the first examples of broadly efficacious and durable cancer immunotherapies. Cancer for the first tim

  3. Pilot Implementation of Breast Cancer Early Detection Programs in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo, Raúl; Díaz, Sandra; Sánchez, Oswaldo; Perry, Fernando; Piñeros, Marion; Poveda, César; Salguero, Edgar; Osorio, Dimelza

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is increasing in developing countries, and Colombia has a double burden from cervical and breast cancer. Suitable guidelines for breast cancer early detection are needed, and the Breast Health Global Initiative provides a favorable framework for breast cancer control in low resource nations. The Colombian National Cancer Institute developed evidence-based guidelines for breast cancer early detection in which coordinated early detection in symptomatic women and hospital-based scr...

  4. Simulation of reduced breast cancer mortality in breast cancer screening programs; Simulacion de la reduccion de mortalidad por cancer de mama en programas de cribado mamografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, L. I.; Forastero, C.; Guirado, D.; Lallena, A. M.

    2011-07-01

    The breast cancer screening programs are an essential tool in the fight against breast cancer. Currently, many questions concerning the setup of these programs are open, namely: age range of women who undergo the same, frequency of mammography, ... The effectiveness of a program should be evaluated in terms of mortality reduction is its systematic implementation in the population. In this sense, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to assess that these reductions.

  5. Susan Short to head Outreach Program Development, Jeri Childers named Center for Organizational and Technological Advancement Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Brunais, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Susan Short has been named to lead Outreach Program Development at Virginia Tech, a key area of Outreach and International Affairs. She replaces Jeri Childers, who has been named a Center for Organizational and Technological Advancement Fellow.

  6. 77 FR 47440 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Office of Disability Employment Program National Center on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... individual job seekers and the systems that assist them in securing, retaining, and advancing in employment... acceptable performance and availability of funding. This solicitation provides background information... Program National Center on Leadership for Employment and Advancement of People With Disabilities...

  7. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program — Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-03-01

    NASA’s Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program has Lucite disks containing Apollo lunar samples and meteorite samples that are available for trained educators to borrow for use in classrooms, museums, science center, and libraries.

  8. Advanced technology needs for a global change science program: Perspective of the Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Swissler, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the NASA program in remote sensing is primarily the Earth system science and the monitoring of the Earth global changes. One of NASA's roles is the identification and development of advanced sensing techniques, operational spacecraft, and the many supporting technologies necessary to meet the stringent science requirements. Langley Research Center has identified the elements of its current and proposed advanced technology development program that are relevant to global change science according to three categories: sensors, spacecraft, and information system technologies. These technology proposals are presented as one-page synopses covering scope, objective, approach, readiness timeline, deliverables, and estimated funding. In addition, the global change science requirements and their measurement histories are briefly discussed.

  9. Analysis of patterns of palliative radiotherapy in north west India: A regional cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative radiotherapy (PRT is the eventual requirement in 30-50% of all cancer patients. PRT is primarily aimed to relieve pain and prevent/treat collapse or fracture in case of bone metastasis, to reduce edema in patients with cranial metastasis, and to control distressing symptoms of rapid primary growth. An audit of PRT planned in a busy cancer center can help in the characterization of the requirements of the patients and the formulation of institutional policies. Materials and Methods: In total, 516 patients who received PRT in our regional cancer center from January 2012 to December 2012 and whose complete records were available for analysis were selected for this retrospective study. Medical records and radiotherapy files were analyzed to obtain data such as sociodemographic parameters, prescription of PRT, and follow up. Descriptive statistics were evaluated in terms of frequencies and percentages to allow comparisons. Results: Of the 516 patients, 73% patients were male; the median age of the patients receiving PRT was 62 years (range 13-83 years. About 48% ( n = 248 patients received PRT at the primary site while rest (52% were given PRT at the metastatic site. The most common indication of PRT was pain (56.8% cases, followed by cytostatic PRT (19.8% and raised ICT (12.4%. The median dose prescribed was 30 Gy (range 8-36 Gy delivered in 1-12 fractions over the duration of 1-18 days. The overall response rate was about 43% at 2 weeks of completion of PRT; the median follow-up of the patients was 154 days (range 9-256 days. The long-term symptom relief at median follow up was 8%. Conclusions: Good clinical judgment and expertise is required in prescribing correct fractionation schedule to achieve effective symptom palliation with lowest possible cost and inconvenience to the patients and relatives. Hypofractionated radiotherapy is a feasible treatment option in patients with advanced incurable disease to achieve effective

  10. A Gene Regulatory Program in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renhua; Campos, John; Iida, Joji

    2015-12-01

    Molecular heterogeneity in human breast cancer has challenged diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical treatment. It is well known that molecular subtypes of breast tumors are associated with significant differences in prognosis and survival. Assuming that the differences are attributed to subtype-specific pathways, we then suspect that there might be gene regulatory mechanisms that modulate the behavior of the pathways and their interactions. In this study, we proposed an integrated methodology, including machine learning and information theory, to explore the mechanisms. Using existing data from three large cohorts of human breast cancer populations, we have identified an ensemble of 16 master regulator genes (or MR16) that can discriminate breast tumor samples into four major subtypes. Evidence from gene expression across the three cohorts has consistently indicated that the MR16 can be divided into two groups that demonstrate subtype-specific gene expression patterns. For example, group 1 MRs, including ESR1, FOXA1, and GATA3, are overexpressed in luminal A and luminal B subtypes, but lowly expressed in HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes. In contrast, group 2 MRs, including FOXM1, EZH2, MYBL2, and ZNF695, display an opposite pattern. Furthermore, evidence from mutual information modeling has congruently indicated that the two groups of MRs either up- or down-regulate cancer driver-related genes in opposite directions. Furthermore, integration of somatic mutations with pathway changes leads to identification of canonical genomic alternations in a subtype-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies have implicated a gene regulatory program for breast tumor progression.

  11. Innovative patient-centered skills training addressing challenging issues in cancer communications: Using patient's stories that teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Thomas W; Gorniewicz, James; Floyd, Michael; Tudiver, Fred; Odom, Amy; Zoppi, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    This workshop demonstrated the utility of a patient-centered web-based/digital Breaking Bad News communication training module designed to educate learners of various levels and disciplines. This training module is designed for independent, self-directed learning as well as group instruction. These interactive educational interventions are based upon video-recorded patient stories. Curriculum development was the result of an interdisciplinary, collaborative effort involving faculty from the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) Graduate Storytelling Program and the departments of Family and Internal Medicine at the James H. Quillen College of Medicine. The specific goals of the BBN training module are to assist learners in: (1) understanding a five-step patient-centered model that is based upon needs, preferences, and expectations of patients with cancer and (2) individualizing communication that is consistent with patient preferences in discussing emotions, informational detail, prognosis and timeline, and whether or not to discuss end-of-life issues. The pedagogical approach to the training module is to cycle through Emotional Engagement, Data, Modeled Practices, Adaptation Opportunities, and Feedback. The communication skills addressed are rooted in concepts found within the Reaching Common Ground communication training. A randomized control study investigating the effectiveness of the Breaking Bad News module found that medical students as well as resident physicians improved their communication skills as measured by an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Four other similarly designed modules were also created: Living Through Treatment, Transitions: From Curable to Treatable/From Treatable to End-of-Life, Spirituality, and Family. PMID:27497456

  12. The National Space Science and Technology Center's Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.; Denson, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the National Space Science and Technology Center's (NSSTC) Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is to support K-20 education by coalescing academic, government, and business constituents awareness, implementing best business/education practices, and providing stewardship over funds and programs that promote a symbiotic relationship among these entities, specifically in the area of K-20 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. NSSTC EPO Program's long-term objective is to showcase its effective community-based integrated stakeholder model in support of STEM education and to expand its influence across the Southeast region for scaling ultimately across the United States. The Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is coordinated by a supporting arm of the NSSTC Administrative Council called the EPO Council (EPOC). The EPOC is funded through federal, state, and private grants, donations, and in-kind contributions. It is comprised of representatives of NSSTC Research Centers, both educators and scientists from the Alabama Space Science and Technology Alliance (SSTA) member institutions, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Education Office. Through its affiliation with MSFC and the SSTA - a consortium of Alabama's research universities that comprise the NSSTC, EPO fosters the education and development of the next generation of Alabama scientists and engineers by coordinating activities at the K-20 level in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Education, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, and Alabama's businesses and industries. The EPO program's primary objective is to be Alabama's premiere organization in uniting academia, government, and private industry by way of providing its support to the State and Federal Departments of Education involved in systemic STEM education reform, workforce development, and innovative uses of technology. The NSSTC EPO

  13. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jaclyn; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo samples and meteorites first hand. Lunar rocks and soil, embedded in Lucite disks, are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks reveals the early history of our Earth-Moon system and meteorites reveal much of the history of the early solar system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet and solar system and the basic processes accretion, differentiation, impact and volcanism. With these samples, educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by many NASA planetary missions. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the

  14. A qualitative evaluation of the 2005-2011 National Academic Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Kristin M; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M; Dela Cruz, Jason; Massetti, Greta M; Mahendra, Reshma

    2015-12-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) funded eight National Academic Centers of Excellence (ACEs) in Youth Violence Prevention from 2005 to 2010 and two Urban Partnership Academic Centers of Excellence (UPACEs) in Youth Violence Prevention from 2006 to 2011. The ACEs and UPACEs constitute DVP's 2005-2011 ACE Program. ACE Program goals include partnering with communities to promote youth violence (YV) prevention and fostering connections between research and community practice. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of the 2005-2011 ACE Program using an innovative approach for collecting and analyzing data from multiple large research centers via a web-based Information System (ACE-IS). The ACE-IS was established as an efficient mechanism to collect and document ACE research and programmatic activities. Performance indicators for the ACE Program were established in an ACE Program logic model. Data on performance indicators were collected through the ACE-IS biannually. Data assessed Centers' ability to develop, implement, and evaluate YV prevention activities. Performance indicator data demonstrate substantial progress on Centers' research in YV risk and protective factors, community partnerships, and other accomplishments. Findings provide important lessons learned, illustrate progress made by the Centers, and point to new directions for YV prevention research and programmatic efforts.

  15. Children Thyroid Cancer treatment in Saint-Petersburg Endocrine SurgeryCenter and Mayo Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Filippovich Romanchishen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThyroid cancer (TC is the most often malignant tumor in childhood and made 1.5 – 3.0% of all children population or 45.3% of pediatric endocrine epithelial cancers. A lot of questions concerning to volume of thyroid surgery, postoperative radio iodine therapy (RIT needs to be discussed.AimEstimation of childhood sporadic thyroid cancer specificity and comparison of children and adolescents treatment in Saint-Petersburg Endocrine Surgery Center (Russia and Mayo Clinic (USA.Material and methodsDuring 1970 –2011 in the Saint-Petersburg Center (1 group were operated 105 TC children and adolescent (up to 20 yeas and in Mayo Clinic – 188 (2 group in  1940 – 2000 period. Since of 80-s in those clinics were used the same perioperative examinations, like TSH, T4, T3 blood levels, USG, fine needles aspiration biopsy, CT and morphological examinations.Results and discussionAverage age of the Saint-Petersburg Center and Rochester patients was the same and achieve 16.3±0.3 and 16.0±0.5, accordingly. In both groups has prevailed girls: in the 1 group they made 73.3% (M:F 1:2.7 and in the 2 – 70.7% (M:F 1:2.4. Childhood differentiated TC were associated with aggressive behavior: regional metastases were found in 53.0% and 81.4%, extrathyroid TC spreading – in 9.6 and 19.7%, distant metastases - in 9.6 and 4.8%, accordingly. In our Center (1 group we have performed hemithyroidectomies and subtotal Thyroidectomies in 58.1% with ipsilateral central neck dissection (CND. In Mayo Clinic in all TC cases were performed thyroidectomy (TE since 1950. TC relapses we have no   observed in 1 group and they have place in 6.9% 2 group patients, recurring lymphatic metastases – in 8.4% and 20.7%, accordingly. Radioiodine therapy (RIT has performed in 21.1% and 25.5% operated children.In 1 group 95 (96.0 % of 99 operated were alive during 5 – 36 years, in the 2– only in two cases reason of death was TC, but in 14 – other malignant tumor

  16. A study of adopting maintenance rule under the periodic safety review and reliability centered maintenance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S Maintenance Rule (MR) has three main functions. One is to monitor the performance changes of SSCs (Structure, System, and Component) caused by risk informed applications. Periodic Safety Review (PSR) program is widely adopted in Europe while it is not adopted in U. S. A where MR and new oversight program are instead used. Recently, in Korea, it was determined to adopt PSR, and the first PSR program has started this year for Kori unit 1 as a pilot plant. Also, a traditional Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) has been performed for 4 systems of YGN unit 1 and 2 and it will be applied to the other nuclear power plants in Korea. However, since MR is adopting many useful concept of RCM, traditional RCM could not be further performed without being associated with MR. Thus, MR, RCM and PSR have recently become hot issue policies which should be well associated each other in Korea, and this paper suggests a desirable new maintenance process which would embrace the concepts of the three policies, and also discusses whether U.S. MR is necessary even though a PSR program is already adopted, and if necessary, then how cost-effectively it can be introduced to. (author)

  17. The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) Foundation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Kleper, Vladimir; Talbot, Skip; Rubin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge contained within in vivo imaging annotated by human experts or computer programs is typically stored as unstructured text and separated from other associated information. The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) Foundation information model is an evolution of the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Cancer Bioinformatics Grid (caBIG®) AIM model. The model applies to various image types created by various techn...

  18. Teacher perceptions of the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempier, Tracie Tingle

    The 12 Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) are funded by the National Science Foundation and are designed to promote creative ways of disseminating marine science research and its importance to the public. The focus of this study is the COSEE Central Gulf of Mexico program which encourages active partnerships between research scientists and teachers. In these collaborative partnerships, teachers and scientists work together to create educational products and disseminate best practices in ocean sciences education. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the lesson plans and curricula created through the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program (COSEE:CGOM), which are the products of this collaboration, were being used effectively in the classroom. The study addressed issues such as teacher perceptions of collaboration with scientists, effectiveness of COSEE:CGOM curriculum implementation in producing more ocean literate students, and teachers' varying views concerning how to successfully implement new COSEE:CGOM knowledge and concepts into their classrooms in order to improve student scientific understanding. In addition, the study examined frequency of use of COSEE:CGOM lesson plans and identified predictor variables that can produce a model for understanding factors hindering or enhancing lesson plan use. Further, participant perceptions of using peer-teaching as a method for disseminating COSEE:CGOM information in their districts were addressed.

  19. A workshop on asthma management programs and centers in Brazil: reviewing and explaining concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Stelmach

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the results of a workshop regarding asthma management programs and centers (AMPCs in Brazil, so that they can be used as a tool for the improvement and advancement of current and future AMPCs. Methods: The workshop consisted of five presentations and the corresponding group discussions. The working groups discussed the following themes: implementation of asthma management strategies; human resources needed for AMPCs; financial resources needed for AMPCs; and operational maintenance of AMPCs. Results: The workshop involved 39 participants, from all regions of the country, representing associations of asthma patients (n = 3, universities (n = 7, and AMPCs (n = 29. We found a direct relationship between a lack of planning and the failure of AMPCs. Based on the experiences reported during the workshop, the common assumptions about AMPCs in Brazil were the importance of raising awareness of managers; greater community participation; interdependence between primary care and specialized care; awareness of regionalization; and use of medications available in the public health system. Conclusions: Brazil already has a core of experience in the area of asthma management programs. The implementation of strategies for the management of chronic respiratory disease and their incorporation into health care system protocols would seem to be a natural progression. However, there is minimal experience in this area. Joint efforts by individuals with expertise in AMPCs could promote the implementation of asthma management strategies, thus speeding the creation of treatment networks, which might have a multiplier effect, precluding the need for isolated centers to start from zero.

  20. A workshop on asthma management programs and centers in Brazil: reviewing and explaining concepts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Rafael; Neto, Alcindo Cerci; Fonseca, Ana Cristina de Carvalho Fernandez; Ponte, Eduardo Vieira; Alves, Gerardo; Araujo-Costa, Ildely Niedia; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury; de Castro, Luci Keiko Kuromoto; Lenz, Maria Lucia Medeiros; Silva, Paulo; Cukier, Alberto; Alves, Alexssandra Maia; Lima-Matos, Aline Silva; Cardoso, Amanda da Rocha Oliveira; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; de São-José, Bruno Piassi; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Schor, Deborah; Peixoto, Décio Medeiros; Brandenburg, Diego Djones; Camillo, Elineide Gomes dos Santos; Serpa, Faradiba Sarquis; Brandão, Heli Vieira; Lima, João Antonio Bonfadini; Pio, Jorge Eduardo; Fiterman, Jussara; Anderson, Maria de Fátima; Cardoso, Maria do Socorro de Lucena; Rodrigues, Marcelo Tadday; Pereira, Marilyn Nilda Esther Urrutia; Antila, Marti; Martins, Sonia Maria; Guimarães, Vanessa Gonzaga Tavares; Mello, Yara Arruda Marques; de Andrade, Wenderson Clay Correia; Salibe-Filho, William; Caldeira, Zelina Maria da Rocha; da Cruz-Filho, Álvaro Augusto Souza; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report the results of a workshop regarding asthma management programs and centers (AMPCs) in Brazil, so that they can be used as a tool for the improvement and advancement of current and future AMPCs. Methods: The workshop consisted of five presentations and the corresponding group discussions. The working groups discussed the following themes: implementation of asthma management strategies; human resources needed for AMPCs; financial resources needed for AMPCs; and operational maintenance of AMPCs. Results: The workshop involved 39 participants, from all regions of the country, representing associations of asthma patients (n = 3), universities (n = 7), and AMPCs (n = 29). We found a direct relationship between a lack of planning and the failure of AMPCs. Based on the experiences reported during the workshop, the common assumptions about AMPCs in Brazil were the importance of raising awareness of managers; greater community participation; interdependence between primary care and specialized care; awareness of regionalization; and use of medications available in the public health system. Conclusions: Brazil already has a core of experience in the area of asthma management programs. The implementation of strategies for the management of chronic respiratory disease and their incorporation into health care system protocols would seem to be a natural progression. However, there is minimal experience in this area. Joint efforts by individuals with expertise in AMPCs could promote the implementation of asthma management strategies, thus speeding the creation of treatment networks, which might have a multiplier effect, precluding the need for isolated centers to start from zero. PMID:25750669

  1. The first national public breast cancer screening program in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Abulkhair, Omalkhair A.; Al Tahan, Fatina M.; Young, Susan E.; Musaad, Salma MA.; Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Despite its relatively low incidence in Saudi Arabia, breast cancer has been the most common cancer among Saudi females for the past 12 consecutive years. The objective of this study was to report the results of the first national public breast cancer screening program in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: Women 40 years of age or older underwent breast cancer screening. Mammograms were scored using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Correlations between im...

  2. Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center in New York City. During the program, it’s easy for you to make referrals, make appointments ... to try to tackle the lung cancer as it stands in 2009. In 2009, lung cancer is ...

  3. A Peer Health Educator Program for Breast Cancer Screening Promotion: Arabic, Chinese, South Asian, and Vietnamese Immigrant Women's Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Joanne; Frisina, Angela; Hack, Tricia; Parascandalo, Faye

    2015-01-01

    This study explored Arabic, Chinese, South Asian, and Vietnamese immigrant women's experiences with a peer health educator program, a public health program that facilitated access to breast health information and mammography screening. Framed within critical social theory, this participatory action research project took place from July 2009 to January 2011. Ten focus groups and 14 individual interviews were conducted with 82 immigrant women 40 years of age and older. Qualitative methods were utilized. Thematic content analysis derived from grounded theory and other qualitative literature was employed to analyze data. Four dominant themes emerged: Breast Cancer Prevention focused on learning within the program, Social Support provided by the peer health educator and other women, Screening Services Access for Women centered on service provision, and Program Enhancements related to specific modifications required to meet the needs of immigrant women accessing the program. The findings provide insights into strategies used to promote breast health, mammography screening, and the improvement of public health programming. Perceived barriers that continue to persist are structural barriers, such as the provision of information on breast cancer and screening by family physicians. A future goal is to improve collaborations between public health and primary care to minimize this barrier.

  4. Supporting Research at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Through Focused Education and Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, F.; Closs, J.

    2003-12-01

    NASA research scientists work closely with Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI) personnel at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) on a large variety of education and public outreach (E/PO) initiatives. This work includes assistance in conceptualizing E/PO plans, then carrying through in the development of materials, publication, cataloging, warehousing, and product distribution. For instance, outreach efforts on the Terra, Aqua, and Aura-still in development-EOS missions, as well as planetary and visualization programs, have been coordinated by SSAI employees. E/PO support includes convening and taking part in sessions at professional meetings and workshops. Also included is the coordination of exhibits at professional meetings such as the AGU, AAAS, AMS and educational meetings such as the National Science Teachers Association. Other E/PO efforts include the development and staffing of booths; arranges for booth space and furnishings; shipping of exhibition materials and products; assembling, stocking, and disassembling of booths. E/PO personnel work with organizations external to NASA such as the Smithsonian museum, Library of Congress, U.S. Geological Survey, and associations or societies such as the AGU, American Chemical Society, and National Science Teachers Association to develop products and programs that enhance NASA mission E/PO efforts or to provide NASA information for use in their programs. At GSFC, E/PO personnel coordinate the efforts of the education and public outreach sub-committees in support of the Space and Earth Sciences Data Analysis (SESDA) contract within the GSFC Earth Sciences Directorate. The committee acts as a forum for improving communication and coordination among related Earth science education projects, and strives to unify the representation of these programs among the science and education communities. To facilitate these goals a Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate Education and Outreach Portal has been developed to provide

  5. Comparison of patient outcomes in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray AS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrienne S Murray, Michael Griswold, Imran Sunesara, Ed SmithUniversity of Mississippi Health Care, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USABackground: Value analysis is the science of balancing the mandate to deliver high-quality clinical outcomes with the necessity to drive down costs in order to thrive in the challenging economics of health care. This study compared average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality across the cardiology, cardiovascular, neuroscience, and orthopedic service lines, in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs (VAPs. The basic question was, “Do academic medical centers with VAPs have lower average length of stay, better morbidity and mortality rates, and lower overall supply costs?”Methods and results: The clinical data base/resource manager (CDB/RM of the University HealthSystem Consortium was utilized as secondary data for this study. Reports from the CDB/RM were generated from 2006 to 2011. Continuous variable differences across VAP status were examined using Wilcoxon two-sample tests. Primary analyses used multilevel linear mixed model methods to estimate the effects of VAPs on primary outcomes (average length of stay, cost, morbidity, mortality. Association components of the linear mixed models incorporated random effects at the hospital level and robust, Huber-White, standard errors were calculated. There was no significant difference for average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality between academic medical centers with and without VAPs. However, outcomes were not noted to be substantially worse.Conclusion: Numerous case studies reveal that aggressively active VAPs do decrease hospital cost. Also, this study did not find a negative impact on patient care. Further studies are needed to explore the benefits of value analysis and its effect on patient outcomes.Keywords: value analysis, average length of stay, morbidity, mortality

  6. Visual inspection with acetic acid (via screening program: 7 years experience in early detection of cervical cancer and pre-cancers in rural South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Rani Poli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer continues to be a major public health problem in India in the absence of wide spread organised cervical screening programs. Visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA is an effective, inexpensive screening test that can be combined with simple treatment procedures for early cervical lesions, provided by trained health workers. We report 7 years experience in early detection of cervical cancer and pre-cancers using the VIA test in a community-based program in rural Andhra Pradesh, India where there are no existing organised cervical screening programs. Materials and Methods: Eligible women aged between 26 and 60 were opportunistically screened by trained health wor kers using the VIA test. Women who tested positive were further evaluated and those with cervical lesions were treated either by cryotherapy in the screening clinic or referred to a higher center. Results: A total of 18,869 women were screened by a single round of VIA testing with a positive rate of 10.75%. Biopsy proven high-grade squamous intraepithelials (HSILs were 90 (0.48% and low-grade squamous intraepithelials (LSILs were 43 (0.28%. The overall prevalence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+ lesion rate is 1.05%. A total of 312 (1.65% cryotherapies were done and 49 women underwent hysterectomy. Conclusions: VIA by trained female health workers is a safe, acceptable, and effective test that can save lives from cervical cancer even in remote areas with few resources. These results have important implications for efficient service delivery in cervical screening programs in low-resourced settings.

  7. Programming in C at NMFECC (National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center): A practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, S.W.; Crotinger, J.A.

    1989-07-26

    Despite its popularity elsewhere, C has not been extensively used for scientific programming on supercomputers. There are a number of reasons for this but perhaps the most compelling has been the lack of C compilers. However, this situation has recently begun to change at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) where two C development platforms --- the Hybrid C Compiler (HCC) written at the Livermore Computer Center and the Portable C Compiler (CC version 4.1) distributed by Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) --- have become available for use. These compilers produce object code for all of the Cray models at NMFECC and, in addition, possess good scalar optimization capabilities along with rudimentary vectorization capabilities. With the advent of the Cray C compilers, it is possible to consider physics code development in C at NMFECC. However, when one actually attempts to pursue this goal, one is quickly faced with a number of practical problems. For instance, How do I compile, link, and debug C codes What special features of C are useful to me as a scientific programmer Are there things I currently can't do in C programs How do I interface my C program to existing Fortran code Can I make use of the Basis code development system from C Over the last three years we have incorporated C into numerous physics codes written at NMFECC and, in the course of this work, we have had to develop solutions to all of the above problems. This turned out to be a surprisingly frustrating and time-consuming venture requiring some rather subtle techniques and hacks. This guide is an attempt to document these techniques.

  8. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir I. Palmero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9% reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8% had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ³ 20% and 214 (23.7% had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%. The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65. These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3% indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers.

  9. Analysis of 10-Year Training Results of Medical Students Using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Ota, Tomoyuki; Thuzar, Moe

    2016-06-01

    Background In this article, we reviewed the training results of medical students using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP), and proposed an ideal microsurgical training program for all individuals by analyzing the training results of medical students who did not have any surgical experience. Methods As of 2015, a total of 29 medical students completed the MRCP. In the most recent 12 medical students, the number of trials performed for each training stage and the number of rats needed to complete the training were recorded. Additionally, we measured the operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students after it became a current program. Results The average operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students was 120 minutes ± 11 minutes (standard deviation [SD]). The average vascular anastomosis time (for the artery and vein) was 52 minutes ± 2 minutes (SD). For the most recent 12 medical students, there was a negative correlation between the number of trials performed in the non-rat stages (stages 1-3) and the number of rats used in the rat stages (stages 4-5). Conclusion Analysis of the training results of medical students suggests that performing microsurgery first on silicon tubes and chicken wings saves animals' lives later during the training program. We believe that any person can learn the technique of microsurgery by performing 7 to 8 hours of training per day over a period of 15 days within this program setting.

  10. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Universal Interfaces and Information Technology Access under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  11. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Research Training Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Research Training Center (RRTC) on Disability Statistics and Demographics under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  12. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Technologies to Support Successful Aging with Disability under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for a competition in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend to use this priority to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  13. Differences Between the Family-Centered "COPCA" Program and Traditional Infant Physical Therapy Based on Neurodevelopmental Treatment Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Hulshof, Lily J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is ba

  14. An Analysis of Bilingual Education Programs and Directors in Texas Education Service Center Region Two School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Michelle Arevalo

    2013-01-01

    In this mixed methods research study, the researcher investigated the difference between additive and subtractive bilingual education programs and student achievement. The researcher examined types of bilingual education and special language programs currently utilized in school districts located within the Education Service Center Region Two…

  15. Research Problems in Data Curation: Outcomes from the Data Curation Education in Research Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. L.; Mayernik, M. S.; Weber, N.; Baker, K. S.; Kelly, K.; Marlino, M. R.; Thompson, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The need for data curation is being recognized in numerous institutional settings as national research funding agencies extend data archiving mandates to cover more types of research grants. Data curation, however, is not only a practical challenge. It presents many conceptual and theoretical challenges that must be investigated to design appropriate technical systems, social practices and institutions, policies, and services. This presentation reports on outcomes from an investigation of research problems in data curation conducted as part of the Data Curation Education in Research Centers (DCERC) program. DCERC is developing a new model for educating data professionals to contribute to scientific research. The program is organized around foundational courses and field experiences in research and data centers for both master's and doctoral students. The initiative is led by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in collaboration with the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee, and library and data professionals at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). At the doctoral level DCERC is educating future faculty and researchers in data curation and establishing a research agenda to advance the field. The doctoral seminar, Research Problems in Data Curation, was developed and taught in 2012 by the DCERC principal investigator and two doctoral fellows at the University of Illinois. It was designed to define the problem space of data curation, examine relevant concepts and theories related to both technical and social perspectives, and articulate research questions that are either unexplored or under theorized in the current literature. There was a particular emphasis on the Earth and environmental sciences, with guest speakers brought in from NCAR, National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Through the assignments, students

  16. Anti program death-1/anti program death-ligand 1 indigestive cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors tend to activate the immune systemregulatory checkpoints as a means of escaping immunosurveillance.For instance, interaction between programdeath-1 (PD-1) and program death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) willlead the activated T cell to a state of anergy. PD-L1 isupregulated on a wide range of cancer cells. Anti-PD-1and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), calledimmune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have consequentlybeen designed to restore T cell activity. Accumulatingdata are in favor of an association between PD-L1expression in tumors and response to treatment. APD-L1 expression is present in 30% to 50% of digestivecancers. Multiple anti-PD-1 (nivolumab, pembrolizumab)and anti-PD-L1 mAbs (MPDL3280A, Medi4736) areunder evaluation in digestive cancers. Preliminaryresults in metastatic gastric cancer with pembrolizumabare highly promising and phase Ⅱ will start soon. Inmetastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), a phase Ⅲ trialof MPDL3280A as maintenance therapy will shortlybe initiated. Trials are also ongoing in metastatic CRCwith high immune T cell infiltration (i.e. , microsatelliteinstability). Major challenges are ahead in order todetermine how, when and for which patients we shoulduse these ICIs. New radiologic criteria to evaluate tumorresponse to ICIs are awaiting prospective validation.The optimal therapeutic sequence and association withcytotoxic chemotherapy needs to be established. Finally,biomarker identification will be crucial to selection of patients likely to benefit from ICIs.

  17. Teaching Scientific Computing: A Model-Centered Approach to Pipeline and Parallel Programming with C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiras Dolgopolovas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an approach to the introduction into pipeline and parallel computing, using a model of the multiphase queueing system. Pipeline computing, including software pipelines, is among the key concepts in modern computing and electronics engineering. The modern computer science and engineering education requires a comprehensive curriculum, so the introduction to pipeline and parallel computing is the essential topic to be included in the curriculum. At the same time, the topic is among the most motivating tasks due to the comprehensive multidisciplinary and technical requirements. To enhance the educational process, the paper proposes a novel model-centered framework and develops the relevant learning objects. It allows implementing an educational platform of constructivist learning process, thus enabling learners’ experimentation with the provided programming models, obtaining learners’ competences of the modern scientific research and computational thinking, and capturing the relevant technical knowledge. It also provides an integral platform that allows a simultaneous and comparative introduction to pipelining and parallel computing. The programming language C for developing programming models and message passing interface (MPI and OpenMP parallelization tools have been chosen for implementation.

  18. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  19. Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: Improving Access to National Cooperative Pediatric Oncology Group (AIEOP) Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Andrea; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Mascarin, Maurizio; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mosso, Maria Luisa; Maule, Milena; Barisone, Elena; Bertolotti, Marina; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Fagioli, Franca; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This analysis compared the numbers of patients treated at Italian pediatric oncology group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica [AIEOP]) centers with the numbers of cases predicted according to the population-based registry. It considered 32,431 patients registered in the AIEOP database (1989-2012). The ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases was 0.79 for children (0-14 years old) and 0.15 for adolescents (15-19 years old). The proportion of adolescents increased significantly over the years, however, from 0.05 in the earliest period to 0.10, 0.18, and then 0.28 in the latest period of observation, suggesting a greater efficacy of local/national programs dedicated to adolescents.

  20. Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community College Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Includes a collection of eight short articles describing model community college programs. Discusses a literacy program, a mobile computer classroom, a support program for at-risk students, a timber-harvesting program, a multimedia presentation on successful women graduates, a career center, a collaboration with NASA, and an Israeli engineering…

  1. Screening history in women with cervical cancer in a Danish population-based screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Poll, Susanne; Junge, Jette;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer.......The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer....

  2. Multi-center evaluation of post-operative morbidity and mortality after optimal cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Rafii

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: While optimal cytoreduction is the standard of care for advanced ovarian cancer, the related post-operative morbidity has not been clearly documented outside pioneering centers. Indeed most of the studies are monocentric with inclusions over several years inducing heterogeneity in techniques and goals of surgery. We assessed the morbidity of optimal cytoreduction surgery for advanced ovarian cancer within a short inclusion period in 6 referral centers dedicated to achieve complete cytoreduction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The 30 last optimal debulking surgeries of 6 cancer centers were included. Inclusion criteria included: stage IIIc- IV ovarian cancer and optimal surgery performed at the site of inclusion. All post-operative complications within 30 days of surgery were recorded and graded using the Memorial secondary events grading system. Student-t, Chi2 and non-parametric statistical tests were performed. RESULTS: 180 patients were included. There was no demographic differences between the centers. 63 patients underwent surgery including intestinal resections (58 recto-sigmoid resection, 24 diaphragmatic resections, 17 splenectomies. 61 patients presented complications; One patient died post-operatively. Major (grade 3-5 complications requiring subsequent surgeries occurred in 21 patients (11.5%. 76% of patients with a major complication had undergone an ultraradical surgery (P = 0.004. CONCLUSION: While ultraradical surgery may result in complete resection of peritoneal disease in advanced ovarian cancer, the associated complication rate is not negligible. Patients should be carefully evaluated and the timing of their surgery optimized in order to avoid major complications.

  3. Papillary Thyroid Cancer in a Child with Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Suresh; DeNardo, Bradley; Stachurski, Dariusz; Greene Welch, Jennifer; Groblewski, Jan C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the presentation and management of a child with Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers (PTGC), an uncommon condition characterized by significant persistent lymphadenopathy, who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma and to explore and review potential links between PTGC and neoplastic processes in the head and neck. Methods. Case presentation and literature review are used. Results. A 10-year-old female presented with a right parotid mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Multiple biopsies revealed PTGC without malignancy. Two years later, she developed fatigue and weight gain, and a thyroid nodule was found. Fine needle aspiration was strongly suggestive of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and central neck dissection without surgical management of the longstanding right lateral neck lymphadenopathy. Final pathology confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was treated with radioactive iodine therapy postoperatively and remains free of disease at three years of follow-up. Conclusions. PTGC is considered a benign condition but has previously been associated with Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma (NLPHL). This is the first reported case of papillary thyroid cancer in a child with preexisting cervical PTGC and no defined risk factors for thyroid malignancy. No link has been established with thyroid carcinoma, but patients with PTGC may have a defect in immune surveillance that predisposes them to malignancy. PMID:27069706

  4. Papillary Thyroid Cancer in a Child with Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To describe the presentation and management of a child with Progressive Transformation of Germinal Centers (PTGC, an uncommon condition characterized by significant persistent lymphadenopathy, who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma and to explore and review potential links between PTGC and neoplastic processes in the head and neck. Methods. Case presentation and literature review are used. Results. A 10-year-old female presented with a right parotid mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Multiple biopsies revealed PTGC without malignancy. Two years later, she developed fatigue and weight gain, and a thyroid nodule was found. Fine needle aspiration was strongly suggestive of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and central neck dissection without surgical management of the longstanding right lateral neck lymphadenopathy. Final pathology confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was treated with radioactive iodine therapy postoperatively and remains free of disease at three years of follow-up. Conclusions. PTGC is considered a benign condition but has previously been associated with Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma (NLPHL. This is the first reported case of papillary thyroid cancer in a child with preexisting cervical PTGC and no defined risk factors for thyroid malignancy. No link has been established with thyroid carcinoma, but patients with PTGC may have a defect in immune surveillance that predisposes them to malignancy.

  5. Implementation of a Lateral TBI protocol in a Mexican Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Francisco; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko; Sosa, Modesto A.

    2008-08-01

    The development of a Lateral Total Body Irradiation protocol to be implemented at a High Specialty Medical Unit in Mexico as preparatory regimen for bone marrow transplant and treatment of several lymphomas is presented. This protocol was developed following AAPM specifications and has been validated for application at a cancer care center in United States. This protocol fundamentally focuses on patient care, avoiding instability and discomfort that may be encountered by other treatment regimes. In vivo dose verification with TLD-100 chips for each anatomical region of interest was utilized. TLD-100 chips were calibrated using a 6 MV photon beam for 10-120 cGy. Experimental results show TLD measurements with an error less than 1%. Standard deviations for calculated and measured doses for seven patients have been obtained. Data gathered for different levels of compensation indicate that a 3% measured tolerance level is acceptable. TLD point-dose measurements have been used to verify the dose beyond partial transmission lung blocks. Dose measurements beyond the lung block showed variation about 50% respects to prescribe dose. Midplane doses to the other anatomical sites were less than 2.5% respect of the prescribed dose.

  6. Practice of geriatric oncology in the setting of a comprehensive cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geriatric oncology is defined by the multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach of the elderly cancer patients. Autonomy, beneficence, non maleficence and justice are the four fundamental principles on which are based the treatment objectives and practical management of these patients. The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment is the most used tool to detect the functional problems in these elderly patients. The standard oncologic managements of cancer is applies to these patients. However treatment plan and geriatric interventions must be adapted to each individual characteristics of the patients.Thus a strong interdependence between oncologic and geriatric teams is warranted. This implies specific teaching programs during initial medical studies and in the setting of continuous medical education. Furthermore, such wold wide teaching programs may help to the implementation of Geriatric Oncology. In the Geriatric Oncology Program in Lyon we have developed a specific miniassessement to be practiced in an oncologic setting. Geriatric data were obtained by the version of the geriatric multidimensional assessment tool, which we have called minimal comprehensive geriatric assessment” or mini-CGA. This procedure has been designed to collect information on several major domains including medical (co-morbidity), functional, cognitive, affective, social, and environmental aspects. It is essentially based on a very careful medical examination. We also used other evaluation tools previously validated in elderly people. Dependence was measured using three tools: Katz’s Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) scale that focuses on six basic activities of daily living (bathing, dressing, toile ting, transferring, continence, and feeding); Lawton’s Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) scale that appraises more complex activities essential for independence in community residence; and the Karnofsky Performance scale (KPS) that is widely used in the oncology setting to

  7. Rocket ranch the nuts and bolts of the Apollo Moon program at Kennedy Space Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Jonathan Ward takes the reader deep into the facilities at Kennedy Space Center to describe NASA’s first computer systems used for spacecraft and rocket checkout and explain how tests and launches proceeded. Descriptions of early operations include a harrowing account of the heroic efforts of pad workers during the Apollo 1 fire. A companion to the author’s book Countdown to a Moon Launch: Preparing Apollo for Its Historic Journey, this explores every facet of the facilities that served as the base for the Apollo/Saturn missions. Hundreds of illustrations complement the firsthand accounts of more than 70 Apollo program managers and engineers. The era of the Apollo/Saturn missions was perhaps the most exciting period in American space exploration history. Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center were buzzing with activity. Thousands of workers came to town to build the facilities and launch the missions needed to put an American on the Moon before the end of the decade. Work at KSC involved much more than j...

  8. Patient-centered cancer treatment planning: improving the quality of oncology care. Summary of an Institute of Medicine workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Erin P; Ganz, Patricia A; Murphy, Sharon B; Nass, Sharyl J; Ferrell, Betty R; Stovall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's National Cancer Policy Forum recently convened a workshop on patient-centered cancer treatment planning, with the aim of raising awareness about this important but often overlooked aspect of cancer treatment. A primary goal of patient-centered treatment planning is to engage patients and their families in meaningful, thorough interactions with their health care providers to develop an accurate, well-conceived treatment plan, using all available medical information appropriately while also considering the medical, social, and cultural needs and desires of the patient and family. A cancer treatment plan can be shared among the patient, family, and care team in order to facilitate care coordination and provide a roadmap to help patients navigate the path of cancer treatment. There are numerous obstacles to achieving patient-centered cancer treatment planning in practice. Some of these challenges stem from the patient and include patients' lack of assertiveness, health literacy, and numeracy, and their emotional state and concurrent illnesses. Others are a result of physician limitations, such as a lack of time to explain complex information and a lack of tools to facilitate treatment planning, as well as insensitivity to patients' informational, cultural, and emotional needs. Potential solutions to address these obstacles include better training of health care providers and patients in optimal communication and shared decision making, and greater use of support services and tools such as patient navigation and electronic health records. Other options include greater use of quality metrics and reimbursement for the time it takes to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan. PMID:22128118

  9. Breast cancer correlates in a cohort of breast screening program participants in Riyadh, KSA

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad A. Al-Amri; Mohammed Y. Saeedi; Fatina M. Al-Tahan; Ali, Arwa M.; Shaker A. Alomary; Mostafa Arafa; Ibrahim, Ahmed K.; Kassim A. Kassim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the first cancer among females in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, accounting for 27.4% of all newly diagnosed female cancers in 2010. There are several risk factors affecting the incidence of breast cancer where some factors influence the risk more than the others. Aim: We aimed to identify the different risk factors related to breast cancer among females participating in the breast-screening program in Riyadh, KSA. Methods: Based on data from phase-I of the br...

  10. Evaluation of the Dutch BRCA1/2 clinical genetic center referral criteria in an unselected early breast cancer population

    OpenAIRE

    van den Broek, Alexandra J.; de Ruiter, Karen; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Verhoef, Senno; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of the Dutch Clinical Genetic Center (CGC) referral guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in 903 early breast cancer patients, unselected for family history, diagnosed in a cancer hospital before the age of 50 years in 1974–2002; most prevalent Dutch pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations had been analyzed on coded DNA in a research setting. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the patients were proven to be BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We found that 78% and 69% of BRCA...

  11. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year...

  12. Modality-dependent dose requirements in the Austrian breast cancer early detection program. First results from technical quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Austrian Breast Cancer Early Detection Program (BKFP) has officially started in January 2014. In order to ensure that all participating women can rely on a sufficient cancer detection rate while at the same time the required dose is as low as reasonably achievable, all participating radiology institutes (approx. 200) have to fulfill strict quality assurance requirements. The control and certification is performed by the Reference Center for Technical Quality Assurance (RefZQS), which has been developing the methods and tolerances in a pilot project since 2007. The limits are defined in the EUREF-Oeprotocol which is based on the European EPQC guidelines. From the requirement for optimized image quality while simultaneously following the ALARA principle, we found modality-dependent dose requirements, which we had expected but which have now been compiled for the first time for Austria.

  13. Successful implementation of a telemedicine-based counseling program for high-risk patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Sandhya; Stange, Kevin J; Malagrino, Gerald D; Chawla, Kashmira S; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Kaur, Judith S

    2013-01-01

    An interactive audio and video telemedicine feasibility program was established to provide counseling on breast cancer risk-reducing strategies for underserved, high-risk Alaskan native women through a collaboration among the Alaska Native Medical Center, the Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic, Mayo's Center for Innovation, and the Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network. The telemedicine model included a navigator to facilitate patient encounters (referrals, electronic records, and scheduling) and a subscription billing contract. Between January 1 and December 31, 2011, 60 consultations were provided to the Alaska Native Medical Center. A survey of a sample of 15 women demonstrated overall patient satisfaction of 98% pertaining to the experience, technology, and medical consultation. The referring physician satisfaction, from 11 visit surveys and 8 referring physicians, revealed 99% satisfaction with the service. In this telemedicine pilot study, we demonstrated the feasibility of a telemedicine program to provide integrated specialty care that resulted in a positive effect on patient satisfaction. This program has a sustainable business model, thus creating a new modality for health care delivery. PMID:23274020

  14. Geocoding and Social Marketing in Alabama’s Cancer Prevention Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianna W. Miner, MPH

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH is collaborating with the National Cancer Institute to develop detailed profiles of underserved Alabama communities most at risk for cancer. These profiles will be combined with geocoded data to create a pilot project, Cancer Prevention for Alabama’s Underserved Populations: A Focused Approach. The project's objectives are to provide the ADPH's cancer prevention programs with a more accurate and cost-effective means of planning, implementing, and evaluating its prevention activities in an outcomes-oriented and population-appropriate manner. The project links geocoded data from the Alabama Statewide Cancer Registry with profiles generated by the National Cancer Institute’s cancer profiling system, Consumer Health Profiles. These profiles have been successfully applied to market-focused cancer prevention messages across the United States. The ADPH and the National Cancer Institute will evaluate the efficacy of using geocoded data and lifestyle segmentation information in strategy development and program implementation. Alabama is the first state in the nation not only to link geocoded cancer registry data with lifestyle segmentation data but also to use the National Cancer Institute’s profiles and methodology in combination with actual state data.

  15. Colon Cancer Biomarkers To Identify Patients Suitable For Therapeutic Intervention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  16. Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies for Liver Cancer Research | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks parties for collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize antibody drug/toxin conjugates as liver cancer therapy and diagnostics.

  17. A model for training medical student innovators: the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care Abundance Agents of Change program

    OpenAIRE

    David B. Duong; Sullivan, Erin E.; Myechia Minter-Jordan; Lindsay Giesen; Andrew L. Ellner

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2013, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care established the Abundance Agents of Change (AoC) program to promote interprofessional learning and innovation, increase partnership between 15 academic and community health centers (CHCs) in Boston's most under-served communities, and increase medical student interest in primary care careers. Methods: The AoC is modeled in the form of a ‘grants challenge’, offering $20,000 to interprofessional student teams to develop an ...

  18. Incentivizing Users of Data Centers Participate in The Demand Response Programs via Time-Varying Monetary Rewards

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Yong; Xu, Du; Yu, Hongfang; Yu, Shui

    2016-01-01

    Demand response is widely employed by today's data centers to reduce energy consumption in response to the increasing of electricity cost. To incentivize users of data centers participate in the demand response programs, i.e., breaking the "split incentive" hurdle, some prior researches propose market-based mechanisms such as dynamic pricing and static monetary rewards. However, these mechanisms are either intrusive or unfair. In this paper, we use time-varying rewards to incentivize users, w...

  19. A joint chance-constrained programming approach for call center workforce scheduling under uncertain call arrival forecasts

    OpenAIRE

    Excoffier, M.; Gicquel, C.; Jouini, O.

    2016-01-01

    International audience A joint chance-constrained programming approach for call center workforce scheduling under uncertain call arrival forecasts Abstract We consider a workforce management problem arising in call centers, namely the shift-scheduling problem. It consists in determining the number of agents to be assigned to a set of predefined shifts so as to optimize the trade-off between manpower cost and customer quality of service. We focus on explicitly taking into account in the shi...

  20. Referral pattern for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the head and neck cancers in a tertiary care center

    OpenAIRE

    V M Patil; V Noronha; Joshi, A; V M Krishna; S Dhumal; Chaudhary, V.; Juvekar, S; P S Pai; C Pankaj; Chaukar, D.; A K Dcruz; Prabhash, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of any treatment modality in cancer depends not only on the effectiveness of the modality, but also on other factors such as local expertise, tolerance of the modality, cost and prevalence of the disease. Oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancer are the major subsites in which majority of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) literature in the head and neck cancers is available. However, oral cancers form a major subsite in India. Materials And Methods: This is an analysis of a prospectiv...

  1. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  2. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's federally funded research and development center for the high-level waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses how the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established a Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA or Center) to perform research and provide technical assistance to support its long-term (decades) responsibilities in licensing a high-level radioactive waste repository. The Center is a special-category government contract (federally funded research and development center (FFRDC)) designed to preclude conflict-of-interest and assure continuity of services beyond the statutory five-year tenure of private-sector contracts. It is charted to work only on the high-level waste (HLW) program for the U.S. NRC. The Center's scope includes the application of all earth sciences, engineering, legal and information management disciplines relevant to repository siting and design, transportation, QA/QC, performance assessments, regulatory requirements analyses and confirmatory research

  3. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Cancer Control Programs in East Asia: Evidence From the International Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Malcolm A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world, including the countries of North-East and South-East Asia. Assessment of burden through cancer registration, determination of risk and protective factors, early detection and screening, clinical practice, interventions for example in vaccination, tobacco cessation efforts and palliative care all should be included in comprehensive cancer control programs. The degree to which this is possible naturally depends on the reso...

  5. The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program at Marshall Space Flight Center - Some problems and conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program by the Department of Energy and the Marshall Space Flight Center activities supporting this program from its conception are defined and discussed. Problems are summarized in the design and financial areas. It is concluded that the program has significantly assisted the creation of a viable solar testing and cooling industry. The cost effective procedures evolving from the program are expected to make a major contribution to reducing the effective life cycle cost of solar installation.

  6. Radiation doses to screened women in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program in 2005 and 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiographers report exposure data for approximately 50 women annually to the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Based on reported data from all laboratories involved in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program average glandular dose (AGD) to the screened. (author)

  7. Reducing Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Disparities: Performance and Outcomes of a Screening Colonoscopy Program in South Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Xirasagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficiency, effectiveness, and racial disparities reduction potential of Screening Colonoscopies for People Everywhere in South Carolina (SCOPE SC, a state-funded program for indigent persons aged 50–64 years (45–64 years for African American (AA with a medical home in community health centers. Patients were referred to existing referral network providers, and the centers were compensated for patient navigation. Data on procedures and patient demographics were analyzed. Of 782 individuals recruited (71.2% AA, 85% (665 completed the procedure (71.1% AA. The adenoma detection rate was 27.8% (males 34.6% and females 25.1%, advanced neoplasm rate 7.7% (including 3 cancers, cecum intubation rate 98.9%, inadequate bowel preparation rate 7.9%, and adverse event rate 0.9%. All indicators met the national quality benchmarks. The adenoma rate of 26.0% among AAs aged 45–49 years was similar to that of older Whites and AAs. We found that patient navigation and a medical home setting resulted in a successful and high-quality screening program. The observed high adenoma rate among younger AAs calls for more research with larger cohorts to evaluate the appropriateness of the current screening guidelines for AAs, given that they suffer 47% higher colorectal cancer mortality than Whites.

  8. Screening history in women with cervical cancer in a Danish population-based screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Poll, Susanne; Rygaard, Carsten;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer....

  9. Culturally Competent Training Program: A Key to Training Lay Health Advisors for Promoting Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei-yu; Song, Lixin; Seetoo, Amy; Cai, Cuijuan; Smith, Gary; Oakley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The lay health advisor (LHA) training program for breast cancer screening was conducted among Chinese-English bilingual trainees residing in Southeast Michigan. Guided by Bandura's Social Learning Theory, the development of the training curriculum followed the health communication process recommended by the National Cancer Institute. Data analysis…

  10. CAN RAP: A Program to Help Patients Choose a Screening Strategy for Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Detmer, William M.; Gilbertson, David G.

    1993-01-01

    The CANcer Risk Assessment and Preference (CAN RAP) system is a prototype computer program that helps patients to select a screening strategy for colon cancer. CAN RAP uses demographic and risk-factor information to calculate the benefit and cost of various screening strategies. The system communicates to patients these benefits and costs, and elicits patient preferences using audio, text, and graphics.

  11. Cyberknife fractionated radiotherapy for adrenal metastases: Preliminary report from a multispecialty Indian cancer care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinanjan Basu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Metastasis to adrenal gland from lung, breast, and kidney malignancies are quite common. Historically radiotherapy was intended for pain palliation. Recent studies with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT including Cyberknife robotic radiosurgery aiming at disease control brings about encouraging results. Here we represent the early clinical experience with Cyberknife stereotactic system from an Indian cancer care center. The main purpose of this retrospective review is to serve as a stepping stone for future prospective studies with non- invasive yet effective technique compared to surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed four cases of adrenal metastases (three: lung and one: renal cell carcinoma treated with Cyberknife SBRT. X sight spine tracking was employed for planning and treatment delivery. Patients were evaluated for local response clinically as well as with PETCT based response criteria.Results: With a median gross tumor volume of 20.5 cc and median dose per fraction of 10 Gy, two patients had complete response (CR and two had partial response (PR when assessed 8-12 weeks post treatment as per RECIST. There was no RTOG grade 2 or more acute adverse events and organs at risk dosage were acceptable. Till last follow up all the patients were locally controlled and alive. Conclusion: Cyberknife SBRT with its unique advantages like non- invasive, short duration outpatient treatment technique culminating in similar local control rates in comparison to surgery is an attractive option. World literature of linear accelerator based SBRT and our data with Cyberknife SBRT with small sample size and early follow up are similar in terms of local control in adrenal metastases. Future prospective data would reveal more information on the management of adrenal metastases.

  12. Stage I seminoma: treatment outcome at King Hussein Cancer Center in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Jamal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this report is to address treatment outcomes of patients with early-stage seminoma in a single institution with special reference to patients with history of surgical violation of the scrotum. Methods Seventy four patients with pure seminoma were treated at King Hussein Cancer Center (Amman, Jordan between 2003 and 2010. All patients underwent orchiectomy. All but 3 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients who underwent surgical violation of the scrotum prior to referral were managed by further excision or irradiation of the scrotal scar. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 200 months (mean, 33 months. Results At the time of follow-up; all but one patient remain alive. The 3-year relapse-free survival for the entire cohort was 95.9%. Three patients developed relapse, all of whom received adjuvant irradiation following inguinal orchiectomy and initially harbored tumors larger than 4 cm upon pathological examination. Median time to relapse was 14 months (range, 8–25 months. None were associated with elevated tumor markers prior to detection of relapse. All but one patient were successfully salvaged by chemotherapy. Conclusions Our results confirm the excellent prognosis of patients with early-stage seminoma treated by orchiectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy in a developing country. Although all patients who developed relapse demonstrated adverse pathological findings upon initial assessment, no consistent predictor of relapse was found. Scrotal scar re-excision or irradiation in patients with prior history of surgical violation of the scrotum are effective measures in preventing local failure.

  13. Characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric cancer: A study of 235 cases at a comprehensive cancer center in U.S.A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yingyan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has been shown to be associated with gastric cancer. However, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the distribution of EBV infected cells (in normal gastric epithelium vs. intestinal metaplastic cells vs. in neoplastic cells and the characteristics of EBV-associated gastric cancer. Lymph node positive EBV-associated gastric cancer has not been systematically studied. The aims of this study were to evaluate EBV-associated gastric cancer, to assess the distribution of EBV infected cells including all positive lymph nodes, and to define the characteristics of EBV-associated gastric cancer. Design The study included primary gastric cancer patients who underwent surgical resection with no preoperative treatment at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1987 and 2006. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from these resection specimens were assessed for EBV by in situ hybridization, the gold standard for EBV detection in tissue. EBV status was analyzed along with clinicopathologic parameters including age, gender, tumor type, lymph node status, and pathologic stage of the tumor. Results Among 235 patients, 12 had intranuclear expression of EBV. EBV staining was seen only in tumor cells and no detectable EBV was observed in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia or stromal cells. Eight of 12 patients with EBV-associated gastric cancer had regional lymph node metastasis. Of note, metastatic tumor cells in all of the involved lymph nodes of these 8 cases contained EBV. The epidemiologic data showed 11 of the 12 patients with EBV-associated gastric cancer were men, ranging in age from 54 to 78 years (mean age, 60 years; median age, 62.1 years. The age distribution for non-EBV associated gastric cancer patients ranged from 21 to 93 years (mean age, 67 years; median age, 66.4 years. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that EBV is present exclusively in gastric cancer cells. The detection of EBV in

  14. Validation of the memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center nomogram to predict disease-specific survival after R0 resection in a Chinese gastric cancer population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglai Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prediction of disease-specific survival (DSS for individual patient with gastric cancer after R0 resection remains a clinical concern. Since the clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric cancer vary widely between China and western countries, this study is to evaluate a nomogram from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC for predicting the probability of DSS in patients with gastric cancer from a Chinese cohort. METHODS: From 1998 to 2007, clinical data of 979 patients with gastric cancer who underwent R0 resection were retrospectively collected from Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute and used for external validation. The performance of the MSKCC nomogram in our population was assessed using concordance index (C-index and calibration plot. RESULTS: The C-index for the MSKCC predictive nomogram was 0.74 in the Chinese cohort, compared with 0.69 for American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC staging system (P<0.0001. This suggests that the discriminating value of MSKCC nomogram is superior to AJCC staging system for prognostic prediction in the Chinese population. Calibration plots showed that the actual survival of Chinese patients corresponded closely to the MSKCC nonogram-predicted survival probabilities. Moreover, MSKCC nomogram predictions demonstrated the heterogeneity of survival in stage IIA/IIB/IIIA/IIIB disease of the Chinese patients. CONCLUSION: In this study, we externally validated MSKCC nomogram for predicting the probability of 5- and 9-year DSS after R0 resection for gastric cancer in a Chinese population. The MSKCC nomogram performed well with good discrimination and calibration. The MSKCC nomogram improved individualized predictions of survival, and may assist Chinese clinicians and patients in individual follow-up scheduling, and decision making with regard to various treatment options.

  15. Cancer Prevention Interdisciplinary Education Program at Purdue University: Overview and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, Dorothy; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Adedokun, Omolola; Childress, Amy; Parker, Loran Carleton; Burgess, Wilella; Nagel, Julie; Knapp, Deborah W.; Lelievre, Sophie; Agnew, Christopher R.; Shields, Cleveland; Leary, James; Adams, Robin; Jensen, Jakob D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a broad field that crosses many disciplines; therefore, educational efforts to enhance cancer prevention research focused on interdisciplinary approaches to the field are greatly needed. In order to hasten progress in cancer prevention research, the Cancer Prevention Internship Program (CPIP) at Purdue University was designed to develop and test an interdisciplinary curriculum for undergraduate and graduate students. The hypothesis was that course curriculum specific to introducing interdisciplinary concepts in cancer prevention would increase student interest in and ability to pursue advanced educational opportunities (e.g., graduate school, medical school). Preliminary results from the evaluation of the first year which included 10 undergraduate and 5 graduate students suggested that participation in CPIP is a positive professional development experience, leading to a significant increase in understanding of interdisciplinary research in cancer prevention. In its first year, the CPIP project has created a successful model for interdisciplinary education in cancer prevention research. PMID:21533583

  16. Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program: impact on patterns of terminal cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M; Gagnon, B.; Brenneis, C; Kneisler, P; Selmser, P; J Hanson

    1999-01-01

    The Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program was established in July 1995 to measure the access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care services, decrease the number of cancer-related deaths in acute care facilities and increase the participation of family physicians in the care of terminally ill patients. In this retrospective study the authors compared the pattern of care and site of deaths before establishment of the program (1992/93) and during its second year of operation (1...

  17. A Blended Learning Model of Peer Support Training Program for Women with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Komatsu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Peer support is an important social support for cancer patients. A blended learning model of peer support training program in breast cancer was tested for feasibility. Methods: We developed a peer support training program for women with breast cancer with a blended learning approach combining face-to-face methods with e-learning. After face-to-face orientation, a 20-session e-learning program was provided on the Web followed by a one-day workshop including role playing. Log-files were recorded to assess the pattern of use in the e-learning program. The usability and acceptability were assessed by an evaluation questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale. Psychosocial outcomes were assessed over time (baseline, post-program, and 3-month follow-up using repeated measured one-way analysis of variance. Results: Twenty-eight women with breast cancer experience were recruited to the study. The rates of retention and assessment completion were high (92.9% and 89.3%, respectively. Participants favorably rated on the usability of the program. The mean time taken to complete the total of 20 sessions in the e-learning program was 18.69 days. There were no adverse psychosocial effects on the participants. Conclusions: The blended learning model of the breast cancer peer support training program was feasible and well accepted by the peer support volunteers.

  18. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  20. Development of Stitched, Braided and Woven Composite Structures in the ACT Program and at Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Dexter, H. Benson

    1997-01-01

    Summary results are presented from the research conducted on woven, braided, knitted and stitched (textile) composites at the Langley Research Center and under the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program in the period from 1985 to 1997. The report also includes an annotated bibliography of 270 U.S. publications on textile composites (with their abstracts). Two major research areas are discussed: (1) the general research in textile composites performed throughout the period under the direction of the Langley Research Center and (2) the development of textile composite aircraft structures by industry under the NASA ACT Program. The annotated bibliography is organized in three subsections: (1) general textiles R&D under the auspices of Langley, (2) ACT Program development of textile structural components, and (3) textiles research by individuals and organizations not associated with the ACT Program. An author index is provided for the reports and documents.

  1. Creating Synergy: Essential Components of a Successful R25E Cancer Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    Gronemeyer, Suzanne A.

    2011-01-01

    For an R25E cancer research program to be a resounding success for both participating students and faculty, and to maintain federal funding, many synergistic elements are necessary. Essential components of the R25E Pediatric Oncology Education (POE) Program at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital include 1) a unique focus, 2) a program director who is passionate about the program and who is enthusiastically supported by the institution, 3) committed and involved faculty mentors, 4) a current...

  2. Programs of recovery of radioactive wastes from the trenches and land decontamination of the radioactive waste storage center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report there are the decontamination program of the land of the Radioactive Waste Storage Center, the Program of Recovery of the radioactive waste of the trenches, the recovery of polluted bar with cobalt 60, the recovery of minerals and tailings of uranium and of earth with minerals and tailings of uranium, the recovery of worn out sealed sources and the waste recovery with the accustomed corresponding actions are presented. (Author)

  3. Impact of Title VII Training Programs on Community Health Center Staffing and National Health Service Corps Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Rittenhouse, Diane R.; Fryer, George E; Phillips, Robert L; Miyoshi, Thomas; Nielsen, Christine; Goodman, David C; Grumbach, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Community health centers (CHCs) are a critical component of the health care safety net. President Bush’s recent effort to expand CHC capacity coincides with difficulty recruiting primary care physicians and substantial cuts in federal grant programs designed to prepare and motivate physicians to practice in underserved settings. This article examines the association between physicians’ attendance in training programs funded by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Title ...

  4. Final priorities; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces priorities under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce priorities for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Rehabilitation Strategies, Techniques, and Interventions (Priority 1), Information and Communication Technologies Access (Priority 2), Individual Mobility and Manipulation (Priority 3), and Physical Access and Transportation (Priority 4). The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas of national need. We intend these priorities to improve community living and participation, health and function, and employment outcomes of individuals with disabilities.

  5. Johnson Space Center's Free Range Bicycle Program.- Fall 2015 Intern Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Stockton, Willem

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center is a big place, encompassing 1,620 acres and more than a hundred buildings. Furthermore, there are reportedly 15 thousand employees, all of which have somewhere to be. To facilitate the movement of all these people JSC has historically relied on human power. Pedaling their way towards deep space, bicycles have been the go to method. Currently there are about 200 Free Range Bicycles at JSC. Free Range Bicycles belong to nobody, except NASA, and are available for anybody to use. They are not to be locked or hidden (although frequently are) and the intention is that there will always be a bike to hop on to get where you're going (although it may not be the bike you rode in on). Although not without its own shortcomings, the Free Range Bicycle Program has continued to provide low cost, simple transportation for NASA's JSC. In addition to the approximately 200 Free Range Bicycles, various larger divisions (like engineering) will often buy a few dozen bikes for their team members to use or individuals will bring their own personal bike to either commute or use on site. When these bicycles fall into disrepair or are abandoned (from retirees etc) they become a problem at JSC. They are an eye sore, create a safety hazard and make it harder to find a working bike in a time of need. The Free Range Program hopes to address this first problem by "tagging out" abandoned or out of service bicycles. A bright orange "DO NOT OPERATE" tag is placed on the bike and given a serial number for tracking purposes. See picture to the right. If the bike has an active owner with intentions to repair the bike the bottom of the tag has instructions for how to claim the abandoned bicycle. After being tagged the owner of the bicycle has 30 days to claim the bicycle and either haul it off site or get it repaired (and labeled) in accordance with Johnson's Bicycle Policy. If the abandoned bicycle is not claimed within 30 days it becomes the property of the Government. The

  6. NASA Glenn Research Center Program in High Power Density Motors for Aeropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Ebihara, Ben; Johnson, Dexter; Choi, Benjamin; Siebert, Mark; Buccieri, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Electric drive of transport-sized aircraft propulsors, with electric power generated by fuel cells or turbo-generators, will require electric motors with much higher power density than conventional room-temperature machines. Cryogenic cooling of the motor windings by the liquid hydrogen fuel offers a possible solution, enabling motors with higher power density than turbine engines. Some context on weights of various systems, which is required to assess the problem, is presented. This context includes a survey of turbine engine weights over a considerable size range, a correlation of gear box weights and some examples of conventional and advanced electric motor weights. The NASA Glenn Research Center program for high power density motors is outlined and some technical results to date are presented. These results include current densities of 5,000 A per square centimeter current density achieved in cryogenic coils, finite element predictions compared to measurements of torque production in a switched reluctance motor, and initial tests of a cryogenic switched reluctance motor.

  7. Evaluation of the Microvascular Research Center Training Program for Assessing Microsurgical Skills in Trainee Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Komatsu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background  We established the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCPto help trainee surgeons acquire and develop microsurgical skills. Medical students wererecruited to undergo theMRCP to assessthe effectiveness oftheMRCP fortrainee surgeons.Methods  Twenty-two medical students with no prior microsurgical experience, who completed the course from2005 to 2012,were included. TheMRCP comprises 5 stages oftraining,each with specific passing requirements. Stages 1 and 2 involve anastomosing silicone tubesand blood vessels of chicken carcasses,respectively,within 20minutes. Stage 3 involves anastomosing the femoral artery and vein oflive ratswith a 1-day patency rate of > 80%. Stage4 requires replantation of free superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps in rats with a 7-daysuccessrate of > 80%. Stage 5 involvessuccessful completion of one case ofratreplantation/transplantation. We calculated the passing rate for each stage and recorded the number ofanastomosesrequired to passstages 3 and 4.Results  The passing rates were 100% (22/22 for stages 1 and 2, 86.4% (19/22 for stage3, 59.1% (13/22 for stage 4, and 55.0% (11/20 for stage 5. The number of anastomosesperformedwas 17.2± 12.2 in stage 3 and 11.3± 8.1 in stage 4.Conclusions  Majority ofthemedicalstudentswho undertook theMRCP acquired basicmicrosurgicalskills. Thus,we conclude thatthe MRCP is an effective microsurgery training programfortrainee surgeons.

  8. [Partnership between Psychosocial Care Center and Family Health Program: the challenge of a new knowledge construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Patrícia Santos de Souza; Sato, Miki Takao; Antoneli, Patrícia de Paulo; Guimarães, Paulo Octávio da Silva

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the article is to report an experience of partnership between a Psychosocial Care Center and three teams of the Family Health Program in the central region of São Paulo city. theoretical concepts like territory, subject, subjectivity/collective, receptiveness, bond, co-responsibility as well as the psychiatric and sanitary reform principles are the base and guide of this work. The partnership aims the promotion of mental health care based on articulated actions from different services. This way, the PSF's and mental health's workers are responsible for the demands of a territory. The strategies used in this partnership were meetings with both teams with training, case discussion about the families assisted, support to workers' difficulties and elaboration of therapeutical projects, and joint domiciliary visits. Some difficulties had been found during the research: great demand for health services and lack of institutional guidelines to guarantee the effectiveness of the partnership. The look directed to the family and the social context presents positive results compared to the look directed only to the illness. The partnership enriches the practice and a larger network of care in the territory becomes possible. It is necessary to bring up new proposals and innovative enterprises.

  9. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  10. Promising Outcomes in Teen Mothers Enrolled in a School-Based Parent Support Program and Child Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Lois S.; Swartz, Martha K.; Ryan-Krause, Patricia; Seitz, Victoria; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki; Grey, Margaret; Clemmens, Donna A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This study described a cohort of teen mothers and their children attending an urban high school with a parent support program and school-based child care center. Specific aims of the study were to describe maternal characteristics and outcomes, and child developmental and health outcomes. Methods: A volunteer sample of 65 adolescent…

  11. 75 FR 1681 - University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program Grants (49 U.S.C. 5506); Suspension of Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... (49 U.S.C. 5506); Suspension of Competitions AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology Administration... intends to suspend competitions for its University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program grants (49 USC... for future UTC competitions are not known at this time. As more information is available about...

  12. 75 FR 21232 - FY 2010 NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) Comprehensive Grants Program Extension of Due...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology FY 2010 NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) Comprehensive Grants Program Extension of Due Date for Proposals AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and... Neutron Research; National Institute of Standards and Technology; 100 Bureau Drive, Stop...

  13. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  14. Effects of different phases of an invitational screening program on breast cancer incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppänen, Johanna; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Anttila, Ahti; Sarkeala, Tytti; Virkkunen, Hanna; Hakulinen, Timo

    2006-08-15

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of separate phases of an invitational screening program on breast cancer incidence at different ages. Our database included detailed municipality-specific information about invitations for mass-screening for breast cancer in 267 Finnish municipalities from time period 1987-2001. The age range was 50-74. For this study, the program was divided into 7 separate phases, and those that had not been invited served as a baseline. The incidence rate was modeled using Poisson regression. To study the differences between age groups within each program phase, an interaction term between age group and phase of screening was included in the model. The modeling was done separately for localized breast cancers, nonlocalized breast cancers and all stages combined. For localized cancers, the risk compared to the noninvited increased during the first years of the 2-year screening rounds in all age groups, and declined below the baseline during the second years. This effect was larger during the first round compared to the subsequent ones. In nonlocalized cancers, a clear incidence peak was detected only during the first year of the first round. A decreasing post screening effect was detected in nonlocalized cancers in women aged 60-69, but not in localized cancers. Cumulating over ages 50-74, extra incidence caused by regular screening in localized cancers was 5.2% if the program was continued up to age 59, and 28.0% if it continued up to age 69. Corresponding figures for nonlocalized cancers were decreases of 19.8% and 20.9%, respectively. PMID:16550598

  15. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program. Final priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-25

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for a Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP) on Improving Methods of Evaluating Return on Investment (ROI) for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program (VR Program). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend for the priority to contribute to improved employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

  16. Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. Methods/design A randomized, controlled obesity prevention trial is currently being conducted over a three year period (2010-present. The sample consists of 28 low-income, ethnically diverse child care centers with 1105 children (sample is 60% Hispanic, 15% Haitian, 12% Black, 2% non-Hispanic White and 71% of caregivers were born outside of the US. The purpose is to test the efficacy of a parent and teacher role-modeling intervention on children’s nutrition and physical activity behaviors. . The Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children (HC2 intervention arm schools received a combination of (1 implementing a daily curricula for teachers/parents (the nutritional gatekeepers; (2 implementing a daily curricula for children; (3 technical assistance with meal and snack menu modifications such as including more fresh and less canned produce; and (4 creation of a center policy for dietary requirements for meals and snacks, physical activity and screen time. Control arm schools received an attention control safety curriculum. Major outcome measures include pre-post changes in child body mass index percentile and z score, fruit and vegetable and other nutritious food intake, amount of physical activity, and parental nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, defined by intentions and behaviors. All measures were administered at the beginning and end of the school year for year one and year two of the study for a total of 4 longitudinal time points for assessment

  17. BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

  18. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  19. DCP Leading NIH Glycoscience Common Fund Program; Funding Opportunities Open | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention is a leading participant for a key initiative in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Glycoscience Common Fund program. This program supports development of accessible and affordable new tools and technologies for studying the role complex carbohydrates in health and disease. |

  20. A Fortran program for the calculation of estrogen receptor contents in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, A; Lage, A

    1981-01-01

    A computer program in Fortran-IV for the processing of data from estradiol receptor assays in human breast cancer is described. The program prints the results in two tables together with the Saturation graph and the Scatchard's Plot. It includes a systematic, operator-independent, method for the elimination of "deviated points".

  1. Analysis of Sociodemographic parameters of patients admitted in a newly established palliative care center in a regional cancer institute of north-west India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Palliative care services are an indispensable part of a tertiary regional cancer care center. The oncologists should be made aware of the requirement of better relief of pain and other distressing symptoms to provide better quality of life to the patients suffering from advanced cancer.

  2. Nasopharyngeal cancer mimicking otitic barotrauma in a resource-challenged center: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Adekunle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Nasopharyngeal cancer commonly manifests with cervical lymphadenopathy, recurrent epistaxis and progressive nasal obstruction. Neuro-ophthalmic and otologic manifestations can also occur. Isolated otologic presentations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare and the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer may not be foremost in the list of differentials. Case presentation We present the case of a 29-year-old Nigerian woman with bilateral conductive hearing loss and tinnitus after air travel. There were no other symptoms. The persistence of the symptoms after adequate treatment for otitic barotrauma necessitated re-evaluation, which led to a diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer. Conclusion Isolated otologic manifestations of nasopharyngeal cancer are rare in regions with low incidence of the disease. There is a need for it to be considered as a possible differential in patients presenting with bilateral serous otitis media.

  3. Development of Foot Massage Program on Nausea and Vomiting for Cancer Patients: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Guru Prapti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to develop a foot massage program to support care activity in reducing nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Two phases, a literature review and the development of a foot massage program were conducted. The literature review was to analyze state of the art massage techniques by reviewing problems, related theories and supporting evidence. Method: Eight published studies in the English language were reviewed. A massage can be performed for different durations, from 10 minutes up to 60 minutes for three to six weeks and can be applied on various body areas. We found that the soft stroke/effleurage seems to be the best method and is most suitable for patients with cancer. It is also evident that foot massaging can be applied as a modality to reduce nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Result: We developed a foot massage program specifically for patients with cancer. The foot massage program comprised of three sessions, including 1 education session, 2 preparation session, and 3 foot massage session. In the education session, patients obtain brief information about the definition of a foot massage, the benefits and contraindication of foot massaging. During the preparation phase, foot soaking and warming up are performed. Subsequently, the foot massage is applied and should last for 30 minutes. Further research is recommended to test the effectiveness of the proposed foot massage program for nausea and vomiting in cancer patients across countries including Indonesia. Key Words: Foot massage program, chemotherapy, nausea and vomiting

  4. Developing a Parent-Centered Obesity Prevention Program for 4-H Families: Implications for Extension Family Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Carrie J.; Bailey, Sandra J.; Martz, Jill; Paul, Lynn; Lynch, Wesley; Eldridge, Galen

    2013-01-01

    Planning youth and family programming in the 21st century is daunting given family members' busy schedules. This is even more challenging when planning programs in rural areas, where there are vast distances between communities. This article discusses a research and educational outreach project that uses best practices in program development…

  5. 75 FR 13521 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... of Program: The purpose of the CIL program is to maximize independence, productivity, empowerment, and leadership of individuals with disabilities and integrate these individuals into the mainstream...

  6. Weight gain prevention among black women in the rural community health center setting: The Shape Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley Perry

    2012-06-01

    for depression. Discussion The Shape Program utilizes an innovative intervention approach to lower the risk of obesity and obesity-associated chronic disease among black women in the primary care setting. The intervention was informed by behavior change theory and aims to prevent weight gain using inexpensive mobile technologies and existing health center resources. Baseline characteristics reflect a socioeconomically disadvantaged, high-risk population sample in need of evidence-based treatment strategies. Trial registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938535.

  7. A distributed model: redefining a robust research subject advocacy program at the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Sabune J; Cagliero, Enrico; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E

    2014-08-01

    The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center ("Harvard Catalyst") Research Subject Advocacy (RSA) Program has reengineered subject advocacy, distributing the delivery of advocacy functions through a multi-institutional, central platform rather than vesting these roles and responsibilities in a single individual functioning as a subject advocate. The program is process-oriented and output-driven, drawing on the strengths of participating institutions to engage local stakeholders both in the protection of research subjects and in advocacy for subjects' rights. The program engages stakeholder communities in the collaborative development and distributed delivery of accessible and applicable educational programming and resources. The Harvard Catalyst RSA Program identifies, develops, and supports the sharing and distribution of expertise, education, and resources for the benefit of all institutions, with a particular focus on the frontline: research subjects, researchers, research coordinators, and research nurses.

  8. Does prostate cancer co-opt the developmental program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Paul C

    2008-07-01

    The hypothesis that cancer is a caricature of normal development and tissue renewal was originally based on descriptive studies of normal tissues and cancers. The concepts that arose from these studies were that both normal tissues and tumors are sustained by a self-renewing population of stem cells that initially gives rise to undifferentiated and highly proliferative progeny. Eventually, derivatives of these proliferating cells become growth quiescent and express differentiation markers characteristic of the organs within which they reside. A major difference between normal tissues and tumors is the impairment of differentiation in tumors such that undifferentiated, mitotically active cells accumulate in tumors. An important feature of the model is the idea that the biology of the undifferentiated and proliferating cell populations in tumors is governed by the same pathways that regulate normal development and tissue renewal. At the time these ideas were formulated, we lacked sufficient understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of prostate development and cancer progression to evaluate the validity of these ideas for understanding prostate cancer. Research in recent years has validated the prediction that cells with stem cell-like properties are a critical source of new cells both during prostate development and during prostate cancer progression. It is also the case that many of the genes that regulate prostatic development re-appear during prostate cancer progression. A closer examination of the best understood of these developmental regulatory pathways, the androgen-signaling pathway, reveals important differences between normal development and tumors. This pathway is co-opted in prostate cancer by genetic and epigenetic changes that alter the molecular details of how signaling is initiated and alter the transcriptional outcome of signaling by silencing key targets of androgen signaling and fusing androgen-responsive promoters to new genes to create

  9. Loss of an iridium-192 source and therapy misadministration at Indiana Regional Cancer Center, Indiana, Pennsylvania, on November 16, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 1, 1992, the Indiana Regional Cancer Center reported to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Region I that they believed a 1.37 E + 11 becquerel (3.7-curie) iridium-192 source from their Omnitron 2000 high dose rate remote brachytherapy afterloader had been found at a biohazard waste transfer station in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. After notifying the NRC, this cancer center, one of several operated by the licensee, Oncology Services Corporation, retrieved the source, and Region I dispatched an inspector and a supervisor to investigate the event. The source was first detected when it triggered radiation alarms at a waste incinerator facility in. Warren, Ohio. The licensee informed the NRC that the source wire had apparently broken during treatment of a patient on November 16, 1992, leaving the source in the patient. On the basis of the seriousness of the incident, the NRC elevated its response to an Incident Investigation. The Incident Investigation Team initiated its investigation on December 3, 1992. The investigation team concluded that the patient received a serious misadministration and died on November 21, 1992, and that over 90 individuals were exposed to radiation from November 16 to December 1, 1992. In a press release dated January 26, 1993, the Indiana County Coroner stated that the cause of death listed in the official autopsy report was ''Acute Radiational Exposure and Consequences Thereof'' An almost identical source wire failure occurred with an afterloader in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on December 7, 1992, but with minimal radiological consequences. This incident was included in the investigation. This report discusses the Omnitron 2000 high dose rate afterloader source-wire failure, the reasons why the failure was not detected by Indiana Regional Cancer Center, the potential consequences to the patient, the estimated radiological doses to workers and the public, and regulatory aspects associated with this incident

  10. Senior Centers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Karen Albers] We provide a wide variety of activities -- physical, health, mental health programs with Senior Plus, cognitive ... of games. [Narrator] Many senior centers also offer exercise programs. [Karen Albers] We offer aerobics, tai chi, ...

  11. Outcome of combined modality treatment including neoadjuvant chemotherapy of 128 cases of locally advanced breast cancer: Data from a tertiary cancer center in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Raina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in many parts of India and the incidence varies from 12 to 31/100000, and is rising. Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC accounts for 30 - 35% of all cases of breast cancers in India. LABC continues to present a challenge and imposes a major health impact in our country. Materials and Methods: We carried out a analysis of our LABC patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT at our hospital over a 10-year period, from January 1995 to December 2004. We analyzed the response to NACT, disease-free survival (DFS, and overall survival (OS. Results: Patients with stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC were included. LABC comprised of 26.24% (609 patients of new patients. One hundred and twenty-eight (31.1% patients received NACT. Median age was 48 years and estrogen receptor was positive in 64%. Chemotherapy protocol was an FEC (5-Fluorouracil, Epirubicin, Cyclophosphamide regimen in the following doses: Cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2, 5-FU 600 mg/m2, and Epirubicin 75 mg/m2 given every three weeks, six doses, followed by modified radical mastectomy (MRM and locoregional radiotherapy. The overall response rate (complete response (CR + partial response (PR was 84.4%, clinical CR (cCR was 13.3% and pathological CR (pCR was 7.8%. Median DFS and OS were 33 and 101 months, respectively. The disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS at five years were 41 and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: This study analyzes the outcome in patients who received NACT, in the largest number of LABC patients from a single center in India, and our results are comparable to the results reported from other centers.

  12. A model for training medical student innovators: the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care Abundance Agents of Change program

    OpenAIRE

    David B. Duong; Sullivan, Erin E.; Minter-Jordan, Myechia; Giesen, Lindsay; Andrew L. Ellner

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2013, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care established the Abundance Agents of Change (AoC) program to promote interprofessional learning and innovation, increase partnership between 15 academic and community health centers (CHCs) in Boston’s most under-served communities, and increase medical student interest in primary care careers.Methods: The AoC is modeled in the form of a ‘grants challenge’, offering $20,000 to interprofessional student teams to develop an i...

  13. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  14. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline. PMID:26970137

  15. Gender and smoking-related risk of lung cancer. The Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, E; Osler, M; Hein, H O;

    1998-01-01

    smokers with more than 60 pack-years of tobacco exposure. RRs did not differ much between men and women: adjusted for pack-years, age, and study population, the ratio between female and male smokers' RRs of developing lung cancer was 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.3-2.1). All histologic types were......Our aim was to compare risk of lung cancer associated with smoking by gender and histologic type. A total of 30,874 subjects, 44% women, from three prospective population-based studies with initial examinations between 1964 and 1992 were followed until 1994 through the National Cancer Registry....... There were 867 cases of lung cancer, 203 among women and 664 among men. Rates among female and male never-smokers were similar, although confidence intervals around rates were wide. Rate ratios (RRs) increased with number of pack-years for both men and women to a maximum of approximately 20 in inhaling...

  16. 75 FR 55587 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Information Center (F2F HIC) grant (H84MC00002) from the Parent to Parent (P2P) of Vermont to the Vermont..., Room 18A-18, Rockville, MD 20857, via e-mail at lperson@hrsa.gov or call 301.443.2370....

  17. 76 FR 31340 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of St. Vincent's Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... process for qualifying hospitals to apply to CMS to receive direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) FTE resident cap slots from the hospital that closed. The procedures we.... Vincent's Medical Center AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION:...

  18. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas - CETUP*2013 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    In response to an increasing interest in experiments conducted at deep underground facilities around the world, in 2010 the theory community has proposed a new initiative - a Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*). The main goal of CETUP* is to bring together people with different talents and skills to address the most exciting questions in particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics, geosciences, and geomicrobiology. Scientists invited to participate in the program do not only provide theoretical support to the underground science, they also examine underlying universal questions of the 21st century including: What is dark matter?, What are the masses of neutrinos?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, How were the elements from iron to uranium made?, What is the origin and thermal history of the Earth? The mission of the CETUP* is to promote an organized research in physics, astrophysics, geoscience, geomicrobiology and other fields related to the underground science via individual and collaborative research in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Our main goal is to bring together scientists scattered around the world, promote the deep underground science and provide a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities. CETUP*2014 included 5 week long program (June 24 – July 26, 2013) covering various theoretical and experimental aspects of Dark Matter, Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Two week long session focused on Dark Matter (June 24-July 6) was followed by two week long program on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (July 15-26). The VIIth International Conference on Interconnections between Particle Physics and Cosmology (PPC) was sandwiched between these sessions (July 8-13) covering the subjects of dark matter, neutrino physics, gravitational waves, collider physics and other from both theoretical end experimental

  19. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ocvirk Janja; Moltara Maja Ebert; Mesti Tanja; Boc Marko; Rebersek Martina; Volk Neva; Benedik Jernej; Hlebanja Zvezdana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

  20. [Qualitative evaluation of TAMARPP, the relapse prevention program for substance abusers at the Mental Health and Welfare Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniai, Tomoko; Yottsuji, Naomi; Okuda, Hidemi; Karibe, Haruo; Miura, Kasumi; Hiraga, Masasi; Kondo, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2014-12-01

    The development of an effective treatment system for patients with addiction-related problems like substance abuse or pathological gambling is urgently needed. The purpose of this study was to clarify the therapeutic factors of the Tama Mental Health and Welfare Center Relapse Prevention Program (TAMARPP). The program is provided at the Tama Comprehensive Center for Mental Health and Welfare, which is operated publicly by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. Seven personnel (3 clinical psychologists, 2 public health nurses, and 2 recovering counselors) searched the consultation records of 31 participants who had continued treatment longer than 1 year, and made a list of qualitative factors that may positively impact participant outcome. The following six factors were extracted: 1) a "no-blame" atmosphere that makes participants feel safe and free; 2) a mutual helping process that enables participants to empathize with one another; 3) an individual-centered approach that focuses on a participant's motivation to recover; 4) a psycho-educational process that establishes treatment goals; 5) a treatment goal that involves some type of social role; and 6) the referral of graduates to another long-term treatment program such as Narcotics Anonymous. Our results suggest the need of personnel to provide treatment as follows: 1) keep the circumstances safe; 2) use a method that matches the participant's motivation; 3) refer graduates to another in-depth treatment program; 4) emphasize the relationship between thinking, emotion, and behavior; and 5) improve the quality of life of the participant. The missions of our center, an official institution that runs such a program, are as follows: 1) to be the first place at which addicts seek aid during the early stage; 2) to cooperate with other facilities in order to provide social resources that support recovery; and 3) to support patients suffering from both addiction and comorbid psychiatric diseases.

  1. Logic Programming and Artificial Neural Networks in Breast Cancer Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, José; Guimarães, Tiago; Gomes, Sabino; Vicente, Henrique; Santos, Mariana; Neves, João; Machado, José; Novais, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    About 90% of breast cancers do not cause or are capable of producing death if detected at an early stage and treated properly. Indeed, it is still not known a specific cause for the illness. It may be not only a beginning, but also a set of associations that will determine the onset of the disease. Undeniably, there are some factors that seem to be associated with the boosted risk of the malady. Pondering the present study, different breast cancer risk assessment models where considered. It i...

  2. Logic programming and artificial neural networks in breast cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Guimarães, T.; Gomes, S.; Vicente, H.; Santos, M. F.; Neves, José; Machado, José Manuel; Novais, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    About 90% of breast cancers do not cause or are capable of producing death if detected at an early stage and treated properly. Indeed, it is still not known a specific cause for the illness. It may be not only a beginning, but also a set of associations that will determine the onset of the disease. Undeniably, there are some factors that seem to be associated with the boosted risk of the malady. Pondering the present study, different breast cancer risk assessment models where considered. It i...

  3. Functional health literacy in Spanish-speaking Latinas seeking breast cancer screening through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Garbers; Karen Schmitt; Anne Marie Rappa; Mary Ann Chiasson

    2010-01-01

    Samantha Garbers1, Karen Schmitt2, Anne Marie Rappa2, Mary Ann Chiasson11Public Health Solutions, New York, NY, USA; 2Columbia University Breast Cancer Screening Program, New York, NY, USABackground: This analysis examines the association between functional health literacy and follow-up after mammography among women receiving breast cancer screening at a National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program site in New York City that provides universal bilingual case management.Methods:...

  4. Validation of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center nomogram for predicting non-sentinel lymph node metastasis in sentinel lymph node-positive breast-cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi X

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Bi,1,* Yongsheng Wang,2 Minmin Li,1,* Peng Chen,2 Zhengbo Zhou,2 Yanbing Liu,2 Tong Zhao,2 Zhaopeng Zhang,2 Chunjian Wang,2 Xiao Sun,2 Pengfei Qiu2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Shandong Cancer Hospital, 2Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study Background: The main purpose of the study reported here was to validate the clinical value of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC nomogram that predicts non-sentinel lymph node (SLN metastasis in SLN-positive patients with breast cancer. Methods: Data on 1,576 patients who received sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB at the Shandong Cancer Hospital from December 2001 to March 2014 were collected in this study, and data on 509 patients with positive SLN were analyzed to evaluate the risk factors for non-SLN metastasis. The MSKCC nomogram was used to estimate the probability of non-SLN metastasis and was compared with actual probability after grouping into deciles. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was drawn and predictive accuracy was assessed by calculating the area under the ROC curve. Results: Tumor size, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, multifocality, number of positive SLNs, and number of negative SLNs were correlated with non-SLN metastasis (P<0.05 by univariate analysis. However, multivariate analysis showed that tumor size (P=0.039, histological grade (P=0.043, lymphovascular invasion (P=0.001, number of positive SLNs (P=0.001, and number of negative SLNs (P=0.000 were identified as independent predictors for non-SLN metastasis. The trend of actual probability in various decile groups was comparable to the predicted probability. The area under the ROC curve was 0.722. Patients with predictive values lower than 10% (97/492, 19.7% had a frequency of non-SLN metastasis of 17.5% (17/97. Conclusion: The

  5. Challenges in the development and implementation of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy; Meneses-García, Abelardo; Erazo-Valle, Aura; Escudero-de Los Ríos, Pedro; Kuri-Morales, Pablo Antonio; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including cancer, have become the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality. In Mexico, cancer is the third leading cause of death, with a high incidence among the economically active population, a high proportion of advanced stages at diagnosis and limited care coverage for patients. However, no public policy aimed at managing this important public health problem has been developed and implemented to date. This manuscript describes the first interinstitutional proposal of a National Program for Cancer Control, considering the known risk factors, early detection, treatment, palliative care and patient rehabilitation. This manuscript also outlines a series of thoughts on the difficulties and needs that the Mexican health system faces in achieving the main objectives of the program: to decrease the incidence of cancer, to increase survival and to improve the quality of life for this group of patients. PMID:27557393

  6. Physician-Initiated Stop-Smoking Program for Patients Receiving Treatment for Early-Stage Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Bladder Cancer; Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Tobacco Use Disorder; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. An Educational Training on Cervical Cancer Screening Program for Rural Healthcare Providers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Caroline Isaac

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional, cytology based Cervical cancer screening programmes used in the developed world is often not practical in developing countries. Training of health care work force on a feasible, low-tech, screening methods is urgently needed in low resource settings. Twenty providers including doctors and nurses participated in a 2-days training workshop organized by a Community Health Center in rural South India. The pre-post-training assessment showed significant improvement in knowledge about cervical cancer, ‘low tech’ screening, treatment options and counseling among the participants.  Twenty volunteers screened at the workshop, 2 women (10% tested positive and one had CINIII lesion and the other had cervical cancer stage IIIB. After the training, the participants felt confident about their ability to counsel and screen women for cervical cancer.

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of cervical cancer screening programs: the case of Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Murillo; Carolina Wiesner; Ricardo Cendales; Marion Piñeros; Sandra Tovar

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify critical screening program factors for reducing cervical cancer mortality in Colombia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Coverage, quality, and screening follow-up were evaluated in four Colombian states with different mortality rates. A case-control study (invasive cancer and healthy controls) evaluating screening history was performed. RESULTS: 3-year cytology coverage was 72.7%, false negative rate 49%, positive cytology follow-up 64.2%. There was no association between screenin...

  9. Central online quality assurance in radiology. An IT solution exemplified by the German Breast Cancer Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Physical-technical quality assurance is one of the essential tasks of the National Reference Centers in the German Breast Cancer Screening Program. For this purpose the mammography units are required to transfer the measured values of the constancy tests on a daily basis and all phantom images created for this purpose on a weekly basis to the reference centers. This is a serious logistical challenge. To meet these requirements, we developed an innovative software tool. Materials and Methods: By the end of 2005, we had already developed web-based software (MammoControl) allowing the transmission of constancy test results via entry forms. For automatic analysis and transmission of the phantom images, we then introduced an extension (MammoControl DIANA). This was based on Java, Java Web Start, the NetBeans Rich Client Platform, the Pixelmed Java DICOM Toolkit and the ImageJ library. Results: MammoControl DIANA was designed to run locally in the mammography units. This allows automated on-site image analysis. Both results and compressed images can then be transmitted to the reference center. We developed analysis modules for the daily and monthly consistency tests and additionally for a homogeneity test. Conclusion: The software we developed facilitates the immediate availability of measurement results, phantom images, and DICOM header data in all reference centers. This allows both targeted guidance and short response time in the case of errors. We achieved a consistent IT-based evaluation with standardized tools for the entire screening program in Germany. (orig.)

  10. Design, implementation, and evaluation of a pediatric and adolescent type 2 diabetes management program at a tertiary pediatric center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan MC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available M Constantine Samaan,1–3 Marlie Valencia,1 Connie Cheung,1 Boguslaw Wilk,1,3 Keith Lau,1,4 Lehana Thabane1,5–8 1Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, 2Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, 3Children's Exercise and Nutrition Center, 4Division of Pediatric Nephrology, McMaster Children's Hospital, 5Population Health Research Institute, 6Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 7Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, 8Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: Global rates of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents have increased significantly over the past three decades. Type 2 diabetes is a relatively new disease in this age group, and there is a dearth of information about how to structure treatment programs to manage its comorbidities and complications. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a personalized multidisciplinary, family-centered, pediatric and adolescent type 2 diabetes program at a tertiary pediatric center in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. We report the process of designing and implementing such a program, and show that this multidisciplinary program led to improvement in glycated hemoglobin (n=17, 8% at baseline versus 6.4% at 1 year, 95% confidence interval (0.1–0.28, P-value <0.0001 and stabilized body mass index, with lowered C-peptide and no change in fitness or metabolic biomarkers of lipid metabolism and liver function. As type 2 diabetes becomes more prevalent in youth, the need for programs that successfully address the complex nature of this disease is central to its management and to mitigate its long-term adverse outcomes. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, pediatric, adolescents, program design, multidisciplinary

  11. The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    How do you keep a classroom of 100 undergraduates actively learning? Can students practice communication and teamwork skills in a large class? How do you boost the performance of underrepresented groups? The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment for Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) Project has addressed these concerns. Because of their inclusion in a leading introductory physics textbook, project materials are used by more than 1/3 of all science, math, and engineering majors nationwide. The room design and pedagogy have been adopted at more than 100 leading institutions across the country. Physics, chemistry, math, astronomy, biology, engineering, earth sciences, and even literature classes are currently being taught this way. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. We promote active learning in a redesigned classroom for 100 students or more. (Of course, smaller classes can also benefit.) Class time is spent primarily on "tangibles" and "ponderables"--hands-on activities, simulations, and interesting questions. Nine students sit in three teams at round tables. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Hundreds of hours of classroom video and audio recordings, transcripts of numerous interviews and focus groups, data from conceptual learning assessments (using widely-recognized instruments in a pretest/posttest protocol), and collected portfolios of student work are part of our rigorous assessment effort. Our findings (based on data from over 16,000 students collected over five years as well as replications at adopting sites) can be summarized as the following: 1) Female failure rate is 1/5 of previous levels, even though more is demanded of students. 2) Minority failure rate is 1/4 that seen in traditionally taught courses. 3) At-risk students are more

  12. A Three Year Undergraduate Program (B.SC) in Medical Radiation Physics in the Ariel University Center of Samaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three year undergraduate program (B.Sc.) in Medical Radiation Physics was established in the Ariel University Center of Samaria. The program was submitted to the Council of Higher Education (MALAG) in 2003 and was finally approved by the Council on October 2005. Registration for the first class was announced in January 2006. Studies started on October 2006. Of 24 candidates who applied, 16 were admitted. 12 of the 16 students completed their study duties in the first year. All of them started their second year studies in October 2007

  13. Breast cancer correlates in a cohort of breast screening program participants in Riyadh, KSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Breast cancer is the first cancer among females in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, accounting for 27.4% of all newly diagnosed female cancers in 2010. There are several risk factors affecting the incidence of breast cancer where some factors influence the risk more than the others. Aim: We aimed to identify the different risk factors related to breast cancer among females participating in the breast-screening program in Riyadh, KSA. Methods: Based on data from phase-I of the breast-screening program, a case-control study was conducted on women living in Riyadh, KSA. A sample of 349 women (58 cases and 290 controls) was recruited to examine the different breast cancer correlates. Multivariate regression model was built to investigate the most important risk factors. Results: The mean age of cases was 48.5 ± 7.1 years. Age at marriage, number of pregnancy, age at menopause, oral contraceptive pills, breast feeding and family history of breast cancer in first-degree relative were identified as the most important correlates among the studied cohort. Conclusions: The findings of the current work suggested that age at marriage, age at menopause ≥50 years, and 1st degree family history of breast cancer were risk factors for breast cancer, while, age at menopause<50 years, number of pregnancies and practicing breast feeding were protective factors against breast cancer. There was no effect of body mass index or physical inactivity. Further studies are needed to explore the hereditary, familial and genetic background risk factors in Saudi population.

  14. NIH Roadmap & the Common Fund - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Roadmap for Medical Research is a series of high impact, trans-NIH programs supported by the NIH Common Fund. These programs address challenges that are priorities for the NIH and medical research but are issues that require the cooperation of more than one NIH institute to address.

  15. 75 FR 76995 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... established the NTP Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) in 1998 (63 FR 68782) to... reported in humans and experimental animals for certain environmental chemicals including arsenic,...

  16. Internal communications program expands at Salina Regional Health Center as the health system grows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreria, J

    1999-01-01

    The e-mail system is evolving into one of Salina, Kan., Regional Health Center's primary sources of communications for its 1,350 employees and physicians. Check out how the health system uses other internal communication tools. PMID:10387297

  17. Implementing women's cancer screening programs in American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Paula M; Orians, Carlyn E; Liebow, Edward; Joe, Jennie R; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Erb, Julie; Kenyon, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provides funding to tribes and tribal organizations to implement comprehensive cancer screening programs using a program model developed for state health departments. We conducted a multiple-site case study using a participatory research process to describe how 5 tribal programs implemented screening services, and to identify strategies used to address challenges in delivering services to American Indian and Alaska Native women. We analyzed data from semistructured interviews with 141 key informants, 16 focus groups with 132 program-eligible women, and program documents. Several challenges regarding the delivery of services were revealed, including implementing screening programs in busy acute-care environments, access to mammography, providing culturally sensitive care, and providing diagnostic/treatment services in rural and remote locations. Strategies perceived as successful in meeting program challenges included identifying a "champion" or main supporter of the program in each clinical setting, using mobile mammography, using female providers, and increasing the capacity to provide diagnostic services at screening sites. The results should be of interest to an international audience, including those who work with health-related programs targeting indigenous women or groups that are marginalized because of culture, geographic isolation, and/or socioeconomic position.

  18. Common astrocytic programs during brain development, injury and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, Daniel J.; Steindler, Dennis A.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to radial glial cells of neurohistogenesis, immature astrocytes with stem-cell-like properties cordon off emerging functional patterns in the developing brain. Astrocytes also can be stem cells during adult neurogenesis, and a proposed potency of injury-associated reactive astrocytes has recently been substantiated. Astrocytic cells might additionally be involved in cancer stem cell-associated gliomagenesis. Thus, there are distinguishing roles for stem-cell-like astrocytes during...

  19. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osibogun Akin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in a subsidized insurance plan in Nigeria and to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness in patients at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods/Design Design: The study has two parts. Part 1 will develop a cardiovascular health education program, using qualitative interviews with stakeholders. Part 2 will evaluate the effectiveness of the program in patients, using a prospective (pre-post observational design. Setting: A rural primary health center in Kwara State, Nigeria. Population: For part 1: 40 patients, 10 healthcare professionals, and 5 insurance managers. For part 2: 150 patients with uncontrolled hypertension or other cardiovascular risk factors after one year of treatment. Intervention: Part 2: patient-centered cardiovascular health education program. Measurements: Part 1: Semi-structured interviews to identify stakeholder perspectives. Part 2: Pre- and post-intervention assessments including patients' demographic and socioeconomic data, blood pressure, body mass index and self-reporting measures on medication adherence and perception of care. Feasibility of the intervention will be measured using process data. Outcomes: For program development (part 1: overview of healthcare professionals' perceptions on barriers and facilitators to care, protocol for patient education, and protocol implementation plan. For program evaluation (part 2: changes in patients' scores on adherence to medication and life style changes, blood pressure, and other physiological and self

  20. Frequency of bacterial isolates and pattern of antimicrobial resistance in patients with hematological malignancies: A snapshot from tertiary cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sengar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections are the most important cause of mortality in patients with high-risk febrile neutropenia. Emergence of multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs has become a major challenge for hemato-oncologists. Knowledge of the prevalent organisms and their antimicrobial sensitivity can help deciding the empirical therapy at individual centers and allows timely measures to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance. AIMS: To evaluate the frequency of bacterial isolates from all the samples and the pattern of bacterial bloodstream infections and incidence of MDROs. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This is a retrospective analysis from a tertiary care cancer center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January to June 2014 information on all the samples received in Department of Microbiology was collected retrospectively. The data from samples collected from patients with hematological cancers were analyzed for types of bacterial isolates and antimicrobial sensitivity. RESULTS: A total of 739 isolates were identified with 67.9% of isolates being Gram-negative. The predominant Gram-negative organisms were Escherichia coli, Psuedomonas spp. and Klebsiella spp. Among the bacterial bloodstream infections, 66% were Gram-negative isolates. MDROs constituted 22% of all isolates in blood cultures. Incidence of resistant Gram-positive organisms was low in the present dataset (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci-1.3%. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis reconfirms the Gram-negative organisms as the predominant pathogens in bacteremia seen in patients with hematological cancers. The high frequency of multi-drug resistance in the dataset calls for the need of emergency measures to curtail further development and propagation of resistant organisms.

  1. Engaging Partners to Initiate Evaluation Efforts: Tactics Used and Lessons Learned From the Prevention Research Centers Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demia Sundra Wright, MPH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s Prevention Research Centers (PRC Program underwent a 2-year evaluation planning project using a participatory process that allowed perspectives from the national community of PRC partners to be expressed and reflected in a national logic model.ContextThe PRC Program recognized the challenge in developing a feasible, useable, and relevant evaluation process for a large, diverse program. To address the challenge, participatory and utilization-focused evaluation models were used.MethodsFour tactics guided the evaluation planning process: 1 assessing stakeholders’ communication needs and existing communication mechanisms and infrastructure; 2 using existing mechanisms and establishing others as needed to inform, educate, and request feedback; 3 listening to and using feedback received; and 4 obtaining adequate resources and building flexibility into the project plan to support multifaceted mechanisms for data collection.ConsequencesParticipatory methods resulted in buy-in from stakeholders and the development of a national logic model. Benefits included CDC’s use of the logic model for program planning and development of a national evaluation protocol and increased expectations among PRC partners for involvement. Challenges included the time, effort, and investment of program resources required for the participatory approach and the identification of whom to engage and when to engage them for feedback on project decisions.InterpretationBy using a participatory and utilization-focused model, program partners positively influenced how CDC developed an evaluation plan. The tactics we used can guide the involvement of program stakeholders and help with decisions on appropriate methods and approaches for engaging partners.

  2. RAS testing in metastatic colorectal cancer: excellent reproducibility amongst 17 Dutch pathology centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Tops, B.B.; Rombout, P.D.; Dequeker, E.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) restricted the indication for anti-EGFR targeted therapy to metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with a wild-type RAS gene, increasing the need for reliable RAS mutation testing. We evaluated the completeness and reproducibility of RAS-testing in the Netherl

  3. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR) axis is a prerequisite for growth in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a potent inhibitor of extracellular and intracellular androgen synthesis by inhibition of the CYP-17 enzyme system, which...

  4. Yttrium-90 radioembolization for the treatment of unresectable liver cancer: Results of a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özhan Özgür

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effects of yttrium-90 (Y-90 resin microsphere radioembolization therapy on patients with unresectable liver cancer who do not benefit from chemotherapy. Methods: Fifty-five patients underwent radioembolization therapy included in the study whose had unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer originating from the gastrointestinal tract. Three were excluded from the study after pre-evaluation angiography. Thirteen (23.6% of the remaining 52 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma and 39 (76.4% had metastatic liver cancer. Fifty-two patients underwent Y-90 radioembolization treatment. Each patient's response to the administered treatment was evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST and the overall probability of survival was displayed graphically by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: After Y-90 therapy, 47 patients were follow-up. While 57% of the patients responded to treatment as clinical benefit, the disease progressed in 43%. The median hepatic progression-free survival time of the patients was 3.4 months (95% confidence interval (ci:1.4-5.3 and the overall survival time was 11.3 months (95%, CI:8.7-14.03. Conclusion: This study emphasizes that Y-90 resin microsphere radioembolization treatment is effective in patients with unresectable liver cancer.

  5. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  6. Life expectancy of screen-detected invasive breast cancer patients compared with women invited to the Nijmegen Screening Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D.M. Otten; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); G.J. den Heeten (Gerard); R. Holland (Roland); J. Fracheboud (Jacques); H.J. de Koning (Harry); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Screening can lead to earlier detection of breast cancer and thus to an improvement in survival. The authors studied the life expectancy of women with screen-detected invasive breast cancer (patients) compared with women invited to the breast cancer screening program in Nijme

  7. Sonographic Findings of Benign Breast Diseases, A Study of 111 Cases in Iranian Center for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. sedighi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Benign lesions are very common in breast. The most important consideration for physicians is to differentiate benign processes from malignant ones .Hence the clinicians and radi-ologists both wish to differentiate them even before surgical procedures. The Iranian Center for Breast Cancer linked to Jahad Daneshgahi Center is a referral place for patients with breast complaints. Patients & Methods: Retrospective study of sonographic findings of 111 patients with benign patho-logic diagnosis revealed 72.1% accuracy for sonogra-phy in diagnosing benign masses. In 31 cases (27.9%, the sonographic diagnosis was incorrect. Among the different benign lesions, the most common lesions were cysts, fibradenomas, and fibrocystic changes with respective sonographic accuracy of 100%, 90%, and 62.5%. Results: It shows that sonography has a high sensitiv-ity for diagnosis of benign breast lesions and this sen-sitivity is higher in cysts and fibradenomas which are the most common benign pathologies of breast. Conclusion: As a result, in this center sonography is an imaging modality for evaluating benign breast le-sion especially in young patients with dense breasts and palpable masses. Its unique role in diagnosis of the cysts is valuable especially to avoid repeated biopsies.

  8. John F. Kennedy Space Center, Safety, Reliability, Maintainability and Quality Assurance, Survey and Audit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This document is the product of the KSC Survey and Audit Working Group composed of civil service and contractor Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) personnel. The program described herein provides standardized terminology, uniformity of survey and audit operations, and emphasizes process assessments rather than a program based solely on compliance. The program establishes minimum training requirements, adopts an auditor certification methodology, and includes survey and audit metrics for the audited organizations as well as the auditing organization.

  9. 75 FR 34249 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... program is to maximize independence, productivity, empowerment, and leadership of individuals with..., 2010 (75 FR 13521). That notice contained background information and our reasons for proposing...

  10. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraqs Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing: A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues, recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, and descriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  11. CENTRO MEDICO ABC CANCER CENTER%ABC医疗中心肿瘤中心

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林之刚; 水润宇

    2011-01-01

    @@ 位于墨西哥城的ABC医学中心(American British Cowdray Medical Center)是墨西哥城最著名的私立医院.这所百年历史的医疗机构分科齐全,覆盖了从产科到整形外科,现仍在继续发展.

  12. The Effects of a Genetic Counseling Educational Program on Hereditary Breast Cancer for Korean Healthcare Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jihyoun; Cho, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Han-Wook; Park, Sue K.; Yang, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Lee, Soo-Jung; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Moon, Nan Mo; Lee, Min Hyuk; ,

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Systematic educational programs and genetic counseling certification courses for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) have not yet been introduced in Korea. We provided and evaluated the effects of genetic counseling education on Korean healthcare providers' knowledge, awareness, and counseling skills for patients at high risk of HBOC. Methods A 3-day educational program was conducted for healthcare providers who were interested in genetic counseling for patients at high risk of HB...

  13. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION 3 OVERALL REVIEW CRITERIA AND IMPACT 3 FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT (FOA) SPECIFIC CRITERIA 8 ORGANIZATION AND STRUCTURE 8 CLINCAL TRIALS RESEARCH PROGRAM 10 CANCER CARE DELIVERY RESEARCH PROGRAM 11 OPERATIONS/DATA MANAGEMENT CORE 12 ADDITIONAL REVIEW CRITERIA 14 PROTECTIONS FOR HUMAN SUBJECTS 14 INCLUSION OF WOMEN, MINORITIES, AND CHILDREN 14 BIOHAZARDS 14 RESOURCE SHARING PLAN 14 BUDGET AND PERIOD OF SUPPORT 14 SCIENTIFIC REVIEW OFFICER'S NOTES 14 SPECIAL EMPHASIS PANEL ROSTER |

  14. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.); Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  15. Head and neck cancer in geriatric patients: Analysis of the pattern of care given at a tertiary cancer care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background And Aim: The percentage of elderly people with head and neck cancers (HNC is on the rise. This makes HNC in this group of patients an important issue for healthcare providers. The present study was planned to analyze the patterns of care given to the geriatric patients and to identify the factors influencing the decision making process. Materials And Methods: Data of all the elderly patients (≥65 years registered in the year 2012, with histologically proven HNC (all sites, stages, histopathological types, except lymphoma, sarcoma and cervical metastasis of unknown origin receiving treatment (definitive/palliative were collected. Results: A total of 270 patients were included in this study. The median age was 72 years (range: 65–101, with predominant male population (70%, n = 190. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC was the most common cancer (57%, n = 154. Eastern Co-Operative Oncology Group performance status (PS of 0–2 was seen in 91% of the patients. Co-morbidities were present in 139 (51.5% patients. 50% (n = 134 of the patients received palliative intent treatment, 45% (n = 123 definitive treatment, whereas in 5% (n = 13 the intent was not mentioned. Age, a clinical stage and PS significantly influenced the decision making on the intent of treatment. 208 (77% patients completed their treatment irrespective of the intent. Age was the only factor influencing treatment completion irrespective of the intent. Conclusion: Geriatric HNC patients frequently present with advanced disease, having multiple co-morbidities. Hence, a multidisciplinary team management of these patients is essential, also taking into account of the social and financial support available to these patients.

  16. Effectiveness of an employee skin cancer screening program for secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Ugur; Hees, Felix; Winnik, Eva; Uter, Wolfgang; Sticherling, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Incidences of UV-induced skin cancer are continuously increasing. For this reason, early diagnosis is becoming more important. In this study, 783 employees of a technical company participated in an employee skin cancer screening program, which consisted of a physical examination for benign and malignant skin lesions and premalignant conditions. To ensure the quality of the examinations, screening was only performed by 5 trained dermatologists. Participants also were asked to complete a standardized questionnaire prior to examination. A total of 661 skin lesions were diagnosed among 48% of participants; 12.8% of participants exhibited 50 or more melanocytic nevi and the risk for developing skin cancer was categorized as at least moderate for 64.9%. Additionally, 84.4% of participants with at least 1 skin lesion were advised to have a checkup within 1 year. The high rate of suspicious nevi detected in this study suggested that employee skin cancer screening programs are effective and also should be recommended at companies where employees are not at increased risk for developing skin cancer due to the nature of their work (eg, those who work outdoors). Despite the comparatively selective and young study population, these examinations provide evidence of the importance of skin cancer screening for the wider population. PMID:27622254

  17. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soejarto, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with t

  18. Profiles of gall bladder cancer reported in the hospital cancer registry of a Regional Cancer Center in the North-East India

    OpenAIRE

    Srabana Misra Bhagabaty; Jagannath Dev Sharma; Manigreeva Krishnatreya; Pintu Nandy; Amal Chandra Kataki

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of gall bladder cancer (GBC) is very high in this part of the world and there is little information on the descriptive epidemiology of GBC from our population. Methods: A retrospective study on the data set of hospital cancer registry was analyzed. The data set consisted of patient information registered during the period of January 2011 to December 2012. The cases included for the present study were histologically confirmed and radiologically diagnosed cases of G...

  19. Network model and short circuit program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Assumptions made and techniques used in modeling the power network to the 480 volt level are discussed. Basic computational techniques used in the short circuit program are described along with a flow diagram of the program and operational procedures. Procedures for incorporating network changes are included in this user's manual.

  20. Atmospheric Effects of Nuclear Energy Centers (AENEC) Program. Annual technical progress report, July 1975--September 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrinos, A. A.; Hoffman, H. W. [comps.

    1977-04-01

    The Technical Memorandum contains information of a preliminary nature from the six participants of the Program describing their activities and presenting the results obtained during the reporting period. The birth of the Program, its definition and evolution are described, and a complete breakdown of responsibilities and tasks assigned to the six AENEC participants is presented.