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Sample records for cancer center hospital

  1. Studies on retrospective analysis of leading primary cancers and improvement of cancer treatment method in Korea cancer center hospital

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    Lee, Jong In; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    2000-12-01

    a. Retrospective studies included cancers of the stomach, breast, bladder, salivary gland, thyroid, esophagus, endometrium and ovary. (1) Study cancers were analyzed about clinical characteristics, prognostic factors influenced on survival time, survival rate, etc. (2) Among 5,305 study patients, 1,405(26.5%) were identified with death, 3,485(65.7%) were alive and 415(7.8%) were not identified. b. Prospective studies included 10 subjects such as bladder cancer, retinoblastoma, malignant patients, gastric cancer, uterine cervix cancer and ovary cancer. We are continuing registering eligible study patients. c. Results for 11 papers were published at the journal. d. We established follow-up system in order to identify the survival for study subjects through National Statistical Office, Government Provincial Office and Cancer Registration System at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. e. At present, we are establishing computerized registration system about case report form for study cancers.

  2. The frequency, cost, and clinical outcomes of hypernatremia in patients hospitalized to a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahudeen, Abdulla K; Doshi, Simit M; Shah, Pankaj

    2013-07-01

    To study the frequency of hypernatremia in hospitalized cancer patients and its impact on clinical outcomes and healthcare cost. Cross-sectional analysis of data obtained from patients admitted to the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center over a 3-month period in 2006. The clinical outcomes and hospital costs were compared among hypernatremics, eunatremics, and hyponatremics (serum sodium values include >147, 135-147, and hypernatremia (90 %) acquired during hospital stay. The multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for mortality in hypernatremic was 5-fold higher than eunatremic (HR for 90 days-5.09 (95 % CI, 3.32-7.81); p hypernatremia was far less frequent than hyponatremia in the hospitalized cancer patients, most hypernatremia were acquired in the hospital and had substantially higher mortality, hospital stay, and hospital bills than eunatremic or even hyponatremic patients. Studies are warranted to determine whether avoidance of hypernatremia or its prompt and sustained correction improves clinical outcomes.

  3. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  4. Colorectal cancer: A case control study of dietary factors, King Faisal specialist hospital and researh center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem M Nashar

    2008-01-01

    Materials and Methods: A case-controlled study of fifty newly-admitted patients at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia diagnosed with colorectal cancer were interviewed to collect data on various dietary factors and their nutritional status. Their data were compared with a sex-matched control group aged fifty. Results: The consumption of meat high in fat, fried eggs and whole fat dairy products, and diet low in fibers 2-3 times or above per week increased the risk of colorectal cancer, while the consumption of whole wheat products, vegetables and fruits, and diet low in animal fats at the same rate per week may play a protective role against colorectal cancer in both men and women when compared to controls. Conclusions: The higher consumption of meat and fat from animal sources could increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The high consumption of whole wheat bread, fruits and vegetables with high fiber content could play a protective role against the risk of colorectal cancer in the Saudi society. Additional studies are needed in different regions of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to verify or refute these results.

  5. Understanding the relationship between the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital Compare star rating, surgical case volume, and short-term outcomes after major cancer surgery.

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    Kaye, Deborah R; Norton, Edward C; Ellimoottil, Chad; Ye, Zaojun; Dupree, James M; Herrel, Lindsey A; Miller, David C

    2017-11-01

    Both the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Hospital Compare star rating and surgical case volume have been publicized as metrics that can help patients to identify high-quality hospitals for complex care such as cancer surgery. The current study evaluates the relationship between the CMS' star rating, surgical volume, and short-term outcomes after major cancer surgery. National Medicare data were used to evaluate the relationship between hospital star ratings and cancer surgery volume quintiles. Then, multilevel logistic regression models were fit to examine the association between cancer surgery outcomes and both star rankings and surgical volumes. Lastly, a graphical approach was used to compare how well star ratings and surgical volume predicted cancer surgery outcomes. This study identified 365,752 patients undergoing major cancer surgery for 1 of 9 cancer types at 2,550 hospitals. Star rating was not associated with surgical volume (P cancer surgery outcomes (mortality, complication rate, readmissions, and prolonged length of stay). The adjusted predicted probabilities for 5- and 1-star hospitals were 2.3% and 4.5% for mortality, 39% and 48% for complications, 10% and 15% for readmissions, and 8% and 16% for a prolonged length of stay, respectively. The adjusted predicted probabilities for hospitals with the highest and lowest quintile cancer surgery volumes were 2.7% and 5.8% for mortality, 41% and 55% for complications, 12.2% and 11.6% for readmissions, and 9.4% and 13% for a prolonged length of stay, respectively. Furthermore, surgical volume and the star rating were similarly associated with mortality and complications, whereas the star rating was more highly associated with readmissions and prolonged length of stay. In the absence of other information, these findings suggest that the star rating may be useful to patients when they are selecting a hospital for major cancer surgery. However, more research is needed before these ratings can

  6. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

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    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  7. The revised Bethesda guidelines: extent of utilization in a university hospital medical center with a cancer genetics program

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    Mukherjee Aparna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop to develop criteria to identify patients with colorectal cancer who should be offered microsatellite instability (MSI testing due to an increased risk for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. These criteria were further modified in 2004 and became known as the revised Bethesda Guidelines. Our study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the percentage of patients diagnosed with HNPCC tumors in 2004 who met revised Bethesda criteria for MSI testing, who were referred for genetic counseling within our institution. Methods All HNPCC tumors diagnosed in 2004 were identified by accessing CoPath, an internal database. Both the Tumor Registry and patients' electronic medical records were accessed to collect all relevant family history information. The list of patients who met at least one of the revised Bethesda criteria, who were candidates for MSI testing, was then cross-referenced with the database of patients referred for genetic counseling within our institution. Results A total of 380 HNPCC-associated tumors were diagnosed at our institution during 2004 of which 41 (10.7% met at least one of the revised Bethesda criteria. Eight (19.5% of these patients were referred for cancer genetic counseling of which 2 (25% were seen by a genetics professional. Ultimately, only 4.9% of patients eligible for MSI testing in 2004 were seen for genetic counseling. Conclusion This retrospective study identified a number of barriers, both internal and external, which hindered the identification of individuals with HNPCC, thus limiting the ability to appropriately manage these high risk families.

  8. Music therapy in a comprehensive cancer center.

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    Richardson, Michael M; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana E; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-01-01

    The use of music as a therapeutic tool in health and medicine dates back to ancient times. In modern Western medicine, music therapy has been available since the 1950s and is now often incorporated into conventional medicine care. Music therapy is a common modality that is used in hospital settings as part of complementary and integrative medicine programs. It is also a key therapeutic tool used within most integrative medicine programs at large cancer centers in the United States. When used in conjunction with conventional cancer treatments, music therapy has been found to help patients promote a better quality of life; better communicate their fear, sadness, or other feelings; and better manage stress, while alleviating physical pain and discomfort. In this article, we review the literature on the value of integrating music therapy in cancer care and describe the experience of music therapy at a large comprehensive cancer center and the benefits that patients with cancer obtain from this service.

  9. Association of alcohol intake and smoking with malignant lymphoma risk in Japanese: a hospital-based case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center.

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    Kanda, Junya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kawase, Takakazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Seto, Masao; Morishima, Yasuo; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo

    2009-09-01

    Given the lower incidence and differences in distribution of malignant lymphoma in Asian than western populations, the association of alcohol intake and smoking with malignant lymphoma risk in Asian populations merits investigation. Here, we conducted a sex- and age-matched case-control study of a Japanese population using two data sets, the first and second versions of the Hospital-based Epidemiological Research Program at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (HERPACC-I and HERPACC-II, respectively), in 452 and 330 cases of histologically diagnosed malignant lymphoma and 2,260 and 1,650 noncancer controls, respectively. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using a conditional logistic regression model that incorporated smoking exposure and alcohol intake. Compared with nondrinking, consumption of >or=50 g/d by frequent drinkers was associated with significantly decreased risk in both data sets [OR (95% CI), 0.70 (0.53-0.93) for HERPACC-I and 0.40 (0.23-0.68) for HERPACC-II]. Given similar findings among groups, we used pooled data sets in subsequent analyses. For any alcohol intake versus nondrinking, point estimates of OR were less than unity for all four malignant lymphoma subtypes. In contrast, pack-years of smoking were associated with increased malignant lymphoma risk: relative to the reference (0-4 pack-years), OR (95% CI) were 1.32 (1.02-1.71), 1.39 (1.07-1.80), and 1.48 (1.12-1.95) for 5 to 19, 20 to 39, and >or=40 pack-years, respectively. This association with smoking was less apparent for all subtypes, except Hodgkin's lymphoma. In conclusion, we found that alcohol had an inverse association with malignant lymphoma risk across all malignant lymphoma subtypes in our Japanese subjects. Smoking appeared to be positively associated with malignant lymphoma risk, but this finding may vary by subtype.

  10. Children's cancer centers

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    ... workers Mental health experts Therapists Child life workers Teachers Clergy Centers also offer many specific benefits such ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. The Start-Up of the first Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Center in the Iraqi Kurdistan: a Capacity-Building Cooperative Project by the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, Sulaymaniyah, and the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation: an Innovative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Majolino, Ignazio; Othman, Dosti; Rovelli, Attilio; Hassan, Dastan; Rasool, Luqman; Vacca, Michele; Abdalrahman, Nigar; Abdullah, Chra; Ahmed, Zhalla; Ali, Dlir; Ali, Kosar; Broggi, Chiara; Calabretta, Cinzia; Canesi, Marta; Ciabatti, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    We describe the entire process leading to the start-up of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation center at the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, in the city of Sulaymaniyah, Kurdistan Iraqi Region. This capacity building project was funded by the Italian Development Cooperation Agency and implemented with the support of the volunteer work of Italian professionals, either physicians, nurses, biologists and technicians. The intervention started in April 2016, was based exclusively on training and coachi...

  12. The Start-Up of the first Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Center in the Iraqi Kurdistan: a Capacity-Building Cooperative Project by the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, Sulaymaniyah, and the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation: an Innovative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majolino, Ignazio; Othman, Dosti; Rovelli, Attilio; Hassan, Dastan; Rasool, Luqman; Vacca, Michele; Abdalrahman, Nigar; Abdullah, Chra; Ahmed, Zhalla; Ali, Dlir; Ali, Kosar; Broggi, Chiara; Calabretta, Cinzia; Canesi, Marta; Ciabatti, Gloria; Del Fante, Claudia; De Sapio, Elisabetta; Dore, Giovanna; Frigato, Andrea; Gabriel, Marcela; Ipsevich, Francesco; Kareem, Harem; Karim, Dana; Leone, Rosa; Mahmood, Tavan; Manna, Annunziata; Massei, Maria Speranza; Mastria, Andrea; Mohammed, Dereen; Mohammed, Rebar; Najmaddin, Khoshnaw; Noori, Diana; Ostuni, Angelo; Palmas, Angelo; Possenti, Marco; Qadir, Ali; Real, Giorgio; Shrif, Rebwar; Valdatta, Caterina; Vasta, Stefania; Verna, Marta; Vittori, Mariangela; Yousif, Awder; Zallio, Francesco; Calisti, Alessandro; Quattrocchi, Sergio; Girmenia, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    We describe the entire process leading to the start-up of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation center at the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, in the city of Sulaymaniyah, Kurdistan Iraqi Region. This capacity building project was funded by the Italian Development Cooperation Agency and implemented with the support of the volunteer work of Italian professionals, either physicians, nurses, biologists and technicians. The intervention started in April 2016, was based exclusively on training and coaching on site, that represent a significant innovative approach, and led to a first autologous transplant in June 2016 and to the first allogeneic transplant in October. At the time of reporting, 9 months from the initiation of the project, 18 patients have been transplanted, 15 with an autologous and 3 with an allogeneic graft. The center at the HCH represents the first transplantation center in Kurdistan and the second in wide Iraq. We conclude that international development cooperation may play an important role also in the field of high-technology medicine, and contribute to improved local centers capabilities through country to country scientific exchanges. The methodology to realize this project is innovative, since HSCT experts are brought as volunteers to the center(s) to be started, while traditionally it is the opposite, i.e. the local professionals to be trained are brought to the specialized center(s). PMID:28512560

  13. Strategic performance evaluation in cancer centers.

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    Delgado, Rigoberto I; Langabeer, James R

    2009-01-01

    Most research in healthcare strategy has focused on formulating or implementing organizational plans and strategies, and little attention has been dedicated to the post-implementation control and evaluation of strategy, which we contend is the most critical aspect of achieving organizational goals. The objective of this study was to identify strategic control approaches used by major cancer centers in the country and to relate these practices to financial performance. Our intent was to expand the theory and practice of healthcare strategy to focused services, such as oncology. We designed a 17-question survey to capture elements of strategy and performance from our study sample, which comprised major cancer hospitals in the United States and shared similar mandates and resource constraints. The results suggest that high-performing cancer centers use more sophisticated analytical approaches, invest greater financial resources in performance analysis, and conduct more frequent performance reviews than do low-performing organizations. Our conclusions point to the need for a more robust approach to strategic assessment. In this article, we offer a number of recommendations for management to achieve strategic plans and goals on the basis of our research. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to concentrate on the area of strategic control.

  14. Senior Clinician | Center for Cancer Research

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    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR), NCI, NIH, HHS is seeking to fill several Senior Clinician positions with outstanding oncologists with research experience and expertise in one of the following areas:  1) genitourinary malignancies, 2) thoracic malignancies; 3) gastrointestinal malignancies; 4) lymphomas; 5) pediatric cancers; or 6) genetic tumor predisposition syndromes. These positions are located at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The NIH Clinical Center is the world’s largest research hospital which offers state-of-the-art facilities, collaborative opportunities, and core facilities for advanced technologies.  The Senior Clinician will have available resources including funding for clinical trials, nurse practitioners, research nurses, and patient care coordinators.  In addition, the senior clinician will have access to a robust clinical trials infrastructure including data management, training, protocol support office, regulatory support, information systems and technology, and data safety monitoring.  The CCR’s collaborative culture also offers research staff access to a wide array of intellectual and technological assets, including high-quality technology cores dedicated to pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, protein chemistry, natural products chemistry, biophysics, mass spectrometry, imaging, microscopy, proteomics and genomics, bioinformatics/biostatistics, and flow cytometry.  For an overview of CCR, please visit http://ccr.cancer.gov/.  For more information contact Lori Holliday at hollidal@mail.nih.gov.

  15. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

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    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  16. THE START-UP OF THE FIRST HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION CENTER IN THE IRAQI KURDISTAN: A CAPACITY-BUILDING COOPERATIVE PROJECT BY THE HIWA CANCER HOSPITAL, SULAYMANIYAH, AND THE ITALIAN AGENCY FOR DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Majolino

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe the entire process leading to the start-up of an hematopoietic stem cell transplantation center at the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, in the city of Sulaymaniyah, Kurdistan Iraqi Region. This capacity building project was funded by the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation, and implemented with the support of the volunteer work of Italian professionals, either physicians, nurses, biologists and technicians. The intervention started in April 2016, was based exclusively on training and coaching, and led to a first autologous transplantation in June 2016 and to an allogeneic transplantation in October. At the time of reporting, 9 months from the initiation of the project, 18 patients have been transplanted, 15with an autologous and 3 with an allogeneic graft. The center at the HCH represents the first transplantation center in Kurdistan and the second in wide Iraq. We conclude that international development cooperation may play an important role also in the field of high-technology medicine, and contribute to improved local centers capabilities through country to country scientific exchanges.

  17. Survival As a Quality Metric of Cancer Care: Use of the National Cancer Data Base to Assess Hospital Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lawrence N; Palis, Bryan E; McCabe, Ryan; Mallin, Kathy; Loomis, Ashley; Winchester, David; McKellar, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Survival is considered an important indicator of the quality of cancer care, but the validity of different methodologies to measure comparative survival rates is less well understood. We explored whether the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) could serve as a source of unadjusted and risk-adjusted cancer survival data and whether these data could be used as quality indicators for individual hospitals or in the aggregate by hospital type. The NCDB, an aggregate of > 1,500 hospital cancer registries, was queried to analyze unadjusted and risk-adjusted hazards of death for patients with stage III breast cancer (n = 116,787) and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 252,392). Data were analyzed at the individual hospital level and by hospital type. At the hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals had comparative risk-adjusted survival rates that were statistically better or worse. By hospital type, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers had risk-adjusted survival ratios that were statistically significantly better than those of academic cancer centers and community hospitals. Using the NCDB as the data source, survival rates for patients with stage III breast cancer and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer were statistically better at National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers when compared with other hospital types. Compared with academic hospitals, risk-adjusted survival was lower in community hospitals. At the individual hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals were shown to have statistically better or worse survival, suggesting that, using NCDB data, survival may not be a good metric to determine relative quality of cancer care at this level.

  18. Hospital-based, acute care after ambulatory surgery center discharge.

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    Fox, Justin P; Vashi, Anita A; Ross, Joseph S; Gross, Cary P

    2014-05-01

    As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. This process, however, may underestimate the acute care needs of patients after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or operative procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1 per 1,000 discharges (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8 per 1,000 discharges (95% confidence interval 31.6-32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median = 1.0/1,000 discharges [25th-75th percentile = 1.0-2.0]), whereas substantial variation existed in adjusted, hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0-39.0]). Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory care at surgery centers, hospital transfer at time of discharge from the ambulatory care center is a rare event. In contrast, the rate of need for hospital-based, acute care in the first week afterwards is nearly 30-fold greater, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Financial Performance of Academic Health Center Hospitals, 1994-2000.

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    Dobson, Allen; Koenig, Lane; Sen, Namrata; Ho, Silver; Gilani, Jawaria

    This study examined how competitive market dynamics between 1994 and 2000 have affected the financial stability of Academic Health Center (AHC) hospitals and their ability to support their academic and social missions. It looked at the financial challenges facing AHC hospitals through a survey involving 1,138 teaching hospitals. Findings…

  20. "Hospes": The Wabash Center as a Site of Transformative Hospitality

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    Jones, Carolyn M.

    2007-01-01

    The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion is a place of hospitality and its staff the epitome of the "good host." This essay explores the meaning of hospitality, including its problematic dimensions, drawing on a number of voices and texts: Jacques Derrida's "Of Hospitality"; Henri M. Nouwen's "Reaching Out: The Three…

  1. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  2. Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

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    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for ...

  3. Health Wellness and Hospital Learning Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Bonnie; And Others

    This paper describes activities conducted by an early childhood classroom in its health play center. A major purpose of this play center was to reduce children's fears and anxieties about medical personnel and emergency vehicles, and to raise awareness of the many aspects of health and wellness. The classroom environment contained a variety of…

  4. Scientist | Center for Cancer Research

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    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The successful candidate for this Scientist I appointment will contribute to scientific, methodological, operational, and logistical oversight of multiple projects that vary in complexity, scope of objectives, number and breadth of participating collaborator organizations, as well as anticipated requirements of budgetary, labor, animal and other resources. This employee will be instrumental in identifying the need, ensuring timely availability, documentation compliance, and assisting in coordinating project efforts with other scientific core facilities, such as the Small Animal Imaging Program, Histopathology Laboratory, and high-throughput genotyping and animal diagnostic facilities, etc. In addition, the Scientist I position is anticipated to initiate, promote, and facilitate project scientific communications among members of Center for Advanced Preclinical Research (CAPR) Preclinical Technology and Optimization (PTO) team at all levels, including periodic scientific data exchanges, interim project status updates, key final deliverables such as project reports, publications, press-releases, and meeting presentations. This employee will also provide support to the PTO team

  5. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Satisfaction of oncologic patients hospitalized in centers with and without service of palliative cares: multicentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Campaña Castillo; Magda Candalija Madueño; Laia Puig Sal; Marta Segura Munera

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the satisfaction regarding care of patients suffering advanced stage cancer admitted in Hospital Sant Jaume de Calella, Sant Rafael de Barcelona and San Lorenzo de Viladecans, subject to the presence or absence of Palliative Care Unit during 2012. An observational, descriptive and transversal study will be conducted.The assessed population are patients admitted to these centers that meet the requirements for inclusion and exclusion.In the Hospital Sant Ja...

  7. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

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    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  8. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development

    OpenAIRE

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J.; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S.; Pishvaian, Michael J.; Thompson, John A.; Taylor, Matthew H.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A. Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Berlin, Jordan D.; Smith, David C.; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator?initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to...

  9. Fighting liver cancer with combination immunotherapies | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial testing the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatment combinations against liver cancer is enrolling patients at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Individually, immunotherapy drugs harness the power of the human immune system to better identify and kill cancer cells. Now, researchers at the NIH’s Center for Cancer Research have begun to find evidence that the drugs may work far more effectively when taken in combination with other therapies and with each other than when taken alone.

  10. Which Obstacles Prevent Us from Recruiting into Clinical Trials: A Survey about the Environment for Clinical Studies at a German University Hospital in a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straube

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProspective clinical studies are the most important tool in modern medicine. The standard in good clinical practice in clinical trials has constantly improved leading to more sophisticated protocols. Moreover, translational questions are increasingly addressed in clinical trials. Such trials must follow elaborate rules and regulations. This is accompanied by a significant increase in documentation issues which require substantial manpower. Furthermore, university-based clinical centers are interested in increasing the amount of patients treated within clinical trials, and this number has evolved to be a key quality criterion. The present study was initiated to elucidate the obstacles that limit clinical scientists in screening and recruiting for clinical trials.MethodsA specific questionnaire with 28 questions was developed focusing on all aspects of clinical trial design as well as trial management. This included questions on organizational issues, medical topics as well as potential patients’ preferences and physician’s goals. The questionnaire was established to collect data anonymously on a web-based platform. The survey was conducted within the Klinikum rechts der Isar, Faculty of Medicine, Technical University of Munich; physicians of all levels (Department Chairs, attending physicians, residents, as well as study nurses, and other study-related staff were addressed. The answers were analyzed using the Survio analyzing tool (http://www.survio.com/de/.ResultsWe collected 42 complete sets of answers; in total 28 physicians, 11 study nurses, and 3 persons with positions in administration answered our survey. The study centers reported to participate in a range of 3–160 clinical trials with a recruitment rate of 1–80%. Main obstacles were determined: 31/42 (74% complained about limited human resources and 22/42 (52% reported to have a lack on technical resources, too. 30/42 (71% consented to the answer, that the documentation

  11. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  12. [Lymph node mapping and axillary sentinel lymph node biopsy in 243 invasive breast cancers with no palpable nodes. The south Lyon hospital center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, J Y; Spirito, C; Isaac, S; Zinzindohoue, C; Joualee, A; Khaled, M; Perrin-Fayolle, O

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of intraoperative lymph node mapping and sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) on the axillary staging of patients with N0 breast carcinoma. Two techniques were used: blue dye alone (Evans Blue and Patent Blue) and combined technique (blue dye and isotope). The incidence of axillary node metastasis in axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and SLND was compared prospectively. Multiple sections of each SLN were examined by HPS staining and immunohistochemical techniques. Two sections of each non sentinel node in ALND specimens were examined by routine HPS staining. 243 patients underwent ALND after SLN biopsy. The SLN detection rate was 225/243 cases (92.59%): 89.94% with blue dye alone and 100% with the combined technique. The false-negative rate was less than 2%. SN biopsy is an accurate staging technique for N0 breast cancer. SLN biopsy with multiple sections and immunohistochemical staining of the SLN can identify significantly more patients with lymph node metastases than ALND with routine HPS staining.

  13. Increased risk of hepatobiliary cancers after hospitalization for autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe A; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina; Koshiol, Jill; Hemminki, Kari

    2014-06-01

    Some autoimmune diseases are associated with increased risk of liver cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of autoimmune diseases among patients who develop different subtypes of hepatobiliary cancer. We examined the association between autoimmune diseases and cancers of the liver and biliary tract in the Swedish population. We analyzed data from national datasets at the Center for Primary Health Care Research (Lund University, Sweden). Data on patients with autoimmune disorders were retrieved from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register, from 1964 through 2008; 33 diseases were evaluated. Hepatobiliary cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and hazard ratios for incident cancers and deaths from hepatobiliary cancers. Among 402,462 patients with autoimmune disorders, 582 were diagnosed with primary liver cancer, 330 with gallbladder cancer, 115 with extrahepatic bile duct cancer, and 43 with ampulla of Vater cancers. We identified 14 autoimmune conditions that were significantly associated with increased risk of primary liver cancer (overall SIR [any autoimmune disease], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-2.3), 5 conditions associated with gallbladder cancer (overall SIR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4), and 3 associated with extrahepatic bile duct cancer (overall SIR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9). The autoimmune disorders with the strongest association with primary liver cancer were primary biliary cirrhosis (SIR, 39.5; 95% CI, 28.2-53.8) and autoimmune hepatitis (SIR, 29.0; 95% CI, 9.1-68.2); ulcerative colitis was strongly associated with extrahepatic bile duct cancer (SIR, 5.6; 95% CI, 3.6-8.4). Celiac disease, Crohn's disease, systemic sclerosis, and ulcerative colitis were associated with at least 2 types of cancer. Increased hazard ratios were observed only for patients with biliary tract cancer who had been hospitalized for autoimmune conditions. In a study of the Swedish

  14. Cancer Virology and HIV Think Tank | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Virology and HIV Think Tank Friday, December 15, 2017 9:30 AM - 3:30 PM Abstract submission deadline: November 29, 2017 Porter Neuroscience Center (Building 35A) Room 620/630 Atrium Space Please mark your calendars for the Cancer Virology and HIV Think Tank Meeting on December 15! This is an annual meeting hosted by the CCR Center of Excellence in HIV/AIDS and Cancer Virology that focuses on the exchange of information about the biology of cancer-associated viruses.

  15. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374. © The Authors. The Oncologist published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press 2017.

  16. 77 FR 9665 - Submission for OMB Emergency Review; Comment Request: A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Multi- Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI... Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request... several centers in Asia thereby increasing the cancer burden in these populations, but the causes remain...

  17. Cancer Biotechnology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology advances continue to underscore the need to educate NCI fellows in new methodologies. The Cancer Biotechnology course will be held on the NCI-Frederick campus on January 29, 2016 (Bldg. 549, Main Auditorium) and the course will be repeated on the Bethesda campus on February 9, 2016 (Natcher Balcony C). The latest advances in DNA, protein and image analysis will be presented. Clinical and postdoctoral fellows who want to learn about new biotechnology advances are encouraged to attend this course.

  18. Orthopedic specialty hospitals: centers of excellence or greed machines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badlani, Neil; Boden, Scott; Phillips, Frank

    2012-03-07

    Orthopedic specialty hospitals have recently been the subject of debate. They are patient-centered, physician-friendly health care alternatives that take advantage of the economic efficiencies of specialization. Medically, they provide a higher quality of care and increase patient and physician satisfaction. Economically, they are more efficient and profitable than general hospitals. They also positively affect society through the taxes they pay and the beneficial aspects of the competition they provide to general hospitals. Their ability to provide a disruptive innovation to the existing hospital industry will lead to lower costs and greater access to health care. However, critics say that physician ownership presents potential conflicts of interest and leads to overuse of medical care. Some general hospitals are suffering as a result of unfair specialty hospital practices, and a few drastic medical complications have occurred at specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals have been scrutinized for increasing the inequality of health care and continue to be a target of government regulations. In this article, the pros and cons are examined, and the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Hospital is analyzed as an example. Orthopedic specialty hospitals provide excellent care and are great assets to society. Competition between specialty and general hospitals has provided added value to patients and taxpayers. However, physicians must take more responsibility in their appropriate and ethical leadership. It is critical to recognize financial conflicts of interest, disclose ownership, and act ethically. Patient care cannot be compromised. With thoughtful and efficient leadership, specialty hospitals can be an integral part of improving health care in the long term. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. [Development and application of hospital customer service center platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minya; Zheng, Konglin; Xia, Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction and application of the platform of client service center in the general hospital and discusses how to provide patients with an entire service including service before clinic, on clinic and after clinic. It can also provide references for a new service mode for clinic service.

  20. Out-of-Hospital ICU Transfers to an Oncological Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Cristina; Cárdenas, Yenny R; Bratcher, Kristie; Melancon, Judd; Myers, Jason; Campbell, Jeannee Y; Feng, Lei; Price, Kristen J; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    To determine resource utilization and outcomes of out-of-hospital transfer patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a cancer referral center. Single-center cohort. A tertiary oncological center. Patients older than 18 years transferred to our ICU from an outside hospital between January 2013 and December 2015. A total of 2127 (90.3%) were emergency department (ED) ICU admissions and 228 (9.7%) out-of-hospital transfers. The ICU length of stay (LOS) was longer in the out-of-hospital transfers when compared to all other ED ICU admissions ( P = .001); however, ICU and hospital mortality were similar between both groups. The majority of patients were transferred for a higher level of care (77.2%); there was no difference in the amount of interventions performed, ICU LOS, and ICU mortality between nonhigher level-of-care and higher level-of-care patients. Factors associated with an ICU LOS ≥10days were a higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, weekend admissions, presence of shock, need for mechanical ventilation, and acute kidney injury on admission or during ICU stay ( P transferred patients was 17.5% and associated risk factors were older age, higher SOFA score on admission, use of mechanical ventilation and vasopressors during ICU stay, and renal failure on admission ( P transfer such as LOS at the outside facility, time of transfer, delay in transfer, and longer distance traveled were not associated with increased LOS or mortality in our study. Organ failure severity on admission, and not transfer-related factors, continues to be the best predictor of outcomes of critically ill patients with cancer when transferred from other facilities to the ICU. Our data suggest that transferring critically ill patients with cancer to a specialized center does not lead to worse outcomes or increased resource utilization when compared to patients admitted from the ED.

  1. Protein Production Associate | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives. The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR). The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and genetics. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Protein Expression Laboratory (PEL) provides support to the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) by producing high quality protein reagents for a variety of research and development purposes. The PEL creates expression constructs, expresses the encoded recombinant proteins in multiple expression systems, and purifies the recombinant proteins for use in downstream applications. The Protein Production Associate will: Carry out experiments, under the review of a scientist, in the areas of prokaryotic and eukaryotic protein production. Carry out E. coli expression work. Carry out insect cell and mammalian cell culture. Perform microscale protein purification scouting. Perform large-scale purification using FPLC technology. Carry out QC on proteins to ensure high quality reagent production.. Provide timely updates of project progress to supervisor and other staff in both informal and formal reports. Maintain detailed records of all laboratory processes and procedures for quality assurance purposes.

  2. Inadequate Nutritional Status of Hospitalized Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In oncology practice, nutrition and also metabolic activity are essential to support the nutritional status and prevent malignant cachexia. It is important to evaluate the patients and plan the maneuvers at the start of the therapy. The primary objective of the study is to define the nutritional status of hospitalized patients and the factors affecting it in order to define the most susceptible patients and maneuvers for better nutritional support. Methods: Patients hospitalized in oncology clinic for therapy were evaluated for food intake and nutritional status through structured interviews. The clinical properties, medical therapies, elements of nutritional support were noted and predictors of inadequate nutritional status (INS were analyzed. Results: Four hundred twenty three patients, between 16-82 years old (median: 52 were evaluated. Nearly half of the patients (185, 43% reported a better appetite at home than in hospital and declared that hospitalization is an important cause of loss of appetite (140/185, 75.6%. Presence of nausea/vomiting (N/V, depression, age less than 65 and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were associated with increased risk of INS in hospitalized cancer patients. On the contrary, steroid medication showed a positive impact on nutritional status of cancer patients. Conclusion: N/V, younger age, presence of depression and NSAIDs medication were associated with INS in hospitalized cancer patients. Clinicians should pay more attention to this group of patients. In addition, unnecessary hospitalizations and medications that may disturb oral intake must be avoided. Corticosteroids are important tools for managing anorexia and INS.

  3. Evaluation of Collection and Disposal of Hospital Waste in Hospitals and Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nazemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the environmental issues is waste of hospitals and healthcare facilities which due to hazardous, toxic, and disease-causing agents such as pharmaceutical, chemical and infectious disease, is of particular sensitivity. According to a 2002 survey by WHO, it was determined that 22 million people worldwide suffer from infectious diseases annually, because of contacting hospital wastes. Also based on a research conducted in 22 countries, 18 to 64 percent of hospitals wastes are not disposed properly [1]. The purpose f the study is to appraise collection and disposal of hospital wastes in hospitals and healthcare centers of Shahroud.In this sectional study, 3 university hospitals (580 beds and 10 healthcare facilities were investigated for six months (mehr-azar 89 at Shahroud. In order to determine the amount of waste, produced waste of an entire day was weighted in hospitals and health centers. In this research, proposed questionnaires of WHO for developing countries was used to evaluate collection and disposal system of hospitals waste. Collected data was coded and analyzed by SPSS ver.15.

  4. Focus on: Washington Hospital Center, Biomedical Engineering Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The Biomedical Engineering Department of the Washington Hospital Center provides clinical engineering services to an urban 907-bed, tertiary care teaching hospital and a variety of associated healthcare facilities. With an annual budget of over $3,000,000, the 24-person department provides cradle-to-grave support for a host of sophisticated medical devices and imaging systems such as lasers, CT scanners, and linear accelerators as well as traditional patient care instrumentation. Hallmarks of the department include its commitment to customer service and patient care, close collaboration with clinicians and quality assurance teams throughout the hospital system, proactive involvement in all phases of the technology management process, and shared leadership in safety standards with the hospital's risk management group. Through this interactive process, the department has assisted the Center not only in the acquisition of 11,000 active devices with a value of more than $64 million, but also in becoming one of the leading providers of high technology healthcare in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

  5. Hospital mortality in cirrhotic patients at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubieta-Rodríguez, R; Gómez-Correa, J; Rodríguez-Amaya, R; Ariza-Mejia, K A; Toloza-Cuta, N A

    Cirrhosis of the liver is known for its high risk of mortality associated with episodes of acute decompensation. There is an even greater risk in patients that present with acute-on-chronic liver failure. The identification of patients at higher risk for adverse outcomes can aid in making the clinical decisions that will improve the prognosis for these patients. To determine in-hospital mortality and evaluate the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of patients with cirrhosis of the liver seen at a tertiary referral hospital. A descriptive, observational, cohort study was conducted on adult patients with cirrhosis of the liver, admitted to a tertiary care center in Bucaramanga, Colombia, within the time frame of March 1, 2015 and February 29, 2016. Eighty-one patients with a mean age of 62 years were included in the study. The main etiology of the cirrhosis was alcoholic (59.3%). In-hospital mortality was 23.5% and the most frequent cause of death was septic shock (68.4%), followed by hypovolemic shock (10.5%). A MELD score≥18, a leukocyte count>12,000/ul, and albumin levels below<2.5g/dl were independent factors related to hospital mortality. In-hospital mortality in cirrhotic patients is high. Sepsis and bleeding are the 2 events leading to acute-on-chronic liver failure and death. A high MELD score, elevated leukocyte count, and low level of albumin are related to poor outcome during hospitalization. Adjusted prevention-centered public health measures and early and opportune diagnosis of this disease are needed to prevent the development of complications and to improve outcome in cirrhotic patients. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Disease specific productivity of american cancer hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A Goldstein

    Full Text Available Research-oriented cancer hospitals in the United States treat and study patients with a range of diseases. Measures of disease specific research productivity, and comparison to overall productivity, are currently lacking.Different institutions are specialized in research of particular diseases.To report disease specific productivity of American cancer hospitals, and propose a summary measure.We conducted a retrospective observational survey of the 50 highest ranked cancer hospitals in the 2013 US News and World Report rankings. We performed an automated search of PubMed and Clinicaltrials.gov for published reports and registrations of clinical trials (respectively addressing specific cancers between 2008 and 2013. We calculated the summed impact factor for the publications. We generated a summary measure of productivity based on the number of Phase II clinical trials registered and the impact factor of Phase II clinical trials published for each institution and disease pair. We generated rankings based on this summary measure.We identified 6076 registered trials and 6516 published trials with a combined impact factor of 44280.4, involving 32 different diseases over the 50 institutions. Using a summary measure based on registered and published clinical trails, we ranked institutions in specific diseases. As expected, different institutions were highly ranked in disease-specific productivity for different diseases. 43 institutions appeared in the top 10 ranks for at least 1 disease (vs 10 in the overall list, while 6 different institutions were ranked number 1 in at least 1 disease (vs 1 in the overall list.Research productivity varies considerably among the sample. Overall cancer productivity conceals great variation between diseases. Disease specific rankings identify sites of high academic productivity, which may be of interest to physicians, patients and researchers.

  7. Cancers in Eastern Libya: first results from Benghazi Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodalal, Zuhir; Azzuz, Raouf; Bendardaf, Riyad

    2014-05-28

    To study the pattern of cancer incidence and determine the incidence rates in Eastern Libya (for the first time in a decade). A hospital-based registry of cancer patients was formed using records from the primary oncology center in eastern Libya - focusing on those diagnosed in the year 2012. The most common malignancies in men were cancers of the colon (22.3%, n = 90), lung (20.3%, n = 82), prostate (16.1%, n = 65), pancreas (4.2%, n = 17) and liver (4.2%, n = 17). For women, they were found to be cancers of the breast (41.5%, n = 213), colon (16.4%, n = 84), uterus (8%, n = 41), ovary (5.5%, n = 28) and pancreas (3.1%, n = 16). Additionally age-standardized rates (ASR) were determined for Libya. The different cities and towns in eastern Libya were compared for any variation. The city of Beida in particular was found to have a remarkably high incidence of gastric cancer. The different findings were discussed and comparisons were made with past literature as well as the incidence rates for neighbouring countries. The incidence rates given for the eastern region showed differences from previously reported values (i.e., the rate of colon cancer was the highest in North Africa whereas other malignancies occurred less frequently). Potential explanations for the urban-rural difference as well as the difference in incidence rates were put forth. The significance of this study is that it establishes a baseline of cancer incidence which should be the backbone for any future national cancer plan in Libya. Proper surveillance programs need to be in place and healthcare policy should be adjusted to take into account the more prevalent and pressing cancers in society.

  8. Facility Head | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility HeadConfocal Microscopy Core FacilityLaboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics (LCBG), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), NCI, NIH, HHS is looking for a motivated and skilled microscopist to fill a Facility Head position to lead its Confocal Microscopy Core Facility. The CCR Microscopy Core provides microscopy equipment and support to approximately 150 active users representing over 20 NCI laboratories. The Core places an emphasis on training independent users, but the staff is available to assist in all phases of experiments. This includes experimental design, data acquisition, and data analysis. The Core provides state-of-the-art microscopic analyses to better understand critical biological structures and cellular processes involved in cancer. The Facility Head will also be expected to participate in the CCR Microscopy Core meetings and to interact extensively with the other microscopy facilities in CCR. Light microscopic techniques and analytic methods currently used in this facility include, but are not limited to: 1) co-localization of fluorescent fusion proteins with organelles; 2) demonstration of membrane ruffling, cytoskeletal organization, focal adhesions and other cell morphology; 3) live time-lapse translocation of fluorescent fusion proteins; 4) fluorescent indicators of oxidative stress in live cells; 5) 4D imaging of cell division; 6) Super-Resolution imaging; 7) tiling; 8) Fluorescent Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET); 9) Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS); 10) Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM); and, 11) Second Harmonic Generation imaging (SHG) of whole live tissue/organ. The Facility's equipment includes a Zeiss LSM 710 NLO for two-photon imaging, a Zeiss LSM 780 for higher sensitivity imaging, a Zeiss LSM 780/ELYRA for super-resolution imaging of fixed cells, and the Zeiss LSM 880/Airyscan for super-resolution imaging of live and

  9. Preferences for photographic art among hospitalized patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Hazel; Schroeter, Kathryn; Hanson, Andrew; Asmus, Kathryn; Grossman, Azure

    2013-07-01

    To determine the preferences of patients with cancer for viewing photographic art in an inpatient hospital setting and to evaluate the impact of viewing photographic art. Quantitative, exploratory, single-group, post-test descriptive design incorporating qualitative survey questions. An academic medical center in the midwestern United States. 80 men (n = 44) and women (n = 36) aged 19-85 years (X = 49) and hospitalized for cancer treatment. Participants viewed photographs via computers and then completed a five-instrument electronic survey. Fatigue, quality of life, performance status, perceptions of distraction and restoration, and content categories of photographs. Ninety-six percent of participants enjoyed looking at the study photographs. The photographs they preferred most often were lake sunset (76%), rocky river (66%), and autumn waterfall (66%). The most rejected photographs were amusement park (54%), farmer's market vegetable table (51%), and kayakers (49%). The qualitative categories selected were landscape (28%), animals (15%), people (14%), entertainment (10%), imagery (10%), water (7%), spiritual (7%), flowers (6%), and landmark (3%). Some discrepancy between the quantitative and qualitative sections may be related to participants considering water to be a landscape. The hypothesis that patients' preferences for a category of photographic art are affected by the psychophysical and psychological qualities of the photographs, as well as the patients' moods and characteristics, was supported. Nurses can play an active role in helping patients deal with the challenges of long hospital stays and life-threatening diagnoses through distraction and restoration interventions such as viewing photographic images of nature. Nurses can use photographic imagery to provide a restorative intervention during the hospital experience. Photographic art can be used as a distraction from the hospital stay and the uncertainty of a cancer diagnosis. Having patients view

  10. Breast cancer in a multi-ethnic Asian setting : Results from the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah; Hartman, Mikael; Saxena, Nakul; Lau, Philip; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo Chin; Lim, Siew Eng; Wong, John E. L.; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    Two hospital-based breast cancer databases (University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia [n = 1513] and National University Hospital, Singapore [n = 2545]) were merged into a regional registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007. A review of the data found 51% of patients

  11. Incorporating the USAF Flight Center's TQM plan in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, R D; Mathews, K A

    1993-01-01

    A total quality management (TQM) plan has been instituted by the United States Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base. To determine the feasibility of implementing the same basic TQM plan in a district hospital, a joint industry-government team was established. Five areas of concentration were selected for review: infrastructure, methodology, training, strategic plan, and a "Quality Bill of Rights." The TQM "infrastructure" is intended to match and complement the existing organizational structure and chain of command, not to supplant it. As the overall plan seemed well-adapted for implementation in a hospital setting, a three-phase implementation approach was identified that included conceptual planning, initial training and goal setting, and full-scale implementation. Each phase is described in terms of objectives, staffing, and timing requirements.

  12. Team Lead | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are seeking a highly motivated Sr. Scientist to lead the newly established Single Cell Analysis Facility (SCAF) of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at NCI. The SCAF will house state-of-the-art single cell sequencing technologies including 10xGenomics Chromium, BD Genomics Rhapsody, DEPPArray, and other emerging single cell technologies. The successful candidate will be responsible for managing the single cell core activities and will interact with close to 200 laboratories within the CCR to design and carry out single cell experiments for cancer research. In addition to the core activities: - Will be responsible for developing new single cell technologies and making it available for CCR community - Will train/guide staff to carry out wet lab experiment from tissue/cell preparation to NexGen sequencing - Work with dedicated bioinformaticians to perform data qc and analysis - Is expected to author publications in peer reviewed scientific journals

  13. Scientific Management Training | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI intramural program is one of the largest centers for cancer research in the world, with approximately 200 principal investigators and 500 postdoctoral fellows. While outstanding scientific research is conducted at NCI, many of the scientists who go on to lead their own laboratories have few management skills. The Scientific Management Training course focuses on personnel and project management. In the “Art of Supervision” section, the emphasis is on the uniqueness of each person and how each staff member should be treated to achieve desired outcomes.

  14. Patient Survey (PCH - HCAHPS) PPS-exempt Cancer Hospital - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  15. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  16. Access to Accredited Cancer Hospitals Within Federal Exchange Plans Under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Kenneth L; Liao, Kai-Ping; Krause, Trudy M; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-02-20

    Purpose The Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance in the United States, but concerns have arisen about access to specialized cancer care within narrow provider networks. To characterize the scope and potential impact of this problem, we assessed rates of inclusion of Commission on Cancer (CoC) -accredited hospitals and National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated cancer centers within federal exchange networks. Methods We downloaded publicly available machine-readable network data and public use files for individual federal exchange plans from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the 2016 enrollment year. We linked this information to National Provider Identifier data, identified a set of distinct provider networks, and assessed the rates of inclusion of CoC-accredited hospitals and NCI-designated centers. We measured variation in these rates according to geography, plan type, and metal level. Results Of 4,058 unique individual plans, network data were available for 3,637 (90%); hospital information was available for 3,531 (87%). Provider lists for these plans reduced into 295 unique networks for analysis. Ninety-five percent of networks included at least one CoC-accredited hospital, but just 41% of networks included NCI-designated centers. States and counties each varied substantially in the proportion of networks listed that included NCI-designated centers (range, 0% to 100%). The proportion of networks that included NCI-designated centers also varied by plan type (range, 31% for health maintenance organizations to 49% for preferred provider organizations; P = .04) but not by metal level. Conclusion A large majority of federal exchange networks contain CoC-accredited hospitals, but most do not contain NCI-designated cancer centers. These results will inform policy regarding access to cancer care, and they reinforce the importance of promoting access to clinical trials and specialized care through community sites.

  17. Bioinformatics Analyst | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) is a part of the Data Science and Information Technology Program at Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. The ABCC provides technology development, scientific consultation, collaboration and training, and high-performance computing support to the NCI and NIH scientists and staff. The Single Cell Analysis Facility (SCAF) is established to utilize a mix of existing and new resources aimed at providing state-of-the-art single-cell technologies to support the cancer research at NCI. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Bioinformatics Analyst Responsible for providing bioinformatics support including project consultation, experimental design, data management and analysis of high throughput sequencing data from next-generation sequencing and single cell technologies Perform single-cell genetic and transcriptional analysis to determine tumor heterogeneity, clonal evolution, immune signatures, and mechanism of resistance Design, develop and maintain robust analysis workflows and software pipelines, as well as custom scripts, to support the analysis of high-throughput sequencing data Provide biological interpretation of analysis results and present analysis results in a clear and concise manner, to scientific audiences Work effectively as a member of a team; coordinate activities among groups located at the Bethesda, Frederick, and Rockville NCI campuses; follow sound scientific practices and maintain effective documentation of activities and analyses This position is in support of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  18. Risk Factors for Thyroid Cancer: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in Korean Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Seung-Kwon; Lee, Chan Wha; Lee, Jeonghee; Kim, Jeongseon; Kim, Hyeon Suk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence of thyroid cancer in Korea has rapidly increased over the past decade, few studies have investigated its risk factors. This study examined the risk factors for thyroid cancer in Korean adults. Materials and Methods The study design was a hospital-based case-control study. Between August 2002 and December 2011, a total of 802 thyroid cancer cases out of 34,211 patients screened from the Cancer Screenee. Cohort of the National Cancer Center in South Korea were inc...

  19. Incidental pulmonary embolism in cancer patients: clinical characteristics and outcome – a comprehensive cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Razeq H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hikmat N Abdel-Razeq1, Asem H Mansour2, Yousef M Ismael11Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, JordanBackground and objectives: Cancer patients undergo routine imaging studies much more than others. The widespread use of the recently introduced multi-detector CT scanners has resulted in an increasing number of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE in asymptomatic cancer patients. The significance and clinical outcome of such incidental PE is described.Methods: Both radiology department and hospital databases were searched for all cancer patients with a diagnosis of incidental PE. CT scans were performed using a 64-slice scanner with a 5.0 mm slice thickness.Results: During the study period, 34 patients with incidental PE were identified. The mean age (±SD was 57.7 (±12.4 years. All patients had active cancer, gastric, lung, colorectal, and lymphomas being the most frequent. Most patients had advanced-stage disease at the time of PE diagnosis; 26 (77% patients had stage IV, whereas only 3 patients had stages I or II disease. Twenty-seven (79% patients had their PE while undergoing active treatment with chemotherapy (68% or radiotherapy (12%; none, however, were on hormonal therapy. Most (74% patients had their PE diagnosed without history of recent hospital admission. Except for 5 (15%, all other patients were anticoagulated. With follow-up, 2 patients developed recurrent PE, 2 others had clinical and echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension, and 9 (26% died suddenly within 30 days of the diagnosis of incidental PE; 2 of these where among the 5 patients who were not anticoagulated.Conclusion: Incidental PE in cancer patients is increasingly encountered. Similar to symptomatic PE, many were diagnosed in patients with advanced stage disease and while undergoing active anti-cancer therapy. A significant percentage of patients had recurrent emboli, pulmonary hypertension

  20. Symptomatic improvement reported after receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Blazek-O'Neill, Betsy; Kopar, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate patient-perceived benefits from receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center. During a 6-month period, adults at a university hospital receiving Reiki through volunteer services were invited to complete a survey asking about perceived changes after Reiki. Changes in pain, mood, distress, sleep, and appetite were rated on a 5-point scale from no benefit to great benefit. Surveys were distributed after completing treatment and were returned in postage-paid envelops. A total of 145 surveys were completed (34.5% response rate), with 47 participants seen in the cancer infusion center and 98 in other areas of the hospital. Reiki was rated as a positive experience by 94% at the cancer center and 93% of others, with 92% at the cancer center and 86% of others interested in receiving additional Reiki sessions. Symptomatic improvement was similar for people at the cancer center and others, respectively, with much to great improvement for 89% and 86% for relaxation, 75% and 75% for anxiety/worry, 81% and 78% for improved mood, 43% and 35% for improved sleep, 45% and 49% for reduced pain, 38% and 43% for reduced isolation/loneliness, 75% and 63% for improved attitude, and 30% and 30% for improved appetite. Response was unaffected by previous exposure to Reiki, massage, or other touch therapy. Reiki results in a broad range of symptomatic benefits, including improvements in common cancer-related symptoms.

  1. Regulatory Submission Coordinator | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides administrative support to the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), Protocol Support Office (PSO). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Performs regulatory submission/administrative duties for the Protocol Support Office, NCI/CCR Assists with the preparation of documents to include protocols, investigator brochures, consent forms, and submissions to the FDA Maintains revision logs and tracking versions of the documents Provides accurate filing of pertinent regulatory documents Provides administrative support related to document control requirements including filing of master documents, formatting and typing of various document Attends regulatory and administrative meetings for taking and typing of minutes, reports and summaries Communicates with clinical, administrative and management personnel to gather or convey information Edits and prepares material for final review Participates in planning functions Works in conjunction with other administrative staff to accomplish program requirements Acts as liaison coordinating tasks/deadlines between the Clinical Research ARC and the Branch This position is located in Rockville, Maryland.

  2. Epidemiology of Bloodstream Infections at a Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Velasco

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Cancer patients are at unusually high risk for developing bloodstream infections (BSI, which are a major cause of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological characteristics and the etiology of BSI in cancer patients. DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Terciary Oncology Care Center. PARTICIPANTS: During a 24-month period all hospitalized patients with clinically significant BSI were evaluated in relation to several clinical and demographic factors. RESULTS: The study enrolled 435 episodes of BSI (349 patients. The majority of the episodes occurred among non-neutropenic patients (58.6% and in those younger than 40 years (58.2%. There was a higher occurrence of unimicrobial infections (74.9%, nosocomial episodes (68.3% and of those of undetermined origin (52.8%. Central venous catheters (CVC were present in 63.2% of the episodes. Overall, the commonest isolates from blood in patients with hematology diseases and solid tumors were staphylococci (32% and 34.7%, respectively. There were 70 episodes of fungemia with a predominance of Candida albicans organisms (50.6%. Fungi were identified in 52.5% of persistent BSI and in 91.4% of patients with CVC. Gram-negative bacilli prompted the CVC removal in 45.5% of the episodes. Oxacillin resistance was detected in 26.3% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates and in 61.8% of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were not observed. Initial empirical antimicrobial therapy was considered appropriate in 60.5% of the cases. CONCLUSION: The identification of the microbiology profile of BSI and the recognition of possible risk factors in high-risk cancer patients may help in planning and conducting more effective infection control and preventive measures, and may also allow further analytical studies for reducing severe infectious complications in such groups of patients.

  3. Trends of oral cancer in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the trend and recent pattern of oral cancer in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Method: A retrospective analysis of all cases of oral cancer (excluding lymphoid cancers) documented in the records of the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and ...

  4. Paediatric cancers at Butare University Teaching Hospital in Rwanda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric cancers at Butare University Teaching Hospital in Rwanda. ... Background: Cancer is an important cause of mortality in many of the economically developed nations of the world. More than 10% of all ... The peak incidence of cancer was found in the 0-5 years age group and accounted for 21 patients (58, 3%).

  5. Programmer Analyst | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC) provides technology development, scientific consultation, collaboration, data analysis and training to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and staff. The Core Infrastructure and Systems Biology (CISB) group in ABCC strives to streamline and provide innovative solutions for the NCI/NIH community to access and use biological information collected across different sources and formats. Integrating diverse data sources to enable disease agnostic access and analysis, variant impact annotation, identifier conversions across species, and merging clinical and research data enables translation from basic to the goal of precision medicine. CISB is looking for an experienced analyst to support the database and application management efforts at the NCI’s Molecular Targets Program (MTP). KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Provide data management and analysis support Maintain scientific applications and databases on single-user personal computer through the multi-user, multi-processor large memory mainframe Communicate with the experts in the MTP, gather requirements and provide support Provide training to researchers on a variety of platforms and applications Evaluate and develop methodologies to allow utilization of new software tools and generate the information required by MTP researchers Determine methods and procedures on new assignments Document approaches and mechanisms clearly and comprehensively

  6. Challenges associated with the management of gynecological cancers in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 George Onyemaechi Ugwu,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu,2 Osaheni Lucky Lawani,3 Azubuike Kanayo Onyebuchi3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Park Lane, Enugu, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria Background: There are reports of increasing incidence of gynecological cancers in developing countries and this trend increases the need for more attention to gynecological cancer care in these countries. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the presentation and treatment of gynecological cancers and identify barriers to successful gynecological cancer treatment in a tertiary hospital in South East Nigeria. Methods: This study was a retrospective longitudinal analysis of the presentation and treatment of histologically diagnosed primary gynecological cancers from 2000 to 2010. Analysis was by descriptive and inferential statistics at the 95% level of confidence using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17 software. Results: Records of 200 gynecological cancers managed during the study period were analyzed. Over 94% of cervical cancers presented in advanced stages of the disease and received palliative/symptomatic treatment. Only 1.9% of cervical cancer patients had radical surgical intervention, and postoperative mortality from these radical surgeries was 100%. Approximately 76% of patients with ovarian cancer had debulking surgery as the mainstay of treatment followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative mortality from ovarian cancer surgery was 63%. Cutting edge cytotoxic drugs were not used as chemotherapy for ovarian and chorionic cancers. Compliance with chemotherapy was poor, with over 70% of ovarian cancer patients failing to complete the

  7. Service of Remembrance: a comprehensive cancer center's response to bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Louise; Cooper, Rhonda S; Hypki, Cinder

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive cancer centers that offer an array of clinical trials and treatment options often experience significant patient mortality rates. Bereavement resources may not be routinely incorporated into the service delivery model in these specialty hospitals. In response, an interdisciplinary team at one cancer center proposed, planned, and implemented an annual Service of Remembrance. The incorporation of music, poetry, and visual arts was important in designing a program that would provide a meaningful, spiritual experience. A community artist who designed an interactive memorial art piece played a pivotal role. This article outlines the process of institutional culture change and describes future challenges in the implementation of this type of bereavement service.

  8. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  9. Variation in rates of breast cancer surgery: A national analysis based on French Hospital Episode Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rococo, E; Mazouni, C; Or, Z; Mobillion, V; Koon Sun Pat, M; Bonastre, J

    2016-01-01

    Minimum volume thresholds were introduced in France in 2008 to improve the quality of cancer care. We investigated whether/how the quality of treatment decisions in breast cancer surgery had evolved before and after this policy was implemented. We used Hospital Episode Statistics for all women having undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy in France in 2005 and 2012. Three surgical procedures considered as better treatment options were analyzed: BCS, immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). We studied the mean rates and variation according to the hospital profile and volume. Between 2005 and 2012, the volume of breast cancer surgery increased by 11% whereas one third of the hospitals no longer performed this type of surgery. In 2012, the mean rate of BCS was 74% and similar in all hospitals whatever the volume. Conversely, IBR and SLNB rates were much higher in cancer centers (CC) and regional teaching hospitals (RTH) [IBR: 19% and 14% versus 8% on average; SLNB: 61% and 47% versus 39% on average]; the greater the hospital volume, the higher the IBR and SLNB rates (p women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Palliative care: concepts, needs, and challenges: perspectives on the experience at the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShami, Mohammad

    2011-04-01

    Palliative care is uprising in developing countries. The Children's Cancer Hospital Egypt 57357 palliative care service put the main concepts in pediatric palliation in consideration while facing the challenges and needs for these children and their families. The palliative care program developed will be connected to other centers in Egypt as well as further branches of the hospital in other Egyptian cities.

  11. The Breast Health Center at Women & Infants Hospital: origin, philosophy, and features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberry, S S; Chung, M; Legare, R; Strenger, R; Wallace, D; Phillips, G; Morry, S; Marchant, D J; Cady, B

    2000-04-01

    The Breast Health Center, a component of the program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital, is a multidisciplinary center devoted to the treatment and study of benign and malignant breast diseases. The philosophy, structure, and function of The Breast Health Center are described along with its specific components. The Breast Health Center's three fundamental missions of patient care, education, and research are discussed.

  12. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  13. Day hospital and psychosocial care center: Expanding the discussion of partial hospitalization in mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Trinta Weber

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Since the second half of the twentieth century the discussions about mental patient care reveal ongoing debate between two health care paradigms: the biomedical/biopsychosocial paradigm and the psychosocial paradigm. The struggle for hegemony over the forms of care, on how to deal optimally with the experience of becoming ill is underpinned by an intentionality of reorganizing knowledge about the health/disease dichotomy, which is reflected in the models proposed for the implementation of actions and services for the promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation of human health. Objective: To discuss the guidelines of care in mental health day hospitals (MHDH in contrast to type III psychosocial care centers (CAPS III. Method: Review of mental health legislation from 1990 to 2014. Results: A definition of therapeutic project could not be found, as well as which activities and techniques should be employed by these health services. Conclusion: The MHDH and PCC III are services that replace psychiatric hospital admission and are characterized by their complementarity in the care to the mentally ill. Due to their varied and distinctive intervention methods, which operate synergistically, the contributions from both models of care are optimized. Discussions on the best mental health care model reveal polarization between the biomedical/biopsychosocial and psychosocial paradigms. This reflects the supremacy of the latter over the former in the political-ideological discourse that circumscribes the reform of psychiatric care, which may hinder a better clinical outcome for patients and their families.

  14. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment......, as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory...

  15. Cancer Treatment Measures – PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses three cancer specific measures. The resulting PPS-Exempt...

  16. Economies of scale in non-revenue producing cost centers: implications for hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranove, D

    1998-01-01

    This paper uses semiparametric methods to estimate the magnitude of economies of scale in 14 non-revenue producing cost centers in hospitals. There are substantial economies of scale in small hospitals, but economies are exhausted in hospitals with over 10,000 discharges annually. In recent hospital mergers challenged by federal antitrust agencies, one or both hospitals had over 10,000 discharges, suggesting that efficiency gains in non-revenue producing cost centers will be small, and could easily be offset by nominal price increases.

  17. Cancer survivors' experiences of discharge from hospital follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, S E; Watson, E K; Ward, A M; Khan, N F; Turner, D; Adams, E; Forman, D; Roche, M F; Rose, P W

    2012-05-01

    Discharge from hospital follow-up is a key time point in the cancer journey. With recommendations for earlier discharge of cancer survivors, attention to the discharge process is likely to become increasingly important. This study explored cancer survivors' experiences of discharge from hospital follow-up. Survivors of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer (n= 1275), 5-16 years post diagnosis were approached to take part in a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire included questions about discharge status, provision of time/information prior to discharge, feelings at discharge and satisfaction with how discharge was managed. Completed questionnaires were returned by 659 survivors (51.7%). Approximately one-third of respondents were not discharged from follow-up 5-16 years post diagnosis. Of those discharged, a substantial minority reported insufficient time (27.9%), information (24.5-45.0%) or adverse emotions (30.9%) at the time of discharge. However, 90.6% of respondents reported satisfaction with how discharge from hospital follow-up was managed. Despite high levels of satisfaction, discharge of cancer survivors from hospital follow-up could be improved with the provision of additional time, information and support. Better structuring of the final hospital appointment or a review appointment in primary care at this time could help to ensure that discharge from hospital follow-up is managed optimally for cancer survivors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Promising Practices for Achieving Patient-centered Hospital Care: A National Study of High-performing US Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboumatar, Hanan J; Chang, Bickey H; Al Danaf, Jad; Shaear, Mohammad; Namuyinga, Ruth; Elumalai, Sathyanarayanan; Marsteller, Jill A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Patient-centered care is integral to health care quality, yet little is known regarding how to achieve patient-centeredness in the hospital setting. The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey measures patients' reports on clinician behaviors deemed by patients as key to a high-quality hospitalization experience. We conducted a national study of hospitals that achieved the highest performance on HCAHPS to identify promising practices for improving patient-centeredness, common challenges met, and how those were addressed. We identified hospitals that achieved the top ranks or remarkable recent improvements on HCAHPS and surveyed key informants at these hospitals. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, we described the interventions used at these hospitals and developed an explanatory model for achieving patient-centeredness in hospital care. Fifty-two hospitals participated in this study. Hospitals used similar interventions that focused on improving responsiveness to patient needs, the discharge experience, and patient-clinician interactions. To improve responsiveness, hospitals used proactive nursing rounds (reported at 83% of hospitals) and executive/leader rounds (62%); for the discharge experience, multidisciplinary rounds (56%), postdischarge calls (54%), and discharge folders (52%) were utilized; for clinician-patient interactions, hospitals promoted specific desired behaviors (65%) and set behavioral standards (60%) for which employees were held accountable. Similar strategies were also used to achieve successful intervention implementation including HCAHPS data feedback, and employee and leader engagement and accountability. High-performing hospitals used a set of patient-centered care processes that involved both leaders and clinicians in ensuring that patient needs and preferences are addressed.

  19. Oesophageal squamous cell cancer in a South African tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oesophageal squamous cell cancer in a South African tertiary hospital: a risk factor and presentation analysis. ... Methodology: Information on patients managed at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital (IALCH), Durban, South Africa, between 1 October 2013 and 31 December 2014 was retrieved from a prospective ...

  20. Coping with cancer and adversity. Hospital ethnography in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulemi, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many people associate hospital treatment with 'getting better', the restoration to health and normal life. The onset of a life-threatening disease such as cancer, however, can transform the hospital into a place of constant struggle and suffering. Hospitalisation in this sense coincides with the

  1. Presentation of Colorectal Cancer in Khartoum Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To determine the age and gender distribution in Sudanese patients with colorectal cancer, as seen in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, and to study its emergency presentation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in Khartoum Teaching Hospital (Sudan). Two hundred and seventy seven (277) ...

  2. Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics, which forms the third cycle CCNE Program at Stanford University, is a consortium that has three highly synchronized Projects and three Cores.

  3. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  4. Smoking habits in lung cancer patients: a hospital based case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective, hospital based case-control study was designed to investigate the cigarette smoking history, the relationship between cigarette smoking and the risk of lung cancer in KHMC-Jordan. Six hundred cases with lung cancer (576 males, 24 females) and 600 controls were included in the study. The majority of ...

  5. Gastric cancers at Kibogora Hospital | Ntakiyiruta | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many of our patients present with advanced gastric cancer with no prospective for cure. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, the clinical presentations, the anatomical and pathological aspects and the management of gastric cancers at Kibogora hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study ...

  6. Laryngeal cancer at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the number of cases of laryngeal cancer seen at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, establish epidemiological parameters of the disease and to outline preventive measures. Method: One hundred and fifteen (115) patients who were managed for laryngeal cancer from 1 st January 1998 ...

  7. A Medical Center Network for Optimized Lung Cancer Biospecimen Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0818 TITLE: “A Medical Center Network for Optimized Lung Cancer Biospecimen Banking ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christopher...To) 20Sep2014 - 19Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “A Medical Center Network for Optimized Lung Cancer Biospecimen Banking ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Although new subject enrollments and specimen collection have ceased, the LCBRN is committed to the outcome of this project, which is a bank of

  8. CCR Careers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be part of our mission to make breakthrough scientific discoveries to find cures and treatments for cancer. Our Principal Investigators lead teams of laboratory scientists, trainees, clinicians, and administrators to unlock scientific knowledge to advance the fight against cancer and HIV/AIDS.

  9. The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Fiering, Steve N; Griswold, Karl E; Hoopes, P Jack; Kekalo, Katerina; Ndong, Christian; Paulsen, Keith; Petryk, Alicea A; Pogue, Brian; Shubitidze, Fridon; Weaver, John

    2015-01-01

    The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence - one of nine funded by the National Cancer Institute as part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - focuses on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer diagnostics and hyperthermia therapy. It brings together a diverse team of engineers and biomedical researchers with expertise in nanomaterials, molecular targeting, advanced biomedical imaging and translational in vivo studies. The goal of successfully treating cancer is being approached by developing nanoparticles, conjugating them with Fabs, hyperthermia treatment, immunotherapy and sensing treatment response.

  10. National Cancer Center Singapore: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Melissa; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, comprising almost 30% of annual deaths. The incidence and prevalence continue to rise, resulting in Singapore having the highest age-standardized rate of cancer in southeast Asia. A review of national health policies in 1992 resulted in the creation of a National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) in 1999. The current NCCS, with its three pillars of clinical service, research and education, manages about 70% of all new cancer cases in the countries public healthcare system. As it outgrows its current outfit and looks to the new NCCS building in 2020, the goal must be for strategic planning to attract and retain the best minds and heart in the field of cancer if it were to continue to be successful in achieving its vision and mission. This article chronicles the NCCS's history and details the foundation of its strategic plans.

  11. Designing Trojan Horses | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waging battle against cancer cells without inflicting damage on normal tissue has long been a goal for cancer treatment. A new type of drug called immunotoxins may help make this goal a reality. Much like the Greeks used a wooden horse to get soldiers inside the gates of Troy, immunotoxins use clever genetic engineering to get a lethal toxin inside cancer cells. Each immunotoxin consists of two components an antibody and a toxin that are fused together. The custom-designed antibody acts as a homing signal, seeking out a specific target present on the surface of cancer cells. When the antibody binds its target, the whole immunotoxin is brought inside the cell. Unwittingly, the cancer cell has exposed itself to a powerful poison, a mistake that will likely condemn it to death.

  12. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there have been tremendous progress in cancer research and treatment, the mortality caused by this disease is still very high. Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide and second leading cause of death in the United States of America. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer covers topics including the role of various signaling pathways in development, regulation of cell fate, tumor angiogenesis, duodenal neoplasias, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer, cancer development and progression, microRNA in cancer and epigenetic regulation of cancer.

  13. Study characterizes how DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs kill cancer cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients whose cancer cells express the SLFN11 protein are more likely to respond to DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs than those whose cancer cells don’t express SLFN11. In a new study, Center for Cancer Research investigators show how these drugs recruit SLFN11 to block replication and kill cancer cells. Read more…

  14. Have We Improved Pain Control in Cancer Patients? A Multicenter Study of Ambulatory and Hospitalized Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta-Sales, Josep; Nabal-Vicuna, Maria; Vallano, Antonio; Espinosa, Jose; Planas-Domingo, Josep; Verger-Fransoy, Eugènia; Julià-Torras, Joaquim; Serna, Judith; Pascual-López, Antonio; Rodríguez, Dulce; Grimau, Isidre; Morlans, Germà; Sala-Rovira, Carme; Calsina-Berna, Agnes; Borras-Andrés, Josep Ma; Gomez-Batiste, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Pain in cancer patients is recognized as a major health problem, yet few studies of both inpatient and outpatient populations have been carried out. The study objective was to assess the frequency, type, and characteristics of pain in adult cancer patients, including both inpatients and outpatients. This cross-sectional study involved 1064 adult cancer patients (437 outpatients and 627 inpatients) from 44 hospitals and/or long-term-care centers in Catalonia, Spain. Cancer patients suffering from pain of any etiology for ≥2 weeks and/or under analgesic treatment ≥2 weeks were enrolled. Demographic and pain data were collected. The Spanish version of the Brief Pain Inventory was used to assess pain. Pain frequency was 55.3%. Pain was less frequent in outpatients than inpatients (41.6% versus 64.7%; ppatients, and intensity was similar in both out- and inpatients; however, outpatients reported less improvement, less pain interference with daily life, and less pain related to the cancer per se. In both groups, patients with multiple myeloma (73%), breast (65%), and lung cancer (61%) were most likely to report pain. Pain in cancer patients, both ambulatory and hospitalized, remains a challenge for health care professionals, health administrators, and stakeholders. Our study reveals the high level of pain and distress that cancer patients continue to suffer, a problem that is particularly notable in outpatients due to the intensity and duration of the pain.

  15. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysis...... process was guided by the hermeneutical–phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital...... to recall some of their feelings of identity. This paper adds knowledge about how cancer patients experience sensory impressions in the hospital environment. An environment that provides homeliness and offers a view to nature seems to help some patients to preserve their identity. Furthermore, positive...

  16. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A postdoctoral position is available in the lab of Dr. Steven A. Feldman, Surgery Branch of the National Cancer Institute for a highly-motivated individual to carry out translational research studies aimed at developing and improving novel adoptive T cell therapies for solid cancers. A major focus of the position will utilize gene editing strategies (ZFN and Crispr) to enhance T cell function and/or re-direct T cells by TCR insertion for development of novel personalized cancer therapies based on identifying and targeting immunogenic mutations expressed by a patient’s tumor. 

  17. The HPV Vaccine | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two researchers leveraged CCR’s unique environment of investigator-driven inquiry to pursue studies of two cancer-causing genes that eventually led to the development of a vaccine against two forms of human papillomavirus.

  18. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  19. Breast Cancer Translational Research Center of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    States Armed Forces. Breast cancer mortality among women អ years accounts for >40% of years of life lost due to this disease. The economic, social and... cancer is a curable disease if it is detected early; as such early detection is related to survivorship, cost of treatment and quality of life for the...certain life style factors as well as comorbidities. For Theme 2 studies, profiling of human biospecimens alone is important but insufficient

  20. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. Methods We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93. For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83 and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74 for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61 and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47 for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94 and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82 for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63 and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79 for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. Conclusions The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  1. Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    counseling within the boundaries of his/her specialty area of education and clinical preparation (pediatrics, adults, urologic, surgical, etc.). Review assigned patient resident reports and carry and answer the resident pager. Provide coverage for the post-call resident’s patients, while working closely with the Inpatient/Fellowship staff.  Support in-patient and out-patient care of subjects enrolled in experimental protocols and clinical trials. Work as a member of a multidisciplinary clinical team to provide comprehensive care to patients in a research environment. Write prescriptions. Explain the care management/discharge plan to all members of the covering team (inpatient NPs, attendings) at signout. This position is located in Bethesda, Maryland in support of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  2. TESTICULAR CANCER AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-02-02

    Feb 2, 2000 ... differentiated tumours(13). Up to 90% of patients with testicular germ cell cancer will have elevated alpha fetoprotein (AFP) or beta human chorionic gonadotrophin. (B-hCG)(14). ... that patients with cryptochirdism have 3-46 fold increased incidence of testicular cancer(18). Furthermore 5-10% of patients ...

  3. Mapping Cancer Cells’ Starting Lines | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of the defective regulatory pathways that lead to aberrant proliferation in cancer converge on DNA replication. So replication regulatory pathways could be targeted to more specifically kill cancer cells.  Unfortunately such targeting would require knowing where and when DNA replication starts in the cancer genome.  In yeast, the locations of replication initiation sites on chromatin have been extensively mapped, but in human cancer cells only a handful of these sites have been identified.

  4. Coping with the diagnosis and hospitalization of a child with childhood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainan de Cerqueira Nóia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Find out how family members cope with hospitalization due to the diagnosis of childhood cancer. Methodology. This is a descriptive-exploratory design study with qualitative data analyses, undertaken in the Support Center for Childhood Cancer in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. 10 members of the families of children with cancer underwent a semi-structured interview as a resource to collect empirical data. Data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Two categories emerged: "family coping with diagnosis" and "family coping with hospitalization." Results. It was observed that family members suffer deeply and cope with the diagnosis of cancer in different manners. In addition, psychological stress has a cumulative impact on long periods of hospitalization and occurs in the presence of sadness, anxiety, suffering due to the invasive procedures the children are submitted to, fear and uncertainties related to prognosis. Conclusion. The diagnosis of cancer and hospitalization process causes severe impact on family dynamics. A competent nurse must be aware and sensitive to minimize this suffering by listening carefully and providing humanized and comprehensive care to children and their families.

  5. Coping with the diagnosis and hospitalization of a child with childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóia, Tainan de Cerqueira; Sant'Ana, Ricardo Souza Evangelista; Santos, Ana Dulce Santana Dos; Oliveira, Sheila de Carvalho; Bastos Veras, Sylvia Maria Cardoso; Lopes-Júnior, Luís Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Find out how family members cope with hospitalization due to the diagnosis of childhood cancer. This is a descriptive-exploratory design study with qualitative data analyses, undertaken in the Support Center for Childhood Cancer in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. 10 members of the families of children with cancer underwent a semi-structured interview as a resource to collect empirical data. Data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Two categories emerged: "family coping with diagnosis" and "family coping with hospitalization." It was observed that family members suffer deeply and cope with the diagnosis of cancer in different manners. In addition, psychological stress has a cumulative impact on long periods of hospitalization and occurs in the presence of sadness, anxiety, suffering due to the invasive procedures the children are submitted to, fear and uncertainties related to prognosis. The diagnosis of cancer and hospitalization process causes severe impact on family dynamics. A competent nurse must be aware and sensitive to minimize this suffering by listening carefully and providing humanized and comprehensive care to children and their families.

  6. Sociodemographic parameters of Esophageal Cancer in northwest India: A regional cancer center experience of 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite various advances in the treatment of Esophageal Cancer (EC, being one of the least responsive tumors to cancer therapy, the overall prognosis remains poor. Therefore, it is significant to understand various sociodemographic factors associated with EC to find out various schemes for primary prevention of the disease. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of medical records of the EC patients registered in the regional cancer center of northwest India from January 2003 to December 2012. The site of the disease and the histology were also recorded in addition to the various sociodemographic parameters. Results: Out of 55,742 patients registered in our hospital; 3,667 were diagnosed to have EC. Male:female ratio was 1.15:1. The mean age was 54.6 ± 11.74 years; 66.15% of the patients were illiterate and 48.6% belonged to the low socioeconomic status. Smoking and alcohol consumption were identified as risk factors in 48 and 25.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The etiology in majority of the patients is linked to tobacco and alcohol, thus, modification of life style with limiting the use of addictions may be an effective strategy in the prevention of this dreaded and mostly incurable disease.

  7. A midwifery-led in-hospital birth center within an academic medical center: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdion, Karen; Lesser, Rebecca; Hirsch, Jennifer; Barger, Mary; Kelly, Thomas F; Moore, Thomas R; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The University of California San Diego Community Women's Health Program (CWHP) has emerged as a successful and sustainable coexistence model of women's healthcare. The cornerstone of this midwifery practice is California's only in-hospital birth center. Located within the medical center, this unique and physically separate birth center has been the site for more than 4000 births. With 10% cesarean delivery and 98% breast-feeding rates, it is an exceptional example of low-intervention care. Integrating this previously freestanding birth center into an academic center has brought trials of mistrust and ineffectual communication. Education, consistent leadership, and development of multidisciplinary guidelines aided in overcoming these challenges. This collaborative model provides a structure in which residents learn to be respectful consultants and appreciate differences in medical practice. The CWHP and its Birth Center illustrates that through persistence and flexibility a collaborative model of maternity services can flourish and not only positively influence new families but also future generations of providers.

  8. Stopping Liver Cancer's Rogue COP | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver cancer is the fourth most common cancer type and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Many liver tumors are actually metastases, tumors seeded in the liver by cancer cells from another organ, but hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), the most common liver tumors, are a heterogeneous family of cancers that arise in hepatocytes, the functional cells of the liver. HCCs are often associated with cirrhosis or liver scarring. Because of the variation in tumor phenotypes, the poor understanding of the molecular origins of these tumors, and the increasing number of diagnoses especially in the US, HCC is a major clinical challenge.

  9. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Position Type: Centrosome Biology and Microscopy A fully funded postdoctoral position is available immediately in the Centrosome Biology group in the Laboratory of Protein Dynamics and Signaling at the National Cancer Institute. We combine advanced biochemical and cell biology approaches to study centrosome biogenesis and their ultra-structure and function in normal and cancer conditions. Fellows interested in microscopy will benefit from an outstanding training in various modalities of advanced microscopy; multicolor live cell imaging, super-resolution microscopy (SIM, STORM), correlative light/electron microscopy, and laser microsurgery.

  10. US News and World Report cancer hospital rankings: do they reflect measures of research productivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Prasad

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Prior research has faulted the US News and World Report hospital specialty rankings for excessive reliance on reputation, a subjective measure of a hospital's performance. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether and to what extent reputation correlates with objective measures of research productivity among cancer hospitals. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: Automated search of NIH Reporter, BioEntrez, BioMedline and Clinicaltrials.gov databases. PARTICIPANTS: The 50 highest ranked cancer hospitals in 2013's US News and World Report Rankings. EXPOSURE: We ascertained the number of NCI funded grants, and the cumulative funds received by each cancer center. Additionally, we identified the number of phase I, phase II, and phase III studies published and indexed in MEDLINE, and registered at clinicaltrials.gov. All counts were over the preceding 5 years. For published articles, we summed the impact factor of the journals in which they appeared. Trials were attributed to centers on the basis of the affiliation of the lead author or study principal investigator. MAIN OUTCOME: Correlation coefficients from simple and multiple linear regressions for measures of research productivity and a center's reputation. RESULTS: All measures of research productivity demonstrated robust correlation with reputation (mean r-squared  = 0.65, median r-squared = 0.68, minimum r-squared = .41, maximum r-squared = 0.80. A multivariable model showed that 93% of the variation in reputation is explained by objective measures. CONCLUSION: Contrary to prior criticism, the majority of reputation, used in US News and World Rankings, can be explained by objective measures of research productivity among cancer hospitals.

  11. Antifungal agent utilization evaluation in hospitalized neutropenic cancer patients at a large teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazin A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Afsaneh Vazin,1 Mohammad Ali Davarpanah,2 Setareh Ghalesoltani3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 2HIV Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; 3International Branch of Faculty of Pharmacy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran Abstract: To evaluate pattern of using of three antifungal drugs: fluconazole, amphotericin B and voriconazole, at the hematology–oncology and bone marrow transplant wards of one large teaching hospital. In a prospective cross-sectional study, we evaluated the appropriateness of using antifungal drugs in patients, using Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines. All the data were recorded daily by a pharmacist in a form designed by a clinical pharmacist and infectious diseases specialist, for antifungals usage, administration, and monitoring. During the study, 116 patients were enrolled. Indications of prescribing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole were appropriate according to guidelines in 83.4%, 80.6%, and 76.9% respectively. The duration of treatments were appropriate according to guidelines in 75%, 64.5%, and 71.1% respectively. The dose of voriconazole was appropriate according to guidelines in 46.2% of patients. None of the patients received salt loading before administration of amphotericin B. The most considerable problems with the mentioned antifungals were about the indications and duration of treatment. In addition, prehydration for amphotericin B and dosage of voriconazole were not completely compatible with the mentioned guidelines. A suitable combination of controlling the use of antifungals and educational programs could be essential for improving the general process of using antifungal drugs at our hospital. Keywords: utilization evaluation, fluconazole, amphotericin B, voriconazole, neutropenia

  12. Performance of activities of daily living among hospitalized cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Line; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    and characterize ADL task performance problems among a group of adult disabled hospitalized cancer patients using interview and questionnaire data. METHODS: Cross-sectional study on prevalence of ADL task performance problems experienced by disabled hospitalized cancer patients using the Activities of Daily Living...... when using only one of the instruments. CONCLUSION: Adult hospitalized disabled cancer patients experience a high degree and variation in difficulties performing ADL, illustrating the need for a comprehensively planned assessment of problems and needs....... Questionnaire (ADL-Q) (n = 118) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 55). RESULTS: All 118 patients reported problems with ADL task performance. Based on the ADL-Q patients reported more problems within instrumental (I-)ADL than personal (P-)ADL. In both I-ADL and P-ADL the results...

  13. Smoking, depression, and hospital costs of respiratory cancers: Examining race and sex variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baqar A. Husaini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of smoking and depression on hospital costs for lung cancer (LC. Methods: We extracted data on depression, smoking history, demographics, and hospital charges for patients with respiratory cancers (ICD-9 codes 161–163, 165 from the 2008 Tennessee Hospital Discharge Data System. The sample (n=6665 was mostly white (86% and male (57%. Age-adjusted rates were developed in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention methods, and hospital costs were compared for patients with LC with versus without depression and a smoking history. Results: Three findings (P<0.001 emerged: (1 the LC rate was higher among blacks than among whites, and higher among men than among women; (2 while 66% of LC patients smoked (more men than women without racial variation, 24% had depression (more females and whites were depressed; (3 the LC hospital cost was 54% higher than the non-LC hospital cost, and this cost doubled for patients with LC with depression and smoking versus those without such characteristics. Conclusion: While LC is more prevalent among blacks and men, depression is higher among female and white patients. Since depression with higher costs existed among LC patients, our findings point to (1 the possibility of cost savings by diagnosing and treating depression among LC patients, and (2 implementation of proven smoking cessation programs to reduce LC morbidity and hospital costs.

  14. A POX on Renal Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proline oxidase, or POX, is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing the amino acid proline. POX contributes to the regulation of cell death that occurs when cellular systems malfunction, a process called apoptosis. Previous studies have determined that levels of POX are reduced in several types of human cancer. Likewise, many cancer cells become resistant to apoptosis, suggesting a link between POX and cancer cell survival.

  15. Cancer Genetics and Signaling | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer, Genetics, and Signaling (CGS) Group at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick  offers a competitive postdoctoral training and mentoring program focusing on molecular and genetic aspects of cancer. The CGS Fellows Program is designed to attract and train exceptional postdoctoral fellows interested in pursuing independent research career tracks. CGS Fellows participate in a structured mentoring program designed for scientific and career development and transition to independent positions.

  16. A study on risk factors of breast cancer among patients attending the tertiary care hospital, in Udupi district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandra Kamath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer has become one of the ten leading causes of death in India. Breast cancer is the most common diagnosed malignancy in India, it ranks second to cervical cancer. An increasing trend in incidence is reported from various registries of national cancer registry project and now India is a country with largest estimated number of breast cancer deaths worldwide. Aim: To study the factors associated with breast cancer. Objectives: To study the association between breast cancer and selected exposure variables and to identify risk factors for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: A hospital based Case control study was conducted at Shirdi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Center, Manipal, Udupi District. Results: Total 188 participants were included in the study, 94 cases and 94 controls. All the study participants were between 25 to 69 years of age group. The cases and controls were matched by ± 2 years age range. Non vegetarian diet was one of the important risk factors (OR 2.80, CI 1.15-6.81. More than 7 to 12 years of education (OR 4.84 CI 1.51-15.46 had 4.84 times risk of breast cancer as compared with illiterate women. Conclusion: The study suggests that non vegetarian diet is the important risk factor for Breast Cancer and the risk of Breast Cancer is more in educated women as compared with the illiterate women. Limitation: This is a Hospital based study so generalisability of the findings could be limited.

  17. CB Registration Form | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The registration deadline for the Cancer Biotechnology (CB) class is 1/27/2016. The first 50 registrants for each class offered (Jan. 29 or Feb. 9) will be accepted. Mandatory responses are marked by an asterisk (*). A confirmation e-mail will be sent to the address listed in the "E-mail Address" field upon completion and submission of the form. Questions?

  18. MBCP - Approach - Immunotherapy | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunotherapy CCR investigators pioneered the use of the tuberculosis vaccine—Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)—in the treatment of bladder cancer. In cases where the tumor burden is not too high and direct contact can be made with the urothelium surface of the bladder, BCG application appears to elicit an immune response that attacks the tumor as well as the attenuated virus. Ongoing clinical trials focusing on enhancing the patient’s immune system are listed below.

  19. Flow Cytometry Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Flow Cytometry Core (Flow Core) of the Cancer & Inflammation Program (CIP) is a service core which supports the research efforts of the CCR by providing expertise in the field of flow cytometry (fluorescence cell sorting) with the goal of gaining a more thorough understanding of the biology of cancer and cancer cells. The Flow Core provides service to 12-15 CIP laboratories and more than 22 non-CIP laboratories. Flow core staff provide technical advice on the experimental design of applications, which include immunological phenotyping, cell function assays, and cell cycle analysis. Work is performed per customer requirements, and no independent research is involved. The Flow Cytometry Technician will be responsible for: Monitor performance of and maintain high dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Operate high dimensional flow cytometer analyzers and cell sorters Monitoring lab supply levels and order lab supplies, perform various record keeping responsibilities Assist in the training of scientific end users on the use of flow cytometry in their research, as well as how to operate and troubleshoot the bench-top analyzer instruments Experience with sterile technique and tissue culture

  20. Focus on: University Hospital & Health Sciences Center SUNY at Stony Brook Biomedical Engineering Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyro, J F

    1993-01-01

    Clinical Engineering is practiced within the Biomedical Engineering Department (BME) at University Hospital, a modern, 536-bed, tertiary care teaching hospital. The 30-member department delivers a full range of clinical engineering services within the Stony Brook academic medical center. Major clinical engineering advances have been made in the areas of technology management, productivity and cost effectiveness, medical device safety, education, and research. University Hospital provides care for 2.5 million people in Suffolk County and other parts of Long Island.

  1. Bariatric Surgery and Liver Cancer in a Consortium of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Yang, Hannah P; Ward, Kristy K; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is implicated as an important factor in the rising incidence of liver cancer in the USA. Bariatric surgery is increasingly used for treating morbid obesity and comorbidities. Using administrative data from UHC, a consortium of academic medical centers in the USA, we compared the prevalence of liver cancer among admissions with and without a history of bariatric surgery within a 3-year period. Admissions with a history of bariatric surgery had a 61 % lower prevalence of liver cancer compared to those without a history of bariatric surgery (prevalence ratio 0.39, 95 % confidence interval 0.35-0.44), and these inverse associations persisted within strata of sex, race, and ethnicity. This hospital administrative record-based analysis suggests that bariatric surgery could play a role in liver cancer prevention.

  2. A Patient-Centered Perspective on Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Zebrack

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients’ physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people’s experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  3. Targeted Infrared Photoimmunotherapy for Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A longstanding goal of cancer therapy is the extensive destruction of cancer cells with minimal collateral damage to normal cells. This goal has been very hard to accomplish. Most existing efficacious treatments inevitably inflict collateral damage on nearby normal cells and tissue.

  4. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  5. Ambulatory surgery center and general hospital competition: entry decisions and strategic choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona; Housman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    General hospitals are consistently under pressure to control cost and improve quality. In addition to mounting payers' demands, hospitals operate under evolving market conditions that might threaten their survival. While hospitals traditionally were concerned mainly with competition from other hospitals, today's reimbursement schemes and entrepreneurial activities encouraged the proliferation of outpatient facilities such as ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) that can jeopardize hospitals' survival. The purpose of this article was to examine the relationship between ASCs and general hospitals. More specifically, we apply the niche overlap theory to study the impact that competition between ASCs and general hospitals has on the survival chances of both of these organizational populations. Our analysis examined interpopulation competition in models of organizational mortality and market demand. We utilized Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the impact of competition from each on ASC and hospital exit while controlling for market factors. We relied on two data sets collected and developed by Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration: outpatient facility licensure data and inpatient and outpatient surgical procedure data. Although ASCs do tend to exit markets in which there are high levels of ASC competition, we found no evidence to suggest that ASC exit rates are affected by hospital density. On the other hand, hospitals not only tend to exit markets with high levels of hospital competition but also experience high exit rates in markets with high ASC density. The implications from our study differ for ASCs and hospitals. When making decisions about market entry, ASCs should choose their markets according to the following: demand for outpatient surgery, number of physicians who would practice in the surgery center, and the number of surgery centers that already exist in the market. Hospitals, on the other hand, should account for competition from ASCs

  6. Protocol Coordinator II | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides programmatic and logistical support for the operations of clinical research for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials Provides deployment of clinical support services for clinical research  Streamlines protocol development timeline Provides data and document collection and compilation for regulatory filing with the FDA and other regulatory authorities Provides technical review and report preparation Provides administrative coordination and general logistical support for regulatory activities Ensures the provision of training for investigators and associate staff to reinforce and enhance a GCP culture Provides quality assurance and quality control oversight Performs regulatory review of clinical protocols, informed consent and other clinical documents  Tracks and facilitates a portfolio of protocols through each process step (IRB, RAC, DSMB, Office of Protocol Services) Assists clinical investigators in preparing clinical research protocols, including writing and formatting protocol documents and consent forms Prepares protocol packages for review and ensures that protocol packages include all the required material and comply with CCR, NCI and NIH policies Collaborates with investigators to resolve any protocol/data issues Coordinates submission of protocols for scientific and ethical review by the Branch scientific review committees, the NCI Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the clinical trial sponsor or the FDA Monitors the review process and maintains detailed, complete and accurate records for each protocol of the approvals at the various stages of the review process, including new protocol submissions, amendments to protocols, and continuing reviews, as well as other submissions such as adverse events Attends and prepares minutes for the Branch Protocol Review Committees For protocols that are performed with other research centers: contacts coordinators at other centers to obtain review committee approvals at these centers,  maintains records of

  7. Tenure Track/Tenure Eligible Investigators | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The newly established RNA Biology Laboratory at the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Frederick, Maryland is recruiting Tenure-eligible or Tenure Track Investigators to join the Intramural Research Program’s mission of high impact, high reward science. These positions, which are supported with stable financial resources, are the equivalent of Assistant Professor/Associate Professor/Professor in an academic department. The RNA Biology Laboratory is looking for candidate(s) who will complement our current group of seven dynamic and collaborative principal investigators (https://ccr.cancer.gov/RNA-Biology-Laboratory). We encourage outstanding scientists investigating any area of RNA Biology to apply. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the roles of RNA-binding proteins, noncoding RNAs and nucleotide modifications in cell and organismal function; the ways in which alterations in RNA homeostasis result in diseases such as cancer, and the development of RNA therapeutics. About NCI's Center for Cancer Research The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is an intramural research component of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). CCR’s enabling infrastructure facilitates clinical studies at the NIH Clinical Center, the world’s largest dedicated clinical research complex; provides extensive opportunities for collaboration; and allows scientists and clinicians to undertake high-impact laboratory- and clinic-based investigations. Investigators are supported by a wide array of intellectual and technological and research resources, including animal facilities and dedicated, high-quality technology cores in areas such as imaging/microscopy, including cryo-electron microscopy; chemistry/purification, mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, SAXS, genomics/DNA sequencing, transgenics and knock out mice, arrays/molecular profiling, and human genetics/bioinformatics. For an overview of CCR, please visit

  8. Oncofertility Resources at NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Clayman, Marla L.; Harper, Maya M.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Reinecke, Joyce; Shah, Shivani

    2013-01-01

    NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) set the standard for providing exemplary patient care. Quality cancer care includes discussions about fertility and referrals to fertility specialists for patients at risk for sterility. This study sought to determine what fertility preservation (FP) resources are available in CCCs and how well those are integrated into patient care. Leaders at each CCC received a letter requesting a short telephone interview with individuals who could provid...

  9. Language barriers and patient-centered breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Hwang, E Shelley; Nickleach, Dana; Kaplan, Celia P

    2011-08-01

    Provision of high quality patient-centered care is fundamental to eliminating healthcare disparities in breast cancer. We investigated physicians' experiences communicating with limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer patients. Survey of a random sample of California oncologists and surgeons. Of 301 respondents who reported treating LEP patients, 46% were oncologists, 75% male, 68% in private practice, and on average 33% of their patients had breast cancer. Only 40% reported at least sometimes using professional interpretation services. Although 75% felt they were usually able to communicate effectively with LEP patients, more than half reported difficulty discussing treatment options and prognosis, and 56% acknowledged having less-patient-centered treatment discussions with LEP breast cancer patients. In multivariate analysis, use of professional interpreters was associated with 53% lower odds of reporting less-patient-centered treatment discussions (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.26-0.85). California surgeons and oncologists caring for breast cancer patients report substantial communication challenges when faced with a language barrier. Although use of professional interpreters is associated with more patient-centered communication, there is a low rate of professional interpreter utilization. Future research and policy should focus on increasing access to and reimbursement for professional interpreter services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The First Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt International Scientific Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2009-10-01

    A wide gathering of scientists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses specialized in pediatric oncology practice met to celebrate the second anniversary of Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). The celebration was in the form of high-brow teaching lectures and reports presented by international experts in the fields of pediatric CNS tumors, solid tumors (neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, soft tissue and bone tumors, lymphoma, leukemia and pediatric oncology nursing. The conference extends its activities to hospital management, clinical pharmacy and telemedicine. Furthermore, CCHE experts presented the efforts performed to establish a state-of-the-art pediatric oncology hospital equipped with all needed facilities to raise the standard of care to the highest levels.

  11. Cancer prevention and detection centers: an overview and critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, L J; Lester, P

    1989-01-01

    Cancer screening is ideally carried out in free standing centers that are located near shopping centers, are quite visible, and have a warm, friendly appearance. This chapter describes the basic elements of such a center, including the use of a mobile mammogram van based at the center. While the precise size, location, and design of a center will vary depending on the specific demographics of an area, these data should facilitate such planning. Programs that can be carried out in this center are described utilizing information from preceding chapters. This chapter enlarges upon their application and then outlines criteria and services. Furthermore, a large section on general or whole-body screening is included. As in other programs, those at risk and the benefits are discussed. While not a high volume, income producer, this program is a requisite component offering great service to the customer.

  12. Not slowing down | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nine and-a-half-year-old Travis Carpenter gets a lot of speeding tickets. (He stresses that “and-a-half” part, too). These speeding tickets don’t come from a law enforcement officer but Jesse, one of his nurses at the NIH Clinical Center. Travis uses a power chair that he’s adorned with racing stickers, and his speeding tickets come from him zooming down the Clinical Center’s hallways, dodging the steady traffic of doctors, nurses, patients and families. He loves all things racing, NASCAR and pit crews. Neurofibromatosis type 1 isn’t slowing him down. Read more...

  13. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A postdoctoral fellowship is currently available for productive, highly-motivated, and energetic individuals in the Inflammation and Tumorigenesis Section of Dr. Yinling Hu at the NCI-Frederick campus.  A dynamic research environment and outstanding resources are available for enthusiastic individuals.  Requirements include a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent degree and experience in Immunology, Molecular Biology, and/or Signaling Research. Candidate must have excellent verbal, written communication and organizational skills, and the ability to handle multiple projects simultaneously. The project will be to investigate mechanisms of IKK/NF-B-involved auto-immunity, infection, innate immunity in mouse models of carcinogenesis/cancer biology, tumor initiating cells, and lymphoid organ development.

  14. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Escorcia Lab within the Molecular Imaging Program (MIP) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral candidate with a background in cancer biology and/or radiation biology to lead projects to develop and assess new tumor-selective imaging and therapeutic agents. MIP provides a collaborative environment of experts in (radio)chemistry, biology and physics and offers a unique opportunity to translate successful imaging and therapeutic agents into clinical trials in the NCI. The primary focus of the lab involves developing tumor-selective imaging agents (e.g. PET, SPECT) to inform cytotoxic therapies such as immuno-oncology agents, small molecule chemotherapy, external radiotherapy, or targeted radioimmunotherapy agents, which can be engineered in the lab. In addition, we aim to develop methods to enhance therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation, especially targeted nuclide therapies (TNTs), and utilize state of the art dose modeling and detection techniques to ensure therapeutic doses to tumors. Our group is uniquely poised to take advantage of recent approvals of TNTs in humans to expand the repertoire of preclinical agents and translate the most promising ones to the clinic. Our approach is multidisciplinary and spans bioinformatics (e.g. analysis of RNASeq data) to help identify novel imaging and therapeutic targets, genetic engineering (e.g. CRISPR/Cas9) and pharmacologic manipulation to study radiosensitivity, as well as radio- and bioconjugate-chemistry and medical physics to generate/assess our imaging and therapeutic agents. Accordingly, the lab is part of a multidisciplinary team of chemists, physicists, biologists, and physician-scientists who all collaborate to advance the mission of the lab and MIP as a whole, providing an excellent environment for motivated postdoctoral candidates to learn and thrive as scientists.

  15. Quality assessments for cancer centers in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Anke; Rajan, Abinaya; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-09-07

    Cancer centers are pressured to deliver high-quality services that can be measured and improved, which has led to an increase of assessments in many countries. A critical area of quality improvement is to improve patient outcome. An overview of existing assessments can help stakeholders (e.g., healthcare professionals, managers and policy makers) improve the quality of cancer research and care and lead to patient benefits. This paper presents key aspects of assessments undertaken by European cancer centers, such as: are assessments mandatory or voluntary? Do they focus on evaluating research, care or both? And are they international or national? A survey was sent to 33 cancer centers in 28 European Union member states. Participants were asked to score the specifics for each assessment that they listed. Based on the responses from 19 cancer centers from 18 member states, we found 109 assessments. The numbers have steadily increased from 1990's till 2015. Although, a majority of assessments are on patient-care aspects (n = 45), it is unclear how many of those include assessing patient benefits. Only few assessments cover basic research. There is an increasing trend towards mixed assessments (i.e., combining research and patient-care aspects) The need for assessments in cancer centers is increasing. To improve efforts in the quality of research and patient care and to prevent new assessments that "reinvent the wheel", it is advised to start comparative research into the assessments that are likely to bring patient benefits and improve patient outcome. Do assessments provide consistent and reliable information that create added value for all key stakeholders?

  16. The impact of the hospital work environment on social support from physicians in breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Lena; Wirtz, Markus; Kowalski, Christoph; Pfaff, Holger; Visser, Adriaan; Ernstmann, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    Research on determinants of a good patient-physician interaction mainly disregards systemic factors, such as the work environment in healthcare. This study aims to identify stressors and resources within the work environment of hospital physicians that enable or hinder the physicians' provision of social support to patients. Four data sources on 35 German breast cancer center hospitals were matched: structured hospital quality reports and surveys of 348 physicians, 108 persons in hospital leadership, and 1844 patients. Associations between hospital structures, physicians' social resources as well as job demands and control and patients' perceived support from physicians have been studied in multilevel models. Patients feel better supported by their physicians in hospitals with high social capital, a high percentage of permanently employed physicians, and less physically strained physicians. The results highlight the importance of the work environment for a good patient-physician interaction. They can be used to develop interventions for redesigning the hospital work environment, which in turn may improve physician satisfaction, well-being, and performance and consequently the quality of care. Health policy and hospital management could create conditions conducive to better patient-physician interaction by strengthening the social capital and by increasing job security for physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metastatic breast cancer in a Nigerian tertiary hospital | Adisa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metastatic breast cancer in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. ... Background: Late presentation of breast carcinoma is common in resource-limited countries with attendant poor outcome. Objective: To describe the pattern of clinical ... resource limitations. Improved awareness of the disease is advocated to reduce late presentation.

  18. Oral Candidiasis amongst cancer patients at Qods Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Within the past two decades, Candida species have emerged as major human pathogens and are currently the fourth most common cause of nosocomial infection. Propose of this study was to determine the occurrence of oral Candidiasis among cancer patients at Qods hospitals in Sanandaj. Materials and ...

  19. 15 Pattern of bladder cancer at University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Patients with bladder cancer who presented to the hospital during this period were recruited and parameters studied included patients demographics, HIV status .... prevalence of schistosomia infection isolated in malignant tissues. Table 2: Distribution of variables among patients. Gender number. Percentage. Mean age.

  20. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  1. Protocol Coordinator III | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides programmatic and logistical support for the operations of clinical research Provides deployment of clinical support services for clinical research Streamlines the protocol development timeline Provides data and documents collection and compilation for regulatory filing with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory authorities Provides technical review and report preparation Provides administrative coordination and general logistical support for regulatory activities Ensures the provision of training for investigators and associate staff to reinforce and enhance a Good Clinical Practices (GCP) culture Oversees quality assurance and quality control, performs regulatory review of clinical protocols, informed consent and other clinical documents Tracks and facilitates a portfolio of protocols through each process step (Institutional Review Board [IRB], Regulatory Affairs Compliance [RAC], Data Safety Monitoring Board [DSMB], Office of Protocol Services) Assists clinical investigators in preparing clinical research protocols, including writing and formatting consent forms Prepares protocol packages for review and ensures that protocol packages include all required material and complies with CCR, NCI and NIH policies Collaborates with investigators to resolve any protocol/data issues Coordinates submission of protocols for scientific and ethical review by the Branch scientific review committees, the NCI IRB, and the clinical trial sponsor or the FDA Monitors the review process and maintains detailed, complete and accurate approval records for each protocol at the various stages of the review process, including new protocol submissions, amendments to protocols, and continuing reviews, as well as other submissions such as adverse events Attends and prepares minutes for the Branch Protocol Review Committees Contacts coordinators at other centers for protocols that are performed there to obtain review committee approvals at those centers

  2. Extending Comprehensive Cancer Center Expertise in Clinical Cancer Genetics and Genomics to Diverse Communities: The power of partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Deborah J.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving genetic and genomic technologies for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) are revolutionizing our approach to targeted therapy and cancer screening and prevention, heralding the era of personalized medicine. Although many academic medical centers provide GCRA services, most people receive their medical care in the community setting. Yet, few community clinicians have the knowledge or time needed to adequately select, apply and interpret genetic/genomic tests. This article describes alternative approaches to the delivery of GCRA services, profiling the City of Hope Cancer Screening & Prevention Program Network (CSPPN) academic and community-based health center partnership as a model for the delivery of the highest quality evidence-based GCRA services while promoting research participation in the community setting. Growth of the CSPPN was enabled by information technology, with videoconferencing for telemedicine and web conferencing for remote participation in interdisciplinary genetics tumor boards. Grant support facilitated the establishment of an underserved minority outreach clinic in the regional County hospital. Innovative clinician education, technology and collaboration are powerful tools to extend GCRA expertise from a NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, enabling diffusion of evidenced-base genetic/genomic information and best practice into the community setting. PMID:20495088

  3. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  4. Quality assessments for cancer centers in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke; Rajan, A.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer centers are pressured to deliver high-quality services that can be measured and improved, which has led to an increase of assessments in many countries. A critical area of quality improvement is to improve patient outcome. An overview of existing assessments can help stakeholders

  5. Status of Hepatitis B Immunization in Medical Stuffs at Children Medical Center Hospital-Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Najafi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B is a disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which is transmitted through percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin or mucosal (i.e., direct contact with mucous membranes exposure to infectious blood or body fluids. HBV can cause chronic infection, resulting in cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Persons with chronic infection also serve as the main reservoir for continued HBV transmission.   Material and Methods: This is a prospective cross sectional study was performed in ChildrenMedicalCenterHospital on 396 medical personals (including 172 students,92 interns,56 residents and 56 fellowships during Sep 2012 to  Oct 2013. Results: All of medical staff had done HB vaccination. In 93% of them the vaccination was complete. The others,16% had only one, and 84% had two dose injections. 73% didn’t check HBsAb after vaccination.  Results showed in 21.4% of fellowships, 42.8% of residents, non of interns and 35% of students, had checked HBsAb.   Conclusion: Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease. HB is a serious world wide infection and medical staff are one of the most high risk groups. So Vaccinate their and HBS Antibody titer determination after complete vaccination is mandatory. 

  6. Status of Hepatitis B Immunization in Medical Stuffs at Children Medical Center Hospital-Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Najafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis B is a disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which is transmitted through percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin or mucosal (i.e., direct contact with mucous membranes exposure to infectious blood or body fluids. HBV can cause chronic infection, resulting in cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Persons with chronic infection also serve as the main reservoir for continued HBV transmission.   Material and Methods: This is a prospective cross sectional study was performed in Children Medical Center Hospital on 396 medical personals (including 172 students, 92 interns, 56 residents and 56 fellowships during September 2012 to October 2013.   Results: All of medical staff had done HB vaccination. In 93% of them the vaccination was complete. The others, 16% had only one, and 84% had two dose injections. 73% didn’t check HBsAb after vaccination.  Results showed in 21.4% of fellowships, 42.8% of residents, non of interns and 35% of students, had checked HBsAb.   Conclusion: Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease. HB is a serious world wide infection and medical staff are one of the most high risk groups. So Vaccinate their and HBS Antibody titer determination after complete vaccination is mandatory.    Keywords:Immunization, Hepatitis B, Medical Staff, Vaccination.  

  7. Ambulatory infusional cancer chemotherapy: nursing role in patient management. The Cancer Center of Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C; Strong, D; Childress, J; Fougere, B; Gotthardt, S

    1996-01-01

    The role of nursing in infusional cancer chemotherapy (ICC) may vary depending on the practice setting. Nurses in free-standing centers and office practices perform many duties that nurses in other facilities may not, because of the lack of many of the supports that benefit hospitals with their multidepartmental and hierarchical structures. Nurses function collaboratively with physicians in the planning and the implementation of patient treatment. Patient-related nursing responsibilities include patient/family education, drug preparation and administration, patient assessment for treatment toxicity, recognition and management of complications related to the catheter or infusion device, and telephone triage. Other duties more removed from patient care might include inventory management, research data collection and management, quality assurance and improvement, compliance with regulatory issues, and a myriad of other responsibilities. The transition of patient care to the outpatient setting has broadened the scope of nursing to include nonpatient care responsibilities due to financial constraints brought about by health care reform, changes in reimbursement patterns, and overhead required to maintain and deliver quality patient care. As a result of nursing responsibilities, it becomes paramount that the aforementioned constructs for program support are in place and that all nurses are consistently trained and have a template to follow for patient treatment and management. Nursing ability to perform patient-related tasks should be proven by formal written and practical competencies repeated annually and as procedural changes are implemented. The paragraphs to follow suggest nursing management of patients receiving ICC using a model developed at The Cancer Center of Boston (TCC).

  8. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  9. [Hemoglobin anomalies at the university hospital center in Lome, Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segbena, A Y; Kueviakoe, I; Messie, A K; Napo-Koura, I G; Vovor, A; David, M

    2002-01-01

    Togo is a sub-Saharan African nation with a number of public health problems including endemic tropical disease. The country is also located in the Lehmann sickle cell belt characterized by a high incidence of genetic red blood cell disorders. The purpose of this study was to identify the main hemoglobin variants, evaluate their incidence and discuss diagnostic pitfalls. Data on 5604 subjects was compiled from the 3 studies, i.e., a 405-case prospective study conducted in a rheumatology department, a 5028-case retrospective study using electrophoresis and a 171-case transversal study in newborns. Diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy was based on alkaline electrophoresis. Rare hemoglobins were identified in the Biochemistry Laboratory of the Henri Mondor Hospital in Paris, France. Diagnosis of alpha-thalassemia was checked by PCR. The main abnormal hemoglobins were the S and C variants with respective incidence ranges of 15.8 to 16.7% for the AS trait and 12.1 to 15.8% for AC trait. SS sickle cell disease was observed in 1.2 to 2% of subjects and SC sickle disease in 2.3 to 4.2%. Rare hemoglobulinopathies involved the fast hemoglobulin variant, hemoglobin D, and hereditary persistence of hemoglobin F. Alpha-thalassemia was detected in 47% of the 171 newborns studied with a predominance of the heterozygous form (36.8%), followed by the homozygous form (8%). The incidence of alpha gene triplication in the newborns was about 2.4%. Hemoglobin Barts was not a consistent finding in association with diagnosis of alpha-thalassemia since it was present in 15 newborns with normal alpha genotype (8.8%) and absent in 10 newborns with heterozygous alpha genotype (5.9%). This study demonstrates that molecular biology is the best method for the detection of the alpha-globin gene abnormalities.

  10. Postdoctoral Fellow | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A postdoctoral fellow position is available in the Tissue Morphodynamics Unit, headed by Dr. Kandice Tanner, at the National Cancer Institute. The Tanner lab combines biophysical and cell biological approaches to understand the interplay between cell motility and tissue architecture. We use a combination of imaging modalities, cell biology and animal models. Experience with zebrafish is desired but not mandatory. It is expected that as a member of this lab, one will have an opportunity to be exposed to all these areas. We value a vibrant and collaborative environment where lab members share ideas, reagents and expertise and want to work on fundamental problems in the establishment of metastatic lesions. The successful candidate will interact with a diverse group of scientists with backgrounds in biochemistry, motor biophysics and cell biology. The position offers a generous salary and benefits package as well as the possibility of further career advancement if performance is excellent. 1. Kim J, Staunton J.R., and Tanner K. Independent control of topography for three-dimensional patterning of the ECM microenvironment. (Adv Mater 10.1002/adma.201503950, 2015) 2. Blehm, B.H., Devine, A., Staunton J.R., Tanner, K. In Vivo Tissue has Non-linear Rheological Behavior Distinct from 3D Biomimetic Hydrogels as Determined by AMOTIV Microscopy. (Biomaterials 83:66-78, 2016) 3. Staunton J.R, Vieira, W., Fung Leung, K., Lake R Devine, A, Tanner, K, Mechanical properties of the tumor stromal microenvironment probed ex vivo by in situ-calibrated optical trap-based active microrheology (CAMB 9(3):398-417, 2016) 4. Staunton J.R., Blehm, B.H., Devine, A., Tanner, K. In situ calibration of position detection in an optical trap for active microrheology in viscous materials, (Optics Express, In press 2017)

  11. Secure of the bi-site radiotherapy activity as part of the resumption of treatments in the Hospital of Epinal by the team of Alexis Vautrin Nancy Cancer Center;Securisation de l'activite de radiotherapie bi-site dans le cadre de la reprise des traitements au centre hospitalier d'Epinal par l'equipe du centre Alexis-Vautrin de Nancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, V.; Aigle, D.; Peiffert, D.; Noel, A. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Noel, A. [Institut national Polytechnique de Lorraine, CNRS UMR7039, laboratoire CRAN, 54 - Nancy (France); Simon, J.M. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-12-15

    In February 2007, the radiation therapy department of the Jean Monnet Hospital in Epinal (France) has stopped the radiotherapy treatments after the discovery of a radiotherapy accident and bad practices leading to overexposure of patients between 1987 and 2006. The Regional Cancer Center 'Centre Alexis Vautrin' in Nancy (France) was given the task of the new start of treatment activity. From February 2007 to January 2008, actions of training, updates of equipment and practices have been performed in the Epinal Hospital, guided by the quality approach, allowing the treatment of new patients in February 2008, with the radiation oncologists and the medical physicists of the Centre Alexis Vautrin, with the highest conditions of security and confidence

  12. Identification of a Novel Cancer Biomarker | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    During cancer development, cells accumulate a variety of mutations which alter their normal components and activities. One potential change is in the carbohydrate or sugar polymers which decorate proteins predominately found on the cell surface. The accessibility of these residues makes them ideal targets for the development of diagnostics or therapeutics.

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qianlai; Asher, Gary N

    2017-03-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common among cancer patients, but the majority of CAM studies do not specify the time periods in relation to cancer diagnoses. We sought to define CAM use by cancer patients and investigate factors that might influence changes in CAM use in relation to cancer diagnoses. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer between 2010 and 2012 at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Questionnaires were sent to 1794 patients. Phone calls were made to nonrespondents. Log binomial/Poisson regressions were used to investigate the association between cancer-related changes in CAM use and conversations about CAM use with oncology providers. We received 603 (33.6 %) completed questionnaires. The mean age (SD) was 64 (11) years; 62% were female; 79% were white; and 98% were non-Hispanic. Respondents reported the following cancer types: breast (47%), prostate (27%), colorectal (14%), lung (11%). Eighty-nine percent reported lifetime CAM use. Eighty-five percent reported CAM use during or after initial cancer treatment, with category-specific use as follows: mind-body medicine 39%, dietary supplements 73%, body-based therapies 30%, and energy medicine 49%. During treatment CAM use decreased for all categories except energy medicine. After treatment CAM use returned to pretreatment levels for most CAMs except chiropractic. Initiation of CAM use after cancer diagnosis was positively associated with a patient having a conversation about CAM use with their oncology provider, mainly driven by patient-initiated conversations. Consistent with previous studies, CAM use was common among our study population. Conversations about CAM use with oncology providers appeared to influence cessation of mind-body medicine use after cancer diagnosis.

  14. Laryngeal preservation in ENT oncology. Retrospective series of 246 patients managed in the Caen University Hospital and François Baclesse Cancer Care Center between 1998 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, F; Meunier, A; Heutte, N; Rame, J-P; De Raucourt, D; Babin, E; Blanchard, D

    2015-06-01

    A 10-year retrospective study investigated factors for survival and laryngeal preservation in advanced laryngeal, hypopharyngeal or epilaryngeal neoplasia. Two hundred and forty-six patients with advanced cancer of the larynx (17.48%), hypopharynx (48.78%) or epilarynx (33.74%) undergoing primary organ-sparing treatment were included from 1998 to 2008. Treatment comprised chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy for 92.68% of patients, isolated radiation therapy for 1.6% and concomitant or sequential radiation-chemotherapy for 5.7%. General health status, history and tumor status were recorded. Factors influencing survival were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier estimator, log-rank test and Cox models. Median overall survival of the population was 2.3 years and median laryngeal preservation 0.99 years in male patients and 2 years in female patients. Survival correlated significantly with body mass index (BMI; P=0.0004), WHO performance status (P=0.0064), alcohol consumption (P=0.0004) and cessation (P<0.0001) and also T stage (P=0.0038), initial laryngeal mobility (P=0.0002) and post-chemotherapy assessment (P<0.0001). Survival with functional larynx correlated with baseline BMI at first consultation (P=0.016), baseline WHO grade (P=0.0005), laryngeal mobility (P<0.0001), T staging (P=0.0009), and T and/or N chemotherapy response to a classical organ preservation protocol (P<0.0001). Over and above established criteria, the present study highlighted the importance of general health and nutritional status during treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Developmental Scientist III | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Establishes, implements and maintains standardized processes and assesses performance to make recommendations for improvement Provides support and guidance to the cellular therapy or vector production facilities at the NIH Clinical Center engaged in the manufacture of patient specific therapies Manufactures cellular therapy products for human use Develops and manufactures lentiviral and/or retroviral vectors Prepares technical reports, abstracts, presentations and program correspondence concerning assigned projects through research and analysis of information relevant to government policy, regulations and other relevant data and monitor all assigned programs for compliance Provides project management support with planning and development of project schedules and deliverables, tracking project milestones, managing timelines, preparing status reports and monitoring progress ensuring adherence to deadlines Facilitates communication through all levels of staff by functioning as a liaison between internal departments, senior management, and the customer Serves as a leader/mentor to administrative staff and prepares employee performance evaluations Develops and implements procedures/programs to ensure effective and efficient business and operational processes  Identifies potential bottlenecks in upcoming development processes and works with team members and senior management for resolution Analyzes and tracks initiatives and contracts Coordinates and reviews daily operations and logistics, including purchasing and shipping of miscellaneous equipment, laboratory and office supplies to ensure compliance with appropriate government regulations  Coordinates the administrative, fiscal, contractual, and quality aspects of all projects Ensures that internal budgets, schedules and performance requirements are met Monitors workflow and timelines to ensure production operations are on schedule and adequate raw materials and supplies are available Ensures all activities are in

  16. Bactericidal efficacy of alcohol solution in community hospital and health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Sungkeeree, Seksit; Saisud, Phitsamai; Chaiyakhot, Pojnicha; Wongwian, Adisak; Pakarasang, Maitree; Prasongwatana, Vitoon; Asayut, Narong; Thipchaksurat, Narongrit; Sribenjalux, Pipat; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate bactericidal efficacy of alcohol solution during actual use and typical storage conditions in community hospital and health centers. The alcohol samples were collected immediately after the first bottle-opening (day 0) and on day 3, 7, 14, 21 and 30 from 10 stations in hospital and community health centers in Pone-na-kaew district, Sakon Nakhon province, Thailand, during May-July 2011. Bactericidal efficacy of these samples against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae was evaluated. Ethanol concentration was quantified by a gas chromatography method. Bactericidal efficacy of the alcohol samples still remained on day 30 with ethanol concentration range of 60.91-65.99% v/v. This finding should be considered as a cost-benefit model for using alcohol solution in community hospital and health centers.

  17. Patient-Centered But Employee Delivered: Patient Care Innovation, Turnover, and Organizational Outcomes in Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Ariel C. Avgar; Rebecca Kolins Givan; Mingwei Liu

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly experimenting with workplace innovations designed to improve the quality of patient care, alleviate financial pressures, and retain staff. The authors examine one such innovation, patient-centered care (PCC), and its effects on clinical and employee outcomes in hospitals in the United Kingdom. Employing PCC entails a shift from an institutional and physician focus to one that emphasizes patients' needs and references. Drawing on a combined dataset covering the perio...

  18. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  19. Lipid Biomarkers Identified for Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive cancer of the liver with poor prognosis and growing incidence in developed countries. Pathology and genetic profiles of HCC are heterogeneous, suggesting that it can begin growing in different cell types. Although human tumors such as HCC have been profiled in-depth by genomics-based studies, not much is known about their overall metabolite modifications and how these changes can form a network that leads to aggressive disease and poor outcome.

  20. Familial clustering of cancer in two tertiary care hospitals in Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Outpatient cancer clinics at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) and Radiotherapy Clinic at Nairobi Hospital. Subjects: Patients with a tissue histological or cytological diagnosis of cancer. Main outcome measures: A reported family history of cancer. Results: A total number of 485 cancer patients were recruited, 382, ...

  1. Oral Cancer Awareness of Non-Consultant Hospital Doctors in Irish Hospitals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, D

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer is rising in Ireland. The aim of this study is to assess the level of awareness of oral cancer amongst non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) in Ireland, so any knowledge deficits can be identified and addressed. Data was collected by means of an anonymous online questionnaire, which was distributed via a private social media page for NCHDs in Ireland. It was completed by 221 participants, of which over 80% recorded that they do not regularly examine patients’ oral mucosa. Sixty percent were ‘unsure’, and 21%, ‘very unsure’, about diagnosing oral cancer based on clinical appearance. Nor were respondents able to identify confidently the various potential risk factors for oral cancer. Eighty-four percent of NCHDs requested further education on the topic. The response rate of the study was low, and further investigation is required to determine if the findings of this study are representative of the wider NCHD community. The chief recommendation of this paper is to provide more education about oral cancer, at both medical undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and to increase awareness of the condition amongst hospital doctors.

  2. Eliminating cancer stem cells: an interview with CCR’s Steven Hou | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Hou, Ph.D., senior investigator in the Basic Research Laboratory at the Center for Cancer Research describes his latest research that has uncovered potential ways to eliminate cancer stem cells and may offer hope to patients with reoccurring tumors.  Learn more...

  3. Meeting report: The 13th Annual Meeting of the Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3); Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment, Columbus, Ohio; March 1-2, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Carson, William E; Repasky, Elizabeth A; Wei, Wei-zen; Kalinski, Pawel; Lotze, Michael T; June, Carl H; Petros, William; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Olencki, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The Translational Research Cancer Centers Consortium (TrC3) is a cancer immunotherapy network, established to promote biologic therapeutics in the Midwestern and Northeastern regions of The United States. The 13th Annual Meeting of the TrC3 was hosted by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute and took place at The Blackwell Hotel and Conference Center in Columbus, OH on March 1-2, 2010 (http://www.osuccc.osu.edu/TrC3/index.htm). This year's theme was "Immune Suppression and the Tumor Microenvironment." The meeting consisted of 21 oral presentations, a roundtable discussion focused on enhancing collaborative relationships within the consortium, and a poster session with 54 abstracts from predoctoral or postdoctoral researchers. This annual meeting brought together more than 170 investigators from 9 regional cancer centers including: Abramson Cancer Center at The University of Pennsylvania, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute at Wayne State University, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Center, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center at West Virginia University, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Penn State Cancer Institute, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. The proceedings of this year's meeting are summarized in this report.

  4. Wnt Inactivation for Liver Cancer Therapy | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common and third most deadly type of cancer in the world. The majority of cases occur in Asia and Africa, resulting in most cases being diagnosed only at advanced stages of the disease when drug resistance is high. HCC typically follows damage to the liver such as cirrhosis, making radiation and chemotherapy a more challenging prospect. Surgery is also not a very viable option because less than one in four carcinomas can be completely removed. The limitations in these treatment modalities create the need for alternative therapeutic approaches.

  5. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  6. Social Welfare Centers Protect Outpatients with Mood Disorders from Risk of Hospital Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Jang, Suk Yong; Park, Sohee; Cho, Kyung Hee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Choi, Young; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    South Korea faces difficulties in the management of mental disorders, and those difficulties are expected to gradually worsen. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders. We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002-2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 50,160 patients who were newly diagnosed with a mood disorder among the 1,025,340 individuals in a nationally representative sample. We performed a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to examine the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders (ICD-10: F3). There was a 3.9% admission rate among a total of 99,533 person-years. Outpatients who lived in regions with more social welfare centers were less likely to be admitted to a hospital (per increase of five social welfare centers per 100,000 people; OR: 0.958; 95% CI: 0.919-0.999). Social welfare centers had an especially strong protective effect on patients with relatively mild mood disorders and those who were vulnerable to medical expenditures. Considering the protective role of social welfare centers in managing patients with mood disorders, health-policy makers need to consider strategies for activating mental healthcare.

  7. Social Welfare Centers Protect Outpatients with Mood Disorders from Risk of Hospital Admission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Tae Han

    Full Text Available South Korea faces difficulties in the management of mental disorders, and those difficulties are expected to gradually worsen. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders.We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002-2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 50,160 patients who were newly diagnosed with a mood disorder among the 1,025,340 individuals in a nationally representative sample. We performed a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equation (GEE models to examine the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders (ICD-10: F3.There was a 3.9% admission rate among a total of 99,533 person-years. Outpatients who lived in regions with more social welfare centers were less likely to be admitted to a hospital (per increase of five social welfare centers per 100,000 people; OR: 0.958; 95% CI: 0.919-0.999. Social welfare centers had an especially strong protective effect on patients with relatively mild mood disorders and those who were vulnerable to medical expenditures.Considering the protective role of social welfare centers in managing patients with mood disorders, health-policy makers need to consider strategies for activating mental healthcare.

  8. Utilization of operating room time in a cancer hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appropriate usage of operating room (OR time can improve efficiency of utilization of resources and help to decrease surgical waiting lists. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of usage of OR time in a tertiary referral cancer hospital. Setting and Design: This was a prospective audit carried out over 2 months in 11 major ORs in a cancer hospital. Materials and Methods: OR anesthesiologists filled a standard form for all patients undergoing elective surgery and documented the following times: entry into OR, start of anesthesia, handover to surgeon, incision, start of reversal, end of anesthesia, and shifting out of patient. Statistical Analysis: Median time utilized for various OR processes was calculated. Results: An average of two surgeries were performed per OR session (828 surgeries in 407 OR sessions. Anesthesia and surgery-related processes contributed to 17% and 79%, respectively, of total OR time, with turnover time between cases accounting for the remaining 4%. Fifteen percent (60 out of 407 OR sessions started more than 10 min later than the planned start time, and 17% (70 of 407 of OR sessions ended more than 2 h after the scheduled finish time. An anesthesia procedure room was utilized in only 15% of cases where it could potentially have been used. Conclusion: This audit identified patterns of OR usage in a cancer hospital and helped to detect areas of inefficient utilization. Anesthesia-related processes contributed to 17% of the total OR time.

  9. Coping strategies used by hospitalized children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Amanda Mota Pacciulio; Silva-Rodrigues, Fernanda Machado; Sparapani, Valéria de Cássia; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2015-03-01

    To analyze coping strategies used by children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy during hospitalization. This was an exploratory study to analyze qualitative data using an inductive thematic analysis. Semistructured interviews using puppets were conducted with 10 children with cancer, between 7 and 12 years old, who were hospitalized and undergoing chemotherapy. The coping strategies to deal with chemotherapy were: understanding the need for chemotherapy; finding relief for the chemotherapy's side effects and pain; seeking pleasure in nourishment; engaging in entertaining activities and having fun; keeping the hope of cure alive; and finding support in religion. Children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy need to cope with hospitalizations, pain, medication side effects, idle time, and uncertainty regarding the success of treatment. These challenges motivated children to develop their own coping strategies, which were effective while undergoing chemotherapy. By gaining knowledge and further understanding about valid coping strategies during chemotherapy treatment, health professionals can mobilize personal and material resources from the children, health teams, and institutions aiming to potentiate the use of these strategies to make treatments the least traumatic. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. Center of Excellence for Individuation of Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Faulds, 1994]. Like other vinca-alkaloids it may interfere with amino acid, cyclic AMP and glutathione metabolism as well as with calmodulin...immunofluorescence. Semin Oncol 16: 5-8 Bunting KD, Lindahl R, Townsend AJ (1994) Oxazaphosphorine-specific resistance in human MCF-7 breast carcinoma cell...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During the most recent period the Center of Excellence continued to collect and process human breast cancer tissues for

  11. COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT HELIPORT SOLUTIONS FOR THE CLINICAL HOSPITAL CENTER IN OSIJEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Timko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexity in takeoff and landing operations of helicopters require careful planning and designing of heliport infrastructure. The world's biggest aviation organization, namely Federal Aviation Administration and International Civil Aviation Organization, published their standards and designing recommendations for heliport designers to implement that are analyzed and compared in this paper. In the Republic of Croatia, helicopters are designed according to the recommendations of National heliport regulations which are based on recommendations of International Civil Aviation Organization (Annex 14. The practical part of the paper deals with the implementation of national heliport standard recommendations in two variants of heliport designs for emergency medical service for the clinical hospital center in Osijek. As a potential location of the new heliport for emergency medical transportation a transit port is analyzed because it is close to the clinical hospital center in Osijek and is well connected with the existing road infrastructure, and it is also possible to make a direct access to the hospital complex from the north side. Two solutions were analyzed and compared upon the criteria of accessibility, security of operations and possibility for instrument flight conditions, size of heliport and necessary areas, costs of building and maintenance and helicopter noise. There is an intention that regional capital cities that have clinical hospital centers need to have infrastructure for emergency helicopter transportation near the hospital.

  12. Positioning academic medical centers and teaching hospitals to thrive in the next decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D E

    1985-06-01

    Market share for academic medical centers and teaching hospitals will decline over the next five years necessitating new strategies to ensure growth and profitability. These types of institutions are, however, in a strong position to compete and gain market share locally by building a defensible competitive advantage. This article offers three avenues for increasing market share: networking, brand name product differentiation, and business diversification.

  13. The Effect on Academic Health Centers of Tertiary Care in Community Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, David A.; Rosenfeld, Lisa A.

    1984-01-01

    The growing cost of medical education and the provision of care to the indigent can be endangered by the dilution of revenue sources traditionally available to the academic health centers but which are being taken over by suburban hospitals. (Author/MLW)

  14. [ISO 9002 at the Center of Pediatric Intensive Care at the Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gé Lacerda, D P; Rocha, M L; Santos, R P

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the process of implementation of a quality program in Pediatric Intensive Therapy Center of "Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein" which resulted in the certification of this service for the Standards ISO 9002/94. It points out the nurse's role as a leader in this process.

  15. [Synchronous bilateral breast cancer: experiences in the Mohammed VI Cancer Treatment Center, CHU Ibn Rochd, Casablanca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmadaye Ibrahim; Bendahhou, Karima; Mestaghanmi, Houriya; Saile, Rachid; Benider, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBBC) are characterized by extensive clinical and morphological heterogeneity, with an frequency between 1.5 and 3.2%. Women treated for unilateral breast cancer are at higher risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. Screening and advances in breast imaging have improved detection rates of SBBC. Our study aims to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, histological and therapeutic features of bilateral breast cancer. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with breast cancer treated at the Mohammed VI Center over a two year period. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using R. software. 31 patients had SBBC, representing 2.4% of breast cancer cases in our Center. The average age was 47.8 ± 8.4 years, 22.6% of patients used oral contraceptives. A family history of breast cancer was observed in 22.6% of cases. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma (58.1%), SBR grade II and III were common (38.7%). Hormone receptors were positive for progesterone (38.7%) and for estrogen (41.9%). HER2 was overexpressed in 20.0% of cases. 29.0% of patients received hormonal therapy and 3.2% targeted therapies. Our study showed that bilateral breast cancer represents a small percentage of all breast cancers but have specific clinical features that help to differentiate it from unilateral breast cancer.

  16. Building a Collaboration Between a Children's Hospital and an Early Childhood Education and Social Services Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Donna; Woods-Jaeger, Briana A; Dowd, M Denise

    2017-09-01

    To address toxic stress among children growing up in poverty, an innovative collaboration was developed between a community center, Operation Breakthrough (OB), and a tertiary care children's hospital, Children's Mercy Hospital (CMH). OB started as a day care center but has expanded and developed ways to provide shelter, safety, food, employment, education and health care. CMH is a traditional academic children's hospital that, in recent years, has been looking for ways to better address the social determinants of health. This article describes how the two organizations found ways to work together to capitalize on each other's strengths. Although the two institutions shared some common goals, they had very different organizational structure. We describe how a series of complex negotiations and trust-building exercises eventually led to a robust and unique partnership. Copyright © 2017 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating organizational change in health care: the patient-centered hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorio, Carlo V; Gorli, Mara; Verzillo, Stefano

    2018-02-08

    An increasing number of hospitals react to recent demographic, epidemiological and managerial challenges moving from a traditional organizational model to a Patient-Centered (PC) hospital model. Although the theoretical managerial literature on the PC hospital model is vast, quantitative evaluations of the performance of hospitals that moved from the traditional to the PC organizational structure is scarce. However, quantitative analysis of effects of managerial changes is important and can provide additional argument in support of innovation. We take advantage of a quasi-experimental setting and of a unique administrative data set on the population of hospital discharge charts (HDCs) over a period of 9 years of Lombardy, the richest and one of the most populated region of Italy. During this period three important hospitals switched to the PC model in 2010, whereas all the others remained with the functional organizational model. This allowed us to develop a difference-in-difference analysis of some selected measures of efficiency and effectiveness for PC hospitals focusing on the "between-variability" of the 25 major diagnostic categories (MDCs) in each hospital and estimating a difference-in-difference model. We contribute to the literature that addresses the evaluation of healthcare and hospital change by providing a quantitative estimation of efficiency and effectiveness changes following to the implementation of the PC hospital model. Results show that both efficiency and effectiveness have significantly increased in the average MDC of PC hospitals, thus confirming the need for policy makers to invest in new organizational models close to the principles of PC hospital structures. Although an organizational change towards the PC model can be a costly process, implying a rebalancing of responsibilities and power among hospital personnel (e.g. medical and nursing staff), our results suggest that changing towards a PC model can be worthwhile in terms of both

  18. Association between Stroke Center Hospitalization for Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Holloway, Robert G.; Chan, Paul S.; Noyes, Katia; Shah, Manish N.; Ting, Henry H.; Chappel, Andre R.; Peterson, Eric D.; Friedman, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Context Although stroke centers are widely accepted and supported, little is known about their impact on patient outcomes. Objective To examine the association between admission to stroke centers for an acute ischemic stroke and mortality. Design, Setting, and Participants Observational study using data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System. We compared mortality for patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke (n=30,947) between 2005 and 2006 at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals using differential distance to hospitals as an instrumental variable to adjust for potential pre-hospital selection bias. Patients were followed for mortality for 1 year after the index hospitalization through 2007. To assess whether our findings were specific to stroke, we also compared mortality for patients admitted with gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n=39,409) or acute myocardial infarction (n=40,024) at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals. Main Outcome Measure Thirty-day all-cause mortality. Results Among 30,947 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 15,297 (49.4%) were admitted to designated stroke centers. Using the instrumental variable analysis, admission to designated stroke centers was associated with greater use of thrombolytic therapy (4.8% vs. 1.7%; adjusted difference 2.2%, 95% CI, 1.6% to 2.8%; P<0.001) and lower 30-day all-cause mortality (10.1% vs. 12.5%; adjusted mortality difference: −2.5%, 95% CI, −3.6% to −1.4%; P<0.001). Differences in mortality also were observed at all time points, including at 1-day, 7-day, and 1-year follow-up. Moreover, the outcome differences were specific to stroke, as stroke centers and non-stroke centers had similar 30-day all-cause mortality rates among those with acute myocardial infarction (adjusted mortality difference: +0.3%, 95% CI, −0.5% to 1.0%; P=0.50) and/or gastrointestinal hemorrhage (adjusted mortality difference: +0.1%, 95% CI, −0.9% to 1.1%; P=0

  19. Hospital competition and financial performance: the effects of ambulatory surgery centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), limited-service alternatives for treating surgery patients not requiring an overnight stay, are a health-care service innovation that has proliferated in the U.S. and other countries in recent years. This paper examines the effects of ASC competition on revenues, costs, and profit margins of hospitals that also provided these services as a subset of their general services in Arizona, California, and Texas during the period 1997-2004. We identified all ASCs operating during the period in the 49 Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions in the three states. The results of fixed effects models suggested that ASCs are meaningful competitors to general hospitals. We found downward pressure on revenues, costs, and profits in general hospitals associated with ASC presence. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Patient-Centered Care in Breast Cancer Genetic Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Anne; Anota, Amélie; Dick, Julia; Kuboth, Violetta; Lareyre, Olivier; De Pauw, Antoine; Cano, Alejandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Schmutzler, Rita; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Kop, Jean-Luc

    2018-02-12

    With advances in breast cancer (BC) gene panel testing, risk counseling has become increasingly complex, potentially leading to unmet psychosocial needs. We assessed psychosocial needs and correlates in women initiating testing for high genetic BC risk in clinics in France and Germany, and compared these results with data from a literature review. Among the 442 counselees consecutively approached, 212 (83%) in France and 180 (97%) in Germany, mostly BC patients (81% and 92%, respectively), returned the 'Psychosocial Assessment in Hereditary Cancer' questionnaire. Based on the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm (BOADICEA) BC risk estimation model, the mean BC lifetime risk estimates were 19% and 18% in France and Germany, respectively. In both countries, the most prevalent needs clustered around the "living with cancer" and "children-related issues" domains. In multivariate analyses, a higher number of psychosocial needs were significantly associated with younger age (b = -0.05), higher anxiety (b = 0.78), and having children (b = 1.51), but not with country, educational level, marital status, depression, or loss of a family member due to hereditary cancer. These results are in line with the literature review data. However, this review identified only seven studies that quantitatively addressed psychosocial needs in the BC genetic counseling setting. Current data lack understandings of how cancer risk counseling affects psychosocial needs, and improves patient-centered care in that setting.

  1. Happy crisis tests hospitals' PR plan. Septuplets' arrival swamps Iowa hospitals with national, international media. Blank Children's Hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The public relations staff believed the birth of healthy septuplets would become a human interest story for local media. But the staff was stunned at the outpouring of international and national media knocking at their front doors. The staff of both Iowa Methodist Medical Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, organized a communications plan for 14 official press conferences, constant updates to the media and a website to handle ongoing inquiries from the public. As a result, the story of the McCaughey septuplets was shown in more than 10,000 television stories around the world. The hospitals received more than 36,000 magazine and newspaper articles. The public relations staff not only fielded more than 2,000 phone calls in the days following the Nov. 19 birth, but more than 15 major networks parked their vehicles and satellite dishes in front of the hospital.

  2. Challenges Implementing Lung Cancer Screening in Federally Qualified Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeliadt, Steven B; Hoffman, Richard M; Birkby, Genevieve; Eberth, Jan M; Brenner, Alison T; Reuland, Daniel S; Flocke, Susan A

    2018-02-08

    The purpose of this study is to identify issues faced by Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in implementing lung cancer screening in low-resource settings. Medical directors of 258 FQHCs serving communities with tobacco use prevalence above the median of all 1,202 FQHCs nationally were sampled to participate in a web-based survey. Data were collected between August and October 2016. Data analysis was completed in June 2017. There were 112 (43%) FQHC medical directors or surrogates who responded to the 2016 survey. Overall, 41% of respondents were aware of a lung cancer screening program within 30 miles of their system's largest clinic. Although 43% reported that some providers in their system offer screening, it was typically at a very low volume (less than ten/month). Although FQHCs are required to collect tobacco use data, only 13% indicated that these data can identify patients eligible for screening. Many FQHCs reported important patient financial barriers for screening, including lack of insurance (72%), preauthorization requirements (58%), and out-of-pocket cost burdens for follow-up procedures (73%). Only 51% indicated having adequate access to specialty providers to manage abnormal findings, and few reported that leadership had either committed resources to lung cancer screening (12%) or prioritized lung cancer screening (12%). FQHCs and other safety-net clinics, which predominantly serve low-socioeconomic populations with high proportions of smokers eligible for lung cancer screening, face significant economic and resource challenges to implementing lung cancer screening. Although these vulnerable patients are at increased risk for lung cancer, reducing patient financial burdens and appropriately managing abnormal findings are critical to ensure that offering screening does not inadvertently lead to harm and increase disparities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer: Single center experience after 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelović Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. At the Department of Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery of the Hospital for Digestive Surgery in Belgrade, hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (hMIE has been a standard of care for patients with resectable esophageal cancer since 2009. As a next and final step in the change management, from January 2015 we utilized total minimally invasive esophagectomy (tMIE as a standard of care. Objective. The aim of the study was to report initial experiences in hMIE (laparoscopic approach for cancer and analyze surgical technique, major morbidity and 30-day mortality. Methods. A retrospective cohort study included 44 patients who underwent elective hMIE for esophageal cancer at the Department for Minimally Invasive Upper Digestive Surgery, Hospital for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade from April 2009 to December 2014. Results. There were 16 (36% middle thoracic esophagus tumors and 28 (64% tumors of distal thoracic esophagus. Mean duration of the operation was 319 minutes (approximately five hours and 20 minutes. The average blood loss was 173.6 ml. A total of 12 (27% of patients had postoperative complications and mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 days. Mean hospital stay after surgery was 16 days. The average number of harvested lymph nodes during surgery was 31.9. The overall 30-day mortality rate within 30 days after surgery was 2%. Conclusion. As long as MIE is an oncological equivalent to open esophagectomy (OE, better relation between cost savings and potentially increased effectiveness will make MIE the preferred approach in high-volume esophageal centers that are experienced in minimally invasive procedures.

  4. Prognostic Implications of Level-of-Care at Tertiary Heart Centers Compared With Other Hospitals After Resuscitation From Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have found higher survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and admission to tertiary heart centers. The aim was to examine the level-of-care at tertiary centers compared with nontertiary hospitals and the association with outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest....... METHODS AND RESULTS: Consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients (n=1078) without ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction admitted to tertiary centers (54%) and nontertiary hospitals (46%) were included (2002-2011). Patient charts were reviewed focusing on level-of-care and comorbidity....... The adjusted odds of predefined markers of level-of-care were higher in tertiary centers: admission to intensive care unit (odds ratio [OR], 1.8 [95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.5]), temporary pacemaker (OR, 6.4 [2.2-19]), vasoactive agents (OR, 1.5 [1.1-2.1]), acute (

  5. Mental Health Conditions and Symptoms in Pediatric Hospitalizations: A Single-Center Point Prevalence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupnik, Stephanie K; Henry, M Katherine; Bae, Hanah; Litman, Jessica; Turner, Shanarra; Scharko, Alexander M; Feudtner, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Children and adolescents necessitating hospitalization for physical health conditions are at high risk for mental health conditions; however, the prevalence of mental health conditions and symptoms among hospitalized children and adolescents is uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of hospitalized children and adolescents who have diagnosed mental health disorders or undiagnosed mental health problems. In this single-center point prevalence study of hospitalized children between the ages of 4 and 21 years, patients or their parents reported known mental health diagnoses and use of services using the Services Assessment for Children and Adolescent, and they reported patient mental health symptoms using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist, 17-item form (PSC-17). Of 229 eligible patients, 119 agreed to participate. Demographic characteristics of patients who enrolled were not statistically significantly different from those of patients who declined to participate. Among participants, 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18%-35%) reported a known mental health diagnosis. On the PSC-17, 29% (95% CI, 21%-38%) of participants had a positive screen for mental health symptoms. Of those with a positive screen, 38% (95% CI, 21%-55%) had no known mental health diagnosis, and 26% (95% CI, 12%-43%) had not received ambulatory mental health services in the 12 months before hospitalization. Mental health conditions and symptoms are common among patients hospitalized in a tertiary children's hospital, and many affected patients are not receiving ambulatory mental health services. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adolescent and young adult oncology patients: Disparities in access to specialized cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Elysia; Keegan, Theresa; Johnston, Emily E; Haile, Robert; Sanders, Lee; Saynina, Olga; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-07-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 15 to 39 years with cancer continue to experience disparate survival outcomes compared with their younger and older counterparts. This may be caused in part by differential access to specialized cancer centers (SCCs), because treatment at SCCs has been associated with improved overall survival. The authors examined social and clinical factors associated with AYA use of SCCs (defined as Children's Oncology Group-designated or National Cancer Institute-designated centers). A retrospective, population-based analysis was performed on all hospital admissions of AYA oncology patients in California during 1991 through 2014 (n = 127,250) using the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the contribution of social and clinical factors on always receiving care from an SCC (vs sometimes or never). Results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Over the past 20 years, the percentage of patients always receiving inpatient care at an SCC increased over time (from 27% in 1991 to 43% in 2014). In multivariable regression analyses, AYA patients were less likely to always receive care from an SCC if they had public insurance (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.62-0.66), were uninsured (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.46-0.56), were Hispanic (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85-0.91), lived > 5 miles from an SCC, or had a diagnosis other than leukemia and central nervous system tumors. Receiving care at an SCC was influenced by insurance, race/ethnicity, geography, and tumor type. Identifying the barriers associated with decreased SCC use is an important first step toward improving outcomes in AYA oncology patients. Cancer 2017;123:2516-23. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Familial clustering of cancer in two tertiary care hospitals in Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the occurrence of cancers in families of individuals diagnosed cancer. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: Outpatient cancer clinics at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) and Radiotherapy Clinic at Nairobi Hospital. Subjects: Patients with a tissue histological or cytological diagnosis of ...

  8. Hospitalization costs of lung cancer diagnosis in Turkey: Is there a difference between histological types and stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Murat; Yıldırım, Fatma; Yurdakul, Ahmet Selim; Öztürk, Can

    2016-12-01

    To establish the direct costs of diagnosing lung cancer in hospitalized patients. Hospital data of patients who were hospitalized and diagnosed as lung cancer between September 2013 and August 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who underwent surgery for diagnosis and who were initiated with cancer treatment during the same hospital stay were excluded from study. Histological types and stages of lung cancer were determined. Expenses were grouped as laboratory costs, pathology costs, diagnostic imaging costs, overnight room charges, medication costs, blood center costs, consumable expenditures' costs and inpatient service charges (including consultants' service, electrocardiogram, follow-up, nursing services, diagnostic interventions). Of the 68 patients, 55 (81%) had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 13 (19%) had small cell lung cancer (SCLC). 47% of patients with NSCLC had stage 4 disease and 86% of patients with SCLC had extensive stage disease. Median total cost per patient was 910 (95% CI= 832-1291) Euros (€). Of all costs, 37% were due to inpatient service charges and 22% were medication costs. Median total cost per patient was 912 (95% CI= 783-1213) € in NSCLC patients and 908 (95% CI= 456-2203) € in SCLC patients (p> 0.05). In NSCLC group, total cost per patient was 873 (95% CI= 591-1143) € in stage 1-2-3 diseases and 975 (95% CI= 847-1536) € in stage 4 disease (p> 0.05). In SCLC group total cost per patient was 937 € in limited stage and 502 (95% CI= 452-2508) € in extensive stage (p> 0.05). There is no significant difference between costs related to diagnosis of different lung cancer types and stages in patients hospitalized in a university hospital.

  9. Hospitalization Rates for Patients on Assisted Peritoneal Dialysis Compared with In-Center Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaishi, Ahmed A.; Dixon, Stephanie N.; Perl, Jeffrey; Jain, Arsh K.; Lavoie, Susan D.; Nash, Danielle M.; Paterson, J. Michael; Lok, Charmaine E.; Quinn, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Assisted peritoneal dialysis is a treatment option for individuals with barriers to self-care who wish to receive home dialysis, but previous research suggests that this treatment modality is associated with a higher rate of hospitalization. The objective of our study was to determine whether assisted peritoneal dialysis has a different rate of hospital days compared to in-center hemodialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted a multicenter, retrospective cohort study by linking a quality assurance dataset to administrative health data in Ontario, Canada. Subjects were accrued between January 1, 2004 and July 9, 2013. Individuals were grouped into assisted peritoneal dialysis (family or home care assisted) or in-center hemodialysis on the basis of their first outpatient dialysis modality. Inverse probability of treatment weighting using a propensity score was used to create a sample in which the baseline covariates were well balanced. Results The study included 872 patients in the in–center hemodialysis group and 203 patients in the assisted peritoneal dialysis group. Using an intention to treat approach, patients on assisted peritoneal dialysis had a similar hospitalization rate of 11.1 d/yr (95% confidence interval, 9.4 to 13.0) compared with 12.9 d/yr (95% confidence interval, 10.3 to 16.1) in the hemodialysis group (P=0.19). Patients on assisted peritoneal dialysis were more likely to be hospitalized for dialysis-related reasons (admitted for 2.4 d/yr [95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 3.2] compared with 1.6 d/yr [95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 2.3] in the hemodialysis group; P=0.04). This difference was partly explained by more hospital days because of peritonitis. Modality switching was associated with high rates of hospital days per year. Conclusions Assisted peritoneal dialysis was associated with similar rates of all-cause hospitalization compared with in-center hemodialysis. Patients on assisted

  10. Telemedicine and telesurgery in cancer care: inaugural conference at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, Robert L; Bogler, Oliver; Hyle, Laurel; Lee, Andrew; Simmons, Angela; Williams, Robert; Hawk, Ernest; Matin, Surena; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2014-09-01

    Despite the growing incidence of cancer worldwide, there are an insufficient number of primary care physicians, community oncologists, and surgeons to meet the demand for cancer care, especially in rural and other medically underserved areas. Teleoncology, including diagnostics, treatment, and supportive care, has the potential to enhance access to cancer care and to improve clinician education and training. Major cancer centers such as The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center must determine how teleoncology will be used as part of strategic planning for the future. The Telemedicine and Telesurgery in Cancer Care (TTCC) conference was convened to determine technologically based strategies for addressing global access to essential cancer care services. The TTCC conference brought policy makers together with physicians, legal and regulatory experts to define strategies to optimize available resources, including teleoncology, to advance global cancer care. The TTCC conference discourse provided insight into the present state of access to care, expertise, training, technology and other interventions, including teleoncology, currently available through MD Anderson, as well as a vision of what might be achievable in the future, and proposals for moving forward with a comprehensive strategy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Chemohormonal therapy in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Sweeney CJ, Chen YH, Carducci M, Liu G, Jarrard DF, Eisenberger M, Wong YN, Hahn N, Kohli M, Cooney MM, Dreicer R, Vogelzang NJ, Picus J, Shevrin D, Hussain M, Garcia JA, DiPaola RS. Department of Medicine; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston; Harvard Medical School, Boston; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; School of Medicine and Public Health; Madison; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University Health System, Philadelphia; Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Seidman Cancer Center; Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Both in Cleveland; University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville; Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada, Las Vegas; Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis; NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, IL; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor; Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick.N Engl J Med. 2015 Aug 20;373(8):737-46. [Epub 2015 Aug 5]. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1503747.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Eggener

    2017-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the backbone of treatment for metastatic prostate cancer since the 1940s. We assessed whether concomitant treatment with ADT plus docetaxel would result in longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. We assigned men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to receive either ADT plus docetaxel (at a dose of 75mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3wk for 6 cycles) or ADT alone. The primary objective was to test the hypothesis that the median overall survival would be 33.3% longer among patients receiving docetaxel added to ADT early during therapy than among patients receiving ADT alone. A total of 790 patients (median age, 63y) underwent randomization. After a median follow-up of 28.9 months, the median overall survival was 13.6 months longer with ADT plus docetaxel (combination therapy) than with ADT alone (57.6 vs. 44.0mo; hazard ratio for death in the combination group, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.47-0.80; P<0.001). The median time to biochemical, symptomatic, or radiographic progression was 20.2 months in the combination group, as compared with 11.7 months in the ADT-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI: 0.51-0.72; P<0.001). The rate of a prostate-specific antigen level of less than 0.2ng/ml at 12 months was 27.7% in the combination group vs. 16.8% in the ADT-alone group (P<0.001). In the combination group, the rate of grade 3 or 4 febrile neutropenia was 6.2%, the rate of grade 3 or 4 infection with neutropenia was 2.3%, and the rate of grade 3 sensory neuropathy and of grade 3 motor neuropathy was 0.5%. Six cycles of docetaxel at the beginning of ADT for metastatic prostate cancer resulted in significantly longer overall survival than that with ADT alone. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00309985.). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  13. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  14. [Estimation of hospital costs of colorectal cancer in Catalonia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Julieta; Borràs, Josep Maria; Chiarello, Pietro; García-Alzorriz, Enric; Macià, Francesc; Reig, Anna; Mateu de Antonio, Javier; Castells, Xavier; Cots, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    To assess the hospital cost associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment by stage at diagnosis, type of cost and disease phase in a public hospital. A retrospective analysis was conducted of the hospital costs associated with a cohort of 699 patients diagnosed with CRC and treated for this disease between 2000 and 2006 in a teaching hospital and who had a 5-year follow-up from the time of diagnosis. Data were collected from clinical-administrative databases. Mean costs per patient were analysed by stage at diagnosis, cost type and disease phase. The mean cost per patient ranged from 6,573 Euros for patients with a diagnosis of CRC in situ to 36,894 € in those diagnosed in stage III. The main cost components were surgery-inpatient care (59.2%) and chemotherapy (19.4%). Advanced disease stages were associated with a decrease in the relative weight of surgical and inpatient care costs and an increase in chemotherapy costs. This study provides the costs of CRC treatment based on clinical practice, with chemotherapy and surgery accounting for the major cost components. This cost analysis is a baseline study that will provide a useful source of information for future studies on cost-effectiveness and on the budget impact of different therapeutic innovations in Spain. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Diverticulitis Outcomes are Equivalent Between Level 1 Trauma Centers and Community Hospitals in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Stephen C; Arumugam, Dena; Dombrovskiy, Viktor Y

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, general surgeons provide emergency general surgery (EGS) coverage by assigned call. The acute care surgery (ACS) model is new and remains confined mostly to academic centers. Some argue that in busy trauma centers, on-call trauma surgeons may be unable to also care for EGS patients. In New Jersey, all three Level 1 Trauma Centers (L1TC) have provided ACS services for many years. Analyzing NJ state inpatient data, we sought to determine whether outcomes in one common surgical illness, diverticulitis, have been different between L1TC and nontrauma centers (NTC) over a 10-year period. The NJ Medical Database was queried for patients aged 18 to 90 hospitalized from 2001 to 2010 for acute diverticulitis. Demographics, comorbidities, operative rates, and mortality were compiled and analyzed comparing L1TC to NTC. For additional comparison between L1TC and NTC, 1:1 propensity score matching with replacement was accomplished. χ(2), t test, and Cochran-Armitage trend test were used. From 2001 to 2010, 88794 patients were treated in NJ for diverticulitis. 2621 patients (2.95%) were treated at L1TCs. Operative rates were similar between hospital types. Patients treated at L1TCs were more often younger (63.1 ± 0.3 vs 64.7 ± 0.1; P diverticulitis are equivalent between LT1C and NTC in NJ. Trauma centers in NJ more commonly provide care to minority and uninsured patients.

  16. Statistical Analysis of Research Data | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in cancer biology have resulted in the need for increased statistical analysis of research data. The Statistical Analysis of Research Data (SARD) course will be held on April 12-13, 2017 from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM at the Natcher Conference Center, Balcony A on the Bethesda campus. SARD is designed to provide an overview of the general principles of statistical analysis of research data. The course will be taught by Paul W. Thurman of Columbia University.

  17. Clinical characteristics and rehabilitation of hospitalised cancer patients in a Korean tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Kyeong Eun; Yoon, Tae Hee; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2017-08-01

    With the increase in the patient survival rates of many types of cancers, a greater proportion of cancer patients live with disease-related problems that diminish their quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and rehabilitation of hospitalised cancer patients who were referred to the Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) at Samsung Medical Center, a tertiary university hospital in Seoul, Korea. Hospitalised cancer patients aged > 18 years who were referred to the Department of PRM from January to December 2012 were enrolled in this retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical characteristics of the patients, the principal reasons for their referral and relevant details of their rehabilitative management. A total of 1,340 cases were included. The most common primary cancer was lung cancer (19.0%) and 28.6% of the cases had solid organ metastasis. The most common reason for referral was deconditioning (31.7%), followed by weakness (23.1%) and respiratory problems (14.5%). Bedside exercise was prescribed to 28.4% of the patients, exercise in the rehabilitation therapy unit to 28.0% and pulmonary rehabilitation to 14.3%. Among the 1,340 cases, 107 (8.0%) were transferred to the Department of PRM for comprehensive rehabilitation. The 32 patients with an identifiable Modified Barthel Index score showed significant functional improvement. The findings of the present study contribute to a better understanding of rehabilitation for hospitalised cancer patients. The information obtained will also be helpful in the development of appropriate cancer rehabilitation strategies.

  18. Costs of Providing Infusion Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Hospital-based Infusion Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Jordana; Ogden, Kristine; Nickman, Nancy; Halpern, Michael T; Cifaldi, Mary; Ganguli, Arijit; Bao, Yanjun; Garg, Vishvas

    2017-08-01

    Many hospital-based infusion centers treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with intravenous biologic agents, yet may have a limited understanding of the overall costs of infusion in this setting. The purposes of this study were to conduct a microcosting analysis from a hospital perspective and to develop a model using an activity-based costing approach for estimating costs associated with the provision of hospital-based infusion services (preparation, administration, and follow-up) in the United States for maintenance treatment of moderate to severe RA. A spreadsheet-based model was developed. Inputs included hourly wages, time spent providing care, supply/overhead costs, laboratory testing, infusion center size, and practice pattern information. Base-case values were derived from data from surveys, published studies, standard cost sources, and expert opinion. Costs are presented in year-2017 US dollars. The base case modeled a hospital infusion center serving patients with RA treated with abatacept, tocilizumab, infliximab, or rituximab. Estimated overall costs of infusions per patient per year were $36,663 (rituximab), $36,821 (tocilizumab), $44,973 (infliximab), and $46,532 (abatacept). Of all therapies, the biologic agents represented the greatest share of overall costs, ranging from 87% to $91% of overall costs per year. Excluding infusion drug costs, labor accounted for 53% to 57% of infusion costs. Biologic agents represented the highest single cost associated with RA infusion care; however, personnel, supplies, and overhead costs also contributed substantially to overall costs (8%-16%). This model may provide a helpful and adaptable framework for use by hospitals in informing decision making about services offered and their associated financial implications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Perception of the organizational climate in the surgical center of a specialized hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiri, W C

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify how a new team of the surgical center staff in a specialized hospital perceive the organization climate. A qualitative approach was utilized. As a theoretical reference to measure the organization climate, we have used CHIAVENATO, that defines organization climate as the interior of an organization that influences its members behavior. The organization climate could be favourable, unfavourable or neutral. The speeches showed a favourable organization climate considering the adopted methodology.

  20. Do-not-resuscitate orders for terminal patients with cancer in teaching hospitals of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeun; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Nam, Eun Mi; Lee, Hye Ran; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Soon Nam

    2007-10-01

    To examine the current practices relating to do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders for terminal patients with cancer at teaching hospitals in Korea. The records of 387 deaths from January 1 to December 31, 2005 at four cancer centers were identified and reviewed to assess the DNR delineation. Basic demographics, circumstances surrounding the establishment of the DNR directive, the percentage of orders for identified populations, and the time interval between DNR consent and death were evaluated. An order of DNR consent was obtained from 296 patients (76%) of a total of 387 patients. All DNR consents were made between the physician and family, without involving the patient. Written preprinted DNR consent forms were used in 169 (57%) cases and 127 patients (43%) had verbal DNR permission. DNR consent was interpreted in two ways: one forbade resuscitation in two hospitals and the other implied limited care in two other hospitals. A unilateral physician decision to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was decided for 62 (16%) patients. Terminal CPR was performed on 29 (7%) patients. DNR discussion was made within 7 days of the day of death on 228 (77%) patient among the 296 DNR consenting patients. From our teaching-hospital-based analysis of terminal cancer patients in Korea, consent for a DNR order was common. However, DNR order forms were not standardized and lacked room to document patient involvement in the decision. Usually the DNR decision was made within last days of the patient's life. Our results reflect the need for the improvement of end-of-life care decisions in Korea.

  1. Outpatient surgery centers draw cases away from hospitals, impact resident training volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Kyle; Liedtke, Eric; Toedter, Lori; Rohatgi, Chand

    2008-01-01

    Across the United States, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are increasing in both number and surgical volume. This trend has been the focus of debate regarding reimbursement and patient safety, as well as surgical productivity and efficiency. However, the impact on surgical resident training caused by this shift toward outpatient surgery in nonhospital settings has not been studied. We reviewed data reported by our hospital and by local surgery centers as well as the case logs of the surgical residents at our institution to determine whether a negative effect on resident case volume has occurred. We conducted a retrospective review of our PGY-1 through PGY-3 level surgical residents' case logs for 3 consecutive academic years, from July 2004 through June 2007. We evaluated a group of common outpatient procedures that are now also being performed in stand-alone surgical centers in our area, such as breast biopsies, incision and drainage, hernia repair, colonoscopy, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). The data were tallied by academic year and compared over time. In addition, we analyzed data reported to state agencies by our hospital and local surgery centers over the last 6 calendar years for any trends in case volume. By evaluating 2 different independent data sets for the same endpoint, we could evaluate our hypothesis twice. When evaluating state-reported data for the defined cases, a significant decrease was observed in the total number of cases performed at Easton Hospital, Easton, Pennsylvania, each year between 2003 and 2006 (p hernia (p = 0.04), excision of skin lesion (p = 0.0022), and incision/drainage (p outpatient surgery experience from procedures performed at our home institution. With the recent surge of stand-alone surgical centers, many outpatient procedures are being performed outside of the hospital in centers where our residents do not rotate. Although current residents in our program are performing enough cases to fulfill the ACGME required

  2. Quality of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in developing countries: a comparison of surgical and oncologic outcomes between a comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Rene; Nick, Alpa M; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Frumovitz, Michael; Soliman, Pamela T; Buitrago, Carlos A; Borrero, Mauricio; Angel, Gonzalo; Reis, Ricardo Dos; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2012-05-01

    To help determine whether global collaborations for prospective gynecologic surgery trials should include hospitals in developing countries, we compared surgical and oncologic outcomes of patients undergoing laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States and a cancer center in Colombia. Records of the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston (between April 2004 and July 2007) and the first 50 consecutive patients who underwent the same procedure at the Instituto de Cancerología-Clínica las Américas in Medellín (between December 2008 and October 2010) were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in median patient age (US 41.9 years [range 23-73] vs. Colombia 44.5 years [range 24-75], P=0.09). Patients in Colombia had a lower median body mass index than patients in the US (24.4 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 kg/m(2), P=0.002). Compared to patients treated in Colombia, patients who underwent surgery in the US had a greater median estimated blood loss (200 mL vs. 79 mL, P<0.001), longer median operative time (328.5 min vs. 235 min, P<0.001), and longer postoperative hospital stay (2 days vs. 1 day, P<0.001). Surgical and oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy were not worse at a cancer center in a developing country than at a large comprehensive cancer center in the United States. These results support consideration of developing countries for inclusion in collaborations for prospective surgical studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PLAYING AND BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS OF CHILDREN WITH CANCER AT A HOSPITAL CLASSROOM

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa Pereira Hostert, Paula Coimbra; Fiorim Enumo, Sônia Regina; Motta Loss, Alessandra Brunoro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Playing in the hospital brings benefits to the child and to the treatment. It works as a hospitalization coping strategy. This study aims at describing play choices adopted by children with cancer at hospital classrooms. Eighteen children with cancer aged between 6 and 12 participated in the study. The children were evaluated using the computerized instrument for assessing play in the hospital (APHcomp) and their parents responded to Rutter’s child behavior scale-A2 (CBS). Their fav...

  4. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  5. The experience of Latino parents of hospitalized children during family-centered rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Vischer, Lisa; Hill, Constance; Mendez, Suzanne S

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the experience of Latino parents of hospitalized children during family-centered rounds (FCRs). Family-centered rounds provide a mechanism to exchange information and facilitate shared decision making. Latino parents may have a suboptimal experience during FCRs. Understanding this experience helps nurse leaders improve patient satisfaction. Using a convenience sample, written surveys in Spanish were given to 20 parents who had attended at least 2 FCRs. The surveys were translated into English for data analysis. The narrative data were analyzed for common themes using content analysis. Four themes were identified: valued perception, inclusion and care, facilitated communication, and meeting expectations. Parents in this study felt that their participation and input were valued and that these positively impacted care. Family-centered rounds helped them understand the plan and facilitated communication when done in Spanish. Nurse leaders play a key role in improving satisfaction and increasing access to translation services or bilingual staff.

  6. Compliance with Baby-Friendly policies and practices in hospitals and community health centers in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiek, Laura N

    2012-08-01

    Since 2001, Quebec's ministry of health and social services has prioritized implementation of the Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI), which includes the original hospital initiative and its expansion to community services. The objective was to document across the province compliance with the BFI's Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding in hospitals, Seven Point Plan in community health centers (CHCs), and International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes (Code). Using managers/staff, mothers, and observers, the author measured the extent of implementation of indicators formulated for each step/point and the Code, based on the revised WHO/UNICEF recommendations. Mean compliance scores in Quebec were 3.13 for 140 CHCs (range, 0 to 7) and 4.54 for 60 hospitals/birthing centers (range, 0 to 10). The mean compliance score for the Code was 0.69 for both CHCs and hospitals/birthing centers. The evaluation documented marked variations in implementation level for each of the steps/points and the Code. Also, managers/staff, mothers, and observers differed in their report of BFI compliance for most steps/points and the Code. Facilities that had applied for or obtained BFI designation demonstrated higher compliance with the BFI than those that had not. Results disseminated to participating organizations allowed comparisons on a regional/provincial perspective and in relation to BFI-designated facilities. Furthermore, this first portrait of BFI compliance in Quebec provided provincial, regional, and local health authorities with valuable information that can be used to bring about policy and organizational changes to achieve the international standards required for Baby-Friendly certification.

  7. PREVALENCE OF INCIDENTAL GALLBLADDER CANCER IN A TERTIARY-CARE HOSPITAL FROM PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides Dias MARTINS-FILHO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGallbladder cancer is sometimes incidentally uncovered following cholecystectomy for gallstones diseases. The supposed highly variable prevalence of incidental gallbladder cancer through our country is unknown.ObjectiveTo explore the prevalence of incidental gallbladder cancer in our tertiary-care hospital.MethodsA cross-sectional study was carried out on patients who consecutively underwent cholecystectomy due to gallstones disease at Faculdade Pernambucana de Saúde, Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira - FPS/IMIP, from January, 2007 to December, 2010. Data on incidental gallbladder cancer patients were explored for prevalence estimation and description of our experience with the management of this malignancy.ResultsOur analysis involved 2018 patients with a marked predominance of women (n=1.697; 84.1% over men (n=321; 15.9%. The 3-year prevalence estimate of 0.34% was recorded for incidental gallbladder cancer in our sample. Regarding tumor staging, there were 1 T1a, 1 T1b, and 5 T2 adenocarcinoma tumors. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy alone was performed for the T1a tumor, and additional radical surgery was performed in five others. One patient presented metastatic disease at the time of repeat surgery. The final pathology revealed residual/additional disease in all T2 tumors after radical surgery whereas the T1b patient underwent a salvage Whipple’s procedure due to a secondary distal cholangiocarcinoma. The patient with T1a tumor is alive after 3-year follow-up but all of the others died because of disease recurrence/progression up to 12 months.ConclusionThis study confirms the poor prognosis of Gallbladder cancer even when incidentally diagnosed following cholecystectomy and supposes a 3-year prevalence estimate of 0.34% for incidental gallbladder cancer in our Center from Pernambuco State, Brazil.

  8. Patterns of health services utilization in the last two weeks of life among cancer patients: Experience in an Australian academic cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Khor, Richard; Bressel, Mathias; Tran, Phillip; Tedesco, Jo; Tai, Keen Hun; Ball, David; Duchesne, Gillian; Foroudi, Farshad

    2017-12-01

    To report the trend in end-of-life health services (HS) utilization among cancer patients treated in a large Australian academic cancer center over a 12-year period. This is a retrospective study of cancer patients treated at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC), who had documented death between January 2002 and December 2013. Using administrative and billing database, we report on the utilization of different categories of HS within two weeks of death: diagnostic investigations (pathology and radiology), inpatient and outpatient services, and potentially futile interventions (PFI, which include radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery). Of the 27 926 "active" cancer patients in the study (i.e. those with medical contact at PMCC in the last year of life), 6368 (23%) had documented HS utilization within two weeks of death. 11% and 9% had pathology and radiology investigations respectively, 14% had outpatient clinic appointments, and 7% had hospital admissions. There were 2654 patients (10%) who had PFI within two weeks of death - 2198 (8%) had radiotherapy, 287 (1%) chemotherapy and 267 (1%) surgery. We observed peak HS and PFI utilization in 2004, which then dropped to its lowest in 2009/2010. Experience in an Australian cancer center suggests approximately one in four "active" cancer patients had HS utilization, and one in ten had PFI, within two weeks of death. The implementation of palliative care guidelines may reduce some of these potentially wasteful and futile interventions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Patterns of treatment for early stage breast cancers at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1997 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Dong, Wenli; Feig, Barry W; Ravdin, Peter; Theriault, Richard L; Giordano, Sharon H

    2009-05-15

    The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of use for adjuvant therapy and the changes in surgical practice for patients with early stage breast cancer and to describe how recent large clinical trial results impacted the patterns of care at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). The study included 5486 women who were diagnosed with stage I through IIIA breast cancer between 1997 and 2004 and received their treatment at MDACC. A chi-square trend test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to assess changes in treatment patterns over time. Among lymph node-positive patients, the use of anthracycline plus taxane chemotherapy increased from 17% in 1997 to 81% in 2004 (P 1997 and 2000. For postmenopausal patients who received endocrine therapy, the use of tamoxifen was replaced increasingly by the use of aromatase inhibitors (from 100% on tamoxifen in 1997 to 14% in 2004; P 1997 to 2004 (from 1.8% to 69.7%, respectively, among patients who underwent mastectomy; and from 18.1% to 87.1%, respectively, among patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery; P < .001). The results from this study suggested that key findings from adjuvant therapy and surgical procedures from large clinical trials often prompt immediate changes in the patient care practices of research hospitals like MDACC.

  10. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected With Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Alassaf, Wajdan

    2015-10-01

    As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered to become an Ebola Treatment Center as part of the US effort to manage the threat. We developed detailed policies and procedures for Ebola patient management at our university hospital. Both the EMS system and county public health made significant contributions during the development process. This article shares information about this process and the outcomes to inform other institutions facing similar challenges of preparing for an emerging threat with limited resources. The discussion includes information about management of (1) patients who arrive by ambulance with prior notification, (2) spontaneous walk-in patients, and (3) patients with confirmed Ebola who are interfacility transfers. Hospital management includes information about Ebola screening procedures, personal protective equipment selection and personnel training, erection of a tent outside the main facility, establishing an Ebola treatment unit inside the facility, and infectious waste and equipment management. Finally, several health policy considerations are presented.

  11. Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The Philippine General Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Edward N. Lo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWell-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC is the most common form of thyroid malignancy. While it is typically associated with good prognosis, it may exhibit higher recurrence and mortality rates in selected groups, particularly Filipinos. This paper aims to describe the experience of a Philippine Hospital in managing patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.MethodsWe performed a retrospective cohort study of 723 patients with WDTC (649 papillary and 79 follicular, evaluating the clinicopathologic profiles, ultrasound features, management received, tumor recurrence, and eventual outcome over a mean follow-up period of 5 years.ResultsThe mean age at diagnosis was 44±13 years (range, 18 to 82, with a majority of cases occurring in the younger age group (<45 years. Most tumors were between 2 and 4 cm in size. The majority of papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, 63.2% and follicular thyroid cancers (FTCs, 54.4% initially presented as stage 1, with a greater proportion of FTC cases (12.7% vs. 3.7% presenting with distant metastases. Nodal metastases at presentation were more frequent among patients with PTC (29.9% vs. 7.6%. A majority of cases were treated by complete thyroidectomy, followed by radioactive iodine therapy and thyroid stimulating hormone suppression, resulting in a disease-free state. Excluding patients with distant metastases at presentation, the recurrence rates for papillary and FTC were 30.1% and 18.8%, respectively.ConclusionOverall, PTC among Filipinos was associated with a more aggressive and recurrent behavior. FTC among Filipinos appeared to behave similarly with other racial groups.

  12. The epidemiological profile of Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanetzki, Camila Sanches; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Cardim; Bass, Lital Moro; Abramovici, Sulim; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2012-01-01

    This study outlined the epidemiological profiles of patients who were admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital during 2009. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients admitted to the PICC during 2009. A total of 433 medical charts were reviewed, and these data were extracted using the DATAMARTS System and analyzed using the statistical software package STATA, version 11.0. There were no statistically significant differences in regards to patient gender, and the predominant age group consisted of patients between the ages of 1 to 4 years. The average occupancy rate was 69.3% per year, and there was a greater number of admissions during April, August, and October. The average length of stay at the hospital ranged from 9.7 to 19.1 days. Respiratory diseases were the main cause for admission to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center, and the mortality rate of the patients admitted was 1.85%. Respiratory diseases were the most common ailment among patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center, and the highest mortality rates were associated with neoplastic diseases.

  13. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; van Harten, Willem H.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations.

  14. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G.; Brown, Allen C.; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A.; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution. PMID:28781723

  15. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G; Brown, Allen C; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-06-14

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  16. [The humanization process of the hospital environment centered around the worker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Dirce Stein; Lunardi Filho, Wilson D; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch

    2006-06-01

    The humanization of the hospital environment cannot be achieved if the focus is directed only to external motivational factors or just to the user. A humanization program needs to be assumed as a participative construction process that demands respect and valuing of the human being that provides care. Based on human and ethics values and principles and on Freire's ideas, this study aims to describe how a humanization process was unchained in a hospital, initially centering on the worker, through the collective discussion of concrete problems and the construction of horizontal, reflective dialogical relations. The proposal made possible a better comprehension of the meaning of humanization, with the rescue of previous initiatives of humanization, the elaboration of a databank in which there is room for subjectivity, the creation of warm collective areas and a closer relationship between directors and workers.

  17. Hospital of diagnosis and probability of having surgical treatment for resectable gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, M.; Verhoeven, R. H. A.; van Sandick, J. W.; Plukker, J. T. M.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.

    Background: Gastric cancer surgery is increasingly being centralized in the Netherlands, whereas the diagnosis is often made in hospitals where gastric cancer surgery is not performed. The aim of this study was to assess whether hospital of diagnosis affects the probability of undergoing surgery and

  18. Surgical Efficiency of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Outpatient Surgical Center Versus Hospital Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Nathan C; Kowalski, Christopher A; Hennrikus, William L

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are complex orthopedic procedures in which a proficient team is of vital importance. Outpatient surgical centers (OSCs) often provide orthopedic-specific teams; however, hospital operating rooms (ORs) commonly rotate staff. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiency of pediatric ACL reconstructions between a surgical center and a hospital OR owned and directed by a single institution. Cases examined involved pediatric patients, aged 12 to 18 years (mean age, 15.9±1.5 years), who underwent ACL reconstructions by a single orthopedic surgeon from 2009 to 2014. Procedural efficiency was defined as shorter total OR time, less total staff, and fewer support staff changes. Total OR time was also broken into 3 distinct time periods: in-room to incision time, total procedure time, and stop time to out-of-room time. A total of 49 ACL reconstructions were performed in healthy athletes, with 28 surgeries at the OSC (mean age, 15.7±1.3 years) and 21 surgeries in the hospital OR (mean age, 16.1±1.8 years). Overall efficiency was higher at the OSC, with total OR time improved by 30 minutes on average (P=.0001) with less total staff (P=.0002). Surgical technician and nursing changes occurred 6 and 2.5 times more often in the hospital OR, respectively. Procedural efficiency was greater at the OSC. The provision of consistent and experienced orthopedicspecific teams allows for improvement in OR efficiency, cost, and value. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(5):297-302.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Oncofertility resources at NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Marla L; Harper, Maya M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Reinecke, Joyce; Shah, Shivani

    2013-12-01

    NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) set the standard for providing exemplary patient care. Quality cancer care includes discussions about fertility and referrals to fertility specialists for patients at risk for sterility. This study sought to determine what fertility preservation (FP) resources are available in CCCs and how well those are integrated into patient care. Leaders at each CCC received a letter requesting a short telephone interview with individuals who could provide information about the institution's FP resources. A semi-structured interview guide was used and responses were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 30 of the 39 CCCs that see adult patients (77%). The remaining institutions included 4 nonresponders, 3 that referred the interviewers to childhood cancer survivorship clinics, 1 that refused, and 1 that could not identify any FP resources. Participants were primarily affiliated with reproductive endocrinology (n=15) or hematology/oncology divisions (n=10). Institutional policies regarding consistent provision of FP information were rare (n=4), although most sites (n=20) either had some services on-site or had referral programs (n=8). However, only 13 had some experimental services, such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Respondents reported barriers to provision of FP, including oncologists' identification of patients at risk, low referral rates, and perceptions of patient prognosis. Only 8 (27%) sites had staff with time dedicated to FP. CCCs vary widely in implementing FP-recommended practice to their patients. CCCs are positioned to provide exemplary oncofertility care, but most need to better integrate FP information and referral into practice.

  20. Hospitalized patients experienced suffering in life with incurable cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The concept 'suffering' has been central within nursing since Florence Nightingale. But few researchers have made empirical studies about the lived phenomenon. Several researchers within nursing agree that more research concerning individual groups of patients has to be initiated. Within research about patients with incurable cancer focus has been on death, the terminal period and patients experience of being dying. This qualitative study was initiated to describe the characteristics of a group of Danish hospitalized patients' experienced suffering in life with incurable cancer. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were arranged with 12 patients ones a week within a period of 4 weeks. In week 2 and 4, the interviews were supplemented by questions developed on the basis of the potential signs of suffering which appeared during the participant observations that took place the day before each interview. C. S. Peirce's semiotic and phenomenological grounded theory of signs was used in order to identify the potential signs. A phenomenological methodology developed by A. Giorgi was used to develop and describe the general structure of the phenomenon. The phenomenon is described as: 'The experience of living in an increasingly unpredictable existents at the mercy of the body, the consciousness, the illness, the death, the treatment, the professionals, one's articulateness, the past, the present and the future, influenced by increasing powerlessness, loneliness and isolation, and the experience of existing in an persistent, and with time, unconquerable struggle to maintain and regain control'.

  1. Cervical Cancer Prevention Knowledge and Attitudes among Female University Students and Hospital Staff in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Asgarlou, Zoleykha; Tehrani, Sepideh; Asghari, Elnaz; Arzanlou, Mohammad; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Piri, Reza; Sheyklo, Sepideh Gareh; Moosavi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is a major preventable cancers. The, current study aimed to assess relevant knowledge and attitude of female students and hospital staff in Iran. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Medical and Nursing faculties and hospitals of East-Azerbaijan Province of Iran. Participants were medical and paramedical female students and female staff in hospitals selected by stratified random sampling techniques. Tools for data collection were questionnaires for w...

  2. PARP inhibitors may affect normal cells in patients with a BRCA mutation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARP inhibition has been approved for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer with BRAC1 and BRAC2 mutations and is being studied in the treatment advanced breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer.  A new study by Center for Cancer Research scientists in the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program and the Laboratory of Genome Integrity, raises concerns that when cancer patients with a BRCA mutation are treated with PARP inhibitors their normal cells may also be affected.  

  3. Factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized cancer patients: a croos-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fernanda Rafaella de Melo; de Oliveira, Mirella Gondim Ozias Aquino; Souza, Alex Sandro Rolland; Figueroa, Jos? Natal; Santos, Carmina Silva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cancer is increasing worldwide and with it the prevalence of malnutrition, which is responsible for the death of almost 20?% of cancer patients. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized cancer patients. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted with 277 hospitalized patients in the Institute of Integrative Medicine Prof. Fernando Figueira from March to November 2013. The nutritional status was classified a...

  4. Brain metastases in patients diagnosed with a solid primary cancer during childhood: experience from a single referral cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Dima; Khoury Abdulla, Rami; Ding, Minming; Khatua, Soumen; Sawaya, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    Metastasis to the brain is frequent in adult cancer patients but rare among children. Advances in primary tumor treatment and the associated prolonged survival are said to have increased the frequency of brain metastasis in children. The authors present a series of cases of brain metastases in children diagnosed with a solid primary cancer, evaluate brain metastasis trends, and describe tumor type, patterns of occurrence, and prognosis. Patients with brain metastases whose primary cancer was diagnosed during childhood were identified in the 1990-2012 Tumor Registry at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. A review of their hospital records provided demographic data, history, and clinical data, including primary cancer sites, number and location of brain metastases, sites of extracranial metastases, treatments, and outcomes. Fifty-four pediatric patients (1.4%) had a brain metastasis from a solid primary tumor. Sarcomas were the most common (54%), followed by melanoma (15%). The patients' median ages at diagnosis of the primary cancer and the brain metastasis were 11.37 years and 15.03 years, respectively. The primary cancer was localized at diagnosis in 48% of patients and disseminated regionally in only 14%. The primary tumor and brain metastasis presented synchronously in 15% of patients, and other extracranial metastases were present when the primary cancer was diagnosed. The remaining patients were diagnosed with brain metastasis after initiation of primary cancer treatment, with a median presentation interval of 17 months after primary cancer diagnosis (range 2-77 months). At the time of diagnosis, the brain metastasis was the first site of systemic metastasis in only 4 (8%) of the 51 patients for whom data were available. Up to 70% of patients had lung metastases when brain metastases were found. Symptoms led to the brain metastasis diagnosis in 65% of cases. Brain metastases were single in 60% of cases and multiple in 35%; 6% had only

  5. Analysis of the Service Quality of Medical Centers Using Servqual Model (Case:Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zare Ahmadabadi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many organizations, especially service oriented ones, relative to their goals and mission, have a special view towards quality phenomena and its management. Methods: This paper analyzes medical service quality in one case; The internal section of Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital Based on the basis of gap analysis model and Servqual technique. A questionnaire was designed and applied to measure expectations and perceptions of patients and personnel of the hospital. Results: On application of non-parametric statistical tests, we propose certain recommendations. These tests drive on five conceptual dimensions of service quality including intangibility, responsiveness, reliability, assurance and empathy. Results show that patients in this section were satisfied from the service provider’s responsiveness, but there are significant differences between expectations and perceptions in other dimensions. Conclusion: The service quality analysis models are useful for managers of medical centers to distinguish gaps between the two sides of service representation; patients and medical centers personnel. Ultimately, they can reinforce strengths and control weaknesses.

  6. Penile cancer: about ten cases at the University Hospital of Rabat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of our study was to report the status of penile cancer sites in the urology department at the University Hospital of Rabat and evaluate long-term results of surgical treatment of this cancer. Patients and Methods: Between 1989 and 2015, 10 patients were treated for penile cancer. 10 cases were retrospectively ...

  7. Prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in the university medical center of Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razine Rachid

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine the hospital-acquired infections (HAI prevalence in all institutions of Rabat University Medical Center, to ascertain risk factors, to describe the pathogens associated with HAI and their susceptibility profile to antibiotics. Materials and methods Point-prevalence survey in January 2010 concerning all patients who had been in the hospital for at least 48 hours. At bedside, 27 investigators filled a standardized questionnaire from medical records, temperature charts, radiographs, laboratory reports and by consultation with the ward’s collaborating health professionals. Risk factors were determined using logistic regression. Results 1195 patients involved, occupancy rate was 51%. The prevalence of HAI was 10.3%. Intensive care units were the most affected wards (34.5%. Urinary tract infection was the most common infected site (35%. Microbiological documentation was available in 61% of HAI. Staphylococcus was the organism most commonly isolated (18.7% and was methicillin-resistant in 50% of cases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with HAI were advanced age, longer length of hospital stay, presence of comorbidity, invasive devices and use of antibiotic use. Conclusion HAI prevalence was high in this study. Future prevention program should focus on patients with longer length of stay, invasive devices, and overprescribing antibiotics.

  8. Management and performance features of cancer centers in Europe: A fuzzy-set analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke; Lobo, Mariana Fernandes; van Dijk, Joris; Lepage-Nefkens, Isabelle; Laranja-Pontes, Jose; da Conceicao Goncalves, Vitor; van Harten, Willem H.; Rocha-Goncalves, Francisco Nuno

    2016-01-01

    The specific aim of this study is to identify the performance features of cancer centers in the European Union by using a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The fsQCA method represents cases (cancer centers) as a combination of explanatory and outcome conditions. This study uses

  9. Assessment of a Hospital Palliative Care Unit (HPCU) for Cancer Patients; A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Saghafinia, Masoud; Zandehdel, Kazem; Motlagh, Ali Ghanbari; Kazemian, Ali; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Tahmasebi, Mamak

    2015-01-01

    The first hospital palliative care unit (HPCU) in Iran (FARS-HPCU) has been established in 2008 in the Cancer Institute, which is the largest referral cancer center in the country. We attempted to assess the performance of the HPCU based on a comprehensive conceptual framework. The main aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for assessment of the HPCU performances through designing a value chain in line with the goals and the main processes (core and support). We collected data from a variety of sources, including international guidelines, international best practices, and expert opinions in the country and compared them with national policies and priorities. We also took into consideration the trend of the HPCU development in the Cancer Institute of Iran. Through benchmarking the gap area with the performance standards, some recommendations for better outcome are proposed. The framework for performance assessment consisted of 154 process indicators (PIs), based on which the main stakeholders of the HPCU (including staff, patients, and families) offered their scoring. The outcome revealed the state of the processes as well as the gaps. Despite a significant improvement in many processes and indicators, more development in the comprehensive and integrative aspects of FARS-HPCU performance is required. Consideration of all supportive and palliative requirements of the patients through interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches is recommended.

  10. Differences between hospital- and community-acquired blood exposure incidents revealed by a regional expert counseling center.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, P.T. van; Pelk-Jongen, M.; Boer, E. de; Voss, A.; Wijkmans, C.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One year (2003) regional analysis of all blood exposure incidents from hospitals as well as from the community. DESIGN: Establishment of an easily accessible regional expert counseling center, operating 24 h a day, for all accidental blood exposures. Tasks of the center were to register

  11. Benchmarking risk-adjusted adult antibacterial drug use in 70 US academic medical center hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, Ron E; Hohmann, Samuel F; Medvedev, Sofia; Ibrahim, Omar

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs are advised to measure and risk-adjust antimicrobial use to facilitate interhospital comparisons, a process called benchmarking. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a new benchmarking strategy for antibacterials. Hospital-wide adult antibacterial drug use in 2009 was measured as days of therapy (DOT) and length of therapy (LOT) from billing records in 70 US academic medical centers (AMCs). Patients were assigned to 1 of 35 clinical service lines (CSL) based on their Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Group. Expected (E) use was determined by indirect standardization and compared with observed (O) use. Of 1,791 ,180 discharged adults, 63.7% received antibacterial drugs; the range by CSL was 14.3% (psychiatry) to 99.7% (lung transplant). Mean ± SD hospital-wide use was 839 ± 106 DOTs (range, 594-1109) and 536 ± 53.0 LOT (range, 427-684) per 1000 patient-days. The ventilator support CSL had the most DOT per discharge, 39.4 ± 9.4 days; the LOT was 21.5 ± 4.5 days. The hospital-wide O/E ratio range was 0.7-1.45; in 5 AMCs the ratio exceeded the 90% confidence interval (CI) and was below the 90% CI in 6. Variability in use was explained by the proportion of treated patients within each CSL and mean LOT and DOT per discharge. Adult antibacterial drug use was benchmarked to expected use adjusted for patient mix, and outlier hospitals were identified. Differences between expected and observed use reflect usage patterns that were benchmarked and are targets for evaluation and intervention.

  12. Exploring "patient-centered" hospitals: a systematic review to understand change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabutti, Irene; Mascia, Daniele; Cicchetti, Americo

    2017-05-22

    The healthcare scenario in developed countries is changing deeply: patients, who are frequently affected by multi-pathological chronic conditions, have risen their expectations. Simultaneously, there exist dramatic financial pressures which require healthcare organizations to provide more and better services with equal (or decreasing) resources. In response to these challenges, hospitals are facing radical transformations by bridging, redesigning and engaging their organization and staff. This study has the ambitious aim to shed light and clearly label the trends of change hospitals are enhancing in developed economies, in order to fully understand the presence of common trends and which organizational models and features are inspiring the most innovative organizations. The purpose is to make stock of what is known in the field of hospital organization about how hospitals are changing, as well as of how such change may be implemented effectively through managerial tools. To do so the methodology adopted integrates a systematic literature review to a wider engaged research approach. Evidence suggests that the three main pillars of change of the system are given by the progressive patient care model, the patient-centered approach and the lean approach. However, there emerge a number of gaps in what is known about how to exploit drivers of change and their effects. This study confirms that efforts in literature are concentrated in analyzing circumscribed experiences in the implementation of new models and approaches, failing therefore to extend the analysis at the organizational and inter-organizational level in order to legitimately draw consequences to be generalized. There seem to be a number of "gaps" in what is known about how to exploit drivers of change and their effects, suggesting that the research approach privileged till now fails in providing a clear guidance to policy makers and to organizations' management on how to concretely and effectively implement

  13. Comparison of nutritional status assessment parameters in predicting length of hospital stay in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, J; Alves, P; Amaral, T F

    2014-06-01

    Undernutrition has been associated with an increased length of hospital stay which may reflect the patient prognosis. The aim of this study was to quantify and compare the association between nutritional status and handgrip strength at hospital admission with time to discharge in cancer patients. An observational prospective study was conducted in an oncology center. Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 and handgrip strength were conducted in a probabilistic sample of 130 cancer patients. The association between baseline nutritional status, handgrip strength and time to discharge was evaluated using survival analysis with discharge alive as the outcome. Nutritional risk ranged from 42.3 to 53.1% depending on the tool used. According to Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment severe undernutrition was present in 22.3% of the sample. The association between baseline data and time to discharge was stronger in patients with low handgrip strength (adjusted hazard ratio, low handgrip strength: 0.33; 95% confidence interval: 0.19-0.55), compared to undernourished patients evaluated by the other tools; Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment: (adjusted hazard ratio, severe undernutrition: 0.45; 95% confidence interval: 0.27-0.75) and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002: (adjusted hazard ratio, with nutritional risk: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.80). An approximate 3-fold decrease in probability of discharge alive was observed in patients with low handgrip strength. Decreasing handgrip strength tertiles allowed to discriminate between patients who will have longer hospital stay, as well as undernutrition and nutritional risk assessed by Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Center of Excellence for Individualization of Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    5-FU resistance in metastatic breast cancer. San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium . 2006. Ref Type: Abstract Collado,M., Gil,J., Efeyan,A., Guerra ...cancer - a new therapeutic opportunity. Nat. Rev. Cancer 5, 505-515. Miller,L.D., Smeds,J., George,J., Vega ,V.B., Vergara,L., Ploner,A., Pawitan,Y., Hall

  15. Quality of life among breast cancer patients undergoing treatment in national cancer centers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Sajani; Shrestha, Deepak Sundar; Taechaboonsermsk, Pimsurang; Siri, Sukhontha; Suparp, Jarueyporn

    2014-01-01

    To study the quality of life and to identify associated factors among breast cancer patients undergoing treatment in national cancer centers in Nepal. One hundred breast cancer patients were selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer EORTC-QLQ-C30 and EORTC-QLQ-BR23 were used to assess quality of life and modified Medical Outcome Study -Social Support survey(mMOS-SS) was used to assess social support. Only multi-item scales of EORTC C30 and BR23 were analyzed for relationships. Independent sample T-tests and ANOVA were applied to analyze differences in mean scores. The score of global health status/quality of life (GHS/GQoL) was marginally above average (mean=52.8). The worst performed scales in C-30 were emotional and social function while best performed scales were physical and role function. In BR-23, most of the patients fell into the problematic group regarding sexual function and enjoyment. Almost 90% had financial difficulties. Symptom scales did not demonstrate many problems. Older individuals, patients with stage I breast cancer and thosewith good social support were found to have good GHS/GQoL. Of all the influencing factors, social support was established to have strong statistical associations with most of the functional scales: GHS/GQoL (0.003), emotional function (system.

  16. Social Media Use for Cancer Education at a Community-Based Cancer Center in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jaesung; Chun, Mison; Lee, Hyun Woo; Woo, Jeong-Hee

    2016-12-12

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the education system using social media. Eight educational video clips were developed instructing the viewer on cancer-related issues such as prevention, treatment, and survivorship. Each video was made with participation of medical professors and posted on a YouTube channel. A mobile phone application was produced containing a scheduler function, introduction of a community cancer center program, and cancer information. A medical blog was established to provide stationary materials such as images and articles. Descriptive analysis was done by Google analytics. From May of 2014 to June of 2016, 15,247 total views were recorded on the YouTube channel, and the average view duration was about 3 min. The most popular video was about chemotherapy treatment; 5409 (36%) people watched this video, and 3615 (23.5%) people viewed a video on balanced dietary habits. As well as South Korea, 1,113 (7%) views were confirmed in the United States and 175 (1%) in Japan. The equipment used to watch the contents were mobile phones (59%), laptops (33%), and tablets (6%). Five hundred people installed the smartphone application from March of 2015 to July of 2016. Three hundred eighty-three medical contents were posted on the blog since March of 2015. Cancer education is necessary to address the education needs of patients with cancer and their caregivers. Education based on social media could be an effective method that reaches beyond geographical boundaries.

  17. Unified Modeling Language (UML) for hospital-based cancer registration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiki, Naomi; Ohno, Yuko; Fujii, Ayumi; Murata, Taizo; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Hospital-based cancer registry involves complex processing steps that span across multiple departments. In addition, management techniques and registration procedures differ depending on each medical facility. Establishing processes for hospital-based cancer registry requires clarifying specific functions and labor needed. In recent years, the business modeling technique, in which management evaluation is done by clearly spelling out processes and functions, has been applied to business process analysis. However, there are few analytical reports describing the applications of these concepts to medical-related work. In this study, we initially sought to model hospital-based cancer registration processes using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), to clarify functions. The object of this study was the cancer registry of Osaka University Hospital. We organized the hospital-based cancer registration processes based on interview and observational surveys, and produced an As-Is model using activity, use-case, and class diagrams. After drafting every UML model, it was fed-back to practitioners to check its validity and improved. We were able to define the workflow for each department using activity diagrams. In addition, by using use-case diagrams we were able to classify each department within the hospital as a system, and thereby specify the core processes and staff that were responsible for each department. The class diagrams were effective in systematically organizing the information to be used for hospital-based cancer registries. Using UML modeling, hospital-based cancer registration processes were broadly classified into three separate processes, namely, registration tasks, quality control, and filing data. An additional 14 functions were also extracted. Many tasks take place within the hospital-based cancer registry office, but the process of providing information spans across multiple departments. Moreover, additional tasks were required in comparison to using a

  18. Bicycle-related hospitalizations at a Taiwanese level I Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang-Tsung; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Liang, Chi-Cheng; Wu, Shao-Chun; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2015-07-29

    This study aimed to investigate differences in injury severity and mortality between patients who met with bicycle or motorcycle accidents and were hospitalized at a Level I trauma center in Taiwan. We performed a retrospective analysis of bicycle-related injuries that have been reported in the Trauma Registry System in order to identify and compare 699 bicyclists to 7,300 motorcyclists who were hospitalized for treatment between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Statistical analyses of the injury severity, associated complications, and length of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) were performed to compare the risk of injury of bicyclists to that of motorcyclists with the corresponding unadjusted odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95 % CIs for mortality were calculated by controlling for confounding variables that included age, and an Injury Severity Score (ISS) was calculated. More of the cyclists were under 19 years of age or over 70 than were the motorcyclists. In contrast, fewer bicyclists than motorcyclists wore helmets, arrived at the emergency department between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., and had a positive blood alcohol concentration test. The bicyclists sustained significantly higher rates of injuries to the extremities, while motorcyclists sustained significantly higher rates of injuries to the head and neck, face, and thorax. Compared to motorcyclists, the bicyclists had significantly lower ISSs and New Injury Severity Scores, shorter length hospital stays, and a smaller proportion of admittance into the ICU. However, the bicyclists had higher AORs for in-hospital mortality (AOR: 1.2, 95 % CI: 1.16-1.20). In terms of critical injury severity (ISS ≥ 25), the bicyclists had 4.4 times (95 % CI: 1.95-9.82) the odds of mortality than motorcyclists with the same ISSs. Data analysis indicated that the bicyclists had unique injury characteristics including bodily injury patterns and lower ISSs, but

  19. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, Carmen Maria Dornelles; da Silva, Patrícia Santos; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Goldim, José Roberto; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9%) agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed. RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173) or degree/specialization (p=0.815). Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed. CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice. PMID:25806636

  20. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Dornelles Prolla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice.METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9% agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed.RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173 or degree/specialization (p=0.815. Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed.CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice.

  1. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Experience of the Philippine General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Edward Lo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAnaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is a rare type of thyroid malignancy and one of the most aggressive solid tumors, responsible for between 14% and 50% of the total annual mortality associated with thyroid cancer.MethodsA retrospective study was made of all ATC cases diagnosed by biopsy in the Philippine General Hospital between 2008 and 2013.ResultsA total of 15 patients were identified, with a median age at diagnosis of 63 years. All tumors were at least 6 cm in size upon diagnosis. All patients had a previous history of thyroid pathology, presenting with an average duration of 11 years. Eleven patients presented with cervical lymphadenopathies, whereas seven exhibited signs of distant metastases, for which the lungs appeared to be the most common site. More than 70% of the patients presented with a rapidly growing neck mass, leading to airway obstruction. Only three patients were treated using curative surgery; the majority received palliative and supportive forms of treatment. In addition, only three patients were offered radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was not offered to any patient. Only two patients were confirmed to still be alive during the study period. The median survival time for the other patients was 3 months; in the majority of cases the patient died within the first year following diagnosis.ConclusionOur experience with ATC demonstrated concordance with other institutions with respect to current clinical profile, presentation, and prognosis. An absence of distant metastases and lymph node involvement was associated with improved survival outcomes, whereas age at diagnosis and tumor size did not affect survival. Curative surgery offers the most effective means of prolonging survival. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in combination with surgery represents a promising treatment strategy.

  2. Choosing a doctor and hospital for your cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... apps.ama-assn.org/doctorfinder/home.jsp American Society of Clinical Oncology - www.cancer.net/find-cancer-doctor ... Group (COG)? The COG focuses on the cancer needs of children -- www.childrensoncologygroup.org/index.php/locations/ .

  3. Availability of Outpatient Clinical Nutrition Services for Patients With Cancer Undergoing Treatment at Comprehensive Cancer Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Mary E; Johnson, Jordan; Woolf, Kathleen; Makarem, Nour; Ompad, Danielle C

    2015-01-01

    The mission of US Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCC) is to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. The type of clinical nutrition services available to outpatients seeking treatment at CCCs is unknown. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence and types of outpatient clinical nutrition services available at CCCs. A list of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated CCCs was compiled. A telephone survey that queried clinical nutrition services available to outpatients undergoing treatment was developed. The survey was conducted with clinical nutrition personnel during usual working hours between April and October 2012. Of the 40 CCCs, 32 (80%) completed the survey. Thirty CCCs offered referral- or consult-based services with a clinical nutrition professional such as a registered dietitian (RD). Other services included nutrition classes (56%), nutrition pamphlets (94%), and counseling by non-nutrition health care providers (81%). Twenty-three of the centers monitored patients regularly, but less than half followed a clinical nutrition protocol such as those established by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Referral-based services were provided for cancers with a high prevalence of malnutrition, such as head and neck and GI, with most monitoring patients regularly but less than half using evidence-based protocols. CCCs rely on referral-based clinical nutrition service, which are not consistently a part of multidisciplinary care. An in-depth comparison of clinical nutrition services among other approaches to cancer care, including a comparison of clinical outcomes among these different approaches, is needed. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a major referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghafinia Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the demographics, clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, by the code blue team at our center to compare with other centers. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from all adult patients who underwent CPR at our hospital from 2007 to 2008. CPR was performed on 290 patients and it was given 313 times. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from the hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated via binomial and chi square-tests. Results: Of the 290 patients included, 95 patients (30.4% had successful CPR. However, only 35 patients (12% were alive at discharge. The majority requiring CPR were above 60 years of age (61.7%. Males required CPR more than females. There were 125 women (43.1% and 165 males (56.9% aged 3 to 78 (average 59.6 years. Majority (179 of the cases (61.7% were above 60 years of age. Regarding the various wards, 54 cases (17.3% were in the internal medicine ward, 63 cases (20.1% in the surgery ward, 1 case (0.3% in the clinic, 11 cases (3.5% in the paraclinic, 116 cases (37.1% in the emergency (ER, 55 cases (17.5% in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and Coronary Care Unit (CCU, and 13 cases (4.2% were in other wards. Cardiac massage was done in 133 cases (42.5%, defibrillation only via electroshock 3 cases (1%, and both were used in177 cases (56.5%. The ER had the most cases of CPR. Both cardiac massage and electroshock defibrillation were needed in most cases. Conclusion: In-hospital CPR for cardiopulmonary arrest was associated with 30.4% success at our center at the end of CPR but only 12% were alive at discharge. Duration of CPR> 10 minutes was predictive of significantly decreased survival to discharge.

  5. Hospital-Based Cancer Incidence in Nepal from 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Krishna Kanta; Huang, Zhibi; Neupane, Prakash Raj; Steel, Roberta; Poudel, Janaki Kharel

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Analyzing the incidence of cancer by site, sex and age is essential to detect the burden of cancer. Throughout the twelve hospital based cancer registries of Nepal, a total of 29,802 cancer cases with known age, were registered from January 1st 2010 to 2013 December 31st. The purpose of this retrospective study is to present the incidence of all cancer sites in both males and females for this period. This paper reviews data from all the hospital based cancer registries over a four-year period. This retrospective study has illustrated the number of cases, frequencies and crude incidence of all cancers by sex and site. For statistical analysis, SPSS (version 23.0) and Microsoft Excel 2010 were used. Over the four-year period from January 1st 2010 to 2013 December 31st the major cancer in males was identified as follows: lung cancer (17.5%) followed by stomach cancer (7.6 %) and larynx cancer (5.4%). Among females, for the same four-year period, the three common cancers were identified as cervix (18.9 %) followed by breast (15.6 %) and lung (10.2%). This retrospective study concluded that cancer is being increased by calendar years both in males and females however, the incidence of cancer is higher in females compared to males. .

  6. Treatment outcomes in stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer in a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Shaun; Persad, Kamleish; Qiao, Xian; Guarino, Michael; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Treatment outcomes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients diagnosed at stage IIIA have been analyzed in many studies, which generally involve patients younger and healthier than the average patient with this disease. To analyze demographics and treatment outcomes in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC at a community cancer center. We reviewed charts of 226 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC from January 2003 to December 2008 treated at our community cancer center. Results Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Median overall survival for all patients and sequentially and concurrently treated chemoradiation patients were 18 months, and 18 months, and 20 months, respectively. Median overall survival for women and men was 24 months and 16 months, respectively. Study design was retrospective and some medical records were not available. However, this population is likely representative of patients treated in similar settings. In our population, advanced age and male gender were associated with lower median survival. Responses to concurrent and sequential chemoradiation seemed to differ based on age group, which may be useful as a prognostic guideline for similar populations. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  7. [Etiology of febrile neutropenia episodes among cancer patients from Hospital Clinico Universidad Catolica, Santiago-Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabagliati B, Ricardo; Fuentes L, Gino; Orellana U, Eric; Oporto C, Jorge; Domínguez M, Isabel; Benítez G, Rosana; Aedo C, Igor; Ramos G, Germán; Garrido S, Marcelo; García C, Patricia

    2009-04-01

    The surveillance of febrile neutropenia (FN) episodes in every center allows adapt the antibiotic therapy guidelines to local epidemiology. To characterize clinical features and compare the FN etiology between hematological cancer (HC) and solid organ cancer (SOC) in our center. Surveillance study in adult patients with FN admitted to Hospital Clinico Universidad Católica, in Santiago, Chile, from January 2004 to August 2007. 154 FN episodes corresponding to 87 patients were included. Mean age: 47 +/- 6 years-old; 71% had HC and 29% SOC. A clinical and/or microbiologically documented infection was recognized in 76%. Gastrointestinal 31.5%, upper respiratory 30.3% and lower respiratory 16.9% were the more frequent clinical focus. In 30.5% blood culture resulted positive: gram negative rods 51%, gram positive cocci 41% and yeasts 8%; being Escherichia coli 22%, S. coagulase negative (SCoN) 20% and Klebsiella pneumoniae 12% most frequent bacteria; 22.2% Enterobacteriaceae were ESBL producers and 55.6% 5CoN were methicillin resistant. In 18.3% of FN episodes the etiology was not established. Highest mortality was observed in episodes with microbiologically documented infection (14.5% vs 1.3%, p < 0.005). A clinical observed focus and positive blood cultures were more frequently obtamed among HC than SOC associated episodes: 37.3% vs 13.6%; (p < 0.01) and 67.2% vs 50%; (p = 0.045), respectively. The etiological profile of FN in our center and the necessity to continue the surveillance was described. Future studies are needed regarding risk factors of invasive infection that have worst prognosis.

  8. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Spek, Nadia; Vos, Joël; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Breitbart, William; Cuijpers, Pim; Knipscheer-Kuipers, Kitty; Willemsen, Vincent; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Asperen, Christi J; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2014-01-28

    Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MCGP-CS. Survivors diagnosed with cancer in the last 5 years and treated with curative intent, are recruited via several hospitals in the Netherlands. After screening, 168 survivors are randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: 1. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP-CS) 2. Supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) 3. Care as usual (CAU). Baseline assessment takes place before randomisation, with follow up assessments post-intervention and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Primary outcome is meaning making (PMP, PTGI, SPWB). Secondary outcome measures address quality of life (EORTC-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), hopelessness (BHS), optimism (LOT-R), adjustment to cancer (MAC), and costs (TIC-P, EQ-5D, PRODISQ). Meaning-focused coping is key to adjustment to life after cancer, however, there is a lack of evidence based psychological interventions in this area. Many cancer survivors experience feelings of loneliness and alienation, and have a need for peer support, therefore a group method in particular, can be beneficial for sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning. If this MCGP-CS is effective for cancer survivors, it can be implemented in the practice of psycho-oncology care. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR3571.

  9. [A Recreation Room for adolescents who are hospitalized at a tertiary-care Center: Care Program for Hospitalized Adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato, Roberto; Rodríguez, M Susana

    2015-06-01

    Hospital admission is a high-impact event in children. Adolescence is a critical and complex period of human development that may be adversely affected by hospitalization. At the Garrahan Hospital, where adolescents account for more than 30% of inpatients, a program for comprehensive care of adolescents was set up in 2008 with a special focus on their specific needs. As a part of this program, the aim of the Recreation Room for Hospitalized Adolescents is to provide a friendly environment to reduce stress and anxiety and to facilitate the learning of healthy behaviors, under the permanent care of nurses and medical doctors. Interventions in health, leisure time, education, and emotional care are effective in diminishing the negative impact of hospitalization and prevent risk behaviors. Our objective was to report our experience in the Recreation Room for Hospitalized Adolescents.

  10. Ambulatory Surgery Data From Hospitals and Ambulatory Surgery Centers: United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Margaret J; Schwartzman, Alexander; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Objectives-This report presents national estimates of surgical and nonsurgical ambulatory procedures performed in hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) in the United States during 2010. Patient characteristics, including age, sex, expected payment source, duration of surgery, and discharge disposition are presented, as well as the number and types of procedures performed in these settings. Methods-Estimates in this report are based on ambulatory surgery data collected in the 2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). NHAMCS has collected outpatient department and emergency department data since 1992 and began gathering ambulatory surgery data from both hospitals and ASCs in 2010. Sample data were weighted to produce annual national estimates. Results-In 2010, 48.3 million surgical and nonsurgical procedures were performed during 28.6 million ambulatory surgery visits to hospitals and ASCs combined. For both males and females, 39% of procedures were performed on those aged 45-64. For females, about 24% of procedures were performed on those aged 15-44 compared with 18% for males, whereas the percentage of procedures performed on those under 15 was lower for females than for males (4% compared with 9%). About 19% of procedures were performed on those aged 65-74, while about 14% were performed on those aged 75 and over. Private insurance was listed as the principal expected source of payment for 51% of ambulatory surgery visits, Medicare for 31% of visits, and Medicaid for 8% of visits. The most frequently performed procedures included endoscopy of large intestine (4.0 million), endoscopy of small intestine (2.2 million), extraction of lens (2.9 million), insertion of prosthetic lens (2.6 million), and injection of agent into spinal canal (2.9 million). Only 2% of visits with a discharge status were admitted to the hospital as an inpatient. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied

  11. COP - Pet Owners - What is Comparative Oncology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is Comparative Oncology? Cancer, in the pet population, is a spontaneous disease. Pet owners, motivated by the desire to prolong their animals' quality of life, frequently seek out the specialized care and treatment of veterinary oncologists at private referral veterinary hospitals and veterinary teaching hospitals across the country. Therapeutic modalities for veterinary cancer patients are similar to those for humans, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and biotherapy.

  12. [Pharmacist involvement in supporting care in patients receiving oral anticancer therapies: A situation report in French cancer centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Sandrine; Petit-Jean, Emilie; Pinguet, Frédéric; Beaupin, Cécile; Daouphars, Mikaël; Parent, Damien; Donamaria, Catherine; Bertrand, Claude; Divanon, Fabienne; Benard-Thiery, Isabelle; Chevrier, Régine

    2017-09-01

    The increasing prescription of oral anticancer therapies has significantly changed inpatient care to outpatient care. This transformation requires an excellent coordination between different professionals to ensure healthcare channel security. We performed a prospective study in 18 French cancer centers from March to April 2016. The aim of this study was to identify resources deployed to support patients receiving oral anticancer therapies and to assess pharmacist's involvement. More than half of the centers have developed patient education program and/or practice pharmaceutical consultations. In total, 54.5% have deployed an oral anticancer drugs program and the pharmacist is involved in multidisciplinary teams. In total, 44.4% of the centers have developed hospital-to-community coordination actions but all of them highlight the time-consuming character of those programs. Administrative burdens are seriously hindering patient education program's development. Multidisciplinary consultations can offer an attractive alternative because of easy implementation modalities. Finally, hospital-to-community coordination actions seem hard to implement and require harmonization of communication practices, and need more technical and financial means. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcomes of stage II endometrial cancer: The UPMC Hillman Cancer Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Katherine S; Berhane, Hebist; Gill, Beant S; Olawaiye, Alexander; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Kelley, Joseph L; Boisen, Michelle M; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Comerci, John T; Edwards, Robert; Berger, Jessica; Beriwal, Sushil

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies of stage II endometrial cancer have included cancers with cervical glandular involvement, a factor no longer associated with risk of recurrence. In order to better assess relapse patterns and the impact of adjuvant therapy, a retrospective analysis was conducted for patients with modern stage II endometrial cancer, defined as cervical stromal invasion. Patients diagnosed with surgically staged FIGO stage II endometrial cancer at the UPMC Hillman Cancer Center from 1990-2013 were reviewed. Factors associated with rates of locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the log rank test. 110 patients with FIGO stage II disease were identified. Most (84.5%) received EBRT±BT, with 13.6% receiving BT alone. With a median follow-up of 64.6months, the 5-year actuarial rates of LRC, DM, DFS, and OS were 94.9%, 85.1%, 67.9%, and 75.0%, respectively. With 5 locoregional failures, the only factor predictive of LRC was pelvic lymph node dissection. Characteristics associated with DM included age, LVSI, depth of myometrial invasion, and receipt of chemotherapy. Factors predictive of both DFS and OS were age, grade, adverse histology, LVSI, depth of myometrial invasion, and receipt of chemotherapy. This represents the largest single-institution study for modern stage II endometrial cancer, confirming high rates of pelvic disease control after surgery and adjuvant therapy. With most patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy, the predominant mode of failure, albeit low in absolute number, remains distant metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidemiology of gastric cancer in jos university teaching hospital jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastric cancer believed to be rare in the past in Africa, is now one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality. It is now known gastric cancer is 2-3 times higher in males than females living in the same environment. We aim to describe the comprehensive histological characteristics of gastric cancer with age ...

  15. Is the Distance Worth It? Patients With Rectal Cancer Traveling to High-Volume Centers Experience Improved Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaomin; Becerra, Adan Z; Justiniano, Carla F; Boodry, Courtney I; Aquina, Christopher T; Swanger, Alex A; Temple, Larissa K; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-12-01

    It is unclear whether traveling long distances to high-volume centers would compensate for travel burden among patients undergoing rectal cancer resection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether operative volume outweighs the advantages of being treated locally by comparing the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer treated at local, low-volume centers versus far, high-volume centers. This was a population-based study. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with rectal cancer. Patients with stage II or III rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection between 2006 and 2012 were included. The outcomes of interest were margins, lymph node yield, receipt of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant chemotherapy, readmission within 30 days, 30-day and 90-day mortality, and 5-year overall survival. A total of 18,605 patients met inclusion criteria; 2067 patients were in the long-distance/high-volume group and 1362 in the short-distance/low-volume group. The median travel distance was 62.6 miles for the long-distance/high-volume group and 2.3 miles for the short-distance/low-volume group. Patients who were younger, white, privately insured, and stage III were more likely to have traveled to a high-volume center. When controlled for patient factors, stage, and hospital factors, patients in the short-distance/low-volume group had lower odds of a lymph node yield ≥12 (OR = 0.51) and neoadjuvant chemoradiation (OR = 0.67) and higher 30-day (OR = 3.38) and 90-day mortality (OR = 2.07) compared with those in the long-distance/high-volume group. The short-distance/low-volume group had a 34% high risk of overall mortality at 5 years compared with the long-distance/high-volume group. We lacked data regarding patient and physician decision making and surgeon-specific factors. Our results indicate that when controlled for patient, tumor, and hospital factors, patients who traveled a long distance to a high-volume center had improved lymph node yield

  16. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  17. Dissatisfaction of hospital patients, their relatives, and friends: Analysis of accounts collected in a complaints center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaad, Béatrice; Bourquin, Céline; Bornet, Floriane; Currat, Thierry; Saraga, Michael; Panese, Francesco; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze complaints of patients, their relatives, and friends who consulted a complaints center based (Espace Patients & Proches (EPP)) in a hospital so as to better understand the reasons that motivated them and their underlying expectations. This study was based on the analysis of written accounts of the 253 situations that occurred during the first year of operation of the EPP. The accounts were analyzed qualitatively using an inductive, thematic analytic approach. We identified 372 different types of complaints and 28 main analytic themes. Five clustered themes emerged from the analysis of the interconnections among the core themes: (1) interpersonal relationship (N=160-the number of accounts including a complaint related to this general theme); (2) technical aspects of care (N=106); (3) health-care institution (N=69); (4) billing and insurance; (5) access to information (N=13). The main reason for patients, their relatives, and friends going to EPP was related to the quality of the interpersonal relationship with health-care professionals. Such complaints were markedly more frequent than those concerning technical aspects of care. These results raise important questions concerning changing patient expectations as well as how hospitals integrate complaints into the process of quality health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Survival after In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Major Referral Center during 2001-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Rafati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to save more people suffering from in-hospital cardiac arrest, rates of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR are no better today than they were more than a decade ago. This study was undertaken to assess the demographics, clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing CPR by the code blue team at our center during 2001 to 2008. Data were collected retrospectively from adult patients (n=2262 who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from the hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using binomial and Chi Square tests. Of the patients included (n=2262, 741 patients (32.8% had successful CPR. The number of male patients requiring CPR was more than females in need of the procedure. The majority of patients requiring CPR were older than 60 years (56.4±17.9. The number of successful CPR cases in long-day shift (7:00 to 19:00 was more than that in the night shift (19:00 to 7:00. Furthermore, 413 (18.4% cases were resuscitated on holidays and 1849 (81.7% on the working days. The duration of CPR was 10 min or less in 710 (31.4% cases. Cardiopulmonary resuscitations which lasted less than 10 minutes were associated with better outcomes. The findings of the present study indicate that some manageable factors including the duration of CPR, working shift, working day (holiday or non-holiday could affect the CPR outcomes. The findings might also be taken as evidence to suggest that the allocation of more personnel in each shift especially in night shifts and holidays, planning to increase the personnel's CPR skills, and decreasing the waste time would result in the improvement of CPR outcome.

  19. Risk of breast cancer recurrence in patients receiving manual lymphatic drainage: a hospital-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao PC

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pei-Chi Hsiao,1,2 Jung-Tai Liu,3 Chien-Liang Lin,4 Willy Chou,1,2 Shiang-Ru Lu5 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; 2Department of Recreation and Health Care Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan; 3Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center Liouying Campus, Tainan, Taiwan; 4Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chi-Mei Medical Center Liouying Campus, Tainan, Taiwan; 5Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Background: This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether manual lymphatic drainage (MLD therapy increases the risk of recurrence of breast cancer. Methods: We analyzed 1,106 women who were diagnosed with stage 0­–3 breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 and experienced remission after surgery and adjuvant therapy. The patients were divided into two groups: group A (n=996, in which patients did not participate in any MLD therapy, regardless of whether they developed breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL after cancer treatment; and group B (n=110, in which patients participated in MLD therapy for BCRL. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether breast cancer recurrence developed, including local or regional recurrence and distant metastasis. Patients who developed cancer recurrence prior to MLD therapy were excluded from analysis. Risk factors associated with cancer recurrence were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: During the monitoring period, 166 patients (15.0% developed cancer recurrence, including 154 (15.5% in group A and 12 (10.9% in group B. The median period from surgery to cancer recurrence was 1.85 (interquartile range 1.18–2.93 years. Independent risk factors for cancer recurrence were tumor histological grading of grade 3, high number (≥3 of axillary lymph node invasion, and a large tumor size (>5 cm. Factors

  20. Impact of pharmacist interventions on cost avoidance in an ambulatory cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Laura A; Walker, Cheri K; Nguyen, Ann T; Zachariah, Subi R

    2018-01-01

    Objective To provide a foundation to justify the presence of a full-time clinical pharmacist in the ambulatory cancer center in addition to an existing centralized pharmacist through cost avoidance calculation and patient and staff satisfaction surveys. Methods The prospective, pilot study took place in an ambulatory cancer center over four weeks in 2014. Cost avoidance values were assigned to interventions performed by a pharmacy resident, who was present in the ambulatory cancer center during clinic hours, along with a centralized oncology pharmacist routinely working with the cancer center. Anonymous patient and staff satisfaction surveys based on a 5-point Likert scale were distributed to assess the perceived benefit of a pharmacist located in the ambulatory cancer center. Results Data collection took place over approximately one month. After evaluation of 962 interventions from both pharmacists, the estimated cost avoidance was US$282,741 per pharmacist per year, yielding a net benefit of US$138,441. The most common interventions made by the resident included chemotherapy regimen review (n = 290, 69%) and patient counseling (n = 102, 24%), while the majority of the centralized pharmacist's interventions was chemotherapy regimen review (n = 525, 97%). Results from the anonymous patient and staff surveys revealed an overall positive perception of the pharmacy resident while in the ambulatory cancer center. Conclusion A full-time clinical pharmacist in an ambulatory cancer center is both financially beneficial and positively perceived by patients and staff.

  1. Breast cancer mortality among patients attending a cancer hospital, Vitoria, ES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Cristina Arthmar Mentz; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa; Zandonade, Eliana; Viana, Kátia; Calheiros, Juliana Oliosi

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between mortality of breast cancer women and the social-demographic and clinical characteristics. During the mortality study of 1,086 women diagnosed with breast cancer and treated from 2000 to 2005 at a cancer hospital in the city of Vitória, Espírito Santo, medical records and tumor registration cards were controlled. The Mortality Information System and the Reclink program were used to identify 280 deaths. Patients were classified under death and non-death, and variables percentages were calculated. For variables that showed statistical significance, considering the level of 0.10, the crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR) were calculated by logistic regression model. There was a correlation between mortality and the following variables: women coming from the Unified Health System (p = 0.014; OR = 2.38), negative c-erb B-2 tumor marker (p = 0.027; OR = 2.03), advanced (III and IV) staging (p = 0.001; OR = 6.89 and OR = 17.13, respectively), presence of metastasis (p = 0.001; OR = 18.23) and recurrence (p = 0.010; OR = 3.53). Mortality associated with staging underlines the necessity of warning the population about the benefits of early diagnosis of the disease of cancer.

  2. [Cancer plans apply to surgical treatment of prostate cancer: A geographically isolated center balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondet, F; Alimi, J-C; Boyer, C

    2017-05-01

    Since 2003, fight against cancer was structured by 3 national cancer programs (CP). The objective of this study is to evaluate the application of these measures in the case of surgical prostate cancer (PCa) treatment in a geographically isolated center. Monocentric retrospective study carried in a 100-bed clinic located 2hours away from a Cancer Regional Reference Center. Between August 2009 and December 2014, 251 consecutive patients were treated by total laparoscopic prostatectomy (TLP). Fifty-seven patients (22.7 %) received a secondary treatment after TLP. The study focused on the delay between prostate biopsies and PTL, the traceability of AD elements, the return of active patients, inclusion in clinical trials (GETUG 17, GETUG 20 and GETUG 22). Data were collected in September 2016. The follow-up defined by the time between the date of the last visit and the prostate biopsy allows a median follow-up of 43.1 months (2.4-80.5). All elements of the CAP are totally gathered on 45 % of the patients (113/251). Thirty-four (13.5 %) patients were active at the time of the intervention. Thirty-one (91.2 %) will return to an identical activity after a median work stoppage of 1.7 month (0.25-6). Fourteen percent (35/251) of the patients are eligible to a clinical trial. Seventeen percent (6/35) of them were proposed to one of a trial after multidisciplinary meeting and 5.7 % (2/35) are eventually included in one trial. CP define a course of high quality care. A better transparency of the founding of the enforceable measures and a better consideration for the local specificities should facilitate their application. The TLP treat the PCa with the reasonable objective of a return to an identical professional activity. The multidisciplinary meeting does not guarantee the participation to clinical trial, which depends mainly on distance from the Cancer Regional Reference Center and the vigilance of the Urologist. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  3. Hospital-centered violence intervention programs: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Vincent E; Smith, Randi; Garcia, Arturo; Lee, Wayne S; Ashley, Linnea; Marks, Anne; Liu, Terrence H; Victorino, Gregory P

    2015-04-01

    Hospital-centered violence intervention programs (HVIPs) reduce violent injury recidivism. However, dedicated cost analyses of such programs have not yet been published. We hypothesized that the HVIP at our urban trauma center is a cost-effective means for reducing violent injury recidivism. We conducted a cost-utility analysis using a state-transition (Markov) decision model, comparing participation in our HVIP with standard risk reduction for patients injured because of firearm violence. Model inputs were derived from our trauma registry and published literature. The 1-year recidivism rate for participants in our HVIP was 2.5%, compared with 4% for those receiving standard risk reduction resources. Total per-person costs of each violence prevention arm were similar: $3,574 for our HVIP and $3,515 for standard referrals. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for our HVIP was $2,941. Our HVIP is a cost-effective means of preventing recurrent episodes of violent injury in patients hurt by firearms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A comprehensive palliative care center implementation in S.B. Ulus State Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kabalak

    2012-06-01

    Every people wants to best care and to die painless in their end-stage of life. This is a human right. Therefore, end-of-life care is considered an indicator of health quality all over the world. The ultimate goal of palliative care is to relieve the suffering of patients and their families by the comprehensive assessment and treatment of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual symptoms experienced by patients. After the patient\\s death, palliative care focuses primarily on bereavement of the family. T.C. Ministry of Health to find a solution of this important issue as a first step, the preparations for the establishment of palliative care centers and units, training of health personnel started. S.B. Ulus State Hospital as a team we have set out to open a comprehensive palliative care center. Our goal is to contribute on take place of palliative care organization in health system and to the spread across the country. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 122-126

  5. Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and

  6. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; status of the Proton Therapy Center at Samsung Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sang Gyu; Jung, Sang Hoon; Chung, Yoonsun; Cho, Sungkoo; Jo, Kwanghyun; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Hong, Chae-Seon; Shin, Jung Suk; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Boram; Shibagaki, Gantaro; Nonaka, Hideki; Sasai, Kenzo; Koyabu, Yukio; Choi, Changhoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Noh, Jae Myung; Yu, Jeong Il; Song, Sanghyuk; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Bomi; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  7. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; Status of the proton therapy center at Samsung Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kwang Zoo; Han, Young Yih; Kim, Jin Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  8. Prospective Evaluation of Infection Episodes in Cancer Patients in a Tertiary Care Academic Center: Microbiological Features and Risk Factors for Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursel Çalık Başaran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency, type, and etiology of infections and the risk factors for infections and mortality in hospitalized cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled adult cancer patients hospitalized in the internal medicine wards of a tertiary care academic center between January and August 2004. Patients were followed during their hospitalization periods for neutropenia, infections, culture results, and mortality. Results: We followed 473 cancer patients with 818 hospitalization episodes and 384 infection episodes in total. Seventy-nine percent of the infections were nosocomial, and febrile neutropenia (FN was observed in 196 (51% of the infection episodes. Bacteremia was found in 29% of FN episodes and in 8% of nonneutropenic patients. Gram-positive bacteria were the leading cause of bacteremia in both neutropenic and nonneutropenic cases (70% and 58%, respectively. Presence of an indwelling central catheter increased bacteremia risk by 3-fold. The overall mortality rate was 17%, whereas 34% of the patients with bloodstream infections died. Presence of bacteremia and advanced disease stage increased overall mortality by 6.1-fold and 3.7-fold, respectively. Conclusion: Nearly half of the cancer patients developed an infection during their hospital stays, with gram-positive bacteria being the predominant etiologic microorganisms. This demonstrates the changing trends in infections considering that, until 2004, gramnegative bacteria were the most predominant microorganisms among cancer patients in our institute.

  9. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women: e0145492

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waseem Khaliq; Ali Aamar; Scott M Wright

    2015-01-01

    .... Patients and Methods A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50-75 years...

  10. Oncology Care Measures – PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses five oncology care measures. The resulting PPS-Exempt...

  11. Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses one clinical effectiveness measure—External Beam...

  12. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  13. Subanesthetic ketamine for pain management in hospitalized children, adolescents, and young adults: a single-center cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehy KA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Kathy A Sheehy,1,* Caroline Lippold,1,* Amy L Rice,1 Raissa Nobrega,1 Julia C Finkel,1 Zenaide MN Quezado1,2 1Division of Anesthesiology, Pain, and Perioperative Medicine, The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Health System, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 2Center for Neuroscience Research, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist used as an adjuvant to opioid for the treatment of pain in adults with acute and chronic pain, have been shown, in some instances, to improve pain intensity and to decrease opioid intake. However, less is known about the role of ketamine in pain management in children, adolescents, and young adults. Purpose: We examined the effects of subanesthetic ketamine on pain intensity and opioid intake in children, adolescents, and young adults with acute and chronic pain syndromes treated in an inpatient setting. Methods: This is a longitudinal cohort study of patients treated with subanesthetic ketamine infusions in regular patient care units in a tertiary pediatric hospital. Primary outcomes included changes in pain scores and morphine-equivalent intake. Results: The study cohort included 230 different patients who during 360 separate hospital admissions received subanesthetic ketamine infusions for pain management. Overall, ketamine infusions were associated with significant reductions in mean pain scores from baseline (mean pain scores 6.64 [95% CI: 6.38–6.90] to those recorded on the day after discontinuation of ketamine (mean pain scores 4.38 [95% CI: 4.06–4.69], p<0.001. Importantly, the effect of ketamine on pain scores varied according to clinical diagnosis (p=0.011, infusion duration (p=0.004, and pain location (p=0

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF TYPES OF CANCER AND PATTERNS OF CANCER TREATMENT AMONG THE PATIENTS AT VARIOUS HOSPITALS IN DHAKA DIVISION, BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan A.H.M Nazmul; Uddin Md.Mesbah; Rafiquzzaman Md.; Chowdhury Sanchita Sharmin; Wahed Tania Binte

    2012-01-01

    A survey study on 171 cancer patients for various aspects related to cancer was done at different hospitals in Dhaka division, Bangladesh, using a questionnaire. Histopathologically confirmed cancer patients; patients having radiological evidence or clinical evidence of malignancy were included in the study. Majority of the patients came from various districts of Dhaka division (57.8%), while only 3.3% patients were from Sylhet division of Bangladesh. There were 117 male and 54 female patient...

  15. Surgical leadership and standardization of multidisciplinary breast cancer care: the evolution of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensenhaver, Jessica; Winchester, David P

    2014-07-01

    Evidence has shown that multidisciplinary specialist team evaluation and management for cancer results in better patient outcomes. For breast cancer, breast centers are where this evaluation and management occurs. The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers has helped standardize multidisciplinary breast cancer care by defining services and standards required of accredited breast centers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Psychosocial Situation and Patient Satisfaction among Clients of Cancer Counselling Centers in Saxony].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Röder, Heiko; Frenschkowski, Sandra; Mehnert, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Outpatient psychosocial counselling (OPC) centers for those affected by cancer fulfill 2 main purposes: (a) to offer low-threshold psychological, social and legal counselling, and (b) to refer clients to other services. Here we report findings from a user-based assessment of OPC in the state of Saxony, Germany. This study was funded in part by the Saxon State Ministry of Social Affairs and Consumer Protection. We used a paper-based questionnaire to survey 213 clients of OPC in Saxony at 2 points (t1: up to one week after first contact, t2: 4 months after t1). All participants were cancer patients. The survey assessed utilization of services, depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), quality of life (SF-8) as well as clients' satisfaction with the counselling service (ZUF-8). The majority of clients (81%) were referred to the OPC from a hospital or rehabilitation center. 46% of patients only had one contact. 78% of counselling sessions treated matters of social law. Patients suffered from 13 problems on average, the most common being fatigue and exhaustion, worries, anxiety, uncertainty about the future, and pain. Half the patients (49%) reported moderate to severe anxiety and 68% showed elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Psychosocial distress did not change significantly over time (GAD-7: p=0.580, PHQ-9: p=0.101). Patients' quality of life was low overall (cut-off<50). At t2, quality of life had particularly increased in physical aspects, but overall quality of life remained lower than in the general population (all subscales: p<0.05). We identified younger age and lower income as risk factors for higher psychosocial distress and lower quality of life. Patients were very satisfied with the counselling they received, 9% reported to be dissatisfied. Our results show that psychosocial distress remains high over a longer period of time at least for some patients. This illustrates the persisting need for long-term support regarding physical, mental and social

  17. Liver disease stage determines whether the immune response stifles or stimulates tumor growth | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the Center for Cancer Research and colleagues from three cancer research centers in Germany have discovered a mechanism whereby precancerous liver cells, found in individuals with chronic liver disease, can prevent neighboring cells from becoming cancerous but can also speed the growth of cells that have already become cancerous.  Learn more...

  18. Assessing the Development of Multidisciplinary Care: Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot L; Chawla, Neetu; Morris, Paul T; Castro, Kathleen M; Carrigan, Angela C; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007 with a goal of expanding cancer research and delivering quality care in communities. The NCCCP Quality of Care (QoC) Subcommittee was charged with developing and improving the quality of multidisciplinary care. An assessment tool with nine key elements relevant to MDC structure and operations was developed. Fourteen NCCCP sites reported multidisciplinary care assessments for lung, breast, and colorectal cancer in June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012 using an online reporting tool. Each site evaluated their level of maturity (level 1 = no multidisciplinary care, level 5 = highly integrated multidisciplinary care) in nine elements integral to multidisciplinary care. Thematic analysis of open-ended qualitative responses was also conducted. The proportion of sites that reported level 3 or greater on the assessment tool was tabulated at each time point. For all tumor types, sites that reached this level increased in six elements: case planning, clinical trials, integration of care coordination, physician engagement, quality improvement, and treatment team integration. Factors that enabled improvement included increasing organizational support, ensuring appropriate physician participation, increasing patient navigation, increasing participation in national quality initiatives, targeting genetics referrals, engaging primary care providers, and integrating clinical trial staff. Maturation of multidisciplinary care reflected focused work of the NCCCP QoC Subcommittee. Working group efforts in patient navigation, genetics, and physician conditions of participation were evident in improved multidisciplinary care performance for three common malignancies. This work provides a blueprint for health systems that wish to incorporate prospective multidisciplinary care into their cancer programs. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. A study on abdomen ultrasonography classified by particular disease practiced in health promotion center of a university hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jong Hak [College of Health Sciences, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    This study is to get preliminary data for an effectiveness evaluation of abdominal examination and improvement of it. Abnormal cases of abdominal ultrasonography are classified by sex, frequency, diagnosis and age, 4.924 examinees were included at a university hospital of health promotion center from January to December in 1999. The results are as follow. According to the distribution of sex, there are more male patients(55.0%) than females patients (48.0%). for men, 40's showed the highest percentage among examinees. For women, 50's were the highest. The reason that 'they visited the health promotion center was that they wanted to check their health status'. This answers were reported the highest (59.3%). Patients that had abnormal cases of abdominal ultrasonography were 48.3%. Liver, kidney, gallbladder showed the highest percentage of abnormal cases in order of organs. Additionally, abnormal cases were discovered in liver cases. According to the frequency of abnormal cases among examinees, the slight fatty liver were the highest regardless of sex. Men had the slight fatty liver, kidney simple cyst, liver calcification and liver simple cyst in order of abnormal cases. Women showed the slight fatty liver kidney simple cyst, kidney calcification, liver simple cyst, and blood vessel tumor in order of abnormal cases. For the abnormal cases of live by sex and age, the 50's reported the highest number of abnormal cases in men (299 patients). In addition, 60's had the highest of disease rata 47.8%. For women, 50's reported the highest number of abnormal cases (361 patients).. Over 70's patients had the highest of disease rata 52.6%. For kidney, men and women showed the highest number of abnormal cases -62 vs 44 respectively. Over 70's patients had the highest percentage of disease rata -23.2% vs 14.0% respectively. For gallbladder, the number of abnormal cases were the most in men's 60's (31 patients) and in women

  20. Cancer risk and subsequent survival after hospitalization for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Baron, John A; Johnsen, Søren P; Pedersen, Lars; Farkas, Dóra K; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2015-04-01

    Intermittent claudication, muscle ischemia due to reduced arterial circulation, may be associated with an increased risk of cancer risk and death due to neoplasm-induced hypercoagulability and angiogenesis, or to shared risk factors, but the relation is not well understood. We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Registry of Patients to identify patients with intermittent claudication from 1980 to 2011 and no history of cancer. We followed these patients for incident cancers using the Danish Cancer Registry and compared cancer incidence among patients with intermittent claudication to that expected in the general population. We also compared the survival of patients with cancer with and without claudication, matched for sex, cancer site, stage, age at diagnosis, and diagnosis year. A total of 53,762 patients with intermittent claudication were identified. We observed 6,270 incident cancers over a total 269,430 years of follow-up (mean, 5.0), compared with 4,306 cancer cases expected [standardized incidence ratio = 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.42-1.49]. Cancer risk also increased after the exclusion of patients with a prior diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, or diabetes, particularly for tobacco-related cancers. The elevated cancer risk persisted over 10 years of follow-up. For patients with cancer, diagnosis of intermittent claudication within 3 months preceding the cancer diagnosis did not influence survival, but before 3 months, was associated with modestly worse survival (mortality rate ratio = 1.19; 95% CI, 1.14-1.25). Intermittent claudication is associated with an increased risk of cancer and poorer subsequent survival. Clinical attention following intermittent claudication diagnosis may reveal incident cancers. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Parental experiences with a hospital-based bereavement program following the loss of a child to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Levin-Russman, Elyse; Gioiella, Marie Elena; Adams, Jeffrey M

    2017-06-01

    The death of a child from cancer is an intense and life-changing loss for a parent. Guided by the principles of patient- and family-centered care, hospital-based caregivers developed a program to provide bereavement support for parents through phone calls and mailings. The aim of the present qualitative phenomenological study was to understand how parents experienced participating in this bereavement program. A total of eight parents from six families participated in a focus-group evaluation of the two-year hospital-based bereavement program. Two social work clinicians/researchers independently analyzed the transcript of the focus group to define themes. Four themes were identified: (1) lived experience of grief, (2) importance of relationships with the hospital-based team, (3) bereavement support from hospital-based providers, and (4) extending bereavement care. Participants indicated the value of ongoing communication and connection with members of the healthcare team, who were often central to a family's life for years during their child's cancer treatment. Parents also provided suggestions for extending bereavement support through continued contact with providers and informal annual gatherings, as well as through a peer (parent-to-parent) support program.

  2. Study shows aspirin reduces the risk and recurrence of prostate cancer in African-American men | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    African-American men who take a daily dose of aspirin experience a significantly lower risk of developing advanced prostate cancer – the aggressive and deadly form of the disease – than African-American men who do not regularly use aspirin, according to a study from the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis. Learn more...

  3. Audit of advanced gastric cancer at Ibn Sina Hospital, Khartoum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    second to lung cancer). In Sudan incidence and prevalence are not clear because of absence of National Cancer Registry. Aim: To find out the frequency of the gastric mesenchymal tumours, whether gender and age influences the ...

  4. Cancer patients' control preferences in decision making and associations with patient-reported outcomes: a prospective study in an outpatient cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Markus; Schildmann, Jan; Trautmann, Freya; Hentschel, Leopold; Hornemann, Beate; Rentsch, Anke; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schmitt, Jochen

    2017-09-01

    "Shared decision making" has been proposed as a prerequisite of patient-centered care. However, little is known on factors, which may influence cancer patients' decision control preferences (DCP) in routine care. This study investigated possible determinants of the patients' DCP with respect to patient characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Consecutive patients presenting at a comprehensive cancer center between May 2014 and October 2014 were offered a self-administered electronic questionnaire including standardized PRO measures and patients' DCP. Results were linked with patient characteristics from the hospital information system and analyzed using cross-sectional methods. Out of 126 patients participating, 102 (81%; 65% male; mean age 62 years) completed the DCP-item. Overall, 49% (n = 50) preferred shared treatment decision responsibility, 29% (n = 30) preferred to leave the control to his/her physician, whereas 22% (n = 22) preferred to be in control of his/her treatment decision. Higher age (p = 0.035) and elevated distress levels (p = 0.038) were significantly associated with an increased willingness to leave the decision control to the physician. Further sociodemographic and PRO measures were not associated with patients' DCP. Our findings demonstrate that DCP assessment in routine cancer care is possible and provides important information to the treating oncologist. Information on DCP combined with PRO may contribute to more individualized decision making in cancer care.

  5. Hospital volume and post-operative mortality after resection for gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, RAM; Meurs, CJC; Dijkhuis, CM; Stassen, LPS; Wiggers, T

    Aims: In low-volume hospitals, expertise in gastric surgery is difficult to maintain because of the decreasing incidence of gastric cancer and the fall of surgery for ulcer disease. We evaluated the prognostic impact of hospital volume on post-operative mortality (POM) in a consecutive series of

  6. Hospital of diagnosis and probability to receive a curative treatment for oesophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeter, M.; van Steenbergen, L. N.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Rutten, H.J.; Roukema, J. A.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of oesophageal cancer in the Netherland is performed in high volume centres. However, the decision to refer patients for curative surgery is made in the referring hospital of diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of hospital of diagnosis

  7. Meharry-Johns Hopkins Center for Prostate Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project seeks to add to research knowledge that impacts racial disparities in prostate cancer by examining how...project seeks to add to available research on racial disparities in prostate cancer by examining health patterns among sons of fathers with the disease...Institute (NCI) state cancer profiles , the mortality rate is almost three times that of CA men (73.9 per 100,000 AA / 25.6 per 100,000 C). Genetic and

  8. Oral cancer at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi | Onyango | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of oral cancer in the African population is still uncertain. Earlier reports suggested a relatively low incidence of oral cancer among Africans. However, there have been recent reports of an upward trend in the incidence of oral cancers in developing countries as a consequence of changes in ...

  9. CANCER OF THE PENIS AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-10-10

    Oct 10, 2000 ... Objectives: To determine how common cancer of penis is in this locality compared to all other ... malignant lymphoma and cancer of the cervix(9,10). The .... Table 8. Methods of treatment in penile cancer patients at KNH (1970-1999). Type of treatment. Circumcision. 2. 3.6. Local excision and radiotherapy.

  10. Pattern of Bladder Cancer at University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is endemic to Zambia and is associated with changes in the patterns of both AIDS and non- AIDS defining cancers. Bladder cancer is one malignancy that has been noted to increase in the era of HIV/ AIDS epidemic. This study sought to describe the pattern of cancer of the ...

  11. Pattern of Skin cancer at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that cover the body should be undertaken by albinos. Public enlightenment towards early recognition of skin cancer will enhance early presentation and ensure adequate and curative treatment. Keywords: Skin cancers, squamous cell carcinoma, late presentation of skin cancer. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery Vol.

  12. Prevalence of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in a tertiary cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Lucíola de Barros; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Bugano, Diogo Diniz Gomes; Karnakis, Theodora; Giglio, Auro Del; Kaliks, Rafael Aliosha

    2014-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of abnormal glomerular filtration rate in elderly patients with solid tumors. A retrospective study with patients aged >65 years diagnosed with solid tumors between January 2007 and December 2011 in a cancer center. The following data were collected: sex, age, serum creatinine at the time of diagnosis and type of tumor. Renal function was calculated using abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formulae and then staged in accordance with the clinical practice guidelines published by the Working Group of the National Kidney Foundation. A total of 666 patients were included and 60% were male. The median age was 74.2 years (range: 65 to 99 years). The most prevalent diagnosis in the study population were colorectal (24%), prostate (20%), breast (16%) and lung cancer (16%). The prevalence of elevated serum creatinine (>1.0mg/dL) was 30%. However, when patients were assessed using abbreviated MDRD formulae, 66% had abnormal renal function, stratified as follows: 45% with stage 2, 18% with stage 3, 3% with stage 4 and 0.3% with stage 5. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first study to estimate the frequency of renal insufficiency in elderly cancer patients in Brazil. The prevalence of abnormal renal function among our cohort was high. As suspected, the absolute creatinine level does underestimate renal function impairment and should not be used as predictor of chemotherapy metabolism, excretion and consequent toxicity.

  13. Physician Assistant/Nurse Practitioner | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    clinical liaison to area hospices and/or home care agencies as needed or as appropriate Acts as a clinical liaison between inpatient and outpatient nurses in order to provide continuity of care to the hospitalized patient Maintains documented evidence of weekly case review with the collaborating physician Attends and participates in multidisciplinary meetings Practices within boundaries established by the Nurse Practice Act, State of Maryland and Medical Board of the Clinical Center Liaises with Leidos Biomed and various NCI staff to initiate and complete tasks relating to medicine and clinical protocols, and all activities related to nursing Performs clinical data recording and medical chart entries Dictates admission and discharge summaries 

  14. Epidemiological Trends of GI Cancers in Patients Visiting a Tertiary Care Hospital in Chandigarh, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Munesh K; Singh, Tarundeep; Pandey, Avdesh K; Kankaria, Ankita

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become an epidemic disease. Nearly ten million new cancer cases are diagnosed annually in the world and out of these about half are from the developing world. To appropriately plan for treatment, management and prevention of the disease, it becomes necessary to study the trends about morbidity caused by cancers. Data for patients diagnosed with any form of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers was extracted from records maintained in the outpatient department registers of the Oncology Department of Government Medical College and Hospital in Chandigarh from 1999 to 2012. Trends were analysed for different categories of GI cancers for the period of 12 years. In present study GI cancers accounted for 23 % of all registered cases (n-9603) of carcinomas. Males predominated for all GI cancers except in the gall bladder. Gastrointestinal cancers as a proportion of total cancers increased from 21% in 1999 to 25.9% in 2012 with a significant increasing trend in our series (χ2 for linear trend=9.36, pCancers of the tonsil, oral cavity and pharynx taken together showed an increasing trend over the years (χ2 for trend=55.2, pcancers of the lower GI (χ2=19.6, pcancers form a significant proportion of all cancers reporting to our data. In depth studies to ascertain the reasons for the changing trends are required to design intervention programs. Further information is necessary from cancer registries and from the hospital records of oncology departments.

  15. Reproductive Cancer Treatment Hospitalizations of U.S. Women with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Susan L.; Son, Esther; Powell, Robyn M.; Igdalsky, Leah

    2018-01-01

    There is a dearth of existing research on the treatment of reproductive cancers among women with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). This study analyzed the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample and compared the prevalence of reproductive cancer treatment hospitalization discharges among women with…

  16. Cancer of the Cervix at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and clinical presentation of cervical cancer in a Nigerian tertiary health institution. Methods: A review of retrieved retrospective data relating to patients managed for cancer of the cervix at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City between January 1991 and December ...

  17. Improvement of best practice in early breast cancer : Actionable surgeon and hospital factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, Marjan; Broekhuis, Manda; Otter, Rene; Klazinga, Niek S.

    To identify actionable elements for improving best practice, this study examined the relative effects of patient, surgeon and hospital factors on surgical treatment variation of 2,929 early breast cancer patients, diagnosed from January 1998 to January 2002 in the region of the Comprehensive Cancer

  18. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, R.; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews

  19. A single center 14 years study of infectious complications leading to hospitalization of patients with primary antibody deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    Full Text Available Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections, leading to hospitalizations. This study was performed to determine the main infectious causes of hospital admissions in selective Iranian patients with PADs. Forty patients with PADs, who were admitted to the Infectious Ward of Children's Medical Center Hospital during a 14-year period, were reviewed in this study. There were 115 documented episodes of hospital admission during a 14-year period. The average length of hospital stay was 33.30 ± 25.72 days. Pneumonia was the most prominent infection leading to hospitalization among these patients (n = 48, followed by gastroenteritis (n = 23. Other less frequent causes of hospitalization were fever and neutropenia, septic arthritis, encephalitis, orbital cellulitis, sepsis, urinary tract infection, meningitis, oral ulcer, and lung abscess. The most common causative organisms of diarrhea were: Giardia lamblia, followed by Candida albicans, and Salmonella sp. Many patients with PADs suffer from repeated infections leading to hospitalization, in spite of immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Respiratory tract infections were the prominent cause of hospitalization among studied patients, followed by gastrointestinal infections.

  20. Commentary on: "Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial." Kwon ED, Drake CG, Scher HI, Fizazi K, Bossi A, van den Eertwegh AJ, Krainer M, Houede N, Santos R, Mahammedi H, Ng S, Maio M, Franke FA, Sundar S, Agarwal N, Bergman AM, Ciuleanu TE, Korbenfeld E, Sengeløv L, Hansen S, Logothetis C, Beer TM, McHenry MB, Gagnier P, Liu D, Gerritsen WR, CA184-043 Investigators. Departments of Urology and Immunology and Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA, Electronic address: kwon.eugene@mayo.edu; Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center and Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; Institut Gustave Roussy, University of Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vienna General Hospital, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France; CHU Caremeau, Nimes, France; Centro Médico Austral, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand, France; St John of God Hospital, Subiaco, WA, Australia; University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy; Hospital de Caridade de Ijuí, Ijuí, Brazil; Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, UK; Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Netherlands Cancer Institute and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Institute of Oncology Ion Chiricuta and University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; Hospital Británico de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 to enhance antitumour immunity. Our aim was to assess the use of ipilimumab after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy. We did a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in which men with at least one bone metastasis from castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel treatment were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive bone-directed radiotherapy (8Gy in one fraction) followed by either ipilimumab 10mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for up to four doses. Non-progressing patients could continue to receive ipilimumab at 10mg/kg or placebo as maintenance therapy every 3 months until disease progression, unacceptable toxic effect, or death. Patients were randomly assigned to either treatment group via a minimisation algorithm, and stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, alkaline phosphatase concentration, haemoglobin concentration, and investigator site. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00861614. From May 26, 2009, to Feb 15, 2012, 799 patients were randomly assigned (399 to ipilimumab and 400 to placebo), all of whom were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Median overall survival was 11.2 months (95% CI: 9.5-12.7) with ipilimumab and 10.0 months (8.3-11.0) with placebo (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.85, 0.72-1.00; P = 0.053). However, the assessment of the proportional hazards assumption showed that it was violated (P = 0.0031). A piecewise hazard model showed that the HR changed over time: the HR for 0-5 months was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.10-1.95), for 5-12 months was 0.65 (0.50-0.85), and beyond 12 months was 0.60 (0.43-0.86). The most common grade 3

  1. Hospitalization Rates and Predictors of Rehospitalization Among Individuals With Advanced Cancer in the Year After Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Robin L; Bell, Janice F; Tancredi, Daniel J; Romano, Patrick S; Bold, Richard J; Joseph, Jill G

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Among individuals with advanced cancer, frequent hospitalization increasingly is viewed as a hallmark of poor-quality care. We examined hospitalization rates and individual- and hospital-level predictors of rehospitalization among individuals with advanced cancer in the year after diagnosis. Methods Individuals diagnosed with advanced breast, colorectal, non-small-cell lung, or pancreatic cancer from 2009 to 2012 (N = 25,032) were identified with data from the California Cancer Registry (CCR). After linkage with inpatient discharge data, multistate and log-linear Poisson regression models were used to calculate hospitalization rates and to model rehospitalization in the year after diagnosis, accounting for survival. Results In the year after diagnosis, 71% of individuals with advanced cancer were hospitalized, 16% had three or more hospitalizations, and 64% of hospitalizations originated in the emergency department. Rehospitalization rates were significantly associated with black non-Hispanic (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.42) and Hispanic (IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.20) race/ethnicity; public insurance (IRR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.47) and no insurance (IRR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.35); lower socioeconomic status quintiles (IRRs, 1.09 to 1.29); comorbidities (IRRs, 1.13 to 1.59); and pancreatic (IRR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.95 to 2.20) and non-small-cell lung (IRR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.54 to 1.86) cancers versus colorectal cancer. Rehospitalization rates were significantly lower after discharge from a hospital that had an outpatient palliative care program (IRR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97) and were higher after discharge from a for-profit hospital (IRR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.56). Conclusion Individuals with advanced cancer experience a heavy burden of hospitalization in the year after diagnosis. Efforts to reduce hospitalization and provide care congruent with patient preferences might target individuals at higher risk. Future work might

  2. Impact of a Fast-track Esophagectomy Protocol on Esophageal Cancer Patient Outcomes and Hospital Charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shewale, Jitesh B; Correa, Arlene M; Baker, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a fast-track esophagectomy protocol (FTEP) on esophageal cancer patients' safety, length of hospital stay (LOS), and hospital charges. BACKGROUND: FTEP involved transferring patients to the telemetry unit instead of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) after...... esophagectomy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 708 consecutive patients who underwent esophagectomy for primary esophageal cancer during the 4 years before (group A; 322 patients) or 4 years after (group B; 386 patients) the institution of an FTEP. Postoperative morbidity and mortality, LOS, and hospital...

  3. Toward Implementing Patient Flow in a Cancer Treatment Center to Reduce Patient Waiting Time and Improve Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suss, Samuel; Bhuiyan, Nadia; Demirli, Kudret; Batist, Gerald

    2017-06-01

    Outpatient cancer treatment centers can be considered as complex systems in which several types of medical professionals and administrative staff must coordinate their work to achieve the overall goals of providing quality patient care within budgetary constraints. In this article, we use analytical methods that have been successfully employed for other complex systems to show how a clinic can simultaneously reduce patient waiting times and non-value added staff work in a process that has a series of steps, more than one of which involves a scarce resource. The article describes the system model and the key elements in the operation that lead to staff rework and patient queuing. We propose solutions to the problems and provide a framework to evaluate clinic performance. At the time of this report, the proposals are in the process of implementation at a cancer treatment clinic in a major metropolitan hospital in Montreal, Canada.

  4. National Evaluation of Hospital Performance on the New Commission on Cancer Melanoma Quality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Christina A; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Yang, Anthony D; Martini, Mary C; Gerami, Pedram; Chandra, Sunandana; Kuzel, Timothy M; Winchester, David P; Palis, Bryan E; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2016-10-01

    To increase adherence to cancer management guidelines, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) developed and approved five melanoma quality measures in 2015. Our objectives were to evaluate formally the national performance of these melanoma measures and to examine patient, tumor, and hospital characteristics associated with adherence. From the National Cancer Data Base (2012), patients with invasive, nonmetastatic melanoma were identified. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were based on the CoC definition for each measure. Patient-level and hospital-level adherence rates were calculated for the five measures. A hospital was deemed "compliant" if it met the CoC standard, which requires 80 % of patients to receive the measure-specific recommended care. Patient, tumor, and hospital characteristics potentially associated with higher likelihood of adherence at the patient-level were estimated using hierarchical random-effects logistic regression models. A total of 31,598 patients from 1343 hospitals were examined. Patient-level adherence rates varied from 31.6 % (Measure 5: ≥10 axillary lymph nodes removed/examined) to 72.6 % (Measure 1: sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) appropriateness measure). Hospital-level adherence rates, ranged from 19.3 % of hospitals (N = 538 hospitals for Measure 5) to 44.8 % of hospitals (N = 1090 hospitals for Measure 3: completion lymph node dissection after positive SLNB). No hospital-level factors (e.g., teaching status) were consistently associated with better adherence. National adherence rates to the five new CoC melanoma quality metrics are low, and most hospitals would not meet the CoC requirement of 80 % adherence. Feedback for performance of these measures to hospitals, decisions support tools, and educational initiatives are needed to improve guideline adherence.

  5. Rehabilitation for cancer patients at Black Lion hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worku, Teshager; Mengistu, Zuriash; Semahegn, Agumasie; Tesfaye, Gezahegn

    2017-11-16

    In Ethiopia, there were greater than 2000 adult and 200 pediatric cancer patients annually in 2010, but the estimated number of cancer patients were increasing. Oncologic rehabilitation treatment may result in improved physical and mental impairment. There is a paucity of information about rehabilitation service utilization among cancer patients in Ethiopia. Hence, the purpose of this study was to assess the rehabilitation service for cancer patient and associated factors at Black Lion hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A hospital-based cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted from March to April 2014. Convenient sampling method was employed to recruit the study participants. Interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were entered into EPI data version 3.1 and exported to SPSS (16.0) software for analysis. Descriptive analysis, binary and multiple logistic regression were carried out. Significance association was interpreted using adjusted odds ratio at 95% confidence interval and p-value less than 0.05. A sample of 423 patients aged 18 years and older were involved in the study. Breast cancer (25%), colorectal cancer (20.6%), cervical cancer (14.7%), lymphoma (7.7%), lung (7.2%), leukemia (5.4%), kidney (3.6%) and prostate cancer (2.6%) were the common forms of cancer diagnosed at cancer unit of the Black Lion Hospital. Twenty six percent of cancer patients received rehabilitation service at least once. The main rehabilitation services given were nutritional and psychological support. Unavailability of supplies, lack of professionals and cost of service were among the barriers to receiving rehabilitation services. Only a few cancer patients received cancer rehabilitation services. Increasing the knowledge of the professionals, stocking cancer units with necessary supplies, and other comprehensive programs are needed.

  6. A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette Linnet; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Hansson, Eva Helena

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety......, depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence. METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical...... and control groups after baseline adjustment. CONCLUSION: We observed higher physical well-being 9 months after randomization in the GSD-GYN-C group, as compared to women receiving usual care. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: The results suggest that the person-centered intervention GSD-GYN-C may improve...

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients at Zhejiang University Teaching Hospital Zhuji Hospital, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lisong; Jin, Ketao; He, Kuifeng; Bian, Chunge; Chen, Weili; Fu, Kaiyan; Zhu, Tieming; Jin, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is garnering increasing interest and acceptance among the general population throughout the world. The use of CAM by cancer patients is very common in China. The referenced English literature has no rural community-based study from China on this subject. This study was conducted to define the prevalence, pattern of use, and reasons for using CAM by cancer patients at Zhejiang University Teaching Hospital Zhuji Hospital (ZUTH-ZJH), China. Face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire were used to determine the use of CAM by cancer patients. All consenting cancer patients were interviewed as they presented at the Department of Surgical Oncology of ZUTH-ZJH, from September 2009 to February 2010. One hundred and twenty one patients were interviewed; 64 (52.9%) were males and 57 (47.1%) were females. One hundred and thirteen patients (93.4%) have used CAM at some time during their current cancer illness, fifty two (46.0%) are female and sixty one (54.0%) are male patients; 8 (6.6%) patients have not used any form of CAM. Chinese medicine (73.5.0%) was the most commonly reported CAM modality. Over 71.7% of those who used CAM were satisfied, only 28.3% were disappointed. Twenty eight users (24.8%) did not see any benefit from the CAM, but eighty one patients (71.7%) could describe some specific benefits. Only one patient will use orthodox medicine instead of CAM in the future, almost all patients will continue to use CAM in the future. CAM use is very common among cancer patients in local area of China. Most users obtain the expected benefits, and adverse events are uncommon. It is imperative that oncologists should explore the use of CAM with their cancer patients and work towards an integrated model of health-care provision. This knowledge will enable oncologists to better counsel the patients.

  8. Does hospital discharge policy influence sick-leave patterns in the case of female breast cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, Rikard; Stenbeck, Magnus; Diderichsen, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to investigate how differences among hospitals in the shift from in-patient care to day surgery and a reduced hospital length of stay affect the sick-leave period for female patients surgically treated for breast cancer. All women aged 18-64 who were diagnosed with breast cancer...... in 2000 were selected from the National Cancer Register and combined with data from the sick-leave database of the National Social Insurance Board and the National Hospital Discharge Register (N = 1834). A multi-factorial model was fitted to the data to investigate how differences in hospital care...... practice affected the length of sick-leave. The main output measure was the number of sick-leave days after discharge during the year following surgery. The confounders used included age, type of primary surgical treatment, whether or not lymph node dissection was performed, labour-market status, county...

  9. A Nationwide Survey of Quality of End-of-Life Cancer Care in Designated Cancer Centers, Inpatient Palliative Care Units, and Home Hospices in Japan: The J-HOPE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    End-of-life (EOL) cancer care in general hospitals and home care has not previously been evaluated in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate EOL cancer care from the perspective of bereaved family members in nationwide designated cancer centers, inpatient palliative care units (PCUs), and home hospices in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey for bereaved family members of cancer patients in March 2008 for 56 designated cancer centers and in June 2007 for 100 PCUs and 14 home hospices. Outcomes were overall care satisfaction, structure and process of care (Care Evaluation Scale), and achievement of a good death (Good Death Inventory). In designated cancer centers, PCUs, and home hospices, 2794 (response rate 59%), 5312 (response rate 69%), and 292 (response rate 67%) bereaved family members participated, respectively. Mean scores for overall care satisfaction were high for all places of death, at 4.3 ± 1.2 for designated cancer centers, 5.0 ± 1.2 for PCUs, and 5.0 ± 1.0 for home hospices. Designated cancer centers showed significantly lower ratings than PCUs and home hospices for structure and process of care and achievement of a good death (P = 0.0001 each). Home hospices were rated significantly higher than PCUs for achievement of a good death (P = 0.0001). The main findings of this study were: (1) overall, bereaved family members were satisfied with end-of-life care in all three places of death; (2) designated cancer centers were inferior to PCUs and home hospices and had more room for improvement; and 3) home hospices were rated higher than PCUs for achieving a good death, although home hospices remain uncommon in Japan. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, N; Vos, J; van Uden-Kraan, C F; Breitbart, W.; Cuijpers, P; Holtmaat, K; Witte, B I; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for cancer survivors (MCGP-CS) to improve personal meaning, compared with supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) and care as usual (CAU). METHOD: A total of 170 cancer survivors were randomly assigned

  11. Delirium in Hospitalized Children with Cancer: Incidence and Associated Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Chani; Ariagno, Sydney; Thau, Francesca; Rosenberg, Lynne; Mauer, Elizabeth A; Gerber, Linda M; Pritchard, David; Kearney, Julia; Greenwald, Bruce M; Silver, Gabrielle

    2017-12-01

    To assess the incidence of delirium and its risk factors in hospitalized children with cancer. In this cohort study, all consecutive admissions to a pediatric cancer service over a 3-month period were prospectively screened for delirium twice daily throughout their hospitalization. Demographic and treatment-related data were collected from the medical record after discharge. A total of 319 consecutive admissions, including 186 patients and 2731 hospital days, were included. Delirium was diagnosed in 35 patients, for an incidence of 18.8%. Risk factors independently associated with the development of delirium included age <5 years (OR = 2.6, P = .026), brain tumor (OR = 4.7, P = .026); postoperative status (OR = 3.3, P = .014), and receipt of benzodiazepines (OR = 3.7,P < .001). Delirium was associated with increased hospital length of stay, with median length of stay for delirious patients of 10 days compared with 5 days for patients who were not delirious during their hospitalization (P < .001). In this cohort, delirium was a frequent complication during admissions for childhood cancer, and was associated with increased hospital length of stay. Multi-institutional prospective studies are warranted to further characterize delirium in this high-risk population and identify modifiable risk factors to improve the care provided to hospitalized children with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The tele-interpreter service at the Bangkok Hospital Medical Center, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroensawat, Boonthida; Wankijcharoen, Somsak

    2013-01-01

    Thailand has become one of the most famous medical hub countries, which is reflected in the increasing number of international patients visiting the Bangkok Hospital Medical Center (BMC). In response, the Interpreter Department at BMC has been established to provide translation for non-English speaking patients. Overtime the Interpreter Department frequently reaches maximum capacity when providing prompt services on demand, resulting in long waiting times and delayed medical treatment. BMC has foreseen the necessity to implement a tele-interpreter system via videoconferencing technology to provide effective translations in the medical environment where delay is usually not tolerated. Tele-interpretation allows doctors to simply select a language icon on their Wi-Fi IP telephone to instantly connect to an interpreter. After implementation in 2oo9, the overall customer satisfaction index for the Interpreter Department increased from 64.5% in Quarter 1 to 85.5% in Quarter 3 of 2011. The tele-interpretation system is currently the closest approximation to the face-to-face interpretation method.

  13. Rapid diagnoses at the breast center of Jeroen Bosch Hospital: a case study invoking queueing theory and discrete event simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vrugt, Noëlle Maria; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Smilde, T.J.; de Jong, M.; Bessems, M.

    2017-01-01

    When suspected tissue is discovered in a patient’s breast, swiftly available diagnostic test results are essential for medical and psychological reasons. The breast center of the Jeroen Bosch Hospital aims to comply with new Dutch standards to provide 90% of the patients an appointment within three

  14. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  15. Barrett's esophagus: Ten years of experience at a tertiary care hospital center in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Bernal-Méndez, A R; Barreto-Zúñiga, R; Briseño-García, D; Martínez-Lozano, J A; Romano-Munive, A F; Elizondo-Rivera, J; Téllez-Ávila, F I

    2017-05-24

    The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus has been calculated at between 1.3 and 1.6%. There is little information with respect to this in Mexico. To determine the frequency and characteristics of Barrett's esophagus in patients that underwent endoscopy at a national referral center, within a 10-year time frame. The databases of the pathology and gastrointestinal endoscopy departments of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" were analyzed, covering the period of January 2002 to December 2012. Patients with a histologic diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus were included. The variables of age, sex, the presence of dysplasia/esophageal adenocarcinoma, Barrett's esophagus length, and follow-up were analyzed. Of 43,639 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed, 420 revealed Barrett's esophagus, corresponding to a frequency of 9.6 patients for every 1,000 endoscopies. Of those patients, 66.9% (n=281) were men, mean patient age±SD was 57.2±15.3 years, 223 patients (53%) presented with long-segment Barrett's esophagus, and 197 (47%) with short-segment Barrett's esophagus. Dysplasia was not present in 339 patients (80.7%). Eighty-one (19.3%) patients had some grade of dysplasia or cancer: 48/420 (11.42%) presented with low-grade dysplasia, 20/420 (4.76%) with high-grade dysplasia, and 13/420 (3.1%) were diagnosed with esophageal cancer arising from Barrett's esophagus. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 years. The frequency of Barrett's esophagus was 9.6 cases for every 1,000 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed. Dysplasia was not documented in the majority of the patients with Barrett's esophagus and they had no histopathologic changes during follow-up. A total of 19.3% of the patients presented with dysplasia or cancer. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromosomal Translocations: Chicken or Egg? | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many tumor cells have abnormal chromosomes. Some of these abnormalities are caused by chromosomal translocations, which occur when two chromosomes break and incorrectly rejoin, resulting in an exchange of genetic material. Translocations can activate oncogenes, silence tumor suppressor genes, or result in the creation of completely new fusion gene products. While there is little doubt that chromosomal translocations can contribute to cancer, there is an active "chicken and the egg" discussion about the role translocations and other chromosomal abnormalities play—do they actually cause cancer or merely occur because of other changes within the cancer cell.  

  17. Japanese structure survey of radiation oncology in 2009 with special reference to designated cancer care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numasaki, Hodaka; Nishio, Masamichi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tago, Masao; Ando, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Terahara, Atsuro; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Murakami, Masao; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Teshima, Teruki

    2013-10-01

    The structure of radiation oncology in designated cancer care hospitals in Japan was surveyed in terms of equipment, personnel, patient load, and geographic distribution, and compared with the structure in other radiotherapy facilities and the previous survey. The Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology surveyed the national structure of radiation oncology in 2009. The structures of 365 designated cancer care hospitals and 335 other radiotherapy facilities were compared. Designated cancer care hospitals accounted for 50.0% of all the radiotherapy facilities in Japan. The patterns of equipment and personnel in designated cancer care hospitals and the other radiotherapy facilities were, respectively, as follows: linear accelerators per facility: 1.4 and 1.0; dual-energy function: 78.6 and 61.3%; three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy function: 88.5 and 70.0%; intensity-modulated radiotherapy function: 51.6 and 25.3%; annual number of patients per linear accelerator: 301.3 and 185.2; Ir-192 remote-controlled after-loading systems: 31.8 and 4.2%; and average number of full-time equivalent radiation oncologists per facility: 1.8 and 0.8. Compared with the previous survey, the ownership ratio of equipment and personnel improved in both designated cancer care hospitals and the other radiotherapy facilities. Annual patient loads per full-time equivalent radiation oncologist in the designated cancer care hospitals and the other radiotherapy facilities were 225.5 and 247.6, respectively. These values exceeded the standard guidelines level of 200. The structure of radiation oncology in designated Japanese cancer care hospitals was more mature than that in the other radiotherapy facilities. There is still a shortage of personnel. The serious understaffing problem in radiation oncology should be corrected in the future.

  18. Environmental market factors associated with electronic health record adoption among cancer hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Will L; Menachemi, Nir

    2017-02-22

    Although recent literature has explored the relationship between various environmental market characteristics and the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) among general, acute care hospitals, no such research currently exists for specialty hospitals, including those providing cancer care. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between market characteristics and the adoption of EHRs among Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited hospitals. Secondary data on EHR adoption combined with hospital and environmental market characteristics were analyzed using logistic regression. Using the resource dependence theory, we examined how measures of munificence, complexity, and dynamism are related to the adoption of EHRs among CoC-accredited hospitals and, separately, hospitals not CoC-accredited. In a sample of 2,670 hospitals, 141 (0.05%) were academic-based CoC-accredited hospitals and 562 (21%) were community-based CoC-accredited hospitals. Measures of munificence such as cancer incidence rates (OR = 0.99, CI [0.99, 1.00], p = .020) and percentage population aged 65+ (OR = 0.99, CI [0.99, 1.00], p = .001) were negatively associated with basic EHR adoption, whereas urban location was positively associated with comprehensive EHR adoption (OR = 3.07, CI [0.89, 10.61], p = .076) for community-based CoC-accredited hospitals. Measures of complexity such as hospitals in areas with less competition were less likely to adopt a basic EHR (OR = 0.33, CI [0.19, 0.96], p = .005), whereas Medicare Managed Care penetration was positively associated with comprehensive EHR adoption (OR = 1.02, CI [1.00, 1.05], p = .070) among community-based CoC-accredited hospitals. Lastly, dynamism, measured as population change, was negatively associated with the adoption of comprehensive EHRs (OR = 0.99, CI [0.99, 1.00], p = .070) among academic-based CoC-accredited hospitals. A greater understanding of the environment's relationship to health information technology adoption in

  19. Costs and outcomes associated with hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications: A retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHILLING, M. BLANE; PARKS, CONNIE; DEETER, ROBERT G.

    2011-01-01

    The average total hospitalization costs for adult cancer patients with neutropenic complications were quantified and the average length of hospital stay (LOS), all-cause mortality during hospitalization and reimbursement rates were determined. This observational retrospective cohort study identified adult patients with cancer who were hospitalized from January 2005 through June 2008 using a large private US health care database (>342 inpatient facilities). ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes identified patients by cancer type and who had neutropenic complications. The utilization and accounting systems of the hospitals were used to calculate mean (±95% confidence interval) hospitalization costs and LOS and percent all-cause mortality and reimbursement. Costs were adjusted to 2009 US dollars. There were 3,814 patients who had cancer and neutropenia, 1,809 (47.4%) also had an infection or fever and 1,188 (31.1%) had infection. Mean hospitalization costs were $18,042 (95% CI 16,997–19,087) for patients with neutropenia, $22,839 (95% CI 21,006–24,672) for patients with neutropenia plus infection or fever and $27,587 (95% CI 24,927–30,247) for patients with neutropenia plus infection. Mean LOS were 9 days (95% CI 8.7–9.3), 10.7 days (95% CI 10.2–11.2) and 12.6 days (95% CI 11.9–13.3), respectively. Mortality followed a similar trend; 8.3, 13.7 and 19.4%, respectively. By cancer type, hematologic malignancies had the highest average hospitalization costs and longest mean LOS of $52,579 (95% CI 42,183–62,975) and 20.3 days (95% CI 17.4–23.2), and a high mortality rate of 20.0%, while primary breast cancer patients had the lowest cost of $8,413 (95% CI 6,103–10,723), shortest LOS of 5.5 days (95% CI 4.2–6.8) and lowest mortality (0%). Mean reimbursement rates were 100.0, 101.5 and 95.4% for patients with neutropenia, neutropenia plus infection or fever and neutropenia plus infection, respectively. Hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications had a

  20. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B are rare genetic diseases, which lead to the development of medullary thyroid cancer, usually in childhood. Surgery is the only standard treatment.

  1. Understanding Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common form of kidney cancer in adults, is not a single disease but rather a collection of different tumor types driven by distinct genetic changes that arise within the same tissue.

  2. [Estimation of the excess of lung cancer mortality risk associated to environmental tobacco smoke exposure of hospitality workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M José; Nebot, Manel; Juárez, Olga; Ariza, Carles; Salles, Joan; Serrahima, Eulàlia

    2006-01-14

    To estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with environmental tobacco (ETS) smoke exposure among hospitality workers. The estimation was done using objective measures in several hospitality settings in Barcelona. Vapour phase nicotine was measured in several hospitality settings. These measurements were used to estimate the excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure for a 40 year working life, using the formula developed by Repace and Lowrey. Excess lung cancer mortality risk associated with ETS exposure was higher than 145 deaths per 100,000 workers in all places studied, except for cafeterias in hospitals, where excess lung cancer mortality risk was 22 per 100,000. In discoteques, for comparison, excess lung cancer mortality risk is 1,733 deaths per 100,000 workers. Hospitality workers are exposed to ETS levels related to a very high excess lung cancer mortality risk. These data confirm that ETS control measures are needed to protect hospital workers.

  3. Nasopharyngeal cancer at the University College Hospital Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Background: Only two reports on nasopharyngeal can- cer (NPC) are available from this large centre and both covered the years 1961 - 1966 and 1966 — 1980. (Objective: This study describes the update of nasopha- ryngeal cancer at the Ibadan Cancer Registry from 1981 to 2000. Method: This is a ...

  4. Nasopharyngeal cancer at the University College Hospital Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... showed differential variation between the sexes suggesting a possible biological effect in the manifestation of this disease. Key Words: Nasopharynx, Nasopharyngeal Cancer, Human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr Virus, Ibadan Nigeria. Résumé Introduction: Il y a deux rapports seulement sur le cancer du nasopharyngite ...

  5. Patterns in Skin Cancers in Tikur Anbessa Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be due to due to melanin protection against ultraviolet rays (5-8). The ratio of skin cancers in dark skinned populations are reported to be 10 to 20 times lower than lighter- skinned populations (4). However. the rate of skin cancer for. African blacks despite their pigmented skin, is occasionally reported to be higher.

  6. Conjunctival cancers in HIV patients at the university hospital of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Conjunctival cancers are masses raised or flat, located in or directly under the conjunctival mucous membrane covering the anterior sclera, tarsus and conjunctival dead-end. These tumours usually occur in the elderly or in cases of HIV/AIDS. Objective: To list the different types of conjunctival cancer in cases of ...

  7. Vaginal Radical Trachelectomy for early stage cervical cancer. Results of the Danish National Single Center Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, L; Høgdall, C; Loft, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present and evaluate an unselected national single center strategy with fertility preserving trachelectomy in cervical cancer. In 2003 nationwide single-center referral of women for trachelectomies was agreed upon between all Danish departments performing cervical cancer surgery...... a total of 77 pregnancies. Of the 72 women 40 were referred to fertility treatment. First and second trimester miscarriage rates were 21.6% and 2.7%, respectively. A total of 53 children were born of which 41 were delivered after gestational week 34. CONCLUSION: This unselected national single center...

  8. Treatment preference and patient centered prostate cancer care: Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadevappa, Ravishankar; Chhatre, Sumedha; Gallo, Joseph J; Wittink, Marsha; Morales, Knashawn H; Bruce Malkowicz, S; Lee, David; Guzzo, Thomas; Caruso, Adele; Van Arsdalen, Keith; Wein, Alan J; Sanford Schwartz, J

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a slow progressing cancer that affects millions of men in the US. Due to uncertainties in outcomes and treatment complications, it is important that patients engage in informed decision making to choose the "optimal treatment". Patient centered care that encompasses informed decision-making can improve treatment choice and quality of care. Thus, assessing patient treatment preferences is critical for developing an effective decision support system. The objective of this patient-centered randomized clinical trial was to study the comparative effectiveness of a conjoint analysis intervention compared to usual care in improving subjective and objective outcomes in prostate cancer patients. We identified preferred attributes of alternative prostate cancer treatments that will aid in evaluating attributes of treatment options. In this two-phase study, in Phase 1 we used mixed methods to develop an adaptive conjoint task instrument. The conjoint task required the patients to trade-off attributes associated with treatments by assessing their relative importance. Phase 2 consisted of a randomized controlled trial of men with localized prostate cancer. We analyzed the effect of conjoint task intervention on the association between preferences, treatment and objective and subjective outcomes. Our conjoint task instrument can lead to a values-based patient-centered decision aid tool and help tailor treatment decision making to the values of prostate cancer patients. This will ultimately improve clinical decision making, clinical policy process, enhance patient centered care and improve prostate cancer outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fecal occult blood versus DNA testing: indirect comparison in a colorectal cancer screening population

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner H; Chen H

    2017-01-01

    Hermann Brenner,1–3 Hongda Chen1,4 1Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 2Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 3German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; 4Program Office for Cancer Screening in Urban China, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Med...

  10. Pain centers professionals' beliefs on non-cancer chronic pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dayse Maioli Garcia; Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos-Pimenta

    2008-01-01

    ...%) pain centers in the city of S.Paulo. The Survey of Chronic Pain Attitudes-Professionals was employed to evaluate pain professionals' beliefs toward emotions, control, disability, solicitude, cure and harm...

  11. Tumor Biology and Immunology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor Biology and Immunology The Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium is collaborating with National Center for Advanced Translational Sciences to complete whole exome sequencing on canine meningioma samples. Results will be published and made publicly available.

  12. University of Nebraska Medical Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal investigator: Michael (Tony) A. Hollingsworth, PhD Institution: Research Unit - University of Nebraska Medical Center Title of the PCDC Project This page is under construction. Please check back at a later date. |

  13. Bloodstream infections in patients with solid tumors: epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes in 528 episodes in a single cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Mar; Gudiol, Carlota; Garcia-Vidal, Carol; Ardanuy, Carmen; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Current information regarding bloodstream infection (BSI) in patients with solid tumors is scarce. We assessed the epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes of BSI in these patients. We also compared patients who died with those who survived to identify risk factors associated with mortality. From January 2006 to July 2012 all episodes of BSI in patients with solid tumors at a cancer center were prospectively recorded and analyzed. A total of 528 episodes of BSI were documented in 489 patients. The most frequent neoplasms were hepatobiliary tumors (19%), followed by lung cancer (18%) and lower gastrointestinal malignancies (16%). Many patients had received corticosteroid therapy (41%), and 15% had neutropenia (AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae (n = 13). The majority of patients with BSI caused by MDR organisms had received antibiotics (70%), and they had been previously hospitalized (61.4%) more frequently than patients with BSI caused by susceptible strains. Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was given to 23% of patients, with a higher proportion in those with BSI due to a MDR strain (69%). Early (cancer (OR, 35.39; 95% CI, 2.48-504.91), shock at presentation (OR, 25.84; 95% CI, 3.73-179.0), and corticosteroid therapy (OR, 6.98; 95% CI, 1.61-30.21).BSI in patients with solid tumors occurred mainly among those with hepatobiliary cancer, and cholangitis was the most frequent source; gram-negative bacilli were the most frequent causative agents. MDR organisms were relatively common, particularly in patients who had previously received antibiotics and had been hospitalized; these patients were frequently treated with inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy and had a poorer outcome. The case-fatality rate of patients with solid tumors and BSI was high and was associated with chronic advanced cancer, corticosteroid therapy, and shock at presentation.

  14. Hospitalization and rehospitalization in Parkinson disease patients: Data from the National Parkinson Foundation Centers of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahgholi, Leili; De Jesus, Sol; Wu, Samuel S; Pei, Qinglin; Hassan, Anhar; Armstrong, Melissa J; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Schmidt, Peter; Okun, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) are at high risk of hospital encounters with increasing morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the rate of hospital encounters in a cohort followed over 5 years and to identify associated factors. We queried the data from the International Multicenter National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement study. Multivariate logistic regression with backward selection was performed to identify factors associated with hospital encounter prior to baseline visit. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained and Cox regression performed on time to hospital encounter after the baseline visit. Of the 7,507 PD patients (mean age 66.5±9.9 years and disease duration 8.9±6.4 years at baseline visit), 1919 (25.6%) had a history of a hospital encounter prior to their baseline visit. Significant factors associated with a history of a hospital encounter prior to baseline included race (white race: OR 0.49), utilization of physical therapy (OR 1.47), history of deep brain stimulation (OR 1.87), number of comorbidities (OR 1.30), caregiver strain (OR 1.17 per standard deviation), and the standardized Timed Up and Go Test (OR 1.21). Patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline were more likely to have a re-hospitalization (HR1.67, P<0.0001) compared to those without a prior hospitalization. In addition, the time to hospital encounter from baseline was significantly associated with age and number of medications. In patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline visit, time to a second hospital encounter was significantly associated with caregiver strain and number of comorbidities. Hospitalization and re-hospitalization were common in this cohort of people with PD. Our results suggest addressing caregiver burden, simplifying medications, and emphasizing primary and multidisciplinary care for comorbidities are potential avenues to explore for reducing hospitalization rates.

  15. Hospitalization and rehospitalization in Parkinson disease patients: Data from the National Parkinson Foundation Centers of Excellence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Shahgholi

    Full Text Available Patients with Parkinson disease (PD are at high risk of hospital encounters with increasing morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the rate of hospital encounters in a cohort followed over 5 years and to identify associated factors.We queried the data from the International Multicenter National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement study. Multivariate logistic regression with backward selection was performed to identify factors associated with hospital encounter prior to baseline visit. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained and Cox regression performed on time to hospital encounter after the baseline visit.Of the 7,507 PD patients (mean age 66.5±9.9 years and disease duration 8.9±6.4 years at baseline visit, 1919 (25.6% had a history of a hospital encounter prior to their baseline visit. Significant factors associated with a history of a hospital encounter prior to baseline included race (white race: OR 0.49, utilization of physical therapy (OR 1.47, history of deep brain stimulation (OR 1.87, number of comorbidities (OR 1.30, caregiver strain (OR 1.17 per standard deviation, and the standardized Timed Up and Go Test (OR 1.21. Patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline were more likely to have a re-hospitalization (HR1.67, P<0.0001 compared to those without a prior hospitalization. In addition, the time to hospital encounter from baseline was significantly associated with age and number of medications. In patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline visit, time to a second hospital encounter was significantly associated with caregiver strain and number of comorbidities.Hospitalization and re-hospitalization were common in this cohort of people with PD. Our results suggest addressing caregiver burden, simplifying medications, and emphasizing primary and multidisciplinary care for comorbidities are potential avenues to explore for reducing hospitalization rates.

  16. [The utilization of parenteral nutrition at Hospital de Jerez (Cádiz): a description and comparison with other hospital centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Henry, J C; Méndez Martínez, C; Blanco Rodríguez, D; Rodríguez Quirós, M

    1996-01-01

    This retrospective study aims to analyze, and compare with other Spanish hospitals, the use of parenteral nutrition, its characteristics and complications, in a general hospital with 610 beds, during 1992. To conduct this study, we have used clinical histories and follow up sheets made up by the Department of Pharmacy for each patient, as well as the results of the sample processing in the microbiology laboratory. Between 1992 and 1993 we have seen an increase in the use of parenteral nutrition, with the number of bags increasing from 2134 to 2575. The departments which have used parenteral nutrition most, were Surgery (57.3%), and ICU (24.8%), with the mean duration being 10.4 days 8SD = +/- 9.3 days). The most frequently used access route in the hospital was the drum, but there are significant differences between the departments. Gastroenterological pathology was, with 71.4% the most frequent indication for its use, and within this, the neoplasias stand out with 26.3% of the total of parenteral nutrition. The complications which affected most patients are: increases of the liver enzymes, hypokalemias, hyponatremias, and hyperglycemias.

  17. Processes of code status transitions in hospitalized patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Lau-Min, Kelsey; Nipp, Ryan D; Greer, Joseph A; Traeger, Lara N; Moran, Samantha M; D'Arpino, Sara M; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Jackson, Vicki A; Cashavelly, Barbara J; Martinson, Holly S; Ryan, David P; Temel, Jennifer S

    2017-12-15

    Although hospitalized patients with advanced cancer have a low chance of surviving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the processes by which they change their code status from full code to do not resuscitate (DNR) are unknown. We conducted a mixed-methods study on a prospective cohort of hospitalized patients with advanced cancer. Two physicians used a consensus-driven medical record review to characterize processes that led to code status order transitions from full code to DNR. In total, 1047 hospitalizations were reviewed among 728 patients. Admitting clinicians did not address code status in 53% of hospitalizations, resulting in code status orders of "presumed full." In total, 275 patients (26.3%) transitioned from full code to DNR, and 48.7% (134 of 275 patients) of those had an order of "presumed full" at admission; however, upon further clarification, the patients expressed that they had wished to be DNR before the hospitalization. We identified 3 additional processes leading to order transition from full code to DNR acute clinical deterioration (15.3%), discontinuation of cancer-directed therapy (17.1%), and education about the potential harms/futility of CPR (15.3%). Compared with discontinuing therapy and education, transitions because of acute clinical deterioration were associated with less patient involvement (P = .002), a shorter time to death (P cancer were because of full code orders in patients who had a preference for DNR before hospitalization. Transitions due of acute clinical deterioration were associated with less patient engagement and a higher likelihood of inpatient death. Cancer 2017;123:4895-902. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Distress Due to Prognostic Uncertainty in Palliative Care: Frequency, Distribution, and Outcomes among Hospitalized Patients with Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramling, Robert; Stanek, Susan; Han, Paul K J; Duberstein, Paul; Quill, Tim E; Temel, Jennifer S; Alexander, Stewart C; Anderson, Wendy G; Ladwig, Susan; Norton, Sally A

    2017-09-18

    Prognostic uncertainty is common in advanced cancer and frequently addressed during palliative care consultation, yet we know little about its impact on quality of life (QOL). We describe the prevalence and distribution of distress due to prognostic uncertainty among hospitalized patients with advanced cancer before palliative care consultation. We evaluate the association between this type of distress and overall QOL before and after palliative care consultation. Observational cohort study. Hospitalized patients with advanced cancer who receive a palliative care consultation at two geographically distant academic medical centers. At the time of enrollment, before palliative care consultation, we asked participants: "Over the past two days, how much have you been bothered by uncertainty about what to expect from the course of your illness?" (Not at all/Slightly/Moderately/Quite a Bit/Extremely). We defined responses of "Quite a bit" and "Extremely" to be indicative of substantial distress. Two hundred thirty-six participants completed the baseline assessment. Seventy-seven percent reported being at least moderately bothered by prognostic uncertainty and half reported substantial distress. Compared with others, those who were distressed by prognostic uncertainty (118/236) reported poorer overall QOL before palliative care consultation (mean QOL 3.8 out of 10 vs. 5.3 out of 10, p = palliative care consultation. Distress from prognostic uncertainty is associated with lower levels of preconsultation QOL and with greater pre-post consultation improvement in the QOL.

  19. Malnutrition Diagnosis during Adult Inpatient Hospitalizations: Analysis of a Multi-Institutional Collaborative Database of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Conrad M; Mott, Sarah L; Nepple, Kenneth G

    2018-01-01

    Malnutrition is a significant problem for hospitalized patients. However, the true prevalence of reported malnutrition diagnosis in real-world clinical practice is largely unknown. Using a large collaborative multi-institutional database, the rate of malnutrition diagnosis was assessed and used to assess institutional variables associated with higher rates of malnutrition diagnosis. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis reported among inpatient hospitalizations. The University Health System Consortium (Vizient) database was retrospectively reviewed for reported rates of malnutrition diagnosis. All adult inpatient hospitalization at 105 member institutions during fiscal years 2014 and 2015 were evaluated. Malnutrition diagnosis based on the presence of an International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision diagnosis code. Hospital volume and publicly available hospital rankings and patient satisfaction scores were obtained. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the association between these variables and reported rates of malnutrition. A total of 5,896,792 hospitalizations were identified from 105 institutions during the 2-year period. It was found that 292,754 patients (5.0%) had a malnutrition diagnosis during their hospital stay. By institution, median rate of malnutrition diagnosis during hospitalization was 4.0%, whereas the rate of severe malnutrition diagnosis was 0.9%. There was a statistically significant increase in malnutrition diagnosis from 4.0% to 4.9% between 2014 and 2015 (P<0.01). Institutional factors associated with increased diagnosis of malnutrition were higher hospital volume, hospital ranking, and patient satisfaction scores (P<0.01). Missing a malnutrition diagnosis appears to be a universal issue because the rate of malnutrition diagnosis was consistently low across academic medical centers. Institutional variables were associated with the prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis, which

  20. Humanization according to cancer patients with extended hospitalization periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Natália Tatiani Gonçalves; Carvalho, Rachel de

    2010-06-01

    To identify the concept of humanization and raise aspects that contribute towards and that hinder humanization of hospital care, according to the opinion of oncology patients. This is a descriptive-exploratory survey, with a qualitative-quantitative approach. The sample was made up of 10 patients hospitalized for more than 30 days at the Oncology Unit of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, who, after satisfying ethical and legal procedures, were interviewed and answered three questions in reference to humanization in oncology. The factors that contributed more towards humanization were warmth in giving care, friendliness, and smiles, and the factors that hindered it were bad moods, noise, and not being promptly attended. Hospital humanization should be experienced and felt by all those who work at hospital and needs to be reflected in the care offered to the client and his/her family members. These aspects become vital in oncology in order to understand the difficult period the patient is going through during the hospital stay, showing an interest in his/her problems and struggles with an attitude of empathy and cordiality, always acting ethically and with professional responsibility.

  1. Humanization according to cancer patients with extended hospitalization periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Tatiani Gonçalves Brito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the concept of humanization and raise aspects that contribute towards and that hinder humanization of hospital care, according to the opinion of oncology patients. Methods: This is a descriptive-exploratory survey, with a qualitative-quantitative approach. The sample was made up of 10 patients hospitalized for more than 30 days at the Oncology Unit of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, who, after satisfying ethical and legal procedures, were interviewed and answered three questions in reference to humanization in oncology. Results: The factors that contributed more towards humanization were warmth in giving care, friendliness, and smiles, and the factors that hindered it were bad moods, noise, and not being promptly attended. Conclusions: Hospital humanization should be experienced and felt by all those who work at hospital and needs to be reflected in the care offered to the client and his/her family members. These aspects become vital in oncology in order to understand the difficult period the patient is going through during the hospital stay, showing an interest in his/her problems and struggles with an attitude of empathy and cordiality, always acting ethically and with professional responsibility.

  2. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durey Angela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals. Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Findings Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v connection to the community. Conclusions Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes.

  3. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sandra C; Shahid, Shaouli; Bessarab, Dawn; Durey, Angela; Davidson, Patricia M

    2011-03-14

    Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals.Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i) being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii) failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii) practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv) the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v) connection to the community. Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes.

  4. 78 FR 22794 - World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC Responders and Survivors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... disruption, as a 9/11 exposure, could be associated with breast cancer.\\3\\ For that reason, the Administrator... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC... Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related Health...

  5. Stability of adrenaline in ambulance and drug storage room Narenthorn Center, Rajavithi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2013-03-01

    The stability and quality of Adrenaline medications were advocated 2 to be stored in temperature labeled at 2 degrees C to 8 degrees C at drug storage room. Thailand is located in a tropical area with the average room temperature within 25 degrees C. There was no previous study of adrenaline medication stability and quality in Thailand. To assess the stability and quality of Adrenaline stored at room temperature in Ambulance and drug storage room of Narenthorn center, Rajavithi Hospital. Forty vials of Adrenaline Bitartrade were stored at the temperature in each season for a period of 4 weeks. Half were stored in one Ambulance and the other half in a drug storage room. Samples were then analyzed for their appearance, pH and using stability indicating High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The average temperature in the drug storage rooms were 30 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 27 degrees C in hot, rainy and cool seasons respectively; and 34 degrees C, 32 degrees C and 31 degrees C in Narenthorn Ambulance. The appearance of adrenaline was not changed as it was still clear. The average pH is 3.18 to 3.36. Adrenaline was found to be stable when storage in both ambulance and drug storage room. The percent drug remaining was 90 Ia% to 115 Ia%. There was no significant difference in between drug quality the two storage places (p = 0.792). No significant difference was found in the percent drug remaining between the hot and cool season. There was significant difference in the percent drug remaining between the rainy season from other seasons (p adrenaline stability and quality were not changed when testing by HPLC.

  6. Variations in survival after cardiac arrest among academic medical center-affiliated hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Christopher Kurz

    Full Text Available Variation exists in cardiac arrest (CA survival among institutions. We sought to determine institutional-level characteristics of academic medical centers (AMCs associated with CA survival.We examined discharge data from AMCs participating with Vizient clinical database-resource manager. We identified cases using ICD-9 diagnosis code 427.5 (CA or procedure code 99.60 (CPR. We estimated hospital-specific risk-standardized survival rates (RSSRs using mixed effects logistic regression, adjusting for individual mortality risk. Institutional and community characteristics of AMCs with higher than average survival were compared with those with lower survival.We analyzed data on 3,686,296 discharges in 2012, of which 33,700 (0.91% included a CA diagnosis. Overall survival was 42.3% (95% CI 41.8-42.9 with median institutional RSSR of 42.6% (IQR 35.7-51.0; Min-Max 19.4-101.6. We identified 28 AMCs with above average survival (median RSSR 61.8% and 20 AMCs with below average survival (median RSSR 26.8%. Compared to AMCs with below average survival, those with high CA survival had higher CA volume (median 262 vs.119 discharges, p = 0.002, total beds (722 vs. 452, p = 0.02, and annual surgical volume (24,939 vs. 13,109, p<0.001, more likely to offer cardiac catheterization (100% vs. 72%, p = 0.007 or cardiac surgery (93% vs. 61%, p = 0.02 and cared for catchment areas with higher household income ($61,922 vs. $49,104, p = 0.004 and lower poverty rates (14.6% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.03.Using discharge data from Vizient, we showed AMCs with higher CA and surgical case volume, cardiac catheterization and cardiac surgery facilities, and catchment areas with higher socioeconomic status had higher risk-standardized CA survival.

  7. Recombination Origin of Retrovirus XMRV | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) was first reported in samples from a human prostate tumor in 2006, and, at that time, claims were made that XMRV infection rates ranged from 6 to 27 percent of human prostate cancers.  Later research reported XMRV in the blood of 67 percent of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). When follow-up studies failed to detect XMRV in multiple sets of specimens from people with prostate cancer or CFS and healthy controls, the original reports came under closer scrutiny.

  8. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  9. Pioneering Quality Assessment in European Cancer Centers: A Data Analysis of the Organization for European Cancer Institutes Accreditation and Designation Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saghatchian, Mahasti; Thonon, Frederique; Boomsma, Femke; Hummel, Henk; Koot, Bert; Harrison, Chris; Rajan, Abinaya; de Valeriola, Dominique; Otter, Renee; Pontes, Jose Laranja; Lombardo, Claudio; McGrath, Eoin; Ringborg, Ulrik; Tursz, Thomas; van Harten, Willem H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In order to improve the quality of care in Cancer Centers (CC) and designate Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCCs), the Organization for European Cancer Institutes (OECI) launched an Accreditation and Designation (A&D) program. The program facilitates the collection of defined data and the

  10. Study of the outcome of suicide attempts: characteristics of hospitalization in a psychiatric ward group, critical care center group, and non-hospitalized group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemuyama Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The allocation of outcome of suicide attempters is extremely important in emergency situations. Following categorization of suicidal attempters who visited the emergency room by outcome, we aimed to identify the characteristics and potential needs of each group. Methods The outcomes of 1348 individuals who attempted suicide and visited the critical care center or the psychiatry emergency department of the hospital were categorized into 3 groups, "hospitalization in the critical care center (HICCC", "hospitalization in the psychiatry ward (HIPW", or "non-hospitalization (NH", and the physical, mental, and social characteristics of these groups were compared. In addition, multiple logistic analysis was used to extract factors related to outcome. Results The male-to-female ratio was 1:2. The hospitalized groups, particularly the HICCC group, were found to have biopsychosocially serious findings with regard to disturbance of consciousness (JCS, general health performance (GAS, psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, and life events (LCU, while most subjects in the NH group were women who tended to repeat suicide-related behaviors induced by relatively light stress. The HIPW group had the highest number of cases, and their symptoms were psychologically serious but physically mild. On multiple logistic analysis, outcome was found to be closely correlated with physical severity, risk factor of suicide, assessment of emergent medical intervention, and overall care. Conclusion There are different potential needs for each group. The HICCC group needs psychiatrists on a full-time basis and also social workers and clinical psychotherapists to immediately initiate comprehensive care by a medical team composed of multiple professionals. The HIPW group needs psychological education to prevent repetition of suicide attempts, and high-quality physical treatment and management skill of the staff in the psychiatric ward. The NH group subjects need a

  11. [Stomach cancer: Epidemiological, clinical and histological aspects at the Lome Campus teaching hospital (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouglouga, O; Lawson-Ananissoh, L M; Bagny, A; Kaaga, L; Amegbor, K

    2015-01-01

    To describe the epidemiological, clinical, and histological aspects of stomach cancer in the gastroenterology department of University Hospital Campus of Lome (Togo). This retrospective descriptive and analytical study reviewed records of patients hospitalized for stomach cancer over an 8-year period. With 32 cases among the 250 gastrointestinal tract cancers over the study period, stomach cancer accounted for the largest proportion (12.8%) of these cases. The sex ratio was 2.5 and the mean age of patients was 58.82 years (range: 32 to 85 years). The clinical picture was dominated by epigastric pain (44%). Ulcerative budding lesions were most common, especially in the pyloric antrum (72%). Adenocarcinoma was the most common histological type (94%). Thirteen of our patients were transferred to the visceral surgery department for palliative care. Nine more were lost to follow-up after release against medical advice due to lack of financial support. Five patients died (16%) during hospitalization. Stomach cancer is common in Togo and ranks first among gastrointestinal cancers in our department. Training hepatogastroenterologists and providing adequate technical facilities, on the one hand, and early recognition of warning signs and a reduction in the cost of gastrointestinal endoscopies, on the other, could improve the survival of patients with gastric cancer in Togo.

  12. A Summary of Pediatric Palliative Care Team Structure and Services as Reported by Centers Caring for Children with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Meaghann S; Rosenberg, Abby R; Tager, Julia; Wichman, Christopher S; Wiener, Lori

    2017-11-27

    Little is known about the composition, availability, integration, communication, perceived barriers, and work load of pediatric palliative care (PPC) providers serving children and adolescents with cancer. To summarize the structure and services of programs to better understand successes and gaps in implementing palliative care as a standard of care. Cross-sectional online survey about the palliative care domains determined by the Psychosocial Care of Children with Cancer and Their Families Workgroup. A total of 142 surveys were completed with representation from 18 countries and 39 states. Three-fourths of sites reported having a PPC program available for the pediatric cancer population at their center. Over one-fourth (28%) have been in existence less than five years. Fewer than half of sites (44%) offered 24/7 access to palliative care consultations. Neither hospital-based nor local community hospice services were available for pediatric patients at 24% of responding sites. A specific inpatient PPC unit was available at 8% of sites. Criteria for automatic palliative referrals ("trigger" diagnoses) were reported by 44% respondents. The presence of such "triggers" increased the likelihood of palliative principle introduction 3.41 times (p palliative care concepts and 17% reported children and families "always" received communication about palliative principles. The most prevalent barriers to palliative care were at the provider level. Children and adolescents with cancer do not yet receive concurrent palliative care as a universal standard.

  13. The Art of Interpreting Epigenetic Activity | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though all the cells of the human body share a common genomic blueprint, epigenetic activity such as DNA methylation, introduces molecular diversity that results in functionally and biologically different cellular constituents. In cancers, this ability of epigenetic activity to introduce molecular diversity is emerging as a powerful classifier of biological aggressiveness.

  14. Finding the Right Care | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trained as a registered nurse and with a doctoral degree in public health, Jane D. is no stranger to the U.S. health care system. But, when she found herself facing a diagnosis of anal cancer in 2013, she felt adrift.

  15. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Support Services | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Support Services As part of the comprehensive care provided at the NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, we provide a wide range of services to address the social, psychological, emotional, and practical facets of pediatric cancer and to support patients and families while they are enrolled in clinical research protocols.

  16. COP - Pet Owners - Open Clinical Trials | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current Open Clinical Trials If you are interested in learning more about the eligibility requirements for any of open studies listed below, please contact the nearest participating University or Christina Mazcko. To search studies being conducted by other groups please visit Vet Cancer Trials. This will allow you to search by location and tumor type.

  17. Ganging Up on Brain Metastases | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    When primary tumors metastasize to the brain, the prognosis for patients is poor. The currently accepted treatment is whole-brain radiation therapy, and the median survival time is several months. Since these types of tumors form in 10 to 30 percent of adult cancer patients, improvements in treatment methods are a necessity.  

  18. NCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. Learn more...

  19. An academic medical center model for community colorectal cancer screening: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstration program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Dorothy S; Cavanagh, Mary F; Messina, Catherine R; Anderson, Joseph C

    2010-08-01

    During 2005-2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded five colorectal cancer (CRC) screening demonstration projects around the United States; only one was based in an academic medical center (AMC) rather than a health department. The Suffolk County Preventive Endoscopy Project (Project SCOPE) was a collaborative effort between Stony Brook University Medical Center (SBUMC) and the Suffolk County Department of Health Services. Project SCOPE's objective was to increase CRC screening among Suffolk County residents at least 50 years old who had inadequate or no insurance coverage for CRC screening. The demonstration application drew on the screening, diagnostic, and treatment resources of the AMC and the indigent populations using its outpatient clinics. Patients at 10 county health centers were a primary target for (previously inaccessible) colonoscopy screening. The project's organizational center was SBUMC's preventive medicine department, which was linked to SBUMC's large gastroenterology practice. The specific staffing, financial, and training issues faced by this project provide insights for others who are similarly interested in community engagement. During 40 months of screening, 800 indigent, culturally diverse patients were recruited, and they underwent colonoscopy. Challenges encountered included unreachable referred patients (425 patients; 28% of referrals) and medical ineligibility (e.g., symptomatic comorbid conditions). Pending legislation providing federal funding for a national program offers other AMCs the opportunity to adopt a model such as that proven feasible during Project SCOPE. The lessons learned may have broader application for fostering collaborative AMC partnerships and for enhancing recruitment and retention of participants through outreach.

  20. Open Partial Nephrectomy in Renal Cancer: A Feasible Gold Standard Technique in All Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Cozar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Partial nephrectomy (PN is playing an increasingly important role in localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC as a true alternative to radical nephrectomy. With the greater experience and expertise of surgical teams, it has become an alternative to radical nephrectomy in young patients when the tumor diameter is 4 cm or less in almost all hospitals since cancer-specific survival outcomes are similar to those obtained with radical nephrectomy. Materials and Methods. The authors comment on their own experience and review the literature, reporting current indications and outcomes including complications. The surgical technique of open partial nephrectomy is outlined. Conclusions. Nowadays, open PN is the gold standard technique to treat small renal masses, and all nonablative techniques must pass the test of time to be compared to PN. It is not ethical for patients to undergo radical surgery just because the urologists involved do not have adequate experience with PN. Patients should be involved in the final treatment decision and, when appropriate, referred to specialized centers with experience in open or laparoscopic partial nephrectomies.

  1. Rescuing the pleasure of playing of child with cancer in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Liliane Faria; Cabral, Ivone Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    to dimension spaces and people that act on playing of children with cancer in outpatient treatment. qualitative research developed with the creative sensitive method. A total of twenty two family members of seven children with cancer in outpatient treatment at a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro participated of this research. Data were generated in the family members' homes, from September 2011 to May 2012. after the diagnosis of childhood cancer, there was a change of scene and in the people who interact and play with children. Hospital has a central place for it, since children discover the pleasure of playing in this setting. the health care professional, especially nurses, who work on hospital care needs, should develop the ability of facilitate playing and therefore, enable care that promotes childhood development.

  2. Challenges and Opportunities to Improve Cervical Cancer Screening Rates in US Health Centers through Patient-Centered Medical Home Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Moshkovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, the incidence of cervical cancer has dramatically decreased. However, health disparities in cervical cancer screening (CCS persist for women from racial and ethnic minorities and those residing in rural and poor communities. For more than 45 years, federally funded health centers (HCs have been providing comprehensive, culturally competent, and quality primary health care services to medically underserved communities and vulnerable populations. To enhance the quality of care and to ensure more women served at HCs are screened for cervical cancer, over eight HCs received funding to support patient-centered medical home (PCMH transformation with goals to increase CCS rates. The study conducted a qualitative analysis using Atlas.ti software to describe the barriers and challenges to CCS and PCMH transformation, to identify potential solutions and opportunities, and to examine patterns in barriers and solutions proposed by HCs. Interrater reliability was assessed using Cohen’s Kappa. The findings indicated that HCs more frequently described patient-level barriers to CCS, including demographic, cultural, and health belief/behavior factors. System-level barriers were the next commonly cited, particularly failure to use the full capability of electronic medical records (EMRs and problems coordinating with external labs or providers. Provider-level barriers were least frequently cited.

  3. Protection behaviors for cytotoxic drugs in oncology nurses of chemotherapy centers in Shiraz hospitals, South of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Ansari, Jasem; Sajadi, Mahboubeh; Hosseinnazzhad, Azam; Moshiri, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of antineoplastic agents for the treatment of cancer is an increasingly common practice in hospitals. As a result, workers involved with handling antineoplastic drugs may be accidentally exposed to these agents, placing them at potential risk for long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Subjects and Methods: The study was designed as an analytic descriptive survey. The res...

  4. The breast cancer and the environment research centers: transdisciplinary research on the role of the environment in breast cancer etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Robert A; Haslam, Sandra Z; Osuch, Janet

    2009-12-01

    We introduce and describe the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC), a research network with a transdisciplinary approach to elucidating the role of environmental factors in pubertal development as a window on breast cancer etiology. We describe the organization of four national centers integrated into the BCERC network. Investigators use a common conceptual framework based on multiple levels of biologic, behavioral, and social organization across the life span. The approach connects basic biologic studies with rodent models and tissue culture systems, a coordinated multicenter epidemiologic cohort study of prepubertal girls, and the integration of community members of breast cancer advocates as key members of the research team to comprise the network. Relevant literature is reviewed that describes current knowledge across levels of organization. Individual research questions and hypotheses in BCERC are driven by gaps in our knowledge that are presented at genetic, metabolic, cellular, individual, and environmental (physical and social) levels. As data collection on the cohort, animal experiments, and analyses proceed, results will be synthesized through a transdisciplinary approach. Center investigators are addressing a large number of specific research questions related to early pubertal onset, which is an established risk factor for breast cancer. BCERC research findings aimed at the primary prevention of breast cancer will be disseminated to the scientific community and to the public by breast cancer advocates, who have been integral members of the research process from its inception.

  5. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two...... primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated...... their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component “body functions and structure”, and the most...

  6. What Are Cancer Centers Advertising to the Public? A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B.; Donohue, Julie M.; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Background Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, the content of these advertisements has not been analyzed. Objective To characterize the informational and emotional content of cancer center advertisements. Design Systematic analysis of all cancer center advertisements in top U.S. consumer magazines (N=269) and television networks (N=44) in 2012. Measurements Using a standardized codebook, we assessed (1) types of clinical services promoted; (2) information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, and costs; (3) use of emotional advertising appeals; and (4) use of patient testimonials. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti. Kappa values ranged from 0.77 to 1.0. Results A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%; padvertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%; padvertisements mentioned insurance coverage or costs (5%). Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), most often evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and evoking fear (30%). Nearly half of advertisements included patient testimonials, usually focused on survival or cure. Testimonials rarely included disclaimers (15%) and never described the results a typical patient might expect. Limitations Internet advertisements were not included. Conclusions Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy using emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, or costs. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. PMID:24863081

  7. 78 FR 9940 - Naugatuck Valley Surgical Center, Department of Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, CT: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ..., Waterbury, CT: Notice of Affirmative Determination, Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application... Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, Connecticut ] (subject firm). The determination was issued on December...

  8. Risk for Hospitalization With Depression After a Cancer Diagnosis: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study of Cancer Patients in Denmark From 1973 to 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, S.O.; Laursen, T.M.; Nylandsted, Lone Ross

    2009-01-01

    for both men and women surviving hormone-related cancers, for women surviving smoking-related cancers, and for men surviving virus- and immune-related cancers. Conclusion This study confirms an increased risk for depression in patients facing a disruptive event like cancer. Early recognition and effective......Purpose As more people survive cancer, it is necessary to understand the long-term impact of cancer. We investigated whether cancer survivors are at increased risk for hospitalization for depression. Methods We linked data on all 5,703,754 persons living in Denmark on January 1, 1973, or born...... thereafter to the Danish Cancer Registry and identified 608,591 adults with a diagnosis of cancer. Follow-up for hospitalization for depression in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register from 1973 through 2003 yielded 121,227,396 person-years and 121,304 hospitalizations for depression. The relative risk (RR...

  9. Survival of adolescents with cancer treated at pediatric versus adult oncology treatment centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Brugieres, Laurence; Laurence, Valérie; Berger, Claire; Kanold, Justyna; Tron, Isabelle; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lacour, Brigitte

    2017-05-01

    In France, although children aged less than 15 years with cancer are usually referred to pediatric oncology centers, adolescents may be treated at pediatric or adult oncology centers. The objective was to compare survival according to their site of treatment. Using population-based registration, 15- to 19-year-old patients diagnosed with cancer in 2006 or 2007 and living in six French regions (accounting for 41% of the French population) were included. Of the 594 patients included, 33% of the French adolescents were treated at a pediatric oncology center. Compared with those treated at a pediatric center, adolescents treated at an adult center were older, were more likely to have carcinoma and germ-cell tumor, had a longer time to diagnosis, and were less likely to be enrolled in a clinical trial. In addition, the decisions for their management were less likely to be taken in the context of multidisciplinary team meetings. In multivariate analysis, adolescent patients treated at a pediatric center did not have significantly different overall survival (OS) compared with those treated at an adult center (5-year OS: 84.1% [95% confidence interval: 78.6-90.0] versus 87.7% [95% confidence interval: 84.2-91.3]; P = 0.25). The outcomes of French adolescents with cancer have begun to improve, with 81.2% survival in 2006-2007, with no difference between the types of treatment center. However, for this unique group of diseases, survival is not the unique endpoint. In order to ensure good quality of life after cancer, management of those patients requires specific approaches, designed to reduce the late effects of cancer treatment and improve supportive care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Procedures after exposure to biological material in a specialized cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Luize,Paula Batista; CANINI, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; GIR,ELUCIR; Toffano,Silmara Elaine Malaguti

    2015-01-01

    Occupational accidents involving biological material are a concern for healthcare facilities due to the severe harm they may cause to healthcare workers. This cross-sectional study's aim was to identify the behavior reported by nursing professionals in response to biological material exposure in a cancer hospital located in São Paulo, Brazil. The population was composed of 441 professionals. The hospital's Institutional Review Board approved the project. Of the 441 interviewed subjects, 82 (1...

  11. THE ROLE OF REGIONAL CENTERS AND UNIVERSITY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN DEVELOPMENT OF HOME MECHANICAL VENTILATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rsovac Snezana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Application of home mechanical ventilators represents the future in the treatment of children with chronic respiratory insufficiency. In this way patients are treated in the home environment, they have full support from their families, they are protected against nosocomial infections and their condition is monitored by medical staff. The role of regional centers is very important in the future development of the home mechanical ventilation network. Doctors in these centers under the full support of the University Children's Hospital physicians can assist and monitor the treatment of children on the household respirators.

  12. Fasting glucose and risk of colorectal cancer in the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeree; Cho, Sooyoung; Woo, Hyeongtaek; Park, Sue K; Shin, Hai-Rim; Chang, Soung-Hoon; Yoo, Keun-Young; Shin, Aesun

    2017-01-01

    Previous cohort studies have demonstrated a positive association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, there are few comparisons between DM groups categorized by fasting glucose level. This study examined associations between diabetes as defined by fasting glucose level and self-reported history of DM and CRC risk among Korean adults. Data from the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort between 1993 and 2005 were analyzed. The study population comprised 14,570 participants aged 20 years or older. Participants were followed until December 31, 2012 (median follow-up: 11.9 years). Among participants with high fasting glucose (≥126mg/dL), the risk of developing CRC was significantly higher (HR: 1.51 [1.02-2.25]) than among participants with low fasting glucose (fasting glucose and history of DM were considered together, the risk of CRC among participants with both high fasting glucose and history of DM was 54% (HR: 1.54 [0.97-2.43]), and the risk of CRC among participants with high fasting glucose and no history of DM was 50% (HR: 1.50 [0.73-3.05]). When the first 5 years of follow-up were excluded, among participants with high fasting glucose, the risk of developing CRC was significantly higher (HR: 1.61 [1.02-2.56]) than among participants with low fasting glucose. Risk of CRC was also significantly higher among participants with high fasting glucose and no history of DM (HR: 1.69 [1.01-2.84]). High fasting glucose and self-reported history of DM were associated with increased risk of CRC in this Korean population.

  13. Inhibiting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a widely distributed cell surface receptor that responds to several extracellular signaling molecules through an intracellular tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates target enzymes to trigger a downstream molecular cascade. Since the discovery that EGFR mutations and amplifications are critical in a number of cancers, efforts have been under way to develop and use targeted EGFR inhibitors. These efforts have met with some spectacular successes, but many patients have not responded as expected, have subsequently developed drug-resistant tumors, or have suffered serious side effects from the therapies to date. CCR Investigators are studying EGFR from multiple vantage points with the goal of developing even better strategies to defeat EGFR-related cancers.

  14. [The struggle over the establishment of the central hospital in the Negev--the Soroka Medical Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvarts, Shifra; Doron, Haim; Sherf, Michael

    2010-03-01

    In December 1959 the Central Hospital for the Negev (today, the Soroka University Medical Center) opened its doors. This event was preceded by an arduous political battle over the Location of hospital facilities for inhabitants of Israel's south. On one side was the presiding Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion, who opposed the establishment of a hospital in Beer Sheba by the Clalit Sick Fund. On the other side were Beer Sheba's residents, led by David Tuviyahu--mayor of Beer Sheba, and Moshe Soroka--a member of the Clalit Sick Fund's management, who sought to bring about the immediate establishment of a hospital in the city itself, following the decision of the Hadassah Women's Organization to close the temporary hospital they had operated in Beer Sheba since 1948. The work at hand describes the ideological and political struggle between the two sides, the conflicting interests of the Government of Israel and the Labor Federation regarding the health needs of the city, and the factors that, in the end, led to the establishment of the hospital by the Federation's Clalit Sick Fund. The research is based on both archival material and on input from informants from the period who constitute primary sources.

  15. Psychological process from hospitalization to death among uninformed terminal liver cancer patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobori Eiko

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the attitude among doctors toward disclosing a cancer diagnosis is becoming more positive, informing patients of their disease has not yet become a common practice in Japan. We examined the psychological process, from hospitalization until death, among uninformed terminal cancer patients in Japan, and developed a psychological model. Methods Terminal cancer patients hospitalized during the recruiting period voluntarily participated in in-depth interviews. The data were analyzed by grounded theory. Results Of the 87 uninformed participants at the time of hospitalization, 67% (N = 59 died without being informed of their diagnosis. All were male, 51–66 years of age, and all experienced five psychological stages: anxiety and puzzlement, suspicion and denial, certainty, preparation, and acceptance. At the end of each stage, obvious and severe feelings were observed, which were called "gates." During the final acceptance stage, patients spent a peaceful time with family, even talking about their dreams with family members. Conclusion Unlike in other studies, the uninformed patients in this study accepted death peacefully, with no exceptional cases. Despite several limitations, this study showed that almost 70% of the uninformed terminal cancer patients at hospitalization died without being informed, suggesting an urgent need for culturally specific and effective terminal care services for cancer patients in Japan.

  16. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    argues a similar point by suggesting that institutional racism encoun- tered by those growing up Black in the U.S. has served to provide...confidential’’); (3) stigma related to testing (e.g., ‘‘If I were found to carry a gene mutation for cancer, it would cause others to view me negatively...related pros (a = .84); negative emotional reaction (a = .69); confidentiality concerns (a = .70); stigma related to testing (a = .73); family related

  17. Modern Soft Tissue Pathology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book comprehensively covers modern soft tissue pathology and includes both tumors and non-neoplastic entities. Soft tissues make up a large bulk of the human body, and they are susceptible to a wide range of diseases. Many soft-tissue tumors are biologically very aggressive, and the chance of them metastasizing to vital organs is quite high. In recent years, the outlook for soft-tissue cancers has brightened dramatically due to the increased accuracy of the pathologist's tools.

  18. NCI Symposium on Chromosome Biology to bring together internationally renowned experts in the fields of chromosome structure and function | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Cancer Research’s Center of Excellence in Chromosome Biology is hosting the “Nuclear Structure, Genome Integrity and Cancer Symposium“ on November 30 - December 1, 2016 at the Natcher Conference Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Learn more ...

  19. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. Key Roles/Responsibilities The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours

  20. DEB TACE for Intermediate and advanced HCC - Initial Experience in a Brazilian Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Jose Hugo Mendes; Luz, Paula M; Martin, Henrique S; Gouveia, Hugo R; Levigard, Raphal Braz; Nogueira, Felipe Diniz; Rodrigues, Bernardo Caetano; de Miranda, Tiago Nepomuceno; Mamede, Marcelo Henrique

    2017-02-06

    According to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification transarterial chemoembolization is indicated in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the intermediate stage. Drug-eluting microspheres can absorb and release the chemotherapeutic agent slowly for 14 days after its intra-arterial administration. This type of transarterial chemoembolization approach appears to provide at least equivalent effectiveness with less toxicity. This is a prospective, single-center study, which evaluated 21 patients with intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting microspheres. The follow up period was 2 years. Inclusion criteria was Child-Pugh A or B liver disease patients, intermediate or advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and performance status equal or below 2. Transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting microspheres was performed at 2-month intervals during the first two sessions. The third and subsequent sessions were performed according to the image findings on follow-up, on a "demand schedule". Tumor response and time to progression were evaluated along the two-year follow up period. Of the 21 patients 90% presented with liver cirrhosis, 62% had Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage B and 38% had Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C hepatocellular carcinoma. Average tumor size was 6.9 cm. The average number of Transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting microspheres procedures was 3 with a total of 64 sessions. The predominant toxicity was mild. Liver function was not significantly affected in most patients. Two deaths occurred within 90 days after Transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting microspheres (ischemic hepatitis and hydropic decompensation). Technical success was achieved in 63 of 64 procedures. The mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. The progression free and overall survival at 1 and 2 years were 73.0% and 37.1%, 73.7% and 41.6%, respectively. Transarterial

  1. Cancer notification at a referral hospital of Kermanshah, Western Iran (2006-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Kasraei, Razieh; Najafi, Farid; Tanhapoor, Maryam; Abdi, Hamed; Rahimi, Ziba; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Aznab, Mozafar; Moradi, Mahmoudreza

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a major public health problem and the leading cause of mortality in both males and females in developed and developing countries. The incidence of cancer is gender dependent. Among Iranians, it is the third cause of death. The information recorded in the files of all patients (7,695 individuals) pathologically diagnosed with cancer in Imam Reza referral hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during the four year period of 2006-2009 were reviewed and analyzed using SPSS statistical software package version 16.0. Around 61.6% of reported cancer cases were males and 38.4% were females. The most prevalent reported malignant tumors occurred at the age group of 70-79 years in males and in females these tumors were presented in the ages of 60-69 years. The most prevalent cancers among studied patients were gastrointestinal (GI) cancers with a frequency of 22.9% [gastric 10.7%, colorectal 6.9%, and esophageal 6%]. The second, third and forth prevalent cancers were blood at 16.4%, lung 13.5% and bladder 12.8%, respectively. In males the cancers of GI (25.6%) were the most prevalent followed in order of frequency by bladder (18%), blood (17.6%), lung (17.4%) and prostate (6.8%) . In females the most frequent recorded cancer was breast (24.1%) followed in order of frequency by GI (20.5%), blood (14.4%), lung (7.3%), uterus (6.2%) and ovary (5.1%) . Breast cancer was the most prevalent cancer (27%) in the age group of 40-49 years. The present study provides frequency data for various types of cancers in both males and females from a referral hospital of Kermanshah that are comparable with some reports from other areas of the country.

  2. Malnutrition Matters in Canadian Hospitalized Patients: Malnutrition Risk in Hospitalized Patients in a Tertiary Care Center Using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adam; Wu, Thomas; Bricknell, Ryan; Muqtadir, Zack; Armstrong, David

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is common in Canadian hospitalized patients, yet system-wide malnutrition screening is not mandatory in Canada. Our goal was to define the point prevalence of malnutrition risk at a major tertiary care center in Hamilton, Ontario, using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) to determine feasibility of hospital-wide screening in the Canadian context. After research ethics approval was obtained, we arranged for a clinical nutrition support team to conduct the MUST screening on all inpatients at Hamilton Health Sciences, Juravinski site, a large academic acute care hospital. A total of 315 patients were included (female, n = 160 [51%]; male, n = 155 [49%]; average age, 71 years). We identified 31% at high risk for malnutrition and 14% at medium risk, keeping with reported rates of malnutrition in the literature. Survey of dietitians and interns indicated that the MUST was easy to use and perform and that they had support of their unit supervisors. All respondents thought that the screen was useful and they wanted to repeat it. The MUST is an easy and efficient way to define point prevalence of malnutrition risk in Canadian hospitalized patients. Moving to system-wide nutritional screening will bring about the best practices in nutrition care with the involvement of key stakeholders and decision makers. Nutritional screening will allow us to utilize nutrition resources more efficiently, engage administrators in addressing shortfalls in nutrition care, and form a baseline for which to measure the efficacy of future nutritional interventions. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Family caregivers' burden: A hospital based study in 2010 among cancer patients from Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Lukhmana, S; S K Bhasin; Chhabra, P; Bhatia, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large number of patients with chronic diseases like, cancer are cared for in homes by the family members in India. The vital role that these family members play as “caregivers” is well recognized, however, the burden on them is poorly understood. Aims: To assess burden and to determine the predictors of burden on family caregivers of cancer patients. Setting And Design: A cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted in National Capital Territory of Delhi. Materials And Method...

  4. Using National Quality Forum breast cancer indicators to measure quality of care for patients in an AVON comprehensive breast center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Radha; Lund, Mary J; Lamson, Philip; Holmes, Leslie; Rizzo, Monica; Bumpers, Harvey; Okoli, Joel; Senior-Crosby, Diana; O'Regan, Ruth; Gabram, Sheryl G A

    2010-01-01

    In April 2007, the National Quality Forum (NQF) endorsed the first nationally recognized hospital-based performance measures for quality of care for breast cancer. The aim of this study was to measure quality of care at our AVON Center for Breast Care (AVONCBC) using these indicators. We retrospectively reviewed tumor registry and medical records of females under age 70 diagnosed with breast cancer in years 2005-2006. For patients diagnosed with hormone receptor negative breast cancer, 22 of 29 (75.9%) and 28 of 32 (87.5%) were considered for or received chemotherapy in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Of those patients, 21 of 29 (72.4%) and 24 of 32 (75.0%) were considered for or received chemotherapy within the NQF 4-month period. For patients undergoing breast conserving surgery (BCS), 20 of 23 (86.9%) in 2005 and 37 of 39 (94.9%) in 2006 were referred for adjuvant radiation therapy. The proportion of patients who received radiation therapy within 1 year of diagnosis was 18 of 23 (78.2%) and 29 of 39 (74.4%) for diagnosis years 2005 and 2006, respectively. The vast majority of patients in our AVONCBC are referred to medical and/or radiation oncology for adjunctive therapy and about three-fourths receive treatment compliant with the NQF QI. To increase our compliance rate, we are developing methods to improve access to the multiple disciplines in our AVONCBC. Using the NQF indicators serves to assess hospital performance at a systems-level and as a useful method for tracking cancer quality of care.

  5. Lumbar Spine Surgeries and Medication Usage During Hospital Stay: One-Center Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neena K; Olotu, Busuyi; Mathew, Asha; Waitman, Lemuel R; Rasu, Rafia

    2017-12-01

    Background: Pain after spine surgery is usually managed with opioid and nonopioids. The rate of lumbar spine surgeries (LSS) is rising, but current practices on LSS are not known. A current trend in LSS and medication usage by age group is needed to gain a better understanding of how LSS and its pain management vary by age. Objective: The aim of this study was to report current practices of LSS of discectomy, laminectomy, and fusion in patients aged 18 and older and to gain an understanding of medication use for management of LSS. Methods: This retrospective study analyzed data of the University of Kansas Medical Center from 2007 to 2014 of patients (>18 years of age) undergoing laminectomy, discectomy, and fusion. Results: A total of 19 463 patients underwent LSS between 2007 and 2014 at Kansas University hospital. For the purpose of this study, 3115 patients' medical records were observed. A 50% increase in LSS between 2007 and 2014 was noted. Specifically, more than 2-fold increase in LSS was observed in patients aged 65 years and older. Among those aged 65 years and older, laminectomy was the most commonly performed surgery (69.6%) while discectomy was the most common surgery performed among those aged 18 to 34 (82.9%) and those aged 35 to 44 (72%). The medication use also increased with a highest usage in opioids alone (55%), followed by opioids combined with other analgesics (42.7%), regardless of lumbar surgery type or age. Conclusion: The information of increase in both LSS and the medication usage over the 7 years can be used to gain a better understanding of quality, expenditure, and outcomes following LSS. This knowledge may help health care providers plan patient care and rehabilitation services for older adults, as the trajectory of lumbar spine surgery is likely to rise with growing prevalence of older adults. The information regarding increased opioid utilization may also help clinicians to refine opioid usage and consider alternative approaches to

  6. Neuro-Oncology Branch Appointment - what happens at the clinical center | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Happens When I Get To The Clinical Center at NIH? 1. Visit the Admissions Department Registering is the first step to being evaluated by the Brain Tumor Clinic. Visit Admissions to get registered as a patient. They will ask you for your contact information and provide you with a patient identification number. 2. Proceed to the NOB Clinic Proceed to the Brain Tumor Clinic on the 13th floor.

  7. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed; Ghafoor, Irum; Jamshed, Arif; Gul, Sabika; Hafeez, Haroon

    2017-04-01

    To review all episodes where an emergency code was called in a cancer-specialized hospital in Pakistan and to assess survival to discharge among patients who received a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reviewed demographic and clinical data related to all "code blue" calls over 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical characteristics with the primary outcome of survival to discharge. A total of 646 code blue calls were included in the analysis. The CPR was performed in 388 (60%) of these calls. For every 20 episodes of CPR among patients with cancer of all ages, only 1 resulted in a patient's survival to discharge, even though in 52.2% episodes there was a return of spontaneous circulation. No association was found between the type of rhythm at initiation of CPR and likelihood of survival to discharge. The proportion of patients with advanced cancer surviving to discharge after in-hospital CPR in a low-income country was in line with the reported international experience. Most patients with cancer who received in-hospital CPR did not survive to discharge and did not appear to benefit from resuscitation. Advance directives by patients with cancer limiting aggressive interventions at end of life and proper documentation of these directives will help in provision of care that is humane and consonant with patients' wishes for a dignified death. Patients' early appreciation of the limited benefits of CPR in advanced cancer is likely to help them formulate such advance directives.

  8. Family caregivers' burden: A hospital based study in 2010 among cancer patients from Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhmana, S; Bhasin, S K; Chhabra, P; Bhatia, M S

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients with chronic diseases like, cancer are cared for in homes by the family members in India. The vital role that these family members play as "caregivers" is well recognized, however, the burden on them is poorly understood. To assess burden and to determine the predictors of burden on family caregivers of cancer patients. A cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted in National Capital Territory of Delhi. 200 family caregivers of cancer patients were selected by systematic random sampling and interviewed using standard, validated Hindi version of Zarit Burden Interview. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (version 17.0). The study population consisted of 90 (45%) males and 110 (55%) female caregivers aged 18-65 years. 113 (56.5%) caregivers reported no or minimal burden while 75 (37.5%) caregivers reported mild to moderate burden. Using logistic regression marital status, education and type of family of caregivers, occupation of cancer patients and type of treatment facility were found to be the predictors of burden on caregivers. In view of the substantial burden on family caregivers coupled with lack of adequate number of cancer hospitals, there is a public-health imperative to recognize this important group. All levels of health-staff in cancer hospitals in developing countries should be sensitized to the various burdens faced by family caregivers.

  9. Does procedure profitability impact whether an outpatient surgery is performed at an ambulatory surgery center or hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotzke, Michael Robert; Courtemanche, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are small (typically physician owned) healthcare facilities that specialize in performing outpatient surgeries and therefore compete against hospitals for patients. Physicians who own ASCs could treat their most profitable patients at their ASCs and less profitable patients at hospitals. This paper asks if the profitability of an outpatient surgery impacts where a physician performs the surgery. Using a sample of Medicare patients from the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, we find that higher profit surgeries do have a higher probability of being performed at an ASC compared to a hospital. After controlling for surgery type, a 10% increase in a surgery's profitability is associated with a 1.2 to 1.4 percentage point increase in the probability the surgery is performed at an ASC. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  11. Joint Replacement Volume Positively Correlates With Improved Hospital Performance on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Quality Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Rachel A; Charubhumi, Vanessa; Hutzler, Lorraine H; Paoli, Albit R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is transitioning Medicare from a fee-for-service program into a value-based pay-for-performance program. In order to accomplish this goal, CMS initiated 3 programs that attempt to define quality and seek to reward high-performing hospitals and penalize poor-performing hospitals. These programs include (1) penalties for hospital-acquired conditions (HACs), (2) penalties for excess readmissions for certain conditions, and (3) performance on value-based purchasing (VBP). The objective of this study was to determine whether high-volume total joint hospitals perform better in these programs than their lower-volume counterparts. We analyzed data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database on total New York State hospital discharges from 2013 to 2015 for total knee and total hip arthroplasty. This was compared to data from Hospital Compare on HAC's, excess readmissions, and VBP. From these databases, we identified 123 hospitals in New York, which participated in all 3 Medicare pay-for-performance programs and performed total joint replacements. Over the 3-year period spanning 2013-2015, hospitals in New York State performed an average of 1136.59 total joint replacement surgeries and achieved a mean readmission penalty of 0.005909. The correlation coefficient between surgery volume and combined performance score was 0.277. Of these correlations, surgery volume and VBP performance, and surgery volume and combined performance showed statistical significance (P quality, as well as joint replacement volumes and VBP performance, specifically. These findings are consistent with previously reported associations between patient outcomes and procedure volumes. However, a relationship between joint replacement volume and HAC scores or readmission penalties could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Koenig, William; Bosson, Nichole; Song, Sarah; Saver, Jeffrey L; Mack, William J; Sanossian, Nerses

    2015-09-01

    Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Each county's local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA) was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45%) had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40%) and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile). In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources.

  13. CANCER OF THE PENIS AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-10-10

    Oct 10, 2000 ... Objectives: To determine how common cancer of penis is in this locality compared to all other malignant tumours and urological malignancies, and to determine and comment on the various methods of treatment available at KNH. Design: A retrospective case study. Setting: Kenyatta National Referral ...

  14. Early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in Japanese kidney transplant recipients: a single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Taigo; Kakuta, Yoichi; Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Okumi, Masayoshi; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Takahara, Shiro; Nonomura, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of malignancies in kidney transplant recipients is increasing. Breast cancer is a common malignancy after kidney transplantation and can be more aggressive in kidney transplant recipients than in the general population. In this study, we evaluated the incidence and prognosis of breast cancer in kidney transplant recipients. Findings Between 1993 and 2013, 750 kidney transplant patients were followed-up at our center. Since 1999, annual physical examination, mammograph...

  15. Visual screening of oral cavity cancer in a male population: Experience from a medical center

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, I-How; Jiang, Rong-San; Wong, Yong-Kie; Wu, Shang-Heng; Chen, Fun-Jou; Liu, Shih-An

    2011-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an oral cavity cancer visual screening program conducted in a tertiary academic medical center. We also wanted to determine which group of participants was at greater risk of contracting oral cavity cancer. Methods: Participants were first asked to relate their personal habits during the past 6 months. Visual screening of the oral cavity was then performed under adequate lighting and with proper instruments. Results: From March 2005 ...

  16. Availability and Integration of Palliative Care at United States Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Elsayem, Ahmed; De La Cruz, Maxine; Berger, Ann; Zhukovsky, Donna S.; Palla, Shana; Evans, Avery; Fadul, Nada; Palmer, J. Lynn; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Context The current state of palliative care in cancer centers is not known. Objective We conducted a survey to determine the availability and degree of integration of palliative care services, and to compare between National Cancer Institute (NCI) and non-NCI cancer centers in the United States. Design, Setting, and Participants Between June and October 2009, we surveyed both executives and palliative care clinical program leaders, where applicable, of 71 NCI cancer centers and a random sample of 71 non-NCI centers regarding their palliative care services. Executives were also asked about their attitudes toward palliative care. Main Outcome Measure Availability of palliative care services in the cancer center, defined as the presence of at least one palliative care physician. Results We sent 142 and 120 surveys to executives and program leaders, with response rates of 71% and 82%, respectively. NCI cancer centers were significantly more likely to have a palliative care program (50/51 (98%) vs. 39/50 (78%), P=0.002), at least one palliative care physician (46/51 (90%) vs. 28/50 (56%), P=0.04), an inpatient palliative care consultation team (47/51 (92%) vs. 28/50 (56%), Ppalliative care clinic (30/51 (59%) vs. 11/50 (22%), Ppalliative care beds (23/101 (23%)) or an institution-operated hospice (37/101 (36%)). The median reported durations from referral to death were 7 (Q1–Q3 4–16), 7 (Q1–Q3 5–10), and 90 (Q1–Q3 30–120) days for inpatient consultation teams, inpatient units, and outpatient clinics, respectively. Research programs, palliative care fellowships, and mandatory rotations for oncology fellows were uncommon. Executives were supportive of stronger integration and increasing palliative care resources. Conclusion Most cancer centers reported a palliative care program, although the scope of services and the degree of integration varied widely. Further efforts to consolidate existing infrastructure and to integrate palliative care in cancer centers

  17. Costs and length of stay of drug-related hospital admissions in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yu; Gwee, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Yu-Chu; Chiang, Joen; Chan, Alexandre

    2014-04-01

    Most previous studies of the incidence and economic impact of drug-related hospital admissions were not cancer specific, despite the fact that drug-related problems (DRPs) are of particular concern in oncology. The goals of this study were to assess the economic impact, particularly the length of stay (LOS) and direct medical costs (DMC), of drug-related hospital admissions and the associated factors in cancer patients in Singapore. A prospective study was conducted over a 5-month period in 2 oncology wards at the largest acute tertiary hospital in Singapore. Drug-related admissions were identified from all oncology admissions to these wards, and the demographic, clinical, and cost data of these drug-related admissions were collected. The association between LOS and DMC as well as their associations with age, severity, and preventability of DRPs were examined. A nationwide estimation was made to determine the overall DMC of drug-related hospital admissions among cancer patients. A total of 151 drug-related admissions that occurred among 137 cancer patients were identified. The mean DMC (in Singapore dollars [SGD]) and LOS per drug-related admission were SGD $4747 and 6.1 days, respectively. A nationwide extrapolation estimated an annual total DMC of SGD $16.2 million. Longer LOS was found to be correlated with higher DMC (rs = 0.86, P Drug-related hospitalization among cancer patients is costly; therefore, more attention is warranted to develop and improve strategies for preventing drug-related morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In-hospital mortality among patients injured in motor vehicle crashes in a Saudi Arabian hospital relative to large U.S. trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Palta, Mari; Hamedani, Azita; Remington, Patrick L; Alkelya, Mohamed; Albedah, Khalid; Durkin, Maureen S

    Traffic-related fatalities are a leading cause of premature death worldwide. According to the 2012 report the Global Burden of Disease 2010, traffic injuries ranked 8th as a cause of death in 2010, compared to 10th in 1990. Saudi Arabia is estimated to have an overall traffic fatality rate more than double that of the U.S., but it is unknown whether mortality differences also exist for injured patients seeking medical care. We aim to compare in-hospital mortality between Saudi Arabia and the United States, adjusting for severity and demographic variables. The analysis included 485,611 patients from the U.S. National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) and 5,290 patients from a trauma registry at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. For comparability, we restricted our sample to NTDB data from level-I public trauma centers (≥400 beds) in the U.S. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of setting (KAMC vs. NTDB) on in-hospital mortality after adjusting for age, sex, Triage-Revised Scale (T-RTS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanism of injury, hypotension, surgery and head injuries. Interactions between setting and ISS, and predictors were also evaluated. Injured patients in the Saudi registry were more likely to be males, and younger than those from the NTDB. Patients at the Saudi hospital were at higher risk of in-hospital death than their U.S. counterparts. In the highest severity group (ISSs, 25-75), the odds ratio of in-hospital death in KAMC versus NTDB was 5.0 (95% CI 4.3-5.8). There were no differences in mortality between KAMC and NTDB among patients from lower ISS groups (ISSs, 1-8, 9-15, and 16-24). Patients who are severely injured following traffic crash injuries in Saudi Arabia are significantly more likely to die in the hospital than comparable patients admitted to large U.S. trauma centers. Further research is needed to identify reasons for this disparity and strategies for improving the care of

  19. The benefits of cancer screening in kidney transplant recipients: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taigo; Kakuta, Yoichi; Abe, Toyofumi; Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Takahara, Shiro; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-02-01

    The frequency of malignancy is increasing in kidney transplant recipients. Posttransplant malignancy (PTM) is a major cause of long-term graft survival inhibition. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and prognosis of PTM at our center and examined the efficacy of cancer screening. Between 1972 and 2013, 750 patients were followed-up at our center. Annual physical examinations and screenings were performed to detect PTM. We investigated the detail of two distinctive cancer groups: screening-detected cancers and symptom-detected cancers. Seventy-seven PTM were identified during the follow-up period. The mean age at the initial PTM detection was 43.6 ± 12.8 years. The mean interval from transplantation to cancer diagnosis was 134.5 ± 11.3 months. Among the 77 patients, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) was the most common cancer (19.5%, 15/77), followed by renal cell carcinoma (15.6%, 12/77). Of the cancer cases, 46.8% (36/77) were detected via screening. The most frequently screening-detected cancer was renal cell carcinoma of the native kidney and breast cancer (22.2%, 8/36). However, it was difficult to detect PTLD, urothelial carcinoma, and colorectal cancer via screening. Interestingly, Cox proportional regression analyses revealed nonscreened recipients to be a significant prognostic factor for PTM (P kidney transplant recipients. These findings support the provision of long-term appropriate screening for kidney transplant recipients. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Palliative care needs in hospitalized cancer patients: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandgren, A; Strang, P

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe and compare diagnoses, symptoms, and care needs in palliative cancer patients in two medium-sized hospitals in a county council with no specialized palliative care available 24/7; to analyze the relationships between diagnosis and symptoms/care needs; and to compare results and trends from two datasets (from 2007 and 2012). The study was population-based with a cross-sectional design and was conducted at two acute care hospitals. We performed 142 one-day inventories (n = 2972) in 2007 and 139 in 2012 (n = 2843) to register symptoms, care needs, and diagnosis based on a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models were used in the analysis. During 2007 and 2012 combined, 10% (n = 589) of hospitalized patients were assessed as having cancer in a palliative phase. Prostate (12%) and colorectal (12%) cancers were most common. Pain (42%) and deterioration (42%) were the most prevalent symptoms and were associated with pancreas cancer in our regression models (p = 0.003 and p = 0.019, respectively). Other cancers had different associations: hematologic malignancies were associated with infections and blood transfusions (p care needs was 2.9; patients with stomach/esophagus cancer had the highest number of symptoms/care needs (3.5). Acute care hospitals still play an important role for patients requiring palliative care. Symptoms and care needs were not strongly associated with specific diagnoses. Therefore, symptoms, rather than the specific cancer diagnoses, should be the focus of care.

  1. [Development and validation of an algorithm to identify cancer recurrences from hospital data bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares-Laya, S; Burón, A; Murta-Nascimento, C; Servitja, S; Castells, X; Macià, F

    2014-01-01

    Hospital cancer registries and hospital databases are valuable and efficient sources of information for research into cancer recurrences. The aim of this study was to develop and validate algorithms for the detection of breast cancer recurrence. A retrospective observational study was conducted on breast cancer cases from the cancer registry of a third level university hospital diagnosed between 2003 and 2009. Different probable cancer recurrence algorithms were obtained by linking the hospital databases and the construction of several operational definitions, with their corresponding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. A total of 1,523 patients were diagnosed of breast cancer between 2003 and 2009. A request for bone gammagraphy after 6 months from the first oncological treatment showed the highest sensitivity (53.8%) and negative predictive value (93.8%), and a pathology test after 6 months after the diagnosis showed the highest specificity (93.8%) and negative predictive value (92.6%). The combination of different definitions increased the specificity and the positive predictive value, but decreased the sensitivity. Several diagnostic algorithms were obtained, and the different definitions could be useful depending on the interest and resources of the researcher. A higher positive predictive value could be interesting for a quick estimation of the number of cases, and a higher negative predictive value for a more exact estimation if more resources are available. It is a versatile and adaptable tool for other types of tumors, as well as for the needs of the researcher. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol consumption and risk of esophageal cancer in Japan: a case-control study in seven hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, T; Tsugane, S; Ando, N; Ishida, K; Kakegawa, T; Isono, K; Takiyama, W; Takagi, I; Ide, H; Watanabe, H

    1994-10-01

    In a multi-center case-control study, we evaluated the risk of esophageal cancer in the Japanese population. All patients and controls were inpatients in the surgical departments of seven hospitals nationwide. Patients eligible for the study were those newly diagnosed as having primary esophageal cancer. One control per case was selected from among patients admitted to the same hospital, and 141 male pairs were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. The results showed dose-response relation between the risk of esophageal cancer and both the quantity (g/week) and frequency (times/week) of alcohol drinking (P value for trend = 0.0001). Although a statistically significant risk increase was shown among moderate to heavy smokers (15 < or = cigarette/day < 25) (odds ratio, 4.35:95% confidence interval, 1.81-10.49), the dose-response for cigarette smoking was unclear (P value for trend = 0.07). No combined effect of alcohol drinking and cigarette smoking was found. A frequent intake of fruit was associated with a decreased risk (P value for trend = 0.02). After adjustment for alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and fruit intake were found not to be associated with the risk, whereas a preference for high-temperature food and drink showed a statistically significant positive association (P value for trend = 0.02). Drinkers who consumed shochu most frequently showed a three-fold increased risk over that for beer consumers, although the association disappeared after adjusting for the amount of alcohol consumed. The present results confirm alcohol intake and a preference for high-temperature food to be associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer and show the amount of alcohol consumed, rather than the type of alcoholic beverage, to be the main risk determinant.

  3. Mutant HABP2 Causes Non-Medullary Thyroid Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that lies at the base of the throat in front of the windpipe. A member of the endocrine system, the thyroid secretes hormones to regulate heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and metabolism. Cancer of the thyroid is the most common endocrine cancer and the eighth most common cancer in the U.S. An estimated 63,450 Americans will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer this year. The vast majority is of follicular cell origin, and the remaining cancer originates from parafollicular cells, so called medullary thyroid cancer.

  4. Nasopharyngeal cancer at the University College Hospital Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a steady increase in the incidence of nasopharyngeal cancer over the last two decades. Overall, the mean age was 41.1years (age range 10 to 81 years). The females had a mean age of 36.1years (age range 11to 80 years) and males 43.2 years (age range 10 to 81 years). The peak age group of incidence for the ...

  5. The Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: past accomplishments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Rudy L; Sunnarborg, Susan; DeSimone, Joseph; Haroon, Zishan

    2011-01-01

    The Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (C-CCNE) is funded by the National Cancer Institute and is based at the University of North Carolina. The C-CCNE features interactions between physical and biological scientists in a series of projects and cores that work together to quickly harness innovations in nanotechnology for the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Two key focus areas of the C-CCNE are, first, the selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents utilizing advanced nanoparticle technology, and second, novel approaches to imaging and radiotherapy utilizing carbon nanotube-based x-ray sources.

  6. Pilot Study of Massage to Improve Sleep and Fatigue in Hospitalized Adolescents With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Shana; Mowbray, Catriona; Cates, Lauren Muser; Baylor, Allison; Gable, Christopher; Skora, Elizabeth; Estrada, Monica; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jichuan; Lewin, Daniel; Hinds, Pamela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescents with cancer experience many troubling symptoms, including sleep disruptions that can affect mood and quality of life. Massage is a safe and popular intervention that has demonstrated efficacy in pediatric and adult patients with cancer. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of conducting a massage intervention to help with sleep in hospitalized adolescent oncology patients. Adolescents ages 12-21 with cancer who were expected to be hospitalized for at least four consecutive nights were recruited from the inpatient unit at Children's National Health System and randomized to either massage intervention or a waitlist control. Patients in the intervention group received one massage per night, for two or three nights. Sleep was measured with actigraphy and patient and proxy reported instruments were used to measure fatigue, mood, and anxiety. The majority (78%) of patients approached for the study consented, and almost all patients in the intervention group (94%) received at least one massage, 69% received two, and rates of completion of instruments among adolescents were high demonstrating feasibility. There were trends toward increased night time and overall sleep in the intervention group compared with standard of care, but no differences between groups in the patient reported outcome measures. Participant and parent feedback on the intervention was positive and was the impetus for starting a clinical massage service at the hospital. Massage for hospitalized adolescents with cancer is feasible, well received, and can potentially improve patients' sleep. A randomized multicenter efficacy study is warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A qualitative analysis of communication between members of a hospital-based multidisciplinary lung cancer team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, S; Callen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how patient information is communicated between health professionals within a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team and to identify mechanisms to improve these communications. A qualitative method was employed using semi-structured in-depth interviews with a representative sample (n = 22) of members of a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team including medical, nursing and allied health professionals. Analysis was undertaken using a thematic grounded theory approach to derive key themes to describe communication patterns within the team and how communication could be improved. Two themes with sub-themes were identified: (1) characteristics of communication between team members including the impact of role on direction of communications, and doctors' dominance in communications; and (2) channels of communication including, preference for face-to-face and the suboptimal roles of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting and the hospital medical record as mediums for communication. Traditional influences of role delineation and the dominance of doctors were found to impact on communication within the multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team. Existing guidelines on implementation of multidisciplinary cancer care fail to address barriers to effective team communication. The paper-based medical record does not support team communications and alternative electronic solutions need to be used. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment--a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, C; Uhrenfeldt, L; Birkelund, R

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysis process was guided by the hermeneutical-phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment had a significant impact on their mood, generating positive thoughts and feelings. A view to nature also helped them to forget their negative thoughts for a while. The possibility of having a view helped some cancer patients to connect with good memories and personal life stories that enabled them to recall some of their feelings of identity. This paper adds knowledge about how cancer patients experience sensory impressions in the hospital environment. An environment that provides homeliness and offers a view to nature seems to help some patients to preserve their identity. Furthermore, positive sensory impressions and the opportunity for recreation through environmental facilities strengthen the patient's positive thoughts and feelings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Quality of life in male cancer patients at Kenyatta National Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods and subjects: Cancer patients above 12 years of age were interviewed during the course of their stay in the hospital, specifically to gather information on; semi structured questions and a modified Beck's 24 item depression inventory with a view to solicit for their reaction on issues which pertains to quality of life.

  10. What Is Important to Young Children Who Have Cancer while in Hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldiss, Susie; Horstman, Maire; O'Leary, Chris; Richardson, Alison; Gibson, Faith

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a participatory research project exploring children's experiences and views of cancer care services. It focusses on findings from interviews conducted with 10 children aged four and five years old. Play and puppets were used to help children express their views. The themes elicited reveal important aspects of hospital care…

  11. Increased cancer risk in patients referred to hospital with suspected fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Kendall, Sally

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether fibromyalgia (FM) and FM-like symptoms are related to an increased incidence of cancer. METHODS: We identified 1361 patients referred on suspicion of FM in the period 1984-99 from hospital records. Following the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, patients...

  12. Attitude of Patients in a General Hospital to Cervical Cancer Screening

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mass media and Non-governmental Organization activities were the main sources of information on cervical cancer screening. More than one third of the respondent gave no reason for non-utilization of Pap smear. A significant percentage of women attending reproductive health services in this Hospital were not aware of ...

  13. Disparities in quality of care for colon cancer between hospitals in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Jansen-Landheer, M.L.E.A.; van de Velde, C.J.H.; Siesling, Sabine; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Aim of this study was to describe treatment patterns and outcome according to region, and according to hospital types and volumes among patients with colon cancer in the Netherlands. Methods: All patients with invasive colon carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2001–2006 were selected from

  14. Risk factors and costs of oral cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sandeep; Tiwari, Vijay Kumar; Nair, Kesavan Sreekantan; Raj, Sherin

    2014-01-01

    The present study conducted with 100 oral cancer patients at a private tertiary care hospital in Delhi demonstrated that stage III cancer was associated with longer use of tobacco and poor oral hygiene. There was also statistically significant association (ptobacco and alcohol. More than 60% treatment expenditure was on surgery followed by accommodation (9%) and investigations (8%). The effect of tobacco was well known among patients as 76% of the patients knew that common cancer in tobacco chewer is 'oral cancer', 22% of the patients however responded that they did not know which cancer is common in tobacco chewers. 58% said that they learnt about ill effects of tobacco from media while 24% said they learnt from family and friends. Out of 78 tobacco users, 60 (77%) said that they never received help to quit tobacco while 18(23%) have received help to quit.

  15. In-hospital mortality following lung cancer resection: nationwide administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Pierre-Benoit; Cottenet, Jonathan; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Bernard, Alain; Quantin, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to determine the effect of a national strategy for quality improvement in cancer management (the "Plan Cancer") according to time period and to assess the influence of type and volume of hospital activity on in-hospital mortality (IHM) within a large national cohort of patients operated on for lung cancer.From January 2005 to December 2013, 76 235 patients were included in the French Administrative Database. Patient characteristics, hospital volume of activity and hospital type were analysed over three periods: 2005-2007, 2008-2010 and 2011-2013.Global crude IHM was 3.9%: 4.3% during 2005-2007, 4% during 2008-2010 and 3.5% during 2011-2013 (p43 resections per year (adjusted (a)OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.197-1.834). The risk of death was lower in the period 2011-2013 than in the period 2008-2010 (aOR 0.841, 95% CI 0.764-0.926). Adjustment variables (age, sex, Charlson score and type of resection) were significantly linked to IHM, whereas the type of hospital was not.The French national strategy for quality improvement seems to have induced a significant decrease in IHM. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  16. Knowledge and awareness about cervical cancer and its prevention amongst interns and nursing staff in Tertiary Care Hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Faizan Ali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality amongst the gynecological cancers worldwide, especially in developing countries. It is imperative for at least health professionals in developing countries like Pakistan to have a sound knowledge about the disease. This study was carried out to assess the knowledge and awareness about cervical cancer and its prevention amongst health professionals in tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODS AND DESIGN: A cross-sectional, interview based survey was conducted in June, 2009. Sample of 400 was divided between the three tertiary care centers. Convenience sampling was applied as no definitive data was available regarding the number of registered interns and nurses at each center. RESULTS: Of all the interviews conducted, 1.8% did not know cervical cancer as a disease. Only 23.3% of the respondents were aware that cervical cancer is the most common cause of gynecological cancers and 26% knew it is second in rank in mortality. Seventy-eight percent were aware that infection is the most common cause of cervical cancer, of these 62% said that virus is the cause and 61% of the respondents knew that the virus is Human Papilloma Virus (HPV. Majority recognized that it is sexually transmitted but only a minority (41% knew that it can be detected by PCR. Only 26% of the study population was aware of one or more risk factors. Thirty seven percent recognized Pap smear as a screening test. In total only 37 out of 400 respondents were aware of the HPV vaccine. CONCLUSION: This study serves to highlight that the majority of working health professionals are not adequately equipped with knowledge concerning cervical cancer. Continuing Medical Education program should be started at the hospital level along with conferences to spread knowledge about this disease.

  17. Vaccines 2.0 | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1974, Jay A. Berzofsky, M.D., Ph.D., now Chief of CCR’s Vaccine Branch, came to NIH to study protein folding. His curious mind and collaborative spirit quickly led him into the intertwined fields of immunology and vaccine development. With close to 500 publications to his name, Berzofsky has pioneered the characterization of B- and T-cell epitopes and their modification to make vaccines directed against cancer and chronic infectious diseases. He has also characterized and taken advantage of the cellular and molecular regulators of immune responses in order to enhance tumor immunity and vaccine efficacy. In the last several years, he has translated many of these strategies into promising clinical trials. From the microcosm of his laboratory, he brings the same spirit of cross-fertilizing, bench-to-bedside research to leading the Vaccine Branch as a whole.

  18. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  19. What are cancer centers advertising to the public?: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Donohue, Julie M; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2014-06-17

    Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, analyses of the content of these advertisements are lacking. To characterize the informational and emotional content of direct-to-consumer cancer center advertisements. Content analysis. Top U.S. consumer magazines (n = 269) and television networks (n = 44) in 2012. Types of clinical services promoted; information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, costs, and insurance availability; use of emotional advertising appeals; and use of patient testimonials were assessed. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti, and κ values ranged from 0.77 to 1.00. A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%). Benefits of advertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%) but were rarely quantified (2%). Few advertisements mentioned coverage or costs (5%), and none mentioned specific insurance plans. Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and inducing fear (30%). Nearly one half of advertisements included patient testimonials, which were usually focused on survival, rarely included disclaimers (15%), and never described the results that a typical patient may expect. Internet advertisements were not included. Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy with emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, costs, or insurance availability. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. National Institutes of Health.

  20. CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCER: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil H Agrawal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is heading towards various types of non-communicable diseases, which are also known as modern epidemics. Among these modern epidemics cancer is among the ten commonest cause of mortality in developing countries including India. Oral cancer is a major problem in India and accounts for 50-70% of all the cancers diagnosed. Ninety percent (90% of oral cancers in South East Asia including India are linked to tobacco chewing and tobacco smoking. Research question: What is the profile of Oral cancer (Oral cavity cases reported in the hospital? Objective: To study the clinico-epidemiological profile associated with Oral cancer cases. Methods: Study Design: Hospital based, Cross -sectional study. Settings: Shri Siddhivinayak Ganapati Cancer Hospital, Miraj, Maharashtra. Participants and Sample size: As it is a time bound study sample size comprised of all the confirmed cases of oral cancer reported in the hospital during the study period. The study was carried out from 1st March 2005 to 28th February 2006. Study variables included demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, enquiries regarding modifiable risk factors such as tobacco usage, alcohol consumption, site involved (within oral cavity, staging, histopathological examination, treatment modality used. Data entry and statistical analysis was done using Microsoft excel. Data presented in form of percentages and proportions. Results: Out of the total 160 cases, majority of the subjects were above 40 years age. 36 (22% of subjects were young adults (below 40 years age. 125 (78% subjects were male. Most of the subjects belonged to upper lower and lower middle socio-economic scale according to modified Kuppuswamy classification. It was observed that 139 (87% cases consumed tobacco in all forms. Out of these, ninety cases consumed tobacco in chewable form. Tobacco was chewed mainly in the form of gutka. Only ten (10 female subjects chewed tobacco. No female subjects smoked. The most

  1. MIF Drives Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness by Downregulating NR3C2 | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancreatic cancer, while relatively rare, is an aggressive disease ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Because most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and their tumors resist available treatments, novel therapeutic targets are urgently needed. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is elevated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, and may provide a molecular link between inflammation and cancer, though the mechanism is unknown.

  2. Hacking the hospital environment: young adults designing youth-friendly hospital rooms together with young people with cancer experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne; Thomsen, Stine Legarth; Matthiesen, Simon Meggers; Hjerming, Maiken; Hertz, Pernille Grarup

    2015-12-09

    There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon). Students in architecture, design, engineering, communication and anthropology participated (27 young adults) - forming eight groups. Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with current or former cancer experience participated as sparring partners. We provided workspace and food during the weekend. The groups presented their products to a jury and relevant stakeholders. The groups created eight unique design concepts. The young designers were extremely flexible listening to ideas and experiences from the young patients, which led to common features including individual and flexible design, privacy in two-bed wardrooms and social contact with other hospitalized AYA. The winning project included an integrated concept for both wardrooms and the AYA day room, including logos and names for the rooms and an 'energy wall' in the day room. A hackathon event was an effective mode of youth participation. The design concepts and ideas were in line with current evidence regarding pleasing hospital environment and youth-friendly inpatient facilities and may be applicable to other young patients.

  3. Organochlorine pesticides accumulation and breast cancer: A hospital-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting-Ting; Zuo, An-Jun; Wang, Ji-Gang; Zhao, Peng

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the accumulation status of organochlorine pesticides in breast cancer patients and to explore the relationship between organochlorine pesticides contamination and breast cancer development. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in 56 patients with breast cancer and 46 patients with benign breast disease. We detected the accumulation level of several organochlorine pesticides products (β-hexachlorocyclohexane, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, polychlorinated biphenyls-28, polychlorinated biphenyls-52, pentachlorothioanisole, and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane) in breast adipose tissues of all 102 patients using gas chromatography. Thereafter, we examined the expression status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and Ki-67 in 56 breast cancer cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we analyzed the risk of breast cancer in those patients with organochlorine pesticides contamination using a logistic regression model. Our data showed that breast cancer patients suffered high accumulation levels of pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane and polychlorinated biphenyls-52. However, the concentrations of pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane and polychlorinated biphenyls-52 were not related to clinicopathologic parameters of breast cancer. Further logistic regression analysis showed polychlorinated biphenyls-52 and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane were risk factors for breast cancer. Our results provide new evidence on etiology of breast cancer.

  4. PRISMA Analysis of 30 Day Readmissions to a Tertiary Cancer Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooksley, Tim; Merten, Hanneke; Kellett, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital readmissions are increasingly used as a quality indicator. Patients with cancer have an increased risk of readmission. The purpose of this study was to develop an in depth understanding of the causes of readmissions in patients undergoing cancer treatment using PRISMA...... methodology and was subsequently used to identify any potentially preventable causes of readmission in this cohort. METHODS: 50 consecutive 30 day readmissions from the 1st November 2014 to the medical admissions unit (MAU) at a specialist tertiary cancer hospital in the Northwest of England were analysed...... retrospectively. RESULTS: Q25(50%) of the patients were male with a median age of 59 years (range 19-81). PRISMA analysis showed that active (human) factors contributed to the readmission of 4 (8%) of the readmissions, which may have been potentially preventable. All of the readmissions were driven by a medical...

  5. Immunonutrition for patients undergoing elective surgery for gastrointestinal cancer: impact on hospital costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauskopf Josephine A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral or enteral dietary supplementation with arginine, omega 3 fatty acids and nucleotides (known as immunonutrition significantly improve outcomes in patients undergoing elective surgery. The objective of the study was to determine the impact on hospital costs of immunonutrition formulas used in patients undergoing elective surgery for gastrointestinal cancer. Methods US hospital costs of stay with and without surgical infectious complications, and average cost per day in the hospital for patients undergoing elective surgery for gastrointestinal cancer were estimated using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s 2008 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. These costs were then used to estimate the impact of perioperative immunonutrition on hospital costs using estimates of reduction in infectious complications or length of stay from a meta-analysis of clinical trials in patients undergoing elective surgery for gastrointestinal cancer. Sensitivity of the results to changes in baseline complication rates or length of stay was tested. Results From the meta-analysis estimates, use of immunonutrition resulted in savings per patient of $3,300 with costs based on reduction in infectious complication rates or $6,000 with costs based on length of hospital stay. Cost savings per patient were present for baseline complication rates above 3.5% or when baseline length of stay and infectious complication rates were reduced to reflect recent US data for those with upper and lower GI elective cancer surgery (range, $1,200 to $6,300. Conclusions Use of immunonutrition for patients undergoing elective surgery for gastrointestinal cancer is an effective and cost-saving intervention.

  6. End-of-Life Cancer Care: Temporal Association between Homecare Nursing and Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Hsien; Sutradhar, Rinku; McGrail, Kim; Fassbender, Konrad; Pataky, Reka; Lawson, Beverley; Sussman, Jonathan; Burge, Fred; Barbera, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Most cancer patients want to die at home, but scaleable models to achieve this are not well researched. Our objective was to investigate the temporal association of homecare nursing, especially by generalist nurses, with reduced end-of-life hospitalizations. We conducted a retrospective Canadian cohort study of end-of-life cancer decedents during 2004-2009 in Ontario (ON), Nova Scotia (NS), and British Columbia (BC), which have homecare systems that use generalist nurses to provide end-of-life care. Each province linked administrative databases to examine the association during the last six months of life between the homecare nursing rate and the hospitalization rate in the subsequent week, using standardized definitions and controlling for other covariates. We dichotomized nursing into standard and end-of-life care intent. Our cohort included 83,827 cancer decedents. Approximately 55% of decedents were older than 70 and the most common cancer was lung. Nearly 85% of the cohort had at least one hospital admission. Receiving end-of-life compared to standard homecare nursing significantly reduced a patient's hospitalization rate by 34%, 33%, and 17% in ON, BC, and NS. In the last month of life patients having a standard nursing rate of greater than five hours compared to one hour per week had a significantly lower hospitalization rate (relative reduction of 15%-23%) across the three provinces. Our study showed a protective effect of nursing with an end-of-life intent on hospitalization across the last six months of life and of standard nursing in the last month. This finding's generalizability is strengthened, since the trends were similar across three different homecare systems.

  7. Predictors of Non-Adherence to Breast Cancer Screening among Hospitalized Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Khaliq

    Full Text Available Disparities in screening mammography use persists among low income women, even those who are insured, despite the proven mortality benefit. A recent study reported that more than a third of hospitalized women were non-adherent with breast cancer screening. The current study explores prevalence of socio-demographic and clinical variables associated with non-adherence to screening mammography recommendations among hospitalized women.A cross sectional bedside survey was conducted to collect socio-demographic and clinical comorbidity data thought to effect breast cancer screening adherence of hospitalized women aged 50-75 years. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association between these factors and non-adherence to screening mammography.Of 250 enrolled women, 61% were of low income, and 42% reported non-adherence to screening guidelines. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical predictors, three variables were found to be independently associated with non-adherence to breast cancer screening: low income (OR = 3.81, 95%CI; 1.84-7.89, current or ex-smoker (OR = 2.29, 95%CI; 1.12-4.67, and history of stroke (OR = 2.83, 95%CI; 1.21-6.60. By contrast, hospitalized women with diabetes were more likely to be compliant with breast cancer screening (OR = 2.70, 95%CI 1.35-5.34.Because hospitalization creates the scenario wherein patients are in close proximity to healthcare resources, at a time when they may be reflecting upon their health status, strategies could be employed to counsel, educate, and motivate these patients towards health maintenance. Capitalizing on this opportunity would involve offering screening during hospitalization for those who are overdue, particularly for those who are at higher risk of disease.

  8. Hospital discharges for fever and neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients: United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Emily L; Walkovich, Kelly J; Mody, Rajen; Gebremariam, Achamyeleh; Davis, Matthew M

    2015-05-10

    Fever and neutropenia (FN) is a common complication of pediatric cancer treatment, but hospital utilization patterns for this condition are not well described. Data were analyzed from the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), an all-payer US hospital database, for 2009. Pediatric FN patients were identified using: age ≤19 years, urgent or emergent admit type, non-transferred, and a combination of ICD-9-CM codes for fever and neutropenia. Sampling weights were used to permit national inferences. Pediatric cancer patients accounted for 1.5 % of pediatric hospital discharges in 2009 (n = 110,967), with 10.1 % of cancer-related discharges meeting FN criteria (n = 11,261). Two-fifths of FN discharges had a "short length of stay" (SLOS) of ≤3 days, which accounted for approximately $65.5 million in hospital charges. Upper respiratory infection (6.0 %) and acute otitis media (AOM) (3.7 %) were the most common infections associated with SLOS. Factors significantly associated with SLOS included living in the Midwest region (OR = 1.65, 1.22-2.24) or West region (OR 1.54, 1.11-2.14) versus Northeast, having a diagnosis of AOM (OR = 1.39, 1.03-1.87) or viral infection (OR = 1.63, 1.18-2.25) versus those without those comorbidities, and having a soft tissue sarcoma (OR = 1.47, 1.05-2.04), Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 2.33, 1.62-3.35), or an ovarian/testicular tumor (OR = 1.76, 1.05-2.95) compared with patients without these diagnoses. FN represents a common precipitant for hospitalizations among pediatric cancer patients. SLOS admissions are rarely associated with serious infections, but contribute substantially to the burden of hospitalization for pediatric FN.

  9. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Smoking, depression, and hospital costs of respiratory cancers: Examining race and sex variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husaini, Baqar; Levine, Robert; Lammers, Phillip; Hull, Pam; Novotny, Meggan; Moonis, Majaz

    2017-01-01

    The role of smoking and depression relative to hospital cost for lung cancer (LC) remains unknown. We extracted data on depression, smoking history, demographics, and hospital charges on patients with respiratory cancers (ICD-9 codes 161-163,165) from the 2008 Tennessee Hospital Discharge Data System. The sample (n=6,665) was mostly white (86%) and male (57). Age-adjusted rates were developed per CDC methodology, and hospital costs were compared for LC with vs. without depression and smoking. Three findings (psmoked (more males than females without racial variation), 24% had depression (more females and whites were depressed); (iii) The LC hospital cost was 54% higher compared to non-LC, and this cost doubled for LC with depression and smoking vs. those without such characteristics. While LC is more prevalent among blacks and males, depression is higher among female and white patients. Since depression with higher costs existed among LC patients, our findings point to: (i) possibility of cost savings by diagnosing and treating depression among LC, and (ii) implementing proven smoking cessation programs to reduce LC morbidity and hospital costs.

  11. ORAL CANCER AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL, NAIROBI JF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-06-06

    Jun 6, 2004 ... June 2004. Table 4. Site distribution of oral cancer according to age groups. Site. 0-9. 10-19. 20-29. 30-39 40-49. 50-59. 60-69. 70-79. 80-89. 90+. Total. Lower lip. 2. 2. 7. 2. 12. 16. 26. 7. 0. 1. 75. Upper lip. 0. 1. 0. 1. 4. 1. 3. 1. 0. 0. 11. Tongue. 0. 2. 9. 9. 55. 45. 71. 24. 5. 0. 220. Mandible. 2. 3. 7. 16. 24. 36.

  12. Cytomegalovirus colitis in hospitalized inflammatory bowel disease patients in Taiwan: a referral center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Meng-Tzu; Tung, Chien-Chih; Lee, Yi-Shuan; Leong, Yew-Loong; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Wong, Jau-Min; Wei, Shu-Chen

    2017-02-13

    Colitis is exacerbated in patients with concurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We assessed the prevalence and clinical features of CMV colitis in hospitalized IBD patients. A retrospective study reviewed the data from January 1, 1998 through December 31, 2013 compiled at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The CMV colitis patients' demographic data, clinical information, treatment regimens, pathologic findings, and outcome were analyzed. A total of 673 IBD patients were hospitalized during the study period. There were 312 patients diagnosed with Crohn's disease (CD) and 361 with ulcerative colitis (UC). CMV colitis was diagnosed as having positive inclusion bodies in colonic tissue. Six of the 312 CD patients (1.9%) and five of the 361 UC patients (1.4%) were diagnosed with CMV colitis. Compared to CD patients without CMV colitis, patients with CMV colitis were more often older (p colitis flare-ups after the index admission. The prevalence of CMV colitis in hospitalized IBD inpatients was 1.6% in Taiwan. Two associated factors for CMV colitis in hospitalized IBD patients were that they were elderly in CD and were on higher doses of steroids. Routine histopathology studies and/or PCR for refractory colitis patients are suggested to diagnose CMV colitis. Once the diagnosis is made, antiviral treatment is recommended to decrease the colitis relapse rate.

  13. Psycho-Oncology Structure and Profiles of European Centers Treating Patients With Gynecological Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasenburg, Annette; Amant, Frederic; Aerts, Leen; Pascal, Astrid; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Kesic, Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Psycho-oncological counseling should be an integrated part of modern cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the structures and interests of psychooncology services within European Society of Gynecological Oncology (ESGO) centers. Methods: In 2010, a survey, which consisted of

  14. In Memoriam: Amar J.S. Klar, Ph.D. | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Memoriam: Amar J.S. Klar, Ph.D. The Center for Cancer Research mourns the recent death of colleague and friend Amar J.S. Klar, Ph.D.  Dr. Klar was a much-liked and respected member of the NCI community as part of the Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory since 1988.

  15. Functional alignment, not structural integration, of medical schools and teaching hospitals is associated with high performance in academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keroack, Mark A; McConkie, Nathan R; Johnson, Erika K; Epting, Gladys J; Thompson, Irene M; Sanfilippo, Fred

    2011-08-01

    Debates continue regarding optimal structures for governance and administration between medical schools and their teaching hospitals. Structural integration (SI) for 85 academic health centers was characterized as high (single leader or fiduciary) or low (multiple leaders or fiduciaries). Functional alignment (FA) was estimated from questionnaire responses by teaching hospitals' chief executive officers, and an index was calculated quantifying organizational collaboration across several functional areas. SI and FA were examined for their association with global performance measures in teaching, research, clinical care, finance, and efficiency. AHCs with high SI had significantly higher FA, though overlap between high-SI and low-SI institutions was considerable. SI was not significantly associated with any performance measure. In contrast, FA was significantly associated with higher performance in teaching, research, and finance but not clinical care and efficiency. FA between medical schools and their primary teaching hospitals more strongly predicts academic health centers' performance than does SI. As demands for greater collaboration increase under health reform, emphasis should be placed on increasing FA rather than SI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Second Primary Tumors associated with Breast Cancer: Kuwait Cancer Control Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; Abuzalouf, Sadeq

    2017-09-01

    To review the clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of patients who presented with two or more primary cancers, one of which was breast cancer (BC) and to develop a follow-up program for the high risk patients. Patients who were diagnosed with BC and one or more non breast cancer (NBC) were retrospectively reviewed. Medical files were retrieved and epidemiological as well as clinical data were analyzed. Sixty-two patients were retrieved. BC was the first primary in 26 patients while it was the second in 36 patients. Two were males and 60 were females. The median age was 48 years and the median follow-up was 11.5 years. The median interval between the 1st and 2nd primary was 6 years. The most commonly associated NBCs were colon and thyroid cancers, each accounts for 24% of cases followed by endometrial cancer, 18%; Hodgkin's disease, 6.5%; renal and ovarian neoplasm and NHL, 5% each. Others included prostate, lung, cervical and gastric cancers, soft tissue sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Thyroid cancer was more common as first cancer while endometrial cancer was more as second cancer. All patients who developed BC following Hodgkin's disease had received chest irradiation. Seven patients developed 3rd primary (4 lung cancers, 2 NHL, and 1 AML). Patients who were diagnosed with BC should be screened for colon and endometrial cancer. Similarly, patients received chest irradiation at young age, and those diagnosed with thyroid or colon cancer should be screened for BC. Protocol of surveillance needs to be defined. Genetic counseling should be offered to individuals who have experienced multiple primary cancers particularly those with family history and young age of onset.

  17. Variations in 30-day hospital readmission rates across primary care clinics within a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Maselli, Judith H; Gonzales, Ralph

    2014-11-01

    Reducing hospital readmissions is a national healthcare priority. Little is known about how readmission rates vary across unique primary care practices. To calculate all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rates at the level of individual primary care practices and identify factors associated with variations in these rates. Retrospective analysis Seven primary care clinics affiliated with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Adults ≥18 years old with a primary care provider (PCP) at UCSF MEASUREMENTS: All-cause 30-day readmission rates were calculated for primary care clinics for discharges between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2012. We built a model to identify demographic, clinical, and hospital factors associated with variation in rates. There were 12,564 discharges for patients belonging to the 7 clinics, with 8685 index discharges and 1032 readmissions. Readmission rates varied across practices, from 14.9% in Human Immunodeficiency Virus primary care and 7.7% in women's health. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with variation in readmission rates included: male gender (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.40), Medicare insurance (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.64; Ref = private), Medicare-Medicaid dual eligible (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01-1.56), multiple comorbidities, and admitting services. Patients with a departed PCP awaiting transfer assignment to a new PCP had an OR of 1.59 (95% CI: 1.16-2.17) compared with having a current faculty PCP. Primary care practices are important partners in improving care transitions and reducing hospital readmissions, and this study introduces a new way to view readmission rates. PCP turnover may be an important risk factor for hospital readmissions. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. [Barriers upon providing assistance with making arrangements for discharging and changing from hospitals while a patient is undergoing cancer therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideo

    2011-12-01

    There has been an increase in cancer patient referrals to our palliative care team during a cancer treatment. In order to help an end-of-life stage homecare cancer patient who becomes being depressed and the family being felt restlessness, a fine-tuned response, an early stage of revelation of the disease and treatment are essential to have a long lasting homecare environment. Based on the Basic Plan to Promote Cancer Control Programs, our hospital established a cancer consulting support center and a palliative cancer care team in June 2009, and staffed them with multidisciplinary personnel. With medical staffs involved as a team, we considered a shared decision making repeatedly in compliance with in-patient's wishes for home care. One of the problems we have experienced was that a patient would take a long time for a decision making due to the state of mental depression, even if the patient had an ability to think and evaluate oneself. For a medicinal treatment of cancer patient with the state of depression, steroid, interferon, hypertension drug, female hormone pill, anti-histamine medicine and anti-fungus agent will cause frequent side effects, but they are easy to get rid of the symptoms. It appears that 5-percent of the patients who had steroid administered 10 days ago have a tendency to have a high manifested risk in 40mg/day PURRE- DONIZORO/Japan calculated. In case of medication related depression, the symptom can be rather controlled quickly by a decrease in the amount of medication. On the other hand, there is a possibility that side effects may appear before anti-depression comes to effects in case of an ordinary depression case. And it takes 2-4 weeks for the medicine to be effective. Therefore, amid the cancer patient is being in the state of depression, a decision to transfer the patient for home care environment should be delayed. This is why we ought to investigate it as one of the problems in palliative care. In conclusion, due to a patient

  19. Prevalence and management of cancer pain in Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Lertsinudom, Sunee; Sookprasert, Aumkhae; Phunmanee, Anakapong; Pratheepawanit, Nutjaree; Wattanaudomrot, Sirintip; Juangpanich, Ubol; Treapkhuntong, Tatiya

    2008-12-01

    Cancer pain remains an invisible problem in cancer care and our study aimed to document its prevalence, characteristics, and patterns of management at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Descriptive, prospective, cohort study. We recruited 335 consecutive adult patients diagnosed with cancers, admitted to Srinagarind Hospital, between February and April 2004. All of the participants were interviewed, and their pain evaluated by direct assessment using a numeric rating scale. The overall prevalence of cancer pain prior to admission was 56.5%, and within the first 24 hours of admission 41.5%. Three-quarters (74%) of patients with pain reported improvement; however one-third of those with pain never received any pain control intervention. Moreover; about half of those with persistent pain only received treatment by requesting it and then only received simple analgesics. Cancer pain remains under-detected and under-treated in many patients. Pain monitoring on a regular basis as well as a training program on pain management should be considered as first-line tools for improving pain control among cancer patients.

  20. [Suspected tuberculosis at a refugee center: 79 referred cases in 2 years at St. Loup Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Philippe; Zwahlen, André

    2003-02-01

    The recent opening, close to the hospital of Saint-Loup, of an application centre for foreigners who ask for a status of refugee in Switzerland gave us the opportunity, over the last two years, to evaluate 79 patients with suspected tuberculosis. Of them 67% came from sub-Saharan Africa and 25% from Eastern Europe. A bacillary tuberculosis was found in 19 cases (24%), requiring immediate treatment and a respiratory isolation of a mean duration of 18 days. In addition, 11 cases (14%) had non-bacillary tuberculosis with negative sputum smear but positive culture. This new situation led us to implement a specific strategy of hospital hygiene.

  1. Prevalence of Known Risk Factors in Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer at Inmol Hospital, Lahore, Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansha, Muhammad; Saleem, Maryam; Wasim, Muhammad; Tariq, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide and its frequency is increasing gradually in many countries. Over the last three decades an increase in the breast cancer has been witnessed in the earlier low-risk Asian countries including Pakistan. The objective of the current study was to assess the prevalence of known risk factors like early menarche, late menopause, socio economic, reproductive and demographic factors, among women diagnosed with breast cancer at INMOL hospital, Lahore, Punjab, as little information exists in this regard. A survey study was conducted on 200 women diagnosed with breast cancer who were seen at Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (INMOL) hospital, Lahore. A structured questionnaire was administered to these patients regarding the known risk factors through face to face interviews after obtaining appropriate consent. Regarding non-modifiable risk factors, our study showed that majority of the breast cancer patients were diagnosed at 35-45 years (32.5%) or at older age (≤46) and experienced menarche at 12 years or older (66 %). Likewise, a large number of patients reached menopause at the age of 45 years (60%), had no family and personal history of breast cancer (80%) and hence fell in a low risk category. Regarding modifiable risk factors in women diagnosed with breast cancer, most of the patients fell in low risk strata as the majority were married (98%) at young age, breastfed their children for 12 months or more (88%) and bore two to three children (80%). Considering income criteria, the majority of the patients had a low risk profile as they belonged to middle class (70%), urban area (60%) and were house wives (80%). However, it was noted that a considerable number of women (34%) diagnosed with breast cancer experienced menarche at an early age (risk category.

  2. Depression and anxiety in cancer patients in a Tertiary General Hospital in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shian Ming; Beck, Kevin Roy; Li, Huihua; Lim, Eng Choon Leslie; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha

    2014-04-01

    Past research has indicated that distress, anxiety and depression may occur in cancer patients during the course of their illness and treatment. This study aims to establish the prevalence of anxiety and depression in cancer patients in a Singapore hospital. It also describes the clinical characteristics of these patients, and examines if cancer patients with a psychiatric diagnosis differ from those without. Cross-sectional anxiety and depression symptom data were collected using the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview generating DSM IV diagnoses from inpatients of an oncology ward in the tertiary hospital. In all, 315 patients were interviewed. Fifty three (16.8%) were diagnosed with major depression, while 30 (9.5%) were found to have generalized anxiety disorder, three to ten times higher than their corresponding prevalence rates in the general population. Patients with depression or anxiety tend to be unemployed, in stage 4 cancer, who can develop these symptoms at any time from the onset of cancer diagnosis, even when perceived social support is strong. Oncology patients with depression were more likely to be in terminal stages of cancer and to correctly identify themselves to have mental health issues, than those without (p<0.01). The psychological impact of cancer is appreciable. The lack of identifiable risk factors makes the task of diagnosing psychiatric conditions in cancer patients an onerous one. The psychiatrist involved may want to look beyond socio-demographic variables and consider biological factors in cancer to better help detect psychiatric morbidity in this group of patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral health-related quality of life among HIV patients at antiretroviral therapy center government hospital, Jaipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Anup

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to center of disease control improving health outcomes of people living with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is one of the key recommendations proposed in 2010 with an ultimate goal of extending life and improving its quality. Aims: The aim was to assess oral health-related quality of life among HIV/AIDS patients at antiretroviral therapy (ART center government hospital, Jaipur. Materials and Methods: A total of 245 patients who attended out-patient department of ART center of government hospital, Jaipur were asked to participate, out of which 237 were agreed to participate. Sampling was done using simple random sampling a structured questionnaire (Cronbach α - 0.85 was used (oral health impact profile. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test P = 0.05. Results: Males were more than females. 37% individuals showed difficulty in doing usual job. 41% showed that they were unable to work to full capacity, 22.4% said they had painful gums, and 19.4% said sleep was interrupted. Conclusions: Patients with more severe AIDS manifestations complained of a poorer status of oral symptoms, functional limitations, emotional and social well-being related to their oral health.

  4. Pregabalin prescription for terminally ill cancer patients receiving specialist palliative care in an acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ryo; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ise, Yuya; Suzuki, Norihito; Yokoyama, Yuta; Kizu, Junko; Katayama, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Pregabalin is recommended as an adjuvant analgesic for neuropathic cancer-related pain, and may be taken at all steps of the World Health Organization analgesic ladder. However, unlike opioids, pregabalin treatments are limited to an oral administration route. If patients have oral feeding difficulties, it is not possible to administer any drug as an adjuvant analgesic for neuropathic cancer-related pain. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the problems of pain control after pregabalin discontinuation in terminally ill cancer patients. Our subjects comprised cancer patients who died during their hospital stay and were referred between April 2013 and October 2015 to the palliative care team of the 899-bed Cancer Hospital at the Nippon Medical School Hospital in Japan. The medical records of each patient were retrospectively reviewed, and patient characteristics were recorded. We obtained data on 183 patients during the study period. Thirty-eight (20.8 %) patients were treated with pregabalin. Thirty-three (86.8 %) out of 38 patients were prescribed pregabalin for neuropathic cancer-related pain. The incidence of bony metastases was significantly higher in patients administered pregabalin than in those not taking the drug (non-pregabalin group 32.4 % vs pregabalin group 57.9 %). Pregabalin was ultimately discontinued in all patients, with the main reason being oral feeding difficulties (81.6 %). After the discontinuation of pregabalin, the amount of opioid drugs administered was increased in 56.5 % of patients with oral feeding difficulties. Our results demonstrated that the amount of opioid drugs administered was increased in more than 50 % of patients following the discontinuation of pregabalin, and was repeatedly increased for some patients. A new administration route is required for cancer patients unable to take oral medication. UMIN000022507. May 28, 2016 retrospectively registered.

  5. Association of Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating With Outcomes in Advanced Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Christina Y; Inaba, Colette S; Sujatha-Bhaskar, Sarath; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2017-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released the Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating to help patients compare hospitals based on a 5-star scale. The star rating was designed to assess overall quality of the institution; thus, its validity toward specifically assessing surgical quality is unknown. To examine whether CMS high-star hospitals (HSHs) have improved patient outcomes and resource use in advanced laparoscopic abdominal surgery compared with low-star hospitals (LSHs). Using the University HealthSystem Consortium database (which includes academic centers and their affiliate hospitals) from January 1, 2013, through December 31, 2015, this administrative database observational study compared outcomes of 72 662 advanced laparoscopic abdominal operations between HSHs (4-5 stars) and LSHs (1-2 stars). The star rating includes 57 measures across 7 areas of quality. Patients who underwent advanced laparoscopic abdominal surgery, including bariatric surgery (sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), colorectal surgery (colectomy, proctectomy), or hiatal hernia surgery (paraesophageal hernia repair, Nissen fundoplication), were included. Risk adjustment included exclusion of patients with major and extreme severity of illness. Main outcome measures included serious morbidity, in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit admissions, and cost. A total of 72 662 advanced laparoscopic abdominal operations were performed in patients at 66 HSHs (n = 38 299; mean [SD] age, 51.26 [15.25] years; 12 096 [31.5%] male and 26 203 [68.4%] female; 28 971 [75.6%] white and 9328 [24.4%] nonwhite) and 78 LSHs (n = 34 363; mean [SD] age, 49.77 [14.77] years; 9902 [28.8%] male and 24 461 [71.2%] female; 21 876 [67.6%] white and 12 487 [32.4%] nonwhite). The HSHs were observed to have fewer intensive care unit admissions (1007 [2.6%] vs 1711 [5.0%], P abdominal surgery. No significant difference was found in serious morbidity between HSHs and

  6. Use of administrative hospital registry data and a civil registry to measure survival and other outcomes after cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen HT

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Toft Sørensen, Timothy L LashDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, DenmarkFor many decades, cancer registries have been a cornerstone in monitoring cancer occurrence in different populations. Cancer registries in the Nordic countries are characterized by a high level of completeness and excellent data quality.1 Cancer diagnoses are often validated through several procedures, with documentation of clinical evidence for the diagnosis. Cancer registries have proven very useful in monitoring cancer incidence, contributing significantly to our understanding of its origin and development. Some registries also have been used to monitor cancer survival at the population level.1

  7. Novel Data Sharing Between a Comprehensive Cancer Center and a Private Payer to Better Understand Care at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuver, Sherri O; McNiff, Kristen; Fraile, Bélen; Odejide, Oreofe; Abel, Gregory A; Dodek, Anton; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2016-08-01

    Understanding end-of-life (EOL) care patterns is a prerequisite to improving the experience for cancer patients. EOL measures endorsed by the National Quality Forum (NQF) have been examined in older patients using Medicare claims. To evaluate EOL care for patients treated at a comprehensive cancer center, using private payer claims data. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) patients who died between July 2010 and December 2012, and were insured by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts. Primary data sources included Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts claims information and DFCI administrative data. We assessed NQF-endorsed measures of EOL care related to emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and intensive care unit admissions in the last 30 days, chemotherapy in the last 14 days, hospice stay, and death in an acute care setting. Patterns of care by cancer type and service location were determined. Among 674 patients (mean age 58 years), event rates for NQF-endorsed EOL measures were similar to those reported using Medicare claims. Decedents with hematologic malignancies received significantly more intensive care and were less likely to have enrolled in hospice, compared to decedents with solid tumors. Thirty to 45% of EOL events occurred outside of DFCI and its affiliated hospitals. Data sharing between a private payer and a large cancer center proved feasible and informative. High rates of hospital service use outside of our sites of care were unexpected. The findings suggest opportunities to better manage care at the end of life. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Second-Opinion Review of Breast Imaging at a Cancer Center: Is It Worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Kristen; D'Alessio, Donna; Keating, Delia M; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2017-06-01

    Second-opinion review of breast imaging studies can be a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether reinterpretation of studies obtained at institutions outside a cancer center influences clinical management, specifically by revealing additional cancer and preventing unnecessary biopsy. A review was conducted of breast imaging studies of 200 patients who underwent ultrasound and MRI at community facilities and had the images submitted for second opinions at a cancer center between January and April 2014. Each case was evaluated for concordance between the original report and the second-opinion interpretation. Second-opinion review resulting in the recommendation and performance of new biopsies was further subdivided into benign, high-risk, and malignant categories based on the histopathologic results obtained at the cancer center. Second-opinion review of the 200 cases showed a change in interpretation in 55 cases (28%; 95% CI, 21-34%). Overall, 26 recommendations (13%; 95% CI, 9-18%) led to a major change in management. Twenty new biopsies were performed, yielding 10 malignancies (5%; 95% CI, 2-9%) and four high-risk lesions (2%; 95% CI, 1-5%). Surgical management was changed to mastectomy for 6 of 10 patients (60%) with new sites of biopsy-proven malignancy. Eight biopsies were averted (4%; 95% CI, 2-8%) on the basis of benign interpretation of the imaging findings, and no disease was found at 1-year follow-up evaluation. Reinterpretation of studies obtained outside a cancer center resulted in a change in interpretation in more than one-fourth of submitted studies. Additional cancer was detected in 5% of patients, and biopsy was averted for 4%. The practice of second-opinion review influences clinical management and adds value to patient care.

  9. PROACT: Iterative Design of a Patient-Centered Visualization for Effective Prostate Cancer Health Risk Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakone, Anzu; Harrison, Lane; Ottley, Alvitta; Winters, Nathan; Gutheil, Caitlin; Han, Paul K J; Chang, Remco

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the US, and yet most cases represent localized cancer for which the optimal treatment is unclear. Accumulating evidence suggests that the available treatment options, including surgery and conservative treatment, result in a similar prognosis for most men with localized prostate cancer. However, approximately 90% of patients choose surgery over conservative treatment, despite the risk of severe side effects like erectile dysfunction and incontinence. Recent medical research suggests that a key reason is the lack of patient-centered tools that can effectively communicate personalized risk information and enable them to make better health decisions. In this paper, we report the iterative design process and results of developing the PROgnosis Assessment for Conservative Treatment (PROACT) tool, a personalized health risk communication tool for localized prostate cancer patients. PROACT utilizes two published clinical prediction models to communicate the patients' personalized risk estimates and compare treatment options. In collaboration with the Maine Medical Center, we conducted two rounds of evaluations with prostate cancer survivors and urologists to identify the design elements and narrative structure that effectively facilitate patient comprehension under emotional distress. Our results indicate that visualization can be an effective means to communicate complex risk information to patients with low numeracy and visual literacy. However, the visualizations need to be carefully chosen to balance readability with ease of comprehension. In addition, due to patients' charged emotional state, an intuitive narrative structure that considers the patients' information need is critical to aid the patients' comprehension of their risk information.

  10. Improving cancer pain control with NCCN guideline-based analgesic administration: a patient-centered outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjan, Nora

    2014-09-01

    Improving the control of cancer-related pain (CRP) is a clinical and ethical imperative. Clinical research has documented improved treatment tolerance and survival rates among patients with cancer who have effective pain control. Barriers to CRP control include inadequate patient and physician education. Meta-analyses of patient education studies correlate improvements in CRP control with improved communications with health care providers and the implementation of strategies that assist with adherence to medication schedules. These strategies build patient confidence, allowing better self-management of pain and reduced psychological consequences. For physicians, ample educational resources exist in CRP management. However, in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, compliance with NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Adult Cancer Pain continues to be less than 70%, and more than one-third of patients continue to receive inadequate doses of analgesics. Patient-centered outcomes have become an integral end point in health policy, and the nation's medical training, research, and delivery systems are transforming to a value-based accreditation and reimbursement system. Pain control is a significant patient-centered outcome in cancer care, because pain adversely impacts function and affects all domains of quality of life. Agreement is clear on the value of health care interventions that relieve suffering from cancer pain and restore personal dignity. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  11. Understanding health care provider barriers to hospital affiliated medical fitness center facility referral: a questionnaire survey and semi structured interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Carissa; Alemagno, Sonia

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study is to understand health care provider barriers to referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities within an affiliated teaching hospital system using referral of diabetic services as an example. The aims of this study include: (1) to assess health care providers' awareness and use of facilities, (2) to determine barriers to referring patients to facilities, (3) identify current and needed resources and/or changes to increase referral to facilities. A 20-item electronic survey and requests for semi-structured interviews were administered to hospital system directors and managers (n = 51). Directors and managers instructed physicians and staff to complete the survey and interviews as applicable. Perceived barriers, knowledge, utilization, and referral of patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities were collected and examined. Descriptive statistics were generated regarding practice characteristics, provider characteristics, and referral. Of the health care providers surveyed and interviewed (n = 25) 40% indicated verbally suggesting use of facilities, 24% provided a flyer about the facilities. No respondents indicated that they directly referred patients to the facilities. However, 16% referred patients to other locations for physical activity - including their own department's management and prevention services. 20% do not refer to Medical Fitness Center Facilities or any other lifestyle programs/locations. Lack of time (92%) and lack of standard guidelines and operating procedures (88%) are barriers to referral. All respondents indicated a strong ability to refer patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities if given education about referral programs available as well as standard clinical guidelines and protocol for delivery. The results of this study indicate that, although few healthcare providers are currently referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities, health care providers with an affiliated Medical Fitness

  12. Early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in Japanese kidney transplant recipients: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taigo; Kakuta, Yoichi; Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Okumi, Masayoshi; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Takahara, Shiro; Nonomura, Norio

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignancies in kidney transplant recipients is increasing. Breast cancer is a common malignancy after kidney transplantation and can be more aggressive in kidney transplant recipients than in the general population. In this study, we evaluated the incidence and prognosis of breast cancer in kidney transplant recipients. Between 1993 and 2013, 750 kidney transplant patients were followed-up at our center. Since 1999, annual physical examination, mammography, and breast ultrasonography have been performed for such patients. Diagnostic studies, including core needle or mammotome biopsy, were performed for suspected malignancies. Patients with malignant neoplasm were administered the appropriate treatment and followed-up to assess tumor response and symptoms. Nine patients were diagnosed with breast cancer during the follow-up period. The mean age at the initial detection of the breast cancer was 47.7 ± 8.4 years. The mean interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 148.7 ± 37.1 months. Of the 9 patients, 8 were detected through the screening test; 7 were treated with breast conservative surgery and 1 was treated with modified radical mastectomy. The cancer stages were 0 (n = 2), I (n = 6), and II (n = 1). The incidence of breast cancer tended to be unchanged with time between transplantation and diagnosis, inconsistent with the increase in the duration of immunosuppression. Annual screening tests are crucial in the early diagnosis of breast cancer. Early treatment of breast cancer can result in an excellent prognosis in kidney transplant recipients.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use among patients with cancer in Mongolia: a National hospital survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyunchimeg, Buyadaa; Hwang, Jung Hye; Ahmed, Mansoor; Choi, Soojeung; Han, Dongwoon

    2017-01-19

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is popular in former Soviet Central Asian countries including Mongolia. However, no studies are available on CAM use among patients with cancer in countries of this region. The aim of this research is to describe the prevalence and patterns of CAM use by patients with cancer in Mongolia. A cross-sectional study was conducted using data from 482 cancer patients attending the National Cancer Center in Mongolia from September 2015 to February 2016. The survey instrument included 25 questions regarding CAM used, factors associated with use of CAM, cancer-related characteristics, and participants' socio-demographic profile. Among 482 respondents (response rate, 95.6%), 47.9% reported using one or more CAM modalities. Products of animal origin were the most popular modalities of CAM, followed by herbal products. Half of the users used CAM while receiving conventional treatment of cancer. Among users, only 29% discussed the CAM use with their doctors. Female gender, younger age, higher education, shorter disease duration, and prior use of CAM were significantly associated with CAM use. CAM appears to be widely accepted by patients with cancer in Mongolia. The findings support the urgent need for further in-depth study into commonly used oral CAM products and their potential effects on health of patients with cancer in Mongolia. High prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in our study warrants further studies in other countries of Central Asia.

  14. In-hospital downgrading of the trauma team: Validation of the Academic Medical Center downgrading criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung Kon Jin, P. H. P.; van Olffen, T. B. M.; Goslings, J. C.; Luitse, J. S. K.; Ponsen, K. J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To reduce overtriage of trauma patients while at the same time minimising undertriage, an in-hospital triage tool was developed with the purpose of reducing the initial full trauma team (downgrading) in a structured and evidence-based manner. This study evaluated the effect on overtriage

  15. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, B; Saoba, Sushama L; Sarade, Monika N; Pinjari, Suvarna V

    2011-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka), smoking (bidi, cigarette), comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI), family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. This an unmatched hospital-based case-control study, comprised of 123 histologically proven prostate 'cancer cases' and 167 'normal controls. Univariate and regression analysis were applied for obtaining the odds ratio for risk factors. The study revealed that there was no significant excess risk for chewers, alcohol drinkers, tea and coffee drinkers, family history of cancer, diabetes, vasectomy and dietary factors. However, patients with BMI >25 (OR = 2.1), those with hypertension history (OR = 2.5) and age >55 years (OR = 19.3) had enhanced risk for prostate cancer. In the present study age, BMI and hypertension emerged as risk factors for prostate cancer. The findings of this study could be useful to conduct larger studies in a more detailed manner which in turn can be useful for public interest domain.

  16. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ganesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. Objectives : The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka, smoking (bidi, cigarette, comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI, family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods : This an unmatched hospital-based case-control study, comprised of 123 histologically proven prostate ′cancer cases′ and 167 ′normal controls. Univariate and regression analysis were applied for obtaining the odds ratio for risk factors. Results : The study revealed that there was no significant excess risk for chewers, alcohol drinkers, tea and coffee drinkers, family history of cancer, diabetes, vasectomy and dietary factors. However, patients with BMI >25 (OR = 2.1, those with hypertension history (OR = 2.5 and age >55 years (OR = 19.3 had enhanced risk for prostate cancer. Conclusions : In the present study age, BMI and hypertension emerged as risk factors for prostate cancer. The findings of this study could be useful to conduct larger studies in a more detailed manner which in turn can be useful for public interest domain.

  17. Prevalence of diabetes in a cancer population in a Malaga hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Peralta, A M; Oliveras-López, M J; Pérez González, R; Martínez Martínez, F; López-García de la Serrana, H

    2012-01-01

    There are multiple risk factors for cancer, including obesity, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes (DM). Hormon Insulin is a growth factor that promotes cellular differentiation. The aim of our study is to observe impaired glycaemia in cancer population compared with control. We studied the prevalence of diabetes (DM) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) in 374 patients with different types of cancer before treatment, by medical records in a Malaga hospital (Spain). We compared the prevalence of basal hyperglycaemia in these patients with general population, within an age range and by gender. The prevalence of diabetes was 32.35% in our cancer patients. The comparison depends of age range, and by gender prevalence was: 45-54 years, DM: 40.91% in men cases, versus (vs.) 14.5% in men control (p = 0.005). 55-64 years, IFG: 23.08% in women cases, vs. 5.9% in women control (p = 0.001). 65-74 years, DM: 47.13% in men cases, vs. 25.4% in men control (p = 0.000), and IFG: 23.81% in women cases, vs. 9.5% in women control (p = 0.019). We found a higher prevalence of diabetes in specific types of cancer such as prostate (p cancer sample. We recommend an OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) for better diagnosis of possible DM in patients with cancer, and an appropriate treatment. It may be an independent risk factor for cancer to have decreased insulin activity, or DM.

  18. Hospital-community interface: a qualitative study on patients with cancer and health care providers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admi, Hanna; Muller, Ella; Ungar, Lea; Reis, Shmuel; Kaffman, Michael; Naveh, Nurit; Shadmi, Efrat

    2013-10-01

    Patients with cancer must deal with complex and fragmented healthcare systems in addition to coping with the burden of their illness. To improve oncology treatment along the care continuum, the barriers and facilitators for streamlined oncologic care need to be better understood. This study sought to gain insight into the hospital-community interface from the point of view of patients with cancer, their families, and health care providers on both sides of the interface i.e., the community and hospital settings. The sample comprised 37 cancer patients, their family members, and 40 multidisciplinary health care providers. Twelve participants were interviewed individually and 65 took part in 10 focus groups. Based on the grounded theory approach, theoretical sampling and constant comparative analyses were used. Two major concepts emerged: "ambivalence and confusion" and "overcoming healthcare system barriers." Ambiguity was expressed regarding the roles of health care providers in the community and in the hospital. We identified three main strategies by which these patients and their families overcame barriers within the system: patients and families became their own case managers; patients and health care providers used informal routes of communication; and nurse specialists played a significant role in managing care. The heavy reliance on informal routes of communication and integration by patients and providers emphasizes the urgent need for change in order to improve coordinating mechanisms for hospital-community oncologic care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Obesity-Linked Mouse Models of Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmy Stauffer, Ph.D., and colleagues working with Robert  Wiltrout, Ph.D., in CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, along with collaborators in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, have developed a novel mouse model that demonstrates how fat-producing phenotypes can influence the development of hepatic cancer.   The team recently reported their findings in Cancer Research.

  20. BMI1 and H-RAS Cooperate to Drive Breast Cancer Metastasis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    There have been significant improvements in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages of the disease. However, even when patients are identified early, there is a 30 percent chance of recurrence after apparently successful treatment of the initial tumor. The major cause of death for breast cancer patients is metastasis of the tumor to other organs but, unfortunately, the mechanisms of metastatic progression and cancer recurrence are poorly understood.

  1. Novel Antibody Targets Glypican-3 in Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for patients with liver cancer, the third most common cause of cancer-related death, are desperately needed. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, and HCC tumors are particularly insensitive to chemotherapy. Surgery is the standard treatment for HCCs caught early, but only about a third of cases are identified at this stage. Antibody therapy offers a potential alternative for treating later-stage tumors.

  2. Factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized cancer patients: a croos-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda Rafaella de Melo; de Oliveira, Mirella Gondim Ozias Aquino; Souza, Alex Sandro Rolland; Figueroa, José Natal; Santos, Carmina Silva

    2015-12-10

    The incidence of cancer is increasing worldwide and with it the prevalence of malnutrition, which is responsible for the death of almost 20% of cancer patients. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized cancer patients. Cross-sectional study conducted with 277 hospitalized patients in the Institute of Integrative Medicine Prof. Fernando Figueira from March to November 2013. The nutritional status was classified as well-nourished and moderate/severe malnutrition, according to the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment. The association between moderate/severe malnutrition and demographic, behavioral, socioeconomic, clinical, therapeutic and nutritional variables was investigated through univariate regression and hierarchical Poisson models, with a 5% significance level. The prevalence of malnutrition was 71.1%, being classified as moderate in 35.4% and severe in 35.7%. After multivariate analysis, smokers/ex-smokers low socioeconomic status, performance status ≥2 and age ≥60 years were associated with increased risk of malnutrition. There was observed a high prevalence of moderate/severe malnutrition in cancer patients, with the increased risk of malnutrition associated with the presence of factors that can be assessed during hospital admission suggesting a higher alert of the medical and health care staff about the need for nutritional assessment and intervention.

  3. Organizational culture and the implementation of person centered care: results from a change process in Swedish hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Tariq Saleem J; Ekman, Inger; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Dudas, Kerstin; Carlström, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Sweden has one of the oldest, most coherent and stable healthcare systems in the world. The culture has been described as conservative, mechanistic and increasingly standardized. In order to provide a care adjusted to the patient, person centered care (PCC) has been developed and implemented into some parts of the health care industry. The model has proven to decrease patient uncertainty. However, the impact of PCC has been limited in some clinics and hospital wards. An assumption is that organizational culture has an impact on desired outcomes of PCC, such as patient uncertainty. Therefore, in this study we identify the impact of organizational culture on patient uncertainty in five hospital wards during the implementation of PCC. Data from 220 hospitalized patients who completed the uncertainty cardiovascular population scale (UCPS) and 117 nurses who completed the organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) were investigated with regression analysis. The results seemed to indicate that in hospitals where the culture promotes stability, control and goal setting, patient uncertainty is reduced. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that a culture of flexibility, cohesion and trust is positive, a culture of stability can better sustain a desired outcome of reform or implementation of new care models such as person centered care. It is essential for health managers to be aware of what characterizes their organizational culture before attempting to implement any sort of new healthcare model. The organizational values questionnaire has the potential to be used as a tool to aid health managers in reaching that understanding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Level of Digitization in Dutch Hospitals and the Lengths of Stay of Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poelgeest, Rube; van Groningen, Julia T; Daniels, John H; Roes, Kit C; Wiggers, Theo; Wouters, Michel W; Schrijvers, Guus

    2017-05-01

    A substantial amount of research has been published on the association between the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) and quality outcomes in U.S. hospitals, while limited research has focused on the Western European experience. The purpose of this study is to explore the association between the use of EMR technologies in Dutch hospitals and length of stay after colorectal cancer surgery. Two data sets were leveraged for this study; the HIMSS Analytics Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAMSM) and the Dutch surgical colorectal audit (DSCA). The HIMSS Analytics EMRAM score was used to define a Dutch hospital's electronic medical records (EMR) capabilities while the DSCA was used to profile colorectal surgery quality outcomes (specifically total length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and the LOS in ICU). A total of 73 hospitals with a valid EMRAM score and associated DSCA patients (n = 30.358) during the study period (2012-2014) were included in the comparative set. A multivariate regression method was used to test differences adjusted for case mix, year of surgery, surgical technique and for complications, as well as stratifying for academic affiliated hospitals and general hospitals. A significant negative association was observed to exist between the total LOS (relative median LOS 0,974, CI 95% 0.959-0,989) of patients treated in advanced EMR hospitals (high EMRAM score cohort) versus patients treated at less advanced EMR care settings, once the data was adjusted for the case mix, year of surgery and type of surgery (laparoscopy or laparotomy). Adjusting for complications in a subgroup of general hospitals (n = 39) yielded essentially the same results (relative median LOS 0,934, CI 95% 0,915-0,954). No consistent significant associations were found with respect to LOS on the ICU. The findings of this study suggest advanced EMR capabilities support a healthcare provider's efforts to achieve desired quality outcomes and efficiency in Western

  5. REHABILITATION NEEDS AND PLANS AMONG PATIENTS WITH CANCER, ASSESSED AT HOSPITALS AND WHEN REHABILITATION BEGINS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Maribo, Thomas; Jensen, Charlotte Maria

    , completing rehabilitation plans and enable referral to rehabilitation. The ICF framework proved useful in gaining insight into the distribution and specifics of stated needs and plans and further seemed potential as a framework to studies within cancer rehabilitation. Gaining knowledge on needs assessment...... and the specifics of needs and plans facilitates targeted rehabilitation interventions. Implications: Systematic needs assessment in cancer rehabilitation unveil the requirement of physical rehabilitation. Supervised physical activity renders an intervention possible tailored the special needs cancer patients have......Background: Systematic assessment of rehabilitation needs is prerequisite for sufficient rehabilitation, but little is known about patients' needs. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe specific stated rehabilitation needs and plans among patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed...

  6. Systematic Review of Hospital Based Cancer Registries (HBCRs): Necessary Tool to Improve Quality of Care in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Nahvijou, Azin; Rostam Niakan Kalhori, Sharareh; Davoodi, Somayeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-08-27

    Introduction: Incidence and mortality rate of cancer is increasing in all countries including low and middle-income countries. Hospital based cancer registry (HBCR) is an important tool for administration purpose and improvement of the quality of care. It is also important resource for population based cancer registries. In this study we reviewed HBCRs in different countries. Methods: We searched the published literature using the MEDLINE (PubMed), Google scholar, Scopus, ProQuest and Google. We also reviewed websites of the HBCRs in different countries. The search was carried out based on proper keywords in English for all motor engines including “hospital-based”, “clinical” and “data quality” combined with “registry”, “cancer” and “tumor” including all subheadings. We reviewed objectives, developer institutions, minimum datasets, data sources, quality control indicators and processes. Results: In total we found 163 papers in the first step. After screening of the titles, abstracts and the full texts, 14 papers remained for analysis. Analysis of the 14 papers showed that the improvement of the quality of the care were the most important objectives among the registries. HBCRs collect information about patients, tumor diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Generally, indicators such as completeness and validity were used for quality control. Conclusion: Because of the increases in cancer burden in the world, more attention is needed to be paid on cancer surveillance systems, including HBCRs. We evaluated and highlighted the importance and characteristics HBCRs and believe that this paper would help the hospitals and policy makers for planning and establishment of new HBCRs. We suggest the establishment of a worldwide network for coordination and collaboration between HBCRs. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. Study of breath-holding spell and its triggering factors in Children’s Hospital Medical Center

    OpenAIRE

    Ashrafi MR

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate breath-holding spell (BHS) and its triggering factors, 47 children with BHS admitted to the out patients clinic of Children's hospital medical center, between Sept 1998-June 1999, were included in this prospective study. Diagnosis of BHS was made for cases by medical history, pediatric physical examination, EEG, ECG and lab findings. 4 cases were excluded from study because of paroxysmal epileptic discharges at their EEGs. Of 43 cases having BHS (M:F: 1.15:1), 74.4% were less...

  8. The experience of accompanying a family member hospitalized for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudelí Mistura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Conhecer a experiência do familiar que acompanha o adulto doente de câncer durante a internação hospitalar. Métodos: estudo descritivo com abordagem qualitativa, realizado em um hospital do interior do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Participaram seis familiares, por meio de entrevista aberta. A análise ocorreu pela Análise de Conteúdo Temática. Resultados: da análise das informações emergiram categorias que abordam os arranjos para acompanhar o familiar doente, a estrutura hospitalar para a permanência do acompanhante, o relacionamento com os profissionais de saúde, os sentimentos em relação à doença e ao familiar doente e as fontes de apoio para o acompanhante e o familiar doente. Conclusão: a internação modifica a dinâmica familiar, sendo que para o acompanhante cuidar de seu familiar doente e enfrentar suas dificuldades surgidas necessita contar com o apoio e a ajuda da família, bem como dos profissionais de saúde.

  9. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, N.; Vos, J.; van Uden-Kraan, C.F.; Breitbart, W.; Cuijpers, P.; Knipscheer-Kuipers, K.; Willemsen, V.W.B.; Tollenaar, R.A.; van Asperen, C.J.; de Leeuw, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors

  10. Costs of complications after colorectal cancer surgery in the Netherlands: Building the business case for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaert, J A; Fiocco, M; van Dijk, W A; Scheffer, A C; de Graaf, E J R; Tollenaar, R A E M; Wouters, M W J M

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare providers worldwide are struggling with rising costs while hospitals budgets are under stress. Colorectal cancer surgery is commonly performed, however it is associated with a disproportionate share of adverse events in general surgery. Since adverse events are associated with extra hospital costs it seems important to explicitly discuss the costs of complications and the risk factors for high-costs after colorectal surgery. Retrospective analysis of clinical and financial outcomes after colorectal cancer surgery in 29 Dutch hospitals (6768 patients). Detailed clinical data was derived from the 2011-2012 population-based Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit database. Costs were measured uniform in all participating hospitals and based on Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing. Of total hospital costs in this study, 31% was spent on complications and the top 5% most expensive patients were accountable for 23% of hospitals budgets. Minor and severe complications were respectively associated with a 26% and 196% increase in costs as compared to patients without complications. Independent from other risk factors, ASA IV, double tumor, ASA III, short course preoperative radiotherapy and TNM-4 stadium disease were the top-5 attributors to high costs. This article shows that complications after colorectal cancer surgery are associated with a substantial increase in costs. Although not all surgical complications can be prevented, reducing complications will result in considerable cost savings. By providing a business case we show that investments made to develop targeted quality improvement programs will pay off eventually. Results based on this study should encourage healthcare providers to endorse quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Building Data-Driven Pathways From Routinely Collected Hospital Data: A Case Study on Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Clark, Jeremy; Cooper, Colin S; Mills, Robert; Rayward-Smith, Victor J; de la Iglesia, Beatriz

    2015-07-10

    Routinely collected data in hospitals is complex, typically heterogeneous, and scattered across multiple Hospital Information Systems (HIS). This big data, created as a byproduct of health care activities, has the potential to provide a better understanding of diseases, unearth hidden patterns, and improve services and cost. The extent and uses of such data rely on its quality, which is not consistently checked, nor fully understood. Nevertheless, using routine data for the construction of data-driven clinical pathways, describing processes and trends, is a key topic receiving increasing attention in the literature. Traditional algorithms do not cope well with unstructured processes or data, and do not produce clinically meaningful visualizations. Supporting systems that provide additional information, context, and quality assurance inspection are needed. The objective of the study is to explore how routine hospital data can be used to develop data-driven pathways that describe the journeys that patients take through care, and their potential uses in biomedical research; it proposes a framework for the construction, quality assessment, and visualization of patient pathways for clinical studies and decision support using a case study on prostate cancer. Data pertaining to prostate cancer patients were extracted from a large UK hospital from eight different HIS, validated, and complemented with information from the local cancer registry. Data-driven pathways were built for each of the 1904 patients and an expert knowledge base, containing rules on the prostate cancer biomarker, was used to assess the completeness and utility of the pathways for a specific clinical study. Software components were built to provide meaningful visualizations for the constructed pathways. The proposed framework and pathway formalism enable the summarization, visualization, and querying of complex patient-centric clinical information, as well as the computation of quality indicators and

  12. Health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours in women who applied to cancer early detection center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting women in Turkey. The early detection methods for breast cancer have been associated with health belief variables. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine women's health beliefs related to breast cancer screening behaviours. Methods: This study was designed as descriptive and cross-sectional survey and was performed on 344 women who applied the Nigde Cancer Early Diagnosis, Screening and Education Center between May and October 2009. The data were collected using a questionnaire which consists of socio-demographic characteristics and breast cancer risk factors and Health Belief Model Scale. Data analysis was performed using frequency and Mann-Whitney U Test. All values of p0.05. According to study results, the rate of regular BSE performance rate for women was found low. Therefore, KETEM was planned to the training programs related to breast cancer screening methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(3.000: 265-271

  13. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood cancer from a tertiary cancer center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejiv Rajendranath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improved survival after childhood cancer is attributed to intensive, aggressive therapy, adverse sequelae of which can manifest months to years after completion of treatment. There is little information about the late adverse effects of both childhood cancer and its therapy in survivors in India. Aim: To determine the long-term sequelae associated with therapy in childhood cancer survivors attending a tertiary cancer center in India. Materials and Methods: We studied 155 consecutive survivors of childhood cancer who were ≤14 years at the time of diagnosis and had completed 3 years of follow-up. The study included a complete history and clinical examination, with specific investigations to detect organ toxicity. Quality of life (QOL was assessed from responses to a standardized questionnaire. Neurocognitive assessment was carried out in 20 survivors with an adaptation of the revised Wechsler adult intelligence scale for adults and the Malins intelligence scale for children. Results: The late effects included impaired fertility in 38 patients (24.5%, impaired growth pattern in 7 (4.5%, endocrine dysfunction in 7 (4.5% and second malignancy in 2 (1.2%. Three of the 20 patients assessed had severe neurocognitive impairment. A high QOL was reported by 60% of survivors and an "average" QOL by 38%. Conclusion: Our study showed that most survivors had a good QOL and our results will help clinicians to better monitor childhood cancer survivors in countries with limited resources.

  14. Going the Extra Mile: Improved Survival for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Traveling to High-volume Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidsky, Michael E; Sun, Zhifei; Nussbaum, Daniel P; Adam, Mohamed A; Speicher, Paul J; Blazer, Dan G

    2017-08-01

    This study compares outcomes following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for patients treated at local, low-volume centers and those traveling to high-volume centers. Although outcomes for PD are superior at high-volume institutions, not all patients live in proximity to major medical centers. Theoretical advantages for undergoing surgery locally exist. The 1998 to 2012 National Cancer Data Base was queried for T1-3N0-1M0 pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients who underwent PD. Travel distances to treatment centers were calculated. Overlaying the upper and lower quartiles of travel distance with institutional volume established short travel/low-volume (ST/LV) and long travel/high-volume (LT/HV) cohorts. Overall survival was evaluated. Of 7086 patients, 773 ST/LV patients traveled ≤6.3 (median 3.2) miles to centers performing ≤3.3 PDs yearly, and 758 LT/HV patients traveled ≥45 (median 97.3) miles to centers performing ≥16 PDs yearly. LT/HV patients had higher stage disease (P travel to a high-volume center remained associated with reduced long-term mortality (hazard ratio 0.75, P travel burden, patients treated at high-volume centers had improved perioperative outcomes, short-term mortality, and overall survival. These data support ongoing efforts to centralize care for patients undergoing PD.

  15. Effciency of HIV-infected patients detection in neurological hospitals of large industrial center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmelev V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim of the study: to evaluate the effciency of detection for HIV-infection in patients of neurological departments of Saratov. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 250 medical histories of patients hospitalized into neurological departments of Saratov hospitals between January 2007 and April 2012. Results. Blood samples of 2010 patients (7,96 % were tested for the presence of HIV-antibodies. 37 patients were HIV-positive (1,84 % of examined patients and 0,15 % of the total number of patients. Conclusion. Increasing popularity and variety of clinical manifestations of HIV-infection requires the expansion of neurological patients whom serum test for antibodies against HIV is needed.

  16. Statistical Machines for Trauma Hospital Outcomes Research: Application to the PRospective, Observational, Multi-Center Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E Moore

    Full Text Available Improving the treatment of trauma, a leading cause of death worldwide, is of great clinical and public health interest. This analysis introduces flexible statistical methods for estimating center-level effects on individual outcomes in the context of highly variable patient populations, such as those of the PRospective, Observational, Multi-center Major Trauma Transfusion study. Ten US level I trauma centers enrolled a total of 1,245 trauma patients who survived at least 30 minutes after admission and received at least one unit of red blood cells. Outcomes included death, multiple organ failure, substantial bleeding, and transfusion of blood products. The centers involved were classified as either large or small-volume based on the number of massive transfusion patients enrolled during the study period. We focused on estimation of parameters inspired by causal inference, specifically estimated impacts on patient outcomes related to the volume of the trauma hospital that treated them. We defined this association as the change in mean outcomes of interest that would be observed if, contrary to fact, subjects from large-volume sites were treated at small-volume sites (the effect of treatment among the treated. We estimated this parameter using three different methods, some of which use data-adaptive machine learning tools to derive the outcome models, minimizing residual confounding by reducing model misspecification. Differences between unadjusted and adjusted estimators sometimes differed dramatically, demonstrating the need to account for differences in patient characteristics in clinic comparisons. In addition, the estimators based on robust adjustment methods showed potential impacts of hospital volume. For instance, we estimated a survival benefit for patients who were treated at large-volume sites, which was not apparent in simpler, unadjusted comparisons. By removing arbitrary modeling decisions from the estimation process and concentrating

  17. Statistical Machines for Trauma Hospital Outcomes Research: Application to the PRospective, Observational, Multi-Center Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sara E; Decker, Anna; Hubbard, Alan; Callcut, Rachael A; Fox, Erin E; Del Junco, Deborah J; Holcomb, John B; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Wade, Charles E; Schreiber, Martin A; Alarcon, Louis H; Brasel, Karen J; Bulger, Eileen M; Cotton, Bryan A; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G; Phelan, Herb A; Cohen, Mitchell J

    2015-01-01

    Improving the treatment of trauma, a leading cause of death worldwide, is of great clinical and public health interest. This analysis introduces flexible statistical methods for estimating center-level effects on individual outcomes in the context of highly variable patient populations, such as those of the PRospective, Observational, Multi-center Major Trauma Transfusion study. Ten US level I trauma centers enrolled a total of 1,245 trauma patients who survived at least 30 minutes after admission and received at least one unit of red blood cells. Outcomes included death, multiple organ failure, substantial bleeding, and transfusion of blood products. The centers involved were classified as either large or small-volume based on the number of massive transfusion patients enrolled during the study period. We focused on estimation of parameters inspired by causal inference, specifically estimated impacts on patient outcomes related to the volume of the trauma hospital that treated them. We defined this association as the change in mean outcomes of interest that would be observed if, contrary to fact, subjects from large-volume sites were treated at small-volume sites (the effect of treatment among the treated). We estimated this parameter using three different methods, some of which use data-adaptive machine learning tools to derive the outcome models, minimizing residual confounding by reducing model misspecification. Differences between unadjusted and adjusted estimators sometimes differed dramatically, demonstrating the need to account for differences in patient characteristics in clinic comparisons. In addition, the estimators based on robust adjustment methods showed potential impacts of hospital volume. For instance, we estimated a survival benefit for patients who were treated at large-volume sites, which was not apparent in simpler, unadjusted comparisons. By removing arbitrary modeling decisions from the estimation process and concentrating on parameters that

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Individuals Presenting for Care at a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Patricia L; Abdallah, Reem; Xiong, Yin; Ebbert, Judith; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2017-03-01

    To define the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in individuals presenting for care at a comprehensive cancer center. A total of 17 639 individuals presenting to an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center (and consortium sites) completed a questionnaire regarding CAM use. Data were analyzed using the univariate χ2 test to assess CAM use associated with a number of variables, including cancer status, age, gender, marital status, ethnicity, race, employment, and education level. Eighty-seven percent of individuals who completed the CAM survey acknowledged CAM therapy use within the previous 12 months. Of the 5 broad categories of CAM, the most commonly used were biologically based approaches (14 759/17 639 [83.67%]), mind-body interventions (4624/17 485 [26.45%]), manipulative and body-based therapies (3957/17 537 [22.56%]), alternative medical systems (429/15 952 [2.69%]), and energy therapies (270/15 872 [1.7%]). CAM use was more prevalent among women, non-Hispanics, Caucasians, patients 60 to 69 years of age, and those who are married, have a higher level of education, and are employed ( P cancer center. Our analysis revealed that a very high percentage of patients utilize CAM. Because many of these CAM interventions are not studied in oncology patients, additional research on safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of action are essential. Furthermore, it is important that oncologists understand CAM modalities and counsel their patients about their use.

  19. Improvement of European Translational Cancer Research - Collaboration between comprehensive cancer centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringborg, Ulrik; de Valeriola, Dominique; van Harten, Willem H.; Llombart Bosch, Antonio; Lombardo, Claudio; Nilsson, Kenneth; Philip, Thierry; Pierotti, Marco A.; Riegman, Peter; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Storme, Guy; Tursz, Thomas; Verellen, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Even though the increasing incidence of cancer is mainly a consequence of a population with a longer life span, part of this augmentation is related to the increasing prevalence of patients living with a chronic cancer disease. To fight the problem, improved preventive strategies are mandatory in

  20. A Multi-Center Assessment of Nutrient Levels and Foods Provided by Hospital Patient Menus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Susan; Fraser, Jackie; Wilkinson, Lori; Steckham, Katherine; Oliphant, Heather; Fletcher, Heather; Tzianetas, Roula; Arcand, JoAnne

    2015-11-11

    Diets of high nutritional quality can aid in the prevention and management of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study evaluated the nutritional quality of hospital patient menus. At three large acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, 84 standard menus were evaluated, which included regular and carbohydrate-controlled diets and 3000 mg and 2000 mg sodium diets. Mean levels of calories, macronutrients and vitamins and minerals provided were calculated. Comparisons were made with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) and Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations. Calorie levels ranged from 1281 to 3007 kcal, with 45% of menus below 1600 kcal. Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9-1.1 g/kg/day). Energy and protein levels were highest in carbohydrate-controlled menus. All regular and carbohydrate-controlled menus provided macronutrients within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The proportion of regular diet menus meeting the DRIs: 0% for fiber; 7% for calcium; 57% for vitamin C; and 100% for iron. Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives. These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

  1. A Multi-Center Assessment of Nutrient Levels and Foods Provided by Hospital Patient Menus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Trang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diets of high nutritional quality can aid in the prevention and management of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study evaluated the nutritional quality of hospital patient menus. At three large acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, 84 standard menus were evaluated, which included regular and carbohydrate-controlled diets and 3000 mg and 2000 mg sodium diets. Mean levels of calories, macronutrients and vitamins and minerals provided were calculated. Comparisons were made with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI and Canada’s Food Guide (CFG recommendations. Calorie levels ranged from 1281 to 3007 kcal, with 45% of menus below 1600 kcal. Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9–1.1 g/kg/day. Energy and protein levels were highest in carbohydrate-controlled menus. All regular and carbohydrate-controlled menus provided macronutrients within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The proportion of regular diet menus meeting the DRIs: 0% for fiber; 7% for calcium; 57% for vitamin C; and 100% for iron. Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives. These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

  2. Accelerating the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Edward; Foti, Margaret; Kean, Marcia A

    2015-05-15

    Significant progress has been made in the past 50 years across the field of oncology, and, as a result, the number of cancer survivors in the United States is more than 14.5 million. In fact, the number of cancer survivors continues to grow on an annual basis, which is due in part to improved treatments that help people with cancer live longer, and improvements in early detection that allow doctors to find cancer earlier when the disease is easier to treat. However, in spite of this progress, innovation in cancer research and care is at risk as the rise in health care spending is leading to significant pressure to contain costs. As the oncology community seeks to ensure that innovation in cancer research and care continues, it is imperative that stakeholders focus their attention on the value that the research and care continuum provides. Over the past several years, the Turning the Tide Against Cancer initiative has worked with the cancer community to accelerate the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer research and care, while addressing value and cost. This article highlights policy recommendations that resulted from the convening of an expert working group comprising leaders from across the oncology field. Of the recommendations, the co-conveners have identified several issue areas that merit particular focus in 2015: Support FDA's efforts to modernize its framework for bringing new medicines to patients, through facilitating and implementing innovative approaches to drug development and regulatory review. Ensure that cancer clinical pathways or similar decision-support tools are transparent; developed through a physician-driven process that includes patient input; and meet minimum standards for clinical appropriateness, timeliness, and patient centeredness. Support oncology decision-support tools that are timely, clinically appropriate, and patient centered. Build on existing efforts to convene a multistakeholder committee and develop a report on

  3. Hospital doctors' smoking behavior and attitude towards smoking cessation interventions for patients: a survey in an Italian Comprehensive Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina, Micaela; Mazza, Roberto; Borreani, Claudia; Brunelli, Cinzia; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Munarini, Elena; De Marco, Cinzia; Pozzi, Paolo; Boffi, Roberto

    2016-06-02

    Tobacco control guidelines recommend all healthcare professionals to ask patients about their smoking status and to offer them at least minimal cessation advice. However, few data are available about the daily practice of hospital clinicians who work with smoking cancer patients. This study assesses, in a comprehensive cancer center, the physicians' smoking habit, their clinical practice in offering a smoking cessation intervention to patients who smoke, and the training they received in this field. A Web-based survey was sent to 285 physicians. The survey response rate was 75%. Sixty-two percent, 24%, and 14% of responders were never, former, and current smokers, respectively. Six percent of all responding physicians have already participated in smoking cessation training and 43% of them declared their willingness to be trained. Eighty-six percent of all responding physicians asked about the patients' smoking status, 50% routinely advised patients to quit smoking, and 32% assessed their motivation to do so. Smoking cessation guidelines were not followed mostly for lack of time, fear to increase patients' stress, and lack of smoking cessation training. Ninety-four percent of responding physicians knew the smoking cessation service for outpatients and 65% referred at least one patient, 66% of responding physicians knew the service for inpatients, and 36% of them asked for at least one intervention in the ward. This study pointed out partial adherence of the physicians working in a leading cancer center to the smoking cessation guidelines. The clinicians' smoking habits did not influence the training and the clinical practice in offering patients smoking cessation interventions.

  4. Trends in antibacterial use in hospitalized pediatric patients in United States academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakyz, Amy L; Gurgle, Holly E; Ibrahim, Omar M; Oinonen, Michael J; Polk, Ronald E

    2009-06-01

    Trends in pediatric antibacterial use were examined in 20 academic health centers during the period 2002-2007. There was a significant increase in the use of linezolid (P macrolides (P = .001) and a significant decrease in the use of aminoglycosides (P < .001) and of first-generation cephalosporins (P < .001).

  5. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Background. Translational research is a complex cumulative process that takes time. However, the operating environment for cancer centers engaged in translational research is now financially insecure. Centers are challenged to improve results and reduce time from discovery to practice innovations. Performance assessment can identify improvement areas that will help reduce translational delays. Currently, no standard method exists to identify models for use in performance assessment. This study aimed to critically appraise translational research models for suitability in performance assessment of cancer centers. Methods. We conducted a systematic review to identify models and developed a set of criteria based on scientometrics, complex adaptive systems, research and development processes, and strategic evaluation. Models were assessed for linkage between research and care components, new knowledge, systems integration, performance assessment, and review of other models. Results. Twelve models were identified; six described phases/components for translational research in different blocks (T models) and six described the process of translational research (process models). Both models view translational research as an accumulation of new knowledge. However, process models more clearly address systems integration, link research and care components, and were developed for evaluating and improving the performance of translational research. T models are more likely to review other models. Conclusion. Process models seem to be more suitable for performance assessment of cancer centers than T models. The most suitable process models (the Process Marker Model and Lean and Six Sigma applications) must be thoroughly tested in practice. PMID:23263926

  6. Variation in neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization for epithelial ovarian cancer at high volume hospitals in the United States and associated survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Emma L; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Stitzenberg, Karyn B; Rossi, Emma C; Gehrig, Paola A; Boggess, John F; Garrett, Joanne M

    2017-06-01

    To estimate variation in the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy by high volume hospitals and to determine the association between hospital utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival. We identified incident cases of stage IIIC or IV epithelial ovarian cancer in the National Cancer Database from 2006 to 2012. Inclusion criteria were treatment at a high volume hospital (>20 cases/year) and treatment with both chemotherapy and surgery. A logistic regression model was used to predict receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on case-mix predictors (age, comorbidities, stage etc). Hospitals were categorized by the observed-to-expected ratio for neoadjuvant chemotherapy use as low, average, or high utilization hospitals. Survival analysis was performed. We identified 11,574 patients treated at 55 high volume hospitals. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was used for 21.6% (n=2494) of patients and use varied widely by hospital, from 5%-55%. High utilization hospitals (n=1910, 10 hospitals) had a median neoadjuvant chemotherapy rate of 39% (range 23-55%), while low utilization hospitals (n=2671, 14 hospitals) had a median rate of 10% (range 5-17%). For all ovarian cancer patients adjusting for clinical and socio-demographic factors, treatment at a hospital with average or high neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization was associated with a decreased rate of death compared to treatment at a low utilization hospital (HR 0.90 95% CI 0.83-0.97 and HR 0.85 95% CI 0.75-0.95). Wide variation exists in the utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to treat stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer even among high volume hospitals. Patients treated at hospitals with low rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization experience decreased survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia among patients of a comprehensive cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixin Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most clinical studies of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia have not included cancer patients who have high risk of thromboembolism, frequent exposure to heparin, and many potential causes of thrombocytopenia other than heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. To estimate the incidence and prevalence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in cancer patients, we identified cases based on diagnostic codes, anti-heparin antibody testing, and clinical characteristics (4T score at a comprehensive cancer center between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. We estimated that the prevalence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia to be 0.02% among all cancer patients and 0.24% among cancer patients exposed to heparin. The annual incidence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia was 0.57 cases per 1000 cancer patients exposed to heparin. Of the 40 cancer patients with the International Classification of Diseases (Ninth Revision; ICD-9 code for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, positive anti-heparin antibody, and 4T score ≥4, 5 (12.5% died of related thromboembolic or hemorrhagic complications. In a multivariate logistic regression model, male gender was a significant (p = 0.035 factor, and non-hematological malignancy was a significant (p = 0.017 factor associated with anti-heparin antibody positivity. Future studies may further examine the risk factors associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in larger cohorts.

  8. Unmet supportive needs of cancer patients in an acute care hospital in Japan--a census study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Park, Sunre; Kimura, Rieko; Suyama, Ikuko; Koyama, Yurie; Takeuchi, Mari; Yoshikawa, Hiroka; Hashiguchi, Saori; Shirahase, Joichiro; Kato, Motoichiro; Takeda, Junzo; Kashima, Haruo

    2010-11-01

    Little research has been done on supportive needs of cancer patients in acute hospitals in Japan. This study aims to comprehensively assess the unmet supportive needs of hospitalized cancer patients, as well as literacy and utilization of appropriate professional care. All cancer patients (aged 20 to 80 years) who were hospitalized in a university hospital in Tokyo during the designated 3-day period between September 1 and October 31, 2007 were recruited for participation in the study. The M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, Brief Cancer-Related Worry Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. Patients' knowledge and use of relevant services were evaluated. The results were compared with those of non-cancer patients in the same treatment settings. A total of 125 cancer patients and 59 non-cancer patients were enrolled. Cancer patients and non-cancer patients equally suffered from physical symptoms (15-26% had severe appetite loss, 18-19% had severe dry mouth, and 16-22% had severe pain); however, psychological distress of cancer patients exceeded that of non-cancer patients (28.0% vs 8.5%; p ≤ 0.05). Severe psychological distress was associated with severe worry about future prospects or interpersonal and social issues and presence of two or more severe symptoms. Two thirds of the patients with severe psychological distress knew about the psychiatric division, but only one third actually sought treatment. Needs related to psychological issues were more prevalent among cancer patients than among non-cancer patients, despite a similar level of physical distress. Special attention should be paid to cancer patients who worry over future prospects or interpersonal and social issues, and those who have two or more severe symptoms.

  9. Hospital discharge diagnostic and procedure codes for upper gastro-intestinal cancer: how accurate are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou Efty

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-level health administrative datasets such as hospital discharge data are used increasingly to evaluate health services and outcomes of care. However information about the accuracy of Australian discharge data in identifying cancer, associated procedures and comorbidity is limited. The Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC is a census of inpatient hospital discharges in the state of New South Wales (NSW. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of the APDC in identifying upper gastro-intestinal (upper GI cancer cases, procedures for associated curative resection and comorbidities at the time of admission compared to data abstracted from medical records (the ‘gold standard’. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 240 patients with an incident upper GI cancer diagnosis derived from a clinical database in one NSW area health service from July 2006 to June 2007. Extracted case record data was matched to APDC discharge data to determine sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV and agreement between the two data sources (κ-coefficient. Results The accuracy of the APDC diagnostic codes in identifying site-specific incident cancer ranged from 80-95% sensitivity. This was comparable to the accuracy of APDC procedure codes in identifying curative resection for upper GI cancer. PPV ranged from 42-80% for cancer diagnosis and 56-93% for curative surgery. Agreement between the data sources was >0.72 for most cancer diagnoses and curative resections. However, APDC discharge data was less accurate in reporting common comorbidities - for each condition, sensitivity ranged from 9-70%, whilst agreement ranged from κ = 0.64 for diabetes down to κ  Conclusions Identifying incident cases of upper GI cancer and curative resection from hospital administrative data is satisfactory but under-ascertained. Linkage of multiple population-health datasets is advisable to maximise case ascertainment and minimise false

  10. [Epidemiologic descriptive study of the clinical characteristics of acute bronchiolitis in patients hospitalized at the pediatric unit of the Manatí Medical Center Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón Blanco, Zidnia M; Colón Rivera, Christian S; Matos González, Migdalis; Pérez Valentín, Brenda L; Rivera Fernández, Renato; Santiago Méndez, Isamir; Cintron, Vielka

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the main reason for pediatric visits both to physician's offices and emergency departments. Bronchiolitis is an acute viral respiratory disease that affects about 10% of infants each year and mostly those under age two. The aim of this study was to identify demographic, epidemiological characteristics and risk factors associated with cases of bronchiolitis admitted to the Manati Medical Center (MMC). In addition, we tried to establish the basis for the development of strategies to prevent of hospitalizations and complications in our Institution. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted in the pediatric wing of MMC in Manati, Puerto Rico between January and December 2009. A total of 508 children were included, 58 % of them male. The average age and weight were 12 +/- 5.3 months and 8.1 +/- 1.4 kg, respectively. We observed a higher predisposition among males as well as a statistically significant relationship between breastfeeding and protection from the disease. No relationship was observed between preterm birth and the parents' smoking habit and the development of the disease. However, the latter factor influences the length of hospital stay. The risk of bronchiolitis was seasonal with a peak between October and November. The presence of respiratory syncitial virus was confirmed in 67 % of the cases.

  11. Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment modality. Design: It is a retrospective study of all confirmed. Burkitt's lymphoma of the head and neck region seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Ile. Ife (OAUTHC) between 1986 and 2002. Patients and methods: The medical records of all the patients with the histopathologically confirmed ...

  12. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Bisht

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. The data obtained from the patients included symptoms reported by the patients, currently prescribed treatments and the site of cancer. Results: The average number of symptoms reported per patient was 5.33 ± 0.67 (mean ± SE. The most common symptoms were pain, weakness/fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, nausea/vomiting, dyspnea, constipation and cough. Polypharmacy was frequent. Patients consumed approximately 8.7 ± 0.38 (mean ± SE drugs on average during the 2-month period of follow-up. Conclusion: The result gives insight into the varied symptomatology of patients with advanced cancer. Polypharmacy was quite common in patients with advanced cancer, predisposing them to complicated drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

  13. Histopathological audit of splenectomies received at a cancer hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Gujral

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are few studies in the literature studying the yield of the diagnostic splenectomy in a suspicious lymphoma case. Moreover, their relevance is limited owing to low number of cases, the use of selection criteria, and the lack of modern ancillary studies. We present a histopathological review of splenectomy specimens referred as a case of lymphoma to our center. Materials and Methods: The medical charts and laboratory data on all patients of all splenectomy specimens between the years 2003 and 2008 were reviewed. Morphological and immunohistochemical features were analyzed and the lymphomas were sub-typed in accordance to 2008 WHO Classification of Hematolymphoid Neoplasms. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping available in few cases was correlated. Results: A total of 46 cases studied incl