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Sample records for cancer cells treated

  1. Co-treatment of Salinomycin Sensitizes AZD5363-treated Cancer Cells Through Increased Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ae-Ran; Jung, Myung-Ji; Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoon, Sungpil

    2015-09-01

    AZD5363, an inhibitor of protein kinase B (AKT), is currently in clinical trials assessing the potential of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The purpose of the present study was to identify conditions that increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to AZD5363. Microscopic examination revealed that treatment of cancer cells with a low concentration of salinomycin reduced cellular growth of AZD5363-treated breast cancer cells. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, Hoechst staining, and annexin V staining revealed that co-treatment with salinomycin sensitizes AZD5363-treated cancer cells via increased apoptosis with S-phase arrest. These results suggest that salinomycin can be applied to increase treatment efficacy for AZD5363-treated cancer cells. Our findings may contribute to improving the efficacy of the development of AZD5363-based sensitization therapies for patients with cancer.

  2. The Principles of Engineering Immune Cells to Treat Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wendell A; June, Carl H

    2017-02-09

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have proven that engineered immune cells can serve as a powerful new class of cancer therapeutics. Clinical experience has helped to define the major challenges that must be met to make engineered T cells a reliable, safe, and effective platform that can be deployed against a broad range of tumors. The emergence of synthetic biology approaches for cellular engineering is providing us with a broadly expanded set of tools for programming immune cells. We discuss how these tools could be used to design the next generation of smart T cell precision therapeutics.

  3. Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents To Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    in culture at the drug concentrations used ( Fig. 1C ; Supplementary Fig. S1B; and data not shown) or in the lung epithelium of mice treated daily...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer with high mortality. We...SCLC, small cell lung cancer, tri-cyclic anti-depressants, tricycl 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  4. Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-05

    Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  5. T-Cell Immunotherapies for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Cancer 74, 301-9. (1997). Bigelow RL, Cardelli JA. The green tea catechins, (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (-)- Epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG...all other malignancies, except lung cancer. The 5-year survival rate hovers around 75-90 % for women diagnosed in the early stages with a dismal 15

  6. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  7. Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: treating cancer like an infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Rebecca; Ozsvari, Bela; Lisanti, Camilla L; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-03-10

    Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of "stemness", independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point - a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known "side-effect", which could be harnessed instead as a "therapeutic effect". Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally, recent

  8. Study on the Variation of Calcium and Phosphorus in Nano Hydroxyapatie Treated Cancer Cells through Synchrotron Radiation XRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The HAP nanoparticles were synthesized with a chemical co-precipitation method. It was monodispersed in needle shape. Its average diameter was 30 nm and length was 70 am. Human liver cancer cells and normal hepatic cells were treated by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. SR-XRF analysis was used to detect the content variation of calcium and phosphor elements in cancer cells when the cells were treated by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. It was introduced to reveal the anti-cancer mechanism of HAP nanoparticles. Experiments verified that the contents of calcium and phosphor elements in hepatocellular carcinoma had been obviously increased after the cells were treated by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. And the contents increased with hydroxyapatite concentration and treatment time increasing. The Ca/P molar ratio in treated cell was different from both that in hydroxyapatite and that in untreated cancer cell. Apatite nanoparticles evidently altered the calcium and phosphor environments in treated hepatocellular carcinoma cells. That finally halted the proliferation of carcinoma cells.

  9. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M;

    2010-01-01

    the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor......Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...

  10. Two Cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Intravenous Cultivated Wild Ginseng Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hwi Bang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous cultivated wild ginseng(Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer pharmacopuncture(CWGP in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC. Design : Prospective case series. Setting : This study was conducted at the East-West Cancer Center of Dunsan Oriental Hospital, Daejeon University. Patients : Two non-small cell lung cancer patients. Intervention : Two non-small cell lung cancer patients were injected CWGP(20mL/day mixed with 0.9% normal saline(100mL intravenously. Each patient received a total of 16 and 9 cycles, respectively. One cycle is composed of 14 days. Outcome Measures : The effect of intravenous CWGP was measured by scanning with computed tomography(CT after every 2 cycle and Positron emission tomography- computed tomography(PET/CT after every 6 cycles. Response and progression was evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors(RECIST Committee classification of complete response(CR, partial response(PR, progressive disease(PD and stable disease(SD. Results : They were treated with intravenous CWGP for 8 and 5 months respectively. time later, each tumor remains stable disease(SD Conclusion : These cases may give us a possibility that intravenous CWGP offers potential benefits for non-small cell lung cancer patients.

  11. Effects of Combined Chinese Drugs and Chemotherapy in Treating Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈衍智; 李占东; 高非; 张莹; 孙红; 李萍萍

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of combined Chinese drugs and chemotherapy in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods:Sixty-three patients with stageⅢB andⅣNSCLC hospitalized from October 2001 to October 2008 were enrolled and assigned to two groups using a randomizing digital table,with 33 patients in the treatment group and 30 in the control group. They were all treated with the Navelbine and Cisplatin(NP) chemotherapy,but to the treatment group the Chinese drugs...

  12. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  13. Gefitinib versus docetaxel in previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (INTEREST): a randomised phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, E.S.; Hirsh, V.; Mok, T.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two phase II trials in patients with previously-treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer suggested that gefitinib was efficacious and less toxic than was chemotherapy. We compared gefitinib with docetaxel in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer wh...

  14. Transcriptional network in ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 treated with Pinellia pedatisecta Schott extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Xu, Teng; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Mei; Zhu, Wen; Wang, Ziqiang; Gu, Hangzhi; Wang, Hanchu; Li, Peizhen; Ying, Jun; Yang, Lei; Ren, Ping; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Zuyuan; Ni, Liyan; Bao, Qiyu; Chen, Jindong

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal disease among the malignant tumors of female reproductive organs. Few successful therapeutic options exist for patients with ovarian cancer. The common therapeutic methods are surgical operation, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and combination of these treatments. In recent years, studies have indicated that Pinellia pedatisecta Schott (PPS), a traditional Chinese medicine, could inhibit tumor growth. In this study, we demonstrated that PPS extract could induce apoptosis in SKOV3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further conducted transcriptome sequencing on PPS extract-treated SKOV3 cells along with controls, and identified 1,754 transcripts whose expression differs at least 3-fold over the controls. These differentially expressed transcripts include the apoptosis-related genes such as the caspase family members, and were significantly enriched in steroid biosynthesis in the KEGG pathway database compared with the transcriptome background. Most of the differentially expressed transcripts from this pathway were upregulated in PPS extract-treated cell line, indicating that PPS extract-induced apoptosis was accompanied by increased steroid biosynthesis (e.g. zymosterol). These results suggest that PPS extract could be a new cytostatic therapeutic agent for ovarian cancer.

  15. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sungpil, E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr [Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  16. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53 tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey.

  17. Mechanism of eliciting host immunity against cancer cells treated with silica-phthalocyanine-based near infrared photoimmunotherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a new type of molecularly-targeted cancer photo-therapy based on conjugating a near infrared silica-phthalocyanine dye, IR700, to a monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting cancer-specific cell-surface molecules. When exposed to NIR light, the conjugate induces a highly-selective necrotic/ immunogenic cell death (ICD) only in receptor-positive, MAb-IR700-bound cancer cells. This cell death occurs as early as 1 minute after exposure to NIR light. Meanwhile, immediately adjacent receptor-negative cells including immune cells are unharmed. Therefore, we hypothesized that NIR-PIT could efficiently elicit host immunity against treated cancer cells. Three-dimensional dynamic quantitative phase contrast microscopy and selective plane illumination microscopy of tumor cells undergoing PIT showed rapid swelling in treated cells immediately after light exposure suggesting rapid water influx into cells, followed by irreversible morphologic changes such as bleb formation, and rupture of vesicles. Furthermore, biological markers of ICD including relocation of HSP70/90 and calreticulin, and release of ATP and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), were clearly detected immediately after NIR-PIT. When NIR-PIT was performed in a mixture of cancer cells and immature dendritic cells, maturation of immature dendritic cells was strongly induced rapidly after NIR-PIT. In summary, NIR-PIT can induce necrotic/ immunogenic cell death that promotes rapid maturation of immature dendritic cells adjacent to dying cancer cells. Therefore, NIR-PIT could efficiently initiate host immune response against NIR-PIT treated cancer cells growing in patients.

  18. Primary non-small cell lung cancer in a transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskan, F. [Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg (Saar) (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ganswindt, U.; Belka, C.; Manapov, F. [Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-04-15

    The first case of primary lung cancer in a transplanted lung was described in 2001. Since then, only 5 cases of lung cancer in donated lung have been reported. We present one more patient with non-small cell cancer in the transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. In most cases of primary lung cancer in transplanted lung, rapid progression of the cancer was reported. Occurrence of the locoregional failure in our case could be explained by factors related to the treatment protocol and also to underlying immunosuppression.

  19. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  1. Prognostic cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, Maartje G; Eijsink, Jasper J H; Roossink, Frank; de Graeff, Pauline; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G Bea A; de Bock, Geertruida H; van der Zee, Ate G J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell b

  2. Treating triple negative breast cancer cells with erlotinib plus a select antioxidant overcomes drug resistance by targeting cancer cell heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Mitrea, Cristina; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Marchetti, Luca; Girsch, Emily; Farr, Rebecca L.; Boerner, Julie L; Mohammad, Ramzi; Dyson, Greg; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia

    2017-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients, those diagnosed with the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype have the worst prog-nosis. TNBC does not express estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, or the HER2 oncogene; therefore, TNBC lacks targets for molecularly-guided therapies. The concept that EGFR oncogene inhibitor drugs could be used as targeted treatment against TNBC has been put forth based on estimates that 30–60% of TNBC express high levels of EGFR. However, results from clinical trials testing EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, did not improve patient outcomes. Results herein offer an explanation as to why EGFR inhibitors failed TNBC patients and support how combining a select antioxidant and an EGFR-specific small molecule kinase inhibitor (SMKI) could be an effective, novel therapeutic strategy. Treatment with CAT-SKL—a re-engineered protein form of the antioxidant enzyme catalase—inhibited cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and treatment with the EGFR-specific SMKI erlotinib inhibited non-CSCs. Thus, combining the antioxidant CAT-SKL with erlotinib targeted both CSCs and bulk cancer cells in cultures of EGFR-expressing TNBC-derived cells. We also report evidence that the mechanism for CAT-SKL inhibition of CSCs may depend on antioxidant-induced downregulation of a short alternative mRNA splicing variant of the methyl-CpG binding domain 2 gene, isoform MBD2c. PMID:28281569

  3. Treating triple negative breast cancer cells with erlotinib plus a select antioxidant overcomes drug resistance by targeting cancer cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Mitrea, Cristina; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Marchetti, Luca; Girsch, Emily; Farr, Rebecca L; Boerner, Julie L; Mohammad, Ramzi; Dyson, Greg; Terlecky, Stanley R; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia

    2017-03-10

    Among breast cancer patients, those diagnosed with the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype have the worst prog-nosis. TNBC does not express estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, or the HER2 oncogene; therefore, TNBC lacks targets for molecularly-guided therapies. The concept that EGFR oncogene inhibitor drugs could be used as targeted treatment against TNBC has been put forth based on estimates that 30-60% of TNBC express high levels of EGFR. However, results from clinical trials testing EGFR inhibitors, alone or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, did not improve patient outcomes. Results herein offer an explanation as to why EGFR inhibitors failed TNBC patients and support how combining a select antioxidant and an EGFR-specific small molecule kinase inhibitor (SMKI) could be an effective, novel therapeutic strategy. Treatment with CAT-SKL-a re-engineered protein form of the antioxidant enzyme catalase-inhibited cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and treatment with the EGFR-specific SMKI erlotinib inhibited non-CSCs. Thus, combining the antioxidant CAT-SKL with erlotinib targeted both CSCs and bulk cancer cells in cultures of EGFR-expressing TNBC-derived cells. We also report evidence that the mechanism for CAT-SKL inhibition of CSCs may depend on antioxidant-induced downregulation of a short alternative mRNA splicing variant of the methyl-CpG binding domain 2 gene, isoform MBD2c.

  4. Cadmium modifies the cell cycle and apoptotic profiles of human breast cancer cells treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asara, Yolande; Marchal, Juan A; Carrasco, Esther; Boulaiz, Houria; Solinas, Giuliana; Bandiera, Pasquale; Garcia, Maria A; Farace, Cristiano; Montella, Andrea; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-08-12

    Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd), which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd.

  5. Cadmium Modifies the Cell Cycle and Apoptotic Profiles of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with 5-Fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Madeddu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd, which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd.

  6. Pulmonary Function in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer Treated With Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: For patients with germ cell cancer, various pulmonary toxicity risk factors have been hypothesized for treatment with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). Because existing studies have shortcomings, we present a large, unselected cohort of patients who have undergone close monitoring...... of lung function before, during, and after treatment with BEP to disclose valid pulmonary toxicity risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients who were treated with BEP at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1984 to 2007, were included. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) that measured...... the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO), forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and forced vital capacity were performed systematically before, during, and after treatment with BEP for 5 years of follow-up. According to local protocol, bleomycin was discontinued if hemoglobin...

  7. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  8. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Segkos; Carl Schmidt; Fadi Nabhan

    2017-01-01

    Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC) is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated ...

  9. Survival Analysis of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated by Using Wheel Balance Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongmin; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2016-12-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect and the overall survival (OS) rate of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have undergone Wheel Balance Cancer Therapy (WBCT). Methods The cases of 33 patients with advanced NSCLC who were treated with WBCT at the East West Cancer Center (EWCC) between October 4, 2004, and October 3, 2013, without undergoing concurrent conventional treatment were analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the OS of the cases, and the median OS was calculated according to age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), conventional-treatment history, WBCT treatment duration, and histological tumor type. Results The median OS of all patients was 31.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.5-58.7) months; the OS rates were 63.6% and 24.2% at years 1 and 2, respectively. The median OS rates of patients under and over 65 years were 45.2 (95% CI = 13.5-76.9) and 19.5 (95% CI = 7.1-31.8) months, respectively (P = .189). The median OS rates of patients who received WBCT for >14 days but treatment and those who had not were 45.2 (95% CI = 9.1-81.3) and 3.9 (95% CI = unable to calculate) months, respectively (P = .000). The median OS rates of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and non-SCC lung cancer were 5.6 (95% CI = unable to calculate) and 45.2 (95% CI = 9.1-81.3) months, respectively (P = .262). The median OS rate of patients with ECOG PS ≥3 was 14.3 (95% CI = 8.8-19.8) months; that of patients ECOG PS treatment and have an ECOG PS <3.

  10. Adaptive responses to dasatinib-treated lung squamous cell cancer cells harboring DDR2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Kim, Jae-Young; Watters, January M; Fang, Bin; Kinose, Fumi; Song, Lanxi; Koomen, John M; Teer, Jamie K; Fisher, Kate; Chen, Yian Ann; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B

    2014-12-15

    DDR2 mutations occur in approximately 4% of lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) where the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a new therapeutic option. We found that ERK and AKT phosphorylation was weakly inhibited by dasatinib in DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells, suggesting that dasatinib inhibits survival signals distinct from other oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and/or compensatory signals exist that dampen dasatinib activity. To gain better insight into dasatinib's action in these cells, we assessed altered global tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) after dasatinib exposure using a mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach. Overlaying protein-protein interaction relationships upon this dasatinib-regulated pY network revealed decreased phosphorylation of Src family kinases and their targets. Conversely, dasatinib enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation in a panel of RTK and their signaling adaptor complexes, including EGFR, MET/GAB1, and IGF1R/IRS2, implicating a RTK-driven adaptive response associated with dasatinib. To address the significance of this observation, these results were further integrated with results from a small-molecule chemical library screen. We found that dasatinib combined with MET and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) inhibitors had a synergistic effect, and ligand stimulation of EGFR and MET rescued DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells from dasatinib-induced loss of cell viability. Importantly, we observed high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR and MET in a panel of human lung SCC tissues harboring DDR2 mutations. Our results highlight potential RTK-driven adaptive-resistant mechanisms upon DDR2 targeting, and they suggest new, rationale cotargeting strategies for DDR2-mutant lung SCC.

  11. Proteomics profile changes in cisplatin-treated human ovarian cancer cell strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengyu; ZHAO Xia; YANG Jinliang; WEI Yuquan

    2005-01-01

    To compare the alterations in proteomes between cisplatin-treated and -untreated human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells, and to explore the feasibility of proteomics in research about antitumor mechanisms of agents, SKOV3 cells were exposed to cisplatin (6 μg/mL) for 6 h. Then, the cells were collected and solubilized and global proteins were extracted by lysis buffer; two-dimensional electrophoresis was conducted with the IPG readystrips as carriers; the gels were stained with Coomassie blue and alterations between gels were compared by PDQuest. Eventually, 11 spots with significant differences were selected and excised and the proteins were identified by PMF and MS/MS analysis. The results revealed that exposure to cisplatin could notably increase expressions of some proteins, such as tropomyosin family, actin family, triosephosphate isomerase family, and HSP60, etc.; while expressions of some other proteins decreased, such as enolase family, etc. Those proteins were involved in cellular energy metabolism, transformation, apoptosis and morphologic maintenance, which suggested that alterations of those physiological processes might be involved in anti-tumor mechanism of cisplatin.

  12. Evaluation of Three Small Molecular Drugs for Targeted Therapy to Treat Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ni; Li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To guide the optimal selection among first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in clinical practice.This review attempted to provide a thorough comparison among three first-generation EGFR-TKIs, namely icotinib,erlotinib, and gefitinib, with regard to their molecular structure, pharmacokinetic parameters, clinical data, adverse reactions, and contraindications.Data Sources: An electronic literature search of the PubMed database and Google Scholar for all the available articles regarding gefitinib,icotinib, and erlotinib in the English language from January 2005 to December 2014 was used.Study Selection: The search terms or keywords included but not limited to "lung cancer", "nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC)","epidemiology", "EGFR", "TKIs", and "optimal selection".Results: As suggested by this review, even though the three first-generation EGFR-TKIs share the quinazoline structure, erlotinib had the strongest apoptosis induction activity because of its use of a different side-chain.The pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that both erlotinib and icotinib are affected by food.The therapeutic window of erlotinib is narrow, and the recommended dosage is close to the maximum tolerable dosage.Icotinib enjoys a wider therapeutic window, and its concentration in the blood is within a safe dosage range even if it is administered with food.Based on multiple large-scale clinical trials, erlotinib is universally applied as the first-line treatment.In marked contrast, icotinib is available only in China as the second-or third-line therapeutic approach for treating advanced lung cancer.In addition, it exhibits a similar efficacy but better safety profile than gefitinib.Conclusions: Although there is a paucity of literature regarding whether icotinib is superior to erlotinib, its superior toxicity profile, noninferior efficacy, and lower cost indicate that it is a better alternative for Chinese patients living with

  13. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby;

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  15. TRAIL-secreting mesenchymal stem cells promote apoptosis in heat-shock-treated liver cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Q; Zhang, Z; Feng, X; Li, T; Liu, N; Lai, J; Shuai, L; Xiong, Q; Fu, C; Zou, H; Wang, Y; Li, X; Ma, K; Bie, P

    2014-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the top six leading causes of cancer-related death. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an important means of treating liver cancer. Residual cancer after RFA is the most frequent cause of recurrence in cases of liver cancer. The main difference between residual cancer cells and ordinary liver cancer cells is that residual cancer cells experience heat shock. The secretable form of trimeric human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (stTRAIL) induces apoptosis in a variety of human cancers but not in normal tissues. It has shown potent cancer-selective killing activity and has drawn considerable attention as a possible cancer therapy. In the present work, the therapeutic potential of this stTRAIL-based gene therapy was evaluated in hepatocellular carcinoma subjected to RFA. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) were isolated and transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding stTRAIL (stTRAIL-MSCs, T-MSCs). Cells treated with heat treatment at 43 °C for 45 min served as simulated residual cancer cells. After treatment with T-MSCs, apoptosis in heat-shock-treated liver cancer cells increased significantly, and caspase-3 was upregulated. When T-MSCs were subcutaneously injected into nude mice, they localized to the tumors and inhibited tumor growth, significantly increasing survival. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that BM-MSC can provide a steady source of stTRAIL and may be suitable for use in the prevention of the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after RFA with secretable trimeric TRAIL.

  16. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  17. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function.

  18. Tolerability and toxicity of adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine for treating non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fan; LI Xiao; CHEN Ke-zhong; JIANG Guan-chao; WANG Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine is an evidence-supported regimen for adjuvant chemotherapy for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).But this doublet has considerable toxicity and unfavorable tolerability,and results in poor compliance.The cisplatin and gemcitabine regimen is one of the most active and well-tolerated regimens against advanced NSCLC,but its toxicity and tolerability has not been adequately evaluated in the adjuvant setting.Methods From a lung cancer database we retrospectively reviewed NSCLC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy of cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) between January 2005 and December 2011.Postoperative demographics,compliance to adjuvant therapy and toxicity were retrieved from medical records.Results A total of 132 patients met the criteria and were included in the study,96 were male (72.7%) and 36 were female (27.3%).Median age was 60.5 years old,range 29-75 years,and 41.7% of patients were ≥65 years old.Overall,68.2%patients received all four planned cycles,and the cumulative dose delivered for gemcitabine was 8333 mg (83.3% of the planned dose) and cisplatin 248 mg (82.7% of the planned dose).There were no treatment-related deaths.Grade 3/4neutropenia developed in 47 patients (35.6%) and was the predominant hematologic toxicity.Common grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting (22.0%),infection (12.3%),and febrile neutropenia (11.4%).Conclusion Cisplatin and gemcitabine are feasible for use in the adjuvant setting with a favorable toxicity profile and superior tolerability compared with published data on cisplatin and vinorelbine.

  19. Treating cancer cachexia to treat cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Se-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Skeletal muscle wasting is a major component of cachectic states found in a variety of disease settings, including cancer. As increasing caloric intake often provides little benefit in combating muscle loss in cachectic patients, a major research focus has been to develop strategies stimulating muscle anabolic pathways - in an attempt to fight the catabolic pathways induced during cachexia. Two recent papers have reported the beneficial effects of blocking the myostatin/activin signalling pathway in mouse models of cancer cachexia. We discuss the implications of their findings both with respect to the role that this signalling pathway may play in the aetiology of cachexia and with respect to the prospects for targeting this pathway as a therapeutic strategy in patients with cachexia.

  20. Increased chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cell lines treated with novel functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yijun; Weng, Ziyi; Wang, Chuanying; Zhu, Mingjie; Lu, Yunshu; Ding, Longlong; Wang, Yongkun; Cheng, Xianhua; Lin, Qing; Wu, Kejin

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major cause of treatment resistance in breast cancer. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit unique properties that make them promising candidates for breast cancer treatment. In the present study, a new functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube carrying oxygen was synthesized; it was determined whether this material could increase chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cell lines, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. MDA-MB-231 cells growing in folic acid (FA) free medium, MDA-MB-231 cells growing in medium containing FA and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with chemotherapy drugs or radiotherapy with or without tombarthite-modified-FA-chitosan (R-O2-FA-CHI)-SWCNTs under hypoxic conditions, and the cell viability was determined by water-soluble tetrazolium salts-1 assay. The cell surviving fractions were determined by colony forming assay. Cell apoptosis induction was monitored by flow cytometry. Expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), survivin, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), RAD51 and Ku80 was monitored by western blotting. The novel synthesized R-O2-FA-CHI-SWCNTs were able to significantly enhance the chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cell lines and the material exhibited its expected function by downregulating the expression of Bcl-2, survivin, HIF-1α, P-gp, MRP-1, RAD51 and Ku80.

  1. Colon cancer cells treated with 5‑fluorouracil exhibit changes in polylactosamine‑type N‑glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liping; Shen, Li; Yu, Meiyun; Ni, Jianlong; Dong, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Yinghui; Wu, Shiliang

    2014-05-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the major chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal carcinoma, which were found to have N-glycans containing polylactosamine on the cancer cell surface. Alterations in the expression and structure of polylactosamine glycans are associated with cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. However, little is known with regard to the correlation between the levels of polylactosamine expressed in colon cancer cells and the anticancer effect of 5-FU. In the present study, SW620 cells were treated with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50; determined by MTT-assay) of 5-FU. Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis indicated that 5-FU administration resulted in apoptosis in SW620 cells. An increased percentage of cells in S phase was also observed among the SW620 cells treated with 5-FU. Under the same experimental conditions, a decrease in the 5-FU‑induced inhibition of polylactosamine glycans was recorded. However, an increase in the activity of alkaline phosphatase was also observed. Furthermore, pretreatment of the SW620 cells with 5-FU inhibited the expression of β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-8 (β3Gn-T8) and cluster of differentiation (CD)147 in a time-dependent manner. Overall, changes in glycosylation were associated with the anticancer effect of 5-FU in the colon cancer cells. In conclusion, polylactosamine may be a useful target for the identification of substances with anticancer activity.

  2. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells that suppress immune responses. These advances in cancer immunotherapy are the result of long-term investments in ... Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat Their Cancers Cancer immunotherapy in children: How does it differ from approaches ...

  3. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed......, and HSP90B that all were related to the proto-oncogene proteins p53, Myc, activator protein 1, and c-fos protein. The modulation of these proteins is consistent with the observations that belinostat is able to inhibit clonogenic cell growth of HCT116 cells and the biological role of these proteins...

  4. E2F4 and ribonucleotide reductase mediate S-phase arrest in colon cancer cells treated with chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimploy, Korakod; Díaz, G Dario; Li, Qingjie; Carter, Orianna; Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza; Mathews, Christopher K; Williams, David E; Bailey, George S; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2009-11-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL) is a water-soluble derivative of chlorophyll that exhibits cancer chemopreventive properties, but which also has been studied for its possible cancer therapeutic effects. We report here that human colon cancer cells treated with CHL accumulate in S-phase of the cell cycle, and this is associated with reduced expression levels of p53, p21, and other G(1)/S checkpoint controls. At the same time, E2F1 and E2F4 transcription factors become elevated and exhibit increased DNA binding activity. In CHL-treated colon cancer cells, bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments provided evidence for the inhibition of DNA synthesis. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a pivotal enzyme for DNA synthesis and repair, was reduced at the mRNA and protein level after CHL treatment, and the enzymatic activity was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner both in vitro and in vivo. Immunoblotting revealed that expression levels of RR subunits R1, R2, and p53R2 were reduced by CHL treatment in HCT116 (p53(+/+)) and HCT116 (p53(-/-)) cells, supporting a p53-independent mechanism. Prior studies have shown that reduced levels of RR small subunits can increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to clinically used DNA-damaging agents and RR inhibitors. We conclude that by inhibiting R1, R2, and p53R2, CHL has the potential to be effective in the clinical setting, when used alone or in combination with currently available cancer therapeutic agents.

  5. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Segkos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated liver metastasis was identified. He underwent laparoscopic microwave ablation of the liver metastasis, with dramatic decline in thyroglobulin and no structural disease identified to date. This case highlights the rare occurrence of isolated liver metastasis from HCTC and also illustrates the utility of thermoablation as an alternative to surgical resection in the treatment of small isolated liver metastases from HCTC.

  6. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segkos, Konstantinos; Schmidt, Carl; Nabhan, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC) is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated liver metastasis was identified. He underwent laparoscopic microwave ablation of the liver metastasis, with dramatic decline in thyroglobulin and no structural disease identified to date. This case highlights the rare occurrence of isolated liver metastasis from HCTC and also illustrates the utility of thermoablation as an alternative to surgical resection in the treatment of small isolated liver metastases from HCTC.

  7. Alterations in Cell Cycle and Induction of Apoptotic Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells Treated with α-Mangostin Extracted from Mangosteen Pericarp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Kurose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of molecularly targeted drugs has greatly advanced cancer therapy, despite these drugs being associated with some serious problems. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the anticancer effects of natural products. α-Mangostin, a xanthone isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen fruit, has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines and to exhibit antitumor activity in a mouse mammary cancer model. In this study, we investigated the influence of α-mangostin on apoptosis and cell cycle in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 (carrying a p53 mutation, and HER2, ER, and PgR negative in order to elucidate its anticancer mechanisms. In α-mangostin-treated cells, induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was observed. On cell-cycle analysis, G1-phase arrest, increased p21cip1 expression and decreases in cyclins, cdc(s, CDKs and PCNA were observed. In conclusion, α-mangostin may be useful as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer carrying a p53 mutation and having HER2- and hormone receptor-negative subtypes.

  8. Recurrence patterns of advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with gefitinib

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min-jiang; ZHONG Wei; ZHANG Li; ZHAO Jing; LI Long-yun; WANG Meng-zhao

    2013-01-01

    Background Gefitinib is widely used in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).However,only a small number of reports have described initial failure sites in patients treated with gefitinib.The aim of this study was to investigate survival,recurrence sites,and treatment after recurrence in these patients.Methods A retrospective review was conducted of all patients with stage Ⅲ/Ⅳ NSCLC treated with gefitinib in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from October 2002 to September 2011.Patient characteristics,initial failure sites,associated clinical factors,and subsequent therapy were included in the analysis of prognostic factors.Results A total of 316 patients were identified The median progress free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times were 238 days and 468 days,respectively.The median survival time after progression was 145 days.The sites of initial failure were lung (62.34%),bone (17.72%),central nerve system (CNS,16.14%),liver (9.49%),and others (7.19%).Patients with single-site progression or multi-site progression were 81.01% and 18.99%,respectively.Progression-free survival time was associated with lung and bone failure.Additionally,the median survival time after progression was lower in patients with multi-site progression and liver progression.Other initial failure sites displayed no relationship with survival,including CNS failure.Subsequent therapy may affect survival after progression.In patients receiving continuous epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy,chemotherapy,radiotherapy,and retreatment with EGFR-TKIs,survival time after progression was prolonged compared with the best supportive care.Conclusions Our data suggest that patients receiving gefltinib should be closely monitored regarding lung metastasis during follow-up.Liver metastases and multi-site progression were poor prognostic factors.After failure with gefltinib,patients may benefit from radiotherapy

  9. Mechanisms of apoptosis in irradiated and sunitinib-treated follicular thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Jirka; Warnke, Elisabeth; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Pohl, Fabian; Wise, Petra; Magnusson, Nils E; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sunitinib (S) seems to have promising potential in the treatment of thyroid cancer. We focused on the impact of S and/or irradiation (R) on mechanisms of apoptosis in follicular thyroid cancer cells. The effects of R, S and their combination were evaluated 2 and 4 days after treatment, using the human thyroid cancer cell line CGTH W-1. The transcription of genes involved in the regulation of apoptosis was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. Western blot analyses of caspases and survivin were also performed. S elevated BAX (day 4), CASP9, CASP3, BIRC5 (day 4) and PRKACA (day 4) gene expression, whereas the mRNAs of BCL2, CASP8, PRKCA, ERK1, and ERK2 were not significantly changed. S, R and R+S clearly induced caspase-9 protein and elevated caspase-3 activity. Survivin was down-regulated at day 4 in control cells and the expression was blunted by S treatment. R+S induced survivin expression at day 2 followed by a reduction at day 4 of treatment. Sunitinib and the combined application with radiation induced apoptosis in follicular thyroid cancer cells via the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In addition, sunitinib might induce apoptosis via decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. These findings suggest the potential use of sunitinib for the treatment of poorly differentiated follicular thyroid carcinomas.

  10. Red blood cell glutathione levels in lung cancer patients treated by radiation and continuously infused carboplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, HJM; Meijer, C; DeVries, EGE; Mulder, NH

    1996-01-01

    Intrinsic resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) curtails the efficacy of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Glutathione (GSH) may be one of the factors responsible for this phenomenon as it counteracts the cytotoxic effects of platinum containing drugs and radiation. GSH levels were studied i

  11. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT). METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, 117 patients with stages IIB-IIIB NSCLC were treated in a multicenter randomized phase II trial with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT. The esophagitis was prospectively scored using the Common...

  12. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianxiong He; Canhua Huang; Aiping Tong; Bin Chen; Zhi Zeng; Peng Zhang; Chunting Wang; Yuquan Wei

    2008-12-01

    Suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an orally administered histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown significant antitumour activity in a variety of tumour cells. To identify proteins involved in its antitumour activity, we utilized a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa following SAHA treatment. Protein expression profiles were analysed by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein identification was performed on a MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS instrument. As a result, a total of nine differentially expressed proteins were visualized by 2-DE and Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Further, all the changed proteins were positively identified via mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Of these, PGAM1 was significantly downregulated in HeLa cells after treatment with SAHA. Moreover, PGAM1 has been proven to be downregulated in another cervical cancer cell line (CaSki) by western blot analysis. Together, using proteomic tools, we identified several differentially expressed proteins that underwent SAHA-induced apoptosis. These changed proteins may provide some clues to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying SAHA-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer.

  13. Successful Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel in a Heavily Treated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient: A Case Report

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    Mikiko Ishihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for the majority of all lung cancers. A 69-year-old female with postoperatively recurrent NSCLC was treated weekly with nanoparticle-albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel monotherapy every 4 weeks as a tenth line chemotherapy, and stable disease was achieved by seven cycles of this regimen. The patient developed grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 leukopenia, but none of the other toxicities, including febrile neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy, were severe, and thus she was able to tolerate this salvage chemotherapy. To our knowledge this is the first report of the efficacy of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy in a heavily treated NSCLC patient.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of Wnt3a-treated triple-negative breast cancer cells.

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    Sylvie Maubant

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. The activation of this pathway leads to the expression of specific target genes depending on the cell/tissue context. Here, we analyzed the transcriptome of two different TNBC cell lines to define a comprehensive list of Wnt target genes. The treatment of cells with Wnt3a for 6h up-regulated the expression (fold change > 1.3 of 59 genes in MDA-MB-468 cells and 241 genes in HCC38 cells. Thirty genes were common to both cell lines. Beta-catenin may also be a transcriptional repressor and we found that 18 and 166 genes were down-regulated in response to Wnt3a treatment for 6h in MDA-MB-468 and HCC38 cells, respectively, of which six were common to both cell lines. Only half of the activated and the repressed transcripts have been previously described as Wnt target genes. Therefore, our study reveals 137 novel genes that may be positively regulated by Wnt3a and 104 novel genes that may be negatively regulated by Wnt3a. These genes are involved in the Wnt pathway itself, and also in TGFβ, p53 and Hedgehog pathways. Thorough characterization of these novel potential Wnt target genes may reveal new regulators of the canonical Wnt pathway. The comparison of our list of Wnt target genes with those published in other cellular contexts confirms the notion that Wnt target genes are tissue-, cell line- and treatment-specific. Genes up-regulated in Wnt3a-stimulated cell lines were more strongly expressed in TNBC than in luminal A breast cancer samples. These genes were also overexpressed, but to a much lesser extent, in HER2+ and luminal B tumors. We identified 72 Wnt target genes higher expressed in TNBCs (17 with a fold change >1.3 which may reflect the chronic activation of the canonical Wnt pathway that occurs in TNBC tumors.

  15. Cell-cycle fate-monitoring distinguishes individual chemosensitive and chemoresistant cancer cells in drug-treated heterogeneous populations demonstrated by real-time FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mako; Toneri, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Murakami, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Essentially every population of cancer cells within a tumor is heterogeneous, especially with regard to chemosensitivity and resistance. In the present study, we utilized the fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) imaging system to investigate the correlation between cell-cycle behavior and apoptosis after treatment of cancer cells with chemotherapeutic drugs. HeLa cells expressing FUCCI were treated with doxorubicin (DOX) (5 μM) or cisplatinum (CDDP) (5 μM) for 3 h. Cell-cycle progression and apoptosis were monitored by time-lapse FUCCI imaging for 72 h. Time-lapse FUCCI imaging demonstrated that both DOX and CDDP could induce cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M in almost all the cells, but a subpopulation of the cells could escape the block and undergo mitosis. The subpopulation which went through mitosis subsequently underwent apoptosis, while the cells arrested in S/G2/M survived. The present results demonstrate that chemoresistant cells can be readily identified in a heterogeneous population of cancer cells by S/G2/M arrest, which can serve in future studies as a visible target for novel agents that kill cell-cycle-arrested cells.

  16. Nanotherapies for treating prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danquah, Michael

    Current prostate cancer treatment remains ineffective primarily due to ineffectual therapeutic strategies and numerous tumor-associated physiological barriers which hinder efficacy of anticancer agents. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate a new combination therapy approach for treating prostate cancer and develop polymeric nanocarriers to facilitate anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery. It was hypothesized that simultaneously targeting androgen-androgen receptor (AR) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) signaling pathways would be effective in treating prostate cancer. The effect of bicalutamide (antiandrogen) and embelin (XIAP inhibitor) on the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo was first examined. Embelin induced caspase 3 and 9 activation in LNCaP and C4-2 cells by decreasing XIAP expression and was more potent than bicalutamide in killing prostate tumor cells irrespective of their androgen status. Using a combination of MTT assay and isobologram analyses, combination of bicalutamide and embelin was observed to be cell line and schedule dependent. Since bicalutamide and embelin are extremely hydrophobic, polymeric micelles were fabricated using polyethylene glycol-b-polylactic acid (PEG-b-PLA) copolymer to improve drug solubility. Micellar formulations were found to result in at least 60-fold increase in the aqueous solubility of bicalutamide and embelin. Tumor growth was also effectively regressed upon treatment with bicalutamide, but the extent of tumor regression was significantly higher when bicalutamide was formulated in micelles. To further improve bicalutamide aqueous solubility, a series of novel biodegradable copolymers for the systematic micellar delivery of bicalutamide was designed and synthesized. Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χFH) was used to assess compatibility between bicalutamide and poly (L-lactide) or poly (carbonate-co-lactide) polymer pairs. Polyethylene glycol-b-poly (carbonate

  17. Clinical Observation of Erlotinib in the Treatment of Advanced and Previously Treated Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Liyan XU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Erlotinib is a small molecular inhibitor of tyrosine kinase. One study has confirmed that it can prolong the median progression-free survival time (PFS, and can improve the one-year survival rate of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the response and adverse reaction of agent erlotinib in advanced and previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods The study was one part of the EAP (Expanded Access Programme study. Forty-five patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, which had been treated with 1-2 regimens containing platinum previously, were treated with erlotinib from Dec 2005. Erlotinib was prescribed at a dose of 150 mg daily. Results Forty-three patients were evaluated response and all patients were evaluated toxicity. Among these patients, CR 0 case, PR 19 cases (44.2%, RR (CR+PR 44.2% and SD 13 cases as their best response, disease control rate (DCR=CR+PR+SD 74.4%, PD 11cases (25.6%. The median progression-free survival time was 4.8 months; the median survival time was 15.0 months; the one-year survival rate was 68.8% (31/45. The median PFS of patients with adenocarcinoma and with non-adenocarcinoma was 7.6 months vs 2.6 months (P=0.018. The drug-related adverse reactions were skin rash (41 cases, 91.1%, billirubine increased (15 cases, 33.3%, ALT increased (9 cases, 20% and diarrhea (4 cases, 8.9%. For patients with and without skin rash, the median PFS was 7.5 months vs 1.1 months (P=0.001, and the median survival time was 15.6 months vs 5.2 months (P=0.002. Conclusion Erlotinib is effective in advanced and previously treated non-small cell lung cancer, and it is much more effective in adenocarcinoma and patients with skin rash. It is well tolerated, only with some minimal adverse reactions.

  18. Orlistat, a novel potent antitumor agent for ovarian cancer: proteomic analysis of ovarian cancer cells treated with Orlistat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Qiong; Tang, Jing; Zhou, Sheng-Tao; Yi, Tao; Peng, Hong-Ling; Shen, Guo-Bo; Xie, Na; Huang, Kai; Yang, Tao; Wu, Jin-Hua; Huang, Can-Hua; Wei, Yu-Quan; Zhao, Xia

    2012-08-01

    Orlistat is an orally administered anti-obesity drug that has shown significant antitumor activity in a variety of tumor cells. To identify the proteins involved in its antitumor activity, we employed a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, following Orlistat treatment. Protein expression profiles were analyzed by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein identification was performed on a MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS instrument. More than 110 differentially expressed proteins were visualized by 2-DE and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. Furthermore, 71 proteins differentially expressed proteins were positively identified via mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. In particular, PKM1/2, a key enzyme involved in tumorigenesis, was found to be significantly downregulated in SKOV3 cells following treatment with Orlistat. Moreover, PKM1/2 was proved to be downregulated in SKOV3 cells by western blot analysis after treatment with Orlistat. Taken together, using proteomic tools, we identified several differentially expressed proteins that underwent Orlistat-induced apoptosis, particularly PKM2. These changes confirmed our hypothesis that Orlistat is a potential inhibitor of ovarian cancer and can be used as a novel adjuvant antitumor agent.

  19. Endocrine Disorders in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated with Haemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Christina Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of haemopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT taking place worldwide has offered a cure to many high risk childhood malignancies with an otherwise very poor prognosis. However, HSCT is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and premature death, and patients who have survived the acute complications continue to face lifelong health sequelae as a result of the treatment. Endocrine dysfunction is well described in childhood HSCT survivors treated for malignancies. The endocrine system is highly susceptible to damage from the conditioning therapy, such as, alkylating agents and total body irradiation, which is given prior stem cell infusion. Although not immediately life-threatening, the impact of these abnormalities on the long term health and quality of life in these patients may be considerable. The prevalence, risk factors, clinical approaches to investigations and treatments, as well as the implications of ongoing surveillance of endocrine disorders in childhood HSCT survivors, are discussed in this review.

  20. Case Report of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Uterine Cervix Treated at a Semiurban Cancer Centre in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Epari

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma of the uterine cervix is very rare. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the uterine cervix treated at a newly commissioned semiurban cancer centre in north India in 2015. Data for this study was obtained from the hospital electronic medical records and the patient's case file. We also reviewed published case reports of uterine and cervical lymphoma involving forty-one patients. We treated a case of stage IV DLBCL cervix with six cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) and intrathecal methotrexate followed by consolidation with radiotherapy. The patient showed complete response to chemotherapy. We conclude that, in advanced stage lymphoma involving uterus and cervix, combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is effective in short term. PMID:27597906

  1. Case Report of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Uterine Cervix Treated at a Semiurban Cancer Centre in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhor Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma of the uterine cervix is very rare. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL involving the uterine cervix treated at a newly commissioned semiurban cancer centre in north India in 2015. Data for this study was obtained from the hospital electronic medical records and the patient’s case file. We also reviewed published case reports of uterine and cervical lymphoma involving forty-one patients. We treated a case of stage IV DLBCL cervix with six cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone and intrathecal methotrexate followed by consolidation with radiotherapy. The patient showed complete response to chemotherapy. We conclude that, in advanced stage lymphoma involving uterus and cervix, combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is effective in short term.

  2. A Case of Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

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    Dong-hyun Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case that shows a significant anticancer effect of Korean medicine therapy (KMT. A 79-year-old man, who was diagnosed as stage Ⅳ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in December 2012, was treated with KMT including intravenous pharmacopunctures and oral herbal medicine from February 22, 2013, until September 2013 without any surgical intervention, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The intravenous pharmacopunctures were the wild ginseng pharmacopuncture, Cordyceps sinensis pharmacopuncture and Trichosanthes kirilowii pharmacopuncture. The oral herbal medicine used was soramdan, made of cultivated wild ginseng. The effectiveness of this therapy was evaluated with computed tomography and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance scale. The size of the tumor mass was markedly decreased and the ECOG performance scale was also improved. These results suggest that KMT alone can be an effective method to treat NSCLC.

  3. Pemetrexed in Previously Treated Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Poor Performance Status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun YoungJUNG; Su JinYOO; Ji Young SHIN; Ji Won PARK; Jeong Eun LEE; Hee Sun PARK; Ju Ock KIM; Sun Young KIM

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective Pemetrexed have been approved for the treatment of patients affected by advanced non-small cell lung cancner (NSCLC) in progression after first-line chemotherapy. We evaluated the activity and feasibility of pemetrexed in previously treated NSCLC.Methods Patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC were evaluated from April 2007 to March 2009. The patients had relapsed or progressed after prior chemotherapy treatment. Pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) was administered intravenously once every 3 weeks after progression to prior chemotherapy. The tumor response was evaluated according to RECIST criteria by chest CT at every 2 cycles of chemotherapy.Results A total 61 patients were eligible for analysis. Performance status of them (100%) was over 2. The response rate and disease control rate were 14.7% and 37.7% respectively. Non-squamous cell carcinoma histology was significantly associated with a superior response rate (P=0.045) and disease control rate (P=0.008). The median survival time and the median progression free survival (PFS) time were 6.11 months and 2.17 months, respectively. Comparing the efficacy of pemetrexed in these two settings [second-line versus (12/61) more than third (49/61)], there was no significant difference in regard to median survival (11.18 months vs 11.46 months, P=0.922,S), but PFS was more longer in third- or further-line groups than second-line group (1.39 months vs 2.25 months, P=0.015,3).Conclusion Pemetrexed is a feasible regimen in previously treated NSCLC with poor performance status.

  4. Treating advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: focus on icotinib

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    Liang JL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jun-Li Liang,1 Xiao-Cang Ren,2 Qiang Lin2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Renqiu, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Icotinib hydrochloride is an orally administered small-molecule reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been independently researched and developed and has independent intellectual property rights in the People’s Republic of China. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the response to icotinib among advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients who received at least one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen was not inferior to gefitinib. Since being launched August 2011 in the People’s Republic of China, icotinib has been widely used in clinics, and has become an important treatment option for Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC. The present study presents the Phase I, II, and III clinical trials of icotinib and discusses current clinical applications in the People’s Republic of China and future research directions. Keywords: targeted therapy, EGFR-TKI, NSCLC

  5. Culture supernatants of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 treated with parthenolide inhibit the proliferation, migration, and lumen formation capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cai-juan; GUO Su-fen; SHI Tie-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Parthenolide has been tested for anti-tumor activities,such as anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis in recent studies.However,little is known about its role in the process of tumor angiogenesis.This study aims to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of parthenolide on the proliferation,migration and lumen formation capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.Methods Different concentrations of parthenolide were applied to the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 cells.After 24-hour incubation,the culture supematants were harvested and used to treat human umbilical vein endothelial cells for 24 hours.Then an inverted fluorescence phase contrast microscope was used to evaluate the human umbilical vein endothelial cells.The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),interleukin (IL)-8 and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9 in the culture supernatant of the MDA-MB-231 cells was then measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assays.Results Suppression of proliferation,migration,and the lumen formation capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was observed in the presence of the culture supernatants from the breast cancer cell line treated with different concentrations of parthenolide.Parthenolide decreased the levels of the angiogenic factors MMP-9,VEGF,and IL-8secreted by the MDA-MB-231 cells.Conclusions Parthenolide may suppress angiogenesis through decreasing angiogenic factors secreted by breast cancer cells to interfere with the proliferation,migration and lumen-like structure formation of endothelial cells,thereby inhibiting tumor growth.It is a promising potential anti-angiogenic drug.

  6. Induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells treated with isorhamnetin glycosides from Opuntia ficus-indica pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Moreno-García, Beatriz E; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Aráiz-Hernández, Diana; Alvarez, Mario M; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O

    2014-12-01

    (OFI) contains health-promoting compounds like flavonoids, being the isorhamnetin glycosides the most abundant. We evaluated the effect of OFI extracts with different isorhamnetin glycosides against two different human colon cancer cells (HT-29 and Caco2). The extracts were obtained by alkaline hydrolysis with NaOH at 40 °C during 15, 30 or 60 min. Tri and diglycosides were the most abundant isorhamnetin glycosides, therefore these compounds were isolated to compare their cytotoxic effect with the obtained from the extracts. The OFI extracts and purified isorhamnetin glycosides were more cytotoxic against HT-29 cells than Caco2 cells. OFI-30 exhibited the lowest IC50 value against HT-29 (4.9 ± 0.5 μg/mL) and against Caco2 (8.2 ± 0.3 μg/mL). Isorhamnetin diglycosides IG5 and IG6 were more cytotoxic than pure isorhamnetin aglycone or triglycosides when they were tested in HT-29 cells. Bioluminescent analysis revealed increased activity of caspase 3/7 in OFI extracts-treated cells, particularly for the extract with the highest concentration of isorhamnetin triglycosides. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that OFI extract and isorhamnetin glycosides induced a higher percentage of apoptosis in HT-29 than in Caco2, while isorhamnetin was more apoptotic in Caco2. This research demonstrated that glycosilation affected antiproliferative effect of pure isorhamnetin glycosides or when they are mixed with other phytochemicals in an extract obtained from OFI.

  7. FoxO3a transcriptional regulation of bim controls apoptosis in paclitaxel-treated breast cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunters, A; de Mattos, SF; Stahl, M; Brosens, JJ; Zoumpoulidou, G; Saunders, CA; Coffer, PJ; Medema, RH; Coombes, RC; Lam, EWF

    2003-01-01

    Paclitaxel is used to treat breast cancers, but the mechanisms by which it induces apoptosis are poorly understood. Consequently, we have studied the role of the FoxO transcription factors in determining cellular response to paclitaxel. Western blotting revealed that in a panel of nine breast cancer

  8. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

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    Steffen Filskov Sorensen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trial results have suggested that programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1 expression measured by immunohistochemistry may predict response to anti–programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 therapy. Results on the association between PD-L1 expression and survival among patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS among 204 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 2007 to 2012. PD-L1 expression was measured using a prototype immunohistochemistry assay with the anti–PD-L1 22C3 antibody (Merck. PD-L1 strong positivity and weak positivity were defined to be traceable to the clinical trial version of the assay. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of patients had PD-L1 strong-positive tumors, and 50% had PD-L1 weak-positive tumors. No statistically significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and survival; adjusted hazard ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-2.03; median OS, 9.0 months for the PD-L1 strong-positive group and 1.07 (0.74-1.55; median OS, 9.8 months for the PD-L1 weak-positive group compared with the PD-L1–negative group (median OS, 7.5 months. No association was seen between PD-L1 expression and OS when PD-L1 expression levels were stratified by median or tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: In concordance with previous studies, we found PD-L1 measured by immunohistochemistry to be frequently expressed in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, PD-L1 expression is not a strong prognostic marker in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with chemotherapy.

  9. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

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    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  10. The cost of treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer: estimates from the chinese experience.

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    Xiaohui Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because of the potentially significant economic burden of healthcare costs associated with many diseases, it is critical that regulatory and medical insurance organisations collect and utilise data on the cost-effectiveness of care provision to make rational policy decisions. However, little is known about healthcare costs in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on health expenditure data for 253 cases of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC registered at the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University in China between 2006 and 2010, the cost of care provision was analysed. The monthly and aggregate annual medical costs were estimated for patients who were in either a progression-free state (PFS or a disease-progression state (DPS. Monthly healthcare costs accumulated during the terminal 3 months were collected separately. The mean cost of treatment for PFS and DPS patients over one year was approximately US$11,566 and $14,519, respectively. The monthly costs for all patients were higher initially than in the subsequent months (PFS: $2,490; DPS: $2,503. For PFS patients, healthcare expenditures stabilised after the 7th month, with a mean monthly medical expenditure of $82.49. For DPS patients, expenditures stabilised after the 9th month, and the mean expenditure during the 9th month was $307.9. Medical care costs in the three successive months prior to death were $3,754, $5,829 and $7,372, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The economic evaluation of health care technologies is becoming ever more important in China, especially in disease areas for which new and expensive therapies are being introduced on a regular basis. This is first paper to present empirically estimated China-specific costs associated with the treatment of NSCLC. The cost estimates are presented in a format that is specifically intended to inform cost-effectiveness analyses of treatments for NSCLC, and hence, contribute to the more

  11. The Effect of 217 Hz Magnetic Field of Cell Phone with Different Intensities on Apoptosis of Normal and Cancerous Cells Treated with Chemotherapy Drug

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    Mahsa Mansourian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the increasing development of home and business electronic equipment in today's world, the biological effects of ELF magnetic fields have been studied at two molecular-cellular and animal- human levels. Considering the therapeutic viewpoint of this study regarding the effects of low-frequency fields of mobile phone, the effect of acute exposure to this field on chemotherapy will be studied.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, based on measurement of the intensity of the magnetic fields from mobile phones in another research, flux densities of magnetic field of 159.44, 93.25 and 120µ tesla with frequency of 217Hz was generated in magnetic field generator system, and the apoptosis level in K562 cancer cells and healthy cells of lymphocytes was assessed after exposure to field using flow cytometry method. This evaluation method was also performed for the cells treated with bleomycin after exposure to this field.Results: 217 Hz magnetic field exposure significantly increases the rate of apoptosis percentage (p > 0.05 in K562 cancer cells and in two intensities of 120 and 159.44µ tesla compared to the control group, but such effect is not observed in lymphocyte cells. Bleomycin-induced apoptosis percentage following exposure to the mentioned magnetic field shows no significant difference compared to the group of treatment with drug and without field exposure. This lack of significant difference is observed between the groups of drug after field exposure and field alone as well as between groups exposed to field and groups treated with bleomycin.Conclusion: Study results showed that 217 Hz magnetic field of mobile phone can induce apoptosis on cancer cells, but it has no effect on healthy cells. Thus, in order to use mobile phone as an effective factor in their treatment, some studies should be conducted at animal-human level.

  12. Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents to Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    switching to more efficient knockout startegies such as CRISPR . We have generated successful CRSPR plasmids with gRNA against slc3a2 and tranfected both...mouse SCLC cells and sorted the GFP+ cells into single well sorts to expand individual CRISPR clones. We are still analyzing these data. PKA...combination therapies (maybe combination with drugs that affect the cell cycle more or could enhance the cell death). We have established a collaborative

  13. Efficacy and safety of albumin-bound paclitaxel in treating recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu-Yuan Xing; Jun-Ling Li; Yan Wang; Xue-Zhi Hao; Bin Wang; Lin Yang; Yuan-Kai Shi

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the efficacy and safety of albumin-bound paclitaxel (ABP) monotherapy in treating recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods:We retrospectively analyzed the short-term efficacy and toxicities of ABP monotherapy in treating 21 patients who had previously undergone multiple cycles of therapy for their advanced NSCLC in our hospital since 2010.The treatment-related survival was also analyzed.Results:Of these 21 patients,the best overall response was partial response (PR) in 6 patients (28.6%),stable disease (SD) in 10 patients (47.6%),and progressive disease (PD) in 5 patients (23.8%).The overall response rate (ORR) was 28.6% and the disease control rate (DCR) (PR + SD) was 76.2%.The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.0 months (95% CI,5.0-7.0 months).The main grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (11.1%),peripheral nerve toxicity (5.6%),muscle and joint aches (5.6%),and fatigue (5.6%).Conclusions:The ABP monotherapy can achieve good objective response in advanced NSCLC patients who have previously received multiple cycles of treatment and be well tolerated.

  14. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anja Rosenlund; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    , to examine possible risk factors of developing SPMs. METHODS: Data on all patients treated for HNSCC with curative intent in the Region of Southern Denmark in the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were reviewed. A total of 1,172 patients were identified. The combined data from the DAHANCA...

  15. Prognostic importance of cell-free DNA in chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer treated with bevacizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Madsen, Christine Vestergaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Treatment of multiresistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is palliative and patients who have become resistant after multiple lines of chemotherapy often have an unmet need for further and less toxic treatment. Anti-angiogenic therapy has attracted considerable attention in the treatment...... of EOC in combination with chemotherapy. However, only a minor subgroup will benefit from the treatment and there is an obvious need for new markers to select such patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of single-agent bevacizumab in multiresistant EOC and the importance...

  16. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    , tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly...... higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were...

  17. Erlotinib dosing-to-rash: A phase II intrapatient dose escalation and pharmacologic study of erlotinib in previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. mita (Alain); K. Papadopoulos (K.); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); G. Schwartz (G.); J. Verweij (Jaap); A. Ricart (A.); Q.S.C. Chu (Q. S C); A.W. Tolcher (A. W.); L. Wood (Lori); S.W. McCarthy (Stanley); M. Hamilton; K.K. Iwata (Kenneth); B. Wacker; K. de Witte (Karel); E.K. Rowinsky (Eric Keith)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To evaluate the anticancer activity of erlotinib in patients with previously treated, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose dose is increased to that associated with a maximal level of tolerable skin toxicity (i.e., target rash (TR)); to characterise the pharmacok

  18. Isolated Late Metastasis of a Renal Cell Cancer Treated by Radical Distal Pancreatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Barras

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53–year-old man underwent right nephrectomy for a locally advanced renal cell carcinoma with concomitant resection of a solitary metastasis in the right lung. Ten years later, he presented with haematochezia caused by a tumour in the tail of pancreas, invading the transverse colon and the greater curvature of the stomach. The tumour was radically resected, and histological examination revealed a solitary metastasis of the previous renal cell carcinoma. This case illustrates a rare indication for pancreatic resection because of pancreatic metastasis.

  19. Altered Ca2+-Homeostasis of Cisplatin-Treated and Low Level Resistant Non-Small-Cell and Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Schrödl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy often leads to encouraging responses in lung cancer. But, in the course of the treatment, resistance to chemotherapy ultimately limits the life expectancy of the patient. We aimed at investigating if treatment with cisplatin alters the intracellular Ca2+-homeostasis of lung cancer cells and how this may be related to cisplatin resistance.

  20. Neural Stem Cell Delivery of Therapeutic Antibodies to Treat Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    and Engineering Neural Stem Cells for Delivery of Genetically Encoded 259 References 1. Snyder, EY., Deichter, DL., Walsh, C., Arnold- Aldea , S...acquired with a Zeiss Axio Imager M1m microscope equipped with a digital camera, using 10x or 20x air objectives. Digital images were analyzed using

  1. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  2. THROMBOCYTOSIS AS PROGNOSTIC FACTOR FOR SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED NON SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER TREATED WITH FIRST- LINE CHEMOTHERAPY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Davidov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate elevated platelet count as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with advanced (stage IIIB/ IV non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC receiving first- line chemotherapy. Methods: From 2005 to 2009 three hundreds forty seven consecutive patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, treated in Department of Medical Oncology, UMHAT "Dr Georgi Stranski" entered the study. The therapeutic regimens included intravenous administration of platinum- based doublets. Survival analysis was evaluated by Kaplan- Meier test. The influence of pretreatment thrombocytosis as prognostic factor for survival was analyzed using multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. Results: Elevated platelet counts were found in 78 patients. The overall survival for patients without elevated platelet counts was 9,6 months versus 6,9 months for these with thrombocytosis. In multivariate analysis as independent poor prognostic factors were identified: stage, performance status and elevated platelet counts. Conclusions: These results indicated that platelet counts as well as some clinical pathologic characteristics could be useful prognostic factors in patients with unresectable NSCLC.

  3. A Clinical Study on Global TCM Therapy in Treating Senile Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To assess the clinical efficacy of global traditional Chinese medicine(TCM)therapy in treating senile advanced non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC),with the aim of seeking a standardized,rational and economical way to treat advanced NSCLC in old patients.Methods:A retrospective analysis and comparison was carried out in 86 patients with senile advanced NSCLC,44 treated by global TCM(TCM group)and 42 by chemotherapy(control group)through dynamical observation on related indexes including tumor size,quality of life and the survival time,as well as on the fee for medical service at various time points in the course of the treatment.Results:The changes of tumor size,score of clinical main symptoms and behavior condition(by ZPS scoring),as well as survival rates in the two groups at corresponding time points,were not different significantly(P>0.05).The mean survival time in the TCM group was 13.20±1.52 months and that in the chemotherapy group was 13.45±1.94 months,showing insignificant difference between them.However,the median survival time in the TCM group(12 months)was actually longer than that in the chemotherapy group (9 months,P<0.05).The mean daily expense and the mean expense(RMB yuan)for each patient in the TCM group were significantly lower than that in the control group,which was 180.73±93.21 vs 825.84±329.63 for the mean daily expense and 34 077.21±14 638.04 vs 58 516.59±45 429.76 for the mean expense for each patient(both P<0.01).Conclusion:Treatment of senile advanced NSCLC with TCM alone has its apparent superiority in stabilizing tumor focus,improving clinical symptoms,elevating quality of life and prolonging the survival time.TCM is also less expensive,making it a good alternative therapeutic approach for this specific group of people.

  4. Transcriptional and post-translational regulation of Bim controls apoptosis in melatonin-treated human renal cancer Caki cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung; Woo, Seon Min; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has recently gained attention as an anticancer agent and for combined cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of the effects of melatonin on cancer cell death. Treatment with melatonin induced apoptosis and upregulated the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) in renal cancer Caki cells. Furthermore, downregulation of Bim expression by siRNA markedly reduced melatonin-mediated apoptosis. Melatonin increased Bim mRNA expression through the induction of Sp1 and E2F1 expression and transcriptional activity. We found that melatonin also modulated Bim protein stability through the inhibition of proteasome activity. However, melatonin-induced Bim upregulation was independent of melatonin's antioxidant properties and the melatonin receptor. Taken together, our results suggest that melatonin induces apoptosis through the upregulation of Bim expression at the transcriptional level and at the post-translational level.

  5. P53-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through a caspase-3-independent, but caspase-9-dependent pathway in oridonin-treated MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao CUI; Jing-hua YU; Jin-nan WU; Shin-ichi TASHIRO; Satoshi ONODERA; Mutsuhiko MINAMI; Takashi IKEJIMA

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the caspase-3-independent mechanisms in oridonin-induced MCF-7 human breast cancer cell apoptosis in vitro. Methods: The viability of oridonin-treated MCF-7 cells was measured by MTT (thiazole blue) assay. Apoptotic cells with condensed nuclei were visualized by phase contrast microscopy. Nucleoso-mal DNA fragmentation was assayed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The apoptotic ratio was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Cell cycle alternation and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometric analysis. Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-9, heat shock protein (Hsp)90, p53, p-p53, p21, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and the inhibitor of caspase-activated Dnase (ICAD) protein expressions were detected by Western blot analysis. Results: Oridonin inhibited cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was altered through the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expressions. Pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and calpain inhibitor Ⅱ both decreased cell death ratio. Nucleosomal DNA fragmentation and the downregulation of △ψmit were detected in oridonin-induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis, which was involved in a postmitochondrial caspase-9-dependent pathway. Decreased Bcl-2 and Hsp90 expression levels and increased Bax and p21 expression levels were positively correlated with elevated levels of phosphorylated p53 phosphorylation. Moreover, PARP was partially cleaved by calpain rather than by capase-3. Conclusion: DNA damage provoked alternations in the mitochondrial and caspase-9 pathways as well as p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, but was not related to caspase-3 activity in oridonin-induced MCF-7 cells.

  6. Immune-associated proteins with potential in vivo anti-tumor activities are upregulated in lung cancer cells treated with umbelliprenin: A proteomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaghanzadeh, Narges; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Ghaderi, Abbas; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Umbelliprenin (Umb), a natural coumarin, has demonstrated anti-tumor activities, both in vitro and particularly in vivo, in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. The present study aimed to identify molecular targets of Umb using a high-throughput approach. Lung cancer cell lines, QU-DB (large-cell lung carcinoma) and A549 (adenocarcinoma), were treated with Umb. Differentially-expressed proteins were identified using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. In the QU-DB cells, differential expression of proteins, including downregulation of the tumorigenic protein heat shock protein 90 kDa and upregulation of the potential anti-tumor proteins Nipsnap1 and glycine-tRNA ligase (GRS), suggested that Umb is a strong anti-tumor compound. In the A549 cells, differential expression of proteins indicated possible contradictory effects of Umbregarding tumorigenesis, which included downregulation of the tumorigenic protein cyclophilin and the tumor suppressor MST, and upregulation of stathmin (tumorigenic) and calreticulin. Calreticulun, in addition to GRS in QU-DB cells, stimulates anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to use a high-throughput approach to identify targets of Umb in cancer. These molecular targets suggested that Umb may exhibit stronger in vitro anti-tumor activity against the large-cell carcinoma model than the adenocarcinoma model. Furthermore, it has been reported that Umb exhibits higher cytotoxicity against QU-DB cells than A549 cells in vitro, and significant Umb anti-tumor activity against lung cancer in vivo, which is consistent with previously published literature. In each cell type, immune-associated molecules were upregulated, indicating that this naturally occurring compound exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in vivo. However, further studies that investigate the effect of Umb in different in vitro models of cancer are required. PMID:28105238

  7. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it; Buti, Sebastiano; Camisa, Roberta [Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Brighenti, Matteo; Lazzarelli, Silvia [Oncology Unit, Azienda Istituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Largo Priori, 1, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Mazza, Giancarlo [Radiology Division, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili,1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passalacqua, Rodolfo, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it [1Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group). The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group): 1 MIU/m{sup 2} (Million International Unit/m{sup 2})twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%), asthenia/anorexia (6%) and diarrhea (7%); patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%), fatigue (21%) and arthralgia (13%). In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response) and 5.1% (only partial response); a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8) and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7) months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1) and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9) months (p = 0.002); and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54) and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60) were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  8. The influences of Chan-Chuang qi-gong therapy on complete blood cell counts in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Tsoy-Ing; Chen, Hsing-Hsia; Chao, Tsu-Yi

    2006-01-01

    After surgery, breast cancer patients are offered adjuvant chemotherapy to avoid cancer cell spread. During chemotherapy process, neutrophils could fall relatively, and side effects could spike to the peak. Therefore, the medical care personnel should prevent the progression of the side effects. This study aimed to examine the effects of Chan-Chuang qi-gong therapy on complete blood counts in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. This study used a quasi-experimental design. The experiment group (n = 32) received a 21-day Chan-Chuang qi-gong therapy, whereas the control group (n = 35) did not. White blood cells, platelet, and hemoglobin were measured on the day before chemotherapy and on days 8, 15, and 22 during chemotherapy. According to this study, there were significant differences in white blood cells (F = 115.76, P qi-gong therapy may decrease leukopenia in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. It is recommended conducting more studies on qi-gong and then introducing it in clinical nursing practice at an appropriate time to promote quality of nursing care and quality of patient life.

  9. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia blast crisis in a patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Isamu; Yoshimoto, Goichi; Obara, Teppei; Ijichi, Kayo; Iwama, Eiji; Harada, Taishi; Akashi, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2017-03-01

    A 59-year-old woman with epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) mutation-positive advanced lung adenocarcinoma was treated with afatinib after a diagnosis of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Twenty-one weeks later, she developed agranulocytosis, and CMML subsequently progressed to blast crisis. After complete remission of CMML, gefitinib was initiated; however, agranulocytosis recurred. This is the first reported case of both EGFR mutation-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer with CMML, and of CMML blast crisis. Physicians should be aware of such risks and monitor EGFR-TKI-treated patients with myeloid neoplasms accordingly.

  10. Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Renal Medullary Carcinoma; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Sheng

    Full Text Available Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  14. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  15. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Hematopoietic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  16. Identification of valid reference genes for the normalization of RT-qPCR expression studies in human breast cancer cell lines treated with and without transient transfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Lin Liu

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a powerful technique for examining gene expression changes during tumorigenesis. Target gene expression is generally normalized by a stably expressed endogenous reference gene; however, reference gene expression may differ among tissues under various circumstances. Because no valid reference genes have been documented for human breast cancer cell lines containing different cancer subtypes treated with transient transfection, we identified appropriate and reliable reference genes from thirteen candidates in a panel of 10 normal and cancerous human breast cell lines under experimental conditions with/without transfection treatments with two transfection reagents. Reference gene expression stability was calculated using four algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and comparative delta Ct, and the recommended comprehensive ranking was provided using geometric means of the ranking values using the RefFinder tool. GeNorm analysis revealed that two reference genes should be sufficient for all cases in this study. A stability analysis suggests that 18S rRNA-ACTB is the best reference gene combination across all cell lines; ACTB-GAPDH is best for basal breast cancer cell lines; and HSPCB-ACTB is best for ER+ breast cancer cells. After transfection, the stability ranking of the reference gene fluctuated, especially with Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent in two subtypes of basal and ER+ breast cell lines. Comparisons of relative target gene (HER2 expression revealed different expressional patterns depending on the reference genes used for normalization. We suggest that identifying the most stable and suitable reference genes is critical for studying specific cell lines under certain circumstances.

  17. Two Cases of Small Cell Cancer of the Maxillary Sinus Treated with Cisplatin plus Irinotecan and Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoaki Tsukahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Small cell carcinoma (SmCC in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is very rare, and definitive therapies have not yet been established. Methods. Chemoradiotherapy comprised 60 Gy of external radiation, with the administration of irinotecan intravenously at 60 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, and 15 and cisplatin at 60 mg/m2 on day 1. Results. Case 1 involved a 66-year-old woman with stage III cancer. Adverse events included decreased white blood cells, anemia, and oral mucositis, all Grade 2. The patient remained free of cancer as of 3 years and 6 months after completing the treatment. Case 2 involved a 60-year-old man with stage IV cancer. He also experienced adverse events of decreased white blood cells, anemia, and oral mucositis, all Grade 2. He died after 11 months due to metastases throughout the body. Conclusions. The results suggest that this regimen may be tolerable as a therapy for this type of carcinoma.

  18. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  19. Biotin-targeted Pluronic(®) P123/F127 mixed micelles delivering niclosamide: A repositioning strategy to treat drug-resistant lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Annapina; Pellosi, Diogo Silva; Pagliara, Valentina; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Caetano, Wilker; Hioka, Noboru; Budillon, Alfredo; Ungaro, Francesca; Russo, Giulia; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2016-09-10

    With the aim to develop alternative therapeutic tools for the treatment of resistant cancers, here we propose targeted Pluronic(®) P123/F127 mixed micelles (PMM) delivering niclosamide (NCL) as a repositioning strategy to treat multidrug resistant non-small lung cancer cell lines. To build multifunctional PMM for targeting and imaging, Pluronic(®) F127 was conjugated with biotin, while Pluronic(®) P123 was fluorescently tagged with rhodamine B, in both cases at one of the two hydroxyl end groups. This design intended to avoid any interference of rhodamine B on biotin exposition on PMM surface, which is a key fundamental for cell trafficking studies. Biotin-decorated PMM were internalized more efficiently than non-targeted PMM in A549 lung cancer cells, while very low internalization was found in NHI3T3 normal fibroblasts. Biotin-decorated PMM entrapped NCL with good efficiency, displayed sustained drug release in protein-rich media and improved cytotoxicity in A549 cells as compared to free NCL (P<0.01). To go in depth into the actual therapeutic potential of NCL-loaded PMM, a cisplatin-resistant A549 lung cancer cell line (CPr-A549) was developed and its multidrug resistance tested against common chemotherapeutics. Free NCL was able to overcome chemoresistance showing cytotoxic effects in this cell line ascribable to nucleolar stress, which was associated to a significant increase of the ribosomal protein rpL3 and consequent up-regulation of p21. It is noteworthy that biotin-decorated PMM carrying NCL at low doses demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity than free NCL in CPr-A549. These results point at NCL-based regimen with targeted PMM as a possible second-line chemotherapy for lung cancer showing cisplatin or multidrug resistance.

  20. Effect of transfection with PLP2 antisense oligonucleotides on gene expression of cadmium-treated MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Alessandra; Librizzi, Mariangela; Luparello, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that cadmium (Cd) is able to regulate gene expression, drastically affecting the pattern of transcriptional activity in human normal and pathological cells. We have already shown that exposure of MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells to 5 μM CdCl(2) for 96 h, apart from significantly affecting mitochondrial metabolism, induces modifications of the expression level of genes coding for members of stress response-, mitochondrial respiration-, MAP kinase-, NF-κB-, and apoptosis-related pathways. In the present study, we have expanded the knowledge on the biological effects of Cd-breast cancer cell interactions, indicating PLP2 (proteolipid protein-2) as a novel member of the list of Cd-upregulated genes by MDA-MB231 cancer cells and, through the application of transfection techniques with specific antisense oligonucleotides, we have demonstrated that such over-expression may be an upstream event to some of the changes of gene expression levels already observed in Cd-treated cells, thus unveiling new possible molecular relationship between PLP2 and genes linked to the stress and apoptotic responses.

  1. Improved survival of mice bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells treated with a combination of radioimmunotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Bai, Jingming; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Biotracer Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Koshida, Kiyoshi [Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioisotope Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama (Japan); Shuke, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    We attempted to determine whether the combined regimen of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and antiangiogenic therapy would favorably affect the survival of animals bearing liver metastases of colon cancer cells. Daily antiangiogenic therapy with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 3 days following intrasplenic cell inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells. RIT with 7 MBq of {sup 131}I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, or {sup 131}I-HPMS-1, an irrelevant IgG1, was conducted at 7 days. Production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by LS180 cells was assessed in vitro. All nontreated mice died by 31 days following cell inoculation (n=5). Monotherapy comprising 2-ME treatment resulted in slightly better survival of mice (n=8) (P<0.05). {sup 131}I-A7 RIT displayed a marked therapeutic effect (n=8) (P<0.001); however, all animals eventually died due to metastases by 99 days. The combined regimen of {sup 131}I-A7 RIT and antiangiogenic therapy demonstrated a superior therapeutic effect in comparison to monotherapy consisting of either RIT or antiangiogenic therapy (n=10) (P<0.05); three mice survived the entire 160-day observation period. The combination of antiangiogenic therapy and {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT failed to provide an appreciable benefit (n=5). Treatment with 2-ME decreased VEGF production by LS180 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, a combination regimen comprising RIT and antiangiogenic therapy initiated at the early stage of metastasis would be of great benefit in terms of improvement of the therapeutic efficacy with respect to liver metastases. (orig.)

  2. Echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omersa, Daniel; Cufer, Tanja; Marcun, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer and remains an important cause of cancer death worldwide. Platinum-based chemotherapy (PBC) for NSCLC can modify outcome while the risk of cardiotoxicity remains poorly researched. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and severity of cardiac injury during PBC in patients with NSCLC and to identify patients at risk. Methods This was a single-centre, prospective, observational study of patients with early and advanced stage NSCLC referred for PBC. In addition to standard care, patients were examined and evaluated for cardiotoxicity before the first dose (visit 1), at the last dose (visit 2) and 6 months after the last dose of PBC (visit 3). Cardiotoxicity (at visit 2 and 3) was defined as increase in the ultrasensitive troponin T, N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide or decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Results Overall, 41 patients (mean age 61 ± 9; 54% men; 68% advanced lung cancer) were included. The median number of PBC cycles was 4. During the study period, there were no incidents of heart failure, and 3 deaths caused by tumour progression were recorded. The mean values of biomarkers and LVEF did not change significantly (p > 0.20). However, 10 (25%) had cardiotoxicity which was independently associated with a history of ischemic heart disease (p = 0.026). Conclusions In NSCLC, cardiac assessment and lifestyle modifications may be pursued in patients with a history of cardiac disease and in patients with longer life expectancy.

  3. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Stress associated gene expression in blood cells is related to outcome in radiotherapy treated head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bøhn Siv K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously observed that a radiotherapy-induced biochemical response in plasma was associated with favourable outcome in head and neck squamous carcinoma cancer (HNSCC patients. The aim of the present study was to compare stress associated blood cell gene expression between two sub-groups of HNSCC patients with different biochemical responses to radiotherapy. Methods Out of 87 patients (histologically verified, 10 biochemical ‘responders’ having a high relative increase in plasma oxidative damage and a concomitant decrease in plasma antioxidants during radiotherapy and 10 ‘poor-responders’ were selected for gene-expression analysis and compared using gene set enrichment analysis. Results There was a significant induction of stress-relevant gene-sets in the responders following radiotherapy compared to the poor-responders. The relevance of the involvement of similar stress associated gene expression for HNSCC cancer and radioresistance was verified using two publicly available data sets of 42 HNSCC cases and 14 controls (GEO GSE6791, and radiation resistant and radiation sensitive HNSCC xenografts (E-GEOD-9716. Conclusions Radiotherapy induces a systemic stress response, as revealed by induction of stress relevant gene expression in blood cells, which is associated to favourable outcome in a cohort of 87 HNSCC patients. Whether these changes in gene expression reflects a systemic effect or are biomarkers of the tumour micro-environmental status needs further study. Trial registration Raw data are available at ArrayExpress under accession number E-MEXP-2460.

  6. Cardiac toxicity and radiation dose to the heart in definitive treated non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred (Dept. of Oncology, Odense Univ. Hospital, 5000 Odense C (Denmark)), E-mail: tine.schytte@dadlnet.dk; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Brink, Carsten (Radiophysic Laboratory, Odense Univ. Hospital, 5000 Odense C (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    In this retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, we did not find a correlation between high mean-dose to three different volumes of the heart (left ventricle, both ventricles or whole heart) and cardiac toxicity defined as having an cardiac event after radiotherapy start. This is not as shown in studies with other diseases treated with radiotherapy. Darby et al. recently published a review concerning radiation related heart disease. They reported a significantly worse survival beyond ten years for breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Some studies reported mortality from heart disease increased by 27%. In Hodgkin lymphoma patients an increased risk value of three to five for cardiac morbidity in general compared to general population and relative risk of death from myocardial infarction compared with general population in range 2 to 4. There may be several possible reasons why we did not experience a significant toxicity despite the high doses we delivered to the heart compared with patients receiving RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Only relative few NSCLC patients live long enough to experience cardiac disease either due to lung cancer itself or comorbidity as a competitive risk factor. In our study the five year survival was 15% leaving very few patients at risk for developing cardiac disease. Without long-term survivors cardiac toxicity does not seem to be a problem, and this suggests that we should aim to increase tumour control by administrating larger doses of radiotherapy to the tumour and/or by adding concurrent chemotherapy. However, the latter may increase the risk of cardiac toxicity by itself, and the results given in present study, may not be extrapolated to this situation. Another reason might be that if NSCLC patients develop dyspnoea, chest pain, etc. it is interpreted as being due to a relapse of lung cancer and not cardiac disease. There are several studies indicating that

  7. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.Y.; Chen, M.M.; Fan, J.G.; Wang, Y.Q.; Hu, Y.; Xu, L.M., E-mail: leiming.xu@aliyun.com.cn, E-mail: huying@sohu.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Du, Y.Q. [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (,24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. (author)

  8. Impact of histological subtype on survival in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer that were treated with definitive radiotherapy: adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the survival outcomes of patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) among patients with locally advanced cervical cancer that were treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods The baseline characteristics and outcome data of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who were treated with definitive radiotherapy between November 1993 and February 2014 were collected and retrospectively reviewed. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to investigate the prognostic significance of AC/ASC histology. Results The patients with AC/ASC of the cervix exhibited significantly shorter overall survival (OS) (p=0.004) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.002) than the patients with SCC of the cervix. Multivariate analysis showed that AC/ASC histology was an independent negative prognostic factor for PFS. Among the patients who displayed AC/ASC histology, larger tumor size, older age, and incomplete response to radiotherapy were found to be independent prognostic factors. PFS was inversely associated with the number of poor prognostic factors the patients exhibited (the estimated 1-year PFS rates; 100.0%, 77.8%, 42.8%, 0.0% for 0, 1, 2, 3 factors, respectively). Conclusion Locally advanced cervical cancer patients with AC/ASC histology experience significantly worse survival outcomes than those with SCC. Further clinical studies are warranted to develop a concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) protocol that is specifically tailored to locally advanced cervical AC/ASC. PMID:28028992

  9. Perfusion CT allows prediction of therapy response in non-small cell lung cancer treated with conventional and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacelli, Nunzia; Santangelo, Teresa; Remy, Jacques [University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); Scherpereel, Arnaud; Cortot, Alexis; Wallyn, Frederic [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Pulmonary and Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Klotz, Ernst [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Lafitte, Jean-Jacques [University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Pulmonary and Thoracic Oncology, Lille (France); Pasteur Institute of Lille, INSERM unit 1019, CIIL, Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine [University of Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); University of Lille Nord de France, Faculty of Medicine, Henri Warembourg, Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    To determine whether CT can depict early perfusion changes in lung cancer treated by anti-angiogenic drugs, allowing prediction of response. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer, treated by conventional chemotherapy with (Group 1; n = 17) or without (Group 2; n = 23) anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drug (bevacizumab) underwent CT perfusion before (TIME 0) and after 1 (TIME 1), 3 (TIME 2) and 6 (TIME 3) cycles of chemotherapy. The CT parameters evaluated included: (1) total tumour vascular volume (TVV) and total tumour extravascular flow (TEF); (2) RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours) measurements. Tumour response was also assessed on the basis of the clinicians' overall evaluation. In Group 1, significant reduction in perfusion was identified between baseline and: (1) TIME 1 (TVV, P = 0.0395; TEF, P = 0.015); (2) TIME 2 (TVV, P = 0.0043; TEF, P < 0.0001); (3) TIME 3 (TVV, P = 0.0034; TEF, P = 0.0005) without any significant change in Group 2. In Group 1: (1) the reduction in TVV at TIME 1 was significantly higher in responders versus non-responders at TIME 2 according to RECIST (P = 0.0128) and overall clinicians' evaluation (P = 0.0079); (2) all responders at TIME 2 had a concurrent decrease in TVV and TEF at TIME 1. Perfusion CT demonstrates early changes in lung cancer vascularity under anti-angiogenic chemotherapy that may help predict therapeutic response. (orig.)

  10. Alternating electric fields (tumor-treating fields therapy) can improve chemotherapy treatment efficacy in non-small cell lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giladi, Moshe; Weinberg, Uri; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Michal; Voloshin, Tali; Blatt, Roni; Cahal, Shay; Itzhaki, Aviran; Onn, Amir; Kirson, Eilon D; Palti, Yoram

    2014-10-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Common treatment modalities for NSCLC include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and, in recent years, the clinical management paradigm has evolved with the advent of targeted therapies. Despite such advances, the impact of systemic therapies for advanced disease remains modest, and as such, the prognosis for patients with NSCLC remains poor. Standard modalities are not without their respective toxicities and there is a clear need to improve both efficacy and safety for current management approaches. Tumor-treating fields (TTFields) are low-intensity, intermediate-frequency alternating electric fields that disrupt proper spindle microtubule arrangement, thereby leading to mitotic arrest and ultimately to cell death. We evaluated the effects of combining TTFields with standard chemotherapeutic agents on several NSCLC cell lines, both in vitro and in vivo. Frequency titration curves demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of TTFields were maximal at 150 kHz for all NSCLC cell lines tested, and that the addition of TTFields to chemotherapy resulted in enhanced treatment efficacy across all cell lines. We investigated the response of Lewis lung carcinoma and KLN205 squamous cell carcinoma in mice treated with TTFields in combination with pemetrexed, cisplatin, or paclitaxel and compared these to the efficacy observed in mice exposed only to the single agents. Combining TTFields with these therapeutic agents enhanced treatment efficacy in comparison with the respective single agents and control groups in all animal models. Together, these findings suggest that combining TTFields therapy with chemotherapy may provide an additive efficacy benefit in the management of NSCLC.

  11. Micro-Raman spectroscopy studies of changes in lipid composition in breast and prostate cancer cells treated with MPA and R1881 hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potcoava, Mariana C.; Futia, Gregory L.; Aughenbaugh, Jessica; Schlaepfer, Isabel; Gibson, Emily A.

    2014-03-01

    Increasing interest in the role of lipids in cancer cell proliferation or resistance to drug therapies has motivated the need to develop better tools for cellular lipid analysis. Quantification of lipids in cells is typically done by destructive chromatography protocols that do not provide spatial information on lipid distribution and prevent dynamic live cell studies. Methods that allow the analysis of lipid content in live cells is therefore of great importance for research. Using Raman micro-spectroscopy we investigated whether the female hormone medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and the synthetic androgen R1881 affect the lipid expression in breast (T47D) and prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells. Differences were noted in the spectral regions at 830-1800 cm-1 and 2800-3000 cm-1 when comparing different drug treatments. Significant changes were noticed for saturated (1063 - 1125 cm-1, 1295 cm-1 and 1439 cm-1), unsaturated (1262 cm-1 and 1656 cm-1, and 1720 - 1748 cm-1) chemical bonds, suggesting that the composition of the lipid droplets was changed by the hormone treatments. Also, significant differences were observed in the high frequency regions of lipids and proteins at 2851 cm-1 and around 2890 cm-1. Principal component analysis with Linear Discriminant Analysis (PCA-LDA) of the Raman spectra was able to differentiate between cancer cells that were treated with MPA, R1881 or vehicle (P < 0.05). Future work includes analysis to determine exact lipid composition and concentrations as well as development of clinical techniques to characterize differences in patient tumor lipid profiles to determine response to drug treatment and prognosis.

  12. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  13. Motexafin Gadolinium and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Prostate Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in bladder cancer cells treated with the DNA-damaging drug etoposide markedly increases apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Mathias; Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; Nexo, Ebba

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the induction of apoptosis by the chemotherapeutic agent etoposide (VP16), and to examine the effect of combining VP16 with gefitinib to see if the cell-survival mechanism can be prevented. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: The bladder cancer cell lines RT4 and T24, representing low- and high-malignancy grades respectively, were treated with VP16 (10 or 50 microM) and the level of apoptosis determined using a commercial kit. EGFR receptor activity was determined by western blotting using antibodies against phosphorylated EGFR....... The EGFR was either activated by heparin-binding (HB)-EGF (1 nM) or inhibited with the specific EGFR inhibitor gefitinib (1 or 5 microM). The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD (30 microM) was used to test the involvement of caspase activity. RESULTS: Treatment of T24 bladder cancer cells with VP16 (50 micro...

  15. The correlation between telomerase activity and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in valproic acid-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Vafaiyan

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that cell viability of MCF-7 cells was decreased after treatment with VPA, probably through a reduction of telomerase activity and an increase in Bax/bcl-2 ratio. Therefore, it could be concluded that VPA is a potent anti-cancer agent for breast cancer cells through inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of apoptosis.

  16. Association of GWAS-identified lung cancer susceptibility loci with survival length in patients with small-cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Genetic variants have been shown to affect length of survival in cancer patients. This study explored the association between lung cancer susceptibility loci tagged by single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified in the genome-wide association studies and length of survival in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC. Eighteen SNPs were genotyped among 874 SCLC patients and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the effects of genotype on survival length under an additive model with age, sex, smoking status and clinical stage as covariates. We identified 3 loci, 20q13.2 (rs4809957G >A, 22q12.2 (rs36600C >T and 5p15.33 (rs401681C >T, significantly associated with the survival time of SCLC patients. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR for patients with the rs4809957 GA or AA genotype was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P = 0.0187 and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.55-0.96; P = 0.0263 compared with the GG genotype. Using the dominant model, the adjusted HR for patients carrying at least one T allele at rs36600 or rs401681 was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.63-0.96; P = 0.0199 and 1.29 (95% CI, 1.08-1.55; P = 0.0047, respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Stratification analyses showed that the significant associations of these 3 loci were only seen in smokers and male patients. The rs4809957 SNP was only significantly associated with length of survival of patients with extensive-stage but not limited-stage tumor. These results suggest that some of the lung cancer susceptibility loci might also affect the prognosis of SCLC.

  17. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Huihua [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan (China); Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Li-E [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Qingyi, E-mail: qwei@mdanderson.org [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  18. The prognostic impact of soluble and vesicular HLA-G and its relationship to circulating tumor cells in neoadjuvant treated breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Lisa; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Hoffmann, Oliver; Bittner, Ann-Kathrin; Wagner, Bettina; Manvailer, Luis Felipe Santos; Schramm, Sabine; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Giebel, Bernd; Kimmig, Rainer; Horn, Peter A; Rebmann, Vera

    2016-09-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) molecule and its soluble forms exert multiple immune suppressive regulatory functions in malignancy and in stem cells contributing to immune escape mechanisms. HLA-G can be secreted as free soluble HLA-G molecules or via extracellular vesicles (EVs). Here we evaluated these soluble HLA-G forms as prognostic marker for prediction of the clinical outcome of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) treated breast cancer (BC) patients. Plasma samples of BC patients procured before (n=142) and after (n=154) NACT were quantified for total soluble HLA-G (sHLA-Gtot) and HLA-G levels in ExoQuick™ derived EV fractions (sHLA-GEV) by ELISA. The corresponding increments were specified as free sHLA-G (sHLA-Gfree). Total and free sHLA-G were significantly increased in NACT treated BC patients compared to healthy controls (n=16). High sHLA-Gfree levels were exclusively associated to estrogen receptor expression before NACT. Importantly, high sHLA-GEV levels before NACT were related to disease progression and the detection of stem cell-like circulating tumor cells, but high sHLA-Gfree levels indicated an improved clinical outcome. Thus, this study demonstrates for the first time that the different sHLA-G subcomponents represent dissimilar qualitative prognostic impacts on the clinical outcome of NACT treated BC patients, whereas the total sHLA-G levels without separating into subcomponents are not related to clinical outcome.

  19. GENE TECHNOLOGY: A NEW WAY TO TREAT CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajapati P M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is the process of introducing genetic material RNA or DNA into a person's cells to fight disease. Gene therapy treats disease by either replacing damaged or missing genes with normal ones, or by providing new genes. The concept of gene therapy was born more than thirty years ago; however, new technology is opening the door to dramatically new possibilities in the treatment of cancers of all kinds. The long-term goal of cancer gene therapy is to develop treatments that attack only cancer cells, thereby eliminating adverse effects on the body and improving the possibility to cure disease. Gene therapy may someday soon make cancer a manageable disease with nominal side effects to the patients. Furthermore, since gene therapy has potential for other diseases such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, sickle-cell anemia, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson's, the value of research and discovery has broad applications.

  20. Analysis of 41 Cases of Primary Hypervascular Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Embolization of Emulsion of Chemotherapeutics and Iodized Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhi ZHOU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Transcatheter arterial chemotherapy and embolization is the main method in the treatment of lung cancer, but most of the reports do not study individually to small cell lung cancer (SCLC, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, hypovascular and hypervascular lung cancer. The pre-embolization perfusion of hemotherapeutics is still being used routinely and seldom report to iodized oil embolization. The article summarized the quality of life after the treatment, clinical efficiency, survival time and complications to evaluate the clinical effect of primary hypervascular NSCLC treated with embolization of emulsion of chemotherapeutics and iodized oil. Methods The study totally analyzed 41 cases which confirmed by pathology and follow up study from January, 2008 to January 2009. The CT scan with IV contrast demonstrates over moderate enhanced lesion which indicate hypervascular. Within the 41 cases, 23 cases of central, 18 cases of peripheral. Suqamous carcinoma 21 cases, adenocarcinoma 15 cases and squamoadenocarcinoma 5 cases. Stage IIIb 34 cases, stage IV 7 cases. Superselective incubation with microcatheter under DSA, to embolize the capillary bed with liquefied iodized oil and the emulsion of pharmorubicin, to embolize the supply artery of the tumor with gelatin foam microparticle. The liquefied iodized oil 5 mL-10 mL, pharmorubicin 10 mg-30 mg. The longest follow up is 12 months and to compare with the references of 2007-2009. Results The KPS is widely acclaimed after the treatment (P < 0.05, no complete response (CR, 31 cases of partial response (PR, 7 cases of no change (NC and 3 cases of progressive disease (PD, the total efficiency (CR+PR is 75.6%. The clinical efficiency (CR+PR+NC is 92.68%. 33 cases of total survival tome over 12 months (80.48%, IIIb stage 29/34 (85.29%, IV stage 4/7 (57.14%. 1 case with severe complication-spinal injury. Conclusion To treat primary hypervascular NSCLC with simple embolization of

  1. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  2. DIFFERENCES OF TUMOR MASSES AND HEMOGLOBIN LEVELS IN CERVICAL CANCER SQUAMOUS CELL TYPE PATIENTS TREATED WITH COMBINATION OF PACLITAXEL AND CARBOPLATIN CHEMOTHERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paclitaxel and carboplatin are standard operating procedure for chemotherapy treatment of cervical cancer squamous cell carcinoma at Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. Chemotherapy improves outcome of cancer treatment. However, chemotherapy brings also a variety of adverse effects and complications. This study aims to evaluate the therapeutic and adverse effects of chemotherapy in patients with squamous cell cervical cancer. Methods: This is a case study of six patients wit...

  3. The prognostic influence of neuroendocrine cells in prostate cancer: Results of a long-term follow-up study with patients treated by radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe distribution of immunohistochemically defined neuroen-docrine (NE) cells in benign, pre-cancerous and neoplastic prostatic tissues and the prognostic value of these cells in prostate cancer were studied in the radical prostatectomy specimens of 90 patients from whom complete long-ter

  4. Variations in Cell Surfaces of Estrogen Treated Breast Cancer Cells Detected by A Combined Instrument for Far-Field and Near-Field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Perner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of single breast cancer cells (cell line T‐47D to 17β‐estradiol (E2 under different concentrations was studied by using an instrument that allows to combine far‐field light microscopy with high resolution scanning near‐field (AFM/SNOM microscopy on the same cell. Different concentrations of E2 induce clearly different effects as well on cellular shape (in classical bright‐field imaging as on surface topography (atomic force imaging and absorbance (near‐field light transmission imaging. The differences range from a polygonal shape at zero via a roughly spherical shape at physiological up to a spindle‐like shape at un‐physiologically high concentrations. The surface topography of untreated control cells was found to be regular and smooth with small overall height modulations. At physiological E2 concentrations the surfaces became increasingly jagged as detected by an increase in membrane height. After application of the un‐physiological high E2 concentration the cell surface structures appeared to be smoother again with an irregular fine structure. The general behaviour of dose dependent differences was also found in the near‐field light transmission images. In order to quantify the treatment effects, line scans through the normalised topography images were drawn and a rate of co‐localisation between high topography and high transmission areas was calculated. The cell biological aspects of these observations are, so far, not studied in detail but measurements on single cells offer new perspectives to be empirically used in diagnosis and therapy control of breast cancers.

  5. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Rationally designed non-covalent protein nanocapsules, incorporating copper -free “click chemistry” moieties, polyethylene glycol (PEG) units, redox...chain variable fragment and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide , which result in specific and efficient accumulation within tumor...nanocapsules with specific cancer cell targeting ligands; Task 3. Preparing and testing of MMP activatable cell penetrating peptides (ACCPs)-coupled

  6. Clinical Observation on 271 Cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Yifei Kangliu Yin (益肺抗瘤饮)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘嘉湘; 施志明; 李和根; 徐振晔; 朱晏伟; 赵丽红; 高虹; 刘苓霜; 朱惠蓉; 张晖

    2001-01-01

    To observe the effects of Yifei Kangliu Yin(YFKLY) in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods:Two hundred and seventy-one patients with NSCLC were randomly divided into three groups, Group A treated only by YFKLY, Group B treated by the combination of YFKLY and chemotherapy, and Group C treated only by chemotherapy as the control group for control. Results: (1) Of the 127 cases in Group A, 1 case got complete remission (CR), 13 got partial remission (PR), 89 had no change (NC), and 24 had progression of disease (PD), thus CR+PR+NC accounting for 81.10%; of the 80 patients in Group B, 17 got PR , 53 got NC, 10 got PD, PR+NC accounting for 87.50%; of the 64 cases of chemotherapy group, 7 cases got PR, 39 cases got NC, 18 cases got PD, PR+NC accounting for 71.88% (P<0.01). (2) The metastasis rate was 23.52% in Group A, 20.00% in Group B and 35.71% in Group C respectively after treatment. (3) The 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-year survival rate were 73.09%, 32.01%, 13.18% and 13.18% in Group A, 71.85%, 46.35%, 29.19% and 23.35% in Group B and 37.61%, 13.67%, 9.7% and 0% in Group C. The symptoms were improved, and Karnofsky score was elevated in Group A and B. Conclusion: YFKLY could increase survival rate and quality of life, decrease metastasis rate, and enhance the immune function in NSCLC patients.

  7. Severe acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with alectinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuzo; Okamoto, Isamu; Otsubo, Kohei; Iwama, Eiji; Hamada, Naoki; Harada, Taishi; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Alectinib, the second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, has significant potency in patients with ALK rearrangement positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and its toxicity is generally well tolerable. We report a patient who developed severe acute interstitial lung disease after alectinib treatment. An 86-year-old woman with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma positive for rearrangement of ALK gene was treated with alectinib. On the 215th day after initiation of alectinib administration, she was admitted to our hospital with the symptom of progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations in both lungs, and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed pronounced lymphocytosis. There was no evidence of infection or other specific causes of her condition, and she was therefore diagnosed with interstitial lung disease induced by alectinib. Her CT findings and respiratory condition improved after steroid pulse therapy. As far as we are aware, this is the first reported case of alectinib-induced severe interstitial lung disease (ILD). We should be aware of the possibility of such a severe adverse event and should therefore carefully monitor patients treated with this drug.

  8. Practical recommendation for rash and diarrhea management in Indian patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Parikh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are a pharmaceutical class of small molecules, orally available with manageable safety profile, approved worldwide for the treatment of several neoplasms, including lung, breast, kidney and pancreatic cancer as well as gastro-intestinal stromal tumours and chronic myeloid leukaemia. In recent years, management of lung cancer has been moving towards molecular-guided treatment, and the best example of this new approach is the use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs in patients with mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. The identification of molecular predictors of response can allow the selection of patients who will be the most likely to respond to these tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Gastrointestinal (GI adverse events (AEs are frequently observed in patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and are most impactful on the patient's quality of life. Dermatologic side effects are also relatively common among patients treated with EGFR inhibitors. Evidence has emerged in recent years to suggest that the incidence and severity of rash, positively correlated with response to treatment.These skin disorders are generally mild or moderate in severity and can be managed by appropriate interventions or by reducing or interrupting the dose. Appropriate and timely management make it possible to continue a patient's quality of life and maintain compliance; however if these adverse events (AEs are not managed appropriately, and become more severe, treatment cessation may be warranted compromising clinical outcome. Strategies to improve the assessment and management of TKI related skin AEs are therefore essential to ensure compliance with TKI therapy, thereby enabling patients to achieve optimal benefits. This article provides a consensus on practical recommendation for the prevention and management of diarrhoea and rash in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC patients receiving TKIs.

  9. Reproducibility of parameter learning with missing observations in naive Wnt Bayesian network trained on colorectal cancer samples and doxycycline-treated cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shriprakash

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript the reproducibility of parameter learning with missing observations in a naive Bayesian network and its effect on the prediction results for Wnt signaling activation in colorectal cancer is tested. The training of the network is carried out separately on doxycycline-treated LS174T cell lines (GSE18560) as well as normal and adenoma samples (GSE8671). A computational framework to test the reproducibility of the parameters is designed in order check the veracity of the prediction results. Detailed experimental analysis suggests that the prediction results are accurate and reproducible with negligible deviations. Anomalies in estimated parameters are accounted for due to the representation issues of the Bayesian network model. High prediction accuracies are reported for normal (N) and colon-related adenomas (AD), colorectal cancer (CRC), carcinomas (C), adenocarcinomas (ADC) and replication error colorectal cancer (RER CRC) test samples. Test samples from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) do not fare well in the prediction test. Also, an interesting case regarding hypothesis testing came up while proving the statistical significance of the different design setups of the Bayesian network model. It was found that hypothesis testing may not be the correct way to check the significance between design setups, especially when the structure of the model is the same, given that the model is trained on a single piece of test data. The significance test does have value when the datasets are independent. Finally, in comparison to the biologically inspired models, the naive Bayesian model may give accurate results, but this accuracy comes at the cost of a loss of crucial biological knowledge which might help reveal hidden relations among intra/extracellular factors affecting the Wnt pathway.

  10. The influence of TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharides on hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the feasibility of its application in treating liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Junsheng Gu, Ranran Sun, Shen Shen, Zujiang Yu Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of China Objective: This study was designed to explore the influence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharides (LPS on liver cancer cell and the feasibility to perform liver cancer adjuvant therapy. Methods: Human liver cancer cell lines HepG2, H7402, and PLC/PRF/5 were taken as models, and the expression of TLRs mRNA was detected by real time-polymerase chain reaction method semiquantitatively. WST-1 method was used to detect the influence of LPS on the proliferation ability of liver cancer cells; propidium iodide (PI single staining and Annexin V/PI double staining were used to test the influence of LPS on the cell cycle and apoptosis, respectively, on human liver cancer cell line H7402. Fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot method were used to determine the change of expression of Cyclin D1. Results: The results demonstrated that most TLRs were expressed in liver cancer cells; stimulating TLR4 by LPS could upregulate TLR4 mRNA and the protein level, activate NF-κB signaling pathway downstream of TLR4, and mediate the generation of inflammatory factors IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α; LPS was found to be able to strengthen the proliferation ability of liver cancer cells, especially H7402 cells; the expression of Cyclin D1 rose and H7402 cells were promoted to transit from G1 stage to S stage under the stimulation of LPS, but cell apoptosis was not affected. It was also found that LPS was able to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription -3 (STAT3 signaling pathway in H7402 cells and meanwhile significantly increase the initiation activity of STAT3; proliferation promoting effect of LPS to liver cancer cells remarkably lowered once STAT3 was blocked or inhibited. Conclusion: Thus, TLR4 agonist LPS is proved to be able to

  11. Increase in soluble PD-1 is associated with prolonged survival in patients with advanced EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Demuth, Christina; Weber, Britta;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The central immune co-inhibitory programmed cell death receptor/ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway plays a key role in tumor immune evasion in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Soluble PD-1 (sPD-1) can be detected in the blood, and preclinical evidence suggests that sPD-1 blocks PD-1/-L1...... interaction and improves anti-tumor immunity. The present study compares the concentration of sPD-1 in the serum of advanced NSCLC patients with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutation prior to erlotinib treatment and at the time of progression and correlates these results to patient outcome....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from 38 patients with EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC treated with erlotinib were analyzed for sPD-1 by sandwich ELISA. EGFR mutational status was assessed in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and tumor biopsies. RESULTS: sPD-1 could be detected in 21% of patients prior...

  12. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  13. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  14. Technical challenges of sparing infrahyoid swallowing organs at risk in oropharynx squamous cell cancer treated with IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, Lyndon, E-mail: lyndon.morley@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tsang, Shirley W.S. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Breen, Stephen L.; Waldron, John N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Maganti, Manjula; Pintilie, Melania [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Shao Hui [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kim, John [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This study reports clinical performance in the sparing of infrahyoid swallowing organs at risk (SWOARs) in oropharynx cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Rates of meeting dose-volume planning goals are reported and compared with geometry-based estimates of what is achievable. This study also develops 3 measures of target-SWOAR geometry and tests their usefulness in providing geometry-based dose-volume planning goals. A total of 50 oropharynx cancer IMRT plans were reviewed. Success rates in meeting institutional dose-volume goals were determined for the glottic larynx (G), postcricoid pharynx (P), and esophagus (E). The following 3 measures of target-SWOAR geometry were investigated as methods of identifying geometry-based planning goals: presence of gross disease in neck levels 3 to 4, target-SWOAR overlap, and a 3-dimensional (3D) measure of target-SWOAR geometry. Locally advanced disease was predominant in this patient population with target volumes overlapping SWOARs in 68% to 98% of cases. Clinical rates of success in meeting dose-volume goals varied by SWOAR (16% to 82%) but compared well with estimated potentially achievable rates in most cases (14% average difference between clinical and potential). Cases grouped by the presence of levels 3 to 4 neck nodes or target-SWOAR overlap did not have significantly different SWOAR doses. Cases grouped using a 3D measure of target-SWOAR geometry differed significantly, providing useful geometry-based planning goals (e.g., mean Glottis dose <45 Gy was achieved 19%, 44%, or 81% of the time in each of 3 groups). This study describes the technical challenge of sparing SWOARs and investigates several potential methods for grouping cases to assist with treatment plan evaluation. Quantifying the 3-D relationship between the targets and SWOARs is a promising way of approaching this complex problem. Data presented in this paper may be useful to evaluate treatment plans using objective geometry

  15. Exploiting replicative stress to treat cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in cancer cells is accompanied by stalling and collapse of the replication fork and signalling in response to DNA damage and/or premature mitosis; these processes are collectively known as 'replicative stress'. Progress is being made to increase our understanding of the mechanisms...

  16. Phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel in second-line advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzakowski, Maciej; Ramlau, Rodryg; Jassem, Jacek;

    2010-01-01

    To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.......To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy....

  17. Pemetrexed single agent chemotherapy in previously treated patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bearz Alessandra

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of second-line pemetrexed in Stage IIIB or IV NSCLC. Methods Overall, 95 patients received pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 i.v. over Day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients also received oral dexamethasone, oral folic acid and i.m. vitamin B12 supplementation to reduce toxicity. NCI CTC 2.0 was used to rate toxicity. All the adverse events were graded in terms of severity and relation to study treatment. Dose was reduced in case of toxicity and treatment was delayed for up to 42 days from Day 1 of any cycle to allow recovering from study drug-related toxicities. Tumor response was measured using the RECIST criteria. Results Patients received a median number of 4 cycles and 97.8% of the planned dose. Overall, 75 patients (78.9% of treated reported at least one adverse event: 34 (35.8% had grade 3 as worst grade and only 5 (5.2% had grade 4. Drug-related events occurred in 57.9% of patients. Neutropenia (8.4% and leukopenia (6.3 % were the most common grade 3/4 hematological toxicities. Grade 3 anemia and thrombocytopenia were reported in 3.2% and 2.1% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea (6.3%, fatigue (3.2% and dyspnea (3.2% were the most common grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicities. The most common drug-related toxicities (any grade were pyrexia (11.6%, vomiting, nausea, diarrhea and asthenia (9.5% and fatigue (8.4%. Tumor Response Rate (CR/PR in treated patients was 9.2%. The survival at 4.5 months (median follow-up was 79% and the median PFS was 3.1 months. Twenty patients (21.1% died mainly because of disease progression. Conclusion Patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC could benefit from second-line pemetrexed, with a low incidence of hematological and non-hematological toxicities.

  18. Implications of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells for Understanding Fomation and Therapy of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Li; Donglin Wang

    2005-01-01

    Most cancers are heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There is increasing evidence suggesting that only a minority of cancer cells, tumorigenic or tumor initiating cells, possess the capacity to proliferate extensively and form new hematopoietic cancer or solid tumors. Tumor initiating cells share characteristics required for normal stem cells. The dysregulation of self-renewal and proliferation of stem cells is a likely requirement for cancer development. This review formulates a model for the origin of cancer stem cells and regulating self-renewal which influences the way we study and treat cancer.

  19. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  20. Early treatment volume reduction rate as a prognostic factor in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jeong Shin; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the relationship between early treatment response to definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and survival outcome in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with LS-SCLC who received definitive CRT between January 2009 and December 2012. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of etoposide/carboplatin (n = 15) or etoposide/cisplatin (n = 32) and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 46 to 64 Gy). Early treatment volume reduction rate (ETVRR) was defined as the percentage change in gross tumor volume between diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and simulation CT for adaptive RT planning and was used as a parameter for early treatment response. The median dose at adaptive RT planning was 36 Gy (range, 30 to 43 Gy), and adaptive CT was performed in 30 patients (63.8%). With a median follow-up of 27.7 months (range, 5.9 to 75.8 months), the 2-year locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The mean diagnostic and adaptive gross tumor volumes were 117.9 mL (range, 5.9 to 447 mL) and 36.8 mL (range, 0.3 to 230.6 mL), respectively. The median ETVRR was 71.4% (range, 30 to 97.6%) and the ETVRR >45% group showed significantly better OS (p < 0.0001) and LRPFS (p = 0.009) than the other group. ETVRR as a parameter for early treatment response may be a useful prognostic factor to predict treatment outcome in LS-SCLC patients treated with CRT.

  1. Clinical Profile of Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors in Treating Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Nine Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Evidence on the benefits of combining cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (COX-2 in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still controversial. We investigated the efficacy and safety profile of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in treating NSCLC.The first meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed to assess the effect of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC on the overall response rate (ORR, overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, one-year survival, and toxicities. The fixed-effects model was used to calculate the pooled RR and HR and between-study heterogeneity was assessed. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the type of COX-2 inhibitors, treatment pattern, and treatment line.Nine randomized clinical trials, comprising 1679 patents with NSCLC, were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled ORR of patients who have NSCLC with COX-2 inhibitors was significantly higher than that without COX-2 inhibitors. In subgroup analysis, significantly increased ORR results were found on celecoxib (RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.51, rofecoxib (RR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.28, chemotherapy (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.20, 1.63, and first-line treatment (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.63. However, COX-2 inhibitors had no effect on the one-year survival, OS, and PFS. Increased RR of leucopenia (RR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.45 and thrombocytopenia (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.76 suggested that COX-2 inhibitors increased hematologic toxicities (grade ≥ 3 of chemotherapy.COX-2 inhibitors increased ORR of advanced NSCLC and had no impact on survival indices, but it may increase the risk of hematologic toxicities associated with chemotherapy.

  2. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  3. Potential advantages of CUDC-101, a multitargeted HDAC, EGFR, and HER2 inhibitor, in treating drug resistance and preventing cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pursell, Natalie W; Samson, Maria Elena S; Atoyan, Ruzanna; Ma, Anna W; Selmi, Abdelkader; Xu, Wanlu; Cai, Xiong; Voi, Maurizio; Savagner, Pierre; Lai, Cheng-Jung

    2013-06-01

    CUDC-101 is a novel, small-molecule, anticancer agent targeting histone deacetylase (HDAC), EGF receptor (EGFR), and HER2. It is currently in phase I clinical development in patients with solid tumors. Previously, we reported that CUDC-101 has potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in cultured tumor cells and in vivo xenograft models. We now show that cancer cells that have acquired resistance to single-target EGFR inhibitors through upregulation of AXL or loss of E-cadherin remain sensitive to CUDC-101, which inhibits MET- and AXL-mediated signaling, restores E-cadherin expression, and reduces cell migration. CUDC-101 also efficiently inhibited the proliferation of MET-overexpressing non-small cell lung cancer and gastric cancer cell lines and inhibited the migration and invasion of invasive tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that coupling HDAC and HER2 inhibitory activities to an EGFR inhibitor may potentially be effective in overcoming drug resistance and preventing cancer cell migration.

  4. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  5. Antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer cells treated in vitro with constituents of a product derived from Pistacia lentiscus L. var. chia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, K V; Prince, J; Han, Z; Dimas, K; Cladaras, M; Wyche, J H; Sitaras, N M; Pantazis, P

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that a 50% ethanol extract of the plant-derived product, Chios mastic gum (CMG), contains compounds which inhibit proliferation and induce death of HCT116 human colon cancer cells in vitro. CMG-treatment induces cell arrest at G(1), detachment of the cells from the substrate, activation of pro-caspases-8, -9 and -3, and causes several morphological changes typical of apoptosis in cell organelles. These events, furthermore, are time- and dose-dependent, but p53- and p21-independent. Apoptosis induction by CMG is not inhibited in HCT116 cell clones expressing high levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, or dominant-negative FADD, thereby indicating that CMG induces cell death via a yet-to-be identified pathway, unrelated to the death receptor- and mitochondrion-dependent pathways. The findings presented here suggest that CMG (a) induces an anoikis form of cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells that includes events associated with caspase-dependent pathways; and (b) might be developed into a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon and other cancers.

  6. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns to Predict the Survival of Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Erlotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao LIU

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Erlotinib is a targeted therapy drug for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. It has been proven that, there was evidence of various survival benefits derived from erlotinib in patients with different clinical features, but the results are conflicting. The aim of this study is to identify novel predictive factors and explore the interactions between clinical variables as well as their impact on the survival of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC heavily treated with erlotinib. Methods The clinical and follow-up data of 105 Chinese NSCLC patients referred to the Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from September 2006 to September 2009 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of progressive-free survival (PFS was performed using recursive partitioning referred to as the classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Results The median PFS of 105 eligible consecutive Chinese NSCLC patients was 5.0 months (95%CI: 2.9-7.1. CART analysis was performed for the initial, second, and third split in the lymph node involvement, the time of erlotinib administration, and smoking history. Four terminal subgroups were formed. The longer values for the median PFS were 11.0 months (95%CI: 8.9-13.1 for the subgroup with no lymph node metastasis and 10.0 months (95%CI: 7.9-12.1 for the subgroup with lymph node involvement, but not over the second-line erlotinib treatment with a smoking history ≤35 packs per year. The shorter values for the median PFS were 2.3 months (95%CI: 1.6-3.0 for the subgroup with lymph node metastasis and over the second-line erlotinib treatment, and 1.3 months (95%CI: 0.5-2.1 for the subgroup with lymph node metastasis, but not over the second-line erlotinib treatment with a smoking history >35 packs per year. Conclusion Lymph node metastasis, the time of erlotinib administration, and smoking history are closely correlated with the survival of advanced NSCLC patients with first- to

  7. Interstitial lung disease in gefitinib-treated Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer – a retrospective analysis: JMTO LC03-02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Harue

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, high incidences of interstitial lung disease (ILD and ILD-related deaths have been reported among gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We investigated the efficacy of gefitinib, the incidence of ILD and risk factors for ILD in these patients. Findings We obtained patient data retrospectively using questionnaires sent to 22 institutions. We asked for demographic and clinical data on NSCLC patients for whom gefitinib treatment had begun between July 2002 and February 2003. Data from a total of 526 patients were analyzed. The patient characteristics were as follows: 64% male, 69% with adenocarcinoma, 61% with a performance score of 0–1, and 5% with concurrent interstitial pneumonitis. The objective response proportion was 80/439 (18.2%; 95% CI: 14.7–22.0. ILD developed in 17 patients (3.2%; 95% CI 1.9–5.1%, of whom 7 died. According to multivariate analysis, female sex, history of prior chemotherapy, low absolute neutrophil count before gefitinib treatment, and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with response to gefitinib treatment. None of the factors we evaluated were associated with the development of ILD. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with previously published values for treatment response proportions and incidence of ILD during gefitinib treatment in Japanese patients. Future studies should be aimed at identifying factors indicating that a patient has a high probability of receiving benefit from gefitinib and a low risk of developing ILD.

  8. ANTISENSE TECHNIQUE TO TREAT BREAST CANCER – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many genes which are responsible for developing breast cancer especially, BRCA2 (Breast Cancer 2 and HER2 are extensively involved in developing breast cancer and hence it is the centre of attractions for all the researchers. Nano-particles conjugated with the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies are called as “Trastazumab” which directly target the HER2 gene. The major advantage of this technology is that the cells can be prevented before they evolve in to mature stages i.e. metastases production. The BRCA2 gene belongs to the family of tumor suppressor genes and its protein product is responsible for the error free repair mechanisms of DNA. This BRCA2 gene interacts with RAD51 gene to fix the DNA breaks. Mutation in BRCA2 gene such as insertion and deletion leads to breast cancer. More than 800 mutations are found in this gene that lead to increased risk of the breast cancer. Furthermore, BRCA2 gene is also associated with various cancers like prostate, ovarian, fallopian, male breast cancer. Researchers believe that altered products produced due to defects in this gene are unable to interact with the gene RAD51 and cannot repair the DNA. Antisense RNA is the tool which can used to block any RNA or DNA to synthesize its product. In this review we focus in using Antisense RNA against the sense RNA of an altered BRCA2 gene to block the altered affectivity of that gene on the DNA repair mechanism. However, Antisense RNA technique may not help in treating breast cancer, it can better manage the breast cancer to occur.

  9. Pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of p53 in cisplatin-treated human testicular cancer are cell context-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    di Pietro, Alessandra; Koster, Roelof; Boersma-van Eck, Wytske; Dam, Wendy A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Gietema, Jourik A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2012-01-01

    In murine testicular cancer (TC) cells wild-type p53 contributes to sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in a dose-dependent way. In human TC, however, the role of wild-type p53 functionality in chemotherapeutic response remains elusive. We analyzed functionality of wild-type p53 in cisplatin sensitivi

  10. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  11. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell

  12. Effect of 4-methoxyindole-3-carbinol on the proliferation of colon cancer cells in vitro, when treated alone or in combination with indole-3-carbinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronbak, Remy; Duus, Fritz; Vang, Ole

    2010-07-28

    Consumption of cruciferous vegetables and cancer prevention seem to be positively associated. We present an easy two-step synthesis for 4-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (4MeOI3C), the expected breakdown product of 4-methoxyglucobrassicin during ingestion. 4MeOI3C inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer cells DLD-1 and HCT 116 with IC(50) values of 116 microM and 96 microM, respectively, after 48 h in vitro, and is therefore a more potent inhibitor than indole-3-carbinol (I3C). 4MeOI3C and I3C combined in different molar ratios inhibited proliferation in a nearly additive to slightly synergistic manner. Proliferation was inhibited by 100 microM 4MeOI3C after 48 h without affecting cell cycle phase distribution, indicating an overall-slowdown effect on the cell cycle. However, 200 microM 4MeOI3C caused a very high level of cell death and an accumulation of living cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase, indicating a concentration-dependent mode of action. We conclude that 4MeOI3C might play a role in the cancer preventive effect of cruciferous vegetables.

  13. Down-Regulation of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel KCa1.1 in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-453 Cells Treated with Vitamin D Receptor Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anowara Khatun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D (VD reduces the risk of breast cancer and improves disease prognoses. Potential VD analogs are being developed as therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatments. The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa1.1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways and is associated with high grade tumors and poor prognoses. In the present study, we examined the effects of treatments with VD receptor (VDR agonists on the expression and activity of KCa1.1 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells using real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Treatments with VDR agonists for 72 h markedly decreased the expression levels of KCa1.1 transcripts and proteins in MDA-MB-453 cells, resulting in the significant inhibition of depolarization responses induced by paxilline, a specific KCa1.1 blocker. The specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed VDR agonist-induced decreases in KCa1.1 protein expression. These results suggest that KCa1.1 is a new downstream target of VDR signaling and the down-regulation of KCa1.1 through the transcriptional repression of KCa1.1 and enhancement of KCa1.1 protein degradation contribute, at least partly, to the antiproliferative effects of VDR agonists in breast cancer cells.

  14. How Is Sickle Cell Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sickle Cell Disease Treated? Health Maintenance To Prevent Complications Babies ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 09/02/2011 In this video— ...

  15. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  16. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  17. Development of chitosan graft pluronic®F127 copolymer nanoparticles containing DNA aptamer for paclitaxel delivery to treat breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach Nguyen, Kim; Le, Duc Vinh; Do, Dinh Ho; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    HER-2/ErbB2/Neu(HER-2), a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is specifically overexpressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and serves a therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to isolate DNA aptamer (Ap) that specifically bind to a HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line, using SELEX strategy. We developed a novel multifunctional composite micelle with surface modification of Ap for targeted delivery of paclitaxel. This binary mixed system consisting of Ap modified pluronic®F127 and chitosan could enhance PTX loading capacity and increase micelle stability. Polymeric micelles had a spherical shape and were self-assemblies of block copolymers of approximately 86.22 ± 1.45 nm diameter. PTX could be loaded with high encapsulation efficiency (83.28 ± 0.13%) and loading capacity (9.12 ± 0.34%). The release profile were 29%-35% in the first 12 h and 85%-93% after 12 d at pH 7.5 of receiving media. The IC50 doses by MTT assay showed the greater activity of nanoparticles loaded paclitaxel over free paclitaxel and killed cells up to 95% after 6 h. These results demonstrated unique assembly with the capacity to function as an efficient detection and delivery vehicle in the biological living system.

  18. The mechanisms of photodynamic action for treating of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Akopov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current views on mechanisms of therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for treating of cancer patients are represented. The history of formation and development of the method is described. The main requirements for agents used as photosensitizers are listed. Detailed review of main photosensitizers used in clinical practice in Russia and in foreign countries with their chemical structure, main spectral characteristics was performed. Methods of its application, therapeutic dose ranges, indications, specifi c pharmacokinetic properties and side-effects are briefl y outlined. Advantages and disadvantages of the most popular modern photosensitizers, main mechanisms of entry of photosensitizers of different chemical structure into cancer cells are observed. Three main possible component of anti-tumor effect: direct damage of cancer cells, impairment of vascular stroma of tumor and elimination of tumor due to immune cells are shown and closely discussed. Necrosis and apotosis of neovascular net which are main development trends of anti-tumor action for photodynamic therapy are noticed. 

  19. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonanno L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Bonanno,1 Giulia Zago,1 Giuseppe Marulli,2 Paola Del Bianco,3 Marco Schiavon,2 Giulia Pasello,1 Valentina Polo,1,4 Fabio Canova,1 Fabrizio Tonetto,5 Lucio Loreggian,5 Federico Rea,2 PierFranco Conte,1,4 Adolfo Favaretto1 1Medical Oncology Unit 2, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 2Thoracic Surgery Department, University of Padova, 3Clinical Trials and Biostatistics Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 4Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 5Radiotherapy Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy Objectives: If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1, paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1, and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8 for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results: In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system. A total of 36 (62% patients achieved partial response (PR, and six (10% progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62% cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64% patients underwent surgery

  20. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  1. Treating Sexual Problems for Men with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a great help to a person’s appearance and self-esteem. Limb amputation Treatment for some cancers can include ... Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, Answers, and Hope. Available Every ...

  2. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Malignant thrombosis of the superior vena cava caused by non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radiation and erlotinib: a case with complete and prolonged response over 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Jianyang Wang,1 Jun Liang,1 Wenqing Wang,1 Han Ouyang,2 Luhua Wang11Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 2Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Most cases of superior vena cava (SVC syndrome resulting from neoplasm, especially from lung cancer, remain a serious challenge to treat. Here, for the first time as far as we are aware, we report the case of a non-small-cell lung cancer patient with a massive SVC malignant thrombosis who was treated with thoracic irradiation and erlotinib. The treatment regimen consisted of erlotinib 150 mg/day and a total dose of 66 Gy/33 fractions delivered to the tumor, malignant thrombosis, and metastasis mediastinal lymph nodes. The malignant thrombosis responded dramatically and the combined regimen was well tolerated. After discharge, the erlotinib was prescribed as maintenance therapy. The patient was followed closely for the next 3 years. During this time, positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans and serum tumor marker screens were undertaken. By 6 months, the primary tumor showed complete response and by 9 months, the SVC thrombosis had disappeared. No sign of relapse has been found to date.Keywords: superior vena cava syndrome, radiotherapy, thoracic irradiation, neoplasm

  4. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, Total-Body Irradiation, Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Bone Marrow Failure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    ; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage

  5. Fludarabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With or Without Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma

  6. Monitoring PD-L1 positive circulating tumor cells in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with the PD-1 inhibitor Nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolazzo, Chiara; Raimondi, Cristina; Mancini, MariaLaura; Caponnetto, Salvatore; Gradilone, Angela; Gandini, Orietta; Mastromartino, Maria; Del Bene, Gabriella; Prete, Alessandra; Longo, Flavia; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2016-08-24

    Controversial results on the predictive value of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) status in lung tumor tissue for response to immune checkpoint inhibitors do not allow for any conclusive consideration. Liquid biopsy might allow real-time sampling of patients for PD-L1 through the course of the disease. Twenty-four stage IV NSCLC patients included in the Expanded Access Program with Nivolumab were enrolled. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were analyzed by CellSearch with anti-human B7-H1/PD-L1 PE-conjugated antibody. PD-L1 expressing CTCs were assessed at baseline, at 3 and 6 months after starting therapy, and correlated with outcome. At baseline and at 3 months of treatment, the presence of CTCs and the expression of PD-L1 on their surface were found associated to poor patients outcome. Nevertheless, the high frequency of PD-L1 expressing CTCs hampered to discriminate the role of PD-L1 in defining prognosis. Conversely although CTCs were found in all patients 6 months after treatment, at this time patients could be dichotomized into two groups based PD-L1 expression on CTCs. Patients with PD-L1 negative CTCs all obtained a clinical benefit, while patients with PD-L1 (+) CTCs all experienced progressive disease. This suggests that the persistence of PD-L1(+) CTCs might mirror a mechanism of therapy escape.

  7. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  8. Histone deacetylase turnover and recovery in sulforaphane-treated colon cancer cells: competing actions of 14-3-3 and Pin1 in HDAC3/SMRT corepressor complex dissociation/reassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams David E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation as anti-cancer agents. Dietary constituents share certain properties of HDAC inhibitor drugs, including the ability to induce global histone acetylation, turn-on epigenetically-silenced genes, and trigger cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or differentiation in cancer cells. One such example is sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate derived from the glucosinolate precursor glucoraphanin, which is abundant in broccoli. Here, we examined the time-course and reversibility of SFN-induced HDAC changes in human colon cancer cells. Results Cells underwent progressive G2/M arrest over the period 6-72 h after SFN treatment, during which time HDAC activity increased in the vehicle-treated controls but not in SFN-treated cells. There was a time-dependent loss of class I and selected class II HDAC proteins, with HDAC3 depletion detected ahead of other HDACs. Mechanism studies revealed no apparent effect of calpain, proteasome, protease or caspase inhibitors, but HDAC3 was rescued by cycloheximide or actinomycin D treatment. Among the protein partners implicated in the HDAC3 turnover mechanism, silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT was phosphorylated in the nucleus within 6 h of SFN treatment, as was HDAC3 itself. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed SFN-induced dissociation of HDAC3/SMRT complexes coinciding with increased binding of HDAC3 to 14-3-3 and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase 1 (Pin1. Pin1 knockdown blocked the SFN-induced loss of HDAC3. Finally, SFN treatment for 6 or 24 h followed by SFN removal from the culture media led to complete recovery of HDAC activity and HDAC protein expression, during which time cells were released from G2/M arrest. Conclusion The current investigation supports a model in which protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates SMRT and HDAC3 in the nucleus, resulting in dissociation of the corepressor

  9. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  10. Steroids for Treating Cancer (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because during treatment, the body manufactures less cortisol. Tapering off the medication gives the body a chance ... Radiation Therapy Caring for a Seriously Ill Child Definition: Corticosteroids Steroids and Cancer Treatment Contact Us Print ...

  11. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  12. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  13. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  14. Genetic polymorphism in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene predicts outcome in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Larsen, Anne; Nissen, Peter H.; Jakobsen, Kristine Raaby;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are important predictors of treatment response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients with mutations do not respond and some patients without mutations show...... with advanced NSCLC. Genotypes were correlated with clinical characteristics, toxicity and outcome. A multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards model while adjusting for clinically relevant factors including EGFR mutation status. RESULTS: 181946CT or TT genotypes showed an association...... response. We therefore need additional biomarkers to improve the selection of these patients for treatment. A promising candidate could be germline genetic variations in the EGFR gene that can alter protein expression or function and may influence the response to TKIs. Thus, the aim of this study...

  15. Docetaxel plus nintedanib versus docetaxel plus placebo in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (LUME-Lung 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    a median follow-up of 31·7 months (IQR 27·8-36·1), overall survival was significantly improved for patients with adenocarcinoma histology who progressed within 9 months after start of first-line treatment in the docetaxel plus nintedanib group (206 patients) compared with those in the docetaxel plus......BACKGROUND: The phase 3 LUME-Lung 1 study assessed the efficacy and safety of docetaxel plus nintedanib as second-line therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Patients from 211 centres in 27 countries with stage IIIB/IV recurrent NSCLC progressing after first-line chemotherapy...... 200 mg orally twice daily or matching placebo on days 2-21, every 3 weeks until unacceptable adverse events or disease progression. Investigators and patients were masked to assignment. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) by independent central review, analysed by intention...

  16. Effect of OK-432 combined UFT in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy. A randomized prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingu, Kenichi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ohmagari, Junichi; Masuda, Kouji [and others

    1997-06-01

    Distant metastasis and local recurrence are the causes of poor treatment results of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer patients. Inhibition of repair from radiation damage in tumors and distant metastases may improve the survival rate. Some authors of this paper previously reported that tegafur combined with OK-432 significantly improved the survival rate in these patients. We conducted a prospective randomized trial using UFT (mixed preparation of tegafur and uracil) with or without OK-432, after radiotherapy in these patients, to assess the effect of OK-432 on survival rate, the duration of continued response by previous treatment, and the effect on leucopenia due to UFT. However, unexpected results were obtained. OK-432 did not prolong response duration, did not improve the survival rate, and did not inhibit the leucopenia due to UFT. (author)

  17. Sexual dysfunctions in men treated for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Susanne; Kristensen, Ellids; Giraldi, Annamaria G E

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated for testicular cancer have increased risk of ejaculatory, orgasmic and erectile dysfunction compared with healthy men. The underlying relations are unclear. This review describes sexual dysfunctions that are associated with various treatment modalities. One meta-analysis and 11...... for understanding sexual dysfunctions in patients with testicular cancer....

  18. The Effects of Microwave Ablation and Surgical Resection on Hematogenous Dissemination of Cancer Cells in Treating Patients with Small Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoyang Wen; Baowei Dong; Ping Liang; Xiaoling Yu; Li Su; Dejiang Yu; Hongtian Xia

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To conduct a comparative study of the effects of treatment using microwave ablation versus surgical resection on hematogenous dissemination of cancer cells, and on the level of immune cells of the peripheral blood in patients with small primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC, ≤5 cm).METHODS Forty patients with small PHC (maximal diameter ≤5 cm) were divided into a microwave group (19 cases) and a surgical operation group (21 cases). A real-time (RT) quantitative nested RT-PCR examination was performed for peripheral blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) mRNA. Studies were conducted to determine the level of CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD4/CD8 cells and for liver function at 30 min before, and 30 min,1 day and 3 days after the treatment.RESULTS Compared to the value before ablation, no obvious changes of CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD4/CD8 cells were found in patients of the microwave group within 7 days after ablation, but CD3, CD4 and CD4/CD8 cells in the operation group were lower compared to that before operatioh. The copy number of AFP mRNA in the peripheral blood samples of the patients of the 2 groups before operation was determined in 67.5% of the patients (27/40). There was an rise in the expression after treatment but no statistical difference was found in comparing the 2 groups. Follow-up of the patients was conducted for 1 to 16 months. For patients with continuous expression of peripheral blood AFP mRNA, the possibility of relapse and metastasis was increased.CONCLUSION Surgical resection or microwave ablation can cause more exfoliation of hepatoma carcinoma cells in the peripheral blood of patients with small PHC. The immune function of peripheral blood cells decreased in the patients after surgical resection, however, the immune function was better protected following microwave ablation. Microwave ablation causes minor reduction in liver function, and the treatment method presents a definite value for PHC therapy.

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  20. Detection and Evaluation of EGFR Mutation Status in Serum of Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with EGFR-TKIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling MA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs has shown a high response rate in the treatment of lung cancer in patients with (EGFR mutation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between EGFR mutation status in serum and predicting benefit from EGFR-TKIs therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods We examined EGFR mutation status in serum of 80 patients with advanced, EGFR-TKIs given as first-line therapy NSCLC. All patients were received long-term follow-up, and the drug efficacy were observed and evaluated. Results The EGFR mutation in serum was detected in 33.8% (27/80 of NSCLC patients examined, in which exon 19 deletion mutation was present at a frequency of 44.4% (12/27 and exon 21 point mutation was 55.6% (15/27; The response rate to EGFR-TKI in patients with EGFR mutation in serum was (55.6%, 15/27, which was remarkably higher than that in EGFR wild-type patients (17.0%, 9/53, the difference was statistically significant (χ2=0.370, P<0.001; The median progression free survival (PFS of patients with EGFR mutation in serum was remarkably better than that of EGFR wild-type patients (9.8 months vs 5.7 months, P=0.014. Conclusion In patients with advanced, EGFR-positive in serum NSCLC, EGFR-TKIs given as first-line therapy is associated with improved drug efficacy. The results suggest that it is feasible to use serum to detect EGFR mutation, which can predict a benefit from EGFR-TKIs given as first-line therapy.

  1. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strome, Scott [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Regine, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  2. Immunotherapy and patients treated for cancer with microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Raphaël; Cohen, Romain; Cochereau, Delphine; Duval, Alex; Lascols, Olivier; Lopez-Trabada, Daniel; Afchain, Pauline; Trouilloud, Isabelle; Parc, Yann; Lefevre, Jérémie H; Fléjou, Jean-François; Svrcek, Magali; André, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a tumor phenotype linked to somatic or germline (Lynch syndrome) inactivating alterations of DNA mismatch repair genes. A broad spectrum of neoplasms exhibits MSI phenotype, mainly colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and gastric cancer. MSI tumors are characterized by dense immune infiltration and high load of tumor neo-antigens. Growing evidence is accumulating on the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition for patients treated for MSI solid tumors. We present a comprehensive overview of MSI phenotype, its biological landscape and current diagnostic methods. Then we focus on MSI as a predictive biomarker of response to immune checkpoint inhibition in the context of colorectal cancer and non-colorectal tumors.

  3. One case treated bladder cancer with Immunity-herbal acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Suk Kim

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available In oriental medicine bladder cancer had been called '溺血(Hematuria', 血淋(Blood Stranguria', 濕熱河注(Downward Flow of Damp-heat' and so on. The symptoms are Hematuria, Oliguria, Lower abdomen pain, febrile sensation and Anemia etc. These are similar to the symptoms of bladder cancer by modem medicine. I have experienced a bladder cancer patient who was diagnosed as stage Ⅲ. She has been treated bladder cancer with Immunity herbal acupuncture and Her clinical and objective symptoms have been better. Therefore I report this results.

  4. One case treated bladder cancer with Immunity-herbal acupuncture

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In oriental medicine bladder cancer had been called '溺血(Hematuria)', 血淋(Blood Stranguria)', 濕熱河注(Downward Flow of Damp-heat)' and so on. The symptoms are Hematuria, Oliguria, Lower abdomen pain, febrile sensation and Anemia etc. These are similar to the symptoms of bladder cancer by modem medicine. I have experienced a bladder cancer patient who was diagnosed as stage Ⅲ. She has been treated bladder cancer with Immunity herbal acupuncture and Her clinical and objective symptoms have been bett...

  5. Prediction of Candidate Drugs for Treating Pancreatic Cancer by Using a Combined Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfen Ma

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the leading cause of death from solid malignancies worldwide. Currently, gemcitabine is the only drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer. Developing new therapeutic drugs for this disease is, therefore, an urgent need. The C-Map project has provided a wealth of gene expression data that can be mined for repositioning drugs, a promising approach to new drug discovery. Typically, a drug is considered potentially useful for treating a disease if the drug-induced differential gene expression profile is negatively correlated with the differentially expressed genes in the target disease. However, many of the potentially useful drugs (PUDs identified by gene expression profile correlation are likely false positives because, in C-Map, the cultured cell lines to which the drug is applied are not derived from diseased tissues. To solve this problem, we developed a combined approach for predicting candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer. We first identified PUDs for pancreatic cancer by using C-Map-based gene expression correlation analyses. We then applied an algorithm (Met-express to predict key pancreatic cancer (KPC enzymes involved in pancreatic cancer metabolism. Finally, we selected candidates from the PUDs by requiring that their targets be KPC enzymes or the substrates/products of KPC enzymes. Using this combined approach, we predicted seven candidate drugs for treating pancreatic cancer, three of which are supported by literature evidence, and three were experimentally validated to be inhibitory to pancreatic cancer celllines.

  6. MAL-PDT for difficult to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, William G; Hanke, C William

    2011-01-01

    With an incidence of over 3.5 million nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) per year in the United States, there is an increasing need for effective, cost-effective treatments for NMSC. When surgical excision is impractical or not feasible, methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) has demonstrated consistently high long-term cure rates ranging from 70-90%, with superior cosmetic outcomes compared with other treatment modalities. With the exception of invasive squamous cell carcinoma, MAL-PDT has been successful in treating all types of NMSC, especially in patients with multiple comorbidities, field cancerization, and lesions in cosmetically sensitive locations. Herein, a step-by-step description of the procedure for MAL-PDT is provided, followed by a review of outcomes from large clinical trials performed over the past 15 years for each variant of NMSC. After reading this review, clinicians should have a thorough understanding of the benefits and limits of MAL-PDT, and should be able to add this valuable procedure to their armamentarium of therapies for NMSC.

  7. Is Huachansu Beneficial in Treating Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of Its Efficacy Combined with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingduo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Huachansu, the sterilized water extract of Bufo bufo gargarizans toad skin, is used in China to alleviate the side-effects and enhance the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess Huachansu’s efficacy. Methods. We extensively searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CBM, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CEBM, WFDP, CSCD, CSTD, and IPA for randomized controlled trials containing Huachansu plus chemotherapy as the test group and chemotherapy as the control group. Seventeen trials were selected based on the selection criteria. The pooled relative ratio (RR of indicators with 95% confidence interval (95% CI was calculated for efficacy evaluation. Results. The meta-analysis demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in objective tumor response, one-year survival, Karnofsky performance status, pain relief, and alleviation of severe side-effects (nausea and vomiting, leukocytopenia in the test group as compared to the control group, but no significant difference in thrombocytopenia. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the efficacy of Huachansu combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. However, limitations exist and high-quality trials are needed for further verification.

  8. Cannabinoid Receptors: A Novel Target for Treating Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (a mixed CB1 / CB2 agonist) resulted in...34 CBI receptor, and the "peripheral" CB2 receptor. Recently we have shown that expression levels of both cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are higher...in human prostate cancer cells than in normal prostate epithelial cells and treatment of LNCaP cells with WIN-55,212-2 (a mixed CB1 / CB2 agonist

  9. Clostridium to treat cancer: dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, Jan; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    In their paper "Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses", Roberts et al. describe the induction of antitumor responses following local spore administration of an attenuated C. novyi strain (C. novyi-NT). Stereotactic intratumoral spore injection led to significant survival advantages in a murine orthotopic brain model and local bacterial treatment produced robust responses in a set of spontaneous canine soft tissue carcinomas. Their preclinical findings in both models, provided the basis for a phase 1 investigational clinical study in patients with solid tumors that were either refractory to standard treatment or without an available standard treatment available (NCT01924689). The results of the first patient enrolled in this trial, a 53-year-old female with a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma, are described. Next to the non-armed C. novyi-NT described in this paper, very potent genetically modified Clostridium expressing anti-cancer therapeutic genes are also being developed. Are treatments with these non-pathogenic clostridia a viable alternative cancer treatment?

  10. 舒尼替尼治疗非小细胞肺癌的现状%The current situation of Sunitinib in treating non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingjie Yang; Xiaoyan Sun; Ming Guo

    2012-01-01

    Sunitinib malate is one of the multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which are being used in clinic.It can inhibit more than 80 kinds of receptor`s tyrosine kinase, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), etc.And tyrosine kinase inhibitor is involved in connection with the generation and progression of many kinds of cancer including lung cancer.Several studies have evaluated the effect of Sunitinib on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), by single agent, continuous daily dosing or in combination with chemotherapeutics (with docetaxel or gemcitabine plus cisplatin), which all showed certain effect.The test of Sunitinib in combination with gemcitabine plus cisplatin for advanced NSCLC shown that at the maximum tolerated dose: oral Sunitinib 37.5 mg/day intermittently (Schedule 2/1: 2 weeks on treatment, 1 week off treatment) schedule with intravenous infusions of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 days 1, 8) and cisplatin (80 mg/m2 day 1), administered in 3-week cycles, 66.7% patients achieved partial responses.And adverse effects were mild to moderate in severity (grades 1 to 2).Therapy was generally well tolerated.In summary, all the evidence above suggests that Sunitinib may play an important role in the treating of NSCLC.

  11. Intracellular Protein Delivery for treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    from any insoluble material (31,000 g, 4 °C, 30 min). The concentration of solubilized p53 was determined using Bradford protein assay and...concentration was qualitatively assessed by SDS-PAGE and quantitatively determined by the Bradford protein assay. SDS-PAGE for washed pellet and p53 protein...hydrochloride was pur- hased from Polymer Science, Inc. CellTiter 96® AQueous ne Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (MTS) reagent as purchased from Promega

  12. Synchronous lung and gastric cancers successfully treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lung and gastric cancers are the first and second leading causes of death from cancer worldwide, and are especially prevalent in Eastern Asia. Relatively few reports are available in relation to the treatment and outcome of synchronous lung and gastric cancers, although there are increasing numbers of patients with these cancers. Efforts to develop more effective drugs for the treatment of synchronous cancers, without serious adverse effects, have been intensifying. Pemetrexed, a multi-targeted antifolate enzyme inhibitor, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer in 2007. Although clinical activity against several tumor types of adenocarcinoma, including gastric cancer, has been demonstrated, the efficacy of pemetrexed for gastric cancer remains to be fully evaluated. Case presentation We report a case involving a 62-year-old Japanese woman with synchronous locally-advanced poorly-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma and poorly-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma, containing signet-ring cells distinguished by immunohistochemical profiles. She had been treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed as a first-line chemotherapy for lung cancer, and had achieved partial responses for both lung and gastric cancers. These responses led to a favorable 12-month progression-free survival after the initiation of chemotherapy, and the patient is still alive more than 33 months after diagnosis. Conclusions This case suggests a new chemotherapeutic regimen for patients with synchronous multiple primary cancers that have an adenocarcinoma background.

  13. Targets and mechanisms of berberine, a natural drug with potential to treat cancer with special focus on breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh Kaboli, Parham; Rahmat, Asmah; Ismail, Patimah; Ling, King-Hwa

    2014-10-05

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide and novel therapeutic agents are needed to treat this disease. The plant-based alkaloid berberine has potential therapeutic applications for breast cancer, although a better understanding of the genes and cellular pathways regulated by this compound is needed to define the mechanism of its action in cancer treatment. In this review, the molecular targets of berberine in various cancers, particularly breast cancer, are discussed. Berberine was shown to be effective in inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis in various cancerous cells. Some signaling pathways affected by berberine, including the MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, are critical for reducing cellular migration and sensitivity to various growth factors. This review will discuss recent studies and consider the application of new prospective approaches based on microRNAs and other crucial regulators for use in future studies to define the action of berberine in cancer. The effects of berberine on cancer cell survival and proliferation are also outlined.

  14. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  15. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in patients treated with sorafenib and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer: a new method of monitoring treatment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Joline S.W.; Postmus, Pieter E.; Smit, Egbert F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijerink, Martijn R.; Kuijk, Cornelis van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1117, P.O. Box 7075, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Maastricht University, Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Oellers, Michel C.; Ruysscher, Dirk de [Maastricht University, Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    We investigated the feasibility of serial dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) in patients with advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving anti-angiogenic (sorafenib) and anti-EGFR (erlotinib) treatment, and correlated tumour blood flow (BF) with treatment outcome. DCE-CTs were performed at baseline and 3 and 6 weeks after starting treatment. Tumour BF, calculated with the maximum slope method, and percentage change were measured in 23 patients (14 male; median age 59 years). Tumour BF was compared at baseline and weeks 3 and 6; the relation with RECIST/Crabb response and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed. Mean tumour perfusion decreased from 39.2 ml/100 g/min at baseline to 15.1 ml/100 g/min at week 3 (p < 0.001) and 9.4 ml/100 g/min at week 6 (p < 0.001). Tumour perfusion was lower in RECIST and Crabb responders versus non-responders at week 3 (4.2 versus 17.7 ml/100 g/min, p = 0.03) and week 6 (0 versus 13.4 ml/100 g/min, p = 0.04). Patients with a decrease larger than the median at week 6 tended to have a longer PFS (7.1 versus 5.7 months, p = 0.06). Serial DCE-CTs are feasible in patients with NSCLC and demonstrated a significant decrease in tumour BF following sorafenib/erlotinib therapy. Early changes in tumour BF correlated with objective response and showed a trend towards longer PFS. (orig.)

  17. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT ({>=}60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual's preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade {<=}1 vs. {>=}2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age {>=}65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy {>=}30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second {>=}60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  18. Exercise Training for Patients Pre- and Postsurgically Treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Hui-Juan; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Yuan, Xun-Tao; Li, He-Fang; Shi, Lei; Yuan, Ping

    2016-05-05

    Background This meta-analysis examined the effects of exercise training on length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, exercise capacity, 6-minute walking distance (6MWD), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients following resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods This review searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration data base up to August 16, 2015. It includes 15 studies comparing exercise endurance and quality of life before versus after exercise training in patients undergoing lung resection for NSCLC. Results This review identified 15 studies, 8 of which are randomized controlled trials including 350 patients. Preoperative exercise training shortened length of hospital stay; mean difference (MD): -4.98 days (95% CI = -6.22 to -3.74, P exercise training improved exercise capacity; 6MWD was increased to 39.95 m (95% CI = 5.31 to 74.6, P = .02) .While postoperative exercise training can also effectively improve exercise capacity, it required a longer training period; 6MWD was increased to 62.83 m (95% CI = 57.94 to 67.72) after 12 weeks of training (P exercise, but dyspnea score was decreased -14.31 points (95% CI = -20.03 to -8.58, P exercise training (MD = 3 points, 95% CI = 0.81 to 5.2, P = .007) while there was no difference with regard to mental health. The I(2) statistics of all statistically pooled data were lower than 30%. There was a low amount of heterogeneity among these studies. Conclusions Evidence from this review suggests that preoperative exercise training may shorten length of hospital stay, decrease postoperative complications and increase 6MWD. Postoperative exercise training can also effectively improve both the 6MWD and quality of life in surgical patients with NSCLC, but requiring a longer training period.

  19. Tumoral stem cell reprogramming as a driver of cancer: Theory, biological models, implications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Hauer, Julia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Ingenhag, Deborah; Rodríguez-Meira, Alba; Auer, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a clonal malignant disease originated in a single cell and characterized by the accumulation of partially differentiated cells that are phenotypically reminiscent of normal stages of differentiation. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumor cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that cancer stem cells could arise through a tumor stem cell reprogramming mechanism, suggesting that genetic lesions that initiate the cancer process might be dispensable for tumor progression and maintenance. This review addresses the impact of these results toward a better understanding of cancer development and proposes new approaches to treat cancer in the future.

  20. EFFECT OF SOMATOSTATIN ON THE CELL CYCLE OF HUMAN GALLBLADDER CANCER CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李济宇; 全志伟; 张强; 刘建文

    2005-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of somatostatin on the cell cycle of human gallbladder cancer cell. Methods Growth curve of gallbladder cancer cell was measured after somatostatin treated on gradient concentration. Simultaneously, the change of gallbladder cancer cell cycle was detected using flow cytometry.Results Concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition caused by somatostatin was detected in gallbladder cancer cell(P<0.05). Cell growth was arrested in S phase since 12h after somatostatin treated, which reached its peak at 24h, then fell down. The changes in apoptosis index of gallbladder cancer cell caused by somatostatin correlated with that's in cell cycle. Conclusion Somatostatin could inhibit the cell growth of human gallbladder cancer cell in vitro on higher concentration. It might result from inducing growth arrest in S phase in early stage and inducing apoptosis in the late stage.

  1. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  2. Chemoprevention gene therapy (CGT): novel combinatorial approach for preventing and treating pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Azab, B M; Das, S K; Quinn, B A; Shen, X; Dash, R; Emdad, L; Thomas, S; Dasgupta, S; Su, Z-Z; Wang, X-Y; Sarkar, D; Fisher, P B

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest of all cancers despite aggressive surgical treatment combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Chemoresistance and radioresistance are the principal causes of failure of pancreatic cancer patients to respond to therapy. Conditionally replication competent adenovirus (CRCA)-based cancer gene therapy is an innovative strategy for treating cancers displaying inherent resistance to treatment. Limitations of current adenovirus (Ad)-based gene therapies for malignant tumors include lack of cancer-specificity, and effective and targeted delivery. To remedy this situation, CRCAs have been designed that express E1A, necessary for Ad replication, under the control of a cancer-specific progression elevated gene-3 promoter (PEG-Prom) with concomitant expression of an immunomodulatory cytokine, such as mda-7/IL-24 or interferon-γ (IFN-γ), under the control of a ubiquitous and strong cytomegalovirus promoter (CMV-Prom) from the E3 region. These bipartite CRCAs, when armed with a transgene, are called cancer terminator viruses (CTVs), i.e., Ad.PEG-E1A-CMV-mda-7 (CTV-M7) and Ad.PEG-E1A-CMV-IFN-γ (CTV-γ), because of their universal effectiveness in cancer treatment irrespective of p53/pRb/p16 or other genetic alterations in tumor cells. In addition to their selective oncolytic effects in tumor cells, the potent 'bystander antitumor' properties of MDA-7/IL-24 and IFN-γ embody the CTVs with expanded treatment properties for both primary and distant cancers. Pancreatic cancer cells display a "translational block" of mda-7/IL-24 mRNA, limiting production of MDA-7/IL-24 protein and cancer-specific apoptosis. Specific chemopreventive agents abrogate this "translational block" resulting in pancreatic cancer-specific killing. This novel chemoprevention gene therapy (CGT) strategy holds promise for both prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancers where all other strategies have proven ineffective.

  3. Laryngeal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the head and neck region with an increased incidence rate worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a group of cells with eternal life or infinite self-renewal ability, which have high migrating, infiltrative, and metastatic abilities. Though CSCs only account for a small proportion in tumors, the high resistance to traditional therapy exempts them from therapy killing and thus they can reconstruct tumors. Our current knowledge, about CSCs in the LSCC, largely depends on head and neck studies with a lack of systematic data about the evidences of CSCs in tumorigenesis of LSCC. Certainly, the combination of therapies aimed at debulking the tumour (e.g. surgery, conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy together with targeted therapies aimed at the elimination of the CSCs might have a positive impact on the long-term outcome of patients with laryngeal cancer (LC in the future and may cast a new light on the cancer treatment.

  4. Total-Body Irradiation With or Without Fludarabine Phosphate Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Psychological functioning in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiegelis, HE; Ranchor, AV; Sanderman, R

    2004-01-01

    Although many side-effects of radiotherapy (RT) are physical, previous studies have shown that patients, when treated with RT, also experience psychological problems. This review describes the psychological functioning of cancer patients prior to, during, and after RT. Moreover, we examined whether

  6. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  7. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  8. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  10. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  11. Predictive value of K-ras and PIK3CA in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs:a systemic review and meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-Ying Chen; Ya-Nan Cheng; Lei Han; Feng Wei; Wen-Wen Yu; Xin-Wei Zhang; Shui Cao; Jin-Pu Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:A meta-analysis was performed to augment the insuffcient data on the impact of mutative EGFR downstream phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways on the clinical effciency of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods:Network databases were explored in April, 2015. Papers that investigated the clinical outcomes of NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs according to the status of K-ras and/or PIK3CA gene mutation were included. A quantitative meta-analysis was conducted using standard statistical methods. Odds ratios (ORs) for objective response rate (ORR) and hazard ratios (HRs) for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Results:Mutation in K-ras signiifcantly predicted poor ORR [OR=0.22;95%conifdence interval (CI), 0.13-0.35], shorter PFS (HR=1.56;95%CI, 1.27-1.92), and shorter OS (HR=1.59;95%CI, 1.33-1.91) in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. Mutant PIK3CA signiifcantly predicted shorter OS (HR=1.83;95%CI, 1.05-3.20), showed poor ORR (OR=0.70;95%CI, 0.22-2.18), and shorter PFS (HR=1.79;95%CI, 0.91-3.53) in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. Conclusion:K-ras mutation adversely affected the clinical response and survival of NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. PIK3CA mutation showed similar trends. In addition to EGFR, adding K-ras and PIK3CA as routine gene biomarkers in clinical genetic analysis is valuable to optimize the effectiveness of EGFR-TKI regimens and identify optimal patients who will beneift from EGFR-TKI treatment.

  12. Predictive value of K-ras and PIK3CA in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie-Ying; Cheng, Ya-Nan; Han, Lei; Wei, Feng; Yu, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Cao, Shui; Yu, Jin-Pu

    2015-01-01

    Objective A meta-analysis was performed to augment the insufficient data on the impact of mutative EGFR downstream phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways on the clinical efficiency of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Network databases were explored in April, 2015. Papers that investigated the clinical outcomes of NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs according to the status of K-ras and/or PIK3CA gene mutation were included. A quantitative meta-analysis was conducted using standard statistical methods. Odds ratios (ORs) for objective response rate (ORR) and hazard ratios (HRs) for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Results Mutation in K-ras significantly predicted poor ORR [OR =0.22; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.13-0.35], shorter PFS (HR =1.56; 95% CI, 1.27-1.92), and shorter OS (HR =1.59; 95% CI, 1.33-1.91) in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. Mutant PIK3CA significantly predicted shorter OS (HR =1.83; 95% CI, 1.05-3.20), showed poor ORR (OR =0.70; 95% CI, 0.22-2.18), and shorter PFS (HR =1.79; 95% CI, 0.91-3.53) in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. Conclusion K-ras mutation adversely affected the clinical response and survival of NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. PIK3CA mutation showed similar trends. In addition to EGFR, adding K-ras and PIK3CA as routine gene biomarkers in clinical genetic analysis is valuable to optimize the effectiveness of EGFR-TKI regimens and identify optimal patients who will benefit from EGFR-TKI treatment. PMID:26175928

  13. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines treated with dioscin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long-term goal of our study is to understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis in human and to discover new possible genetic markers for use in clinical practice. We have used microarray technology (Human OneArray microarray, phylanxbiotech.com) to compare gene ex...

  14. Effect of 4-methoxyindole-3-carbinol on the proliferation of colon cancer cells in vitro, when treated alone or in combination with indole-3-carbinol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronbak, Remy; Duus, Fritz; Vang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    synergistic manner. Proliferation was inhibited by 100 microM 4MeOI3C after 48 h without affecting cell cycle phase distribution, indicating an overall-slowdown effect on the cell cycle. However, 200 microM 4MeOI3C caused a very high level of cell death and an accumulation of living cells in the G(0)/G(1...

  15. Natural ways to prevent and treat oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Danaraddi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the usual causes of mortality all over the world, with a five-year survival rate of only 50%. Oral cancers are treated primarily by surgery with / without adjuvant radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy. However, there is significant post-treatment morbidity and mortality secondary to recurrences. Dietary supplements like fruits and vegetables are rich in phytochemicals and provide a variety of antioxidants like vitamin A, C, E. Spirulina, Selenium, Green tea (EGCG, Neem, Tomatoes (lycopene, Turmeric (curcumin, and some medicinal mushrooms are also used as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. This overview emphasizes on natural therapies to fight against oral cancer. Thus, there are several natural compounds that can enhance the prevention of oral cancer.

  16. High-Dose Chemotherapy With or Without Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-07

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2

  17. Experimental studies on ultralow frequency pulsed gradient magnetic field inducing apoptosis of cancer cell and inhibiting growth of cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾繁清; 郑从义; 张新晨; 李宗山; 李朝阳; 王川婴; 张新松; 黄晓玲; 张沪生

    2002-01-01

    The morphology characteristics of cell apoptosis of the malignant tumour cells in magnetic field-treated mouse was observed for the first time. The apoptotic cancer cell contracted, became rounder and divorced from adjacent cells; the heterochromatin condensed and coagulated together along the inner side of the nuclear membrane; the endoplasmic reticulums(ER) expanded and fused with the cellular membrane; many apoptotic bodies which were packed by the cellular membrane appeared and were devoured by some lymphocytes and plasma. Apoptosis of cancer cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated in situ nick end labeling(TUNEL). It was found that the number of apoptosis cancer cells of the sample treated by the magnetic field is more than that of the control sample. The growth of malignant tumour in mice was inhibited and the ability of immune cell to dissolve cancer cells was improved by ultralow frequency(ULF) pulsed gradient magnetic field; the nuclei DNA contents decreased, indicating that magnetic field can block DNA replication and inhibit mitosis of cancer cells. It was suggested that magnetic field could inhibit the metabolism of cancer cell, lower its malignancy, and restrain its rapid and heteromorphic growth. Since ULF pulsed gradient magnetic field can induce apoptosis of cancer cells and inhibit the growth of malignant tumour, it could be used as a new method to treat cancer.

  18. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy.

  19. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  20. Treating asthma means treating airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, S; Sukkar, M B; Fust, A; Dhaliwal, S; Burgess, J K

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Airway smooth muscle cells are known to be the main effector cells of airway narrowing. In the present paper, studies will be discussed that have led to a novel view of the role of airway smooth muscle

  1. The Efficacy and Safety of Icotinib in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated with Chemotherapy: A Single-Arm, Multi-Center, Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuankai; Zhou, Caicun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Dong; Song, Yong; Li, Qiang; Feng, Jifeng; Qin, Shukui; Xv, Nong; Zhou, Jianying; Zhang, Li; Hu, Chunhong; Zhang, Shucai; Luo, Rongcheng; Wang, Jie; Tan, Fenlai; Wang, Yinxiang; Ding, Lieming; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Icotinib is a small molecule targeting epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which shows non-inferior efficacy and better safety comparing to gefitinib in previous phase III trial. The present study was designed to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods Patients with NSCLC progressing after one or two lines of chemotherapy were enrolled to receive oral icotinib (125mg tablet, three times per day). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints included overall survival, objective response rate, time to progression, quality of life and safety. Results From March 16, 2010 to October 9, 2011, 128 patients from 15 centers nationwide were enrolled, in which 124 patients were available for efficacy evaluation and 127 patients were evaluable for safety. The median progression-free survival and time to progression were 5.0 months (95%CI 2.9–6.6 m) and 5.4 months (95%CI 3.1–7.9 m), respectively. The objective response rate and disease control rate were 25.8% and 67.7% respectively. Median overall survival exceeded 17.6 months (95%CI 14.2 m-NA) according to censored data. Further follow-up of overall survival is ongoing. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were rash (26%, 33/127), diarrhea (12.6%, 16/127) and elevation of transaminase (15.7%, 20/127). Conclusions In general, this study showed similar efficacy and numerically better safety when compared with that in ICOGEN trial, further confirming the efficacy and safety of icotinib in treating patients with advanced NSCLC previously treated with chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02486354 PMID:26599904

  2. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  3. Cancer cells with irons in the fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Laura M; Rivella, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and proliferation of cells, as well as for many biological processes that are important for the maintenance and survival of the human body. However, excess iron is associated with the development of cancer and other pathological conditions, due in part to the pro-oxidative nature of iron and its damaging effects on DNA. Current studies suggest that iron depletion may be beneficial for patients that have diseases associated with iron overload or other iron metabolism disorders that may increase the risk for cancer. On the other hand, studies suggest that cancer cells are more vulnerable to the effects of iron depletion and oxidative stress in comparison to normal cells. Therefore, cancer patients might benefit from treatments that alter both iron metabolism and oxidative stress. This review highlights the pro-oxidant effects of iron, the relationship between iron and cancer development, the vulnerabilities of the iron-dependent cancer phenotype, and how these characteristics may be exploited to prevent or treat cancer.

  4. Busulfan, Etoposide, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Myeloid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  5. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  6. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ömer Acar; Tarık Esen; Lack, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 379641, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379641 Review Article New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Ömer Acar,1 TarJk Esen,1,2 and Nathan A. Lack1 1 VKF American Hospital, Guzelbahce sokak, Nisantasi, Istanbul 34365, Turkey 2 School of Medicine, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Natha...

  7. Down-regulation of histone deacetylase 4, -5 and -6 as a mechanism of synergistic enhancement of apoptosis in human lung cancer cells treated with the combination of a synthetic retinoid, Am80 and green tea catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Yukiko; Mondal, Anupom; Rawangkan, Anchalee; Umsumarng, Sonthaya; Iida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Kanno, Miki; Suzuki, Kaori; Li, Zhenghao; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Koichi; Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    2017-04-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea catechin, acts as a synergist with various anticancer drugs, including retinoids. Am80 is a synthetic retinoid with a different structure from all-trans-retinoic acid: Am80 is now clinically utilized as a new drug for relapsed and intractable acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. Our experiments showed that the combination of EGCG and Am80 synergistically induced both apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line PC-9 and up-regulated expressions of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), death receptor 5, and p21(waf1) genes in the cells. To understand the mechanisms of synergistic anticancer activity of the combination, we gave special attention to the lysine acetylation of proteins. Proteomic analysis using nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS revealed that PC-9 cells treated with the combination contained 331 acetylated proteins, while nontreated cells contained 553 acetylated proteins, and 59 acetylated proteins were found in both groups. Among them, the combination increased acetylated-p53 and acetylated-α-tubulin through reduction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in cytosol fraction, although the levels of acetylation in histones H3 or H4 did not change, and the combination reduced protein levels of HDAC4, -5 and -6 by 20% to 80%. Moreover, we found that a specific inhibitor of HDAC4 and -5 strongly induced p21(waf1) gene expression, and that of HDAC6 induced both GADD153 and p21(waf1) gene expression, which resulted in apoptosis. All results demonstrate that EGCG in combination with Am80 changes levels of acetylation in nonhistone proteins via down-regulation of HDAC4, -5 and -6 and stimulates apoptotic induction.

  8. Impact of pretreatment whole-tumor perfusion computed tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography measurements on local control of non–small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Seino, Hiroko; Kakehata, Shinya; Tsushima, Fumiyasu; Fujita, Hiromasa; Fujita, Tamaki; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between the average iodine density (AID) detected by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) yielded by [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Seventy-four patients with medically inoperable NSCLC who underwent both DE-CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT before SBRT (50‒60 Gy in 5‒6 fractions) were followed up after a median interval of 24.5 months. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to determine associations between local control (LC) and variables, including AID, SUVmax, tumor size, histology, and prescribed dose. The median AID and SUVmax were 18.64 (range, 1.18–45.31) (100 µg/cm3) and 3.2 (range, 0.7–17.6), respectively. No correlation was observed between AID and SUVmax. Two-year LC rates were 96.2% vs 75.0% (P = 0.039) and 72.0% vs 96.2% (P = 0.002) for patients classified according to high vs low AID or SUVmax, respectively. Two-year LC rates for patients with adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma vs unknown cancer were 96.4% vs 67.1% vs 92.9% (P = 0.008), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified SUVmax as a significant predictor of LC. The 2-year LC rate was only 48.5% in the subgroup of lower AID and higher SUVmax vs >90% (range, 94.4–100%) in other subgroups (P = 0.000). Despite the short follow-up period, a reduction in AID and subsequent increase in SUVmax correlated significantly with local failure in SBRT-treated NSCLC patients. Further studies involving larger populations and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27296251

  9. Cutaneous side effects in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with Iressa (ZD1839), an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Woo; Seo, Chul-Won; Kim, Sang-We; Yang, Hwa-Jeong; Lee, Hae-Woong; Choi, Jee-Ho; Moon, Kee-Chan; Koh, Jai-Kyoung

    2004-01-01

    We report the cutaneous side effects of Iressa (ZD1839), a new anti-cancer agent that acts by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor signal transduction. The most common cutaneous adverse effect was the development of an acneiform eruption on the face, anterior trunk and back (39%). The second most common side effect was xerosis or desquamation of the face, body or distal parts of the fingers or toes (36%). Additional cutaneous side effects included multiple ingrown paronychial inflammation of the toes and fingers (6%), small ulcers of the oral mucosa or nasal mucosa, and urticaria. The cutaneous adverse effects of Iressa are similar to those of other epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted agents and result from direct interference with the functions of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in the skin. Iressa-induced acne may be related to excessive follicular hyperkeratosis, follicular plugging, obstructions of the follicular ostium and alteration of hair cycle progression, which lead to an inflammatory response. Xerosis or desquamation reflects a disturbance of the equilibrium between proliferation and differentiation of epidermis. The mechanism by which Iressa leads to the development of paronychia and ingrown nail remains unclear.

  10. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  11. Combining Physical and Biologic Parameters to Predict Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Matthew H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Shangdong Cancer Hospital, Jinan (China); Ritter, Timothy [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the plasma dynamics of 5 proinflammatory/fibrogenic cytokines, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}), and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-{beta}1) to ascertain their value in predicting radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), both individually and in combination with physical dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Treatments of patients receiving definitive conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) on clinical trial for inoperable stages I-III lung cancer were prospectively evaluated. Circulating cytokine levels were measured prior to and at weeks 2 and 4 during RT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT, defined as grade 2 and higher radiation pneumonitis or symptomatic pulmonary fibrosis. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Results: Of 58 eligible patients, 10 (17.2%) patients developed RILT. Lower pretreatment IL-8 levels were significantly correlated with development of RILT, while radiation-induced elevations of TGF-ss1 were weakly correlated with RILT. Significant correlations were not found for any of the remaining 3 cytokines or for any clinical or dosimetric parameters. Using receiver operator characteristic curves for predictive risk assessment modeling, we found both individual cytokines and dosimetric parameters were poor independent predictors of RILT. However, combining IL-8, TGF-ss1, and mean lung dose into a single model yielded an improved predictive ability (P<.001) compared to either variable alone. Conclusions: Combining inflammatory cytokines with physical dosimetric factors may provide a more accurate model for RILT prediction. Future study with a larger number of cases and events is needed to validate such findings.

  12. External validation of nomograms for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients treated with definitive surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhu; Wei-Jie Gu; Ding-Wei Ye; Xu-Dong Yao; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Yi-Jun Shen

    2014-01-01

    Using a population-based cancer registry, Thuret et al. developed 3 nomograms for estimating cancer-specific mortality in men with penile squamous cell carcinoma. In the initial cohort, only 23.0% of the patients were treated with inguinal lymphadenectomy and had pN stage. To generalize the prediction models in clinical practice, we evaluated the performance of the 3 nomograms in a series of penile cancer patients who were treated with definitive surgery. Clinicopathologic information was obtained from 160 M0 penile cancer patients who underwent primary tumor excision and regional lymphadenectomy between 1990 and 2008. The predicted probabilities of cancer-specific mortality were calculated from 3 nomograms that were based on different disease stage definitions and tumor grade. Discrimination, calibration, and clinical usefulness were assessed to compare model performance. The discrimination ability was similar in nomograms using the TNM classification or American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (Harrell’s concordance index = 0.817 and 0.832, respectively), whereas it was inferior for the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results staging (Harrel ’s concordance index = 0.728). Better agreement with the observed cancer-specific mortality was shown for the model consisting of TNM classification and tumor grade, which also achieved favorable clinical net benefit, with a threshold probability in the range of 0 to 42%. The nomogram consisting of TNM classification and tumor grading was shown to have better performance for predicting cancer-specific mortality in penile cancer patients who underwent definitive surgery. Our data support the integration of this model in decision-making and trial design.

  13. HS-4, a highly potent inhibitor of cell proliferation of human cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Lan Xing; Shu-Hong Tian; Xue-Li Xie; Jian Fu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antitumor activity of the compound HS-4 and the action mechanism.Methods:MTT method was used to testin vitroantitumor activity of the compound HS-4. Orthotopic xenotransplantation tumor model of liver cancer was established in nude mice, and,in vivoantitumor activity of compound HS-4 was tested with a small animal in-vivo imaging system. Sequencing of small RNA library and RNA library was performed in HS-4 treated tumor cell group and control group to investigate the anti-cancer mechanism of HS-4 at level of functional genomics, using high-throughput sequencing technology. Results:HS-4 was found to have relatively highin-vitro antitumor activity against liver cancer cells, gastric cancer cells, renal cancer cells, lung cancer cells, breast cancer cells and colon cancer cells. The IC50 values against SMMC-7721 and Bel-7402 of liver cancer cells were 0.14 and 0.13 nmol/L respectively, while the IC50 values against MGC-803 and SGC-7901 of gastric cancer cells were 0.19 and 0.21 nmol/L, respectively. It was demonstrated that HS- 4 possessed a better therapeutic effect in liver cancer.Conclusions: A new reliable orthotopic xenotransplantation tumor model of liver cancer in nude mice is established. The new compounds HS-4 was found to possess relatively highin vivo andin vitroantitumor activity against liver cancer cells.

  14. Spatial Distrubiton of Children Treated by Cancer in Zonguldak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Cam; Kuzlu Ayyıldız, Tülay; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-06-01

    This research is focused on the examination of child cancer cases in Zonguldak (Turkey) descriptively in epidemiological aspect thanks to GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 0-19 years old, treated in Children Oncology Clinic of Health Application and Research Center in BEU. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95% confidence interval and pdisease diagnosis of the children participated in the study were evaluated, it was observed that 33.3% (n=20) were being treated for ALL, 13.3% (n=8) for Medullablastoma and 11.7% (n=7) for Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma. It was detected that 31.7% (n=19) were in Ereğli, 31.7% (n=19) were in Central district and 18.3% (n=11) were in Çaycuma, when the places where children were living were evaluated. Statistically significant difference was found (p=0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and overall distribution map of the number of cancer cases was produced in this context. This is the first research subjecting the distribution of cancer cases for Zonguldak province.

  15. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns that Predict Survival in 127 Chinese Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by Gefitinib Who Failed to Previous Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziping WANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gefitinib produces only 10%-20% tumor regression in heavily pretreated, unselected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients as the second- and third-line setting. Asian, female, nonsmokers and adenocarcinoma are favorable factors; however, it is difficult to find a patient satisfying all the above clinical characteristics. The aim of this study is to identify novel predicting factors, and to explore the interactions between clinical variables and their impact on the survival of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC who were heavily treated with gefitinib in the second- or third-line setting. Methods The clinical and follow-up data of 127 advanced NSCLC patients referred to the Cancer Hospital & Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from March 2005 to March 2010 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of progression-free survival (PFS was performed using recursive partitioning, which is referred to as the classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Results The median PFS of 127 eligible consecutive advanced NSCLC patients was 8.0 months (95%CI: 5.8-10.2. CART was performed with an initial split on first-line chemotherapy outcomes and a second split on patients’ age. Three terminal subgroups were formed. The median PFS of the three subsets ranged from 1.0 month (95%CI: 0.8-1.2 for those with progressive disease outcome after the first-line chemotherapy subgroup, 10 months (95%CI: 7.0-13.0 in patients with a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age <70, and 22.0 months for patients obtaining a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy at age 70-81 (95%CI: 3.8-40.1. Conclusion Partial response, stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age ≥ 70 are closely correlated with long-term survival treated by gefitinib as a second- or third-line setting in advanced NSCLC. CART can be used to identify previously unappreciated patient

  16. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  18. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  19. All-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes prevent the relapse of breast cancer arising from the cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruo-Jing; Ying, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Ju, Rui-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Xing; Yao, Hong-Juan; Men, Ying; Tian, Wei; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Ren-Jie; Lu, Wan-Liang

    2011-02-10

    The relapse of cancer is mostly due to the proliferation of cancer stem cells which could not be eliminated by a standard chemotherapy. A new kind of all-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes was developed for preventing the relapse of breast cancer and for treating the cancer in combination with a cytotoxic agent, vinorelbine stealth liposomes. In vitro studies were performed on the human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In vivo evaluations were performed on the newly established relapse model with breast cancer stem cells. Results showed that the particle size of all-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes was approximately 80nm, and the encapsulation efficiency was >90%. Breast cancer stem cells were identified with the CD44(+)/CD24(-) phenotype and characterized with properties: resistant to cytotoxic agent, stronger capability of proliferation, and stronger capability of differentiation. Inhibitory effect of all-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes was more potent in cancer stem cells than in cancer cells. The mechanisms were defined to be two aspects: arresting breast cancer stem cells at the G(0)/G(1) phase in mitosis, and inducing the differentiation of breast cancer stem cells. The cancer relapse model was successfully established by xenografting breast cancer stem cells into NOD/SCID mice, and the formation and growth of the xenografted tumors were significantly inhibited by all-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes. The combination therapy of all-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes with vinorelbine stealth liposomes produced the strongest inhibitory effect to the relapse tumor model. It could be concluded that all-trans retinoic acid stealth liposomes could be used for preventing the relapse of breast cancer by differentiating cancer stem cells and arresting the cell-cycle, and for treating breast cancer as a co-therapy, thus providing a novel strategy for treating breast cancer and preventing relapse derived from breast cancer stem cells.

  20. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  1. Influence of oral glutamine supplementation on survival outcomes of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topkan Erkan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine (Gln supplementation during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT effectively reduces the incidence and severity of acute radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE. However, there are concerns that Gln might stimulate tumor growth, and therefore negatively impact the outcomes of anticancer treatment. We retrospectively investigated the effect of co-administration of oral Gln during C-CRT on survival outcomes of patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. We additionally evaluated role of oral Gln in preventing C-CRT-induced weight change, acute and late toxicities. Methods The study included 104 patients: 56 (53.8% received prophylactic powdered Gln (Gln+ orally at a dose of 10 g/8 h and 48 (46.2% did not receive Gln (Gln- and served as controls. The prescribed radiation dose to the planning target volume was 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Primary endpoints of progression-free survival (PFS, local/regional progression-free survival (LRPFS, and overall survival (OS were correlated with status of Gln supplementation. Results Oral Gln was well tolerated except for mild nausea/vomiting in 14 (25.0% patients. There was no C-CRT-related acute or late grade 4–5 toxicity. Administration of Gln was associated with a decrease in the incidence of grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE (7.2% vs. 16.7% for Gln+ vs. Gln-; p=0.02 and late-RIE (0% vs. 6.3%; p=0.06, a reduced need for unplanned treatment breaks (7.1% vs. 20.8%; p=0.04, and reduced incidence of weight loss (44.6% vs. 72.9%; p=0.002. At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 9.2-34.4 the median OS, LRPFS, and PFS for Gln+ vs. Gln- cohorts were 21.4 vs. 20.4 (p=0.35, 14.2 vs.11.3 (p=0.16, and 10.2 vs. 9.0 months (p=0.11, respectively. Conclusion In our study, supplementation with Gln during C-CRT had no detectable negative impact on tumor control and survival outcomes in patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC. Furthermore, Gln appeared to have a beneficial

  2. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has proven to be very challenging. Until recently, docetaxel was the only therapeutic demonstrated to extend overall patient survival. Yet recently, a considerable number of new therapeutics have been approved to treat CRPC patients. These remarkable advances now give new tools for the therapeutic management of late-stage prostate cancer. In this review, we will examine mechanistic and clinical data of several newly approved therapeutics including the chemotherapeutic cabazitaxel, antiandrogen enzalutamide, endocrine disruptor abiraterone acetate, immunotherapy sipuleucel-T, and bone-targeting radiopharmaceutical alpharadin. In addition, we will examine other promising therapeutics that are currently in Phase III trials.

  3. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  4. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have the potential of accumulating more years of cell phone exposure than adults do. Thus far, the data from studies in children with cancer do not support this theory. The first published analysis came from a large ...

  5. Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Donor Natural Killer Cell Therapy, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and Tacrolimus in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. Cancer Stem Cells in Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, D; Brown, H K; Tellez-Gabriel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and...

  7. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. GP方案引起NSCLC患者糖耐量异常的临床研究%Clinical Study of Glucose Levels in Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by GP Regimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚兰; 蒋成霞; 徐勇; 叶序卷; 贾钰铭; 雷开键; 唐元英

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate blood glucose differences before and after three cycles of chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods 44 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer conducted blood routine,bi-ochemical,and C-reactive protein test;Normal blood glucose group treated chemotherapy with GP 3 cycles,high blood sugar groups measured blood glucose by oral glucose tolerance test,then were on diets,exercised or injected insulin. After GP regimen of 3 cy-cles,blood analysis,biochemical,C-reactive protein,oral glucose tolerance test,c-peptide and insulin release test were measured. Results After 3 cycles of GP,25%(8/32) of patients with normal glucose appears abnormal,and half of patients with abnormal glucose tolerance turn into diabetic. After chemotherapy,aspartate aminotransferase and C-reactive protein were significantly differ-ent from the patients with increased blood glucose and normal blodd glucose,the difference was statistically significant(P<0. 05). Conclusion GP regimen could cause glucose metabolism disorders in some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and even induce diabetes. Patients with abnormal aspartate aminotransferase and C-reactive protein are susceptible to elevate blood glu-cose.%目的:分析非小细胞肺癌晚期患者GP方案化疗3周期前后血糖的差异。方法将44名非小细胞肺癌晚期患者根据血糖情况分为血糖正常组和血糖升高组:血糖正常组32例患者直接用GP方案化疗3周期,血糖升高组12例患者予以饮食、运动及胰岛素干预后,再进行GP方案化疗3周期,化疗前后行口服葡萄糖耐量试验、C肽及胰岛素释放试验。结果化疗前血糖正常者经GP方案化疗3周期后25%(8/32)的患者出现血糖升高,而糖调节受损患者化疗后出现一半的患者转变为糖尿病患者。化疗后血糖升高者与血糖正常者比较谷草转氨酶及C反应蛋白差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)

  9. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  10. Mathematical models in cell biology and cancer chemotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to show how mathematics can be applied to improve cancer chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most drugs used in treating cancer kill both normal and abnormal cells. However, more cancer cells than normal cells can be destroyed by the drug because tumor cells usually exhibit different growth kinetics than normal cells. To capitalize on this last fact, cell kinetics must be studied by formulating mathematical models of normal and abnormal cell growth. These models allow the therapeutic and harmful effects of cancer drugs to be simulated quantitatively. The combined cell and drug models can be used to study the effects of different methods of administering drugs. The least harmful method of drug administration, according to a given criterion, can be found by applying optimal control theory. The prerequisites for reading this book are an elementary knowledge of ordinary differential equations, probability, statistics, and linear algebra. In order to make this book self-contained, a chapter on...

  11. Nanotechnology for delivery of gemcitabine to treat pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Gebremariam; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Zandi-Karimi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most deadly and quickly fatal human cancers with a 5-year mortality rate close to 100%. Its prognosis is very poor, mainly because of its hostile biological behavior and late onset of symptoms for clinical diagnosis; these bring limitations on therapeutic interventions. Factors contributing for the difficulties in treating PC include: high rate of drug resistance, fast metastasis to different organs, poor prognosis and relapse of the tumor after therapy. After being approved by US FDA 1997, Gemcitabine (Gem) is the first line and the gold standard drug for all stages of advanced PC till now. However, its efficacy is unsatisfactory, mainly due to; its chemical instability and poor cellular uptake, resulting in an extremely short half-life and low bioavailability. To solve this drawbacks and increase the therapeutic outcome important progress has been achieved in the field of nanotechnology and offers a promising and effective alternative. This review mainly focus on the most commonly investigated nanoparticle (NP) delivery systems of Gem for PC treatment and the latest progresses achieved. Novel nanocarriers with better tumor targeting efficiencies and maximum treatment outcome to treat this deadly due are given much attention.

  12. The inositide signaling pathway as a target for treating gastric cancer and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongJun eKim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer and colorectal cancer are the leading cause of cancer mortality and have a dismal prognosis. The introduction of biological agents to treat these cancers has resulted in improved outcomes, and combination chemotherapy with targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents is regarded as standard therapy. Additional newly clarified mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to targeted agents require the development of new biologic agents. Aberrantly activation of the inositide signaling pathway by a loss of function PTEN mutation or gain of function mutation/amplification of PIK3CA is an oncogenic mechanism in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Clinical trials with biologic agents that target the inositide signaling pathway are being performed to further improve treatment outcomes of patients with advanced gastric cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this review we summarize the inositide signaling pathway and introduce targeted agents that inhibit abnormal activation of this signaling pathway and clinical trials currently being performed in patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer and metastatic CRC using molecular target agents.

  13. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-17

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. Cancer Mortality in People Treated with Antidepressants before Cancer Diagnosis: A Population Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelian Sun

    Full Text Available Depression is common after a cancer diagnosis and is associated with an increased mortality, but it is unclear whether depression occurring before the cancer diagnosis affects cancer mortality. We aimed to study cancer mortality of people treated with antidepressants before cancer diagnosis.We conducted a population based cohort study of all adults diagnosed with cancer between January 2003 and December 2010 in Denmark (N = 201,662. We obtained information on cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry, on the day of death from the Danish Civil Registry, and on redeemed antidepressants from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Current users of antidepressants were defined as those who redeemed the latest prescription of antidepressant 0-4 months before cancer diagnosis (irrespective of earlier prescriptions, and former users as those who redeemed the latest prescription five or more months before cancer diagnosis. We estimated an all-cause one-year mortality rate ratio (MRR and a conditional five-year MRR for patients who survived the first year after cancer diagnosis and confidence interval (CI using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Overall, 33,111 (16.4% patients redeemed at least one antidepressant prescription in the three years before cancer diagnosis of whom 21,851 (10.8% were current users at the time of cancer diagnosis. Current antidepressant users had a 32% higher one-year mortality (MRR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.29-1.35 and a 22% higher conditional five-year mortality (MRR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.17-1.26 if patients survived the first year after the cancer diagnosis than patients not redeeming antidepressants. The one-year mortality was particularly high for patients who initiated antidepressant treatment within four months before cancer diagnosis (MRR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.47-1.61. Former users had no increased cancer mortality.Initiation of antidepressive treatment prior to cancer diagnosis is common and is associated with an increased

  16. Oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaini, Giancarlo; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial metabolism may play a key role in controlling cancer cells life and proliferation. Recent evidence also indicates how the altered contribution of these organelles to metabolism and the resistance of cancer mitochondria against apoptosis-associated permeabilization are closely related. The hallmarks of cancer growth, increased glycolysis and lactate production in tumours, have raised attention due to recent observations suggesting a wide spectrum of oxidative phosphorylation deficit and decreased availability of ATP associated with malignancies and tumour cell expansion. More specifically, alteration in signal transduction pathways directly affects mitochondrial proteins playing critical roles in controlling the membrane potential as UCP2 and components of both MPTP and oxphos complexes, or in controlling cells life and death as the Bcl-2 proteins family. Moreover, since mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics, are also involved in processes of cells life and death, proper regulation of these mitochondrial functions is crucial for tumours to grow. Therefore a better understanding of the key pathophysiological differences between mitochondria in cancer cells and in their non-cancer surrounding tissue is crucial to the finding of tools interfering with these peculiar tumour mitochondrial functions and will disclose novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. Here, we review the peculiarity of tumour mitochondrial bioenergetics and the mode it is linked to the cell metabolism, providing a short overview of the evidence accumulated so far, but highlighting the more recent advances.

  17. Molecular advances to treat cancer of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah-Shaykh, H M; Zhao, L J; Mickey, B; Kafrouni, A I

    2000-06-01

    Malignant primary and metastatic brain tumours continue to be associated with poor prognosis. Nevertheless, recent advances in molecular medicine, specifically in the strategies of gene therapy, targeting tumour cells, anti-angiogenesis and immunotherapy, have created novel tools that may be of therapeutic value. To date, gene therapy trials have not yet demonstrated clinical efficacy because of inherent defects in vector design. Despite this, advances in adenoviral technology, namely the helper-dependent adenoviral constructs (gutless) and the uncovering of brain parenchymal cells as effective and necessary targets for antitumour benefits of adenoviral-mediated gene transfer, suggest that developments in vector design may be approaching the point of clinical utility. Targeting tumour cells refers to strategies that destroy malignant but spare normal cells. A new assortment of oncolytic viruses have emerged, capable of specific lysis of cancer tissue while sparing normal cells and propagating until they reach the tumour borders. Furthermore, peptides have been transformed into bullets that specifically seek and destroy cancer cells. The concept of tumour angiogenesis has been challenged by new but still very controversial findings that tumour cells themselves may form blood channels. These results may lead to the redirecting of the molecular targets toward anti-angiogenesis in some tumours including glioblastoma multiform. Unfortunately, our knowledge regarding the immunological ignorance of the tumour is still limited. Even so, newly discovered molecules have shed light on novel pathways leading to the escape of the tumour from the immune system. Finally, significant limitations in our current experimental tumour models may soon be overcome by firstly, the development of models of reproducible organ-specific tumours in non-inbred animals and secondly applying genomics to individualize therapy for a particular tumour in a specific patient.

  18. Multicenter Phase II Study of Whole-Body and Intracranial Activity With Ceritinib in Patients With ALK-Rearranged Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Chemotherapy and Crizotinib : Results From ASCEND-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crino, Lucio; Ahn, Myung-Ju; De Marinis, Filippo; Groen, Harry J. M.; Wakelee, Heather; Hida, Toyoaki; Mok, Tony; Spigel, David; Felip, Enriqueta; Nishio, Makoto; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Branle, Fabrice; Emeremni, Chetachi; Quadrigli, Massimiliano; Zhang, Jie; Shaw, Alice T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Phase I data (ASCEND-1) showed ceritinib efficacy in patients with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), regardless of brain metastases status and with or without prior therapy with an inhibitor of the ALK protein. Data are presented from a phase II trial (ASCEND-2) in which cer

  19. Different impact of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 on survival in male and female patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer treated with carboplatin and gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Torsten;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) status was assessed in patients receiving carboplatin and gemcitabine for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the association between the ERCC1 status and the overall survival after the chemotherapy. PATIENTS...

  20. Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered DDX3 inhibitor to treat oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sabindra K; Routray, Samapika; Veeramachaneni, Ganesh Kumar; Dash, Rupesh; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-04-28

    DDX3 belongs to DEAD box RNA helicase family and is involved in the progression of several types of cancer. In this work, we employed a High Throughput Virtual screening approach to identify bioactive compounds against DDX3 from ZINC natural database. Ketorolac salt was selected based on its binding free energy less than or equals to -5 Kcal/mol with reference to existing synthetic DDX3 inhibitors and strong hydrogen bond interactions as similar to crystallized DDX3 protein (2I4I). The anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac salt against DDX3 was tested using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. This compound significantly down regulated the expression of DDX3 in human OSCC line (H357) and the half maximal growth inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Ketorolac salt in H357 cell line is 2.6 µM. Ketorolac salt also inhibited the ATP hydrolysis by directly interacting with DDX3. More importantly, we observed decreased number of neoplastic tongue lesions and reduced lesion severity in Ketorolac salt treated groups in a carcinogen induced tongue tumor mouse model. Taken together, our result demonstrates that Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered bioactive compound against DDX3 and this compound can be used as an ideal drug candidate to treat DDX3 associated oral cancer.

  1. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...... with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance...

  3. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples.

  5. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients.

  6. Impact of Annexin A3 expression in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S Y; Li, Y; Fan, L Q; Zhao, Q; Tan, B B; Liu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Annexin A3 participates in various biological processes, including tumorigenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Annexin A3 in gastric cancer and its relationship with cell differentiation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Annexin A3 expression in gastric cancer tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was measured by the MTT assay. Cell migration and invasion were determined via wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. Knock down of endogenous Annexin A3 in gastric cancer BGC823 cells was performed using siRNA technology. The expression of Annexin A3 was significantly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues, and negatively correlated with the differentiation degree. Silencing of endogenous Annexin A3 suppressed the proliferation, migration, and invasion of BGC823 cells. Additionally, the expression of p21, p27, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 was upregulated, and the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1, MMP-1, and MMP-2 decreased in cells treated with Annexin A3-siRNA. Annexin A3 was upregulated in gastric cancer cells. Deletion of endogenous Annexin A3 significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  7. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  8. Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164099.html Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease ... 15, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cells may offer new hope for people losing their ...

  9. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  10. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma treated by radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, H; Thunnissen, E; Arends, JW; de Jong, J; ten Velde, G; Lamers, R; Guinee, D; Holden, J; Wouters, M

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic value of the expression of p53 and bcl-2, the apoptotic index and the expression of topoisomerase II alpha in patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with high dose radiotherapy. Patients and methods: A numbe

  11. Induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by berberine in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Keqiang; Zhang, Cheng; Feng, Jinbo; Hou, Lifang; Yan, Lei; Zhou, Zunlin; Liu, Zhaoxu; Liu, Cheng; Fan, Yidon; Zheng, Baozhong; Xu, Zhonghua

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common type of cancer, and its surgery is always followed by chemotherapy to prevent recurrence. Berberine is non-toxic to normal cells but has anti-cancer effects in many cancer cell lines. This study was aimed to determine whether berberine inhibits the cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU-87 and T24 bladder cancer cell line. The superficial bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 and invasive T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of berberine. MTT assay was used to determine the effects of berberine on the viability of these cells. The cell cycle arrest was detected through propidium iodide (PI) staining. The induction of apoptosis was determined through Annexin V-conjugated Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa488) staining. Berberine inhibited the viability of BIU-87 and T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also promoted cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis. We observed that H-Ras and c-fos mRNA and protein expressionswere dose-dependently and time-dependently decreased by berberine treatment. Also, we investigated the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 protein expressions increased in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibits the cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU-87, bladder cancer cell line and T24, invasive bladder cancer cell line. Berberine can inhibit the oncogentic H-Ras and c-fos in T24 cells, and can induce the activation of the caspase-3 and caspase-9 apoptosis. Therefore, berberine has the potential to be a novel chemotherapy drug to treat the bladder cancer by suppressing tumor growth.

  12. Resveratrol Sensitizes Selectively Thyroid Cancer Cell to 131-Iodine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Hosseinimehr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study, the radiosensitizing effect of resveratrol as a natural product was investigated on cell toxicity induced by 131I in thyroid cancer cell. Methods. Human thyroid cancer cell and human nonmalignant fibroblast cell (HFFF2 were treated with 131I and/or resveratrol at different concentrations for 48 h. The cell proliferation was measured by determination of the percent of the survival cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results. Findings of this study show that resveratrol enhanced the cell death induced by 131I on thyroid cancer cell. Also, resveratrol exhibited a protective effect on normal cells against 131I toxicity. Conclusion. This result indicates a promising effect of resveratrol on improvement of cellular toxicity during iodine therapy.

  13. Cancers in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD: a retrospective analysis of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petoumenos Kathy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective survey describes types of cancers diagnosed in HIV-infected subjects in Asia, and assesses risk factors for cancer in HIV-infected subjects using contemporaneous HIV-infected controls without cancer. Methods TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD sites retrospectively reviewed clinic medical records to determine cancer diagnoses since 2000. For each diagnosis, the following data were recorded: date, type, stage, method of diagnosis, demographic data, medical history, and HIV-related information. For risk factor analyses, two HIV-infected control subjects without cancer diagnoses were also selected. Cancers were grouped as AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs, and non-ADCs. Non-ADCs were further categorized as being infection related (NADC-IR and unrelated (NADC-IUR. Results A total of 617 patients were included in this study: 215 cancer cases and 402 controls from 13 sites. The majority of cancer cases were male (71%. The mean age (SD for cases was 39 (10.6, 46 (11.5 and 44 (13.7 for ADCs, NADC-IURs and NADCs-IR, respectively. The majority (66% of cancers were ADCs (16% Kaposi sarcoma, 40% non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 9% cervical cancer. The most common NADCs were lung (6%, breast (5% and hepatocellular carcinoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma (2% each. There were also three (1.4% cases of leiomyosarcoma reported in this study. In multivariate analyses, individuals with CD4 counts above 200 cells/mm3 were approximately 80% less likely to be diagnosed with an ADC (p Conclusions The spectrum of cancer diagnoses in the Asia region currently does not appear dissimilar to that observed in non-Asian HIV populations. One interesting finding was the cases of leiomyosarcoma, a smooth-muscle tumour, usually seen in children and young adults with AIDS, yet overall quite rare. Further detailed studies are required to better describe the range of cancers in this region, and to help guide the development of screening programmes.

  14. Current Approaches of Photothermal Therapy in Treating Cancer Metastasis with Nanotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Hong; He, Bin; Zeng, Lijuan; Tan, Tao; Cao, Haiqiang; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Guo, Shengrong; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis accounts for the high mortality of many types of cancer. Owing to the unique advantages of high specificity and minimal invasiveness, photothermal therapy (PTT) has been evidenced with great potential in treating cancer metastasis. In this review, we outline the current approaches of PTT with respect to its application in treating metastatic cancer. PTT can be used alone, guided with multimodal imaging, or combined with the current available therapies for effective treatment...

  15. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  16. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  17. Differential expression and alternative splicing of cell cycle genes in imatinib-treated K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lin, Jin; Huang, Lin-Feng; Huang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wei-Ming; Min, Qing-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression often involves the disorder of the cell cycle, and a number of effective chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively investigate the effects of imatinib on the expression profile of cell cycle genes in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell line. In addition, we also investigated alternative splicing of the cell cycle genes affected by imatinib, since an important relationship has been shown to exist between RNA splicing and cell cycle progression. Exon array analysis was performed using total RNA purified from normal and imatinib-treated K562 cells. We identified 185 differentially expressed genes and 277 alternative splicing events between the two cell groups. A detailed analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of key genes confirmed the experimental results of the exon array. These results suggested that treatment of K562 cells with imatinib shifts the expression and alternative splicing profiles of several cell cycle-related genes. Importantly, these findings may help improve imatinib treatment strategies in patients with CML and may be useful for imatinib resistance research and CML drug development.

  18. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Combination Effect of Nimotuzumab with Radiation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Radiologicaland Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor nimotuzumab in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT-8, LoVo, WiDr, and HCT-116 were treated with nimotuzumab and/or radiation. The effects on cell proliferation, viability, and cell cycle progression were measured by MTT, clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. An immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in colorectal cancer cell lines. Under these experimental conditions, pre-treatment with nimotuzumab increased radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cell lines, except for cell line HCT-116. However, cell proliferation or cell cycle progression was not affected by the addition of nimotuzumab, irrespective of irradiation. Nimotuzumab enhanced the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting EGFR-mediated cell survival signaling. This study provided a rationale for the clinical application of the selective EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in combination with radiation in colorectal cancer cells.

  20. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  1. Where do patients treated for oral cancer die? A 20-year cohort study 1992-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisetty, A; Magennis, P; Mayland, C; Jack, B; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2015-12-01

    Of 1290 consecutive patients treated between 1992 and 2011 for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity at a regional centre, 750 had died by August 2013. About half of them (n=373) died in hospital, 113 (15%) in a hospice, 180 (24%) at home, 57 (8%) in a care home, and 22 (3%) elsewhere. Cancer was the underlying cause of death in 64%, and of them, 56% were oral cancers. The place of death was strongly associated with the age at death and cancer being the underlying cause. The percentage of people who died from cancer at home or in a hospice rose over time across all age groups and, from 2010, accounted for two-thirds. In contrast, less than 1 in 5 who did not die from cancer, died at home or in a hospice, and in this there has been no discernible change over the last 20 years. The percentage of deaths from cancer in hospital and hospice ranged from 32%-38% and 20%-29%, respectively, across age groups. An increase in the number of deaths from cancer in care homes in those aged 75 years and over was mirrored by fewer at home. Most of those who did not die from cancer, died in hospital, two-thirds were under 65 years, 85% were aged 65-84, and 56% were older. This was mirrored by fewer deaths at home in those under 85 and more in care homes in those over 75. In conclusion, our findings suggest that patients' preferences not to die in hospital are being realised. However, at the end of their lives, patients and their carers need more support at home, and more research is required.

  2. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  3. Stem Cell Therapy to Treat Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets offers a direct treatment for type 1 diabetes and in some cases, insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. However, its widespread use is hampered by a shortage of donor organs. Many extant studies have focused on deriving β-cell progenitors from pancreas and pluripotent stem cells. Efforts to generate β-cells in vitro will help elucidate the mechanisms of β-cell formation and thus provide a versatile in vivo system to evaluate the therapeutic potential of these ...

  4. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  5. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas silymarin showed significant inhibition only at the highest concentrations assessed. We found synergistic effects when colon cancer cells were treated with curcumin and silymarin together. The combination treatment led to inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to single compound treated cells. Combination treated cells exhibited marked cell rounding and membrane blebbing of apoptotic cells. Curcumin treated cells showed 3-fold more caspase3/7 activity whereas combination treated cells showed 5-fold more activity compared to control and silymarin treated cells. When DLD-1 cells were pre-exposed to curcumin, followed by treatment with silymarin, the cells underwent a high amount of cell death. The pre-exposure studies indicated curcumin sensitization of silymarin effect. Our results indicate that combinatorial treatments using phytochemicals are effective against colorectal cancer. PMID:27390600

  6. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  7. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  8. [18F]FDG PET/CT-based response assessment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer treated with paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab with or without nitroglycerin patches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Evelyn E.C. de; Elmpt, Wouter van; Leijenaar, Ralph T.H.; Lambin, Philippe [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groen, Harry J.M. [University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Noort, Vincent van der [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G.C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is a vasodilating drug, which increases tumor blood flow and consequently decreases hypoxia. Therefore, changes in [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) uptake pattern may occur. In this analysis, we investigated the feasibility of [18F]FDG PET for response assessment to paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab (PCB) treatment with and without NTG patches. And we compared the [18F]FDG PET response assessment to RECIST response assessment and survival. A total of 223 stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were included in a phase II study (NCT01171170) randomizing between PCB treatment with or without NTG patches. For 60 participating patients, a baseline and a second [18F]FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) scan, performed between day 22 and 24 after the start of treatment, were available. Tumor response was defined as a 30 % decrease in CT and PET parameters, and was compared to RECIST response at week 6. The predictive value of these assessments for progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed with and without NTG. A 30 % decrease in SUVpeak assessment identified more patients as responders compared to a 30 % decrease in CT diameter assessment (73 % vs. 18 %), however, this was not correlated to OS (SUVpeak30 p = 0.833; CTdiameter30 p = 0.557). Changes in PET parameters between the baseline and the second scan were not significantly different for the NTG group compared to the control group (p value range 0.159-0.634). The CT-based (part of the [18F]FDG PET/CT) parameters showed a significant difference between the baseline and the second scan for the NTG group compared to the control group (CT diameter decrease of 7 ± 23 % vs. 19 ± 14 %, p = 0.016, respectively). The decrease in tumoral FDG uptake in advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy with and without NTG did not differ between both treatment arms. Early PET-based response assessment showed more tumor responders

  9. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  10. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  11. Interleukin-12 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Cancer That Has High Levels of HER2/Neu

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Bone Metastases; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Distal Urethral Cancer; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Liver Metastases; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Occult Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal

  12. Risk of virus-associated cancer in female arthritis patients treated with biologigal DMARDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, René; Mellemkjær, Lene; Glintborg, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    .0) cancer only occurred among bDMARD-treated patients. SIR was not increased for cervical cancer, either in ever or never bDMARD-treated patients. SIRs for Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas were increased in never bDMARD-treated patients (SIR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.5, 4.0). CONCLUSION: bDMARD therapy...... was not associated with an overall excess of virus-associated cancers in female arthritis patients. The observed increased occurrence of oropharyngeal cancer needs further investigation. Lymphoma incidence was increased in patients unexposed to bDMARD treatment.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of virus-associated cancer in female arthritis patients ever treated with biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) compared with never bDMARD-treated patients and ever and never treated with bDMARD compared with the general population. METHODS: This was a cohort study...

  13. Responses of Cancer Cells Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kushibiki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT involves the administration of a photosensitizer, followed by local irradiation of tumor tissues using a laser of an appropriate wavelength to activate the photosensitizer. Since multiple cellular signaling cascades are concomitantly activated in cancer cells exposed to the photodynamic effect, understanding the responses of cancer cells to PDT will aid in the development of new interventions. This review describes the possible cell-death signaling pathways initiated by PDT. In addition, we describe our latest findings regarding the induction of expression of miRNAs specific to apoptosis in cancer cells and the induction of antitumor immunity following PDT against cancer cells. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to PDT will potentially improve long-term survival of PDT treated patients.

  14. Astragalus extract inhibits destruction of gastric cancer cells to mesothelial cells by anti-apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Na; Fu-Nan Liu; Zhi-Feng Miao; Zong-Min Du; Hui-Mian Xu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the inhibitory effect of Astragalus memebranaceushas on gastric cancer cell supernatantinduced apoptosis of human peritoneal mesothelial cells. METHODS: Human peritoneal mesothelial cell (HPMC) line HMrSV5 was co-incubated with gastric cancer cell supernatant (MKN45) and/or Astragalus memebranaceushas. Morphological changes in gastric cancer cells were observed under phase-contrast microscope. Quantitative cell damage was determined by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined under transmission electron microscope and quantified by detecting acridine orange/ethidium bromide-stained (AO/EB) condensed nuclei under fluorescent microscope or by flow cytometry. Expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were evaluated with immunostaining. RESULTS: Morphological changes and exfoliation occurred and naked areas appeared in cultured HMrSV5 cells 24 h after they were treated with gastric cancer cell supernatant. Cell supernatant from MKN45 gastric cancer cells induced apoptosis of HMrSV5 cells in a time-dependent manner. Obvious morphological changes were observed in cell apoptosis, such as condensation of chromatin, nuclear fragmentations and apoptotic bodies. Astragalus memebranaceus could partly suppress these changes and regulate the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax in HMrSV5 cells. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer cells induce apoptosis of HPMCs through the supernatant. Astragalus memebranaceushas inhibits this phenomenon and can be used an adjuvant chemothera-peutic agent in gastric cancer therapy.

  15. Cancer stem cells: therapeutic implications and perspectives in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Han

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory is gaining increasing attention from researchers and has become an important focus of cancer research. According to the theory, a minority population of cancer cells is capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding the properties and characteristics of CSCs is key to future study on cancer research, such as the isolation and identification of CSCs, the cancer diagnosis, and the cancer therapy. Standard oncology treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection, can only shrink the bulk tumor and the tumor tends to relapse. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting CSCs and their microenvironmental niche address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies to eradicate the CSCs that otherwise result in therapy resistance. The combined use of traditional therapies with targeted CSC-specific agents may target the whole cancer and offer a promising strategy for lasting treatment and even cure.

  16. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  17. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  18. Acetylsalicylic Acid and Eflornithine in Treating Patients at High Risk for Colorectal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This phase II trial is studying how well giving acetylsalicylic acid together with eflornithine works in treating patients at high risk for colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of certain drugs to keep cancer from forming. The use of acetylsalicylic acid and eflornithine may prevent colorectal cancer. |

  19. Variation of Protein's Expression Correlated to the Drug Resistance after Sequential Anti-cancer Treatment in Human Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hong Chi; Ji-ren Zhang; Peng Li; Duan-qi Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multi-drug resistance is one of the leading causes for fai lure to treat patients with cancer. This study is to explore the expression of the proteins correlated with chemoresistance in a human lung cancer cell line (LPET-a-1) repeatedly treated by anti-cancer drugs.

  20. Advanced Merkel cell cancer and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bird, B R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Merkel cell cancer (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine skin cancer occurring predominantly in elderly Caucasians. It tends to metastasize to regional lymph nodes and viscera and is sensitive to chemotherapy but recurs rapidly. AIM: To report one such case, its response to chemotherapy and briefly review the literature. METHODS: A 73-year-old male with a fungating primary lesion on his left knee and ulcerated inguinal lymph nodes was diagnosed with MCC and treated with chemotherapy. The two largest case series and reviews of case reports were summarised. RESULTS: His ulcer healed after two cycles of carboplatin and etoposide with improvement in quality of life. Overall response rates of nearly 60% to chemotherapy are reported but median survival is only nine months with metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy should be considered for fit elderly patients with MCC who have recurrent or advanced disease.

  1. How Taxol/paclitaxel kills cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Beth A

    2014-09-15

    Taxol (generic name paclitaxel) is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. It is used off-label to treat gastroesophageal, endometrial, cervical, prostate, and head and neck cancers, in addition to sarcoma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Paclitaxel has long been recognized to induce mitotic arrest, which leads to cell death in a subset of the arrested population. However, recent evidence demonstrates that intratumoral concentrations of paclitaxel are too low to cause mitotic arrest and result in multipolar divisions instead. It is hoped that this insight can now be used to develop a biomarker to identify the ∼50% of patients that will benefit from paclitaxel therapy. Here I discuss the history of paclitaxel and our recently evolved understanding of its mechanism of action.

  2. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pokrywczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  3. Steroidogenesis in amlodipine treated purified Leydig cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Rabia, E-mail: rabialatif08@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa, E-mail: drmustafa786@gmail.com [Department of Physiology, Wah Medical College, Wah (Pakistan); Hameed, Waqas, E-mail: waqham@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Rehman Medical College, Peshawar (Pakistan); Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: professormaslam@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology, Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-01-01

    Drugs have been shown to adversely affect male fertility and recently anti-hypertensive drugs were added to the list. The anti-fertility effects of amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, are well-illustrated in in vivo experiments but lack an in vitro proof. The present study was designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of amlodipine on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in vitro. Leydig cells of Sprague–Dawley rats were isolated and purified by Percoll. Cells were incubated for 3 h with/without amlodipine in the presence/absence of LH, dbcAMP, Pregnenolone and 25-Hydroxycholesterol. Cytosolic calcium was measured in purified Leydig cells by fluorometric technique. The results showed significantly reduced (P < 0.05) steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in amlodipine exposed rats. The site of amlodipine induced steroidogenic inhibition seems to be prior to the formation of Pregnenolone at the level of StAR protein. -- Highlights: ► Inhibition of steroidogenesis in isolated and purified Leydig cells by amlodipine. ► Site of inhibition was before Pregnenolone formation, at the level of StAR protein. ► Inhibition of LH stimulated rise in cytosolic calcium by amlodipine.

  4. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  5. Overcoming cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells by targeting HIF-1-regulated cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhihong; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Fan, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating ovarian cancer; however, resistance to cisplatin is common. In this study, we explored an experimental strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer from the new perspective of cancer cell metabolism. By using two pairs of genetically matched cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, we tested the hypothesis that downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, is a promising strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer cells. We found that cisplatin downregulated the level of the regulatable α subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells through enhancing HIF-1α degradation but did not downregulate HIF-1α in their cisplatin-resistant counterparts. Overexpression of a degradation-resistant HIF-1α (HIF-1α ΔODD) reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in cisplatin-sensitive cells, whereas genetic knockdown of HIF-1α or pharmacological promotion of HIF-1α degradation enhanced response to cisplatin in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We further demonstrated that knockdown of HIF-1α improved the response of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by redirecting the aerobic glycolysis in the resistant cancer cells toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cell death through overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings suggest that the HIF-1α-regulated cancer metabolism pathway could be a novel target for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

  6. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  7. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  8. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  9. Spermine oxidase SMO(PAOh1), Not N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase PAO, is the primary source of cytotoxic H2O2 in polyamine analogue-treated human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledgie, Allison; Huang, Yi; Hacker, Amy; Zhang, Zhe; Woster, Patrick M; Davidson, Nancy E; Casero, Robert A

    2005-12-02

    The induction of polyamine catabolism and its production of H2O2 have been implicated in the response to specific antitumor polyamine analogues. The original hypothesis was that analogue induction of the rate-limiting spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) provided substrate for the peroxisomal acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO), resulting in a decrease in polyamine pools through catabolism, oxidation, and excretion of acetylated polyamines and the production of toxic aldehydes and H2O2. However, the recent discovery of the inducible spermine oxidase SMO(PAOh1) suggested the possibility that the original hypothesis may be incomplete. To examine the role of the catabolic enzymes in the response of breast cancer cells to the polyamine analogue N1,N1-bis(ethyl)norspermine (BENSpm), a stable knockdown small interfering RNA strategy was used. BENSpm differentially induced SSAT and SMO(PAOh1) mRNA and activity in several breast cancer cell lines, whereas no N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase PAO mRNA or activity was detected. BENSpm treatment inhibited cell growth, decreased intracellular polyamine levels, and decreased ornithine decarboxylase activity in all cell lines examined. The stable knockdown of either SSAT or SMO(PAOh1) reduced the sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 cells to BENSpm, whereas double knockdown MDA-MB-231 cells were almost entirely resistant to the growth inhibitory effects of the analogue. Furthermore, the H2O2 produced through BENSpm-induced polyamine catabolism was found to be derived exclusively from SMO(PAOh1) activity and not through PAO activity on acetylated polyamines. These data suggested that SSAT and SMO(PAOh1) activities are the major mediators of the cellular response of breast tumor cells to BENSpm and that PAO plays little or no role in this response.

  10. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  11. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  12. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  13. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parisha; Bhatia; Koji; Tsumagari; Zakaria; Y; Abd; Elmageed; Paul; Friedlander; Joseph; F; Buell; Emad; Kandil

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  14. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  15. In vitro study on effect of germinated wheat on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research investigated the possible anti-cancer effects of germinated wheat flours (GWF) on cell growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In a series of in vitro experiments, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cells were cultured and treated with GWF that wer...

  16. Cancer immunotherapy using γδT cells : dealing with diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    The broad and potent tumour-reactivity of innate-like γδT cells makes them valuable additions to current cancer immunotherapeutic concepts based on adaptive immunity, such as monoclonal antibodies and αβT cells. Nevertheless, clinical success using γδT cells to treat cancer has so far fallen short h

  17. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-03-31

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A-nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells.

  19. How I treat Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carl E.; Ladisch, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    “Langerhans cell histiocytosis” (LCH) describes a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from a single bone lesion or trivial skin rash to an explosive disseminated disease. Regardless of clinical severity, LCH lesions share the common histology of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells with characteristic morphology among an inflammatory infiltrate. Despite historical uncertainty defining LCH as inflammatory vs neoplastic and incomplete understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis, clinical outcomes have improved markedly over the past decades through cooperative randomized clinical trials based on empiric therapeutic strategies. Significant advances include recognition of high- and low-risk clinical groups defined by hematopoietic and/or hepatic involvement, and of the importance of optimal intensity and of duration of chemotherapy. Nevertheless, mortality of high-risk patients, disease recurrence, lack of robustly tested salvage strategies, and significant disease morbidity of both high- and low-risk patients remain challenges. Recent discovery of recurrent somatic mutations in mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes at critical stages of myeloid hematopoietic differentiation in LCH patients supports redefinition of the disease as a myeloproliferative disorder and provides opportunities to develop novel approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25827831

  20. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  1. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Lehman, John R; Clancy, Rebecca; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Somiari, Stella; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Hu, Hai; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN) breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38) in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3) when cultured in three dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  2. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Iida

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38 in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231 but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3 when cultured in three dimensional (3D type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  3. Study on Tongkuaixiao Babu Plaster(痛块消巴布剂)in Treating Cancer Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万冬桂; 李佩文

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the efficacy of Tongkuaixiao Babu plaster (痛块消巴剂, TKXBBP)in treating cancer pain. Methods: In the clinical observation, sixty-five patients with moderate or severe cancer pain were randomly divided into two groups: 32 in the treated group (TKXBBP group) and 33 in the control group (Bucinnazine group). The therapeutic effects in relieving pain, improving quality of life (QOL),and the rate of satisfaction the patients felt of the two groups were compared respectively. Results: TKXBBP was effective in treating cancer pain. There wasn't any statistically significant difference in total effective rate (P>0.05), but the statistical difference was significant in obvious remission rate (P<0.05) between the treated and control group, and the effect on serious pain shown in the treated group was better than that of the control group (P<0.05). The difference in the initiation time of relieving cancer pain was insignificant (P>0.05), while in the remission period, the treated group showed its treatment was obviously superior to that of the control group (P<0.05). TKXBBP showed better effect in the improvement of QOL (P<0.05)and satisfaction rate, with significant difference between the treated and the control groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: TKXBBP's effect in treating cancer pain was obvious, its application was safe and convenient. It was shown that the external treatment with this kind of Chinese medicine had great advantage in treating cancer pain.

  4. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  5. Sunitinib Malate in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With Cancer Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    -transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Biomarkers of evasive resistance predict disease progression in cancer patients treated with antiangiogenic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, Andreas; Jöhrer, Karin; Kocher, Florian; Steiner, Normann; Graziadei, Ivo; Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Kremser, Christian; Kern, Johann; Untergasser, Gerold; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2016-04-12

    Numerous antiangiogenic agents are approved for the treatment of oncological diseases. However, almost all patients develop evasive resistance mechanisms against antiangiogenic therapies. Currently no predictive biomarker for therapy resistance or response has been established. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predicting the development of therapy resistance in patients with hepatocellular cancer (n = 11), renal cell cancer (n = 7) and non-small cell lung cancer (n = 2). Thereby we measured levels of angiogenic growth factors, tumor perfusion, circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and tumor endothelial markers (TEM) in patients during the course of therapy with antiangiogenic agents, and correlated them with the time to antiangiogenic progression (aTTP). Importantly, at disease progression, we observed an increase of proangiogenic factors, upregulation of CEC/CEP levels and downregulation of TEMs, such as Robo4 and endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR), reflecting the formation of torturous tumor vessels. Increased TEM expression levels tended to correlate with prolonged aTTP (ECSCR high = 275 days vs. ECSCR low = 92.5 days; p = 0.07 and for Robo4 high = 387 days vs. Robo4 low = 90.0 days; p = 0.08). This indicates that loss of vascular stabilization factors aggravates the development of antiangiogenic resistance. Thus, our observations confirm that CEP/CEC populations, proangiogenic cytokines and TEMs contribute to evasive resistance in antiangiogenic treated patients. Higher TEM expression during disease progression may have clinical and pathophysiological implications, however, validation of our results is warranted for further biomarker development.

  7. Third-line chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, WK; ten Hacken, NHT; Groen, HJM

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of third-line chemotherapy treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is unknown. We present our experience with third-tine chemotherapy for recurrent SCLC. Between January 1996 and July 2004 all. consecutive patients treated for SCLC were retrospectively studied. We recorded patient chara

  8. [Spontaneous rupture of the spleen in a patient treated with chemotherapy and growth factors for stem cell mobilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossitto, M; Versaci, A; Barbera, A; Broccio, M; Lepore, V; Ciccolo, A

    1998-05-01

    The Authors report a case of spontaneous spleen rupture in a woman with breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and growth factors for stem cell mobilization. After a wide review of the literature, they suppose this therapy, causing a considerable increase of immature cells, that promote the stasis of the splenic microcirculation, can sometime elicit a spontaneous rupture of the organ.

  9. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  10. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  11. Anti-Cancer Activity of Solanum nigrum (AESN through Suppression of Mitochondrial Function and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Jang Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is the main approach for treating advanced and recurrent carcinoma, but the clinical performance of chemotherapy is limited by relatively low response rates, drug resistance, and adverse effects that severely affect the quality of life of patients. An association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and chemotherapy resistance has been investigated in recent studies. Our recent studies have found that the aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum (AESN is a crucial ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine formulas for treating various types of cancer patients and exhibits antitumor effects. We evaluated the suppression of EMT in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with AESN. The mitochondrial morphology was investigated using Mitotracker Deep-Red FM stain. Our results indicated that AESN markedly inhibited cell viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest mediated by activation of caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, mitochondrial fission was observed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with AESN. In addition to elevation of E-cadherin, downregulations of ZEB1, N-cadherin, and vimentin were found in AESN-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These results suggested that AESN could inhibit EMT of MCF-7 breast cancer cells mediated by attenuation of mitochondrial function. AESN could be potentially beneficial in treating breast cancer cells, and may be of interest for future studies in developing integrative cancer therapy against proliferation, metastasis, and migration of breast cancer cells.

  12. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for kidney (renal cell) cancer. The list ...

  13. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  14. Activation of TIM1 induces colon cancer cell apoptosis via modulating Fas ligand expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xueyan; Sun, Wenjing; Hu, Xiaocui; Li, Xiaolin; Fu, Songbin; Liu, Chen

    2016-04-29

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is unclear. It is proposed that TIM1 has an association with human cancer. The present study aims to investigate the role of TIM1 activation in the inhibition of human colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell line, HT29 and T84 cells were cultured. The expression of TIM1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The TIM1 on the cancer cells was activated in the culture by adding recombinant TIM4. The chromatin structure at the FasL promoter locus was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The apoptosis of the cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 cells and T84 cells, expressed TIM1. Activation of TIM1 by exposing the cells to TIM4 significantly increased the frequency of apoptotic colon cancer cells. The expression of FasL was increased in the cancer cells after treating by TIM4. Blocking Fas or FasL abolished the exposure to TIM4-induced T84 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, HT29 cells and T84 cells express TIM1; activation TIM1 can induce the cancer cell apoptosis. TIM1 may be a novel therapeutic target of colon cancer.

  15. Telomere shortening and cell senescence induced by perylene derivatives in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taka, Thanachai; Huang, Liming; Wongnoppavich, Ariyaphong; Tam-Chang, Suk-Wah; Lee, T Randall; Tuntiwechapikul, Wirote

    2013-02-15

    Cancer cells evade replicative senescence by re-expressing telomerase, which maintains telomere length and hence chromosomal integrity. Telomerase inhibition would lead cancer cells to senesce and therefore prevent cancer cells from growing indefinitely. G-quadruplex ligands can attenuate telomerase activity by inducing G-quadruplex formation at the 3'-overhang of telomere and at the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter; the former prevents telomerase from accessing the telomere, and the latter acts as a transcriptional silencer. The present investigation found that perylene derivatives PM2 and PIPER induced G-quadruplex formation from both telomeric DNA and the hTERT promoter region in vitro. Further, TRAP assay showed that these compounds inhibited telomerase in a dose-dependent manner. When A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with these compounds, hTERT expression was down-regulated. Moreover, the crude protein extract from these treated cells exhibited less telomerase activity. In the long-term treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with sub-cytotoxic dose of these perylenes, telomere shortening, reduction of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity, and cell senescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that perylene derivatives warrant further consideration as effective agents for cancer therapy.

  16. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  17. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design.

  18. Preliminary Results of Treating Cancerous Cells of Lung (QU-DB by Hyperthermia using Diode Laser and Gold Coated Fe3O4/SiO2 Nano-Shells: An in-Vitro Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Etrati Khosroshahi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we describe the results of controlled synthesis and application of gold coated Fe3O4/SiO2 nano-shells combined with the optical property of gold for enhancement of selective photothermal interaction with cancerous cells based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR Phenomena. Materials and Methods Magnetite Nano-Particles (MNPs were prepared by means of co-precipitation. MNPs were modified with a thin layer of Silica using the Stober method. The amino-modified Fe3O4/SiO2 nano-shells were covered with gold colloids as a self-assembeled process. In-vitro assays were performed to determine the effect of apoptosis of the cells based on the cells morphological changes. Results The biologically inert nano-shells (85 nm with a Magnetite/Silica core and a gold shell were optically activated. A successful laser-hyperthermia based on the thermal effect of surface plasmon resonance was performed using different gold concentrations. The thermal profile effects of laser power are presented as ideal cases of nanoshell-assisted photo-thermal therapy. The thermally-induced cell death has been shown to be dependent on NPs concentration and laser power density. The power densities of 157 and 184 W/cm2 caused complete cell death at the focal point of the laser beam.Cell damage was reduced by decreasing the power density of laser. Also, a larger area of damage on cell culture plates was observed at longer intervals of laser irradiation. Conclusion An optimized laser-(SPR hyperthermia was obtained using a concentration of gold coated Fe3O4/SiO2 nano-shells concentration=0.1 mg/ml at intensity=157 W/cm2 at 60s.

  19. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  20. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles inhibit prostate cancer by attenuating the stemness of cancer cells via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Yang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Tie; Shi, Min-Feng; Sun, Chen-Xia; Gao, Xiu-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Qiong; Cui, Xin-Gang; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Disordered copper metabolism plays a critical role in the development of various cancers. As a nanomedicine containing copper, cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) exert ideal antitumor pharmacological effects in vitro and in vivo. Prostate cancer is a frequently diagnosed male malignancy prone to relapse, and castration resistance is the main reason for endocrine therapy failure. However, whether CONPs have the potential to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer is still unknown. Here, using the castration-resistant PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line as a model, we report that CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. CONPs can also attenuate the stemness of cancer cells and inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway, both of which highlight the great potential of CONPs as a new clinical castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy.

  1. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  2. Apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisbert-Valenzuela, Edwin O; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is a public health problem in the world and breast cancer is the most frequently cancer in women. Approximately 15% of the breast cancers are triple-negative. Apoptosis regulates normal growth, homeostasis, development, embryogenesis and appropriate strategy to treat cancer. Bax is a protein pro-apoptotic enhancer of apoptosis in contrast to Bcl-2 with antiapoptotic properties. Initiator caspase-9 and caspase-8 are features of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway, respectively. NF-κB is a transcription factor known to be involved in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Noscapine, an alkaloid derived from opium is used as antitussive and showed antitumor properties that induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines. The aim of the present study was to determine the apoptotic effect of noscapine in breast cancer cell lines compared to breast normal cell line. Three cell lines were used: i) a control breast cell line MCF-10F; ii) a luminal-like adenocarcinoma triple-positive breast cell line MCF-7; iii) breast cancer triple-negative cell line MDA-MB-231. Our results showed that noscapine had lower toxicity in normal cells and was an effective anticancer agent that induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells because it increases Bax gene and protein expression in three cell lines, while decreases Bcl-xL gene expression, and Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in breast cancer cell lines. Therefore, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased in the three cell lines. This drug increased caspase-9 gene expression in breast cancer cell lines and caspase-8 gene expression increased in MCF-10F and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, it increased cleavage of caspase-8, suggesting that noscapine-induced apoptosis is probably due to the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Antiapoptotic gene and protein expression diminished and proapoptotic gene and protein expression increased noscapine-induced expression, probably due to decrease in NF-κB gene and protein expression

  3. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard Thomsen, Karina Hedelund; Lyng, Maria Bibi; Elias, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers...... predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated...... by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p

  4. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A D Smith

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined.MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography.Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U]glucose.This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism.

  5. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Doni Jayavelu

    Full Text Available Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs and target genes (TGs. The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA. Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE, mid-early (ME, mid-late (ML and very late (VL. Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  6. Current Approaches of Photothermal Therapy in Treating Cancer Metastasis with Nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Hong; He, Bin; Zeng, Lijuan; Tan, Tao; Cao, Haiqiang; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Guo, Shengrong; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis accounts for the high mortality of many types of cancer. Owing to the unique advantages of high specificity and minimal invasiveness, photothermal therapy (PTT) has been evidenced with great potential in treating cancer metastasis. In this review, we outline the current approaches of PTT with respect to its application in treating metastatic cancer. PTT can be used alone, guided with multimodal imaging, or combined with the current available therapies for effective treatment of cancer metastasis. Numerous types of photothermal nanotherapeutics (PTN) have been developed with encouraging therapeutic efficacy on metastatic cancer in many preclinical animal experiments. We summarize the design and performance of various PTN in PTT alone and their combinational therapy. We also point out the lacking area and the most promising approaches in this challenging field. In conclusion, PTT or their combinational therapy can provide an essential promising therapeutic modality against cancer metastasis.

  7. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  8. Influenza vaccination in children being treated with chemotherapy for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Goossen; L.C.M. Kremer; M.D. van de Wetering

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is a potential cause of severe morbidity in children with cancer, therefore vaccination against influenza is recommended. However, there are conflicting data concerning the immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer and the value of vaccination re

  9. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  10. Observation and nursing care of Locally advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with intratumoral bruceajavanica oil injection%鸦胆子油乳瘤内注射治疗LANSCLC疗效观察与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华; 刘敏

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨鸦胆子油乳瘤内注射治疗不可手术切除局部晚期非小细胞肺癌的疗效及护理.方法:对284例不可手术切除局部晚期非小细胞肺癌患者采用瘤内注射鸦胆子油乳,并配合有效护理,观察疗效及不良反应.结果:完全缓解(CR)20例,部分缓解(PR)126例,好转(MR)76例,稳定(SD)46例,进展(PD)16例,有效率51.4%.无进展生存期(PFS)11.31月.结论:加强鸦胆子油乳瘤内注射治疗不可手术切除局部晚期非小细胞肺癌注射前后的健康指导和护理,可显著提高疗效.%Objective:To investigate the intratumoral injection of Brucea javanica oil in the treatment of no operation resection for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer and nursing care. Methods:284 cases of no operation resection of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer with intratumoral injection of Brucea javanica oil, combined with effective nursing, observation curative effect and adverse reaction. Results:The complete response ( CR ) in 20 cases, partial remission ( PR ) in 126 cases,76 cases improved ( MR ), stability ( SD ) in 46 cases, progress (PD) in 16 cases, with an efficiency of 51.4%. Progression free survival ( PFS ) in 11.31months. Conclusion:Strengthening of Brucea Javanica Oil intratumor injection for treatment of no operation resection of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer before and after injection of health guidance and care, can significantly improve the efficacy.

  11. DNA Damage and Repair Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: An Exploratory Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Vici

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells commonly harbour a defective G1/S checkpoint owing to the interaction of viral oncoproteins with p53 and retinoblastoma protein. The activation of the G2/M checkpoint may thus become essential for protecting cancer cells from genotoxic insults, such as chemotherapy. In 52 cervical cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we investigated whether the levels of phosphorylated Wee1 (pWee1, a key G2/M checkpoint kinase, and γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, discriminated between patients with a pathological complete response (pCR and those with residual disease. We also tested the association between pWee1 and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1, a kinase acting upstream Wee1 in the G2/M checkpoint pathway. pWee1, γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed in diagnostic biopsies by immunohistochemistry. The degrees of pWee1 and pChk1 expression were defined using three different classification methods, i.e., staining intensity, Allred score, and a multiplicative score. γ-H2AX was analyzed both as continuous and categorical variable. Irrespective of the classification used, elevated levels of pWee1 and γ-H2AX were significantly associated with a lower rate of pCR. In univariate and multivariate analyses, pWee1 and γ-H2AX were both associated with reduced pCR. Internal validation conducted through a re-sampling without replacement procedure confirmed the robustness of the multivariate model. Finally, we found a significant association between pWee1 and pChk1. The message conveyed by the present analysis is that biomarkers of DNA damage and repair may predict the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate these encouraging findings.

  12. Modern oncologic and operative outcomes for oesophageal cancer treated with curative intent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reynolds, J V

    2011-09-01

    The curative approach to oesophageal cancer carries significant risks and a cure is achieved in approximately 20 per cent. There has been a recent trend internationally to observe improved operative and oncological outcomes. This report audits modern outcomes from a high volume centre with a prospective database for the period 2004-08. 603 patients were referred and 310 (52%) were treated with curative intent. Adenocarcinoma represented 68% of the cohort, squamous cell cancer 30%. Of the 310 cases, 227 (73%) underwent surgery, 105 (46%) underwent surgery alone, and 122 (54%) had chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.7%. The median and 5-year survival of the 310 patients based on intention to treat was 36 months and 36%, respectively, and of the 181 patients undergoing R0 resection, 52 months and 42%, respectively. An in-hospital postoperative mortality rate of less than 2 per cent, and 5-year survival of between 35 and 42% is consistent with benchmarks from international series.

  13. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  14. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  15. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  16. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  17. Deferasirox for Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant and Have Iron Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    Iron Overload; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  18. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  19. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ... cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. ...

  20. Inhaled sodium cromoglycate to treat cough in advanced lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, M.; Porta, C.; Gualtieri, G.; Nastasi, G.; Tinelli, C.

    1996-01-01

    C-fibres probably represent the common final pathway in both ACE inhibitors and neoplastic cough. A recent report demonstrated that inhaled sodium cromoglycate is an effective treatment for ACE inhibitors' cough; this effect might be due to the suppression of afferent unmyelinated C-fibres. We tested the hypothesis that inhaled sodium cromoglycate might also be effective in lung cancer patients who presented with irritative neoplastic cough. Twenty non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients complaining of cough resistant to conventional treatment were randomised to receive, in a double-blind trial, either inhaled sodium cromoglycate or placebo. Patients recorded cough severity daily, before and during treatment, on a 0 to 4 scale. The efficacy of treatment was tested with the Mann-Whitney U-test for non-parametric measures, comparing the intergroup differences in the measures of summary of symptom scores calculated in each patient before and after treatment. We report that inhaled sodium cromoglycate can reduce cough, also in NSCLC patients and that such reduction, observed in all patients treated, is statistically significant (P < 0.001). Inhaled sodium cromoglycate appears to be a cost-effective and safe treatment for lung cancer-related cough. PMID:8688342

  1. Inhaled sodium cromoglycate to treat cough in advanced lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, M; Porta, C; Gualtieri, G; Nastasi, G; Tinelli, C

    1996-07-01

    C-fibres probably represent the common final pathway in both ACE inhibitors and neoplastic cough. A recent report demonstrated that inhaled sodium cromoglycate is an effective treatment for ACE inhibitors' cough; this effect might be due to the suppression of afferent unmyelinated C-fibres. We tested the hypothesis that inhaled sodium cromoglycate might also be effective in lung cancer patients who presented with irritative neoplastic cough. Twenty non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients complaining of cough resistant to conventional treatment were randomised to receive, in a double-blind trial, either inhaled sodium cromoglycate or placebo. Patients recorded cough severity daily, before and during treatment, on a 0 to 4 scale. The efficacy of treatment was tested with the Mann-Whitney U-test for non-parametric measures, comparing the intergroup differences in the measures of summary of symptom scores calculated in each patient before and after treatment. We report that inhaled sodium cromoglycate can reduce cough, also in NSCLC patients and that such reduction, observed in all patients treated, is statistically significant (P sodium cromoglycate appears to be a cost-effective and safe treatment for lung cancer-related cough.

  2. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  3. Involvement of calreticulin in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in diallyl disulfide-treated HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lan; Shan, Jian; Chen, Xin; Li, Guoqing; Li, Linwei; Tan, Hui; Su, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has shown potential as a therapeutic agent in various cancers. Previously, calreticulin (CRT) was found to be downregulated in differentiated HL-60 cells treated with DADS. The present study investigated the role of CRT proteins in DADS-induced proliferation, invasion and differentiation in HL-60 cells. The present study demonstrated that DADS treatment significantly changed the morphology of HL-60 cells and caused the significant time-dependent downregulation of CRT. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRT expression significantly inhibited proliferation, decreased invasion ability, increased the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)11b and reduced the expression of CD33 in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. DADS also significantly affected cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in CRT-overexpressed HL-60 cells. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assays showed decreased NBT reduction activity in the CRT overexpression group and increased NBT reduction in the CRT siRNA group. Following treatment with DADS, the NBT reduction abilities in all groups were increased. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the downregulation of CRT during DADS-induced differentiation in HL-60 cells and indicates that CRT is involved in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in DADS-treated HL-60 cells.

  4. Curcumin induces chemo/radio-sensitization in ovarian cancer cells and curcumin nanoparticles inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallapu Murali M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo/radio-resistance is a major obstacle in treating advanced ovarian cancer. The efficacy of current treatments may be improved by increasing the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemo/radiation therapies. Curcumin is a naturally occurring compound with anti-cancer activity in multiple cancers; however, its chemo/radio-sensitizing potential is not well studied in ovarian cancer. Herein, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a curcumin pre-treatment strategy for chemo/radio-sensitizing cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. To improve the efficacy and specificity of curcumin induced chemo/radio sensitization, we developed a curcumin nanoparticle formulation conjugated with a monoclonal antibody specific for cancer cells. Methods Cisplatin resistant A2780CP ovarian cancer cells were pre-treated with curcumin followed by exposure to cisplatin or radiation and the effect on cell growth was determined by MTS and colony formation assays. The effect of curcumin pre-treatment on the expression of apoptosis related proteins and β-catenin was determined by Western blotting or Flow Cytometry. A luciferase reporter assay was used to determine the effect of curcumin on β-catenin transcription activity. The poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (Nano-CUR was developed by a modified nano-precipitation method and physico-chemical characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering methods. Results Curcumin pre-treatment considerably reduced the dose of cisplatin and radiation required to inhibit the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. During the 6 hr pre-treatment, curcumin down regulated the expression of Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 pro-survival proteins. Curcumin pre-treatment followed by exposure to low doses of cisplatin increased apoptosis as indicated by annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 9 and PARP. Additionally, curcumin pre

  5. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann

    2013-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil......Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  6. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  7. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  8. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an a

  9. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  10. Induction of apoptosis in lung cancer cells by isorhamnetin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LingZHU; Li-mingZHOU; Chun-leiYANG; Zun-zhenZHANG; JingXIAO; Zheng-rongWANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM The aim of the present study was to explore cytotoxic activity and the mechanism of tumor cell killing by isorhamnetin and to investigate the effect of isorhamnetin on tumor growth, cell prolification and apoptosis in transplantation tumor of lung cancer of Lewis cell line in C57BL/6 mice. METHODS Human A549 cells were treated with 10-320(g/ml isorhamnetin, C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously inoculated Lewis cells 0.2ml/each (1×107cells/ml) below the right forelimb armpit and were treated with 50 (g/ml isorhamnetin isorhamnetin.The results were observed and analyzed under light-microscope, electronic microscopy, growth inhibition was analyzed by MTT, clonogenic asssays and growth curve;the apoptosis and the expression-associated genes peaks were detected with flow cytometry (FCM), DNA fragmentation, single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay,

  11. The direct effect of estrogen on cell viability and apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Liu, Min; Ding, Qianshan; Ji, Xiang; Hao, Yarong; Wu, Xiaomin; Xiong, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiology researches indicated that gastric cancer is a male-predominant disease; both expression level of estrogen and expression pattern of estrogen receptors (ERs) influence its carcinogenesis. But the direct effect of estrogen on gastric cancer cells is still unclear. This study aimed to explore the direct effect of β-estradiol (E2) on gastric cancer cells. SGC7901 and BGC823 were treated with a serial of concentrations of E2. The survival rates of both the cell lines were significantly reduced, and the reduction of viability was due to apoptosis triggered by E2 treatment. Caspase 3 was activated in response to the increasing E2 concentration in both SGC7901 and BGC823. Cleaved Caspase 3 fragments were detected, and the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were reduced. Apoptosis was further confirmed by flow cytometry. The expression level of PEG10, an androgen receptor target gene, was reduced during E2 treatment. Both ERα and ERβ were expressed in these cell lines, and the result of bioinformatics analysis of gastric cancer from GEO datasets indicated that the expression levels of both ERα and ERβ were significantly higher in noncancerous gastric tissues than in gastric cancer tissues. Our research indicated that estrogen can reduce cell viability and promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells directly; ERs expression level is associated with gastric cancer. Our research will help to understand the mechanism of gender disparity in gastric cancer.

  12. CYLD Promotes TNF-α-Induced Cell Necrosis Mediated by RIP-1 in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xing; Chen, Qianshun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitination enzyme and contributes to the degradation of ubiquitin chains on RIP1. The aim of the present study is to investigate the levels of CYLD in lung cancer patients and explore the molecular mechanism of CYLD in the lung cancer pathogenesis. The levels of CYLD were detected in human lung cancer tissues and the paired paracarcinoma tissues by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The proliferation of human lung cancer cells was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FACS assay. The results demonstrated that low levels of CYLD were detected in clinical lung carcinoma specimens. Three pairs of siRNA were used to knock down the endogenous CYLD in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CYLD promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer cells. Otherwise overexpression of CYLD induced TNF-α-induced cell death in A549 cells and H460 cells. Moreover, CYLD-overexpressed lung cancer cells were treated with 10 μM of z-VAD-fmk for 12 hours and the result revealed that TNF-α-induced cell necrosis was significantly enhanced. Additionally, TNF-α-induced cell necrosis in CYLD-overexpressed H460 cells was mediated by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) kinase. Our findings suggested that CYLD was a potential target for the therapy of human lung cancers.

  13. Integrative Nanomedicine: Treating Cancer With Nanoscale Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Iris R.; Sarter, Barbara; Koithan, Mary; Banerji, Prasanta; Banerji, Pratip; Jain, Shamini; Ives, John

    2014-01-01

    Finding safer and more effective treatments for specific cancers remains a significant challenge for integrative clinicians and researchers worldwide. One emerging strategy is the use of nanostructured forms of drugs, vaccines, traditional animal venoms, herbs, and nutraceutical agents in cancer treatment. The recent discovery of nanoparticles in traditional homeopathic medicines adds another point of convergence between modern nanomedicine and alternative interventional strategies. A way in ...

  14. A survey on anticancer effects of artemisinin, iron, miconazole, and butyric acid on 5637 (bladder cancer and 4T1 (Breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Shahbazfar

    2014-01-01

    The groups treated with miconazole showed identical changes, with less severity compared to combination therapy groups. In butyric acid-treated groups, the only detectable changes were, mild cell swelling, few apoptosis, and rare necrosis. Conclusions: A combination therapy with artemisinin can be more effective against cancer cells than monotherapy with that. Butyric acid was not effective on cancer cells. Miconazole deviated the nature of cell death from apoptosis to necrosis and it must be used under caution.

  15. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-xiang Yuan; Jingxin Mo; Guixian Zhao; Gang Shu; Hua-lin Fu; Wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  16. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Khazim Al-Asmari

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90% in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for

  17. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  18. Approach for mechanism of BH3 domain counterpart BH3I-2′ inducing colorectal cancer cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wan-yu; LIU Yang; ZHANG Zhi-cheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discuss mechanism of BH3 domain counterpart BH3I-2' inducing colorectal cancer cell apoptosis. Methods Detected inhibition ratio and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells HCT-116, which were treated by BH3I-2', with microplate reader and flow cytometry. Results Inhibition ratio of colorectal cancer cells, which were treated by BH3I-2', could reach about 50 %. Ratio of viable apoptotic cell decreased and that of non-viable apoptotie cell increased as time went. Conclusions BH3I-2' can induce colorectal cancer cell apoptosis.

  19. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  20. Amygdalin induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Ma, Jinshu; Wang, Fang; Hu, Jie; Cui, Ai; Wei, Chengguo; Yang, Qing; Li, Fan

    2013-02-01

    Amygdalin, a naturally occurring substance, has been suggested to be efficacious as an anticancer substance. The effect of amygdalin on cervical cancer cells has never been studied. In this study, we found that the viability of human cervical cancer HeLa cell line was significantly inhibited by amygdalin. 4,6-Diamino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI) staining showed that amygdalin-treated HeLa cells developed typical apoptotic changes. The development of apoptosis in the amygdalin-treated HeLa cells were confirmed by double staining of amygdalin-treated HeLa cells with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) along with increase in caspase-3 activity in these cells. Further studies indicated that antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was downregulated whereas proapoptotic Bax protein was upregulated in the amygdalin-treated HeLa cells implying involvement of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In vivo, amygdalin administration inhibited the growth of HeLa cell xenografts through a mechanism of apoptosis. The results in the present study suggest that amygdalin may offer a new therapeutic option for patients with cervical cancer.

  1. Clinicopathological Features of a Series of 27 Cases of Post-Denosumab Treated Giant Cell Tumors of Bones: A Single Institutional Experience at a Tertiary Cancer Referral Centre, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhi, Bharat; Verma, Vivek; Gulia, Ashish; Jambhekar, Nirmala A; Desai, Subhash; Juvekar, Shashikant L; Bajpai, Jyoti; Puri, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is mostly a benign tumor, but associated with recurrences and metastasis. Lately, denosumab is being utilized in the treatment of certain GCTBs. Twenty-seven tumors, analyzed in the present study, occurred in 16 males and 11 females (M: F = 1.45:1), in the age-range of 16 to 47 years (mean = 29.5, median = 29). Most tumors were identified in the tibia(6) and femur(6), followed by the humerus(3), radius(3), pelvis(3), fibula(3), sacrum(1), metacarpal(1) and metatarsal(1) bones. There were 18(66.6 %) primary and 9(33.3 %) recurrent tumors. Exact tumor size (19 cases) varied from 3.7 to 15 cm (mean = 7.8, median = 6.4). Eight of the 19 tumors (42.1 %) had size more than or equal to 8 cm. On histopathologic examination of post-denosumab treated specimens, more than half cases (15)(55.5 %) revealed complete absence of osteoclast-like giant cells (OCLGs) and 12 cases revealed residual OCLGCs. In addition, there was replacement by fibro-osseous tissue, including reactive woven bone or osteoid in most cases, followed by variable amount of spindle cells, hyalinisation, fibrosis and chronic inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. Post-treatment follow-up (25 cases, 92.5 %), over 7-27 months duration (median = 18), revealed 20 cases continuously disease-free. Five patients developed recurrences at 9, 12, 13, 14 and 18 months, respectively. Out of these, who underwent repeat surgical intervention, 4 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and a single patient, planned for a second surgery, is alive-with-disease. Denosumab was mostly offered to patients with large sized, borderline salvageable tumors, in order to decrease the morbidity of index surgical procedure, that led to disappearance of OCLGCs in most cases. Post-denosumab treated GCT cases appear as low grade osteosarcomas on histopathologic examination, but lack the clinical behaviour of an osteosarcoma, therefore may be

  2. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  3. The regulatory effects of radiation and histone deacetylase inhibitor on liver cancer cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Hyung Seok; Jang, Dong Gun; Lee, Hong Je; Yang, Seoung Oh [Dept. Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medicine Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Radiation has been an effective tool for treating cancer for a long time. Radiation therapy induces DNA damage within cancer cells and destroys their ability to reproduce. Radiation therapy is often combined with other treatments, like surgery and chemotherapy. Here, we describe the effects of radiation and histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostain A, on cell cycle regulation in hepatoma cells. Results demonstrate that the treatment of radiation TSA induces cell cycle arrest, thereby stimulating cell death in hepatoma cells. In addition, since different cells or tissues have different reactivity to radiation and TSA, these results might be an indicator for the combination therapy with radiation and drugs in diverse cancers.

  4. Gadolinium uptake by brain cancer cells: Quantitative analysis with X-PEEM spectromicroscopy for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Mercanti, D.; Ciotti, M. T.; Casalbore, P.; Larocca, L. M.; Rinelli, A.; Pallini, R.

    2000-05-01

    We present the first X-PEEM spectromicroscopy semi-quantitative data, acquired on Gd in glioblastoma cell cultures from human brain cancer. The cells were treated with a Gd compound for the optimization of GdNCT (Gadolinium Neutron Capture Therapy). We analyzed the kinetics of Gd uptake as a function of exposure time, and verified that a quantitative analytical technique gives the same results as our MEPHISTO X-PEEM, demonstrating the feasibility of semi-quantitative spectromicroscopy.

  5. Identification of MAC1: A Small Molecule That Rescues Spindle Bipolarity in Monastrol-Treated Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Mitchison, Timothy J; Crews, Craig M; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-06-17

    The genetic integrity of each organism is intimately tied to the correct segregation of its genome during mitosis. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are fundamental for both basic research and the development of novel strategies to treat mitosis-relevant diseases such as cancer. Due to their fast mode of action, small molecules are invaluable tools to dissect mitosis. Yet, there is a great demand for novel antimitotic compounds. We performed a chemical genetic suppression screen to identify compounds that restore spindle bipolarity in cells treated with Monastrol, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5. We identified one compound-MAC1-that rescued spindle bipolarity in cells lacking Eg5 activity. Mechanistically, MAC1 induces the formation of additional microtubule nucleation centers, which allows kinesin Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5 activity. Thus, our chemical genetic suppression screen revealed novel unexpected insights into the mechanism of spindle assembly in mammalian cells.

  6. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: literature review and consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mirabile; G. Numico; E.G. Russi; P. Bossi; F. Crippa; A. Bacigalupo; V. De Sanctis; S. Musso; A. Merlotti; M.G. Ghi; M.C. Merlano; L. Licitra; F. Moretto; N. Denaro; O. Caspiani; M. Buglione; S. Pergolizzi; A. Cascio; J. Bernier; J. Raber-Durlacher; J.B. Vermorken; B. Murphy; M.V. Ranieri; R.P. Dellinger

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of infecti

  7. Associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Cnossen, Ingrid C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Ren; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Recordings of speech and videofluoroscopy of 51 patients after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were analysed. Acoustic voice parame

  8. Prevalence and predictors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer: a multinational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana P; Sjøgren, Per; Ekholm, Ola;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify prevalence and associated factors of cognitive dysfunction in opioid-treated patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS EPOS (European Pharmacogenetic Opioid Study) is a prospective cross-sectional multicenter study in which adult patients with cancer who received treatment...

  9. Biomarkers in tissue from patients with upper gastrointestinal cancers treated with erlotinib and bevacizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrberg, Kristoffer Staal; Pappot, Helle; Lassen, Ulrik;

    2011-01-01

    Malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract are amongst the most aggressive cancers and only few treatment options exist. We have recently analysed data from a phase II trial where patients with UGI cancers were treated with erlotinib and bevacizumab. The combination therapy could...

  10. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants.

  11. Determination of School-Related Problems in Children Treated for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Medine C.; Sari, Hatice Yildirim; Cetingul, Nazan; Kantar, Mehmet; Erermis, Serpil; Aksoylar, Serap

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive and case-control study was carried out in a pediatric oncology outpatient clinic to determine the school-related physical, social, and psychological problems and problems experienced in academic achievement of children treated for cancer. The sample of the study consisted of 56 Turkish patients with cancer, aged 7-18 years, who…

  12. Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma successfully treated with pazopanib: impact of TKIs' antiangiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Giovanni; Monterisi, Santa; Signorelli, Diego; Cona, Silvia; Cassano, Alessandra; Danza, Francesco; Barone, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma, especially without neoplastic thrombosis of the vena cava, is extremely rare. The prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been radically influenced by the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but very few reports in the literature have described their activity in heart metastasis. We report the case of a woman with a left ventricle metastasis from kidney cancer without renal vein involvement, who was treated with pazopanib. The patient achieved a prolonged partial response, with clear signs of metastasis devascularization and a favorable toxicity profile.

  13. ER-Dependent Ca++-mediated Cytosolic ROS as an Effector for Induction of Mitochondrial Apoptotic and ATM-JNK Signal Pathways in Gallic Acid-treated Human Oral Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Liang; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2016-02-01

    Release of calcium (Ca(++)) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been proposed to be involved in induction of apoptosis by oxidative stress. Using inhibitor of ER Ca(++) release dantrolene and inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(++) uptake Ru-360, we demonstrated that Ca(++) release from the ER was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis of human oral cancer (OC) cells induced by gallic acid (GA). Small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase inhibited tunicamycin-induced induction of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, C/EBP homologous protein, pro-caspase-12 cleavage, cytosolic Ca(++) increase and apoptosis, but did not attenuate the increase in cytosolic Ca(++) level and apoptosis induced by GA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and apoptosis by GA was blocked by dantrolene. The specificity of ROS-mediated ATM-JNK activation was confirmed by treatment with N-acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger. Blockade of ATM activation by specific inhibitor KU55933, short hairpin RNA, or kinase-dead ATM overexpression suppressed JNK phosphorylation but did not completely inhibit cytosolic ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, pro-caspase-3 cleavage, and apoptosis induced by GA. Taken together, these results indicate that GA induces OC cell apoptosis by inducing the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic and ATM-JNK signal pathways, likely through ER Ca(++)-mediated ROS production.

  14. What's New in Research and Treatment of Basal and Squamous Cell Skin Cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... basal cell nevus syndrome. For example, the drug vismodegib (Erivedge) has been shown to lower the number ... do, these cancers can be hard to treat. Vismodegib and sonidegib, drugs that target the hedgehog signaling ...

  15. MicroRNA-873 mediates multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells by targeting ABCB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di-di; Li, Xue-Song; Meng, Xiao-Na; Yan, Jing; Zong, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly treated with cisplatin and paclitaxel combination chemotherapy; however, ovarian cancer cells often develop resistance to these drugs. Increasingly, microRNAs (miRNAs) including miR-873 have been implicated in drug resistance in many cancers, but the role of miR-873 in ovarian cancer remains unknown. MTT cell viability assays revealed that the sensitivities of ovarian cancer lines to cisplatin and paclitaxel increased following transfection with miR-873 (P ovarian cancer in vivo (P ovarian cancer lines OVCAR3 and A2780 to cisplatin and paclitaxel, which can be reversed by miR-873 mimic transfection (P ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin and paclitaxel by targeting MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that combination therapies with chemotherapy agents and miR-873 may suppress drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  16. Robotic Radiosurgery. Treating prostata cancer and related genitourinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponsky, Lee E. (ed.) [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States). University Hospitals Case Medical Center

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among North American and European men, but its treatment continues to be problematic owing to serious side-effects, including erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and potential lower GI complications. Robotic radiosurgery offers a novel, rapid, non-invasive outpatient treatment option for prostate cancer that combines robotics, advanced image-guided motion detection, and automated real-time corrective spatial positioning with submillimeter precision. This book examines all aspects of the treatment of prostate cancer with robotic radiosurgery. After introductory sections on radiosurgery as a multidisciplinary practice and specific issues relating to prostate cancer, the important challenge posed by prostate motion when administering radiation therapy is examined in depth, with detailed discussion as to how image-guided robotic radiosurgery overcomes this problem by continously identifying the precise location of the prostate throughout the course of treatment. A further major section is devoted to a discussion of techniques and potential radiobiological and clinical advantages of hypofractionated radiation delivery by means of robotic radiosurgery systems. The book closes by discussing other emerging genitourinary applications of robotic radiosurgery. All of the authors are experts in their field who present a persuasive case for this fascinating technique. (orig.)

  17. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  18. Stem cell characteristics in prostate cancer cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, M.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate the presence of a small, stem-like cell population in several human cancers that is crucial for the tumour (re)population. OBJECTIVE: Six established prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines-DU145, DuCaP, LAPC-4, 22Rv1, LNCaP, and PC-3-were examined for their stem cell pr

  19. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  20. Modulating Dickkopf-1: A Strategy to Monitor or Treat Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, Mélody; Masi, Delphine; Carreau, Madeleine

    2016-06-28

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is a secreted Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist involved in embryogenesis. It was first described 25 years ago for its function in head induction and limb morphogenesis. Since then, this protein has been widely studied in the context of active Wnt/β-catenin signalling during cellular differentiation and development. Dysregulation of DKK1 has been associated with bone pathologies and has now emerged as a potential biomarker of cancer progression and prognosis for several types of malignancies. Reducing the amount of circulating DKK1 may reveal a simple and efficient strategy to limit or reverse cancer growth. This review will provide an overview of the role of Dickkopf-1 in cancer and explore its potential use as a biomarker and therapeutic target.

  1. Modulating Dickkopf-1: A Strategy to Monitor or Treat Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélody Mazon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 is a secreted Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist involved in embryogenesis. It was first described 25 years ago for its function in head induction and limb morphogenesis. Since then, this protein has been widely studied in the context of active Wnt/β-catenin signalling during cellular differentiation and development. Dysregulation of DKK1 has been associated with bone pathologies and has now emerged as a potential biomarker of cancer progression and prognosis for several types of malignancies. Reducing the amount of circulating DKK1 may reveal a simple and efficient strategy to limit or reverse cancer growth. This review will provide an overview of the role of Dickkopf-1 in cancer and explore its potential use as a biomarker and therapeutic target.

  2. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  3. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  4. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  5. To treat or not to treat : Developments in the field of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, T. C.; Kapiteijn, E.; Corssmit, E. P.; Oosting, S. F.; van der Horst-Schrivers, A. N. A.; Links, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is the most prevalent endocrine malignancy. Based on the increased understanding of thyroid tumourigenesis, novel therapeutic agents have been identified. However, given the low incidence, the good prognosis of the majority of these tumours and the limited evidence of diff

  6. PROMISES FOR TREATING COLON CANCER PATIENTS WITH BRAF GENE MUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer represents a heterogenous disease group, which differ by cancerogenesis mechanisms, molecular alterations, prognosis and treatment possibilities. In modern clinical practice assessment of KRAS and NRAS genes status is already necessary in order to prescribe anti-EGFR treatment for metastatic disease. A separate poor prognosis group are patients with BRAF mutation. In this review we will focus on biological features of BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer, its epidemiology, clinical features on different stages, treatment choice and promising new treatment possibilities.

  7. Trastuzumab Sensitizes Ovarian Cancer Cells to EGFR-targeted Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilken Jason A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early studies have demonstrated comparable levels of HER2/ErbB2 expression in both breast and ovarian cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody directed against HER2, is FDA-approved for the treatment of both early and late stage breast cancer. However, clinical studies of trastuzumab in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC patients have not met the same level of success. Surprisingly, however, no reports have examined either the basis for primary trastuzumab resistance in ovarian cancer or potential ways of salvaging trastuzumab as a potential ovarian cancer therapeutic. Methods An in vitro model of primary trastuzumab-resistant ovarian cancer was created by long-term culture of HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cell lines with trastuzumab. Trastuzumab treated vs. untreated parental cells were compared for HER receptor expression, trastuzumab sensitivity, and sensitivity to other HER-targeted therapeutics. Results In contrast to widely held assumptions, here we show that ovarian cancer cells that are not growth inhibited by trastuzumab are still responsive to trastuzumab. Specifically, we show that responsiveness to alternative HER-targeted inhibitors, such as gefitinib and cetuximab, is dramatically potentiated by long-term trastuzumab treatment of ovarian cancer cells. HER2-positive ovarian carcinoma-derived cells are, therefore, not "unresponsive" to trastuzumab as previously assumed, even when they not growth inhibited by this drug. Conclusions Given the recent success of EGFR-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of other solid tumors, and the well-established safety profile of trastuzumab, results presented here provide a rationale for re-evaluation of trastuzumab as an experimental ovarian cancer therapeutic, either in concert with, or perhaps as a "primer" for EGFR-targeted therapeutics.

  8. Parkin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Jung, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kang, Yeo Wool; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2015-08-14

    Parkin is a known tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which parkin acts as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, we reported that parkin expression induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. However, at that time, we did not consider the involvement of parkin in cell cycle control. In the current study, we investigated whether parkin is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppression of cancer cell growth. In our cell cycle analyses, parkin expression induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which parkin induces this G2/M arrest, we analyzed cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M transition. Parkin expression induced CDC2 phosphorylation which is known to inhibit CDC2 activity and cause G2/M arrest. Cyclin B1, which is degraded during the mitotic transition, accumulated in response to parkin expression, thereby indicating parkin-induced G2/M arrest. Next, we established that Myt1, which is known to phosphorylate and inhibit CDC2, increased following parkin expression. In addition, we found that parkin also induces increased Myt1 expression, G2/M arrest, and reduced cell viability in TNF-α-treated HCT15 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of parkin expression by parkin-specific siRNA decreased Myt1 expression and phosphorylation of CDC2 and resulted in recovered cell viability. These results suggest that parkin acts as a crucial molecule causing cell cycle arrest in G2/M, thereby suppressing tumor cell growth.

  9. Single-cell analysis in cancer genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatpour, Assieh; Lai, Shujing; Guo, Guoji; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Genetic changes and environmental differences result in cellular heterogeneity among cancer cells within the same tumor, thereby complicating treatment outcomes. Recent advances in single-cell technologies have opened new avenues to characterize the intra-tumor cellular heterogeneity, identify rare cell types, measure mutation rates, and, ultimately, guide diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review the recent single-cell technological and computational advances at the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, and discuss their applications in cancer research. PMID:26450340

  10. Growth inhibitory effect of 4-phenyl butyric acid on human gastric cancer cells is associated with cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-Zhu Li; Hong-Xia Deng; Wen-Zhu Lou; Xue-Yan Sun; Meng-Wan Song; Jing Tao; Bing-Xiu Xiao; Jun-Ming Guo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth effects of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on human gastric carcinoma cells and their mechanisms. METHODS: Moderately-differentiated human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and lowly-differentiated MGC-803 cells were treated with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L PBA for 1-4 d. Cell proliferation was detected using the MTT colorimetric assay. Cell cycle distributions were examined using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells was inhibited by PBA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Flow cytometry showed that SGC-7901 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G0/G1 phase, whereas cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G2/M phase. Although MGC-803 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were also arrested at the G0/G1 phase, cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the S phase. CONCLUSION: The growth inhibitory effect of PBA on gastric cancer cells is associated with alteration of the cell cycle. For moderately-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. For lowly-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and S phases.

  11. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  12. Correlation between Twist expression and multidrug resistance of breast cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Xi Wang; Xiao-Mei Chen; Jun Yan; Zhi-Ping Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation between Twist expression and multidrug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. Methods:Human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, cisplatin-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/DDP, doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/Adr and taxol-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF/PTX were cultured, Twist in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 was overexpressed and treated with doxorubicin, and then cell viability and expression levels of EMT marker molecules and related signaling pathway molecules were detected. Results:mRNA contents and protein contents of Twist in drug-resistant breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/DDP, MCF-7/Adr and MCF/PTX were higher than those in MCF-7 cell lines;after doxorubicin treatment, inhibitory rates of cell viability in MCF-7 cell lines were higher than those in MCF-7/Adr and MCF-7/Twist cell lines;E-cadherin expression levels in MCF-7/Adr cell lines and MCF-7/Twist cell lines were lower than those in MCF-7 cell lines, and mRNA contents and protein contents of N-cadherin, Vimentin, TGF-β, Smad, Wnt,β-catenin, TNF-αand NF-kB were higher than those in MCF-7 cell lines. Conclusion:Increased expression of Twist is associated with the occurrence of drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

  13. Alpinetin inhibits lung cancer progression and elevates sensitization drug-resistant lung cancer cells to cis-diammined dichloridoplatium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu L

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lin Wu, Wei Yang, Su-ning Zhang, Ji-bin Lu Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Objective: Alpinetin is a novel flavonoid that has demonstrated potent antitumor activity in previous studies. However, the efficacy and mechanism of alpinetin in treating lung cancer have not been determined. Methods: We evaluated the impact of different doses and durations of alpinetin treatment on the cell proliferation, the apoptosis of lung cancer cells, as well as the drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Results: This study showed that the alpinetin inhibited the cell proliferation, enhanced the apoptosis, and inhibited the PI3K/Akt signaling in lung cancer cells. Moreover, alpinetin significantly increased the sensitivity of drug-resistant lung cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic effect of cis-diammined dichloridoplatium. Taken together, this study demonstrated that alpinetin significantly suppressed the development of human lung cancer possibly by influencing mitochondria and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and sensitized drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Conclusion: Alpinetin may be used as a potential compound for combinatorial therapy or as a complement to other chemotherapeutic agents when multiple lines of treatments have failed to reduce lung cancer. Keywords: alpinetin, cell proliferation and apoptosis, drug resistance reversal, PI3K/Akt, lung cancer

  14. Survival after early-stage breast cancer of women previously treated for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis Frederik Palm; Johansen, Christoffer; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this nationwide, register-based cohort study was to determine whether women treated for depression before primary early-stage breast cancer are at increased risk for receiving treatment that is not in accordance with national guidelines and for poorer survival. Material...... and Methods We identified 45,325 women with early breast cancer diagnosed in Denmark from 1998 to 2011. Of these, 744 women (2%) had had a previous hospital contact (as an inpatient or outpatient) for depression and another 6,068 (13%) had been treated with antidepressants. Associations between previous...... treatment of depression and risk of receiving nonguideline treatment of breast cancer were assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. We compared the overall survival, breast cancer-specific survival, and risk of death by suicide of women who were and were not treated for depression before...

  15. Assessment of Ovarian Cancer Tumors Treated with Intraperitoneal Cisplatin Therapy by Nanoscopic X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Brecht; Carlier, Charlotte; Vekemans, Bart; Villanova, Julie; Tucoulou, Rémi; Ceelen, Wim; Vincze, Laszlo

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is amongst the most common types of cancer in women, with a relatively low overall cure rate of approximately 30%. This is therefore an important incentive to urge for further research in order to maximize the chances of survival for these patients. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy with Cisplatin is an effective treatement for ovarian cancer; however, many questions still remain concerning the ideal treatment protocol and tumor resistance towards the drug, which should be resolved for optimal application of this therapy. For the first time in-vivo grown tumors treated with both hyper- and normothermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy have been studied using nano-XRF spectroscopy to examine the platinum (Pt) distribution within the analyzed tissues. These measurements prove Pt resides predominantly outsides the cancer cells in the stroma of the tissue. These findings indicate the resistance mechanism of the cancer cells prevents Cisplatin from diffusing through their cell membranes. This is an important addition to the existing knowledge on the resistance mechanism providing insights which might help to overcome this effect. In our aim to find the optimal treatment protocol, no significant differences were found between the two examined procedures. A more extensive data set will be needed to draw definite conclusions.

  16. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T ce

  17. Vincristine, adriamycin, and mitomycin (VAM) therapy for previously treated breast cancer. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, M W; Park, Y

    1983-01-15

    Fifteen patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy were treated with a regimen consisting of vincristine, Adriamycin, and mitomycin. Eleven patients (73%) responded with three complete and eight partial responses. The median duration of response was eight months. While all four nonresponders died within five months, the median duration of survival of responders was 18 months. Toxicity was significant but tolerable. Thus, this preliminary report suggests that this regimen is active in advanced previously treated breast cancer, providing meaningful remissions with acceptable toxicity.

  18. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  19. Regulation of endometrial cancer cell growth by luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, S.; Bax, C M R; Chatzaki, E; Chard, Tim; Iles, Ray K.

    2000-01-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) have been used to treat recurrent endometrial cancer. However, the mode of action is uncertain. Our previous studies showed no direct effect of GnRHa on endometrial cancer cell growth in vitro. We have now examined the effect of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) on endometrial cancer cell growth. The aim was to determine whether suppression of pituitary LH and FSH by GnRHa could explain the tumour regression seen ...

  20. Quercetin-Induced Cell Death in Human Papillary Thyroid Cancer (B-CPAP Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Mutlu Altundağ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have investigated the antiproliferative effect of quercetin on human papillary thyroid cancer cells and determined the apoptotic mechanisms underlying its actions. We have used different concentrations of quercetin to induce apoptosis and measured cell viability. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Finally, we have measured changes in caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP protein expression levels as hallmarks of apoptosis and Hsp90 protein expression level as a marker of proteasome activity in treated and control cells. Quercetin treatment of human papillary thyroid cancer cells resulted in decreased cell proliferation and increased rate of apoptosis by caspase activation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that quercetin induces cancer cell apoptosis by downregulating the levels of Hsp90. In conclusion, we have shown that quercetin induces downregulation of Hsp90 expression that may be involved in the decrease of chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity which, in order, induces inhibition of growth and causes cell death in thyroid cancer cells. Thus, quercetin appears to be a promising candidate drug for Hsp90 downregulation and apoptosis of thyroid cancer cells.

  1. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  2. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel; Vever, Henriette; Knoop, Ann S; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-12-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p proliferation, growth, and development. TFF3, which encodes for trefoil factor 3 and is an estrogen-responsive oncogene shown to play a functional role in tamoxifen resistance and metastasis of ER+ breast cancer, was also shown to be upregulated in an AI-resistant cell line model, and reduction of TFF3 levels using TFF3-specific siRNAs decreased the growth of both the AI-resistant and -sensitive parental cell lines. Moreover, overexpression of TFF3 in parental AI-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cells resulted in reduced sensitivity to the AI exemestane, whereas TFF3 overexpression had no effect on growth in the absence of exemestane, indicating that TFF3 mediates growth and survival signals that abrogate the growth inhibitory effect of exemestane. We identified a panel of 26 genes exhibiting altered expression associated with disease recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy, including TFF3, which was shown to exhibit a growth- and survival-promoting effect in the context of AI treatment.

  3. Thumb metastasis from small cell lung cancer treated with radiation Metástase em polegar de carcinoma de pequenas células de pulmão tratada com radioterapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of thumb metastasis from small cell lung cancer is presented. The patient underwent local radiotherapy with complete palliation of symptoms. She died 4 months later with disseminated disease. Considerations about incidence, treatment, and physiopathology of this kind of dissemination are made. Conservative treatment of finger metastasis with radiation may be considered due to the poor outcome of these patients.Apresentamos um caso raro de metástase em polegar de carcinoma de pequenas células de pulmão. A paciente foi submetida a radioterapia local com alívio completo dos sintomas. Quatro meses após o término do tratamento evoluiu a óbito com doença disseminada. São feitas considerações sobre incidência, tratamento e fisiopatologia desse tipo de disseminação. O tratamento conservador com radioterapia de metástases em dedos deve ser considerado, principalmente devido ao prognóstico reservado desses pacientes.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  5. WNT signaling regulates self-renewal and differentiation of prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabelle Bisson; David M Prowse

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics were identified in human prostate cancer cell lines by their abil-ity to form from single cells self-renewing prostaspheres in non-adherent cultures. Prostaspheres exhibited heteroge-neous expression of proliferation, differentiation and stem cell-associated makers CD44, ABCG2 and CD133. Treat-ment with WNT inhibitors reduced both prostasphere size and self-renewal, In contrast, addition of Wnt3a caused increased prostasphere size and self-renewal, which was associated with a significant increase in nuclear β-catenin, keratin 18, CD133 and CD44 expression. As a high proportion of LNCaP and C4-2B cancer cells express androgen receptor we determined the effect of the androgen receptor antagonist bicalutamide. Androgen receptor inhibition reduced prostasphere size and expression of PSA, but did not inhibit prostasphere formation. These effects are con-sistent with the androgen-independent self-renewal of cells with stem cell characteristics and the androgen-dependent proliferation of transit amplifying cells. As the canonical WNT signaling effector β-catenin can also associate with the androgen receptor, we propose a model for tumour propagation involving a balance between WNT and androgen re-ceptor activity. That would affect the self-renewal of a cancer cell with stem cell characteristics and drive transit am-plifying cell proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that WNT activity regulates the self-renewal of prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics independently of androgen receptor activity. Inhibition of WNT signaling therefore has the potential to reduce the self-renewal of prostate cancer cells with stem cell charac-teristics and improve the therapeutic outcome.

  6. Mast cells and cancer: enemies or allies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyduch, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells are a component of cancer microenvironment the role of which is complex and poorly understood. Mast cells promote cancer growth by stimulation of neoangiogenesis, tissue remodeling and by modulation of the host immune response. The mediators of cancer promotion include protease-activated receptors, mitogen activated protein kinases, prostaglandins and histamine. Histamine may induce tumor proliferation and immunosuppression through H1 and H2 receptors, respectively. The mast cell-derived modulators of immune response include also interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and CD30L. Possibly stimulation of angiogenesis is the most important. Mast cells release potent proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), TNF- α and IL-8, and mast cells' enzymes, like metaloproteinases (MMPs), tryptase and chymase participate in vessels' formation. The anti-cancer actions of mast cells include direct growth inhibition, immunologic stimulation, inhibition of apoptosis and decreased cell mobility; the mediators of these processes include chymase, tryptase, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. The very same mediators may exert both pro- or anti-cancer effects depending on concentration, presence of cofactors or location of secreting cells. In fact, peri- and intra-tumoral mast cells may have dissimilar effects. Understanding of the role of mast cells in cancer could lead to improved prognostication and development of therapeutic methods targeting the mast cells.

  7. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  8. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  9. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  10. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  11. Irreversible electroporation inhibits pro-cancer inflammatory signaling in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Ishan; Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl; Morrison, Ryan G; Allen, Irving C; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S; Bickford, Lissett R

    2017-02-01

    Low-level electric fields have been demonstrated to induce spatial re-distribution of cell membrane receptors when applied for minutes or hours. However, there is limited literature on the influence on cell signaling with short transient high-amplitude pulses typically used in irreversible electroporation (IRE) for cancer treatment. Moreover, literature on signaling pertaining to immune cell trafficking after IRE is conflicting. We hypothesized that pulse parameters (field strength and exposure time) influence cell signaling and subsequently impact immune-cell trafficking. This hypothesis was tested in-vitro on triple negative breast cancer cells treated with IRE, where the effects of pulse parameters on key cell signaling factors were investigated. Importantly, real time PCR mRNA measurements and ELISA protein analyses revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) signaling was down regulated by electric field strengths above a critical threshold, irrespective of exposure times spanning those typically used clinically. Comparison with other treatments (thermal shock, chemical poration, kinase inhibitors) revealed that IRE has a unique effect on TSLP. Because TSLP signaling has been demonstrated to drive pro-cancerous immune cell phenotypes in breast and pancreatic cancers, our finding motivates further investigation into the potential use of IRE for induction of an anti-tumor immune response in vivo.

  12. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  13. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  14. A Novel RNA Helicase Inhibitor to Treat Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    encapsulate NZ51 in various copolymers to facilitate faster release in mouse plasma. Even the use of PLGA or chitosan derivatives did not resolve the...Subsequently, we attempted to encapsulate a different DDX3 inhibitor into PLGA nanoparticle . This appears to be more feasible than NZ51. The manuscript... nanoparticles containing dual-MR contrast agent, on the primary orthotopic tumor in a preclinical breast cancer model using non-invasive magnetic

  15. 10-year epidemiological profile changes for cervical and endometrial cancer patients treated by radiotherapy in the Pernambuco state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F., E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: amanciobike@gmail.com, E-mail: juannapessoa@gmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia; Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A., E-mail: aristidesoliveira466@hotmail.com, E-mail: jonathan@truenet.com.br [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Santo Amaro, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem, its prevention and control are included within 16 strategic objectives of the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the period 2011-2015. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common tumor in the female population, being new 15,590 cases estimated for 2014 according to the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA). Pernambuco is the fifth state with the highest number of cases of cervical cancer and the seventh in cases of endometrial ones, both estimative for 2014. The understanding of the epidemiological profile of these pathologies corroborates strategies for prevention, control and treatment. As Pernambuco has implemented the radiotherapy for cancer treatment since 1998-1999, this work encompassed the comparison of the 1998-1999 epidemiological profile of patients treated by radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, with 2008-2009 profile - ten years after. Medical record of 490 patients treated at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE) were compiled according to the patient origin, the affected uterus region, the staging of disease, the type and cell differentiation of the tumor, the age group, and, finally, the realization of hysterectomy as part of the treatment. More than 90% of the patients were affected by cervical cancer in the two investigated periods. For the interval of 1998-1999 the proportion of patients submitted to hysterectomy was quite higher compared to those after ten years. The results also showed a change in the origin of the patients, in which, in 1999, most of the patients were from the capital and the metropolitan area, while, after ten years, patients were mostly from the interior of the State. There was a predominance of squamous cell type tumors in both periods evaluated. For the 1998-1999 interval, tumors were stage 2, moderately differentiated type. Differently, the tumors were mostly stage 3, not differentiated type, for the 2008-2009 period

  16. Paclitaxel augments cytotoxic effect of photodynamic therapy using verteporfin in gastric and bile duct cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungwoo; Hong, Sung Pil; Oh, Tae Yoon; Bang, Seungmin; Chung, Jae Bock; Song, Si Young

    2008-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) shows a limited antitumor effect in treating gastrointestinal tumors because of improper light penetration or insufficient photosensitizer uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PDT combined with paclitaxel on in vitro cancer cells. In vitro photodynamic therapy was performed in gastric cancer cells (NCI-N87) and bile duct cancer cells (YGIC-6B) using verteporfin (2 ug mL(-1)) and a PTH light source (1 000 W, Oriel Co.) with 665-675 nm narrow band pass filter. Cytotoxicity was compared using the MTT assay between cancer cells treated with PDT alone or pretreated with paclitaxel (IC(25)). Apoptotic changes were evaluated using DAPI staining, DNA fragmentation analysis, Annexin V-FITC apoptosis assay, cell cycle analysis, and western blots for cytochrome c, Bax, and Bid. The PDT-induced cytotoxicity was potentiated by pretreating with low dose paclitaxel (P cancer therapy.

  17. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  18. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Glatstein, Eli; Stevenson, James P; Sterman, Daniel H; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is increasingly being utilized to treat thoracic malignancies. For patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy is primarily employed as an endobronchial therapy to definitely treat endobronchial, roentgenographically occult, or synchronous primary carcinomas. As definitive monotherapy, photodynamic therapy is most effective in treating bronchoscopically visible lung cancers ≤1 cm with no extracartilaginous invasion. For patients with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy can be used to palliate obstructing endobronchial lesions, as a component of definitive multi-modality therapy, or to increase operability or reduce the extent of operation required. A review of the available medical literature detailing all published studies utilizing photodynamic therapy to treat at least 10 patients with non-small cell lung cancer is performed, and treatment recommendations and summaries for photodynamic therapy applications are described.

  19. Microenvironment promotes tumor cell reprogramming in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio D'Anselmi

    Full Text Available The microenvironment drives mammary gland development and function, and may influence significantly both malignant behavior and cell growth of mammary cancer cells. By restoring context, and forcing cells to properly interpret native signals from the microenvironment, the cancer cell aberrant behavior can be quelled, and organization re-established. In order to restore functional and morphological differentiation, human mammary MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were allowed to grow in a culture medium filled with a 10% of the albumen (EW, Egg White from unfertilized chicken egg. That unique microenvironment behaves akin a 3D culture and induces MCF-7 cells to produce acini and branching duct-like structures, distinctive of mammary gland differentiation. EW-treated MDA-MB-231 cells developed buds of acini and duct-like structures. Both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells produced β-casein, a key milk component. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression was reactivated in MDA-MB-231 cells, as a consequence of the increased cdh1 expression; meanwhile β-catenin - a key cytoskeleton component - was displaced behind the inner cell membrane. Such modification hinders the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MDA-MB-231 cells. This differentiating pathway is supported by the contemporary down-regulation of canonical pluripotency markers (Klf4, Nanog. Given that egg-conditioned medium behaves as a 3D-medium, it is likely that cancer phenotype reversion could be ascribed to the changed interactions between cells and their microenvironment.

  20. Induction of apoptosis by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo, T; Sato, T; Nagatomi, Y; Kitamura, T

    2001-07-01

    Prostaglandins are thought to play an important role in the proliferation of prostate cancer and are highly expressed in prostate cancer tissue. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), or prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase, is a key enzyme in the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin. In several cancers, COX-2 contributes to the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. To assess the role of COX-2 in prostate cancer, we investigated whether the inhibition of COX-2 affected the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. The human prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and PC 3, and a normal prostate stromal cell line (PrSC) were treated with COX-2 inhibitors NS 398 and Etodolac. The proliferation rate of the cell lines was examined using 3(4,5-dimethylethiazoly 1-2-) 2,5-diphonyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. A DNA fragmentation assay was also used for proof of apoptosis. COX-2 inhibitors could suppress the proliferation of LNCaP and PC 3 cells. In contrast, PrSC was not affected by COX-2 inhibitors. These suppressive effects occurred in a time- and dose-dependent manner. One of mechanisms responsible for cell death was apoptosis. COX-2 seems to play a significant role in the progression of prostate cancer. COX-2 may be a therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Since COX-2 inhibitors suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and have no effect in normal prostate stromal cells, COX-2 inhibitors will be useful for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  2. Characterization of the metabolic phenotype of rapamycin-treated CD8+ T cells with augmented ability to generate long-lasting memory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism plays a critical role in regulating T cell responses and the development of memory T cells with long-term protections. However, the metabolic phenotype of antigen-activated T cells that are responsible for the generation of long-lived memory cells has not been characterized. DESIGN AND METHODS: Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV peptide gp33-specific CD8(+ T cells derived from T cell receptor transgenic mice, we characterized the metabolic phenotype of proliferating T cells that were activated and expanded in vitro in the presence or absence of rapamycin, and determined the capability of these rapamycin-treated T cells to generate long-lived memory cells in vivo. RESULTS: Antigen-activated CD8(+ T cells treated with rapamycin gave rise to 5-fold more long-lived memory T cells in vivo than untreated control T cells. In contrast to that control T cells only increased glycolysis, rapamycin-treated T cells upregulated both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. These rapamycin-treated T cells had greater ability than control T cells to survive withdrawal of either glucose or growth factors. Inhibition of OXPHOS by oligomycin significantly reduced the ability of rapamycin-treated T cells to survive growth factor withdrawal. This effect of OXPHOS inhibition was accompanied with mitochondrial hyperpolarization and elevation of reactive oxygen species that are known to be toxic to cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that these rapamycin-treated T cells may represent a unique cell model for identifying nutrients and signals critical to regulating metabolism in both effector and memory T cells, and for the development of new methods to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell cancer therapy.

  3. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  4. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  5. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  6. Decreasing relapse in colorectal cancer patients treated with cetuximab by using the activating KRAS detection chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Yii; Liu, Hsueh-Chiao; Yen, Li-Chen; Chang, Jia-Yuan; Huang, Jian-Jhang; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2014-10-01

    The KRAS oncogene was among the first genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) to be discovered. Moreover, KRAS somatic mutations might be used for predicting the efficiency of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapeutic drugs. Because the KRAS mutations are similar in the primary CRC and/or the CRC metastasis, KRAS mutation testing can be performed on both specimen types. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical advantage of using a KRAS pathway-associated molecule analysis chip to analyze CRC patients treated with cetuximab. Our laboratory developed a KRAS pathway-associated molecule analysis chip and a weighted enzymatic chip array (WEnCA) technique, activating KRAS detection chip, which can detect KRAS mutation status by screening circulating cancer cells in the bloodstream. We prospectively enrolled 210 stage II-III CRC patients who received adjuvant oxaliplatin plus infusional 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (FOLFOX)-4 chemotherapy with or without cetuximab. We compared the chip results of preoperative blood specimens with disease control status in these patients. Among the 168 CRC patients with negative chip results, 119 were treated with FOLFOX-4 plus cetuximab chemotherapy, and their relapse rate was 35.3 % (42/119). In contrast, the relapse rate was 71.4 % among the patients with negative chip results who received FOLFOX-4 treatment alone (35/49). Negative chip results were significantly correlated with better treatment outcomes in the FOLFOX-4 plus cetuximab group (P chip is a potential tool for predicting clinical outcomes in CRC patients following FOLFOX-4 treatment with or without cetuximab therapy.

  7. Prognostic Significance of p16 Expression in Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lewis, James S. [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Pfeifer, John [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Huettner, Phyllis [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 126 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages Ib1-IVb cervical cancer treated with radiation. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was given to 108 patients. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from the paraffin-embedded diagnostic biopsy specimens. Immunoperoxidase staining was performed on the TMA and a p16 monoclonal antibody was utilized. IHC p16 extent was evaluated and scored in quartiles: 0 = no staining, 1 = 1-25% of cells staining, 2 = 26 to 50%, 3 = 51 to 75%, and 4 = 76 to 100%. Results: The p16 IHC score was 4 in 115 cases, 3 in 1, 2 in 3 and 0 in 7. There was no relationship between p16 score and tumor histology. Patients with p16-negative tumors were older (mean age at diagnosis 65 vs. 52 years for p16-positive tumors; p = 0.01). The 5-year cause-specific survivals were 33% for p16-negative cases (score = 0) compared with 63% for p16-positive cases (scores 1, 2, 3 or 4; p = 0.07). The 5-year recurrence-free survivals were 34% for those who were p16-negative vs. 57% for those who were p16-positive (p = 0.09). In addition, patients with p16-positive tumors (score > 0) were more likely to be complete metabolic responders as assessed by the 3-month posttherapy 18 [F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomograph compared with patients with p16-negative tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusion: p16 expression is predictive of improved survival outcome after chemoradiation therapy for advanced-stage invasive cervical carcinoma. Further testing will be needed to evaluate p16-negative cervical tumors.

  8. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and preven

  9. Alternative Methods to Treat Nausea and Vomiting from Cancer Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Sheikhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV is among the most intensive side effects and critical concerns for patients with cancer. Most of these patients experience nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy. Sometimes, this is so annoying that it may prevent them from continuing the therapy. With the recent advances, a variety of therapeutic methods are innovated and applied to control CINV. Among them, the main methods include medicinal therapy, relaxation, and herbal therapy. Yet, using dexamethasone together with massage therapy and ginger is identified as the most effective method.

  10. Testing whether drugs that weaken norepinephrine signaling prevent or treat various types of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Fitzgerald

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H. Snyder, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Recently, I put forth the hypothesis that the signaling molecule, norepinephrine (NE, is an etiological factor in a number of types of cancer. In this brief commentary, I summarize evidence that NE plays a role in cancer and describe details involved in testing the hypothesis in humans through epidemiological investigation of existing medical records of persons who have taken pharmaceutical drugs that affect NE. If NE plays an etiological role in cancers of a number of organs, then taking a single pharmaceutical drug (such as clonidine, prazosin, or propranolol that weakens NE signaling systemically, may simultaneously prevent or treat many different types of cancer, and this may represent a breakthrough in pharmaceutical prevention and possibly treatment of cancer.Keywords: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, cancer, clonidine, prazosin, propranolol

  11. Experience of ReCell in Skin Cancer Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Gilleard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ReCell system (Avita Medical is a cell culture product that allows the immediate processingof a small split-thickness skin biopsy to produce a complete population of cells includingkeratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and fibroblasts. This series is the first to highlightthe reconstructive applications of ReCell following ablative skin cancer surgery. The ReCell systemwas utilized for three patients following skin cancer excision. In two cases, the cells were appliedto forehead flap donor sites following nasal reconstruction. In one case, the cells were appliedto the calvarial periosteum following wide local excision of a melanoma scar. Assessment of thetreated area was performed using the patient and observer scar assessment scale after 1 year.The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS scores for the 2 patients treated withReCell following forehead flap surgery were 22 and 32. The score for the patient that underwentwide local excision of a melanoma scar was 45. The absence of a donor site, accelerated healingand the satisfactory aesthetic appearance of the mature scars in this series suggest that ReCellmay play a useful role in reconstruction following skin cancer excision.

  12. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  13. Study Progress on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by EGFR-targeted Drug%EGFR靶向治疗非小细胞肺癌研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇

    2013-01-01

    非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)是造成死亡最多的恶性肿瘤之一,发现晚、进展快、预后差,而且对于常规放疗化疗敏感性极低,数十年来其五年生存率一直徘徊在20%以下.EGFR靶向药物的发现为NSCLC的治疗带来了新的希望,以gefitinib(吉非替尼)和erlotinib(厄洛替尼)为代表的EGFR酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor,EGFRTKI)对于携带某些EGFR突变的非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)具有良好的疗效.虽然在EGFR靶向治疗非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)上已经取得了一定成果,但是目前依然有很多相关问题亟待解决.%Of all malignant tumors, non - small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the biggest killers all over the world, normally with a late discovery, a rapid progression and a poor prognosis. NSCLC has a very low sensibility to conventional radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy, which make its five - year survival rate low than 20 % . However, recently the discovery of EGFR- targeted drug brings new hope to NSCLC patients. Represented by gefitinib and erlotinib, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR- TKI) has a good therapeutic effect on a part of NSCLC patients, who have some special EGFR mutations. Even if we get a big step on EGFR- targeted therapy on NSCLC, we still have many problems to solve.

  14. Preclinical evaluation of 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate on liver cancer and cancer stem cells with different p53 status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Lamy

    Full Text Available Isothiocyanates from plants of the order Brassicales are considered promising cancer chemotherapeutic phytochemicals. However, their selective cytotoxicity on liver cancer has been barely researched. Therefore, in the present study, we systematically studied the chemotherapeutic potency of 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC. Selective toxicity was investigated by comparing its effect on liver cancer cells and their chemoresistant subpopulations to normal primary hepatocytes and liver tissue slices. Additionally, in a first assessment, the in vivo tolerability of MTBITC was investigated in mice. Growth arrest at G2/M and apoptosis induction was evident in all in vitro cancer models treated with MTBITC, including populations with cancer initiating characteristics. This was found independent from TP53; however cell death was delayed in p53 compromised cells as compared to wt-p53 cells which was probably due to differential BH3 only gene regulation i. e. Noxa and its antagonist A1. In normal hepatocytes, no apoptosis or necrosis could be detected after repeated administration of up to 50 µM MTBITC. In mice, orally applied MTBITC was well tolerated over 18 days of treatment for up to 50 mg/kg/day, the highest dose tested. In conclusion, we could show here that the killing effect of MTBITC has a definite selectivity for cancer cells over normal liver cells and its cytotoxicity even applies for chemoresistant cancer initiating cells. Our study could serve for a better understanding of the chemotherapeutic properties of isothiocyanates on human liver-derived cancer cells.

  15. The Biological Effects of Dickkopf1 on Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells and Bone Metastasis.

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    Pang, Hailin; Ma, Ningqiang; Jiao, Mi; Shen, Weiwei; Xin, Bo; Wang, Tongfei; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Helong

    2017-01-02

    The bone is among the most common sites of metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Over 30%-40% of lung cancers can develop bone metastasis, and no effective therapeutic methods exist in clinic cases. Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferentially metastasizes to the skeleton. However, the role of DKK1 in osteotropism of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to define the role of DKK1 in SCLC bone metastasis and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that the expression level of DKK1 was dramatically higher in bone metastatic SCLC cells (SBC-5 cell line) compared with that in cells without bone metastatic ability (SBC-3 cell line). Therefore, we hypothesized that DKK1 was involved in the bone metastasis of SCLC. We then suppressed the DKK1 expression in SBC-5 cells by RNAi and found that downregulation of DKK1 can inhibit cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, and invasion, but increase the apoptosis rate. Downregulation of DKK1 did not affect the cell cycle progression of SBC-5 cells in vitro. In vivo, downregulated DKK1 in SBC-5 cells resulted in attenuated bone metastasis. These results indicated that DKK1 may be an important regulator in bone metastases of SCLC, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to prevent and treat skeleton metastases in SCLC cases.

  16. Substrate stiffness regulates filopodial activities in lung cancer cells.

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    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and

  17. Preparation and characterization of nano-hydroxyapatite nanomaterials for liver cancer cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhaveni, Sathiyamoorthy; Yuvakkumar, Rathinam; Rajkumar, Mani; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi; Rajendran, Venkatachalam

    2013-03-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite was synthesized by means of the hydrothermal treatment. The effects of nano-hydroxyapatite material on the behaviour of G2 liver cancer cells were explored. About 50% of cell viability was lost in nHAp material treated cells at 200 degrees C @ 5 h, followed by -30% in nHAp treated cells at 100 degrees C @ 5 h. Compared with control, nHAp material treated cells at 200 degrees C @ 5 h showed 60% and nHAp material treated cells at 100 degrees C @ 5 h showed 15% morphological change. Moreover, 50% of cell death was observed at 24 h incubation with nHAp material treated at 200 degrees C @ 5 h cells and 56% cell death at 48 h incubation and hence alters and disturbs the growth of cancer cells. In contrast, the nHAp material treated at 100 degrees C @ 5 h protects the cells and could be used for liver cancer cell treatment.

  18. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  19. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future.

  20. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment

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    Hilde Almåsbak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation.

  1. Inhibitory Activity of (+-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

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    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  2. Stem cell concepts renew cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, John E

    2008-12-15

    Although uncontrolled proliferation is a distinguishing property of a tumor as a whole, the individual cells that make up the tumor exhibit considerable variation in many properties, including morphology, proliferation kinetics, and the ability to initiate tumor growth in transplant assays. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in the design of therapeutic strategies. The mechanistic basis of tumor heterogeneity has been uncertain; however, there is now strong evidence that cancer is a cellular hierarchy with cancer stem cells at the apex. This review provides a historical overview of the influence of hematology on the development of stem cell concepts and their linkage to cancer.

  3. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  4. Cancer-secreted AGR2 induces programmed cell death in normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello, Elizabeth A.; Quek, Sue-Ing; Kincaid, Heather; Fuchs, Thomas; Crichton, Daniel J.; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior Gradient 2 (AGR2) is a protein expressed in many solid tumor types including prostate, pancreatic, breast and lung. AGR2 functions as a protein disulfide isomerase in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, AGR2 is secreted by cancer cells that overexpress this molecule. Secretion of AGR2 was also found in salamander limb regeneration. Due to its ubiquity, tumor secretion of AGR2 must serve an important role in cancer, yet its molecular function is largely unknown. This study examined the effect of cancer-secreted AGR2 on normal cells. Prostate stromal cells were cultured, and tissue digestion media containing AGR2 prepared from prostate primary cancer 10-076 CP and adenocarcinoma LuCaP 70CR xenograft were added. The control were tissue digestion media containing no AGR2 prepared from benign prostate 10-076 NP and small cell carcinoma LuCaP 145.1 xenograft. In the presence of tumor-secreted AGR2, the stromal cells were found to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) characterized by formation of cellular blebs, cell shrinkage, and DNA fragmentation as seen when the stromal cells were UV irradiated or treated by a pro-apoptotic drug. PCD could be prevented with the addition of the monoclonal AGR2-neutralizing antibody P3A5. DNA microarray analysis of LuCaP 70CR media-treated vs. LuCaP 145.1 media-treated cells showed downregulation of the gene SAT1 as a major change in cells exposed to AGR2. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the array result. SAT1 encodes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, which maintains intracellular polyamine levels. Abnormal polyamine metabolism as a result of altered SAT1 activity has an adverse effect on cells through the induction of PCD. PMID:27283903

  5. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity.

  6. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yin Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1 based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs activity.

  7. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  8. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  9. Knockdown of Immature Colon Carcinoma Transcript 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiling; He, Jiantao; Zhang, Shenghui; Yang, Qingbo; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhiyu; Wu, Xintian

    2016-07-13

    Non-small cell lung cancer, as the most frequent type lung cancer, has lower survival rate of 5 years, despite improvements in surgery and chemotherapy. Previous studies showed immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 is closely related to tumorigenesis of human cancer cells. In the present study, we found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues using Oncomine database mining, and the biological effect of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 was investigated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines 95D and A549. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference was used to knock down immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 expression in 95D and A549 cells in vitro, and the knockdown efficiency was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay. Knockdown of immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 significantly suppressed non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability confirmed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was applied to measure cell cycle arrest, and the result showed the cell cycle arrested in G2/M phase in 95D cells and arrested in G0/G1 phase in A549 cells. Furthermore, we measured the levels of cell cycle-associated proteins by Western blot analysis and found immature colon carcinoma transcript 1-mediated cell proliferation inhibition appeared due to downregulation of cell cycle activator cyclin D1 and upregulation of cell cycle inhibitor p21. In addition, immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 silencing significantly induced non-small cell lung cancer cell apoptosis by annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D double-staining assay. All our data suggest that immature colon carcinoma transcript 1 may play an important role for non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and could be a potential molecular target for diagnosing and treating human non-small cell lung cancer.