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Sample records for cancer cells treated

  1. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of death among women worldwide. It is characterized by a well-defined premalignant phase that can be suspected on cytological examination of exfoliated cervical cells and confirmed on histological examination of cervical material. However, this is ...

  2. Improved immunogenicity of fusions between ethanol-treated cancer cells and dendritic cells exposed to dual TLR stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koido, Shigeo; Homma, Sadamu; Okamoto, Masato; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Hara, Eiich; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    ...) fused to whole cancer cells. We have recently revealed that ethanol-treated neoplastic cells fused to DCs exposed to 2 Toll-like receptor agonists efficiently induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes via TGF...

  3. Metformin-treated cancer cells modulate macrophage polarization through AMPK-NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chi-Fu; Chao, Ting-Ting; Su, Yu-Fu; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Chien, Chu-Yen; Chiu, Kuo-Chou; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Shieh, Yi-Shing

    2017-03-28

    Accumulating evidence is indicating metformin to possess the potential ability in preventing tumor development and suppressing cancer growth. However, the exact mechanism of its antitumorigenic effects is still not clear. We found that metformin suppressed the ability of cancer to skew macrophage toward M2 phenotype. Metformin treated cancer cells increased macrophage expression of M1-related cytokines IL-12 and TNF-α and attenuated M2-related cytokines IL-8, IL-10, and TGF-β expression. Furthermore, metformin treated cancer cells displayed inhibited secretion of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13; cytokines important for inducing M2 macrophages. Conversely, M1 inducing cytokine IFN-γ was upper-regulated in cancer cells. Additionally, through increasing AMPK and p65 phosphorylation, metformin treatment activated AMPK-NF-κB signaling of cancer cells that participate in regulating M1 and M2 inducing cytokines expression. Moreover, Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, significantly increased IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 expression while BAY-117082, an NF-κB inhibitor, decreased expression. In metformin-treated tumor tissue, the percentage of M2-like macrophages decreased while M1-like macrophages increased. These findings suggest that metformin activates cancer AMPK-NF-κB signaling, a pathway involved in regulating M1/M2 expression and inducing genes for macrophage polarization to anti-tumor phenotype.

  4. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  5. Raman confocal microscopy and AFM combined studies of cancerous cells treated with Paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derely, L.; Collart Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Michotte de Welle, Sylvain; Szabo, V.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2011-03-01

    Paclitaxel interferes with the normal function of microtubule breakdown, induces apoptosis in cancer cells and sequesters free tubulin. As this drug acts also on other cell mechanisms it is important to monitor its accumulation in the cell compartments. The intracellular spreading of the drug was followed using a WITEC 300R confocal Raman microscope equipped with a CCD camera. Hence Atomic force microscopy (an MFP3D- Asylum Research AFM) in imaging and force mode was used to determine the morphological and mechanical modifications induced on living cells. These studies were performed on living epithelial MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Paclitaxel was added to cell culture media for 3, 6 and 9 hours. Among the specific paclitaxel Raman bands we selected the one at 1670 cm-1 because it is not superposed by the spectrum of the cells. Confocal Raman images are formed by monitoring this band, the NH2 and the PO4 band. Paclitaxel slightly accumulates in the nucleus forming patches. The drug is also concentrated in the vicinity of the cell membrane and in an area close to the nucleus where proteins accumulate. Our AFM images reveal that the treated cancerous MCF-7 cells keep the same size as the non treated ones, but their shape becomes more oval. Cell's elasticity is also modified: a difference of 2 kPa in the Young Modulus characterizes the treated MCF-7 mammary cancerous cell. Our observations demonstrate that paclitaxel acts not only on microtubules but accumulates also in other cell compartments (nucleus) where microtubules are absent.

  6. Gene therapy strategies using engineered stem cells for treating gynecologic and breast cancer patients (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Seul; Hwang, Kyung-A; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-05-01

    There are three types of stem cells: embryonic stem (ES) cells, adult stem (AS) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These stem cells have many benefits including the potential ability to differentiate into various organs. In addition, engineered stem cells (GESTECs) designed for delivering therapeutic genes may be capable of treating human diseases including malignant cancers. Stem cells have been found to possess the potential for serving as novel delivery vehicles for therapeutic or suicide genes to primary or metastatic cancer formation sites as a part of gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy (GEPT). Given the advantageous properties of stem cells, tissue-derived stem cells are emerging as a new tool for anticancer therapy combined with prodrugs. In this review, the effects of GESTECs with different origins, i.e., neural, amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid, introduced to treat patients with diverse types of gynecologic and breast cancers are discussed. Data from the literature indicate the therapeutic potential of these cells as a part of gene therapy strategies to selectively target malignancies in women at clinically terminal stages.

  7. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...... the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor...

  8. Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, A; Francis, P; Nilbert, M

    2010-01-01

    the incidence in fact has increased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need of biomarkers is of great significance. In this study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite of topoisomerase-1 inhibitor......Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrial countries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development of improved surgical methods and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortality has remained constant during the past decades even though...

  9. Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  10. Two Cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Intravenous Cultivated Wild Ginseng Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hwi Bang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous cultivated wild ginseng(Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer pharmacopuncture(CWGP in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC. Design : Prospective case series. Setting : This study was conducted at the East-West Cancer Center of Dunsan Oriental Hospital, Daejeon University. Patients : Two non-small cell lung cancer patients. Intervention : Two non-small cell lung cancer patients were injected CWGP(20mL/day mixed with 0.9% normal saline(100mL intravenously. Each patient received a total of 16 and 9 cycles, respectively. One cycle is composed of 14 days. Outcome Measures : The effect of intravenous CWGP was measured by scanning with computed tomography(CT after every 2 cycle and Positron emission tomography- computed tomography(PET/CT after every 6 cycles. Response and progression was evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors(RECIST Committee classification of complete response(CR, partial response(PR, progressive disease(PD and stable disease(SD. Results : They were treated with intravenous CWGP for 8 and 5 months respectively. time later, each tumor remains stable disease(SD Conclusion : These cases may give us a possibility that intravenous CWGP offers potential benefits for non-small cell lung cancer patients.

  11. Formation of AR-SMRT binding in prostate cancer cells treated with natural histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtková, Kateřina; Pašková, Lenka; Matiješčuková, Natálie; Kolář, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression. The AR is a classical nuclear receptor (NR) providing a link between signaling molecule and transcription response. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on prostate cancer cells and their implication in silence AR signaling may have potential therapeutic use. We aimed to study the inhibitory effects of the corepressor SMRT (Silencing Mediator for Retinoid and Thyroid hormone receptors) which forms a complex together with nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) and with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) on AR activity. The androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell line C4-2 both AR-positive, and androgen-insensitive DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines were treated with two HDACIs, sodium butyrate (NaB) and/or trichostatin A (TSA). We amplified immunoprecipitated DNA by conventional PCR and in the following step we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis coupled with quantitative PCR for monitoring NaB induced formation of AR-SMRT/N-CoR complex binding on the PSA promoter. The co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed increase in AR-SMRT formation in NaB treated cells. Simultaneously, the Western blot analysis showed a significant decrease in AR protein expression. Furthermore, we estimated the reduced presence of HDAC2 and HDAC3 proteins by NaB and TSA treatment in AR-negative DU145 cell line. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of NaB on AR gene expression seems to be specific and unique for prostate cancer AR-positive cell lines and corresponds with its ability to stimulate AR-SMRT complex formation. We suggest that AR and SMRT/N-CoR corepressors may form a stable complex in vitro and NaB may facilitate the interaction between AR nuclear steroid receptor and SMRT corepressor protein.

  12. [Hepatic intra-arterial infusion of BAK immune cells to treat metastatic liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Takusaburo

    2011-11-01

    Based on the "living with cancer" concept while maintaining a favorable QOL and avoiding side effects and drug resistance, we have developed a new immune cell treatment called BAK (BRM activated killer) therapy, primarily using CD56+ cells for a case of advanced progressive solid cancer. In the present case, we administered BAK cells by hepatic intra-arterial infusion to a patient who happened to be a surgeon and wished to undergo this therapy. The patient was a 52-year- old male surgeon who underwent surgery for rectal cancer in April 2007. Heavy particle radiotherapy was administered when liver metastases were identified in July 2008. Starting in December 2008, 10 billion BAK cells were administered each month by hepatic intra-arterial infusion via a catheter on a total of six different occasions. The 10 billion autologous lymphocytes were suspended in 200 mL of Ringer's solution and returned to the patient by hepatic intra-arterial infusion over a period of one hour. Interactions between the activated lymphocytes and liver cancer cells increased levels of serum α1AG, an inflammation marker, but these levels normalized following the sixth and final administration. Conventional drip-infusion BAK therapy was administered thereafter. Diagnostic imaging, including PET-CT and PET, confirmed a complete disappearance of liver metastases. This case suggests the effectiveness of hepatic intra-arterial infusion BAK cell therapy in treating liver cancer.

  13. JUNB promotes the survival of Flavopiridol treated human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Mellissa; Hu, Qiuping; Macrae, Erin; DeWille, James

    2014-07-18

    Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle to achieving durable progression-free-survival in breast cancer patients. Identifying resistance mechanisms is crucial to the development of effective breast cancer therapies. Immediate early genes (IEGs) function in the initial cellular reprogramming response to alterations in the extracellular environment and IEGs have been implicated in cancer cell development and progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of kinase inhibitors on IEG expression in breast cancer cells. The results demonstrated that Flavopiridol (FP), a CDK9 inhibitor, effectively reduced gene expression. FP treatment, however, consistently produced a delayed induction of JUNB gene expression in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Similar results were obtained with Sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor and U0126, a MEK1 inhibitor. Functional studies revealed that JUNB plays a pro-survival role in kinase inhibitor treated breast cancer cells. These results demonstrate a unique induction of JUNB in response to kinase inhibitor therapies that may be among the earliest events in the progression to treatment resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  15. Chemical Analysis of Morphological Changes in Lysophosphatidic Acid-Treated Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Karen A; Klymenko, Yuliya; Feist, Peter E; Hummon, Amanda B; Stack, M Sharon; Schultz, Zachary D

    2017-11-10

    Ovarian cancer (OvCa) cells are reported to undergo biochemical changes at the cell surface in response to treatment with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Here we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging via supercontinuum excitation to probe morphological changes that result from LPA treatment. SEM images show distinct shedding of microvilli-like features upon treatment with LPA. Analysis of multiplex CARS images can distinguish between molecular components, such as lipids and proteins. Our results indicate that OvCa429 and SKOV3ip epithelial ovarian cancer cells undergo similar morphological and chemical responses to treatment with LPA. The microvilli-like structures on the surface of multicellular aggregates (MCAs) are removed by treatment with LPA. The CARS analysis shows a distinct decrease in protein and increase in lipid composition on the surface of LPA-treated cells. Importantly, the CARS signals from cellular sheddings from MCAs with LPA treatment are consistent with cleavage of proteins originally present. Mass spectrometry on the cellular sheddings show that a large number of proteins, both membrane and intracellular, are present. An increased number of peptides are detected for the mesenchymal cell line relative to the epithelial cell indicating a differential response to LPA treatment with cancer progression.

  16. Autophagy mediates cytotoxicity of human colorectal cancer cells treated with garcinielliptone FC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Shen-Jeu; Yen, Cheng-Hsin; Lin, Ting-Yu; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chen, Jyun-Ti; Su, Chun-Li

    2018-01-01

    The tautomeric pair of garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a novel tautomeric pair of polyprenyl benzophenonoid isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. (G. subelliptica, Clusiaceae), a tree with abundant sources of polyphenols. Our previous report demonstrated that GFC induced apoptosis on various types of human cancer cell lines including chemoresistant human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. In the present study, we observed that many autophagy-related genes in GFC-treated HT-29 cells were up- and down-regulated using a cDNA microarray containing oncogenes and kinase genes. GFC-induced autophagy of HT-29 cells was confirmed by observing the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, LC3 puncta, and double-membrane autophagic vesicles using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Inhibition of AKT/mTOR/P70S6K signaling as well as formation of Atg5-Atg12 and PI3K/Beclin-1 complexes were observed using Western blot. Administration of autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine and shRNA Atg5) and apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD showed that the GFC-induced autophagy was cytotoxic form and GFC-induced apoptosis enhanced GFC-induced autophagy. Our data suggest the involvement of autophagy and apoptosis in GFC-induced anticancer mechanisms of human colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  18. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  19. Gene expression analysis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with recombinant bromelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouz, Nour; Amid, Azura; Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun

    2014-08-01

    The contributing molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of breast cancer need to be better characterized. The principle of our study was to better understand the genetic mechanism of oncogenesis for human breast cancer and to discover new possible tumor markers for use in clinical practice. We used complimentary DNA (cDNA) microarrays to compare gene expression profiles of treated Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) with recombinant bromelain and untreated MCF-7. SpringGene analysis was carried out of differential expression followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), to understand the underlying consequence in developing disease and disorders. We identified 1,102 known genes differentially expressed to a significant degree (pbromelain produces a unique signature affecting different pathways, specific for each congener. The microarray results give a molecular mechanistic insight and functional effects, following recombinant bromelain treatment. The extent of changes in genes is related to and involved significantly in gap junction signaling, amyloid processing, cell cycle regulation by BTG family proteins, and breast cancer regulation by stathmin1 that play major roles.

  20. Exploring cell apoptosis and senescence to understand and treat cancer: an interview with Scott Lowe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scott W. Lowe is currently principal investigator at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After beginning his studies in chemical engineering, he decided to take another path and became fascinated by biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, which ultimately led to an interest in human disease, particularly cancer. During his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Scott had the opportunity to benefit from the exceptional mentorship of Earl Ruley, David Housman and Tyler Jacks, and contributed to elucidating how the p53 (TP53 tumor suppressor gene limits oncogenic transformation and modulates the cytotoxic response to conventional chemotherapy. This important work earned him a fellowship from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which helped to launch his independent career. Scott is now a leading scientist in the cancer field and his work has helped to shed light on mechanisms of cell apoptosis and senescence to better understand and treat cancer. In this interview, he talks about this incredible scientific journey.

  1. MAPK inhibitors, particularly the JNK inhibitor, increase cell death effects in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells via increased superoxide anion and glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2017-11-24

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induce apoptosis in cancer cells by regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The present study investigated the effects of MAPK inhibitors on cell growth and death as well as changes in ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. H2O2 inhibited growth and induced death of Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. All MAPK inhibitors appeared to enhance growth inhibition in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells and increased the percentage of Annexin V-FITC-positive cells in these cancer cells. Among the MAPK inhibitors, a JNK inhibitor significantly augmented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm) in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. Intracellular ROS levels were significantly increased in the H2O2-treated cells at 1 and 24 h. Only the JNK inhibitor increased ROS levels in the H2O2-treated cells at 1 h and all MAPK inhibitors raised superoxide anion levels in these cells at 24 h. In addition, H2O2 induced GSH depletion in Calu-6 and A549 cells and the JNK inhibitor significantly enhanced GSH depletion in H2O2‑treated cells. Each of the MAPK inhibitors altered ROS and GSH levels differently in the Calu-6 and A549 control cells. In conclusion, H2O2 induced growth inhibition and death in lung cancer cells through oxidative stress and depletion of GSH. The enhanced effect of MAPK inhibitors, especially the JNK inhibitor, on cell death in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells was correlated with increased O2•- levels and GSH depletion.

  2. Cadmium Modifies the Cell Cycle and Apoptotic Profiles of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with 5-Fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Madeddu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd, which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd.

  3. Lowering T Cell Activation Thresholds and Deregulating Homeostasis to Facilitate Immunotherapeutic Responses to Treat Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwon, Eugene D

    2006-01-01

    ... to develop immune-based therapies for prostate cancer Hence, relatively straightforward manipulations that induce specific T cell responses against prostate tumors or epithelial tissues, especially...

  4. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Steffen Filskov; Zhou, Wei; Dolled-Filhart, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS) among 204 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 2007 to 2012. PD...... by immunohistochemistry to be frequently expressed in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, PD-L1 expression is not a strong prognostic marker in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with chemotherapy....

  5. Pulmonary Function in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer Treated With Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: For patients with germ cell cancer, various pulmonary toxicity risk factors have been hypothesized for treatment with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). Because existing studies have shortcomings, we present a large, unselected cohort of patients who have undergone close monitoring...... of lung function before, during, and after treatment with BEP to disclose valid pulmonary toxicity risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients who were treated with BEP at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1984 to 2007, were included. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) that measured...... the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO), forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and forced vital capacity were performed systematically before, during, and after treatment with BEP for 5 years of follow-up. According to local protocol, bleomycin was discontinued if hemoglobin...

  6. Antiapoptotic effects of caspase inhibitors on H2O2-treated lung cancer cells concerning oxidative stress and GSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2017-09-08

    Exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in cancer cells. This study evaluated the antiapoptotic effects of pan-caspase and caspase-3, -8, or -9 inhibitors on H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). Treatment with 50-500 μM H2O2 inhibited the growth of Calu-6 and A549 cells at 24 h and induced apoptosis in these cells. All the tested caspase inhibitors significantly prevented cell death in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells. H2O2 increased intracellular ROS levels, including that of O 2·- , at 1 and 24 h. It also increased the activity of catalase but decreased the activity of SOD. In addition, H2O2 triggered GSH deletion in Calu-6 and A549 cells at 24 h. It reduced GSH levels in Calu-6 cells at 1 h but increased them at 24 h. Caspase inhibitors decreased O 2·- levels in H2O2-treated Calu-6 cells at 1 h and these inhibitors decreased ROS levels, including that of O 2·- , in H2O2-treated A549 cells at 24 h. Caspase inhibitors partially attenuated GSH depletion in H2O2-treated A549 cells and increased GSH levels in these cells at 24 h. However, the inhibitors did not affect GSH deletion and levels in Calu-6 cells at 24 h. In conclusion, H2O2 induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in Calu-6 and A549 cells, which was accompanied by increases in ROS and GSH depletion. The antiapoptotic effects of caspase inhibitors were somewhat related to the suppression of H2O2-induced oxidative stress and GSH depletion.

  7. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-12

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma AJCC v7; WT1 Positive

  8. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on a-Lactalbumin and Sulindac treated colon cancer cells: ELF-EMF and colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgulu, Kivanc; Gokce, Burak; Aydemir, Isil; Ozbilgin, M. Kemal; Vatansever, H.Seda

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In this research, we aimed to investigate the effects extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on proliferation and apoptosis during treatment of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines. Material and Methods: Colon cell lines; COLO-320, COLO-741 and as control mouse fibroblast (STO) cells were cultured in 24 wells of tissue culture plate. Both COLO-320 and COLO-741 cells were treated with a-lactalbumin, sulindac and a-lactalbumin + sulindac. The cells from all grou...

  9. Radiation pneumonitis in non‑small‑cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RP) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing helical tomotherapy (HT) and the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data from the treatment protocols of 62 NSCLC patients.

  10. Radiation pneumonitis in non.small.cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RP) in non.small.cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing helical tomotherapy (HT) and the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data from the treatment protocols of 62 NSCLC patients.

  11. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents To Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    obtained from the National Disease Research Inter- change program at the NIH. The tumor was digested with colla- genase and dispase (Roche). Cells were... Invitro - gen). Briefl y, trypsinized cells treated with the drugs in 2% serum at different time points were stained with 2.5 μmol/L Fluo-3AM for 30

  13. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    Introduction: Compared to incidentally found lung cancer, the presence of symptoms (eg. cough, haemoptysis, pain, weight loss) at diagnosis is associated with a 50% reduction in median survival. In surgically treated patients, it is unknown whether presence of symptoms has prognostic significance...... higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were...

  14. Alterations in Cell Cycle and Induction of Apoptotic Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells Treated with α-Mangostin Extracted from Mangosteen Pericarp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Kurose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of molecularly targeted drugs has greatly advanced cancer therapy, despite these drugs being associated with some serious problems. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the anticancer effects of natural products. α-Mangostin, a xanthone isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen fruit, has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines and to exhibit antitumor activity in a mouse mammary cancer model. In this study, we investigated the influence of α-mangostin on apoptosis and cell cycle in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 (carrying a p53 mutation, and HER2, ER, and PgR negative in order to elucidate its anticancer mechanisms. In α-mangostin-treated cells, induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was observed. On cell-cycle analysis, G1-phase arrest, increased p21cip1 expression and decreases in cyclins, cdc(s, CDKs and PCNA were observed. In conclusion, α-mangostin may be useful as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer carrying a p53 mutation and having HER2- and hormone receptor-negative subtypes.

  15. Prognostic significance of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in surgically treated lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Nonaka, Makoto; Kadokura, Mitsutaka; Takaba, Toshihiro

    2003-04-01

    The serum concentrations of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) obtained from 124 surgically treated primary non-small cell lung cancer patients, including 75 adenocarcinomas (AD) and 49 squamous cell carcinomas (SQ), were studied. The changes in the SCC-Ag concentration, which were obtained before and one month after surgery, were analyzed. The 5-year survival rate of the patients with AD who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively (32%) was lower than that for those who were negative for SCC-Ag preoperatively (57%, p<0.05). Meanwhile, in those with SQ, the 5-year survival rate of those who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively (59%) was not different when compared with those who were negative for SCC-Ag preoperatively (73%). The 5-year survival rate of patients with AD who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively and negative postoperatively was 53% versus 17% for those who remained positive postoperatively (p<0.05). In those with SQ, the 5-year survival rate of those who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively and negative postoperatively was 76% while it was 0% for those who remained positive postoperatively (p<0.01). In patients with negative SCC-Ag postoperatively, 5-year survival rates were not different between the patients who had positive antigen preoperatively and the patients who had negative antigen preoperatively both in AD (53% and 57%, respectively) and SQ (76% and 75%, respectively). In conclusion, though SCC-Ag is widely used for SQ, preoperative SCC-Ag did not reflect the prognosis. In AD, the survival rate was lower in antigen-positive than antigen-negative patients. Survival rate was higher in antigen-positive patients who became antigen-negative following resection than in patients who remained antigen-positive for both AD and SQ. In the patients who were negative for SCC-Ag postoperatively, survival was the same regardless of the preoperative SCC-Ag positivity in both AD and SQ.

  16. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laboratories that will be responsible for the comprehensive molecular analysis of clinical trial specimens for biomarkers associated ... Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer Biological Therapies for Cancer CAR T Cells: Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat ...

  17. Mechanisms of apoptosis in irradiated and sunitinib-treated follicular thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Jirka; Warnke, Elisabeth; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Pohl, Fabian; Wise, Petra; Magnusson, Nils E; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sunitinib (S) seems to have promising potential in the treatment of thyroid cancer. We focused on the impact of S and/or irradiation (R) on mechanisms of apoptosis in follicular thyroid cancer cells. The effects of R, S and their combination were evaluated 2 and 4 days after treatment, using the human thyroid cancer cell line CGTH W-1. The transcription of genes involved in the regulation of apoptosis was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. Western blot analyses of caspases and survivin were also performed. S elevated BAX (day 4), CASP9, CASP3, BIRC5 (day 4) and PRKACA (day 4) gene expression, whereas the mRNAs of BCL2, CASP8, PRKCA, ERK1, and ERK2 were not significantly changed. S, R and R+S clearly induced caspase-9 protein and elevated caspase-3 activity. Survivin was down-regulated at day 4 in control cells and the expression was blunted by S treatment. R+S induced survivin expression at day 2 followed by a reduction at day 4 of treatment. Sunitinib and the combined application with radiation induced apoptosis in follicular thyroid cancer cells via the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In addition, sunitinib might induce apoptosis via decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. These findings suggest the potential use of sunitinib for the treatment of poorly differentiated follicular thyroid carcinomas.

  18. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT). METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, 117 patients with stages IIB-IIIB NSCLC were treated in a multicenter randomized phase II trial with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT. The esophagitis was prospectively scored using the Common...

  19. Neural Stem Cell Delivery of Therapeutic Antibodies to Treat Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    conditions is promising ( 1 ) . Furthermore, it has previously 1. Introduction John S. Yu (ed.), Cancer Stem Cells, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol...D, Aucoin R, Blust J, Murry B, Greiter‐ Wilke  A: p75 neurotrophin receptor functions as a survival receptor in brain‐metastatic melanoma cells, J...domains. Nat Biotechnol 23(9): 1126-1136. (39) Colcher D, Pavlinkova G, Beresford G, Booth BJ, Choudhury A, Batra SK (1998) Pharmacokinetics and

  20. Successful Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel in a Heavily Treated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko Ishihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for the majority of all lung cancers. A 69-year-old female with postoperatively recurrent NSCLC was treated weekly with nanoparticle-albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel monotherapy every 4 weeks as a tenth line chemotherapy, and stable disease was achieved by seven cycles of this regimen. The patient developed grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 leukopenia, but none of the other toxicities, including febrile neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy, were severe, and thus she was able to tolerate this salvage chemotherapy. To our knowledge this is the first report of the efficacy of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy in a heavily treated NSCLC patient.

  1. Successfully-treated advanced bile duct cancer of donor origin after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by pancreaticoduodenectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruki, Koichiro; Shiba, Hiroaki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2014-07-01

    Secondary malignancies are one of the late complications observed in long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, reports on secondary non-hematopoietic solid tumors derived from donor cells is extremely rare. We herein report a successfully-treated case of advanced bile duct cancer of donor-origin after allogeneic HSCT. A 44-year-old man was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. When he achieved the third complete response, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells of one-mismatch female donor were transplanted at the age of 50 years. Post-transplant acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was treated by increased immunosuppression. At the age of 59, the patient was diagnosed with lower bile duct cancer and underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. Pathological findings revealed a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the bile duct. Additional fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed female patterns of the tumor cells, which suggested that the tumor cells originated from the donor. The patient had a satisfactory recovery, and received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. He remains well with no evidence of tumor recurrence as of one year after resection. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Bcl-2 confers survival in cisplatin treated cervical cancer cells: circumventing cisplatin dose-dependent toxicity and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisching, Gina; Loos, Benjamin; Botha, Matthys; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-10-16

    Cisplatin is the main chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of cervical cancers, however resistance to cisplatin is increasingly common and therefore has limited the efficacy and use of this drug in the clinic. Dose-dependent toxicity poses an additional challenge since patients suffer long-term and often permanent side-effects after treatment. Bcl-2 up-regulation has been implicated in the resistance to cisplatin in a variety of cancer cell lines, however its role in cervical cancer is confounding. A low, non-cytotoxic concentration of cisplatin was used in the treatment of HeLa and CaSki cells. Bcl-2 expression was determined through Western blotting and immunocytochemistry before and after treatment with cisplatin. To assess the reliance of the cervical cancer cells on Bcl-2 in the presence of cisplatin, Bcl-2 knock-down was achieved through RNA interference, where after apoptosis was assessed through PARP cleavage (Western blotting), Caspase activity (Caspase-Glo(©)) and PI inclusion analysis (Flow cytometry). Finally, pre-malignant and malignant cervical tissue was analysed for the presence of Bcl-2 through Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Cervical cancer cells upregulate Bcl-2 when treated with a non-cytotoxic concentration of cisplatin, which when silenced, effectively enhanced cisplatin sensitivity, and therefore significantly induced apoptosis. Analysis of the expression profile of Bcl-2 in cervical tissue revealed its up-regulation in cervical carcinoma, which agrees with results obtained from the in vitro data. Our data strongly suggest that utilising a lower dose of cisplatin is feasible when combined with Bcl-2 silencing as an adjuvant treatment, thereby improving both the dose-dependent toxicity, as well as cervical cancer resistance.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Wnt3a-treated triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Maubant

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. The activation of this pathway leads to the expression of specific target genes depending on the cell/tissue context. Here, we analyzed the transcriptome of two different TNBC cell lines to define a comprehensive list of Wnt target genes. The treatment of cells with Wnt3a for 6h up-regulated the expression (fold change > 1.3 of 59 genes in MDA-MB-468 cells and 241 genes in HCC38 cells. Thirty genes were common to both cell lines. Beta-catenin may also be a transcriptional repressor and we found that 18 and 166 genes were down-regulated in response to Wnt3a treatment for 6h in MDA-MB-468 and HCC38 cells, respectively, of which six were common to both cell lines. Only half of the activated and the repressed transcripts have been previously described as Wnt target genes. Therefore, our study reveals 137 novel genes that may be positively regulated by Wnt3a and 104 novel genes that may be negatively regulated by Wnt3a. These genes are involved in the Wnt pathway itself, and also in TGFβ, p53 and Hedgehog pathways. Thorough characterization of these novel potential Wnt target genes may reveal new regulators of the canonical Wnt pathway. The comparison of our list of Wnt target genes with those published in other cellular contexts confirms the notion that Wnt target genes are tissue-, cell line- and treatment-specific. Genes up-regulated in Wnt3a-stimulated cell lines were more strongly expressed in TNBC than in luminal A breast cancer samples. These genes were also overexpressed, but to a much lesser extent, in HER2+ and luminal B tumors. We identified 72 Wnt target genes higher expressed in TNBCs (17 with a fold change >1.3 which may reflect the chronic activation of the canonical Wnt pathway that occurs in TNBC tumors.

  4. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARSENIC-TREATED MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS EXPRESSING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF HSP70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression profiles in arsenic-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing different levels of HSP70Gail Nelson, Susan Hester, Ernest Winkfield, Jill Barnes, James AllenEnvironmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Rese...

  5. Cell-cycle fate-monitoring distinguishes individual chemosensitive and chemoresistant cancer cells in drug-treated heterogeneous populations demonstrated by real-time FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mako; Toneri, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Murakami, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Essentially every population of cancer cells within a tumor is heterogeneous, especially with regard to chemosensitivity and resistance. In the present study, we utilized the fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) imaging system to investigate the correlation between cell-cycle behavior and apoptosis after treatment of cancer cells with chemotherapeutic drugs. HeLa cells expressing FUCCI were treated with doxorubicin (DOX) (5 μM) or cisplatinum (CDDP) (5 μM) for 3 h. Cell-cycle progression and apoptosis were monitored by time-lapse FUCCI imaging for 72 h. Time-lapse FUCCI imaging demonstrated that both DOX and CDDP could induce cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M in almost all the cells, but a subpopulation of the cells could escape the block and undergo mitosis. The subpopulation which went through mitosis subsequently underwent apoptosis, while the cells arrested in S/G2/M survived. The present results demonstrate that chemoresistant cells can be readily identified in a heterogeneous population of cancer cells by S/G2/M arrest, which can serve in future studies as a visible target for novel agents that kill cell-cycle-arrested cells.

  6. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund Andersen, Anja; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at an elevated risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPM). Our objectives were to estimate the excess risk of oesophageal and gastric SPMs in patients with malignancies of the pharynx or larynx and, additionally......, to examine possible risk factors of developing SPMs. METHODS: Data on all patients treated for HNSCC with curative intent in the Region of Southern Denmark in the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were reviewed. A total of 1,172 patients were identified. The combined data from the DAHANCA...

  8. Analysis of miRNA expression profile induced by short term starvation in breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Daniele; Buscemi, Silvio; Ciaccio, Marcello; Russo, Antonio; Castorina, Sergio; Bazan, Viviana

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies showed that dietary approaches restricting food intake can be helpful to hinder tumor progression. To date, the molecular mechanisms are unclear and a key role seems to be exerted by nutrient-related signaling pathways. Since several evidences showed that non-coding small RNAs, including microRNAs, are correlated to cancer progression and antiblastic treatment response, our work aims to study their involvement in a triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line treated with doxorubicin under Short Term Starvation (STS) condition. Human TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231 and healthy breast cell line MCF10A were treated with 1 μM doxorubicin for 24 h under STS condition for 48 h and miRNA expression profiles were analyzed using Taqman® Low Density Array A human microRNA microfluidic cards. In addition, the expression of specific mRNAs and miRNAs differentially expressed under STS was analyzed using Real-time PCR analyses. MiRNA expression profile analysis in MDA-MB-231 and MCF10A cells treated with doxorubicin under STS for 48 h could explain the molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects associated to STS. Among deregulated miRNAs, a subset, including miR-15b, miR-23a, miR-26a, miR-29a, miR-106b, miR-128, miR-149, miR-181a, miR-192, miR-193b, miR-195, miR-324-3p and miR-494, has been shown to be involved in pathways related to drug sensitivity/resistance. The obtained data from our study suggest a potential involvement of some miRNAs in molecular pathways mediating the anticancer effects of STS in doxorubicin-treated breast cancer cells. Preliminary results seem to be encouraging and, in future, could allow the discovery of new potential targets useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:29069757

  9. Live viruses to treat cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Oliver; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2013-08-01

    Viruses that selectively replicate in cancer cells, leading to the death of the cell, are being studied for their potential as cancer therapies. Some of these viruses are naturally occurring but cause little if any illness in humans; others have been engineered to make them specifically able to kill cancer cells while sparing normal cells. These oncolytic viruses may be selective for cancer cells because viral receptors are over-expressed on the surface of cancer cells or because antiviral pathways are distorted in cancer cells. Additionally, when oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells, it can stimulate an antitumour immune response from the host that can enhance efficacy. Numerous early phase trials of at least six oncolytic viruses have been reported with no evidence of concerning toxicity either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapies and radiotherapy. Three oncolytic viruses have reached randomized testing in cancer patients; reolysin in head and neck cancer and JX594 in hepatocellular cancers, while results from the first-phase III trial of T-vec in metastatic melanoma are expected shortly.

  10. Case Report of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Uterine Cervix Treated at a Semiurban Cancer Centre in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibhor Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma of the uterine cervix is very rare. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL involving the uterine cervix treated at a newly commissioned semiurban cancer centre in north India in 2015. Data for this study was obtained from the hospital electronic medical records and the patient’s case file. We also reviewed published case reports of uterine and cervical lymphoma involving forty-one patients. We treated a case of stage IV DLBCL cervix with six cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone and intrathecal methotrexate followed by consolidation with radiotherapy. The patient showed complete response to chemotherapy. We conclude that, in advanced stage lymphoma involving uterus and cervix, combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is effective in short term.

  11. Predictive Factors for Poor Progression-free Survival in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshihiko; Tamiya, Akihiro; Isa, Syun-Ichi; Nakahama, Kenji; Okishio, Kyoichi; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Inoue, Takako; Tamiya, Motohiro; Hirashima, Tomonori; Imamura, Fumio; Atagi, Shinji

    2017-10-01

    Nivolumab has shown promising effects in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a second- or later-line treatment. This study aimed to identify patients who would not experience any benefit from nivolumab treatment. In this study, data for 201 patients treated with nivolumab during 17 December 2015 to 31 July 2016 at three respiratory medical centers in Japan were retrospectively reviewed. We collected clinical data at the time of nivolumab treatment commencement. We investigated the relationship between progression-free survival (PFS) and patient characteristics. In both univariate and multivariate analysis, performance status (PS) score ≥2, steroid use at baseline and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level >240 IU/l were significantly associated with poor PFS (all pnivolumab. Careful monitoring is recommended for treating such patients with nivolumab (UMIN-ID: UMIN000025908). Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Cancer: see, reach, treat

    OpenAIRE

    Geschwind, Jean-François “Jeff”; Lin, MingDe

    2015-01-01

    An academic-industry partnership between Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Philips has yielded quantitative methods to evaluate liver cancer. Their 3D visualisation technique offers a more accurate representation of the tumour and could radically improve treatment

  13. Exercise intervention for patients surgically treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Katy; Maguire, Roma; Campbell, Anna; Kearney, Nora

    2014-03-01

    Surgery remains the best curative option for appropriately selected patients with lung cancer. Evidence suggests that improving cardiovascular fitness and functional capacity can accelerate post-surgery recovery and reduce mortality. However, the effect of exercise intervention for patients surgically treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer [NCSLC] has not been fully examined. This review examines the literature regarding exercise intervention for patients who are surgically treated for NSCLC focussing on three key areas: methodological quality, intervention design (e.g. duration, frequency, type) and outcomes measured. A search of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychINFO was undertaken. Randomised Controlled Trials [RCTs] and non-RCTs including exercise training pre or post lung cancer resection were included. Descriptive characteristics were extracted and methodological quality assessed using Downs and Black appraisal checklist. Twenty studies (eight RCT's) were included: nine pre-surgical, nine post-surgical and two pre to post-surgical. The quality of evidence is questionable with many limitations (e.g. small samples, inadequate allocation concealment and a lack of clear reporting on timing, adverse events and follow-up). Regarding design of exercise intervention and outcomes measured, there was much variation between studies producing a disparate set of data. An optimal programme is still to be determined; however, suggestions are made relating to type of exercise (i.e. mixing aerobic, resistance and breathing exercises). Preliminary work from this review suggests that exercise intervention compared with usual care both pre and post-surgery is associated with improved cardiopulmonary exercise capacity, increased muscle strength and reduced fatigue, post-operative complications and hospital length of stay. Results concerning pulmonary function, quality of life, and blood gas analysis were variable and inconsistent. In order to implement exercise intervention

  14. Treating advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: focus on icotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang JL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jun-Li Liang,1 Xiao-Cang Ren,2 Qiang Lin2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Hebei Medical University Fourth Hospital, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, North China Petroleum Bureau General Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Renqiu, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Icotinib hydrochloride is an orally administered small-molecule reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been independently researched and developed and has independent intellectual property rights in the People’s Republic of China. Clinical trials have demonstrated that the response to icotinib among advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients who received at least one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen was not inferior to gefitinib. Since being launched August 2011 in the People’s Republic of China, icotinib has been widely used in clinics, and has become an important treatment option for Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC. The present study presents the Phase I, II, and III clinical trials of icotinib and discusses current clinical applications in the People’s Republic of China and future research directions. Keywords: targeted therapy, EGFR-TKI, NSCLC

  15. Pemetrexed in Previously Treated Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Poor Performance Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Young JUNG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Pemetrexed have been approved for the treatment of patients affected by advanced non-small cell lung cancner (NSCLC in progression after first-line chemotherapy. We evaluated the activity and feasibility of pemetrexed in previously treated NSCLC. Methods Patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC were evaluated from April 2007 to March 2009. The patients had relapsed or progressed after prior chemotherapy treatment. Pemetrexed (500 mg/m2 was administered intravenously once every 3 weeks after progression to prior chemotherapy. The tumor response was evaluated according to RECIST criteria by chest CT at every 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Results A total 61 patients were eligible for analysis. Performance status of them (100% was over 2. The response rate and disease control rate were 14.7% and 37.7% respectively. Non-squamous cell carcinoma histology was significantly associated with a superior response rate (P=0.045 and disease control rate (P=0.008. The median survival time and the median progression free survival (PFS time were 6.11 months and 2.17 months, respectively. Comparing the efficacy of pemetrexed in these two settings [second-line versus (12/61 more than third (49/61], there was no significant difference in regard to median survival (11.18 months vs 11.46 months, P=0.922,5, but PFS was more longer in third- or further-line groups than second-line group (1.39 months vs 2.25 months, P=0.015,

  16. Induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells treated with isorhamnetin glycosides from Opuntia ficus-indica pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Moreno-García, Beatriz E; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Aráiz-Hernández, Diana; Alvarez, Mario M; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O

    2014-12-01

    (OFI) contains health-promoting compounds like flavonoids, being the isorhamnetin glycosides the most abundant. We evaluated the effect of OFI extracts with different isorhamnetin glycosides against two different human colon cancer cells (HT-29 and Caco2). The extracts were obtained by alkaline hydrolysis with NaOH at 40 °C during 15, 30 or 60 min. Tri and diglycosides were the most abundant isorhamnetin glycosides, therefore these compounds were isolated to compare their cytotoxic effect with the obtained from the extracts. The OFI extracts and purified isorhamnetin glycosides were more cytotoxic against HT-29 cells than Caco2 cells. OFI-30 exhibited the lowest IC50 value against HT-29 (4.9 ± 0.5 μg/mL) and against Caco2 (8.2 ± 0.3 μg/mL). Isorhamnetin diglycosides IG5 and IG6 were more cytotoxic than pure isorhamnetin aglycone or triglycosides when they were tested in HT-29 cells. Bioluminescent analysis revealed increased activity of caspase 3/7 in OFI extracts-treated cells, particularly for the extract with the highest concentration of isorhamnetin triglycosides. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that OFI extract and isorhamnetin glycosides induced a higher percentage of apoptosis in HT-29 than in Caco2, while isorhamnetin was more apoptotic in Caco2. This research demonstrated that glycosilation affected antiproliferative effect of pure isorhamnetin glycosides or when they are mixed with other phytochemicals in an extract obtained from OFI.

  17. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Yip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  18. FoxO3a transcriptional regulation of bim controls apoptosis in paclitaxel-treated breast cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunters, A; de Mattos, SF; Stahl, M; Brosens, JJ; Zoumpoulidou, G; Saunders, CA; Coffer, PJ; Medema, RH; Coombes, RC; Lam, EWF

    2003-01-01

    Paclitaxel is used to treat breast cancers, but the mechanisms by which it induces apoptosis are poorly understood. Consequently, we have studied the role of the FoxO transcription factors in determining cellular response to paclitaxel. Western blotting revealed that in a panel of nine breast cancer

  19. FoxO3a transcriptional regulation of Bim controls apoptosis in paclitaxel-treated breast cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunters, A.; Fernandez de Mattos, S.; Stahl, M.; Brosens, J.J.; Zoumpoulidou, G.; Saunders, C.A.; Coffer, P.J.; Medema, R.H.; Coombes, R.C.; Lam, E.W.-F.

    2003-01-01

    Paclitaxel is used to treat breast cancers, but the mechanisms by which it induces apoptosis are poorly understood. Consequently, we have studied the role of the FoxO transcription factors in determining cellular response to paclitaxel. Western blotting revealed that in a panel of nine breast cancer

  20. Development and Implementation of an Internet-Based Survivorship Care Program for Cancer Survivors Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjala, Karen L.; Stover, Allison C.; Yi, Jean C.; Artherholt, Samantha B.; Romano, Eleni M.; Schoch, Gary; Stewart, Susan; Flowers, Mary E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The internet provides a widely accessible modality for meeting survivorship care needs of cancer survivors. In this paper we describe the development and implementation of an internet site designed as a base from which to conduct a randomized controlled trial to meet psycho-educational needs of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) survivors. Methods A cross-disciplinary team designed, wrote content and programmed an internet site for online study registration, consent, assessment, and study implementation. All 3–18 year survivors of HSCT for hematologic malignancy treated at one transplant center were approached by mail for participation. All study activities could be conducted without study staff contact. However, participants had options for phone or email contact with study staff as desired. Results Of 1775 participants approached for the study, 775 (58% of those eligible) consented and completed baseline assessment. Mean age was 51.7 (SD=12.5, age range 18–79), with 56% male. 57% required staff contact one or more times; a majority were for minor technical issues or delays in completion of enrollment or baseline assessment. Discussions/Conclusions This study demonstrated the potential for providing internet-based survivorship care to long-term survivors of HSCT. Although building a survivorship internet site requires a team with diverse expertise, once built, these resources can be implemented rapidly with large numbers of survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors While internet-based services will not meet all the needs of cancer survivors, this methodology represents an important modality for augmenting onsite clinical services as a method for meeting psycho-educational, information and resource needs of cancer survivors. PMID:21544671

  1. A review on the effects of current chemotherapy drugs and natural agents in treating non–small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chih-Yang; Ju, Da-Tong; Chang, Chih-Fen; Muralidhar Reddy, P.; Velmurugan, Bharath Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and this makes it an attractive disease to review and possibly improve therapeutic treatment options. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, targeted treatments, and immunotherapy separate or in combination are commonly used to treat lung cancer. However, these treatment types may cause different side effects, and chemotherapy-based regimens appear to have reached a therapeutic plateau. Hence, effective, better-tolerated treatments are n...

  2. The Effect of 217 Hz Magnetic Field of Cell Phone with Different Intensities on Apoptosis of Normal and Cancerous Cells Treated with Chemotherapy Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Mansourian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the increasing development of home and business electronic equipment in today's world, the biological effects of ELF magnetic fields have been studied at two molecular-cellular and animal- human levels. Considering the therapeutic viewpoint of this study regarding the effects of low-frequency fields of mobile phone, the effect of acute exposure to this field on chemotherapy will be studied.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, based on measurement of the intensity of the magnetic fields from mobile phones in another research, flux densities of magnetic field of 159.44, 93.25 and 120µ tesla with frequency of 217Hz was generated in magnetic field generator system, and the apoptosis level in K562 cancer cells and healthy cells of lymphocytes was assessed after exposure to field using flow cytometry method. This evaluation method was also performed for the cells treated with bleomycin after exposure to this field.Results: 217 Hz magnetic field exposure significantly increases the rate of apoptosis percentage (p > 0.05 in K562 cancer cells and in two intensities of 120 and 159.44µ tesla compared to the control group, but such effect is not observed in lymphocyte cells. Bleomycin-induced apoptosis percentage following exposure to the mentioned magnetic field shows no significant difference compared to the group of treatment with drug and without field exposure. This lack of significant difference is observed between the groups of drug after field exposure and field alone as well as between groups exposed to field and groups treated with bleomycin.Conclusion: Study results showed that 217 Hz magnetic field of mobile phone can induce apoptosis on cancer cells, but it has no effect on healthy cells. Thus, in order to use mobile phone as an effective factor in their treatment, some studies should be conducted at animal-human level.

  3. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy studies of changes in lipid content and composition in hormone-treated breast and prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potcoava, Mariana C; Futia, Gregory L; Aughenbaugh, Jessica; Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Gibson, Emily A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in the role of lipids in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to drug therapies has motivated the need to develop better tools for cellular lipid analysis. Quantification of lipids in cells is typically done by destructive chromatography protocols that do not provide spatial information on lipid distribution and prevent dynamic live cell studies. Methods that allow the analysis of lipid content in live cells are therefore of great importance. Using micro-Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, we generated a lipid profile for breast (T47D, MDA-MB-231) and prostate (LNCaP, PC3) cancer cells upon exposure to medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and synthetic androgen R1881. Combining Raman spectra with CARS imaging, we can study the process of hormone-mediated lipogenesis. Our results show that hormone-treated cancer cells T47D and LNCaP have an increased number and size of intracellular lipid droplets and higher degree of saturation than untreated cells. MDA-MB-231 and PC3 cancer cells showed no significant changes upon treatment. Principal component analysis with linear discriminant analysis of the Raman spectra was able to differentiate between cancer cells that were treated with MPA, R1881, and untreated.

  4. MV-NIS Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  5. Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents to Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    switching to more efficient knockout startegies such as CRISPR . We have generated successful CRSPR plasmids with gRNA against slc3a2 and tranfected both...mouse SCLC cells and sorted the GFP+ cells into single well sorts to expand individual CRISPR clones. We are still analyzing these data. PKA...combination therapies (maybe combination with drugs that affect the cell cycle more or could enhance the cell death). We have established a collaborative

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: david_sher@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liptay, Michael J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  7. Cyclophosphamide or Denileukin Diftitox Followed By Expanding a Patient's Own T Cells in the Laboratory in Treating Patients With HER-2/Neu Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With HER-2/Neu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  8. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby

    2010-01-01

    , and HSP90B that all were related to the proto-oncogene proteins p53, Myc, activator protein 1, and c-fos protein. The modulation of these proteins is consistent with the observations that belinostat is able to inhibit clonogenic cell growth of HCT116 cells and the biological role of these proteins...

  9. The role of thymidylate synthase in non-small cell lung cancer treated with pemetrexed continuation maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Fan, Wei-Fei; Pu, Xiao-Lin; Meng, Li-Juan; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Pemetrexed continuation maintenance therapy has been proven to be beneficial for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the eligibility criteria for maintenance treatment are too simple. This study sought to evaluate thymidylate synthase (TS) as a predicting biomarker for pemetrexed continuation maintenance treatment in NSCLC. Specimens were collected from 87 patients treated with pemetrexed continuation maintenance therapy before and after four-cycle induction chemotherapy. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect TS expression in tissues. The TS expression level was correlated with characteristic clinical data, radiographic response, progression-free time (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Low total TS expression (<8.47) was associated with improved PFS (median: 4.7 months vs. 3.5 months, p = 0.034) and improved OS (time from random assignment: 16.4 months vs. 11.7 months, p = 0.026; time from induction: 19.7 months vs. 14.8 months, p = 0.022). Our results indicate that in NSCLC patients treated with pemetrexed continuation maintenance therapy, low TS expression is associated with improved PFS and OS.

  10. Metastatic Ovarian Cancer Can Be Efficiently Treated by Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Lenka; Bohovic, Roman; Matuskova, Miroslava; Smolkova, Bozena; Kucerova, Lucia

    2016-08-16

    Due to late diagnosis, often recurrence, formation of metastases and resistance to commonly used chemotherapeutics human ovarian carcinoma represents a serious disease with high mortality. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSC) can serve as vehicles for therapeutic genes and we engineered AT-MSC to express either Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk-MSC), which phosphorylates ganciclovir (GCV) to its toxic metabolites or yeast fused cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT-MSC), which converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to highly toxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Here, we reported different responses of cytotoxicity mediated by CD::UPRT-MSC/5-FC treatment on human ovarian carcinoma cell lines-SKOV-3 and A2780 used in adherent or three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and we proved high potential of 3D model to predict results in our in vivo experiments. Both tumor cell lines showed similarly high chemosensitivity to the used treatment in adherent culture, but 3D model revealed severe discrepancy-only 36% of SKOV-3 cells but even 90% of A2780 cells were eliminated. This result served as a prognostic marker-we were able to achieve significantly decreased tumor volumes of subcutaneous xenografts of A2780 cells in nude mice and we prolonged tumor-free survival in 33% of animals bearing highly metastatic ovarian carcinoma after CD::UPRT-MSC/5-FC treatment.

  11. Prognostic importance of cell-free DNA in chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer treated with bevacizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Madsen, Christine Vestergaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Treatment of multiresistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is palliative and patients who have become resistant after multiple lines of chemotherapy often have an unmet need for further and less toxic treatment. Anti-angiogenic therapy has attracted considerable attention in the treatment...... of EOC in combination with chemotherapy. However, only a minor subgroup will benefit from the treatment and there is an obvious need for new markers to select such patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of single-agent bevacizumab in multiresistant EOC and the importance...

  12. Evaluation of the efficacyof aminolevulinic acid-dependent photodynamic therapy on melanoma cancer cells treated with tocopherol succinate (in-vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Kouchesfahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photodynamic therapy (PDT using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA to produce an intracellular photo-sensitizer, a protoporphyrin molecule IX (PPIX which absorbs light and targets cells, is a promising cancer treatment. Unfortunately, treatment failures are still a common occurrence when ALA is used. In this study, in order to enhance the efficacy of ALA-dependent photodynamic therapy, the effects of photodynamic therapy on melanoma cancer cells were studied after treating them with tocopherol succinate.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study melanoma cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium for 24 h. then, cells were treated with tocopherol succinate (6μm/ml. After 48 and 72 hours, the mediums were replaced by serum-free medium in the darkness, with ALA, 0.1mg/ml and then cells incubated for 4h. After that, cells were irradiated by using Nd: YAG laser (532 nm. After 24h, cell survival was measured by the MTT assay.Results: Twenty-four hours after PDT, among compared groups, pretreated cells with tocopherol succinate showed significant lower cell viability than control group. Conclusion: Induction of differentiation by using tocopherol succinate augmented intracellular PPIX accumulation in cells treated with ALA. Therefore phototoxic cell death after exposure to 532nm light enhances significantly in tocopherol succinate-pretreated cells. This study suggests that tocopherol succinate may act as a biological enhancer of ALA based photodynamic therapy

  13. Tumoral cavitation in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with antiangiogenic therapy using bevacizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Cryer, Sarah K.; Okajima, Yuka; Sholl, Lynette M.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Rabin, Michael S.; Jackman, David M.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Rationale and objectives: To investigate the frequency and radiographic patterns of tumoral cavitation in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with bevacizumab, and correlate the imaging findings with the pathology, clinical characteristics and outcome. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients with NSCLC treated with bevacizumab therapy were identified retrospectively. Baseline and follow-up chest computed tomography scan were reviewed to identify tumoral cavitation and subsequent filling in of cavitation. Radiographic cavitation patterns were classified into 3 groups. The clinical and outcome data were correlated with cavity formation and patterns. Results: Out of 72 patients, 14 patients developed cavitation after the initiation of bevacizumab therapy (19%; median time to event, 1.5 months; range 1.0–24.8 months). Three radiographic patterns of tumoral cavitation were noted: (1) development of cavity within the dominant lung tumor (n = 8); (2) development of non-dominant cavitary nodules (n = 3); and (3) development of non-dominant cavitary nodules with adjacent interstitial abnormalities (n = 3). Eleven patients (79%) demonstrated subsequent filling in of cavitation (the time from the cavity formation to filling in; median 3.7 months; range 1.9–22.7 months). No significant difference was observed in the clinical characteristics, including smoking history, or in the survival between patients who developed cavitation and those who did not. Smoking history demonstrated a significant difference across 3 radiographic cavitation patterns (P = 0.006). Hemoptysis was noted in 1 patient with cavity formation and 4 patients without, with no significant difference between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Tumoral cavitation occurred in 19% in patients with NSCLC treated with bevacizumab and demonstrated 3 radiographic patterns. Subsequent filling in of cavitation was noted in the majority of cases. PMID:22743083

  14. Isolated Late Metastasis of a Renal Cell Cancer Treated by Radical Distal Pancreatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Barras

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 53–year-old man underwent right nephrectomy for a locally advanced renal cell carcinoma with concomitant resection of a solitary metastasis in the right lung. Ten years later, he presented with haematochezia caused by a tumour in the tail of pancreas, invading the transverse colon and the greater curvature of the stomach. The tumour was radically resected, and histological examination revealed a solitary metastasis of the previous renal cell carcinoma. This case illustrates a rare indication for pancreatic resection because of pancreatic metastasis.

  15. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in bladder cancer cells treated with the DNA-damaging drug etoposide markedly increases apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Mathias; Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; Nexo, Ebba

    2007-01-01

    : The bladder cancer cell lines RT4 and T24, representing low- and high-malignancy grades respectively, were treated with VP16 (10 or 50 microM) and the level of apoptosis determined using a commercial kit. EGFR receptor activity was determined by western blotting using antibodies against phosphorylated EGFR...

  16. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination genes and clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yin

    Full Text Available The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (i.e., RAD51 -135G>C/rs1801320 and -172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794 and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS and radiation pneumonitis (RP in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 -135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG. We also found that RAD51 -135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14-2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02-2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 -135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemotherapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  17. Polymorphisms of Homologous Recombination Genes and Clinical Outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing; Huang, Yu-Jing; Liu, Zhensheng; Yuan, Xianglin; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2011-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the major mechanism to maintain genomic stability in response to irradiation. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in DSB repair genes may affect clinical outcomes among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy. We genotyped six potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (i.e., RAD51 −135G>C/rs1801320 and −172G>T/rs1801321, XRCC2 4234G>C/rs3218384 and R188H/rs3218536 G>A, XRCC3 T241M/rs861539 and NBN E185Q/rs1805794) and estimated their associations with overall survival (OS) and radiation pneumonitis (RP) in 228 NSCLC patients. We found a predictive role of RAD51 −135G>C SNP in RP development (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31–0.86, P = 0.010 for CG/CC vs. GG). We also found that RAD51 −135G>C and XRCC2 R188H SNPs were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (adjusted HR = 1.70, 95% CI, 1.14–2.62, P = 0.009 for CG/CC vs. GG; and adjusted HR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.02–2.85, P = 0.043 for AG vs. GG, respectively) and that the SNP-survival association was most pronounced in the presence of RP. Our study suggests that HR genetic polymorphisms, particularly RAD51 −135G>C, may influence overall survival and radiation pneumonitis in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:21647442

  18. THROMBOCYTOSIS AS PROGNOSTIC FACTOR FOR SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED NON SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER TREATED WITH FIRST- LINE CHEMOTHERAPY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Davidov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate elevated platelet count as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with advanced (stage IIIB/ IV non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC receiving first- line chemotherapy. Methods: From 2005 to 2009 three hundreds forty seven consecutive patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, treated in Department of Medical Oncology, UMHAT "Dr Georgi Stranski" entered the study. The therapeutic regimens included intravenous administration of platinum- based doublets. Survival analysis was evaluated by Kaplan- Meier test. The influence of pretreatment thrombocytosis as prognostic factor for survival was analyzed using multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. Results: Elevated platelet counts were found in 78 patients. The overall survival for patients without elevated platelet counts was 9,6 months versus 6,9 months for these with thrombocytosis. In multivariate analysis as independent poor prognostic factors were identified: stage, performance status and elevated platelet counts. Conclusions: These results indicated that platelet counts as well as some clinical pathologic characteristics could be useful prognostic factors in patients with unresectable NSCLC.

  19. Genital squamous cell carcinoma in men treated by photochemotherapy. A cancer registry-based study from 1978 to 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, F; Puzenat, E; Arveux, P; Louvat, P; Quencez, E; Humbert, P

    2001-06-01

    One single report from the U.S. 16-centre-trial indicated that psoralen and ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy may induce an increased risk of genital tumours in men, and protection of the genital area is, therefore, recommended. To evaluate the relevance of this risk in routine clinical practice. Two groups of patients were included in a 1978-98 retrospective study. Case records of men with genital squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) identified from the Cancer Registry of the Doubs area of France were examined for a history of PUVA therapy, topical tar treatment, psoriasis, human papillomavirus infection or genital dermatitis. In addition, all the dermatologists of the Doubs area (in public and private practice) using PUVA therapy were asked to provide information on the number of patients having received PUVA therapy and whether the genital area was exposed during treatment. Between 1978 and 1998, among the 48 men who had developed a genital SCC in the Doubs area, only one had a history of intensive PUVA therapy. About 150,000 treatments with PUVA therapy had been performed by 15 dermatologists in the Doubs area for 5400 patients since 1978. No case of genital SCC had been reported, despite the fact that the genital area had not been protected during UVA exposure. Although retrospective, our study demonstrates that the occurrence of genital SCC in men treated with PUVA therapy is a very rare event in common dermatological practice.

  20. Effect of Increased Radiotoxicity on Survival of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Curatively Intended Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgersson, Georg; Bergström, Stefan; Liv, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Edlund, Per; Blomberg, Carl; Nyman, Jan; Friesland, Signe; Ekman, Simon; Asklund, Thomas; Henriksson, Roger; Bergqvist, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the impact of different forms of radiation toxicities (esophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, mucositis and hoarseness), on the survival of patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data were individually collected retrospectively for all patients diagnosed with NSCLC subjected to curatively intended radiotherapy (≥50 Gy) in Sweden during the time period 1990 to 2000. Esophagitis was the only radiation-induced toxicity with an impact on survival (hazard ratio=0.83, p=0.016). However, in a multivariate model, with clinical- and treatment-related factors taken into consideration, the impact of esophagitis on survival was no longer statistically significant (hazard ratio=0.88, p=0.17). The effect on survival seen in univariate analysis may be related to higher radiation dose and to the higher prevalence of chemotherapy in this group. The results do not suggest that the toxicities examined have any detrimental effect on overall survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. RAD6 promotes DNA repair and stem cell signaling in ovarian cancer and is a promising therapeutic target to prevent and treat acquired chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasagara, R R; Spencer, S M; Tripathi, K; Clark, D W; Mani, C; Madeira da Silva, L; Scalici, J; Kothayer, H; Westwell, A D; Rocconi, R P; Palle, K

    2017-11-30

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most deadly gynecological cancer and unlike most other neoplasms, survival rates for OC have not significantly improved in recent decades. We show that RAD6, an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, is significantly overexpressed in ovarian tumors and its expression increases in response to carboplatin chemotherapy. RAD6 expression correlated strongly with acquired chemoresistance and malignant behavior of OC cells, expression of stem cell genes and poor prognosis of OC patients, suggesting an important role for RAD6 in ovarian tumor progression. Upregulated RAD6 enhances DNA damage tolerance and repair efficiency of OC cells and promotes their survival. Increased RAD6 levels cause histone 2B ubiquitination-mediated epigenetic changes that stimulate transcription of stem cell genes, including ALDH1A1 and SOX2, leading to a cancer stem cell phenotype, which is implicated in disease recurrence and metastasis. Downregulation of RAD6 or its inhibition using a small molecule inhibitor attenuated DNA repair signaling and expression of cancer stem cells markers and sensitized chemoresistant OC cells to carboplatin. Together, these results suggest that RAD6 could be a therapeutic target to prevent and treat acquired chemoresistance and disease recurrence in OC and enhance the efficacy of standard chemotherapy.

  2. Fluorodeoxyglucose position-emission tomography ratio in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Cheol; Wu, Hong Gyun; Yu, Tosol; Kim, Hak Jae; Paeng, Jin Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    To determine whether the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose uptake by positron emission tomography (FDG PET) ratio of lymph node to primary tumor (mSUVR) could be a prognostic factor for node positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). A total of 68 NSCLC T1-4, N1-3, M0 patients underwent FDG PET before RT. Optimal cutoff values of mSUVR were chosen based on overall survival (OS). Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. The most significant cutoff value for mSUVR was 0.9 with respect to OS. Two-year OS was 17% for patients with mSUVR > 0.9 and 49% for those with mSUVR ≤ 0.9 (p = 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, including age, performance status, stage, use of chemotherapy, and mSUVR, only performance status (p = 0.05) and mSUVR > 0.9 (p = 0.05) were significant predictors of OS. Two-year OS for patients with both good performance (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group [ECOG] ≤ 1) and mSUVR ≤ 0.9 was significantly better than that for patients with either poor performance (ECOG > 1) or mSUVR > 0.9, 23% (71% vs. 23%, p = 0.04). Our results suggested that the mSUVR was a strong prognostic factor among patients with lymph node positive NSCLC following RT. Addition of mSUVR to performance status identifies a subgroup at highest risk for death after RT.

  3. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James [Department of Medical Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Apisarnthanarax, Smith, E-mail: apisarns@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  4. Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level correlate with growth inhibition of prostate cancer cells treated in vitro with a novel anticancer drug, irofulven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woynarowska BAHigdon, A L; Muñoz, R M; Bushong, P; Waters, S J

    2001-01-01

    Irofulven (hydroxymethylacylfulvene, HMAF, MGI 114) is a novel agent with alkylating activity and a potent inducer of apoptosis. It is currently undergoing Phase II clinical trials for several tumor types, including hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Reduction of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels has been proposed as a generally useful endpoint for evaluating the antitumor efficacy of treatments for prostate cancer. However, the utility of PSA as a marker of tumor cell burden could be compromised, if drugs directly affected PSA secretion and/or expression. In these studies, we evaluated the effects of irofulven on PSA protein and mRNA levels during the course of treatment of prostate tumor cells in vitro. The rate of PSA secretion (normalized per equal cell number) by control and drug treated cells was similar, as determined by a solid phase, two-site immunoradiometric assay. Consistent with the lack of effect of irofulven on PSA protein level, the drug does not appear to affect the expression of PSA mRNA (on a per cell basis) as assessed by RT-PCR. Thus, changes in PSA secretion and expression appear to reflect irofulven-induced cell growth inhibition rather than reflecting a direct effect of the drug on PSA. These results suggest that PSA should be a reasonable marker of tumor burden in irofulven-treated prostate cancer patients.

  5. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it; Buti, Sebastiano; Camisa, Roberta [Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Brighenti, Matteo; Lazzarelli, Silvia [Oncology Unit, Azienda Istituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Largo Priori, 1, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Mazza, Giancarlo [Radiology Division, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili,1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passalacqua, Rodolfo, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it [1Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group). The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group): 1 MIU/m{sup 2} (Million International Unit/m{sup 2})twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%), asthenia/anorexia (6%) and diarrhea (7%); patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%), fatigue (21%) and arthralgia (13%). In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response) and 5.1% (only partial response); a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8) and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7) months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1) and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9) months (p = 0.002); and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54) and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60) were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  6. Prognostic role of patient gender in limited-disease small-cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Eze, Chukwuka; Niyazi, Maximilian; Li, Minglun; Belka, Claus; Manapov, Farkhad [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido [University of Rostock, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that female gender could be a prognostic factor in limited-disease (LD) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), but the correlation between patient gender and survival parameters remains unclear. Data from 179 LD SCLC patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) were reviewed. Influence of patient gender on time to progression (TTP), local control (LC), brain metastasis-free (BMFS), distant metastasis-free (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) was analysed. Definitive CRT was completed by 179 (110 men/69 women) patients. Of these, 68 (38%; 34 men/34 women) patients were treated in concurrent and 111 (62%; 76 men/35 women) in sequential mode. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was subsequently applied in 70 (39%; 36 men/34 women) patients with partial or complete response after CRT. Median OS was 20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 10-22) and 14 (95% CI 10-18) months in female and male patients, respectively (p = 0.021). In subgroups defined by remission status (complete and partial response) after CRT, an OS benefit for females compared to males was also detected. There was no correlation between patient gender and TTP, LC or DMFS, and no difference in OS in the female and male subgroups treated with PCI. The incidence of metachronous brain metastases (BMs) in the male and female subgroups differed significantly (40/110 men vs. 18/69 women, p = 0.03). Also, mean BMFS was significantly longer in women (p = 0.023). Patient gender also significantly correlated with OS on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other prognostic factors (p = 0.04, HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.08-1.92). In this heterogeneous LD SCLC patient cohort treated with definitive CRT, female gender was significantly associated with longer BMFS and OS, as well as with a lower incidence of metachronous brain failure. (orig.) [German] Studien haben gezeigt, dass weibliches Geschlecht ein prognostischer Faktor beim kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinom (SCLC) im Stadium &apos

  7. Identification of valid reference genes for the normalization of RT-qPCR expression studies in human breast cancer cell lines treated with and without transient transfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Lin Liu

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a powerful technique for examining gene expression changes during tumorigenesis. Target gene expression is generally normalized by a stably expressed endogenous reference gene; however, reference gene expression may differ among tissues under various circumstances. Because no valid reference genes have been documented for human breast cancer cell lines containing different cancer subtypes treated with transient transfection, we identified appropriate and reliable reference genes from thirteen candidates in a panel of 10 normal and cancerous human breast cell lines under experimental conditions with/without transfection treatments with two transfection reagents. Reference gene expression stability was calculated using four algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and comparative delta Ct, and the recommended comprehensive ranking was provided using geometric means of the ranking values using the RefFinder tool. GeNorm analysis revealed that two reference genes should be sufficient for all cases in this study. A stability analysis suggests that 18S rRNA-ACTB is the best reference gene combination across all cell lines; ACTB-GAPDH is best for basal breast cancer cell lines; and HSPCB-ACTB is best for ER+ breast cancer cells. After transfection, the stability ranking of the reference gene fluctuated, especially with Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent in two subtypes of basal and ER+ breast cell lines. Comparisons of relative target gene (HER2 expression revealed different expressional patterns depending on the reference genes used for normalization. We suggest that identifying the most stable and suitable reference genes is critical for studying specific cell lines under certain circumstances.

  8. Biotin-targeted Pluronic(®) P123/F127 mixed micelles delivering niclosamide: A repositioning strategy to treat drug-resistant lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Annapina; Pellosi, Diogo Silva; Pagliara, Valentina; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Caetano, Wilker; Hioka, Noboru; Budillon, Alfredo; Ungaro, Francesca; Russo, Giulia; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2016-09-10

    With the aim to develop alternative therapeutic tools for the treatment of resistant cancers, here we propose targeted Pluronic(®) P123/F127 mixed micelles (PMM) delivering niclosamide (NCL) as a repositioning strategy to treat multidrug resistant non-small lung cancer cell lines. To build multifunctional PMM for targeting and imaging, Pluronic(®) F127 was conjugated with biotin, while Pluronic(®) P123 was fluorescently tagged with rhodamine B, in both cases at one of the two hydroxyl end groups. This design intended to avoid any interference of rhodamine B on biotin exposition on PMM surface, which is a key fundamental for cell trafficking studies. Biotin-decorated PMM were internalized more efficiently than non-targeted PMM in A549 lung cancer cells, while very low internalization was found in NHI3T3 normal fibroblasts. Biotin-decorated PMM entrapped NCL with good efficiency, displayed sustained drug release in protein-rich media and improved cytotoxicity in A549 cells as compared to free NCL (Pbiotin-decorated PMM carrying NCL at low doses demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity than free NCL in CPr-A549. These results point at NCL-based regimen with targeted PMM as a possible second-line chemotherapy for lung cancer showing cisplatin or multidrug resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neutropenia-related costs in patients treated with first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Michael E; Muehlenbein, Catherine E; Marciniak, Martin D; Faries, Douglas E; Motabar, Saeed; Gillespie, Theresa W; Lipscomb, Joseph; Knopf, Kevin B; Buesching, Don P

    2009-10-01

    Neutropenia is a major adverse event often associated with chemotherapy administration. Neutropenia-related complications often lead to increased use of costly health care including inpatient and outpatient services. Monitoring and treatment of neutropenia thus place an economic burden on the health care system. To evaluate (a) costs and medical resource use for chemotherapy- related afebrile and febrile neutropenia in an elderly population with Stage IIIB or Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and (b) costs unrelated to neutropenia and total all-cause health care costs during first-line chemotherapy. Study patients in this retrospective database analysis were aged 65 years or older with a diagnosis of Stage IIIB or Stage IV NSCLC in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry from 1998 through 2002. Neutropenia was identified by the presence of a primary or secondary diagnosis code for diseases of white blood cells (ICD-9-CM = 288.xx) during a period of first-line chemotherapy treatment. Febrile neutropenia was defined by (a) an inpatient hospitalization with a primary or secondary diagnosis for neutropenia occurring at any time during first-line chemotherapy or (b) intravenous or intramuscular antibiotic administration occurring after the initial neutropenia diagnosis and during first-line chemotherapy. Patients with neutropenia without these events were considered to have afebrile neutropenia. Patients were followed in the SEER-Medicare database to evaluate costs (defined as all Medicare payments, primary insurer payments, and patient copayments and deductibles) and resource use associated with afebrile or febrile neutropenia while on first-line chemotherapy. If a patient switched to second-line chemotherapy, the day prior to the switch was defined as the end of first-line treatment. If a switch to second-line therapy did not occur, then first-line therapy was assumed to end 30 days following administration of the last first

  10. Chemoresistance is associated with increased cytoprotective autophagy and diminished apoptosis in bladder cancer cells treated with the BH3 mimetic (-)-Gossypol (AT-101).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Jens; Vallo, Stefan; Rakel, Stefanie; Antonietti, Patrick; Gessler, Florian; Blaheta, Roman; Bartsch, Georg; Michaelis, Martin; Cinatl, Jindrich; Haferkamp, Axel; Kögel, Donat

    2015-04-07

    cell death in BH3 mimetic-treated 5637(r)GEMCI(20) and 5637(r)CDDP(1000) cells. Our findings show for the first time that (-)-gossypol concomitantly triggers apoptosis and a cytoprotective type of autophagy in bladder cancer and support the notion that enhanced autophagy may underlie the chemoresistant phenotype of these tumors. Simultaneous targeting of Bcl-2 proteins and the autophagy pathway may be an efficient new strategy to overcome their "autophagy addiction" and acquired resistance to current therapy.

  11. Cross Talk Mechanism among EMT, ROS, and Histone Acetylation in Phorbol Ester-Treated Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Kamiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays a pivotal role in the progression of cancer, and some transcription factors including Slug and Snail are known to be involved in EMT processes. It has been well established that the excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and epigenetics such as DNA methylation and histone modifications participate in carcinogenesis; however, the cross talk mechanism among EMT, ROS, and epigenetics remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the treatment of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with phorbol ester (TPA, a protein kinase C activator, significantly induced cell proliferation and migration, and these were accompanied by the significant induction of Slug expression. Moreover, the TPA-elicited induction of Slug expression was regulated by histone H3 acetylation and NADPH oxidase (NOX 2-derived ROS signaling, indicating that ROS and histone acetylation are involved in TPA-elicited EMT processes. We herein determined the cross talk mechanism among EMT, ROS, and histone acetylation, and our results provide an insight into the progression of cancer metastasis.

  12. Heterogeneous resistance mechanisms in an EGFR exon 19-mutated non-small cell lung cancer patient treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Grauslund, Morten; Melchior, Linea C

    2017-01-01

    an EGFR exon 19-mutation (p.E746_A750delELREA) and a previously unreported 2bp frame-shift microdeletion in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3; p.D785fs*31) gene. Interestingly, FGFR3-mutations have previously been described in other cancer types of Caucasian patients and may represent...... an alternative pathway to EGFR-signaling. The patient received first-line erlotinib but after only 7 weeks showed metastatic pleural effusion, in which transformation to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that retained the EGFR- and FGFR3-mutations was identified. Consequently, standard carboplatin-etoposide regimen...... for SCLC combined with erlotinib continuation was implemented obtaining significant objective response. However, after completing 6 cycles of this combination, new pulmonary and hepatic metastases appeared and showed persistence of the original EGFR- and FGFR3-mutated ADC phenotype together...

  13. Gene Expression Profiles of NO- and HNO-donor Treated Breast Cancer Cells: Insights into Tumor Response and Resistance Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert YS; Basudhar, Debashree; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Julie L.; Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Glynn, Sharon; Switzer, Christopher H.; Ambs, Stefan; Miranda, Katrina M.; Wink, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (NOS2), a major inflammatory protein, modulates disease progression via NO in a number of pathologies, including cancer. The role of NOS2-derived NO is not only flux-dependent, which is higher in mouse vs. human cells, but also varies based on spatial and temporal distribution both within tumor cells and in the tumor microenvironment. NO donors have been utilized to mimic NO flux conditions and to investigate the effects of varied NO concentrations. As a wide range of effects mediated by NO and other nitrogen oxides such as nitroxyl (HNO) have been elucidated, multiple NO- and HNO-releasing compounds have been developed as potential therapeutics, including as tumor modulators. One of the challenges is to determine differences in biomarker expression from extracellular vs. intracellular generation of NO or HNO. Taking advantage of new NO and HNO releasing agents, we have characterized the gene expression profile of estrogen receptor-negative human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells following exposure to aspirin, the NO donor DEA/NO, the HNO donor IPA/NO and their intracellularly-activated prodrug conjugates DEA/NO-aspirin and IPA/NO-aspirin. Comparison of the gene expression profiles demonstrated that several genes were uniquely expressed with respect to NO or HNO, such as miR-21, HSP70, cystathionine γ-lyase and IL24. These findings provide insight into targets and pathways that could be therapeutically exploited by the redox related species NO and HNO. PMID:25153034

  14. Clinical Effects for Patients with Recurrent Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Icotinib Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingying NONG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Icotinib hydrochloride is the third single target EGFR-TKI used in clinical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Clinical research reports on its efficacy and survival in patients with Recurrent Advanced NSCLC are still little.The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and survival of Icotinib hydrochloride for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who failed to previous chemotherapy and explore the association of clinical features with the efficacy and survival. Methods The clinical data of 60 NSCLC patients referred to the Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University from March 2009 to July 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results The overall response rate (ORR was 45.0% and the disease control rate (DCR was 80.0%. The median progression-free survival (PFS time was 6.7 months. RR and PFS in female were superior to male (P=0.014, 0.013, respectively. RR, DCR in 2nd-line subgroup were superior to ≥3rd-line subgroup (P=0.020, 0.024, respectively. RR, DCR and PFS in EGFR mutation carriers were significantly superior to wild-type patients (P=0.006, <0.001, 0.002, respectively . There was no statistical difference in RR and PFS between those age <65 and ≥65 or PS<2 and PS≥2. There was no statistical difference in RR and DCR between exon 19 deletion and exon 21 mutations, while the former had much longer PFS (P=0.020. EGFR mutation and exon 19 deletion are the independent prognostic factors to significantly improve the PFS (P=0.009, 0.012, respectively. The side effects were generally mild and consisted of rash and diarrhea. Conclusion Icotinib hydrochloride is effective especially in EGFR mutation carriers and well tolerated in patients with recurrent advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

  15. Controlled clinical trial of adjuvant immunotherapy with BCG and neuraminidase-treated autologous tumour cells in large bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B N; Walker, C; Andrewartha, L; Freeman, S; Bennett, R C

    1989-01-01

    A controlled, randomised clinical trial of immunotherapy was performed in 301 patients with stage B or C colorectal cancer. The immunotherapy treatment consisted of 18 vaccinations over a 2 year period following surgery with a combination of BCG given by scarification plus subcutaneous injection of Vibrio cholera neuraminidase (VCN)-modified autologous tumour cells. Five year follow-up has now been completed in all patients. The immunotherapy did not alter either the disease-free interval or the overall survival of patients in comparison with a control group of patients not receiving immunotherapy.

  16. The Cytotoxicity Mechanism of 6-Shogaol-Treated HeLa Human Cervical Cancer Cells Revealed by Label-Free Shotgun Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women in the world. 6-Shogaol is a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale. In this paper, we demonstrated that 6-shogaol induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial pathway were involved in 6-shogaol-mediated apoptosis. Proteomic analysis based on label-free strategy by liquid chromatography chip quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was subsequently proposed to identify, in a non-target-biased manner, the molecular changes in cellular proteins in response to 6-shogaol treatment. A total of 287 proteins were differentially expressed in response to 24 h treatment with 15 μM 6-shogaol in HeLa cells. Significantly changed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by multiple analyzing software. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA suggested that 14-3-3 signaling is a predominant canonical pathway involved in networks which may be significantly associated with the process of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by 6-shogaol. In conclusion, this work developed an unbiased protein analysis strategy by shotgun proteomics and bioinformatics analysis. Data observed provide a comprehensive analysis of the 6-shogaol-treated HeLa cell proteome and reveal protein alterations that are associated with its anticancer mechanism.

  17. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Safety and tolerability of combination therapy vs. standard treatment alone for patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. James Gulley is leading a team to test the safety and tolerability of the combination of nivolumab and CV301 to see if it can improve the survival for patientis with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.  Learn more...

  19. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.Y.; Chen, M.M.; Fan, J.G.; Wang, Y.Q.; Hu, Y.; Xu, L.M., E-mail: leiming.xu@aliyun.com.cn, E-mail: huying@sohu.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Du, Y.Q. [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (,24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. (author)

  1. Cell cycle kinetics, apoptosis rates, DNA damage and TP53 gene expression in bladder cancer cells treated with allyl isothiocyanate (mustard essential oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, André Luiz Ventura; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; de Camargo, Elaine Aparecida; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2014-04-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is present in plants of the cruciferous family and is abundant in mustard seed. Due to its high bioavailability in urine after ingestion, AITC has been considered a promising antineoplastic agent against bladder cancer. Because TP53 mutations are the most common alterations in bladder cancer cells and are frequently detected in in situ carcinomas, in this study, we investigated whether the AITC effects in bladder cancer cells are dependent on the TP53 status. Two bladder transitional carcinoma cell lines were used: RT4, with wild-type TP53; and T24, mutated TP53 gene. AITC was tested at concentrations of 0.005, 0.0625, 0.0725, 0.0825, 0.0925, 0.125 and 0.25 μM in cytotoxicity, cell and clonogenic survival assays, comet and micronucleus assays and for its effects on cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometry and on TP53 gene expression. The data showed increased primary DNA damage in both cell lines; however, lower concentrations of AITC were able to induce genotoxicity in the mutant cells for the TP53 gene. Furthermore, the results demonstrated increased apoptosis and necrosis rates in the wild-type cells, but not in mutated TP53 cells, and cell cycle arrest in the G2 phase for mutated cells after AITC treatment. No significant differences were detected in TP53 gene expression in the two cell lines. In conclusion, AITC caused cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis rates and varying genotoxicity dependent on the TP53 status. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that those differences could reflect other intrinsic genetic alterations in the examined cell lines, which may also carry mutations in genes other than TP53. Therefore, further studies using other molecular targets need to be performed to better understand the mechanisms by which AITC may exert its antineoplastic properties against tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymen, Bart, E-mail: bart.reymen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Lunde, Ragnar [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven/ KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  3. AFM studies of DNA structures extracted from adriamycin treated and non-treated Ehrlich tumor cells

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    M. AVRAMOV IVIC

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM, a unique tool to investigate drug treatment of cancer cells, was used to analyze the anti-neoplastic activity of adriamycin by comparing DNA structures of non-treated and adriamycin-treated Ehrlich tumor cells. The non-treated cells exhibited a highly branched intact chromatin structure, related to the intensive DNA replication in cancer cells. Images from adriamycin-treated tumor cells showed that the DNA chains were broken and the chromatin structure had been destroyed. Possible explanations for these effects of adriamycin are considered: breakage of hydrogen bonding, oxidation and intercalation effects, as well as the poisoning of topoisomerase enzyme. DNA fractal andmultifractal analyses, performed in order to evaluate the degree of bond scission, showed that the treated DNA had become more fractal compared to non-treated DNA.

  4. Phase Ib study of the mitochondrial inhibitor ME-344 plus topotecan in patients with previously treated, locally advanced or metastatic small cell lung, ovarian and cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Jennifer R; Goff, Barbara; Forster, Martin D; Bendell, Johanna C; Britten, Carolyn D; Gordon, Michael S; Gabra, Hani; Waterhouse, David M; Poole, Mark; Ross Camidge, D; Hamilton, Erika; Moore, Kathleen M

    2017-10-01

    Background This multicenter, open-label, phase Ib study was designed to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics and preliminary efficacy of ME-344, a mitochondrial inhibitor, administered in combination with the topoisomerase I inhibitor, topotecan, in patients with previously treated, locally advanced or metastatic small cell lung (SCLC), ovarian and cervical cancers. Patients and methods In Part 1, patients received ME-344 10 mg/kg intravenously weekly on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 in combination with topotecan 4 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28 day cycle. Cycles were repeated until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Patients were evaluated for dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in cycle 1 and ME-344 pharmacokinetic samples were obtained. In Part 2, patients with locally advanced or metastatic SCLC and ovarian cancer were enrolled in expansion cohorts treated at the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) determined in Part 1. Results Fourteen patients were enrolled in Part 1 and no DLTs were observed. The RP2D of ME-344 in combination with topotecan was established as 10 mg/kg. In Part 2, 32 patients were enrolled. The most common treatment-emergent all-grade and grade 3/4 toxicities included fatigue (65.2%, 6.5%), neutropenia (56.5%, 43.5%) and thrombocytopenia (50%, 23.9%). One patient with recurrent ovarian cancer experienced a partial response by RECIST 1.1 and 21 patients achieved stable disease as best response. Conclusions The combination of ME-344 10 mg/kg weekly and topotecan 4 mg/m2 was tolerable, however, the degree of anti-cancer activity does not support further investigation of the combination in unselected patients with SCLC, ovarian and cervical cancers.

  5. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia

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    Schwab, K.S.; A. Heine; Weimann, T.; Kristiansen, G; Brossart, P.

    2016-01-01

    Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer...

  6. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a patient treated with long-term pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for recurrent ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Matteo; Bona Galvagno, Maurizio; Bongioannini, Guido

    2015-01-14

    We present a case of a woman who developed an oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) after being treated for a recurrent ovarian carcinoma with subtotal gastric resection and adjuvant pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD). She received six cycles of PLD induction and maintenance therapy, which was continued for 5 years. She was free from disease at the following visits but 3 years later she developed SCC of her left inferior edentulous gums. The patient was negative for human papillomavirus and had never smoked in her life or had a history of alcohol use or any other environmental risk factors. PLD is known to accumulate in eccrine glands of the hands and the feet and in the oral mucosa, therefore causing skin toxicity and mucositis. It is conceivable that this specific biodistribution to the oral mucosa may be responsible for the onset of SCC. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, K S; Heine, A; Weimann, T; Kristiansen, G; Brossart, P

    2016-01-01

    Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, we assumed that nivolumab could also be effective in our patients with refractory metastatic squamous cell cancer of the skin. So far, there have been no clinical data on the therapeutic efficacy of nivolumab in squamous cell skin cancer. We here present a case of a patient with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer refractory to previous therapies, who showed a good response to nivolumab over a period of 5 months, but developed a serious hemolytic crisis under nivolumab treatment after eight applications.

  8. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Schwab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, we assumed that nivolumab could also be effective in our patients with refractory metastatic squamous cell cancer of the skin. So far, there have been no clinical data on the therapeutic efficacy of nivolumab in squamous cell skin cancer. We here present a case of a patient with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer refractory to previous therapies, who showed a good response to nivolumab over a period of 5 months, but developed a serious hemolytic crisis under nivolumab treatment after eight applications.

  9. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  10. Demographics and Outcomes of Stage I-II Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treated with Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared with Wide Local Excision in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Truong, Minh Tam; Sahni, Debjani

    2018-02-03

    The optimal surgical approach (wide local excision (WLE) vs. Mohs micrographic surgery (MOHS)) for treating Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is yet to be determined. To compare survival outcomes in patients with early stage MCC treated with MOHS versus WLE. A retrospective review of all cases in the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of MCC of clinical Stage I-II MCC treated with WLE or MOHS was performed. 1,795 cases of Stage I-II MCC were identified who underwent WLE (N=1,685) or MOHS (N=110). There was no difference in residual tumor on surgical margins between the two treatment groups (p=0.588). On multivariate analysis, there was no difference in overall survival between the treatment modalities (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.72-1.45, p=0.897). There was no difference in overall survival between the two groups on propensity score matched analysis. Disease specific survival was not reported as this data in not available in the NCDB. MOHS appears to be as effective as WLE in treating early stage MCC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. k-RAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with TKIs among smokers and non-smokers: a meta-analysis

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    Ai-Gui Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Recent studies have suggested that k-RAS mutations are related to the response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitions (TKIs in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the relationship between smoking history and k-RAS mutations in NSCLC treated with TKIs. Material and methods : We searched MEDLINE and Web of Science up to 15 March 2014. The pooled relative risk (RR was estimated by using fixed effect model or random effect model, according to heterogeneity between studies. We also carried out power analyses. Results : We identified 12 studies with 1193 patients, including 196 patients (16.4% with k-RAS mutations. The pooled k-RAS mutations incidence was 22.8% (174/764 in patients with smoke expose vs. 5.4% (23/429 in those with no smoke exposure. The pooled RR was 2.991 (95% CI: 1.884–4.746; Z = 4.65, p = 0.000. No publication bias was found (Begg’s test: z = 1.09, p = 0.274 and Egger’s test: t = 1.38, p = 0.201. In subgroup analyses, the pooled RR was 3.336 (95% CI: 1.925–5.779; Z = 4.30, p = 0.000 in the Caucasian subgroup, while in the Asian subgroup the pooled RR was 2.093 (95% CI: 0.909–4.822; Z = 1.73, p = 0.083, but the sample size was underpowered (0.465. Conclusions : The current meta-analysis found that smoking was related to increased incidence of k-RAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer treated with TKIs. This may be further evidence that smoking will lead to a worse prognosis in NSCLC patients treated with TKIs.

  12. Atypical responses in patients with advanced melanoma, lung cancer, renal-cell carcinoma and other solid tumors treated with anti-PD-1 drugs: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirolo, Paola; Spagnolo, Francesco

    2017-09-01

    Anti-programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) drugs nivolumab and pembrolizumab were recently approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other solid tumors. Atypical patterns of response (i.e. tumor shrinkage or stabilization after initial progression) were observed in about 10% of metastatic melanoma patients treated with anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) drug ipilimumab and were associated with improved survival; however, the rate of atypical response patterns to anti-PD-1 therapy is not clear. An electronic search was performed to identify clinical trials evaluating response to anti-PD-1 therapy with nivolumab and pembrolizumab in patients with advanced solid tumors. Thirty-eight studies were included in our analysis for a total of 7069 patients with advanced cancer treated with anti-PD-1 therapy. Responses were evaluated by unconventional response criteria in 19 trials and were observed for all cancer types but tumors with mismatch-repair deficiency and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Overall, 151 atypical responses were observed in 2400 patients (6%) evaluated by unconventional response criteria. The results of our systematic review highlight the clinical relevance of unconventional responses to anti-PD-1 therapy and support further investigation into the development of tools that may assist evaluation of the antitumor activity of immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

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    Xiong, Huihua [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Avenue, Wuhan (China); Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Zhensheng [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Li-E [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Qingyi, E-mail: qwei@mdanderson.org [Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  14. Prognostic factors in patients with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer treated with whole-brain radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Mori, Keita; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Nakasu, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors associated with overall survival (OS) in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastasis who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). This study included 264 consecutive NSCLC patients with brain metastasis who received WBRT. Patients with leptomeningeal metastasis and those who underwent craniotomy or stereotactic radiotherapy before WBRT were excluded. The evaluated prognostic factors for OS included gender, neurological deficit, histology, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, previous cytotoxic chemotherapy, previous EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) score. All factors with a P < 0.05 in univariate analysis were entered into multivariate analysis using Cox regression and a confidence interval of 99%. Two hundred thirty patients had died, 14 patients were alive, and 20 patients were lost to follow-up. The median follow-up time was 20.9 months. The median survival time was 5.5 months (95% confidence interval; 4.8-6.3). Univariate analysis showed that gender, neurological deficit, histology, EGFR mutation status, RPA class, and DS-GPA score were significant prognostic factors for OS. In multivariate analysis, RPA class and histology were found to be significant prognostic factors for OS, with P values of 0.0039 and 0.0014, respectively. RPA Class I or II (Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70) and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with longer OS. These factors should be taken into account when considering indication for WBRT.

  15. The Risk of Neutropenia and Leukopenia in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Erlotinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Guo; Tian, Xu; Cheng, Long; Zhou, Quan; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Bai, Yu-ju; Ma, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are a critical member of systemic therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Erlotinib is the first-generation EGFR-TKIs, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend it as a first-line agent in patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations. However, the safety of erlotinib plus chemotherapy (CT) or erlotinib alone for advanced NSCLC remains controversial. We carried out a systematic meta-analysis to determine the overall risk of neutropenia and leukopenia associated with erlotinib. PubMed, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, WanFang database, The Cochrane library, Web of Science, as well as abstracts presented at ASCO conferences and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched to identify relevant studies. RR with 95% CIs for neutropenia and leukopenia were all extracted. The random-effects model was used to calculate pooled RRs and 95% CIs. Power calculation was performed using macro embedded in SAS software after all syntheses were conducted. We identified 12 eligible studies involving 3932 patients. Erlotinib plus CT or alone relative to CT is associated with significantly decreased risks of neutropenia and leukopenia in patients with advanced NSCLC (RR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.21–0.71; P = 0.00; incidence: 9.9 vs. 35.2%) and (RR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11–0.93; P = 0.04; incidence: 3.5 vs. 11.6%), respectively. The subgroup analysis by erlotinb with or without CT showed that erlotinib combine with CT have no significance decrease the relative risks of neutropenia or leukopenia (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.78–1.23; P = 0.87; incidence: 26.2 vs. 30.5%) and (RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.34–1.95; P = 0.64; incidence: 6.5 vs. 9.3%), respectively. However, erlotinib alone could decrease incidence of neutropenia (RR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.07–0.27; P = 0.00; incidence: 3.7 vs. 40.8%) or leukopenia (RR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01–0.45; P = 0.01; incidence: 0.8 vs. 15.7%). The power analysis

  16. Safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel for treating advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hideyuki; Nakahara, Yoshiro; Yokoba, Masanori; Mitsufuji, Hisashi; Sasaki, Jiichiro; Masuda, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    There are few established treatments for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with interstitial lung disease (ILD). The safety and efficacy of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) in combination with carboplatin is uncertain, although the combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel is the most common regimen for treating NSCLC patients with ILD. A total of 9 NSCLC patients with ILD, treated between April 2013 and March 2016, were retrospectively investigated. Carboplatin (AUC 5-6) was administered on day 1 and nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8 and 15, every 4-6 weeks. The median age of the patients upon initiating chemotherapy was 67 years. The pathological examination revealed 6 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, and 6 patients exhibited the typical pattern of ILD. The response rate was 55.6%, and the median progression-free and overall survival time was 174 and 344 days, respectively. Acute exacerbation of ILD was not observed in any of the patients, and febrile neutropenia developed in 3 patients (3/9, 33.3%). Thus, treatment with carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel was found to be safe and effective for NSCLC patients with ILD, although management of hematological adverse events, such as febrile neutropenia, was required. However, these encouraging results require confirmation by a large-scale clinical trial.

  17. Pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death in cancer patients treated with programmed cell death-1 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Cui P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Cui,1–3,* Jun-Xun Ma,1,* Fei-Xue Wang,1,* Jing Zhang,1 Hai-Tao Tao,1 Yi Hu1 1First Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Graduate Administration, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 3Health Bureau of the 75709 Army, Central Theater of the Chinese PLA, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: We conducted a meta-analysis of published clinical trials to determine the relationship between the risks of pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 inhibitor treatment in patients with cancer.Materials and methods: We examined clinical trials from the Medline and Google Scholar databases. Data from original studies and review articles were also cross-referenced and evaluated. Randomized Phase II and Phase III trials of pembrolizumab and nivolumab treatment in patients with cancer were eligible for the analysis. Information about the participants, all-grade and high-grade pneumonitis, and pneumonitis-related death was extracted from each study and analyzed.Results: After the exclusion of ineligible studies, 12 clinical trials were included in the analysis. The odds ratio (OR for all-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.51–8.37; P<0.00001, and the OR for high-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 3.83 (95% CI: 1.54–9.48; P=0.004. The OR for pneumonitis-related death after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 2.47 (95% CI: 0.41–14.81; P=0.32. Moreover, the OR for all-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 3.54 (95% CI: 1.52–8.23; P=0.003, and that for high-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 2.35 (95% CI: 0.45–12.13; P=0.31. Treated cancer appeared to have no effect on the risk of pneumonitis.Conclusion: Our data showed that PD-1 inhibitors were associated with increased risks of all

  18. Variations in Cell Surfaces of Estrogen Treated Breast Cancer Cells Detected by A Combined Instrument for Far-Field and Near-Field Microscopy

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    P. Perner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of single breast cancer cells (cell line T‐47D to 17β‐estradiol (E2 under different concentrations was studied by using an instrument that allows to combine far‐field light microscopy with high resolution scanning near‐field (AFM/SNOM microscopy on the same cell. Different concentrations of E2 induce clearly different effects as well on cellular shape (in classical bright‐field imaging as on surface topography (atomic force imaging and absorbance (near‐field light transmission imaging. The differences range from a polygonal shape at zero via a roughly spherical shape at physiological up to a spindle‐like shape at un‐physiologically high concentrations. The surface topography of untreated control cells was found to be regular and smooth with small overall height modulations. At physiological E2 concentrations the surfaces became increasingly jagged as detected by an increase in membrane height. After application of the un‐physiological high E2 concentration the cell surface structures appeared to be smoother again with an irregular fine structure. The general behaviour of dose dependent differences was also found in the near‐field light transmission images. In order to quantify the treatment effects, line scans through the normalised topography images were drawn and a rate of co‐localisation between high topography and high transmission areas was calculated. The cell biological aspects of these observations are, so far, not studied in detail but measurements on single cells offer new perspectives to be empirically used in diagnosis and therapy control of breast cancers.

  19. Analysis of 41 Cases of Primary Hypervascular Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Embolization of Emulsion of Chemotherapeutics and Iodized Oil

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    Yunzhi ZHOU

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Transcatheter arterial chemotherapy and embolization is the main method in the treatment of lung cancer, but most of the reports do not study individually to small cell lung cancer (SCLC, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, hypovascular and hypervascular lung cancer. The pre-embolization perfusion of hemotherapeutics is still being used routinely and seldom report to iodized oil embolization. The article summarized the quality of life after the treatment, clinical efficiency, survival time and complications to evaluate the clinical effect of primary hypervascular NSCLC treated with embolization of emulsion of chemotherapeutics and iodized oil. Methods The study totally analyzed 41 cases which confirmed by pathology and follow up study from January, 2008 to January 2009. The CT scan with IV contrast demonstrates over moderate enhanced lesion which indicate hypervascular. Within the 41 cases, 23 cases of central, 18 cases of peripheral. Suqamous carcinoma 21 cases, adenocarcinoma 15 cases and squamoadenocarcinoma 5 cases. Stage IIIb 34 cases, stage IV 7 cases. Superselective incubation with microcatheter under DSA, to embolize the capillary bed with liquefied iodized oil and the emulsion of pharmorubicin, to embolize the supply artery of the tumor with gelatin foam microparticle. The liquefied iodized oil 5 mL-10 mL, pharmorubicin 10 mg-30 mg. The longest follow up is 12 months and to compare with the references of 2007-2009. Results The KPS is widely acclaimed after the treatment (P < 0.05, no complete response (CR, 31 cases of partial response (PR, 7 cases of no change (NC and 3 cases of progressive disease (PD, the total efficiency (CR+PR is 75.6%. The clinical efficiency (CR+PR+NC is 92.68%. 33 cases of total survival tome over 12 months (80.48%, IIIb stage 29/34 (85.29%, IV stage 4/7 (57.14%. 1 case with severe complication-spinal injury. Conclusion To treat primary hypervascular NSCLC with simple embolization of

  20. Expression profiling of stem cell-related genes in neoadjuvant-treated gastric cancer: a NOTCH2, GSK3B and β-catenin gene signature predicts survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Bauer

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cell (CSC based gene expression signatures are associated with prognosis in various tumour types and CSCs are suggested to be particularly drug resistant. The aim of our study was first, to determine the prognostic significance of CSC-related gene expression in residual tumour cells of neoadjuvant-treated gastric cancer (GC patients. Second, we wished to examine, whether expression alterations between pre- and post-therapeutic tumour samples exist, consistent with an enrichment of drug resistant tumour cells. The expression of 44 genes was analysed in 63 formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tumour specimens with partial tumour regression (10-50% residual tumour after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by quantitative real time PCR low-density arrays. A signature of combined GSK3B(high, β-catenin (CTNNB1(high and NOTCH2(low expression was strongly correlated with better patient survival (p<0.001. A prognostic relevance of these genes was also found analysing publically available gene expression data. The expression of 9 genes was compared between pre-therapeutic biopsies and post-therapeutic resected specimens. A significant post-therapeutic increase in NOTCH2, LGR5 and POU5F1 expression was found in tumours with different tumour regression grades. No significant alterations were observed for GSK3B and CTNNB1. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a chemotherapy-associated increase in the intensity of NOTCH2 staining, but not in the percentage of NOTCH2. Taken together, the GSK3B, CTNNB1 and NOTCH2 expression signature is a novel, promising prognostic parameter for GC. The results of the differential expression analysis indicate a prominent role for NOTCH2 and chemotherapy resistance in GC, which seems to be related to an effect of the drugs on NOTCH2 expression rather than to an enrichment of NOTCH2 expressing tumour cells.

  1. Anti-angiogenic-specific adverse events in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with nintedanib and docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Mellemgaard, Anders; von Pawel, Joachim; Gottfried, Maya; Bondarenko, Igor; Cheng, Ying; Zarogoulidis, Kostas; Luft, Alexander; Bennouna, Jaafar; Barrueco, José; Aboshady, Hesham; Hocke, Julia; Kaiser, Rolf; Douillard, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    LUME-Lung 1 was a randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase III trial investigating nintedanib+docetaxel versus placebo+docetaxel in patients with advanced NSCLC progressing after first-line chemotherapy. Progression-free survival was significantly improved with nintedanib+docetaxel in the overall population and overall survival was significantly improved in the pre-specified analysis of patients with adenocarcinoma. We evaluated the frequency of characteristic adverse events (AEs) commonly seen with existing anti-angiogenic agents. The incidence and intensity of AEs were evaluated in all patients who received at least one dose of study medication (N=1307) and for the two main histologies: adenocarcinoma (n=653) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; n=553). AEs of special interest were analyzed by category, preferred term, and worst CTCAE grade and included perforation, hypertension, bleeding, thromboembolic events, and skin disorders. The incidence of patients with all-grade gastrointestinal (GI) perforations was low and balanced between arms (0.5% in both) and across histologies; the incidence of non-GI perforations was 1.2% with nintedanib+docetaxel versus 0.2% with placebo+docetaxel. The incidence of some events was higher with nintedanib+docetaxel versus placebo+docetaxel; hypertension (3.5% vs 0.9%), rash (11.0% vs 8.1%), and cutaneous adverse reactions (13.0% vs 10.7%). Rash and cutaneous adverse reactions were predominantly Grade 1-2 with both treatments. The incidence of all-grade bleeding was also slightly higher in nintedanib+docetaxel-treated patients (14.1% vs 11.6%) driven by between-treatment differences in the SCC subpopulation; most events were Grade 1-2. The proportion of patients with a thromboembolic event was low and comparable between arms for all grades (5.1% vs 4.6%) and Grade ≥3 (2.1% vs 3.1%). Safety evaluation of the LUME-Lung 1 study showed that the frequency of AEs commonly associated with other anti-angiogenic agents was lower with

  2. The prognostic influence of neuroendocrine cells in prostate cancer: Results of a long-term follow-up study with patients treated by radical prostatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe distribution of immunohistochemically defined neuroen-docrine (NE) cells in benign, pre-cancerous and neoplastic prostatic tissues and the prognostic value of these cells in prostate cancer were studied in the radical prostatectomy specimens of 90 patients from whom complete

  3. Using Oncolytic Viruses to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments known as oncolytic viruses are being tested in clinical trials, and one, T-VEC or Imlygic®, has been approved by the FDA. Research now suggests that these treatments work not only by infecting and killing tumor cells, but that they may also be a form of cancer immunotherapy.

  4. The efficacy and safety of nivolumab in previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jiaxing Huang,1,2,* Yaxiong Zhang,1,2,* Jin Sheng,1,2,* Hongyu Zhang,3 Wenfeng Fang,1,2 Jianhua Zhan,1,2 Ting Zhou,1,2 Ying Chen,1,2 Lin Liu,1,2 Li Zhang1,2 1Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, 2State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, 3Department of Medical Oncology, the Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Nivolumab (BMS-936558/ONO-4538 was the first monoclonal antibody targeting programmed death (PD-1. So far, a number of clinical trials on nivolumab have showed satisfactory efficacy in treating non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Herein, we present a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of nivolumab for previously treated advanced NSCLC patients. Methods: Electronic databases were searched for eligible literature. Data of objective response rate (ORR, disease control rate, overall survival, progression-free survival, and adverse effects (AEs were extracted and pooled. Outcomes analyzed and presented in this study were according to the original data from nivolumab 3 mg/kg. Results: In general, nine trials with 817 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled ORR, disease control rate, 1-year overall survival rate, and 1-year progression-free survival rate were 20% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 17%–23%, 36% (95% CI: 22%–51%, 47% (95% CI: 40%–53%, 21% (95% CI: 18%–24%, respectively. In addition, the rate of grade 3–4 AEs was only 8% (95% CI: 6%–12%. Subgroup analysis showed no significant difference in terms of ORR between squamous and non-squamous NSCLC (odds ratio 1.23, 95% CI: 0.63–2.39, P=0.51. However, significantly greater ORR was presented in programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1 positive cohort (ORR 31%, 95% CI: 24%–38%, compared to PD-L1 negative cohort (ORR 12%, 95% CI: 9%–17%. The odds ratio for objective response to nivolumab in

  5. Second primary cancer in survivors of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimoto, Go; Kubo, Toshio; Oze, Isao; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Soh, Junichi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2018-02-02

    The standard treatment for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) is chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but surgical resection following induction CRT can extend overall survival in a select population. However, patients who survive longer are at risk of developing a second primary cancer (SPC). This is the first report to determine the incidence of SPC in survivors with LA-NSCLC after trimodal therapy. Between October 1997 and October 2013, 112 Stage III NSCLC patients underwent trimodal therapy in our hospital. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.8%. SPC developed in 10 of the 112 patients 0.60-15.0 (median 5.49) years after initiating CRT. The observed incidence of SPC was 1.8 per 100 patient-years. Although trimodal therapy can prolong patient survival, the estimated incidence of SPC does not increase. A large prospective study with a longer follow-up time is required to determine the effects of trimodal therapy, including the development of SPC. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Mechanotransduction in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jin; Zhang, Yueling; Ye, Rui; Zheng, Yingcheng; Zhao, Zhihe; Li, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept, which arose about a decade ago, proposes that tumor growth is sustained by a subpopulation of highly malignant cells. These cells, termed CSCs, are capable of extensive self-renewal that contributes to metastasis and treatment resistance. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target CSCs should be developed for improving outcomes of cancer patients. Recent progress has highlighted the importance of physical properties of the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction pathway in cancer cells during cancer development. On the other hand, the significance of CXCR1, an upstream signal of FAK/PI3K/Akt has been revealed in CSCs. FAK/PI3K/Akt is a key signal mediator in mechanotransduction pathway. Therefore, mechanotransduction could be a new target for CSCs, and would be an innovative way to treat cancer by inhibiting FAK/PI3K/Akt. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  7. Reproducibility of parameter learning with missing observations in naive Wnt Bayesian network trained on colorectal cancer samples and doxycycline-treated cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shriprakash

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript the reproducibility of parameter learning with missing observations in a naive Bayesian network and its effect on the prediction results for Wnt signaling activation in colorectal cancer is tested. The training of the network is carried out separately on doxycycline-treated LS174T cell lines (GSE18560) as well as normal and adenoma samples (GSE8671). A computational framework to test the reproducibility of the parameters is designed in order check the veracity of the prediction results. Detailed experimental analysis suggests that the prediction results are accurate and reproducible with negligible deviations. Anomalies in estimated parameters are accounted for due to the representation issues of the Bayesian network model. High prediction accuracies are reported for normal (N) and colon-related adenomas (AD), colorectal cancer (CRC), carcinomas (C), adenocarcinomas (ADC) and replication error colorectal cancer (RER CRC) test samples. Test samples from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) do not fare well in the prediction test. Also, an interesting case regarding hypothesis testing came up while proving the statistical significance of the different design setups of the Bayesian network model. It was found that hypothesis testing may not be the correct way to check the significance between design setups, especially when the structure of the model is the same, given that the model is trained on a single piece of test data. The significance test does have value when the datasets are independent. Finally, in comparison to the biologically inspired models, the naive Bayesian model may give accurate results, but this accuracy comes at the cost of a loss of crucial biological knowledge which might help reveal hidden relations among intra/extracellular factors affecting the Wnt pathway.

  8. Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Persistent, Relapsed, or Progressing Cancer After Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma

  9. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-07

    Carcinoma of the Collecting Ducts of Bellini; Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma; Kidney Medullary Carcinoma; Kidney Oncocytoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  10. The influence of TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharides on hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the feasibility of its application in treating liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Junsheng Gu, Ranran Sun, Shen Shen, Zujiang Yu Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of China Objective: This study was designed to explore the influence of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharides (LPS on liver cancer cell and the feasibility to perform liver cancer adjuvant therapy. Methods: Human liver cancer cell lines HepG2, H7402, and PLC/PRF/5 were taken as models, and the expression of TLRs mRNA was detected by real time-polymerase chain reaction method semiquantitatively. WST-1 method was used to detect the influence of LPS on the proliferation ability of liver cancer cells; propidium iodide (PI single staining and Annexin V/PI double staining were used to test the influence of LPS on the cell cycle and apoptosis, respectively, on human liver cancer cell line H7402. Fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot method were used to determine the change of expression of Cyclin D1. Results: The results demonstrated that most TLRs were expressed in liver cancer cells; stimulating TLR4 by LPS could upregulate TLR4 mRNA and the protein level, activate NF-κB signaling pathway downstream of TLR4, and mediate the generation of inflammatory factors IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α; LPS was found to be able to strengthen the proliferation ability of liver cancer cells, especially H7402 cells; the expression of Cyclin D1 rose and H7402 cells were promoted to transit from G1 stage to S stage under the stimulation of LPS, but cell apoptosis was not affected. It was also found that LPS was able to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription -3 (STAT3 signaling pathway in H7402 cells and meanwhile significantly increase the initiation activity of STAT3; proliferation promoting effect of LPS to liver cancer cells remarkably lowered once STAT3 was blocked or inhibited. Conclusion: Thus, TLR4 agonist LPS is proved to be able to

  11. The Hemoglobin Level as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Gemcitabine and cis-Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan N. Davidov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anemia is observed in various malignancies including non- small cell lung cancer /NSCLC/ and is considered to be a poor prognostic factor. The aim of this study is to investigate whether there is a correlation between anemia, other clinic- pathological factors and survival in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with Gemcitabine / cis- Platinum- containing chemotherapy. Methods: Seventy eight consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC treated in Department of Chemotherapy, UMHAT - Dr. G. Stranski, Medical University - Pleven between 2006-2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Of those, 27 patients /34, 6%/ had low hemoglobin /HB/ level (<120g/L for men and <110g/L for women prior to start chemotherapy. The HB levels were obtained at the time of their first visit to the hospital. All patients received chemotherapy regimen consists of intravenous administration of Gemcitabine 1250 mg/m2 day 1 and 8 and cis- Platinum 80mg/m2 day 1 with repetition over 21 days. Survival analysis was evaluated by Kaplan- Meier test. Results: The median survival time for all patients was 9,5 months. The median survival time for patients with low HB levels was 7,6 months versus 11,3 months in patients without anemia /p<0.05/. There was a significant correlation between anemia and clinical stage or performance status /p<0.05/.Conclusions: These results indicate that patients without anemia have significantly higher survival rate. Pretreatment HB level appears to be a useful prognostic indicator for survival in patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with chemotherapy.

  12. PSF1 (Partner of SLD Five 1) is a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Surgery Following Preoperative Chemotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Ryu; Naito, Hisamichi; Kise, Kazuyoshi; Takara, Kazuhiro; Eino, Daisuke; Minami, Masato; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Kimura, Toru; Okumura, Meinoshin; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    PSF1 (Partner of SLD Five 1) is an evolutionarily conserved DNA replication factor that is part of the GINS (Go, Ichi, Nii, and San) complex . The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between PSF1 expression and prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with surgery following preoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Sixty-nine patients with NSCLC treated with surgery following preoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy who did not achieve pathologic complete response were enrolled. The status of PSF1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship between expression of PSF1 and Ki-67 was determined, as well as correlations between PSF1 expression and prognosis. We found that 27 of 69 patients' tumors (39 %) were positive for PSF1 expression. The Ki-67 index was significantly higher in the PSF1-positive versus the PSF1-negative group (p = 0.0026). Five-year, disease-free survival of the PSF1-positive group was significantly worse (17.7 vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.0088), and the 5-year overall survival also was worse (16.6 vs. 47.2 %, p = 0.0059). Moreover, PSF1 expression was found to be a significant independent prognostic factor for shorter survival by Cox multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 2.43, 95 % confidence interval 1.27-4.60, p = 0.0076). PSF1 is a useful prognostic biomarker to stratify NSCLC patients treated with surgery following preoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy.

  13. Association of SUMO1 and UBC9 genotypes with tumor response in non-small-cell lung cancer treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Youn; Lee, Geon Kook; Yoo, Sun Young; Yoon, Sung Jin; Cho, Eun Young; Kim, Heung Tae; Lee, Jin Soo

    2010-04-01

    Irinotecan induces small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-1 conjugation to topoisomerase-I, leading to enhanced sensitivity to irinotecan. In this study, we genotyped SUMO1 and UBC9 polymorphisms in 147 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with irinotecan chemotherapy to investigate the association between genotypes and tumor response rate. Immunohistochemistry for SUMO1 and UBC9 was performed in 42 tumor samples and correlated with genotypes. The UBC9 10920CG genotype was associated with significantly higher response rate than the C/C genotype (81 vs 37%, P=0.0002). This predictive effect on tumor response was also seen in multivariate analysis (odds ratio=8.5, P=0.003). Moreover, tumors arising from the UBC9 10920CG genotype were associated with higher prevalence of SUMO1 overexpression compared with those with CC genotype (78 vs 31%, P=0.021). This finding suggests that the UBC9 10920CG genotype enhances sensitivity to irinotecan chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC through upregulation of SUMO1 in tumor cells.

  14. Increase in soluble PD-1 is associated with prolonged survival in patients with advanced EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Demuth, Christina; Weber, Britta

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The central immune co-inhibitory programmed cell death receptor/ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway plays a key role in tumor immune evasion in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Soluble PD-1 (sPD-1) can be detected in the blood, and preclinical evidence suggests that sPD-1 blocks PD-1/-L1...... interaction and improves anti-tumor immunity. The present study compares the concentration of sPD-1 in the serum of advanced NSCLC patients with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutation prior to erlotinib treatment and at the time of progression and correlates these results to patient outcome....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from 38 patients with EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC treated with erlotinib were analyzed for sPD-1 by sandwich ELISA. EGFR mutational status was assessed in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and tumor biopsies. RESULTS: sPD-1 could be detected in 21% of patients prior...

  15. TNFRSF1B +676 T>G polymorphism predicts survival of non-Small cell lung cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komaki Ritsuko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dysregulation of gene expression in the TNF-TNFR superfamily has been involved in various human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Furthermore, functional polymorphisms in TNF-α and TNFRSF1B genes that alter gene expression are likely to be associated with risk and clinical outcomes of cancers. However, few reported studies have investigated the association between potentially functional SNPs in both TNF-α and TNFRSF1B and prognosis of NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods We genotyped five potentially functional polymorphisms of TNF-α and TNFRSF1B genes [TNF-α -308 G>A (rs1800629 and -1031 T>C (rs1799964; TNFRSF1B +676 T>G (rs1061622, -1709A>T(rs652625 and +1663A>G (rs1061624] in 225 NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate associations between these variants and NSCLC overall survival (OS. Results We found that the TNFRSF1B +676 GG genotype was associated with a significantly better OS of NSCLC (GG vs. TT: adjusted HR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.15-0.94; GG vs. GT/TT: adjusted HR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.14-0.88. Further stepwise multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the TNFRSF1B +676 GG was an independent prognosis predictor in this NSCLC cohort (GG vs. GT/TT: HR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.14-0.85, in the presence of node status (N2-3 vs. N0-1: HR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.09-2.35 and tumor stage (T3-4 vs. T0-2: HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.08-2.03. Conclusions Although the exact biological function for this SNP remains to be explored, our findings suggest a possible role of TNFRSF1B +676 T>G (rs1061622 in the prognosis of NSCLC. Further large and functional studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  16. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoma Small cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Secondhand smoke and lung cancer Normal lungs and alveoli Respiratory system Smoking hazards Bronchoscope References Horn L, Eisenberg R, ...

  17. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  18. Phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel in second-line advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzakowski, Maciej; Ramlau, Rodryg; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.......To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy....

  19. Nanotechnology for sensing, imaging, and treating cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Wickstrom, Eric

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology encompasses the creation and use of materials, devices, and systems at the level of atoms, molecules, and supramolecular structures. Nanotechnology for cancer consists of three main areas: (1) nanodetectors for sensing proteins and cancer cells, (2) nanoparticle or nanovector formulations for high-contrast imaging, and (3) nanotechnology-based drug delivery and therapeutic formulations. Although there are tremendous challenges facing nanotechnologists, nanotechnology, if properly integrated with established cancer research, can make laboratory-to-clinic transfer of technology successful, which can result in breakthrough potential for patient care.

  20. Treating Colon Cancer Cells with FK228 Reveals a Link between Histone Lysine Acetylation and Extensive Changes in the Cellular Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tian-yun; Jia, Yan-long; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Qiu-li; Li, Yi-Chun; Zhang, Jun-he; Zhao, Chun-peng; Wang, Xiao-yin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic value of FK228 as a cancer treatment option is well known, and various types of cancer have been shown to respond to this drug. However, the complete mechanism of FK228 and the affect it has on histone lysine acetylation and the colon cancer cell proteome are largely unknown. In the present study, we used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and affinity enrichment followed by high-resolution liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS)/MS analysis ...

  1. Peripheral immune cell gene expression changes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with first line combination chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Che Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Increasing evidence has shown that immune surveillance is compromised in a tumor-promoting microenvironment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and can be restored by appropriate chemotherapy. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we analyzed microarray gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 patients with newly-diagnosed advanced stage NSCLC, and 20 age-, sex-, and co-morbidity-matched healthy controls. All the patients received a median of four courses of chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine for a 28-day cycle as first line treatment. RESULTS: Sixty-nine differentially expressed genes between the patients and controls, and 59 differentially expressed genes before and after chemotherapy were identified. The IL4 pathway was significantly enriched in both tumor progression and chemotherapy signatures. CXCR4 and IL2RG were down-regulated, while DOK2 and S100A15 were up-regulated in the patients, and expressions of all four genes were partially or totally reversed after chemotherapy. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR for the four up-regulated (S100A15, DOK2 and down-regulated (TLR7, TOP1MT genes in the patients, and the six up-regulated (TLR7, CRISP3, TOP1MT and down-regulated (S100A15, DOK2, IL2RG genes after chemotherapy confirmed the validity of the microarray results. Further immunohistochemical analysis of the paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues identified strong S100A15 nuclear staining not only in stage IV NSCLC as compared to stage IIIB NSCLC (p = 0.005, but also in patients with stable or progressive disease as compared to those with a partial response (p = 0.032. A high percentage of S100A15 nuclear stained cells (HR 1.028, p = 0.01 was the only independent factor associated with three-year overall mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a potential role of the IL4 pathway in immune surveillance of advanced stage NSCLC, and immune potentiation of combination

  2. Cancer Stem Cells and the Ontogeny of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Craig D.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world today and is poised to claim approximately 1 billion lives during the 21st century. A major challenge in treating this and other cancers is the intrinsic resistance to conventional therapies demonstrated by the stem/progenitor cell that is responsible for the sustained growth, survival, and invasion of the tumor. Identifying these stem cells in lung cancer and defining the biologic processes necessary for their existence is paramou...

  3. Early treatment volume reduction rate as a prognostic factor in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jeong Shin; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the relationship between early treatment response to definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and survival outcome in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with LS-SCLC who received definitive CRT between January 2009 and December 2012. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of etoposide/carboplatin (n = 15) or etoposide/cisplatin (n = 32) and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 46 to 64 Gy). Early treatment volume reduction rate (ETVRR) was defined as the percentage change in gross tumor volume between diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and simulation CT for adaptive RT planning and was used as a parameter for early treatment response. The median dose at adaptive RT planning was 36 Gy (range, 30 to 43 Gy), and adaptive CT was performed in 30 patients (63.8%). With a median follow-up of 27.7 months (range, 5.9 to 75.8 months), the 2-year locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The mean diagnostic and adaptive gross tumor volumes were 117.9 mL (range, 5.9 to 447 mL) and 36.8 mL (range, 0.3 to 230.6 mL), respectively. The median ETVRR was 71.4% (range, 30 to 97.6%) and the ETVRR >45% group showed significantly better OS (p < 0.0001) and LRPFS (p = 0.009) than the other group. ETVRR as a parameter for early treatment response may be a useful prognostic factor to predict treatment outcome in LS-SCLC patients treated with CRT.

  4. Clinical Profile of Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors in Treating Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Nine Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Evidence on the benefits of combining cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (COX-2 in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still controversial. We investigated the efficacy and safety profile of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in treating NSCLC.The first meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed to assess the effect of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC on the overall response rate (ORR, overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, one-year survival, and toxicities. The fixed-effects model was used to calculate the pooled RR and HR and between-study heterogeneity was assessed. Subgroup analyses were conducted according to the type of COX-2 inhibitors, treatment pattern, and treatment line.Nine randomized clinical trials, comprising 1679 patents with NSCLC, were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled ORR of patients who have NSCLC with COX-2 inhibitors was significantly higher than that without COX-2 inhibitors. In subgroup analysis, significantly increased ORR results were found on celecoxib (RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.51, rofecoxib (RR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.28, chemotherapy (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.20, 1.63, and first-line treatment (RR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.63. However, COX-2 inhibitors had no effect on the one-year survival, OS, and PFS. Increased RR of leucopenia (RR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.45 and thrombocytopenia (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.76 suggested that COX-2 inhibitors increased hematologic toxicities (grade ≥ 3 of chemotherapy.COX-2 inhibitors increased ORR of advanced NSCLC and had no impact on survival indices, but it may increase the risk of hematologic toxicities associated with chemotherapy.

  5. Comparison of RECIST to immune-related response criteria in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with immune-checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Heo, Mi Hwa; Lee, Han Sang; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Se-Hoon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Keunchil; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2017-07-21

    Given that immune-related response in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well evaluated, we assessed tumor response using the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors, version 1.1 (RECIST v1.1) and immune-related response criteria (irRC) to identify atypical responses in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with immunotherapeutic agents. Patients received immune-checkpoint inhibitors (pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, nivolumab, and durvalumab plus tremelimumab) to treat metastatic or recurrent NSCLC after failed platinum-based chemotherapy. Tumor response was assessed according to both RECIST v1.1 and irRC. Responses by 41 patients were analyzed. The overall response rate (ORR) was 29.2% (95% CI 17.6-44.5) assessed by RECIST v1.1 and 34.1% (95% CI 21.6-49.4) by irRC, showing similar results from the two methods (p = 0.923). Two patients (4.9%) were defined as having progressive disease as assessed by RECIST but not by irRC. The patients eventually experienced tumor regression, suggesting delayed pseudoprogression. For all patients, the median PFS was 5.1 months (95% CI 3.4-6.7) and OS was 18.3 months (95% CI 6.7-29.8). In multivariate analysis, ex- or current smokers (HR 0.34, p = 0.14) and EGFR mutation negativity (HR 0.16, p = 0.05) were associated with significantly longer PFS. Our study found that pseudoprogression was not frequently observed in NSCLC. Conventional RECIST v1.1 might underestimate the benefit of immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Given the small number of patients studied, further study is warranted on whether treatment with immune-checkpoint inhibitors beyond RECIST progression benefits patients with advanced NSCLC.

  6. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  7. Long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and synchronous brain metastasis treated with whole-brain radiotherapy and thoracic chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrieta Oscar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases occur in 30-50% of Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and confer a worse prognosis and quality of life. These patients are usually treated with Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT followed by systemic therapy. Few studies have evaluated the role of chemoradiotherapy to the primary tumor after WBRT as definitive treatment in the management of these patients. Methods We reviewed the outcome of 30 patients with primary NSCLC and brain metastasis at diagnosis without evidence of other metastatic sites. Patients were treated with WBRT and after induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin for two cycles. In the absence of progression, concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the primary tumor with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was indicated, with a total effective dose of 60 Gy. If disease progression was ruled out, four chemotherapy cycles followed. Results Median Progression-free survival (PFS and Overall survival (OS were 8.43 ± 1.5 and 31.8 ± 15.8 months, respectively. PFS was 39.5% at 1 year and 24.7% at 2 years. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.1 and 60.2%, respectively. Three-year OS was significantly superior for patients with N0-N1 stage disease vs. N2-N3 (60 vs. 24%, respectively; Response rate [RR], 0.03; p= 0.038. Conclusions Patients with NSCLC and brain metastasis might benefit from treatment with WBRT and concurrent thoracic chemoradiotherapy. The subgroup of N0-N1 patients appears to achieve the greatest benefit. The result of this study warrants a prospective trial to confirm the benefit of this treatment.

  8. Long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and synchronous brain metastasis treated with whole-brain radiotherapy and thoracic chemoradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Zamora, Jesús; Blake-Cerda, Mónika; de la Mata, María D; Zavala, Diego G; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; de la Garza, Jaime

    2011-11-25

    Brain metastases occur in 30-50% of Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and confer a worse prognosis and quality of life. These patients are usually treated with Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) followed by systemic therapy. Few studies have evaluated the role of chemoradiotherapy to the primary tumor after WBRT as definitive treatment in the management of these patients. We reviewed the outcome of 30 patients with primary NSCLC and brain metastasis at diagnosis without evidence of other metastatic sites. Patients were treated with WBRT and after induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin for two cycles. In the absence of progression, concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the primary tumor with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was indicated, with a total effective dose of 60 Gy. If disease progression was ruled out, four chemotherapy cycles followed. Median Progression-free survival (PFS) and Overall survival (OS) were 8.43 ± 1.5 and 31.8 ± 15.8 months, respectively. PFS was 39.5% at 1 year and 24.7% at 2 years. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.1 and 60.2%, respectively. Three-year OS was significantly superior for patients with N0-N1 stage disease vs. N2-N3 (60 vs. 24%, respectively; Response rate [RR], 0.03; p= 0.038). Patients with NSCLC and brain metastasis might benefit from treatment with WBRT and concurrent thoracic chemoradiotherapy. The subgroup of N0-N1 patients appears to achieve the greatest benefit. The result of this study warrants a prospective trial to confirm the benefit of this treatment.

  9. Functional dosimetric metrics for predicting radiation-induced lung injury in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dongqing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI is an important dose-limiting toxicity during thoracic radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT perfusion-weighted functional dose-volume histogram (FDVH for predicting RILI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Methods Fifty-seven locally advanced NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Patients had treatment scans and dose calculations to provide a standard dose-volume histogram (DVH. Fusion of SPECT and computed tomography scans provided perfusion-weighted FDVH and associated functional dosimetric parameters (relative volumes of functional lung receiving more than a threshold dose of 5 – 60 Gy at increments of 5 Gy [FV5 – FV60]. The predictive abilities of FDVH and DVH were calculated and compared based on the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC. Results The accumulative incidence of ≥ 2 grade RILI was 19.3% with a median follow-up of 12 months. Univariate analysis showed that the functional (FV5 – FV60 and standard (V5 – V40 parameters were associated with RILI (all value of p  Conclusions Functional metrics are identified as reliable predictors for RILI, however, this observation still needs to be further verified using a larger sample size.

  10. A phase II trial of 6-hydroxymethylacylfulvene (MGI-114, irofulven) in patients with advanced non-small cell cancer previously treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, J E; Johnson, D H; Rogers, J S; Shyr, Y; McCullough, N; Krozely, P; DeVore, R F

    2001-01-01

    To test the efficacy and safety of the novel antitumor agent MGI-114 (NSC 683863) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously treated with chemotherapy. A two-stage accrual design was used to ensure detection of a true response rate of at least 20% with a type I error of .04. Eligible patients received 11 mg/m2 daily for five consecutive days. Cycles were repeated every 28 days. Fifteen patients received a total of 34 cycles of MGI-114. All patients had a performance status of 0 or 1. Eleven patients had previously received carboplatin and paclitaxel +/- radiation. Two patients had received cisplatin and CPT-11, one patient had received weekly paclitaxel, and one patient had received carboplatin and docetaxel. None of the first 15 patients enrolled experienced objective tumor response, and the study was closed. Forty percent of patients developed > or = grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Grade 3 nausea and > or = grade 2 vomiting were observed in 40% and 47% of patients respectively. Thirty-three percent of patients experienced > or = grade 2 fatigue. MGI-114, at this dose and schedule, does not have significant activity as second line therapy for patients with advanced NSCLC.

  11. Exploiting replicative stress to treat cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in cancer cells is accompanied by stalling and collapse of the replication fork and signalling in response to DNA damage and/or premature mitosis; these processes are collectively known as 'replicative stress'. Progress is being made to increase our understanding of the mechanisms...

  12. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  13. Impact of the chemotherapy cocktail used to treat testicular cancer on the gene expression profile of germ cells from male Brown-Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbès, Geraldine; Chan, Donovan; Pakarinen, Pirjo; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Advances in treatment for testicular cancer that include the coadministration of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) have brought the cure rate to higher than 90%%. The goal of this study was to elucidate the impact of BEP treatment on gene expression in male germ cells. Brown-Norway rats were treated for 9 wk with vehicle (0x) or BEP at doses equivalent to 0.3x and 0.6x the human dose. At the end of treatment, spermatogenesis was affected, showing altered histology and a decreased sperm count; spermatozoa had a higher number of DNA breaks. After 9 wk of treatment, round spermatids were isolated, and RNA was extracted and probed on Rat230-2.0 Affymetrix arrays. Of the 31 099 probe sets present on the array, 59%% were expressed in control round spermatids. BEP treatment significantly altered the expression of 221 probe sets, with at least a 1.5-fold change compared with controls; 80% were upregulated. We observed a dose-dependent increase in the expression of oxidative stress response genes and no change in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. BEP upregulated genes were implicated in pathways related to Jun and Junb protooncogenes. Increased mRNA levels of Jun and Junb were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR; furthermore, JUN protein was increased in elongating spermatids. Thus, BEP exposure triggers an oxidative stress response in round spermatids and induces many pathways that may lead to the survival of damaged cells and production of abnormal sperm.

  14. Investigation of opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Jeon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jong Mog; Kim, Moon Soo; Kim, Jee Hee; Cho, Hyeyeon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Eom, Woosik

    2017-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used for postoperative pain control in cancer patients. In addition to pain control, an association between opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes, such as recurrence or overall survival, has been postulated. The aim of this study was to determine whether postoperative opioid use in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with long-term oncologic outcomes, including recurrence and death. Data obtained from 1009 medical records of patients who underwent...

  15. [Meta-analysis on effectiveness and safety of traditional Chinese medicine combined with first-generation EGFR-TKI in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Cheng, Miao

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine combined with first-generation EGFR-TKI in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). China biomedical literature database (CBM), China Journal Full-text Database (CNKI), VIP, PubMed, CochraneLibrary, EMbase and other Chinese and English databases were searched for randomized and clinical controlled trials of traditional Chinese medicine combined with first-generation EGFR-TKI in treating advanced NSCLC. The statistical effect was measured by Revman 5.3.5 based on the outcome indexes of total response rate, disease control rate, quality of life, one-year survival rate, and adverse reactions/events. Meanwhile, a bias risk assessment was conducted by Stata12.0. A total of 17 studies were included, involving 1 391 cases, with 706 cases in the treatment group and 685 cases in the control group. The studies featured a low methodological quality, high homogeneity and low publication bias risk. The meta-analysis showed that total response rate [RR=1.33, 95%CI (1.17, 1.51)], disease control rate [RR=1.21, 95%CI (1.13, 1.29)], quality of life improvement rate [RR=1.28, 95%CI (1.17, 1.41)], one-year survival rate [RR=1.27, 95%CI (1.01, 1.61)], and other indexes of effectiveness of Chinese medicine combined with first-generation EGFR-TKI were all superior to those of first-generation EGFR-TKI alone, with significant differences (PChinese medicine combined with first-generation EGFR-TKI group were lower than those in first-generation EGFR-TKI group, with significant differences (Ptraditional Chinese medicine combined with first-generation EGFR-TKI had a better efficacy and safety in treating advanced NSCLC than EGFR-TKI alone. However, due to the small sample size and the low methodological quality of included papers, the conclusion still needs to be further proved by high-quality, large-sample randomized controlled trials. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Proapoptotic protein Smac mediates apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells when treated with the anti-tumor agent AT101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenbin; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jingsheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yuan, Zhu; Nie, Chunlai; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-01-02

    Chemoresistance of ovarian cancer has been previously attributed to the expression and activation of Bcl-2 family proteins. BH3-mimetic molecules possessing potential anticancer activity are able to inhibit antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. AT101 (R-(-)-gossypol), a natural BH3-mimetic molecule, has shown anti-tumor activity as a single agent and in combination with standard anticancer therapies in a variety of tumor models. Here, we report the effect of AT101 on apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells and identify the major molecular events that determine sensitivity. AT101 induced cell apoptosis by activating Bax through a conformational change, translocation, and oligomerization. The inhibition of Bax expression only partially prevented caspase-3 cleavage. However, the gene silencing of Bax had no effect on mitochondrial Smac release. Further experiments demonstrated that Smac reduction inhibited caspase-3 activation and attenuated cell apoptosis. More importantly, the inhibition of Smac or overexpression of XIAP attenuated Bax activation in ovarian cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that the Akt-p53 pathway is involved in the regulation of Smac release. Taken together, our data demonstrate the role of Smac and the molecular mechanisms of AT101-induced apoptosis of chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. Our findings suggest that AT101 not only triggers Bax activation but also induces mitochondrial Smac release. Activated Smac can enhance Bax-mediated cellular apoptosis. Therefore, Smac mediates Bax activation to determine the threshold for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

  17. Antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptosis in human colon cancer cells treated in vitro with constituents of a product derived from Pistacia lentiscus L. var. chia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, K V; Prince, J; Han, Z; Dimas, K; Cladaras, M; Wyche, J H; Sitaras, N M; Pantazis, P

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that a 50% ethanol extract of the plant-derived product, Chios mastic gum (CMG), contains compounds which inhibit proliferation and induce death of HCT116 human colon cancer cells in vitro. CMG-treatment induces cell arrest at G(1), detachment of the cells from the substrate, activation of pro-caspases-8, -9 and -3, and causes several morphological changes typical of apoptosis in cell organelles. These events, furthermore, are time- and dose-dependent, but p53- and p21-independent. Apoptosis induction by CMG is not inhibited in HCT116 cell clones expressing high levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, or dominant-negative FADD, thereby indicating that CMG induces cell death via a yet-to-be identified pathway, unrelated to the death receptor- and mitochondrion-dependent pathways. The findings presented here suggest that CMG (a) induces an anoikis form of cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells that includes events associated with caspase-dependent pathways; and (b) might be developed into a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon and other cancers.

  18. Indium In 111 Pentetreotide in Treating Patients With Refractory Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Intraocular Melanoma; Islet Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Neoplastic Syndrome; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Pheochromocytoma

  19. Binding of AR to SMRT/N-CoR complex and its co-operation with PSA promoter in prostate cancer cells treated with natural histone deacetylase inhibitor NaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtkova, K; Paskova, L; Matijescukova, N; Strnad, M; Kolar, Z

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression. The AR is a classical nuclear receptor (NR) providing a link between signaling molecule and transcription response. Histone deacetylase inhibitors- (HDACI) have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on prostate cancer cells and their implication in silence AR signaling may have potential therapeutic use. We aimed to study the inhibitory effects of the corepressor SMRT (Silencing Mediator for Retinoid and Thyroid -hormone receptors) which forms a complex together with nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) and with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) on AR activity.The androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell line C4-2 both AR-positive, and androgen-insensitive DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines were treated with two HDACIs, sodium butyrate (NaB) and/or trichostatin A (TSA). We amplified immunoprecipitated DNA by conventional PCR and in the -following step we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis coupled with quantitative PCR for monitoring NaB induced formation of AR-SMRT/N-CoR complex binding on the PSA promoter. The co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed increase in AR-SMRT formation in NaB treated cells. Simultaneously, the Western blot analysis showed a significant decrease in AR protein expression. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect of NaB on AR gene expression seems to be specific and unique for prostate cancer AR-positive cell lines and corresponds with its ability to stimulate AR-SMRT complex formation. We suggest that AR and SMRT/N-CoR corepressors may form a stable complex in vitro and NaB may facilitate the interaction between AR nuclear steroid receptor and SMRT corepressor prote.

  20. Preventing lung cancer by treating tobacco dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard D; Ebbert, Jon O; Hays, J Taylor; McFadden, David D

    2011-12-01

    Tobacco use is a chronic medical disorder. Providing evidence-based treatment of tobacco-dependent patients is a challenge, and a team approach provides an efficient treatment model. Tobacco treatment specialists could expand the collective tobacco treatment expertise in the medical setting. Effective tobacco dependence treatment frequently requires tailoring and intensifying of interventions to meet the needs of the individual patient. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of lung cancer and many other cancers, cardiovascular disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease. Treating tobacco dependence is one of the most cost-effective therapies in medicine and it deserves adequate reimbursement for it to be more widely available. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  2. Interstitial lung disease in gefitinib-treated Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer – a retrospective analysis: JMTO LC03-02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Harue

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, high incidences of interstitial lung disease (ILD and ILD-related deaths have been reported among gefitinib-treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We investigated the efficacy of gefitinib, the incidence of ILD and risk factors for ILD in these patients. Findings We obtained patient data retrospectively using questionnaires sent to 22 institutions. We asked for demographic and clinical data on NSCLC patients for whom gefitinib treatment had begun between July 2002 and February 2003. Data from a total of 526 patients were analyzed. The patient characteristics were as follows: 64% male, 69% with adenocarcinoma, 61% with a performance score of 0–1, and 5% with concurrent interstitial pneumonitis. The objective response proportion was 80/439 (18.2%; 95% CI: 14.7–22.0. ILD developed in 17 patients (3.2%; 95% CI 1.9–5.1%, of whom 7 died. According to multivariate analysis, female sex, history of prior chemotherapy, low absolute neutrophil count before gefitinib treatment, and adenocarcinoma histology were associated with response to gefitinib treatment. None of the factors we evaluated were associated with the development of ILD. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with previously published values for treatment response proportions and incidence of ILD during gefitinib treatment in Japanese patients. Future studies should be aimed at identifying factors indicating that a patient has a high probability of receiving benefit from gefitinib and a low risk of developing ILD.

  3. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer limited-disease. Dose response, feasibility and outcome for patients treated in western Sweden, 1998-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallqvist, Andreas; Rylander, Hillevi; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Nyman, Jan [ Dept. of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    Addition of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) to chemotherapy (CHT) can increase overall survival in patients with small cell lung cancer limited-disease (SCLC-LD). Accelerated fractionation and early concurrent platinum-based CHT, in combination with prophylactic cranial irradiation, represent up-front treatment for this group of patients. Optimised and tailored local and systemic treatment is important. These concepts were applied when a new regional treatment programme was designed at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital in 1997. The planned treatment consisted of six courses of CHT (carboplatin/etoposide)+TRT{+-}prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). Standard TRT was prescribed as 1.5 Gy BID to a total of 60 Gy during 4 weeks, starting concomitantly with the second or third course of CHT. However, patients with large tumour burdens, poor general condition and/or poor lung function received 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy BID, during 3 weeks. PCI in 15 fractions to a total dose of 30 Gy was administered to all patients with complete remission (CR) and 'good' partial remission (PR) at response evaluation. Eighty consecutive patients were treated between January 1998 and December 2004. Forty-six patients were given 60 Gy and 34 patients 45 Gy. Acute toxicity occurred as esophagitis grade III (RTOG/EORTC) in 16% and as pneumonitis grade I-II in 10%. There were no differences in toxicity between the two groups. Three- and five-year overall survival was 25% and 16%, respectively. Median survival was 20.8 months with no significant difference between the two groups. In conclusion, TRT with a total dose of 60 or 45 Gy is feasible with comparable toxicity and no difference in local control or survival. Distant metastasis is the main cause of death in this disease; the future challenge is thus further improvement of the systemic therapy combined with optimised local TRT.

  4. Prospective evaluation of pulmonary function in cancer patients treated with total body irradiation, high-dose melphalan, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandola, L.; Siena, S.; Bregni, M.; Sverzellati, E.; Piotti, P.; Stucchi, C.; Gianni, A.M.; Lombardi, F. (Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy))

    1990-09-01

    Pulmonary function tests (standard vital capacity, SVC; total lung capacity, TLC; forced expiratory volume in 1 second-forced vital capacity ratio, FEV1/FVC; carbon monoxide transfer factor, DLCO) were prospectively evaluated in patients (median age 25 years, 13-52 years; median follow-up 20 months, 6-51 months) with Hodgkin's disease (15 patients), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (9 patients), and inflammatory breast cancer (3 patients) treated with sequential high-dose therapy comprising the following phases over approximately 2 months: (a) cyclophosphamide (7 g/m2); (b) vincristine (1.4 mg/m2), methotrexate (8 g/m2), and cisplatinum (120 mg/m2) or etoposide (2 g/m2); (c) total body irradiation (TBI; 12.5 gy, 5 fractions over 48 hours), intravenous melphalan (120-180 mg/m2), and transplantation of autologous peripheral blood and/or bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Within 2 months after transplantation, 12 patients also received 25 Gy radiotherapy boost to mediastinum and clavicular regions. In vivo dosimetry evaluations of fractionated TBI treatments showed that mean radiation dose absorbed by lungs was 12.18 Gy (97.4% of TBI dose). Despite such a high radiation dose, we observed only transient and subclinical decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO. The decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO was more evident and prolonged in patients receiving radiotherapy boost. All parameters progressively recovered to normal values within 2 years after transplantation. In contrast, FEV1/FVC remained within normal limits in all patients, thus demonstrating the absence of obstructive ventilatory changes. In addition, no interstitial pneumonia was observed.

  5. SU-F-R-53: CT-Based Radiomics Analysis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, E; Coroller, T; Narayan, V; Agrawal, V; Hou, Y; Romano, J; Franco, I; Mak, R; Aerts, H [Brigham Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and has demonstrated excellent local control and survival. However, some patients still develop distant metastases and local recurrence, and therefore, there is a clinical need to identify patients at high-risk of disease recurrence. The aim of the current study is to use a radiomics approach to identify imaging biomarkers, based on tumor phenotype, for clinical outcomes in SBRT patients. Methods: Radiomic features were extracted from free breathing computed tomography (CT) images of 113 Stage I-II NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. Their association to and prognostic performance for distant metastasis (DM), locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival was assessed and compared with conventional features (tumor volume and diameter) and clinical parameters (e.g. performance status, overall stage). The prognostic performance was evaluated using the concordance index (CI). Multivariate model performance was evaluated using cross validation. All p-values were corrected for multiple testing using the false discovery rate. Results: Radiomic features were associated with DM (one feature), LRR (one feature) and survival (four features). Conventional features were only associated with survival and one clinical parameter was associated with LRR and survival. One radiomic feature was significantly prognostic for DM (CI=0.670, p<0.1 from random), while none of the conventional and clinical parameters were significant for DM. The multivariate radiomic model had a higher median CI (0.671) for DM than the conventional (0.618) and clinical models (0.617). Conclusion: Radiomic features have potential to be imaging biomarkers for clinical outcomes that conventional imaging metrics and clinical parameters cannot predict in SBRT patients, such as distant metastasis. Development of a radiomics biomarker that can identify patients at high-risk of

  6. Wood-smoke exposure as a response and survival predictor in erlotinib-treated non-small cell lung cancer patients: an open label phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Martinez-Barrera, Luis; Treviño, Sergio; Guzman, Enrique; Castillo-Gonzalez, Patricia; Rios-Trejo, Miguel Angel; Flores-Estrada, Diana; Téllez, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Cesar; de la Cruz Vargas, Johny; Gonzalez-De la Rosa, Claudia Haydee; Hernandez-Pedro, Norma; Morales-Barrera, Rafael; De la Garza, Jaime

    2008-08-01

    Erlotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has improved survival and quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after first- or second-line chemotherapy. Asian origin, adenocarcinoma histology, female gender, lack of tobacco use, and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor are significant independent predictors of response to Erlotinib. Although tobacco use is considered a major cause of NSCLC, other risk factors such as wood-smoke exposure (WSE) are associated. Almost 3 billion people worldwide rely on solid fuels as their primary source of domestic energy for cooking and heating. In this study, 150 consecutive unselected patients with histologically proven NSCLC with progression after prior first- or second-line chemotherapy and/or poor performance status were treated with Erlotinib 150 mg/d. Clinical and pathologic characteristics were associated with response. Overall response to Erlotinib was observed in 51 patients [34%; 95% confidence interval {95% CI}, 29.9-37.6]. In multivariate analysis, clinical features associated with response to Erlotinib were adenocarcinoma (35 versus 20%; p = 0.05) and WSE (83 versus 13%; p < 0.001). Factors associated with longer progression-free survival in Cox analysis included adenocarcinoma (7.9 versus 2.3 months; p = 0.009), female gender (8.4 versus 5.3 months; p = 0.04), and WSE (17.6 versus 5.3 months; p = 0.006). WSE is associated with better response to Erlotinib and improved progression-free survival in patients with NSCLC. Additional studies in epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway in WSE-associated NSCLC are warranted.

  7. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns to Predict the Survival of Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Erlotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao LIU

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Erlotinib is a targeted therapy drug for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. It has been proven that, there was evidence of various survival benefits derived from erlotinib in patients with different clinical features, but the results are conflicting. The aim of this study is to identify novel predictive factors and explore the interactions between clinical variables as well as their impact on the survival of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC heavily treated with erlotinib. Methods The clinical and follow-up data of 105 Chinese NSCLC patients referred to the Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from September 2006 to September 2009 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of progressive-free survival (PFS was performed using recursive partitioning referred to as the classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Results The median PFS of 105 eligible consecutive Chinese NSCLC patients was 5.0 months (95%CI: 2.9-7.1. CART analysis was performed for the initial, second, and third split in the lymph node involvement, the time of erlotinib administration, and smoking history. Four terminal subgroups were formed. The longer values for the median PFS were 11.0 months (95%CI: 8.9-13.1 for the subgroup with no lymph node metastasis and 10.0 months (95%CI: 7.9-12.1 for the subgroup with lymph node involvement, but not over the second-line erlotinib treatment with a smoking history ≤35 packs per year. The shorter values for the median PFS were 2.3 months (95%CI: 1.6-3.0 for the subgroup with lymph node metastasis and over the second-line erlotinib treatment, and 1.3 months (95%CI: 0.5-2.1 for the subgroup with lymph node metastasis, but not over the second-line erlotinib treatment with a smoking history >35 packs per year. Conclusion Lymph node metastasis, the time of erlotinib administration, and smoking history are closely correlated with the survival of advanced NSCLC patients with first- to

  8. Long-Term Survival in a Patient with Multiple Brain Metastases from Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Gamma Knife Radiosurgery on Four Occasions: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer L. Elaimy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases are the most common cancerous neoplasm in the brain. The treatment of these lesions is challenging and often includes a multimodality management approach with whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and neurosurgery options. Although advances in biomedical imaging technologies and the treatment of extracranial cancer have led to the overall increase in the survival of brain metastases patients, the finding that select patients survive several years remains puzzling. For this reason, we present the case of a 70-year-old patient who was diagnosed with multiple brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer five years ago and is currently alive following treatment with chemotherapy for the primary cancer and whole-brain radiation therapy and Gamma Knife radiosurgery on four separate occasions for the neurological cancer. Since the diagnosis of brain metastases five years ago, the patient’s primary cancer has remained controlled. Furthermore, multiple repeat GKRS procedures provided this patient with high levels of local tumor control, which in combination with a stable primary cancer led to an extended period of survival and a highly functional life. Further analysis and clinical research will be valuable in assessing the durability of multiple GKRS for brain metastases patients who experience long-term survival.

  9. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  10. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  11. Pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of p53 in cisplatin-treated human testicular cancer are cell context-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    di Pietro, Alessandra; Koster, Roelof; Boersma-van Eck, Wytske; Dam, Wendy A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; Gietema, Jourik A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2012-01-01

    In murine testicular cancer (TC) cells wild-type p53 contributes to sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in a dose-dependent way. In human TC, however, the role of wild-type p53 functionality in chemotherapeutic response remains elusive. We analyzed functionality of wild-type p53 in cisplatin

  12. High-dose OxyContin to treat pain associated with bone metastasis in patients with small-cell lung cancer: a case study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Xia; Dong, Yan; Zhuang, Feifei; Jiang, Fengquan; Yu, Jinming; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Pain management is an important topic that has received extensive attention from clinical practitioners. Nearly all patients with malignant tumors suffer pain at the advanced stage of their disease. Oxycodone is a first-line choice for treating moderate-to-severe cancer-related pain, and OxyContin, a controlled-release oxycodone hydrochloride tablet, is internationally recognized as a safe and effective opioid analgesic. OxyContin has the characteristics of both immediate release and sustained release, with a time to onset and peak similar to those of immediate-release morphine. It acts on both μ and κ receptors and has been shown to be effective in treating different types of pain, especially neuropathic pain, theoretically without a dose cap. However, the dose is limited in clinical applications due to various factors that are likely to affect its analgesic effect and reduce patient quality of life. Cooperation with a patient's family members is required during the treatment of cancer pain. Chronic cancer pain has a long disease course, which could easily cause complex psychological symptoms due to their important role in the pain experience. Pain is controllable, and patients have a right to not experience pain. An optimal living state can be achieved through collaboration between physicians and patients. Rational personalized treatment of cancer pain can improve patient quality of life, relieve pain, and help prolong patient survival. This article reports the treatment procedure and adverse reactions in a patient who was treated with high-dose OxyContin, with the aim of providing a reference for other clinical practitioners.

  13. Investigation of opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Kyu Oh

    Full Text Available Opioids are commonly used for postoperative pain control in cancer patients. In addition to pain control, an association between opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes, such as recurrence or overall survival, has been postulated. The aim of this study was to determine whether postoperative opioid use in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with long-term oncologic outcomes, including recurrence and death. Data obtained from 1009 medical records of patients who underwent curative resection at the National Cancer Center, Korea between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Seven-day opioid use was divided into four quartiles to analyze probability of recurrence and death. Multivariate regression analyses of recurrence and death was conducted, including the calculation of odds ratios. A total of 871 patients were analyzed. When opioid dosage was examined by quartiles, the probability of death and recurrence increased gradually with increasing opioid use. However, in the multivariate regression analysis, the amount of opioid usage did not affect the risk of recurrence or death of lung cancer (P = 0.520 for recurrence; P = 0.659 for death. Opioid use was correlated with outcome when stratified by lung cancer stage (P = 0.004 for recurrence; P = 0.049 for death; however, the odds ratios only slightly increased (1.001 for stage IA-IIIA for both outcomes. In non-small cell lung cancer patients, the amount of opioid usage does not affect the risk of recurrence and death of lung cancer. There was an association with stage (IA-IIIA, but the effect was negligible. A well-designed prospective study is needed.

  14. Investigation of opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Jeon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jong Mog; Kim, Moon Soo; Kim, Jee Hee; Cho, Hyeyeon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Eom, Woosik

    2017-01-01

    Opioids are commonly used for postoperative pain control in cancer patients. In addition to pain control, an association between opioid use and long-term oncologic outcomes, such as recurrence or overall survival, has been postulated. The aim of this study was to determine whether postoperative opioid use in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with long-term oncologic outcomes, including recurrence and death. Data obtained from 1009 medical records of patients who underwent curative resection at the National Cancer Center, Korea between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Seven-day opioid use was divided into four quartiles to analyze probability of recurrence and death. Multivariate regression analyses of recurrence and death was conducted, including the calculation of odds ratios. A total of 871 patients were analyzed. When opioid dosage was examined by quartiles, the probability of death and recurrence increased gradually with increasing opioid use. However, in the multivariate regression analysis, the amount of opioid usage did not affect the risk of recurrence or death of lung cancer (P = 0.520 for recurrence; P = 0.659 for death). Opioid use was correlated with outcome when stratified by lung cancer stage (P = 0.004 for recurrence; P = 0.049 for death); however, the odds ratios only slightly increased (1.001 for stage IA-IIIA) for both outcomes. In non-small cell lung cancer patients, the amount of opioid usage does not affect the risk of recurrence and death of lung cancer. There was an association with stage (IA-IIIA), but the effect was negligible. A well-designed prospective study is needed.

  15. Down-Regulation of Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel KCa1.1 in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-453 Cells Treated with Vitamin D Receptor Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anowara Khatun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D (VD reduces the risk of breast cancer and improves disease prognoses. Potential VD analogs are being developed as therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatments. The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa1.1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling pathways and is associated with high grade tumors and poor prognoses. In the present study, we examined the effects of treatments with VD receptor (VDR agonists on the expression and activity of KCa1.1 in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells using real-time PCR, Western blotting, flow cytometry, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Treatments with VDR agonists for 72 h markedly decreased the expression levels of KCa1.1 transcripts and proteins in MDA-MB-453 cells, resulting in the significant inhibition of depolarization responses induced by paxilline, a specific KCa1.1 blocker. The specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 suppressed VDR agonist-induced decreases in KCa1.1 protein expression. These results suggest that KCa1.1 is a new downstream target of VDR signaling and the down-regulation of KCa1.1 through the transcriptional repression of KCa1.1 and enhancement of KCa1.1 protein degradation contribute, at least partly, to the antiproliferative effects of VDR agonists in breast cancer cells.

  16. Uptake of silver nanoparticles by DHA-treated cancer cells examined by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in a microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhimin; Zhang, Fengqiu; Chen, Xiangyu; Zhong, Jie; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yangchao; Huang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    This paper reports on the synthesis and application of biocompatible and sensitive SERS nanoparticles for the study of uptake of nanoparticles into living cells in a microfluidic chip through surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The nanoparticles were fabricated as beta-cyclodextrin-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag@CD NPs) modified with para-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) and folic acid (FA) on the surface. The p-ATP molecules act as the Raman reporter while the FA tags have high affinity for folate receptors (FR) that are over-expressed on the surface cancerous cells, so that the nanoparticles can enter the cells and be monitored by the Raman reporter. Therefore, the nanoparticles could be utilized not only as cell invaders due to endocytosis but also as a SERS sensitive probe to monitor the effect of FR-targeted drugs such as dihydroartemisinin (DHA) that induce the population change of FR on the membrane of living cells. As a result, we have successfully demonstrated that we are able to employ the Ag@CD@p-ATP@FA NPs to evaluate the number of NPs entering living cells quantitatively and correspondingly the drug effect on cancer cells in a well-controlled way.

  17. High-dose OxyContin to treat pain associated with bone metastasis in patients with small-cell lung cancer: a case study report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou T

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tao Zhou,1,* Xia Zhang,2,* Yan Dong,1 Feifei Zhuang,1 Fengquan Jiang,3 Jinming Yu,4 Bin Zhang1,4 1Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, 2Department of Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, 3Laboratory of Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pain management is an important topic that has received extensive attention from clinical practitioners. Nearly all patients with malignant tumors suffer pain at the advanced stage of their disease. Oxycodone is a first-line choice for treating moderate-to-severe cancer-related pain, and OxyContin, a controlled-release oxycodone hydrochloride tablet, is internationally recognized as a safe and effective opioid analgesic. OxyContin has the characteristics of both immediate release and sustained release, with a time to onset and peak similar to those of immediate-release morphine. It acts on both µ and κ receptors and has been shown to be effective in treating different types of pain, especially neuropathic pain, theoretically without a dose cap. However, the dose is limited in clinical applications due to various factors that are likely to affect its analgesic effect and reduce patient quality of life. Cooperation with a patient’s family members is required during the treatment of cancer pain. Chronic cancer pain has a long disease course, which could easily cause complex psychological symptoms due to their important role in the pain experience. Pain is controllable, and patients have a right to not experience pain. An optimal living state can be achieved through collaboration between physicians and patients. Rational personalized treatment of cancer pain can improve

  18. Basal cell cancer (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure ... is required to watch for new sites of basal cell cancer.

  19. Prostate cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate gland formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative androgen receptor-negative (AR(-)) status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade therapy. The androgen-regulated gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG could be used to clarify both the cells of origin and the evolution of prostate cancer cells. In this review, we show that the hypothesis that distinct subtypes of cancer result from abnormalities within specific cell types-the stem cell theory of cancer-may instigate a major paradigm shift in cancer research and therapy. Ultimately, the stem cell theory of cancers will affect how we practice clinical oncology: our diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy of prostate and other cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  1. Randomised feasibility study of a more liberal haemoglobin trigger for red blood cell transfusion compared to standard practice in anaemic cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yakymenko, D.; Frandsen, K. B.; Christensen, I. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this feasibility study was to identify quality of life (QoL) scores and symptom scales as tools for measuring patient-reported outcomes (PRO) associated with haemoglobin level in chemotherapy-treated cancer patients. Secondary objectives included comparing Qo...... to a haemoglobin trigger for RBCT of either7gdL-1 (arm A) or... Status (PS). The association between haemoglobin and PRO variables was assessed using a linear mixed model with random effects. Results: A total of 133 patients were enrolled, of which 86 patients received RBCT (28 in arm A, 58 in arm B). Baseline questionnaires were filled out in 79·7% of cases...

  2. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  3. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Laura; Zago, Giulia; Marulli, Giuseppe; Del Bianco, Paola; Schiavon, Marco; Pasello, Giulia; Polo, Valentina; Canova, Fabio; Tonetto, Fabrizio; Loreggian, Lucio; Rea, Federico; Conte, PierFranco; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1), paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1), and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8) for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system). A total of 36 (62%) patients achieved partial response (PR), and six (10%) progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62%) cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64%) patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and two patients received radical-intent radiotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 11 months and 23 months, respectively. Both PFS and OS were significantly correlated to objective response (P<0.0001) and surgery (P<0.0001 and P=0.002). Patients obtaining PR and receiving local treatment achieved a median PFS and OS of 35 and 48 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS of patients not achieving PR or not receiving local treatment were 5–7 and 11–15 months, respectively. The extension of surgery did not affect the outcome. Conclusion The

  4. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  5. Factors Associated With Early Mortality in Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Dahele, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hu, Bo; Palma, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Clínica Universidad, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital de la Esperanza, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Rodrigues, George, E-mail: George.Rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (con-CRT) is recommended for fit patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) but is associated with toxicity, and observed survival continues to be limited. Identifying factors associated with early mortality could improve patient selection and identify strategies to improve prognosis. Methods and Materials: Analysis of a multi-institutional LA-NSCLC database consisting of 1245 patients treated with con-CRT in 13 institutions was performed to identify factors predictive of 180-day survival. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was performed to identify prognostic groups for 180-day survival. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to create a clinical nomogram predicting 180-day survival based on important predictors from RPA. Results: Median follow-up was 43.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 40.3-48.8) and 127 patients (10%) died within 180 days of treatment. Median, 180-day, and 1- to 5-year (by yearly increments) actuarial survival rates were 20.9 months, 90%, 71%, 45%, 32%, 27%, and 22% respectively. Multivariate analysis adjusted by region identified gross tumor volume (GTV) (odds ratio [OR] ≥100 cm{sup 3}: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.10-6.20; P=.029) and pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV{sub 1}], defined as the ratio of FEV{sub 1} to forced vital capacity [FVC]) (OR <80%: 2.53; 95% CI: 1.09-5.88; P=.030) as significant predictors of 180-day survival. RPA resulted in a 2-class risk stratification system: low-risk (GTV <100 cm{sup 3} or GTV ≥100 cm{sup 3} and FEV{sub 1} ≥80%) and high-risk (GTV ≥100 cm{sup 3} and FEV{sub 1} <80%). The 180-day survival rates were 93% for low risk and 79% for high risk, with an OR of 4.43 (95% CI: 2.07-9.51; P<.001), adjusted by region. A clinical nomogram predictive of 180-day survival, incorporating FEV{sub 1}, GTV, N stage, and maximum esophagus dose yielded favorable calibration (R{sup 2} = 0

  6. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer ... because of timely detection and treatment of his prostate cancer. He participated in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial. ...

  7. Development of chitosan graft pluronic®F127 copolymer nanoparticles containing DNA aptamer for paclitaxel delivery to treat breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach Nguyen, Kim; Le, Duc Vinh; Do, Dinh Ho; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    HER-2/ErbB2/Neu(HER-2), a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is specifically overexpressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and serves a therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, we aimed to isolate DNA aptamer (Ap) that specifically bind to a HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line, using SELEX strategy. We developed a novel multifunctional composite micelle with surface modification of Ap for targeted delivery of paclitaxel. This binary mixed system consisting of Ap modified pluronic®F127 and chitosan could enhance PTX loading capacity and increase micelle stability. Polymeric micelles had a spherical shape and were self-assemblies of block copolymers of approximately 86.22 ± 1.45 nm diameter. PTX could be loaded with high encapsulation efficiency (83.28 ± 0.13%) and loading capacity (9.12 ± 0.34%). The release profile were 29%-35% in the first 12 h and 85%-93% after 12 d at pH 7.5 of receiving media. The IC50 doses by MTT assay showed the greater activity of nanoparticles loaded paclitaxel over free paclitaxel and killed cells up to 95% after 6 h. These results demonstrated unique assembly with the capacity to function as an efficient detection and delivery vehicle in the biological living system.

  8. Nintedanib Compared With Placebo in Treating Against Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Are Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-08

    Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonanno L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Bonanno,1 Giulia Zago,1 Giuseppe Marulli,2 Paola Del Bianco,3 Marco Schiavon,2 Giulia Pasello,1 Valentina Polo,1,4 Fabio Canova,1 Fabrizio Tonetto,5 Lucio Loreggian,5 Federico Rea,2 PierFranco Conte,1,4 Adolfo Favaretto1 1Medical Oncology Unit 2, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 2Thoracic Surgery Department, University of Padova, 3Clinical Trials and Biostatistics Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, 4Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, 5Radiotherapy Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padova, Italy Objectives: If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1, paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1, and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8 for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results: In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system. A total of 36 (62% patients achieved partial response (PR, and six (10% progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62% cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64% patients underwent surgery

  10. Combining Drugs to Treat Ovarian Cancer - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 70 percent of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer will die from the disease. Read about the NCI-funded combination drug trial that has successfully treated Betsy Brauser's recurrent cancer.

  11. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, Total-Body Irradiation, Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Bone Marrow Failure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-29

    ; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage

  12. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  13. Application of nanoLC-ESI-TOF-MS for the metabolomic analysis of phenolic compounds from extra-virgin olive oil in treated colon-cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arroyo, S; Gómez-Martínez, A; Rocamora-Reverte, L; Quirantes-Piné, R; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A; Ferragut, J A

    2012-04-07

    Crude phenolic extracts (PE) have been obtained from naturally bearing Spanish extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) showing different polyphenol families such as secoiridoids, phenolic alcohols, lignans, and flavones. EVOO-derived complex phenols (especially from the Arbequina variety olive) have been shown to suppress cell growth of SW480 and HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Inhibition of proliferation by EVOO-PE Arbequina variety extract was accompanied by apoptosis in both colon-cancer-cell lines and a limited G₂M cell-cycle arrest in the case of SW480 cells. The metabolized compounds from EVOO-PE in culture medium and cytoplasm of both cell lines were analyzed using nano-liquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled with electrospray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). The results showed many phenolic compounds and their metabolites both in the culture medium as well as in the cytoplasm. The main compounds identified from EVOO-PE were hydroxylated luteolin and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hurthle Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Hurthle cell cancer Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Basal cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell skin cancer almost never spreads. If it is left untreated, it may spread into surrounding areas and nearby tissues and bone. In these cases, treatment can injure the appearance of the skin.

  16. Monitoring PD-L1 positive circulating tumor cells in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with the PD-1 inhibitor Nivolumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolazzo, Chiara; Raimondi, Cristina; Mancini, MariaLaura; Caponnetto, Salvatore; Gradilone, Angela; Gandini, Orietta; Mastromartino, Maria; del Bene, Gabriella; Prete, Alessandra; Longo, Flavia; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Controversial results on the predictive value of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) status in lung tumor tissue for response to immune checkpoint inhibitors do not allow for any conclusive consideration. Liquid biopsy might allow real-time sampling of patients for PD-L1 through the course of the disease. Twenty-four stage IV NSCLC patients included in the Expanded Access Program with Nivolumab were enrolled. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were analyzed by CellSearch with anti-human B7-H1/PD-L1 PE-conjugated antibody. PD-L1 expressing CTCs were assessed at baseline, at 3 and 6 months after starting therapy, and correlated with outcome. At baseline and at 3 months of treatment, the presence of CTCs and the expression of PD-L1 on their surface were found associated to poor patients outcome. Nevertheless, the high frequency of PD-L1 expressing CTCs hampered to discriminate the role of PD-L1 in defining prognosis. Conversely although CTCs were found in all patients 6 months after treatment, at this time patients could be dichotomized into two groups based PD-L1 expression on CTCs. Patients with PD-L1 negative CTCs all obtained a clinical benefit, while patients with PD-L1 (+) CTCs all experienced progressive disease. This suggests that the persistence of PD-L1(+) CTCs might mirror a mechanism of therapy escape. PMID:27553175

  17. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-02

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  18. Malignant thrombosis of the superior vena cava caused by non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radiation and erlotinib: a case with complete and prolonged response over 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Jianyang Wang,1 Jun Liang,1 Wenqing Wang,1 Han Ouyang,2 Luhua Wang11Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 2Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Most cases of superior vena cava (SVC syndrome resulting from neoplasm, especially from lung cancer, remain a serious challenge to treat. Here, for the first time as far as we are aware, we report the case of a non-small-cell lung cancer patient with a massive SVC malignant thrombosis who was treated with thoracic irradiation and erlotinib. The treatment regimen consisted of erlotinib 150 mg/day and a total dose of 66 Gy/33 fractions delivered to the tumor, malignant thrombosis, and metastasis mediastinal lymph nodes. The malignant thrombosis responded dramatically and the combined regimen was well tolerated. After discharge, the erlotinib was prescribed as maintenance therapy. The patient was followed closely for the next 3 years. During this time, positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans and serum tumor marker screens were undertaken. By 6 months, the primary tumor showed complete response and by 9 months, the SVC thrombosis had disappeared. No sign of relapse has been found to date.Keywords: superior vena cava syndrome, radiotherapy, thoracic irradiation, neoplasm

  19. Migration Rate Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells Treated by Caffeic Acid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: An In Vitro Comparison Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Kabała-Dzik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the deadliest cancers among women is a breast cancer. Research has shown that two natural substances occurring in propolis, caffeic acid (CA and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE, have significant anticancer effects. The purpose of our in vitro study was to compare cytotoxic activity and migration rate inhibition using CA and CAPE (doses of 50 and 100 µm against triple-negative, MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma line cells, drawn from Caucasian women. Viability was measured by XTT-NR-SRB assay (Tetrazolium hydroxide-Neutral Red-Sulforhodamine B for 24 h and 48 h periods. Cell migration for wound healing assay was taken for 0 h, 8 h, 16 h, and 24 h periods. CAPE displayed more than two times higher cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 cells. IC50 values for the XTT assay were as follows: CA for 24 h and 48 h were 150.94 µM and 108.42 µM, respectively, while CAPE was 68.82 µM for 24 h and 55.79 µM for 48 h. For the NR assay: CA was 135.85 µM at 24 h and 103.23 µM at 48 h, while CAPE was 64.04 µM at 24 h and 53.25 µM at 48 h. For the SRB assay: CA at 24 h was 139.80 µM and at 48 h 103.98 µM, while CAPE was 66.86 µM at 24 h and 47.73 µM at 48 h. Both agents suspended the migration rate; however, CAPE displayed better activity. Notably, for the 100 µM CAPE dose, motility of the tested breast carcinoma cells was halted.

  20. Migration Rate Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cells Treated by Caffeic Acid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: An In Vitro Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Kubina, Robert; Jastrzębska-Stojko, Żaneta; Stojko, Rafał; Wojtyczka, Robert Dariusz; Stojko, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    One of the deadliest cancers among women is a breast cancer. Research has shown that two natural substances occurring in propolis, caffeic acid (CA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), have significant anticancer effects. The purpose of our in vitro study was to compare cytotoxic activity and migration rate inhibition using CA and CAPE (doses of 50 and 100 µm) against triple-negative, MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma line cells, drawn from Caucasian women. Viability was measured by XTT-NR-SRB assay (Tetrazolium hydroxide-Neutral Red-Sulforhodamine B) for 24 h and 48 h periods. Cell migration for wound healing assay was taken for 0 h, 8 h, 16 h, and 24 h periods. CAPE displayed more than two times higher cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 cells. IC50 values for the XTT assay were as follows: CA for 24 h and 48 h were 150.94 µM and 108.42 µM, respectively, while CAPE was 68.82 µM for 24 h and 55.79 µM for 48 h. For the NR assay: CA was 135.85 µM at 24 h and 103.23 µM at 48 h, while CAPE was 64.04 µM at 24 h and 53.25 µM at 48 h. For the SRB assay: CA at 24 h was 139.80 µM and at 48 h 103.98 µM, while CAPE was 66.86 µM at 24 h and 47.73 µM at 48 h. Both agents suspended the migration rate; however, CAPE displayed better activity. Notably, for the 100 µM CAPE dose, motility of the tested breast carcinoma cells was halted. PMID:29048370

  1. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Karen M.; Peltz, Gerson; Faries, Douglas E.; Lang, Kathleen; Nyambose, Joshua; Earle, Craig C.; Sugarman, Katherine P.; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Thompson, David; Marciniak, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N = 2,644) with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G) and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T) identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002). Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P = .018). No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction = .257). There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:22482053

  2. Does Type of Tumor Histology Impact Survival among Patients with Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with First-Line Doublet Chemotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Clements

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy regimens may have differential efficacy by histology in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We examined the impact of histology on survival of patients (N=2,644 with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who received first-line cisplatin/carboplatin plus gemcitabine (C/C+G and cisplatin/carboplatin plus a taxane (C/C+T identified retrospectively in the SEER cancer registry (1997–2002. Patients with squamous and nonsquamous cell carcinoma survived 8.5 months and 8.1 months, respectively (P=.018. No statistically significant difference was observed in survival between C/C+G and C/C+T in both histologies. Adjusting for clinical and demographic characteristics, the effect of treatment regimen on survival did not differ by histology (P for interaction =.257. There was no statistically significant difference in hazard of death by histology in both groups. These results contrast the predictive role of histology and improved survival outcomes observed for cisplatin-pemetrexed regimens in advanced nonsquamous NSCLC.

  3. Phase II study of a novel taxane (Cabazitaxel-XRP 6258) in previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Ankit; Jones, Benjamin S; Bordoni, Rodolfo; Saleh, Mansoor N; Jerome, Mary S; Miley, Deborah K; Jackson, Bradford E; Robert, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Given the success of cabazitaxel in patients with prostate cancer who progressed after receiving prior chemotherapy, its preclinical efficacy in various cell lines and possible ability to cross blood-brain barrier, cabazitaxel was hypothesized to increase objective response rate (ORR) in second-line setting in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This was a phase II 2-stage trial in 28 patients using two different treatment schedules (A: 20 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks intravenously and B: 8.4 mg/m(2) intravenously weekly) to determine the ORR of cabazitaxel with secondary end points including progression-free survival (PFS), safety, and overall survival (OS). There was one objective response in schedule B. PFS and OS of schedule A was 3 and 6 months, respectively. PFS and OS of schedule B was 3 and 13 months, respectively. The stable disease rate was higher in schedule A (SD = 69.23 %; 95 % CL 38.57, 90.90) as compared to schedule B (SD = 38.46 %; 95 % CL 13.86, 68.42), but this difference was not statistically significant (P value = 0.1156). There were two grade 5 toxicities from sepsis. Hematuria of any grade developed in greater percentage of patients (35%) as compared to previous cabazitaxel phase 3 trial and led to change in our protocol. Response to cabazitaxel in NSCLC was not as robust as seen in prostate cancer and not superior to currently used agents such as docetaxel, pemetrexed, and erlotinib. In absence of significant objective responses, the second stage of the study was not undertaken.

  4. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  5. Histone deacetylase turnover and recovery in sulforaphane-treated colon cancer cells: competing actions of 14-3-3 and Pin1 in HDAC3/SMRT corepressor complex dissociation/reassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Praveen; Delage, Barbara; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Yu, Tian-Wei; Wuth, Bradyn; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2011-05-30

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation as anti-cancer agents. Dietary constituents share certain properties of HDAC inhibitor drugs, including the ability to induce global histone acetylation, turn-on epigenetically-silenced genes, and trigger cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or differentiation in cancer cells. One such example is sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate derived from the glucosinolate precursor glucoraphanin, which is abundant in broccoli. Here, we examined the time-course and reversibility of SFN-induced HDAC changes in human colon cancer cells. Cells underwent progressive G2/M arrest over the period 6-72 h after SFN treatment, during which time HDAC activity increased in the vehicle-treated controls but not in SFN-treated cells. There was a time-dependent loss of class I and selected class II HDAC proteins, with HDAC3 depletion detected ahead of other HDACs. Mechanism studies revealed no apparent effect of calpain, proteasome, protease or caspase inhibitors, but HDAC3 was rescued by cycloheximide or actinomycin D treatment. Among the protein partners implicated in the HDAC3 turnover mechanism, silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) was phosphorylated in the nucleus within 6 h of SFN treatment, as was HDAC3 itself. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed SFN-induced dissociation of HDAC3/SMRT complexes coinciding with increased binding of HDAC3 to 14-3-3 and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase 1 (Pin1). Pin1 knockdown blocked the SFN-induced loss of HDAC3. Finally, SFN treatment for 6 or 24 h followed by SFN removal from the culture media led to complete recovery of HDAC activity and HDAC protein expression, during which time cells were released from G2/M arrest. The current investigation supports a model in which protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates SMRT and HDAC3 in the nucleus, resulting in dissociation of the corepressor complex and enhanced binding of HDAC3 to 14-3-3 or Pin1. In

  6. Histone deacetylase turnover and recovery in sulforaphane-treated colon cancer cells: competing actions of 14-3-3 and Pin1 in HDAC3/SMRT corepressor complex dissociation/reassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams David E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation as anti-cancer agents. Dietary constituents share certain properties of HDAC inhibitor drugs, including the ability to induce global histone acetylation, turn-on epigenetically-silenced genes, and trigger cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or differentiation in cancer cells. One such example is sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate derived from the glucosinolate precursor glucoraphanin, which is abundant in broccoli. Here, we examined the time-course and reversibility of SFN-induced HDAC changes in human colon cancer cells. Results Cells underwent progressive G2/M arrest over the period 6-72 h after SFN treatment, during which time HDAC activity increased in the vehicle-treated controls but not in SFN-treated cells. There was a time-dependent loss of class I and selected class II HDAC proteins, with HDAC3 depletion detected ahead of other HDACs. Mechanism studies revealed no apparent effect of calpain, proteasome, protease or caspase inhibitors, but HDAC3 was rescued by cycloheximide or actinomycin D treatment. Among the protein partners implicated in the HDAC3 turnover mechanism, silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT was phosphorylated in the nucleus within 6 h of SFN treatment, as was HDAC3 itself. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed SFN-induced dissociation of HDAC3/SMRT complexes coinciding with increased binding of HDAC3 to 14-3-3 and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase 1 (Pin1. Pin1 knockdown blocked the SFN-induced loss of HDAC3. Finally, SFN treatment for 6 or 24 h followed by SFN removal from the culture media led to complete recovery of HDAC activity and HDAC protein expression, during which time cells were released from G2/M arrest. Conclusion The current investigation supports a model in which protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates SMRT and HDAC3 in the nucleus, resulting in dissociation of the corepressor

  7. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  8. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Crizotinib in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery and ALK Fusion Mutations (An ALCHEMIST Treatment Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    ALK Gene Rearrangement; ALK Gene Translocation; ALK Positive; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7

  10. Detection of ESR1 mutations in circulating cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with palbociclib and letrozole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyanchandani, Rekha; Kota, Karthik J; Jonnalagadda, Amruth R; Minteer, Tanya; Knapick, Beth A; Oesterreich, Steffi; Brufsky, Adam M; Lee, Adrian V; Puhalla, Shannon L

    2017-09-15

    ESR1 mutations are frequently acquired in hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer (MBC). CDK4/6 inhibition along with endocrine therapy is a promising strategy in hormone receptor-positive MBC. However, the incidence and impact of ESR1 mutations on clinical outcome in patients treated with CDK4/6 inhibitors have not been defined. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of ESR1 mutations in cfDNA from 16 patients with MBC undergoing palbociclib and letrozole therapy. Four common ESR1 mutations (D538G, Y537C, Y537N, and Y537S) were analyzed in serial blood draws using ddPCR. Mutation rate was 31.3% (5/16) (n=3; de novo, n=2; acquired). D538G was the most frequent mutation (n=3), followed by Y537N and Y537S (n=2). One patient showed multiple ESR1 mutations. Mutations were enriched during therapy. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were similar in patients with and without mutation detected at any given time during treatment. However, PFS was significantly shorter in patients with ESR1 mutation at initial blood draw (3.3 versus 9.0 months, P-value=0.038). In conclusion, ESR1 mutation prevalence is consistent with recent studies in hormone-refractory breast cancer. Further, treatment with palbociclib and letrozole does not prevent selection of ESR1 mutations in later lines of therapy. Larger studies are warranted to validate these findings.

  11. Palliative systemic therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Investigating disparities between patients who are treated versus those who are not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brule, Stephanie Y; Al-Baimani, Khalid; Jonker, Hannah; Zhang, Tinghua; Nicholas, Garth; Goss, Glenwood; Laurie, Scott A; Wheatley-Price, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Palliative systemic therapy (ST) in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with improved overall survival (OS) and quality of life, yet many patients remain untreated. We explored differences between patients who did and did not receive palliative ST in order to gain evidence to support and advocate for the untreated. We performed a retrospective analysis of newly diagnosed patients with advanced, incurable NSCLC seen as outpatients at our institution between 2009 and 2012. Demographics, treatment, and survival data were collected. 528 patients were seen: 291 (55%) received palliative ST, while 237 (45%) received none. Demographics were as follows: Median age 67, 55% male, 50% ECOG performance status (PS) 0-1, 48% with weight loss. Untreated patients were older (median 71 vs. 64, ptherapies effective and tolerated in a sicker population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted Therapy Combined with Immune Modulation Using Gold Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    stimulate the body’s immune system to target and attack cancer cells. Another part of our research includes coating these gold nanoparticles with...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0427 TITLE: Targeted Therapy Combined with Immune Modulation Using Gold Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal... Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0427 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Branden Moriarity, Tim

  13. Response to anti-programmed cell death protein-1 antibodies in men treated for platinum refractory germ cell cancer relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschäbitz, Stefanie; Lasitschka, Felix; Hadaschik, Boris; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Jentsch-Ullrich, Kathleen; Grüner, Marcus; Jäger, Dirk; Grüllich, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Treatment options for patients with platinum refractory metastatic germ cell tumours (GCT) relapsing after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation are limited and survival is poor. Antibodies directed against programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) are currently assessed within clinical trials. We present updated data on our experience with checkpoint inhibitors as a compassionate use off-label treatment attempt for highly-pretreated patients with GCT and provide an overview of the current literature on PD-L1 expression in this rare tumour entity. We analysed all patients with platinum refractory GCT treated with checkpoint inhibitors at our institutions between 2015 and 2017. Data were retrieved retrospectively from the patient charts. Seven patients were treated with nivolumab or pembrolizumab. Four patients received single-dose treatment and died shortly afterwards due to tumour progression; the remaining three patients received treatment for at least 6 months. No significant treatment toxicity was observed. Long-term tumour response was achieved in two of the three patients, both of them highly positive for PD-L1 staining. We consider checkpoint inhibition to be efficient in carefully selected patients with platinum refractory GCT. However, predictive markers associated with tumour response are not yet known and larger prospective clinical trials are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved survival outcomes with the incidental use of beta-blockers among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H M; Liao, Z X; Komaki, R; Welsh, J W; O'Reilly, M S; Chang, J Y; Zhuang, Y; Levy, L B; Lu, C; Gomez, D R

    2013-05-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that norepinephrine can directly stimulate tumor cell migration and that this effect is mediated by the beta-adrenergic receptor. We retrospectively reviewed 722 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiotherapy (RT). A Cox proportional hazard model was utilized to determine the association between beta-blocker intake and locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). In univariate analysis, patients taking beta-blockers (n = 155) had improved DMFS (P beta-blockers (n = 567). In multivariate analysis, beta-blocker intake was associated with a significantly better DMFS [hazard ratio (HR), 0.67; P = 0.01], DFS (HR, 0.74; P = 0.02), and OS (HR, 0.78; P = 0.02) with adjustment for age, Karnofsky performance score, stage, histology type, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, gross tumor volume, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the use of aspirin. There was no association of beta-blocker use with LRPFS (HR = 0.91, P = 0.63). Beta-blocker use is associated with improved DMFS, DFS, and OS in this large cohort of NSCLC patients. Future prospective trials can validate these retrospective findings and determine whether the length and timing of beta-blocker use influence survival outcomes.

  15. Levobuipivacaine-Induced Dissemination of A549 Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shun-Ming; Lin, Bo-Feng; Wong, Chih-Shung; Chuang, Wen-Ting; Chou, Yu-Ting; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2017-08-17

    While anaesthetics are frequently used on cancer patients during surgical procedures, their consequence on cancer progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to investigate the influence of local anesthetics on lung cancer cell dissemination in vitro and in vivo. A549 human non-small lung cancer cells were treated with various local anaesthetics including ropivacaine, lidocaine, levobupivacaine and bupivacaine. Cell barrier property was assessed using an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of treated cells was studied by immunofluorescence staining. In vitro and in vivo cancer cell dissemination were investigated.Gene expression microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) assays were used to identify the genes responsible for levobupivacaine-mediated cancer cell dissemination.The results illustrated that only levobupivacaine induced EMT in the treated cells and also caused the dissemination of cancer cells in vitro. In addition, after intravenous injection, levobupivacaine encouraged cancer cell dissemination in vivo. Gene expression microarray, qrt-PCR and immunoblotting revealed that after levobupivacaine treatment, the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- 2α gene was upregulated in cancer cells. Our findings suggest that levobupivacaine may induce A549 lung cancer cell dissemination both in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, HIF-2α signaling possibly contributes to levobupivacaine-mediated A549 lung cancer cell dissemination.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of S-1 versus docetaxel in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy (East Asia S-1 Trial in Lung Cancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokihara, H; Lu, S; Mok, T S K; Nakagawa, K; Yamamoto, N; Shi, Y K; Zhang, L; Soo, R A; Yang, J C; Sugawara, S; Nishio, M; Takahashi, T; Goto, K; Chang, J; Maemondo, M; Ichinose, Y; Cheng, Y; Lim, W T; Morita, S; Tamura, T

    2017-11-01

    Chemotherapy remains a viable option for the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) despite recent advances in molecular targeted therapy and immunotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy of oral 5-fluorouracil-based S-1 as second- or third-line therapy compared with standard docetaxel therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. Patients with advanced NSCLC previously treated with ≥1 platinum-based therapy were randomized 1 : 1 to docetaxel (60 mg/m2 in Japan, 75 mg/m2 at all other study sites; day 1 in a 3-week cycle) or S-1 (80-120 mg/day, depending on body surface area; days 1-28 in a 6-week cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival. The non-inferiority margin was a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.2. A total of 1154 patients (577 in each arm) were enrolled, with balanced patient characteristics between the two arms. Median overall survival was 12.75 and 12.52 months in the S-1 and docetaxel arms, respectively [HR 0.945; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.833-1.073; P = 0.3818]. The upper limit of 95% CI of HR fell below 1.2, confirming non-inferiority of S-1 to docetaxel. Difference in progression-free survival between treatments was not significant (HR 1.033; 95% CI 0.913-1.168; P = 0.6080). Response rate was 8.3% and 9.9% in the S-1 and docetaxel arms, respectively. Significant improvement was observed in the EORTC QLQ-C30 global health status over time points in the S-1 arm. The most common adverse drug reactions were decreased appetite (50.4%), nausea (36.4%), and diarrhea (35.9%) in the S-1 arm, and neutropenia (54.8%), leukocytopenia (43.9%), and alopecia (46.6%) in the docetaxel arm. S-1 is equally as efficacious as docetaxel and offers a treatment option for patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC. Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center, JapicCTI-101155.

  17. Skin rash in patients treated with neoadjuvant erlotinib (Tarceva in resectable non-small cell lung cancer: Predictor for tumor response and survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Gool MH

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin rash during treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI has been reported to be predictive for response and survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate whether skin rash during treatment (as a biomarker in a preoperative setting was related to response and survival. Methods: This study was designed as an open-label phase II trial (also known as M06NEL. Patients received preoperative erlotinib (Tarceva 150 mg once daily for 3 weeks. Skin toxicity during treatment was analysed in relation to metabolic and histopathological response, overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: In total 59 patients (25 male, 34 female were eligible for analysis. In 39 patients (66% skin toxicity occurred. According to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCICTC, Grade 1 toxicity was seen in 15 patients (25%, Grade 2 in 19 patients (32% and Grade 3 in five patients (8%. None of the patients showed skin toxicity Grade 4 and 5. The median follow up was 74 months. Thirty-six patients (61% were alive at time of analysis. Twenty-seven patients (46% showed disease progression during follow up. Hazard ratios (HR indicated lower risk of death (HR = 0.66, 95%CI: 0.29 - 1.50 and progression (HR = 0.64, 0.30 - 1.36, although in this small group results were not significant. Skin rash did not adequately predict response. Conclusions: In this neoadjuvant setting with limited treatment time in patients with early stage NSCLC, skin rash was not associated with response and survival and cannot be used as an early biomarker.

  18. Cancer-associated fibroblasts promote proliferation of endometrial cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita S Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic malignancy worldwide; yet the tumor microenvironment, especially the fibroblast cells surrounding the cancer cells, is poorly understood. We established four primary cultures of fibroblasts from human endometrial cancer tissues (cancer-associated fibroblasts, CAFs using antibody-conjugated magnetic bead isolation. These relatively homogenous fibroblast cultures expressed fibroblast markers (CD90, vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin and hormonal (estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conditioned media collected from CAFs induced a dose-dependent proliferation of both primary cultures and cell lines of endometrial cancer in vitro (175% when compared to non-treated cells, in contrast to those from normal endometrial fibroblast cell line (51% (P<0.0001. These effects were not observed in fibroblast culture derived from benign endometrial hyperplasia tissues, indicating the specificity of CAFs in affecting endometrial cancer cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism underlying the differential fibroblast effects, we compared the activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk pathways in endometrial cancer cells following treatment with normal fibroblasts- and CAFs-conditioned media. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of both phosphorylated forms of Akt and Erk were significantly down-regulated in normal fibroblasts-treated cells, but were up-regulated/maintained in CAFs-treated cells. Treatment with specific inhibitors LY294002 and U0126 reversed the CAFs-mediated cell proliferation (P<0.0001, suggesting for a role of these pathways in modulating endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Rapamycin, which targets a downstream molecule in PI3K pathway (mTOR, also suppressed CAFs-induced cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Cytokine profiling analysis revealed that CAFs secrete higher levels of macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, RANTES and vascular

  19. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  20. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2005-01-01

    To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  1. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence dose/time-dependence and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  2. Treatment Related Cardiac Toxicity in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    To determine the incidence, dose/time-dependence, and functional significance of regional cardiac perfusion abnormalities in patients with left-sided breast cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT...

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cell cancer include: Having light-colored skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Long-term, daily sun exposure (such as in people who work outside) Many severe sunburns early in life Older age Having had many x-rays Chemical exposure A weakened immune system, especially in ...

  4. Is Huachansu Beneficial in Treating Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of Its Efficacy Combined with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingduo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Huachansu, the sterilized water extract of Bufo bufo gargarizans toad skin, is used in China to alleviate the side-effects and enhance the therapeutic effect of chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess Huachansu’s efficacy. Methods. We extensively searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CBM, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CEBM, WFDP, CSCD, CSTD, and IPA for randomized controlled trials containing Huachansu plus chemotherapy as the test group and chemotherapy as the control group. Seventeen trials were selected based on the selection criteria. The pooled relative ratio (RR of indicators with 95% confidence interval (95% CI was calculated for efficacy evaluation. Results. The meta-analysis demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in objective tumor response, one-year survival, Karnofsky performance status, pain relief, and alleviation of severe side-effects (nausea and vomiting, leukocytopenia in the test group as compared to the control group, but no significant difference in thrombocytopenia. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the efficacy of Huachansu combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. However, limitations exist and high-quality trials are needed for further verification.

  5. Circulating Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells as Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with First-Line Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Coco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell-free DNA (cfDNA and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are promising prognostic and predictive biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. In this study, we examined the prognostic role of cfDNA and CTCs, in separate and joint analyses, in NSCLC patients receiving first line chemotherapy. Seventy-three patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in this study. CfDNA and CTC were analyzed at baseline and after two cycles of chemotherapy. Plasma cfDNA quantification was performed by quantitative PCR (qPCR whereas CTCs were isolated by the ScreenCell Cyto (ScreenCell, Paris, France device and enumerated according to malignant features. Patients with baseline cfDNA higher than the median value (96.3 hTERT copy number had a significantly worse overall survival (OS and double the risk of death (hazard ratio (HR: 2.14; 95% confidence limits (CL = 1.24–3.68; p-value = 0.006. Conversely, an inverse relationship between CTC median baseline number (6 CTC/3 mL of blood and OS was observed. In addition, we found that in patients reporting stable disease (SD, the baseline cfDNA and CTCs were able to discriminate patients at high risk of poor survival. cfDNA demonstrated a more reliable biomarker than CTCs in the overall population. In the subgroup of SD patients, both biomarkers identified patients at high risk of poor prognosis who might deserve additional/alternative therapeutic interventions.

  6. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwab, K S; Heine, A; Weimann, T; Kristiansen, G; Brossart, P

    2016-01-01

    ... and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated...

  7. [How to treat an elderly person's cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Siru; Nevala, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Among the elderly having cancer, many are in good condition and wish for active treatment. Although elderly people have been shown to benefit from oncological treatments, they are more susceptible than the young to the adverse effects of treatment. Comprehensive geriatric assessment has been utilized in predicting the capability of an elderly patient to tolerate treatment. A functional status questionnaire completed by the patient her/himself has been used in the oncological unit of Helsinki University Hospital in support of a cancer drug therapy assessment. The consultations with an oncologist have been centralized and the patients have had a possibility to meet a geriatrist.

  8. Alcohol and Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Xu; Jia Luo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption has been associated with increased risk of several cancers, including cancer of the colon, rectum, female breast, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, liver, and esophagus. It appears that alcohol exposure not only promotes carcinogenesis but also enhances the progression and aggressiveness of existing cancers. The molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol tumor promotion, however, remain unclear. Cancer stem cells (CSC), a subpopulation of cancer cells with self-renewal and ...

  9. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  10. High frequency of radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent radiotherapy and gemcitabine after induction with gemcitabine and carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Michel, Rosa M; Astorga-Ramos, Alma M; Martínez-Barrera, Luis; de la Garza, Jaime

    2009-07-01

    The combination of chemotherapy and thoracic radiation is the standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, most favorable chemotherapy regimen, timing of full-dose chemotherapy, and optimal combination of chemotherapy with radiation remain to be determined. Our primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine concurrent with radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus carboplatin for locally advanced NSCLC. Patients with histologically proven NSCLC stage IIIA and -B received carboplatin (area under the curve of 2.5) and gemcitabine (800 mg/m) on days 1 and 8, every 21 days for two cycles, followed by conventional fractioned thoracic radiotherapy and concomitant weekly gemcitabine 200 mg/m, and finally, consolidation chemotherapy. Inclusion was discontinued because of high-grade 3 to 5 radiation-pneumonitis events (6 of 19 patients, 31.6%), including one treatment-related death associated with radiation pneumonitis. Median follow-up was 11.9 months. Most common grades 3/4 hematological side effects comprised anemia, neutropenia 3 of 19 patients, each (15.8%), and thrombocytopenia (4 of 19, 21.1%) during induction. Partial response was observed in 10 patients (52.6%) following induction chemotherapy. After concurrent chemo-radiotherapy, overall response was 68.4%. Four patients (21.1%) underwent surgical resection. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 12 +/- 1 month (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8-14.1) and 21 +/- 3.5 months (95% CI, 14-27.9 months), respectively. Concurrent radiotherapy with gemcitabine after induction with gemcitabine and carboplatin showed a high-response rate; however, it is associated with excessive pulmonary toxicity. Adjustments in gemcitabine dosage during radiotherapy or changes in radiotherapy planning could reduce toxicity.

  11. Change in Diffusing Capacity After Radiation as an Objective Measure for Grading Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Treated for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Scoring of radiation pneumonitis (RP), a dose-limiting toxicity after thoracic radiochemotherapy, is subjective and thus inconsistent among studies. Here we investigated whether the extent of change in diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) after radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) could be used as an objective means of quantifying RP. Patients and Methods: We analyzed potential correlations between DLCO and RP in 140 patients who received definitive RT ({>=}60 Gy) with or without chemotherapy for primary NSCLC. All underwent DLCO analysis before and after RT. Post-RT DLCO values within 1 week of the RP diagnosis (Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3) were selected and compared with that individual's preradiation values. Percent reductions in DLCO and RP grade were compared by point biserial correlation in the entire patient group and in subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Results: Patients experiencing Grade 0, 1, 2, or 3 RP had median percentage changes in DLCO after RT of 10.7%, 13%, 22.1%, or 35.2%. Percent reduction in DLCO correlated with RP Grade {<=}1 vs. {>=}2 (p = 0.0004). This association held for the following subgroups: age {>=}65 years, advanced stage, smokers, use of chemotherapy, volume of normal lung receiving at least 20 Gy {>=}30%, and baseline DLCO or forced expiratory volume in 1 second {>=}60%. Conclusions: By correlating percent change in DLCO from pretreatment values at the time of diagnosis of RP with RP grade, we were able to identify categories of RP based on the change in DLCO. These criteria provide a basis for an objective scoring system for RP based on change in DLCO.

  12. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors versus chemotherapy in EGFR wild-type pre-treated advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer in daily practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasini, Pascale; Brosseau, Solenn; Mazières, Julien; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Mosser, Jean; Wislez, Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Besse, Benjamin; Rouquette, Isabelle; Debieuvre, Didier; Escande, Fabienne; Westeel, Virginie; Audigier-Valette, Clarisse; Missy, Pascale; Langlais, Alexandra; Morin, Frank; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Zalcman, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are approved for second-line treatment of EGFR wild-type (EGFR-wt) nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from randomised trials performed to compare EGFR-TKIs with chemotherapy in this population did not show any survival benefit. In the era of immunotherapy, many drugs are approved for second-line treatment of EGFR-wt NSCLC and there is a need to reassess the role of EGFR-TKIs in this setting. The Biomarkers France study is a large nationwide cohort of NSCLC patients tested for EGFR mutations. We used this database to collect clinical, biological, treatment and outcome data on EGFR-wt patients who received second-line treatment with either EGFR-TKIs or chemotherapy. Among 1278 patients, 868 received chemotherapy and 410 received an EGFR-TKI. Median overall survival and progression-free survival were longer with chemotherapy than with an EGFR-TKI. Overall survival was 8.38 versus 4.99 months, respectively (hazard ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.59–0.83; p<0.0001) and progression-free survival was 4.30 versus 2.83 months, respectively (hazard ratio 0.66, 95% CI 0.57–0.77; p<0.0001). This study is helpful to guide a multiline treatment strategy for EGFR-wt NSCLC patients. Immunotherapy is approved for second-line treatment. For third-line treatment, chemotherapy results in longer overall survival and progression-free survival, and should be preferred to EGFR-TKIs. PMID:28798090

  13. EGFR mutations and HER2/3 protein expression and clinical outcome in Chinese advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Ming; Han, Yu; Duan, Hai Qing; Gao, E Mei; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Jing Sheng; Toschi, Luca; Galetta, Domenico; Azzariti, Amalia; Paradiso, Angelo

    2009-06-01

    To assess the role of various epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and HER2/3 protein expression as predictive markers of responsiveness to gefitinib therapy in Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 106 Chinese NSCLC patients who had failed at least one chemotherapy regimen received gefitinib 250 mg once daily. All the 106 tumors from these patients were screened for mutations in the EGFR exons 18-24, and 84 tumors were studied by immunohistochemistry for HER2/3 expression and correlated with clinical treatment outcome. Patients with EGFR mutations had a significantly higher overall response rate (ORR), longer time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) compared with those with wild-type receptor. No difference in ORR was observed between patients with exon 19 deletion and patients with other EGFR mutations. ORR in HER2-positive patients was significantly higher than in the HER2-negative group, irrespective of EGFR mutational status, and a trend for better ORR was observed for HER3-positive patients. HER2 and HER3 expression levels were not associated with any difference in terms of TTP and OS. Nevertheless, when considering the subgroups of non-responders to gefitinib, median TTP in patients with mutated EGFR was significantly longer than in those with no mutations (8.0 vs. 3.0 months, P = 0.0065). EGFR-mutated patients had no significant difference in ORR, TTP and OS according to HER2 and/or HER3 expression. EGFR mutations are effective predictors for gefitinib efficacy in Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC. HER2 and HER3 expression does not provide any additional information for selecting patients most likely to benefit from gefitinib treatment.

  14. Randomized Phase II Study of Docetaxel plus Personalized Peptide Vaccination versus Docetaxel plus Placebo for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Wild Type EGFR Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Takayama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV combined with chemotherapy for patients with previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Patients and Methods. Previously treated PS0-1 patients with IIIB/IV EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor wild genotype NSCLC were randomly assigned to docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on Day 1 plus PPV based on preexisting host immunity or docetaxel plus placebo. Docetaxel administration was repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Personalized peptides or placebo was injected subcutaneously weekly in the first 8 weeks and biweekly in subsequent 16 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS. Results. PPV related toxicity was grade 2 or less skin reaction. The median PFS for placebo arm and PPV arm was 52 days and 59 days, respectively. There was no significant difference between two arms by log-rank test (p=0.42. Interestingly, PFS and overall survival (OS in humoral immunological responder were significantly longer than those in nonresponder. Conclusion. PPV did not improve the survival in combination with docetaxel for previously treated advanced NSCLC. However, PPV may be efficacious for the humoral immunological responders and a further clinical investigation is needed.

  15. The Risk of Neutropenia and Leukopenia in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Erlotinib: A Prisma-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Guo; Tian, Xu; Cheng, Long; Zhou, Quan; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Bai, Yu-ju; Ma, Hu

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are a critical member of systemic therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Erlotinib is the first-generation EGFR-TKIs, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend it as a first-line agent in patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations. However, the safety of erlotinib plus chemotherapy (CT) or erlotinib alone for advanced NSCLC remains controversial. We carried out a systematic meta-analysis to determine the overall risk of neutropenia and leukopenia associated with erlotinib. PubMed, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, WanFang database, The Cochrane library, Web of Science, as well as abstracts presented at ASCO conferences and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched to identify relevant studies. RR with 95% CIs for neutropenia and leukopenia were all extracted. The random-effects model was used to calculate pooled RRs and 95% CIs. Power calculation was performed using macro embedded in SAS software after all syntheses were conducted. We identified 12 eligible studies involving 3932 patients. Erlotinib plus CT or alone relative to CT is associated with significantly decreased risks of neutropenia and leukopenia in patients with advanced NSCLC (RR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.21-0.71; P = 0.00; incidence: 9.9 vs. 35.2%) and (RR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.93; P = 0.04; incidence: 3.5 vs. 11.6%), respectively. The subgroup analysis by erlotinib with or without CT showed that erlotinib combine with CT have no significance decrease the relative risks of neutropenia or leukopenia (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.78-1.23; P = 0.87; incidence: 26.2 vs. 30.5%) and (RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.34-1.95; P = 0.64; incidence: 6.5 vs. 9.3%), respectively. However, erlotinib alone could decrease incidence of neutropenia (RR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.07-0.27; P = 0.00; incidence: 3.7 vs. 40.8%) or leukopenia (RR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.45; P = 0.01; incidence: 0.8 vs. 15.7%). The power analysis suggests that a power of 61.31% was determined

  16. Different impact of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 on survival in male and female patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer treated with carboplatin and gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) status was assessed in patients receiving carboplatin and gemcitabine for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed the association between the ERCC1 status and the overall survival after the chemotherapy. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: We retrospectively identified 163 patients with inoperable NSCLC and sufficient tumor tissue for ERCC1 analysis, who had received carboplatin and gemcitabine as first-line treatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of ERCC1. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-three patients were...... included. Seventy (42%) were ERCC1 positive. Patients treated with carboplatin and gemcitabine and having ERCC1-negative tumors had a significantly increased survival when compared to patients with ERCC1-positive tumors (median survival, 12.0 months v 8.2 months; P = .02). This difference was mainly seen...

  17. Early reduction in tumour [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine (FLT) uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiotherapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigonis, Ioannis; Tamal, Mahbubunnabi; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Jackson, Alan; Asselin, Marie-Claude [The University of Manchester, Institute of Population Health, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Koh, Pek Keng [The University of Manchester, Manchester Cancer Research Centre, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, Ben; Ryder, David; Earl, Mark [The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Haslett, Kate; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona [The University of Manchester, Manchester Cancer Research Centre, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Young, Helen [AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Changes in tumour 3'-deoxy-3'-[{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine (FLT) uptake during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been reported, at variable time points, in two pilot positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to assess whether FLT changes occur early in response to radiotherapy (RT) without concurrent chemotherapy and whether such changes exceed test-retest variability. Sixteen patients with NSCLC, scheduled to have radical RT, underwent FLT PET once/twice at baseline to assess reproducibility and/or after 5-11 RT fractions to evaluate response. Primary and nodal malignant lesions were manually delineated on CT and volume, mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}) estimated. Analysis included descriptive statistics and parameter fitting to a mixed-effects model accounting for patients having different numbers of evaluable lesions. In all, 35 FLT PET scans from 7 patients with a total of 18 lesions and 12 patients with a total of 30 lesions were evaluated for reproducibility and response, respectively. SUV{sub mean} reproducibility in primary tumours (SD 8.9 %) was better than SUV{sub max} reproducibility (SD 12.6 %). In nodes, SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} reproducibilities (SD 18.0 and 17.2 %) were comparable but worse than for primary tumours. After 5-11 RT fractions, primary tumour SUV{sub mean} decreased significantly by 25 % (p = 0.0001) in the absence of significant volumetric change, whereas metastatic nodes decreased in volume by 31 % (p = 0.020) with a larger SUV{sub mean} decrease of 40 % (p < 0.0001). Similar changes were found for SUV{sub max}. Across this group of NSCLC patients, RT induced an early, significant decrease in lesion FLT uptake exceeding test-retest variability. This effect is variable between patients, appears distinct between primary and metastatic nodal lesions, and in primary tumours is lower than previously

  18. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancers or Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Dyall

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis is becoming more widely accepted as a model for carcinogenesis. Tumours are heterogeneous both at the molecular and cellular level, containing a small population of cells that possess highly tumourigenic “stem-cell” properties. Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumour-initiating cells, have the ability to self-renew, generate xenografts reminiscent of the primary tumour that they were derived from, and are chemoresistant. The characterisation of the CSC population within a tumour that drives its growth could provide novel target therapeutics against these cells specifically, eradicating the cancer completely. There have been several reports describing the isolation of putative cancer stem cell populations in several cancers; however, no defined set of markers has been identified that conclusively characterises “stem-like” cancer cells. This paper highlights the current experimental approaches that have been used in the field and discusses their limitations, with specific emphasis on the identification and characterisation of the CSC population in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  20. Consultations with Women Treated for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Health professionals, including general practitioners involved in followup of breast cancer patients, need to systematically assess opportunities to offer patients support with ongoing or new problems. Methods. A self-administered needs assessment questionnaire was developed with reference to a multidisciplinary team. Short, evidence-based, readable questions were emphasized, and questions were tested for face validity. The questions flowed across three domains: physical, social, and psychological. Content validity and user friendliness were assessed. Results. A final set of 30 questions was rated as easy to read and comprehend (Flesch Reading Ease score 65.8 and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level 6.9. When piloted with twenty-one patients the self-administered questionnaire detected 121 items of unmet need encompassing all three domains. Conclusions. This self-administered questionnaire has the potential to assist in the holistic assessment of breast cancer patient after treatment. The clinical value of the self-administered questionnaire will need to be further tested before it can be widely adopted.

  1. Effect of PDT-treated apoptotic cells on macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng; Xing, Da; Zhou, Fei-fan; Chen, Wei R.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the long-term immunological effects of photodynamic therapy have attracted much attention. PDT induced immune response was mainly initiated through necrotic cells and apoptotic cells, as well as immune cells such as macrophages. Nitric oxide (NO) as an important regulatory factor in signal transfer between cells has been wildly studied for generation, development, and metastasis of tumors. NO synthase is a key enzyme in nitric oxide synthesis. However, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is usually activated under pathological conditions, such as stress and cancer, which can produce high levels of nitric oxide and contribute to tumor cytotoxicity. In addition, increased NO production by iNOS has been associated with the host immune response and cell apoptosis, which play an important role in many carcinogenesis and anti-carcinoma mechanisms. This study focuses on the NO production in macrophages, induced by mouse breast carcinoma apoptotic cells treated by PDT in vitro, and on the effects of immune response induced by apoptotic cells in tumor cells growth.

  2. Metachronous Esophageal Cancer and Colon Cancer Treated by Endoscopic Mucosal Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chao Chang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cases of esophageal cancer and colorectal cancer in Taiwan are diagnosed in the advanced stage and treated by surgery or concurrent chemoirradiation. The detection rates of early esophageal cancer and early colorectal cancer are still low in Taiwan. Metachronous early esophageal cancer and early colorectal cancer have rarely been reported. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR is a well-established method for treatment of early gastrointestinal cancer in Japan. We report a 77-year-old man with metachronous early esophageal cancer and early colorectal cancer detected by chromoendoscopy with 3% Lugol's iodine and 0.2% indigo carmine, respectively. These two lesions were successfully treated by EMR. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract may be considered in patients who are not suitable for open surgery. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(3 Suppl:S5-S9

  3. Cancer treatments transform residual cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harless William W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiologic wound repair and tissue regeneration are associated with distinct cellular behaviors triggered by tissue damage. Normally quiescent stem cells proliferate to regenerate damaged tissue, while relatively immobile epithelial cells can transform into a motile, tissue invasive phenotype through a partial epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These distinct cellular behaviors may have particular relevance to how cancer cells can be predicted to behave after treatments damaging a tumor. Presentation of the hypothesis Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy trigger highly conserved wound healing pathways that: (1 facilitate the phenotypic transformation of surviving cancer cells into a highly mobile, metastatic phenotype through an EMT or epithelial-mesenchymal transition and (2 induce residual cancer stem cell proliferation. Testing the hypothesis Tissue damage caused by cancer treatments will trigger the release of distinct cytokines with established roles in physiologic wound healing, EMT induction, and stem cell activation. They will be released rapidly after treatment and detectable in the patient's blood. Careful histologic evaluation of cancerous tissue before and after treatment will reveal cellular changes suggestive of EMT induction (down regulation of cytokeratin expression and cancer stem cell enrichment (stem cell markers upregulated. Implications of the hypothesis Cancer cells surviving treatment will be more capable of metastasis and resistant to conventional therapies than the pre-treatment population of cancer cells. These changes will develop rapidly after treatment and, in distinct contrast to selection pressures fostering such changes, be triggered by highly conserved wound repair signals released after tissue damage. This pattern of tissue (tumor repair may be amenable to treatment intervention at the time it is upregulated.

  4. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of 4-methoxyindole-3-carbinol on the proliferation of colon cancer cells in vitro, when treated alone or in combination with indole-3-carbinol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronbak, Remy; Duus, Fritz; Vang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    synergistic manner. Proliferation was inhibited by 100 microM 4MeOI3C after 48 h without affecting cell cycle phase distribution, indicating an overall-slowdown effect on the cell cycle. However, 200 microM 4MeOI3C caused a very high level of cell death and an accumulation of living cells in the G(0)/G(1...

  6. Stem cells and solid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor A; Schier, Stefanie; Wright, Nicholas A; Alison, Malcolm R

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in our knowledge of stem cells found in tissues that can develop solid tumours. In particular, novel stem cell markers have been identified for the first time identifying multipotential cells: a required characteristic of a stem cell. The scarcity of cancer stem cells has been questioned. Current dogma states that they are rare, but novel research has suggested that this may not be the case. Here, we review the latest literature on stem cells, particularly cancer stem cells within solid tumours. We discuss current thinking on how stem cells develop into cancer stem cells and how they protect themselves from doing so and do they express unique markers that can be used to detect stem cells. We attempt to put into perspective these latest advances in stem cell biology and their potential for cancer therapy.

  7. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  8. Novel Therapeutic Approaches Toward Treating Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Nat. Cell Biol. 1, 207-214 54. Pogacic, V .. Bullock, A. N .. Fedorov , 0 .. Filippakopoulos, P., Gasser, C., Biondi, A., Meyer-Monard, S., Knapp...J Med Chern 2009;52:74-86. 22. Pogacic V, Bullock AN, Fedorov 0, Fllippakopoulos P, Gasser C, Biondi A, eta!. Structural analysis Identifies

  9. Class I and class II histone deacetylases are potential therapeutic targets for treating pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; He, Jing; Zhao, Jianyun; Yun, Wenting; Xie, Chengzhi; Taub, Jeffrey W; Azmi, Asfar; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Dong, Yan; Kong, Wei; Guo, Yingjie; Ge, Yubin

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have shown promising antitumor activities against preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we sought to identify clinically relevant histone deacetylases (HDACs) to guide the selection of HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) tailored to the treatment of pancreatic cancer. HDAC expression in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells was determined by Western blotting. Antitumor interactions between class I- and class II-selective HDACIs were determined by MTT assays and standard isobologram/CompuSyn software analyses. The effects of HDACIs on cell death, apoptosis and cell cycle progression, and histone H4, alpha-tubulin, p21, and γH2AX levels were determined by colony formation assays, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blotting, respectively. The majority of classes I and II HDACs were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines, albeit at variable levels. Treatments with MGCD0103 (a class I-selective HDACI) resulted in dose-dependent growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, accompanied by induction of p21 and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In contrast, MC1568 (a class IIa-selective HDACI) or Tubastatin A (a HDAC6-selective inhibitor) showed minimal effects. When combined simultaneously, MC1568 significantly enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest, while Tubastatin A only synergistically enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest. Although MC1568 or Tubastatin A alone had no obvious effects on DNA DSBs and p21 expression, their combination with MGCD0103 resulted in cooperative induction of p21 in the cells. Our results suggest that classes I and II HDACs are potential therapeutic targets for treating pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, treating pancreatic

  10. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after telomerase activity expression levels or telomere length of CSCs and bulk tumor cells in these cell lines did not correlate with the increased sensitivity of CSCs to imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  11. Synchronous lung and gastric cancers successfully treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lung and gastric cancers are the first and second leading causes of death from cancer worldwide, and are especially prevalent in Eastern Asia. Relatively few reports are available in relation to the treatment and outcome of synchronous lung and gastric cancers, although there are increasing numbers of patients with these cancers. Efforts to develop more effective drugs for the treatment of synchronous cancers, without serious adverse effects, have been intensifying. Pemetrexed, a multi-targeted antifolate enzyme inhibitor, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer in 2007. Although clinical activity against several tumor types of adenocarcinoma, including gastric cancer, has been demonstrated, the efficacy of pemetrexed for gastric cancer remains to be fully evaluated. Case presentation We report a case involving a 62-year-old Japanese woman with synchronous locally-advanced poorly-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma and poorly-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma, containing signet-ring cells distinguished by immunohistochemical profiles. She had been treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed as a first-line chemotherapy for lung cancer, and had achieved partial responses for both lung and gastric cancers. These responses led to a favorable 12-month progression-free survival after the initiation of chemotherapy, and the patient is still alive more than 33 months after diagnosis. Conclusions This case suggests a new chemotherapeutic regimen for patients with synchronous multiple primary cancers that have an adenocarcinoma background.

  12. Synchronous lung and gastric cancers successfully treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takashi; Tomaru, Koji; Koide, Tomoko; Masuda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masaki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2012-08-31

    Lung and gastric cancers are the first and second leading causes of death from cancer worldwide, and are especially prevalent in Eastern Asia. Relatively few reports are available in relation to the treatment and outcome of synchronous lung and gastric cancers, although there are increasing numbers of patients with these cancers. Efforts to develop more effective drugs for the treatment of synchronous cancers, without serious adverse effects, have been intensifying. Pemetrexed, a multi-targeted antifolate enzyme inhibitor, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer in 2007. Although clinical activity against several tumor types of adenocarcinoma, including gastric cancer, has been demonstrated, the efficacy of pemetrexed for gastric cancer remains to be fully evaluated. We report a case involving a 62-year-old Japanese woman with synchronous locally-advanced poorly-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma and poorly-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma, containing signet-ring cells distinguished by immunohistochemical profiles. She had been treated with carboplatin and pemetrexed as a first-line chemotherapy for lung cancer, and had achieved partial responses for both lung and gastric cancers. These responses led to a favorable 12-month progression-free survival after the initiation of chemotherapy, and the patient is still alive more than 33 months after diagnosis. This case suggests a new chemotherapeutic regimen for patients with synchronous multiple primary cancers that have an adenocarcinoma background.

  13. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines treated with dioscin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The long-term goal of our study is to understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis in human and to discover new possible genetic markers for use in clinical practice. We have used microarray technology (Human OneArray microarray, phylanxbiotech.com) to compare gene ex...

  14. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, Floor M.; Van der Schaft, Jorien; Van den Reek, Juul M.; Politiek, Klaziena; Van Osmedendorp, Harmieke; Van Dijk, Marijke; Hijnen, Dirk J.; De Graaf, Marlies; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; De Jong, Elke M.; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; De Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  15. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, F.M.; Schaft, J. van der; Reek, J.M.P.A. van den; Politiek, K.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Dijk, M.; Hijnen, D.J.; Graaf, M de; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Schuttelaar, M.A.; Bruin-Weller, M.S. de

    2017-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  16. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    native forms in responses to reducing conditions such as the cytoplasm. Rationally designed non- covalent protein nanocapsules, incorporating copper-free...the tumor cells towards other various treatments ( radio - and chemotherapy) (Blagosklonny, 2002). Different strategies pursuing this goal have been...target protein to form a non- covalent shell that encapsulates the protein. The monomer acrylamide (1) is used as a general building block of the water

  17. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Following electrostatic deposition of the monomers acrylamide (1 in Figure 1a) and N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide (2), and the cross-linker N,N’-bis...APO N localization cellular upt MBP-APO PO to eith ells. Prior ho-APO). oscopy show cells within hell, corres lular interna ed for 2 hou acrylamide ...polymerized in situ around the target protein to form a noncovalent shell that encapsulates the protein. The monomer acrylamide (1) is used as a

  18. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJpma, I; Renken, R J; Ter Horst, G J; Reyners, A K L

    2015-02-01

    Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic taste in chemotherapy treated cancer patients. Literature search for metallic taste and chemotherapy was performed in PubMed up to September 2014, resulting in 184 articles of which 13 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria: English publications addressing metallic taste in cancer patients treated with FDA-approved chemotherapy. An additional search in Google Scholar, in related articles of both search engines, and subsequent in the reference lists, resulted in 13 additional articles included in this review. Cancer patient forums were visited to explore management strategies. Prevalence of metallic taste ranged from 9.7% to 78% among patients with various cancers, chemotherapy treatments, and treatment phases. No studies have been performed to investigate the influence of metallic taste on dietary intake, body weight, and quality of life. Several management strategies can be recommended for cancer patients: using plastic utensils, eating cold or frozen foods, adding strong herbs, spices, sweetener or acid to foods, eating sweet and sour foods, using 'miracle fruit' supplements, and rinsing with chelating agents. Although metallic taste is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy and a much discussed topic on cancer patient forums, literature regarding metallic taste among chemotherapy treated cancer patients is scarce. More awareness for this side effect can improve the support for these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. No relationship between the amount of DNA damage and the level of hMLH1 and RASSF1A gene expression in bladder cancer cells treated with cisplatin and gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Elaine Aparecida de; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; Gobette, Camila Pereira; Marcondes, Joao Paulo de Castro; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Favero

    2013-01-01

    Tumor response to antineoplastic drugs is not always predictable. This is also true for bladder carcinoma, a highly recurrent neoplasia. Currently, the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine is well accepted as a standard protocol for treating bladder carcinoma. However, in some cases, this treatment protocol causes harmful side effects. Therefore, we investigated the roles of the genes TP53, RASSF1A (a tumor suppressor gene) and hMLH1 (a gene involved in the mismatch repair pathway) in cell susceptibility to cisplatin/gemcitabine treatment. Two bladder transitional carcinoma cell (TCC) lines, RT4 (wild-type TP53) and 5637 (mutated TP53), were used in this study. First, we evaluated whether the genotoxic potential of cisplatin/gemcitabine was dependent on TP53 status. Then, we evaluated whether the two antineoplastic drugs modulated RASSF1A and hMLH1 expression in the two cell lines. Increased DNA damage was observed in both cell lines after treatment with cisplatin or gemcitabine and with the two drugs simultaneously, as depicted by the comet assay. A lack of RASSF1A expression and hypermethylation of its promoter were observed before and after treatment in both cell lines. On the other hand, hMLH1 downregulation, unrelated to methylation status, was observed in RT4 cells after treatment with cisplatin or with cisplatin and gemcitabine simultaneously (wild-type TP53); in 5637 cells, hMLH1 was upregulated only after treatment with gemcitabine. In conclusion, the three treatment protocols were genotoxic, independent of TP53 status. However, cisplatin was the most effective, causing the highest level of DNA damage in both wild-type and mutated TP53 cells. Gemcitabine was the least genotoxic agent in both cell lines. Furthermore, no relationship was observed between the amount of DNA damage and the level of hMLH1 and RASSF1A expression. Therefore, other alternative pathways might be involved in cisplatin and gemcitabine genotoxicity in these two bladder cancer cell

  20. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  2. Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-18

    Feb 18, 2011 ... To investigate vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer (CRC) cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells. (DCs) in advanced CRC, 14 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity, tolerability, immune and clinical responses to the vaccine. No.

  3. Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer (CRC) cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced CRC, 14 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity, tolerability, immune and clinical responses to the vaccine. No severe toxicity ...

  4. 18F-FDG PET/CT for Very Early Response Evaluation Predicts CT Response in Erlotinib-Treated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: A Comparison of Assessment Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fledelius, Joan; Winther-Larsen, Anne; Khalil, Azza A; Bylov, Catharina M; Hjorthaug, Karin; Bertelsen, Aksel; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Meldgaard, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which method for early response evaluation with 18F-FDG PET/CT performed most optimally for the prediction of response on a later CT scan in erlotinib-treated non-small cell lung cancer patients. Methods:18F-FDG PET/CT scans were obtained before and after 7-10 d of erlotinib treatment in 50 non-small cell lung cancer patients. The scans were evaluated using a qualitative approach and various semiquantitative methods including percentage change in SUVs, lean body mass-corrected (SUL) SULpeak, SULmax, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The PET parameters and their corresponding response categories were compared with the percentage change in the sum of the longest diameter in target lesions and the resulting response categories from a CT scan obtained after 9-11 wk of erlotinib treatment using receiver-operating-characteristic analysis, linear regression, and quadratic-weighted κ. Results: TLG delineation according to the PERCIST showed the strongest correlation to sum of the longest diameter (R = 0.564, P evaluation correctly categorized 50%, with a κ-value of 0.47 (95% CI, 0.24-0.70). Conclusion: TLG (PERCIST) was the optimal predictor of response on later CT scans, outperforming both SULpeak and SULmax The use of TLG (PERCIST) with a 25% cutoff after 1-2 wk of treatment allows us to safely identify 41% of the patients who will not benefit from erlotinib and stop the treatment at this time. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  5. pattern and experience with cancers treated with the chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 10 October 2000. PATTERN AND EXPERIENCE WITH CANCERS TREATED WITH THE CHINESE GWGP80 COBALT UNIT AT MULAGO HOSPITAL, KAMPALA. J. B. Kigula Mugambe, MBChB, MMed (Rad) MUK, MSc (Rad. Oncol.) Cairo, Department of Radiology, Makerere ...

  6. Pattern and experience with cancers treated with the chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The Chinese GWGP80 Cobalt unit has effectively treated a large number of cancer patients but the failures of the “force back system” of its radioactive source compromise its radiation safety and ideally would require a change in the engineering design to decrease on the associated radiation hazards.

  7. The Efficacy and Safety of Icotinib in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated with Chemotherapy: A Single-Arm, Multi-Center, Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Hu

    Full Text Available Icotinib is a small molecule targeting epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which shows non-inferior efficacy and better safety comparing to gefitinib in previous phase III trial. The present study was designed to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.Patients with NSCLC progressing after one or two lines of chemotherapy were enrolled to receive oral icotinib (125 mg tablet, three times per day. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints included overall survival, objective response rate, time to progression, quality of life and safety.From March 16, 2010 to October 9, 2011, 128 patients from 15 centers nationwide were enrolled, in which 124 patients were available for efficacy evaluation and 127 patients were evaluable for safety. The median progression-free survival and time to progression were 5.0 months (95%CI 2.9-6.6 m and 5.4 months (95%CI 3.1-7.9 m, respectively. The objective response rate and disease control rate were 25.8% and 67.7% respectively. Median overall survival exceeded 17.6 months (95%CI 14.2 m-NA according to censored data. Further follow-up of overall survival is ongoing. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were rash (26%, 33/127, diarrhea (12.6%, 16/127 and elevation of transaminase (15.7%, 20/127.In general, this study showed similar efficacy and numerically better safety when compared with that in ICOGEN trial, further confirming the efficacy and safety of icotinib in treating patients with advanced NSCLC previously treated with chemotherapy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02486354.

  8. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with severe acute radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Bo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the association between the clinical, dosimetric factors and severe acute radiation pneumonitis (SARP in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LANSCLC treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods We analyzed 94 LANSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT between May 2005 and September 2006. SARP was defined as greater than or equal 3 side effects and graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0. The clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between clinical, dosimetric factors and SARP. Results Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range 6.5-24. Of 94 patients, 11 (11.7% developed SARP. Univariate analyses showed that the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP, mean lung dose (MLD, relative volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose of 5-60 Gy at increments of 5 Gy (V5-V60, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and Forced Expiratory Volume in the first second (FEV1 were associated with SARP (p p = 0.001 and V10 (p = 0.015 were the most significant factors associated with SARP. The incidences of SARP in the group with NTCP > 4.2% and NTCP ≤4.2% were 43.5% and 1.4%, respectively (p 50% were 5.7% and 29.2%, respectively (p Conclusions NTCP value and V10 are the useful indicators for predicting SARP in NSCLC patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT.

  9. SRC family kinases as novel therapeutic targets to treat breast cancer brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Huang, Wen-Chien; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Chenyu; Lowery, Frank J; Ding, Zhaoxi; Guo, Hua; Wang, Hai; Huang, Suyun; Sahin, Aysegul A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2013-09-15

    Despite better control of early-stage disease and improved overall survival of patients with breast cancer, the incidence of life-threatening brain metastases continues to increase in some of these patients. Unfortunately, other than palliative treatments there is no effective therapy for this condition. In this study, we reveal a critical role for Src activation in promoting brain metastasis in a preclinical model of breast cancer and we show how Src-targeting combinatorial regimens can treat HER2(+) brain metastases in this model. We found that Src was hyperactivated in brain-seeking breast cancer cells derived from human cell lines or from patients' brain metastases. Mechanistically, Src activation promoted tumor cell extravasation into the brain parenchyma via permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier. When combined with the EGFR/HER2 dual-targeting drug lapatinib, an Src-targeting combinatorial regimen prevented outgrowth of disseminated breast cancer cells through the induction of cell-cycle arrest. More importantly, this combinatorial regimen inhibited the outgrowth of established experimental brain metastases, prolonging the survival of metastases-bearing mice. Our results provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of Src-targeting regimens to treat patients with breast cancer suffering from brain metastasis. ©2013 AACR.

  10. Lgr5-Positive Cells are Cancer-Stem-Cell-Like Cells in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongli Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Effective treatment of gastric cancer (GC requires better understanding of the molecular regulation of its carcinogenesis. Identification of cancer stem cells (CSCs in GC appears to be a critical question. Methods: We analyzed Lgr5 expression in GC specimen. We used an adeno-associated virus (AAV that carries diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA under the control of Lgr5 promoter (AAV-pLgr5-DTA to transduce human GC cells. The growth of GC cells with/without depletion of Lgr5-positive cells was studied in vitro in an MTT assay, and in vivo by analyzing bioluminescence levels. Results: A portion of GC cells in the resected specimen expressed Lgr5. GC cells that formed tumor spheres expressed high Lgr5. Selective depletion of Lgr5-positive GC cells resulted in significant growth inhibition of GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Lgr5-positive cells may be CSCs-like cells in GC and may play a pivotal role in the tumorigenesis of GC. Treating Lgr5-positive GC cells may substantially improve the therapeutic outcome.

  11. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  12. Cardiovascular Effects in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated with Anthracyclines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian I. Franco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthracyclines are commonly used to treat childhood leukemias and lymphomas, as well as other malignancies, leading to a growing population of long-term childhood cancer survivors. However, their use is limited by cardiotoxicity, increasing survivors' vulnerability to treatment-related complications that can markedly affect their quality of life. Survivors are more likely to suffer from heart failure, coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular accidents compared to the general population. The specific mechanisms of anthracycline cardiotoxicity are complex and remain unclear. Hence, determining the factors that may increase susceptibility to cardiotoxicity is of great importance, as is monitoring patients during and after treatment. Additionally, treatment and prevention options, such as limiting cumulative dosage, liposomal anthracyclines, and dexrazoxane, continue to be explored. Here, we review the cardiovascular complications associated with the use of anthracyclines in treating malignancies in children and discuss methods for preventing, screening, and treating such complications in childhood cancer survivors.

  13. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Horn L, Eisenberg R, Gius D, et al. Cancer of the lung. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan ...

  14. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate anticancer effects of bergenin on human colorectal cancer cell lines. Methods: Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 was treated with various concentrations of bergenin for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were analyzed ...

  15. Natural ways to prevent and treat oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Danaraddi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the usual causes of mortality all over the world, with a five-year survival rate of only 50%. Oral cancers are treated primarily by surgery with / without adjuvant radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy. However, there is significant post-treatment morbidity and mortality secondary to recurrences. Dietary supplements like fruits and vegetables are rich in phytochemicals and provide a variety of antioxidants like vitamin A, C, E. Spirulina, Selenium, Green tea (EGCG, Neem, Tomatoes (lycopene, Turmeric (curcumin, and some medicinal mushrooms are also used as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. This overview emphasizes on natural therapies to fight against oral cancer. Thus, there are several natural compounds that can enhance the prevention of oral cancer.

  16. Impact of pretreatment whole-tumor perfusion computed tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography measurements on local control of non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Seino, Hiroko; Kakehata, Shinya; Tsushima, Fumiyasu; Fujita, Hiromasa; Fujita, Tamaki; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between the average iodine density (AID) detected by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) yielded by [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Seventy-four patients with medically inoperable NSCLC who underwent both DE-CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT before SBRT (50‒60 Gy in 5‒6 fractions) were followed up after a median interval of 24.5 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to determine associations between local control (LC) and variables, including AID, SUVmax, tumor size, histology, and prescribed dose. The median AID and SUVmax were 18.64 (range, 1.18-45.31) (100 µg/cm3) and 3.2 (range, 0.7-17.6), respectively. No correlation was observed between AID and SUVmax Two-year LC rates were 96.2% vs 75.0% (P = 0.039) and 72.0% vs 96.2% (P = 0.002) for patients classified according to high vs low AID or SUVmax, respectively. Two-year LC rates for patients with adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma vs unknown cancer were 96.4% vs 67.1% vs 92.9% (P = 0.008), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified SUVmax as a significant predictor of LC. The 2-year LC rate was only 48.5% in the subgroup of lower AID and higher SUVmax vs >90% (range, 94.4-100%) in other subgroups (P = 0.000). Despite the short follow-up period, a reduction in AID and subsequent increase in SUVmax correlated significantly with local failure in SBRT-treated NSCLC patients. Further studies involving larger populations and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  17. New Paradigm in Treating Cancer: Right on Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorwati Sutandyo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer prevalence is increasing every year and now cancer is the third highest cause of death in developing countries. Effective anticancer treatment can prolong life and improve the patient’s quality of life. Targeted therapy is a new therapeutic modality which targets specific molecules in the cancer cell and disrupts dysregulated signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis. Since targeted therapy does not attack normal cells, its side effects are considered low compared to chemotherapy. More than 15 drugs have been approved for treatment in various human cancers. These drugs can largely be grouped into tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. This review will focus on the most common agents within both groups.

  18. Omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid induces pyroptosis cell death in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizato, Nathalia; Luzete, Beatriz Christina; Kiffer, Larissa Fernanda Melo Vasconcelos; Corrêa, Luís Henrique; de Oliveira Santos, Igor; Assumpção, José Antônio Fagundes; Ito, Marina Kiyomi; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2018-01-31

    The implication of inflammation in pathophysiology of several type of cancers has been under intense investigation. Omega-3 fatty acids can modulate inflammation and present anticancer effects, promoting cancer cell death. Pyroptosis is an inflammation related cell death and so far, the function of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in pyroptosis cell death has not been described. This study investigated the role of DHA in triggering pyroptosis activation in breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were supplemented with DHA and inflammation cell death was analyzed. DHA-treated breast cancer cells triggered increased caspase-1and gasdermin D activation, enhanced IL-1β secretion, translocated HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm, and membrane pore formation when compared to untreated cells, suggesting DHA induces pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells. Moreover, caspase-1 inhibitor (YVAD) could protect breast cancer cells from DHA-induced pyroptotic cell death. In addition, membrane pore formation showed to be a lysosomal damage and ROS formation-depended event in breast cancer cells. DHA triggered pyroptosis cell death in MDA-MB-231by activating several pyroptosis markers in these cells. This is the first study that shows the effect of DHA triggering pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells and it could improve the understanding of the omega-3 supplementation during breast cancer treatment.

  19. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  20. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer initiating cells by targeting Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-01-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here we report that berbamine (BBM) and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK...

  1. Differential Expression of Gene Profiles in MRGX-treated Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Yong-Kyun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Modified regular ginseng extract (MRGX has stronger anti-cancer activity-possessing gensenoside profiles. Methods: To investigate changes in gene expression in the MRGX-treated lung cancer cells (A549, we examined genomic data with cDNA microarray results. After completing the gene-ontology-based analysis, we grouped the genes into up-and down-regulated profiles and into ontology-related regulated genes and proteins through their interaction network. Results: One hundred nine proteins that were up- and down-regulated by MRGX were queried by using IPA. IL8, MMP7 and PLAUR and were found to play a major role in the anti-cancer activity in MRGX-treated lung cancer cells. These results were validated using a Western blot analysis and a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions: Most MRGX-responsive genes are up-regulated transiently in A549 cells, but down-regulated in a sustained manner in lung cancer cells.

  2. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  3. Sexual dysfunctions in men treated for testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Susanne; Kristensen, Ellids; Giraldi, Annamaria G E

    2008-01-01

    Patients treated for testicular cancer have increased risk of ejaculatory, orgasmic and erectile dysfunction compared with healthy men. The underlying relations are unclear. This review describes sexual dysfunctions that are associated with various treatment modalities. One meta-analysis and 11...... original works were examined. About one third of the patients experience one or more sexual problems in relation to the treatment. Only retroperitoneal surgery can cause a specific sexual dysfunction, namely loss of ejaculation ability or ejaculatory functioning. Psychosexual causes are important...... for understanding sexual dysfunctions in patients with testicular cancer....

  4. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. Significance of targeted therapy and genetic alterations in EGFR, ALK, or KRAS on survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Kimberley S; Gainor, Justin F; Niemierko, Andrzej; Oh, Kevin S; Willers, Henning; Choi, Noah C; Loeffler, Jay S; Sequist, Lecia V; Shaw, Alice T; Shih, Helen A

    2015-02-01

    We determined the impact of genetic alterations in EGFR, ALK, or KRAS on survival after radiotherapy for brain metastases in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Of 172 genotyped NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy for brain metastases in 2005-2012, 54 had cancers with EGFR mutations, 12 had ALK rearrangements, 38 had KRAS mutations, and 68 were wild-type (WT). Overall survival (OS) was determined. Median follow-up was 8.6 months. Median OS was 13.6 months for patients with EGFR mutations and 26.3 months for patients with ALK rearrangements, in contrast to 5.7 months for KRAS-mutant patients and 5.5 months for WT patients (P = .001). On multivariate analysis, adjusting for receipt of targeted therapy after cranial radiotherapy, ALK rearrangements were associated with improved OS (HR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.13-0.74; P = .008). EGFR mutations were not significantly associated with improved OS on multivariate analysis (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.37-1.38; P = .3). KRAS mutations were also not associated with improved OS (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.59-1.47; P = .8). Receipt of targeted therapy after cranial radiotherapy was independently associated with improved OS (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.17-0.54; P genetic alterations in ALK have improved survival outcomes after radiotherapy for brain metastases compared with EGFR, KRAS, or WT. Subsequent receipt of targeted therapy was associated with additional improvement in OS. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Telmisartan inhibits human urological cancer cell growth through early apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUYAMA, MASAHIDE; FUNAO, KIYOAKI; KURATSUKURI, KATSUYUKI; TANAKA, TOMOAKI; KAWAHITO, YUTAKA; SANO, HAJIME; CHARGUI, JAMEL; TOURAINE, JEAN-LOUIS; YOSHIMURA, NORIO; YOSHIMURA, RIKIO

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used as hypertensive therapeutic agents. In addition, studies have provided evidence that ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of several types of cancer cells. It was reported that telmisartan (a type of ARB) has peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activation activity. We previously reported that the PPAR-γ ligand induces growth arrest in human urological cancer cells through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of telmisartan and other ARBs on cell proliferation in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC) and testicular cancer (TC) cell lines. The inhibitory effects of telmisartan and other ARBs (candesartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) on the growth of the RCC, BC, PC and TC cell lines was investigated using an MTT assay. Flow cytometry and Hoechst staining were used to determine whether the ARBs induced apoptosis. Telmisartan caused marked growth inhibition in the urological cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Urological cancer cells treated with 100 μM telmisartan underwent early apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. However, the other ARBs had no effect on cell proliferation in any of the urological cancer cell lines. Telmisartan may mediate potent anti-proliferative effects in urological cancer cells through PPAR-γ. Thus, telmisartan is a potent target for the prevention and treatment of human urological cancer. PMID:22993542

  7. Magnesium for treating sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Nan Nitra; Soe, Htoo Htoo Kyaw; Palaniappan, Senthil K; Abas, Adinegara Bl; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2017-04-14

    between two groups (low quality evidence). None of the studies reported on quality of life or length of hospital stay. Two studies (n = 68) reported there were no differences in levels of magnesium in either plasma or red blood cells (moderate quality evidence). Two studies (n = 56) reported adverse events. One reported episodes of mild diarrhoea and headache, all of which resolved without stopping treatment. The second study reported adverse events as gastrointestinal disorders, headache or migraine, upper respiratory infections and rash; which were all evenly distributed across treatment groups (moderate quality evidence). Moderate to low quality evidence showed neither intravenous magnesium and oral magnesium therapy has an effect on reducing painful crisis, length of hospital stay and changing quality of life in treating sickle cell disease. Therefore, no definitive conclusions can be made regarding its clinical benefit. Further randomized controlled studies, perhaps multicentre, are necessary to establish whether intravenous and oral magnesium therapies have any effect on improving the health of people with sickle cell disease.

  8. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but...

  9. Phase III Multinational, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Tivantinib (ARQ 197) Plus Erlotinib Versus Erlotinib Alone in Previously Treated Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Nonsquamous Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio; von Pawel, Joachim; Novello, Silvia; Ramlau, Rodryg; Favaretto, Adolfo; Barlesi, Fabrice; Akerley, Wallace; Orlov, Sergey; Santoro, Armando; Spigel, David; Hirsh, Vera; Shepherd, Frances A; Sequist, Lecia V; Sandler, Alan; Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Qiang; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Shuster, Dale; Schwartz, Brian

    2015-08-20

    Tivantinib, a MET receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, demonstrated increased anticancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies when combined with erlotinib. Our study aimed to confirm efficacy and safety of the combination in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC previously treated with one to two systemic regimens, including a platinum doublet, were randomly assigned at a 1:1 ratio to receive erlotinib 150 mg daily plus oral tivantinib 360 mg twice daily (E + T) or erlotinib plus placebo (E + P) until disease progression. Tumor specimens were evaluated for EGFR and KRAS mutations, MET expression, and MET gene amplification. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary and exploratory objectives included progression-free survival (PFS), OS in molecular subgroups, and safety. The study enrolled 1,048 patients and was discontinued for futility at the interim analysis. OS did not improve with E + T versus E + P (median OS, 8.5 v 7.8 months, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.98; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.15; P = .81), even though PFS increased (median PFS, 3.6 v 1.9 months; HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.89; P < .001). Exploratory subgroup analyses suggested OS improvement in patients with high MET expression (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49 to 1.01). Most common adverse events occurring with E + T versus E + P were rash (33.1% v 37.3%, respectively), diarrhea (34.6% v 41.0%), asthenia or fatigue (43.5% v 38.1%), and neutropenia (grade 3 to 4; 8.5% v 0.8%). E + T was well tolerated and increased PFS but did not improve OS in the overall nonsquamous NSCLC population. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Correlation of Radiation Pneumonitis History Before Nivolumab with Onset of Interstitial Lung Disease and Progression-free Survival of Patients with Pre-treated Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiya, Akihiro; Tamiya, Motohiro; Nakahama, Kenji; Taniguchi, Yoshihiko; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Inoue, Takako; Okishio, Kyoichi; Nishino, Kazumi; Kumagai, Toru; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Imamura, Fumio; Atagi, Shinji

    2017-09-01

    Nivolumab has a promising efficacy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as second-line or later treatment, and after radiotherapy as abscopal effect. However, the effects of radiation pneumonitis history before nivolumab have not been clarified. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed the correlation of a history of radiation pneumonitis before nivolumab with onset of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and progression-free survival (PFS) after nivolumab treatment in patients with previously treated NSCLC. A total of 201 patients treated with nivolumab were retrospectively reviewed. We collected clinical data of patients at the time of starting nivolumab and we evaluated ILD incidence and PFS in relation to patient characteristics, including radiation pneumonitis history. The median age was 68 years; 135 patients were men, 157 had a smoking history, and 153 had performance status of 0 or 1. Thirty-four patients experienced radiation pneumonitis before nivolumab, and 50 patients received radiotherapy to the chest (31 patients received curative radiotherapy). The overall median PFS was 2.8 months and the overall ILD rate was 12.4%. Higher ILD incidence was observed in the group with a history of radiation pneumonitis (26.5%) compared to the group without radiation pneumonitis (9.6%). The median PFS was 3.6 and 2.3 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a history of radiation pneumonitis was also significantly correlated with good PFS (p=0.023). Although increasing the risk of ILD, a history of radiation pneumonitis before nivolumab also contributes to the prolongation of PFS after nivolumab. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Nivolumab Versus Docetaxel in Previously Treated Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Two-Year Outcomes From Two Randomized, Open-Label, Phase III Trials (CheckMate 017 and CheckMate 057).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Leora; Spigel, David R; Vokes, Everett E; Holgado, Esther; Ready, Neal; Steins, Martin; Poddubskaya, Elena; Borghaei, Hossein; Felip, Enriqueta; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pluzanski, Adam; Reckamp, Karen L; Burgio, Marco A; Kohlhäeufl, Martin; Waterhouse, David; Barlesi, Fabrice; Antonia, Scott; Arrieta, Oscar; Fayette, Jérôme; Crinò, Lucio; Rizvi, Naiyer; Reck, Martin; Hellmann, Matthew D; Geese, William J; Li, Ang; Blackwood-Chirchir, Anne; Healey, Diane; Brahmer, Julie; Eberhardt, Wilfried E E

    2017-10-12

    Purpose Nivolumab, a programmed death-1 inhibitor, prolonged overall survival compared with docetaxel in two independent phase III studies in previously treated patients with advanced squamous (CheckMate 017; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01642004) or nonsquamous (CheckMate 057; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01673867) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report updated results, including a pooled analysis of the two studies. Methods Patients with stage IIIB/IV squamous (N = 272) or nonsquamous (N = 582) NSCLC and disease progression during or after prior platinum-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 1:1 to nivolumab (3 mg/kg every 2 weeks) or docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks). Minimum follow-up for survival was 24.2 months. Results Two-year overall survival rates with nivolumab versus docetaxel were 23% (95% CI, 16% to 30%) versus 8% (95% CI, 4% to 13%) in squamous NSCLC and 29% (95% CI, 24% to 34%) versus 16% (95% CI, 12% to 20%) in nonsquamous NSCLC; relative reductions in the risk of death with nivolumab versus docetaxel remained similar to those reported in the primary analyses. Durable responses were observed with nivolumab; 10 (37%) of 27 confirmed responders with squamous NSCLC and 19 (34%) of 56 with nonsquamous NSCLC had ongoing responses after 2 years' minimum follow-up. No patient in either docetaxel group had an ongoing response. In the pooled analysis, the relative reduction in the risk of death with nivolumab versus docetaxel was 28% (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.84), and rates of treatment-related adverse events were lower with nivolumab than with docetaxel (any grade, 68% v 88%; grade 3 to 4, 10% v 55%). Conclusion Nivolumab provides long-term clinical benefit and a favorable tolerability profile compared with docetaxel in previously treated patients with advanced NSCLC.

  12. The predictive value of 53BP1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Laura; Costa, Carlota; Majem, Margarita; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Gimenez-Capitan, Ana; Rodriguez, Ignacio; Vergenegre, Alain; Massuti, Bartomeu; Favaretto, Adolfo; Rugge, Massimo; Pallares, Cinta; Taron, Miquel; Rosell, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for non-oncogene-addicted non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and the analysis of multiple DNA repair genes could improve current models for predicting chemosensitivity. We investigated the potential predictive role of components of the 53BP1 pathway in conjunction with BRCA1. The mRNA expression of BRCA1, MDC1, CASPASE3, UBC13, RNF8, 53BP1, PIAS4, UBC9 and MMSET was analyzed by real-time PCR in 115 advanced NSCLC patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients expressing low levels of both BRCA1 and 53BP1 obtained a median progression-free survival of 10.3 months and overall survival of 19.3 months, while among those with low BRCA1 and high 53BP1 progression-free survival was 5.9 months (P <0.0001) and overall survival was 8.2 months (P=0.001). The expression of 53BP1 refines BRCA1-based predictive modeling to identify patients most likely to benefit from platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:24197907

  13. Colon cancer cell treatment with rose bengal generates a protective immune response via immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianzhong; Kunda, Nicholas; Qiao, Guilin; Calata, Jed F; Pardiwala, Krunal; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2017-02-02

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to manage patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies are desired; however, mechanisms to incite tumor-specific immune responses remain to be elucidated. Rose bengal (RB) is toxic at low concentrations to malignant cells and may induce damage-associated molecular patterns; therefore, we investigated its potential as an immunomodulator in colon cancer. Murine and human colon cancer lines were treated with RB (10% in saline/PV-10) for cell cycle, cell death, and apoptosis assays. Damage-associated molecular patterns were assessed with western blot, ELISA, and flow cytometry. In an immunocompetent murine model of colon cancer, we demonstrate that tumors regress upon RB treatment, and that RB induces cell death in colon cancer cells through G2/M growth arrest and predominantly necrosis. RB-treated colon cancer cells expressed distinct hallmarks of immunogenic cell death (ICD), including enhanced expression of calreticulin and heat-shock protein 90 on the cell surface, a decrease in intracellular ATP, and the release of HMGB1. To confirm the ICD phenotype, we vaccinated immunocompetent animals with syngeneic colon cancer cells treated with RB. RB-treated tumors served as a vaccine against subsequent challenge with the same CT26 colon cancer tumor cells, and vaccination with in vitro RB-treated cells resulted in slower tumor growth following inoculation with colon cancer cells, but not with syngeneic non-CT26 cancer cells, suggesting a specific antitumor immune response. In conclusion, RB serves as an inducer of ICD that contributes to enhanced specific antitumor immunity in colorectal cancer.

  14. Characterising Castrate Tolerant Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ASHLEE KATE CLARK

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent disease in aging males. This thesis explores prostate cancer cells that escape current therapy and give rise to end-stage disease. Using sophisticated experimental approaches, this important cancer cell population was identified and characterised in human prostate cancer tissues.  Our discoveries will eventually lead to improved cancer treatments for men with prostate cancer.

  15. Stem cell transplantation for treating spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Liangbi; Chen, Yu

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends of stem cell transplantation for treating spinal cord injury using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for stem cell transplantation for treating spinal cord injury from 2002 to 2011 using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on stem cell transplantation for treating spinal cord injury that were published and indexed...

  16. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns that Predict Survival in 127 Chinese Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by Gefitinib Who Failed to Previous Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziping WANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gefitinib produces only 10%-20% tumor regression in heavily pretreated, unselected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients as the second- and third-line setting. Asian, female, nonsmokers and adenocarcinoma are favorable factors; however, it is difficult to find a patient satisfying all the above clinical characteristics. The aim of this study is to identify novel predicting factors, and to explore the interactions between clinical variables and their impact on the survival of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC who were heavily treated with gefitinib in the second- or third-line setting. Methods The clinical and follow-up data of 127 advanced NSCLC patients referred to the Cancer Hospital & Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from March 2005 to March 2010 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of progression-free survival (PFS was performed using recursive partitioning, which is referred to as the classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Results The median PFS of 127 eligible consecutive advanced NSCLC patients was 8.0 months (95%CI: 5.8-10.2. CART was performed with an initial split on first-line chemotherapy outcomes and a second split on patients’ age. Three terminal subgroups were formed. The median PFS of the three subsets ranged from 1.0 month (95%CI: 0.8-1.2 for those with progressive disease outcome after the first-line chemotherapy subgroup, 10 months (95%CI: 7.0-13.0 in patients with a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age <70, and 22.0 months for patients obtaining a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy at age 70-81 (95%CI: 3.8-40.1. Conclusion Partial response, stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age ≥ 70 are closely correlated with long-term survival treated by gefitinib as a second- or third-line setting in advanced NSCLC. CART can be used to identify previously unappreciated patient

  17. Effect of lycopene on cell viability and cell cycle progression in human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomato, has a potential anticancer activity in many types of cancer. Epidemiological and clinical trials rarely provide evidence for mechanisms of the compound’s action, and studies on its effect on cancer of different cell origins are now being done. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of lycopene on cell cycle and cell viability in eight human cancer cell lines. Methods Human cell lines were treated with lycopene (1–5 μM for 48 and 96 h. Cell viability was monitored using the method of MTT. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptotic cells were identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick labeling (TUNEL and by DAPI. Results Our data showed a significant decrease in the number of viable cells in three cancer cells lines (HT-29, T84 and MCF-7 after 48 h treatment with lycopene, and changes in the fraction of cells retained in different cell cycle phases. Lycopene promoted also cell cycle arrest followed by decreased cell viability in majority of cell lines after 96 h, as compared to controls. Furthermore, an increase in apoptosis was observed in four cell lines (T-84, HT-29, MCF-7 and DU145 when cells were treated with lycopene. Conclusions Our findings show the capacity of lycopene to inhibit cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle in different phases and increase apoptosis, mainly in breast, colon and prostate lines after 96 h. These observations suggest that lycopene may alter cell cycle regulatory proteins depending on the type of cancer and the dose of lycopene administration. Taken together, these data indicated that the antiproliferative effect of lycopene was cellular type, time and dose-dependent.

  18. Vaginal vault carcinoma as second primary in a treated case of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushruta Shrivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advances in the treatment of cancer, the chances of survival have increased today. The five-year relative survival rate is about 66%. With the increasing survival rate, it is important to identify the late effects of cancer and its therapy. One of the most serious events experienced by cancer survivors is the diagnosis of a new cancer. Case: A 32-year-old unmarried female diagnosed as ovarian cancer in the year 2010. She was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy followed by surgery. Histopathology was well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. She received three more cycles of chemotherapy after surgery. She was under follow-up and developed vaginal vault carcinoma after a disease-free interval of 2 years. The biopsy was suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma. She was treated with radiation for vaginal cancer successfully. This case indicates that female gynecological cancers with different histology may occur in minimum period of interval even in the absence of any predisposing factors like human papilloma virus infection.

  19. Stem cell therapy to treat heart ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali Qayyum, Abbas; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (CABG), morbidity and mortality is still high in patients with CAD. Along with PCI and CABG or in patients without options for revascularization, stem cell regenerative therapy in controlled trials is a possibility. Stem cells are believed to exert their actions by angiogenesis and regeneration...... of cardiomyocytes. Recently published clinical trials and meta-analysis of stem cell studies have shown encouraging results with increased left ventricle ejection fraction and reduced symptoms in patients with CAD and heart failure. There is some evidence of mesenchymal stem cell being more effective compared...... to other cell types and cell therapy may be more effective in patients with known diabetes mellitus. However, further investigations are warranted....

  20. Single cancer cell analysis on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yoon Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells in blood may represent “a real time liquid biopsy” through the interrogation of single cancer cells thereby determining the outspread of their heterogeneity and guiding therapy. In this thesis, we focused on single cancer cell analysis downstream of the isolation of cancer cells from

  1. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Apoptosis induction of epifriedelinol on human cervical cancer cell line

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Present investigation evaluates the antitumor activity of epifriedelinol for the management of cervical cancer by inducing process of apoptosis. Methods: Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line, C33A and HeLa were selected for study and treated with epifriedelinol at a concentration of (50-1000 μg/ml). Cytotoxicity of ...

  3. Survival of adolescents with cancer treated at pediatric versus adult oncology treatment centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Brugieres, Laurence; Laurence, Valérie; Berger, Claire; Kanold, Justyna; Tron, Isabelle; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lacour, Brigitte

    2017-05-01

    In France, although children aged less than 15 years with cancer are usually referred to pediatric oncology centers, adolescents may be treated at pediatric or adult oncology centers. The objective was to compare survival according to their site of treatment. Using population-based registration, 15- to 19-year-old patients diagnosed with cancer in 2006 or 2007 and living in six French regions (accounting for 41% of the French population) were included. Of the 594 patients included, 33% of the French adolescents were treated at a pediatric oncology center. Compared with those treated at a pediatric center, adolescents treated at an adult center were older, were more likely to have carcinoma and germ-cell tumor, had a longer time to diagnosis, and were less likely to be enrolled in a clinical trial. In addition, the decisions for their management were less likely to be taken in the context of multidisciplinary team meetings. In multivariate analysis, adolescent patients treated at a pediatric center did not have significantly different overall survival (OS) compared with those treated at an adult center (5-year OS: 84.1% [95% confidence interval: 78.6-90.0] versus 87.7% [95% confidence interval: 84.2-91.3]; P = 0.25). The outcomes of French adolescents with cancer have begun to improve, with 81.2% survival in 2006-2007, with no difference between the types of treatment center. However, for this unique group of diseases, survival is not the unique endpoint. In order to ensure good quality of life after cancer, management of those patients requires specific approaches, designed to reduce the late effects of cancer treatment and improve supportive care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Stimulation of dendritic cells by DAMPs in ALA-PDT treated SCC tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Ji, Jie; Zhang, Haiyan; Fan, Zhixia; Zhang, Linglin; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Xiuli

    2015-12-29

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) not only kills tumor cells directly but also rapidly recruits and activates immune cells favoring the development of antitumor adaptive immunity. It is believed that Topical 5-aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) can induce anti-tumor immune responses through dangerous signals damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). In this study, we investigated the effect of ALA-PDT induced DAMPs on immune cells. We focused on the stimulation of dendritic cells by major DAMPs, enhanced the expression of calreticulin (CRT), heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70), and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), either individually or in combination. We evaluated in vitro and in vivo expressions of DAMPs induced by ALA-PDT using immunohistochemistry, western blot, and ELISA in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) mouse model. The role of DAMPs in the maturation of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells was detected by FACS and ELISA. Our results showed that ALA-PDT enhanced the expression of CRT, HSP70, and HMGB1. These induced DAMPs played an important part in activating DCs by PDT-treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (increase of surface expression of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86) and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12). Furthermore, injecting ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells into naïve mice resulted in complete protection against cancer cells of the same origin. Our findings indicate that ALA-PDT can increase DAMPs and enhance tumor immunogenicity, providing a promising strategy for inducing a systemic anticancer immune response.

  5. Class I and class II histone deacetylases are potential therapeutic targets for treating pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs have shown promising antitumor activities against preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we sought to identify clinically relevant histone deacetylases (HDACs to guide the selection of HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs tailored to the treatment of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY: HDAC expression in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells was determined by Western blotting. Antitumor interactions between class I- and class II-selective HDACIs were determined by MTT assays and standard isobologram/CompuSyn software analyses. The effects of HDACIs on cell death, apoptosis and cell cycle progression, and histone H4, alpha-tubulin, p21, and γH2AX levels were determined by colony formation assays, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: The majority of classes I and II HDACs were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines, albeit at variable levels. Treatments with MGCD0103 (a class I-selective HDACI resulted in dose-dependent growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, accompanied by induction of p21 and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. In contrast, MC1568 (a class IIa-selective HDACI or Tubastatin A (a HDAC6-selective inhibitor showed minimal effects. When combined simultaneously, MC1568 significantly enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest, while Tubastatin A only synergistically enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest. Although MC1568 or Tubastatin A alone had no obvious effects on DNA DSBs and p21 expression, their combination with MGCD0103 resulted in cooperative induction of p21 in the cells. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that classes I and II HDACs are potential therapeutic targets for

  6. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  7. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  8. Spatial Distrubiton of Children Treated by Cancer in Zonguldak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Cam; Kuzlu Ayyıldız, Tülay; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-06-01

    This research is focused on the examination of child cancer cases in Zonguldak (Turkey) descriptively in epidemiological aspect thanks to GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 0-19 years old, treated in Children Oncology Clinic of Health Application and Research Center in BEU. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95% confidence interval and pobserved that 33.3% (n=20) were being treated for ALL, 13.3% (n=8) for Medullablastoma and 11.7% (n=7) for Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma. It was detected that 31.7% (n=19) were in Ereğli, 31.7% (n=19) were in Central district and 18.3% (n=11) were in Çaycuma, when the places where children were living were evaluated. Statistically significant difference was found (p=0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and overall distribution map of the number of cancer cases was produced in this context. This is the first research subjecting the distribution of cancer cases for Zonguldak province.

  9. Mathematical models in cell biology and cancer chemotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to show how mathematics can be applied to improve cancer chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most drugs used in treating cancer kill both normal and abnormal cells. However, more cancer cells than normal cells can be destroyed by the drug because tumor cells usually exhibit different growth kinetics than normal cells. To capitalize on this last fact, cell kinetics must be studied by formulating mathematical models of normal and abnormal cell growth. These models allow the therapeutic and harmful effects of cancer drugs to be simulated quantitatively. The combined cell and drug models can be used to study the effects of different methods of administering drugs. The least harmful method of drug administration, according to a given criterion, can be found by applying optimal control theory. The prerequisites for reading this book are an elementary knowledge of ordinary differential equations, probability, statistics, and linear algebra. In order to make this book self-contained, a chapter on...

  10. The ratio of cancer cells to stroma after induction therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masaki; Naito, Masahito; Saruwatari, Koichi; Hisakane, Kakeru; Kojima, Motohiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Nomura, Shogo; Aokage, Keiju; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Yokoi, Kohei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-02-01

    Induction therapy induces degenerative changes of various degrees in both cancerous and non-cancerous cells of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The effect of induction therapy on histological characteristics, in particular the ratio of residual cancer cells to non-cancerous components, is unknown. Seventy-four NSCLC patients treated with induction therapy followed by surgery were enrolled. Residual cancer cells were identified using anti-pan-cytokeratin antibody (AE1/AE3). We analyzed and quantified the following three factors via digital image analysis; (1) the tumor area containing cancer cells and non-cancerous components (TA), (2) the total area of AE1/AE3 positive cancer cells (TACC), (3) the percentage of TACC to TA (%TACC). These factors were also analyzed in a matched control group (surgery alone, n = 80). The median TACC of the induction therapy group was significantly lower than that of the control group (p induction therapy group (5.9 %) was significantly lower than that of the control group (58.6 %) (p induction therapy group. Conversely, TACC had a strong positive correlation with %TACC in the induction therapy group (r = 0.95), but not in the control group. Unlike the control group, the smaller the total area of residual cancer cells, the higher residual tumor contained non-cancerous components in the induction group, which may be the characteristic histological feature of NSCLC after induction therapy.

  11. Demands of illness in people treated for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, P; Miller, M A; Fernsler, J

    2000-05-01

    To describe the most common and most intense demands of illness in people with colorectal cancer. Descriptive, comparative. People with colorectal cancer were accrued through weekly online computer postings. 121 people (68 men and 53 women) from 35 states (n = 106) and six other countries (n = 15) who were treated for colon, rectal, or anal cancer. Mailed questionnaires included a 125-item, self-report instrument with seven subscales (Demands of Illness Inventory (DOII) and a 14-item demographic form. Demands of illness, time since treatment, perception of illness state, activity level, and age. Demands of illness were greatest in the personal meaning domain, with more than 93% of subjects reporting that they thought about the value of life and how long they might live. More than 85% reported uncertainty in six similar areas. The 10 most intense demands were predominately psychosocial and existential concerns. Respondents in the youngest age group (illness, activity level) accounted for 45% of the variance in DOII scores. Colorectal cancer imposed significant psychosocial and existential concerns on respondents, especially the youngest age group. Nurses should address these concerns with patients while continuing to identify and scientifically test creative strategies to minimize psychosocial morbidity.

  12. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...... using the Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse to generate information on the mechanical properties of the tissue. The objective quantitative elastography shear wave velocity was compared to the T stage classification and TRG. RESULTS: The baseline mean tumor elasticity was 3.13m/s. Two and six weeks after...

  13. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has proven to be very challenging. Until recently, docetaxel was the only therapeutic demonstrated to extend overall patient survival. Yet recently, a considerable number of new therapeutics have been approved to treat CRPC patients. These remarkable advances now give new tools for the therapeutic management of late-stage prostate cancer. In this review, we will examine mechanistic and clinical data of several newly approved therapeutics including the chemotherapeutic cabazitaxel, antiandrogen enzalutamide, endocrine disruptor abiraterone acetate, immunotherapy sipuleucel-T, and bone-targeting radiopharmaceutical alpharadin. In addition, we will examine other promising therapeutics that are currently in Phase III trials.

  14. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-23

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. Pemetrexed plus carboplatin versus pemetrexed in pretreated patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer : treating the right patients based on individualized treatment effect prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kruijsdijk, R. C. M.; Visseren, F. L. J.; Boni, L.; Groen, H. J. M.; Dingemans, A. M. C.; Aerts, J. G. J. V.; van der Graaf, Y.; Ardizzoni, A.; Smit, E. F.

    In this study, it is shown that there is important heterogeneity in the effects of pemetrexed-carboplatin versus pemetrexed on progression-free survival in pretreated patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer. Treatment effect can be predicted for individual patients using a

  16. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind; Meijer, Coby; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of markers of cancer stem cells and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in small cell lung cancer is not known. We retrospectively studied these markers in the biopsy tissue of patients with small cell lung cancer and correlated them with overall survival and the strongest

  17. Molecular analysis of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 expression in differentially expressing estrogen receptor breast cancer MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-468 cell lines treated with adriamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study: Bcl-2 and Cyclin D1 (CCND1 are key elements in cancer development and progression. Bcl-2 acts as a cell death suppressor and is involved in apoptosis regulation. Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of G1/S phase of the cell cycle progression. In addition, estrogen receptor (ER is an important prognostic factor in breast cancer cells. Therefore it is important to determine the Bcl-2 and CCND1 expression in MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell lines with different ER status following Adriamycin (ADR treatment. Methods: Cytotoxicity of ADR (250 and 500nM after 1-5 days exposure of the cell lines was evaluated by MTT assay. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 in tested cell lines were also analyzed by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry (ICC methods. Results: ADR cytotoxicity was highest in MDA-MB-468 and lowest in MCF7 cells in a time-dependent manner. Bcl-2 mRNA increased in MCF7 and decreased in MDA-MB-468 after exposure to ADR but it was less detectable in T47D cells. The expression of CCND1 in MCF7 with high level of ER expression was higher than the other two cell lines in untreated conditions. However, CCND1 mRNA did not show significant changes after ADR treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis did not show significant differences between Bcl-2 protein expression in the presence or absence of ADR in MDA-MB-468 cell line while in T47D and MCF7 cells its expression decreased after exposure to ADR. In addition to nuclear expression of cyclin D1 in all cell lines, strong cytoplasmic expression of cyclin D1 protein was observed only in MCF7 and T47D cells. Conclusion: The tested cell lines with different levels of ER expression showed differential molecular responses to ADR that is important in tumor-targeted cancer therapy.

  18. ERRγ target genes are poor prognostic factors in Tamoxifen-treated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Singh, Salendra; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2015-05-15

    One-third of estrogen (ER+) and/or progesterone receptor-positive (PGR+) breast tumors treated with Tamoxifen (TAM) do not respond to initial treatment, and the remaining 70% are at risk to relapse in the future. Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ESRRG, ERRγ) is an orphan nuclear receptor with broad, structural similarities to classical ER that is widely implicated in the transcriptional regulation of energy homeostasis. We have previously demonstrated that ERRγ induces resistance to TAM in ER+ breast cancer models, and that the receptor's transcriptional activity is modified by activation of the ERK/MAPK pathway. We hypothesize that hyper-activation or over-expression of ERRγ induces a pro-survival transcriptional program that impairs the ability of TAM to inhibit the growth of ER+ breast cancer. The goal of the present study is to determine whether ERRγ target genes are associated with reduced distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in ER+ breast cancer treated with TAM. Raw gene expression data was obtained from 3 publicly available breast cancer clinical studies of women with ER+ breast cancer who received TAM as their sole endocrine therapy. ERRγ target genes were selected from 2 studies that published validated chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses of ERRγ promoter occupancy. Kaplan-Meier estimation was used to determine the association of ERRγ target genes with DMFS, and selected genes were validated in ER+, MCF7 breast cancer cells that express exogenous ERRγ. Thirty-seven validated receptor target genes were statistically significantly altered in women who experienced a DM within 5 years, and could classify several independent studies into poor vs. good DMFS. Two genes (EEF1A2 and PPIF) could similarly separate ER+, TAM-treated breast tumors by DMFS, and their protein levels were measured in an ER+ breast cancer cell line model with exogenous ERRγ. Finally, expression of ERRγ and these two target genes are elevated in models of ER+ breast

  19. Binding mechanism of patulin to heat-treated yeast cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Yuan, Y; Yue, T; Hatab, S; Wang, Z

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to assess the removal mechanism of patulin using heat-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and identify the role of different cell wall components in the binding process. In order to understand the binding mechanism, viable cells, heat-treated cells, cell wall and intracellular extract were performed to assess their ability to remove patulin. Additionally, the effects of chemical and enzymatic treatments of yeast on the binding ability were tested. The results showed that there was no significant difference between viable (53·28%) and heat-treated yeast cells (51·71%) in patulin binding. In addition, the cell wall fraction decreased patulin by 35·05%, and the cell extract nearly failed to bind patulin. Treatments with protease E, methanol, formaldehyde, periodate or urea significantly decreased (P patulin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicated that more functional groups were involved in the binding process of heat-treated cells. Polysaccharides and protein are important components of yeast cell wall involved in patulin removal. In addition, hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding processes. Heat-treated S. cerevisiae cells could be used to control patulin contamination in the apple juice industry. Also, our results proof that the patulin removal process is based mainly on the adsorption not degradation. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Steroidogenesis in amlodipine treated purified Leydig cells

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    Latif, Rabia, E-mail: rabialatif08@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa, E-mail: drmustafa786@gmail.com [Department of Physiology, Wah Medical College, Wah (Pakistan); Hameed, Waqas, E-mail: waqham@hotmail.com [Department of Physiology, Rehman Medical College, Peshawar (Pakistan); Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: professormaslam@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology, Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-01-01

    Drugs have been shown to adversely affect male fertility and recently anti-hypertensive drugs were added to the list. The anti-fertility effects of amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, are well-illustrated in in vivo experiments but lack an in vitro proof. The present study was designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of amlodipine on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in vitro. Leydig cells of Sprague–Dawley rats were isolated and purified by Percoll. Cells were incubated for 3 h with/without amlodipine in the presence/absence of LH, dbcAMP, Pregnenolone and 25-Hydroxycholesterol. Cytosolic calcium was measured in purified Leydig cells by fluorometric technique. The results showed significantly reduced (P < 0.05) steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in amlodipine exposed rats. The site of amlodipine induced steroidogenic inhibition seems to be prior to the formation of Pregnenolone at the level of StAR protein. -- Highlights: ► Inhibition of steroidogenesis in isolated and purified Leydig cells by amlodipine. ► Site of inhibition was before Pregnenolone formation, at the level of StAR protein. ► Inhibition of LH stimulated rise in cytosolic calcium by amlodipine.

  1. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  3. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  4. Influenza vaccination in children being treated with chemotherapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, Ginette M; Kremer, Leontien C M; van de Wetering, Marianne D

    2013-08-01

    Influenza infection is a potential cause of severe morbidity in children with cancer; therefore vaccination against influenza is recommended. However, data are conflicting regarding the immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer, and the value of vaccination remains unclear. 1. To assess the efficacy of influenza vaccination in stimulating an immunological response in children with cancer during chemotherapy, compared with control groups.2. To assess the efficacy of influenza vaccination in preventing confirmed influenza and influenza-like illness and/or in stimulating immunological response in children with cancer treated with chemotherapy, compared with placebo, no intervention or different dosage schedules.3. To identify the adverse effects associated with influenza vaccines in children with cancer treated with chemotherapy, compared with other control groups. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1966 to 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to 2012) up to August 2012. We also searched reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP). We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) in which the serological response to influenza vaccination of children with cancer was compared with that of control groups. We also considered RCTs and CCTs that compared the effects of influenza vaccination on clinical response and/or immunological response in children with cancer being treated with chemotherapy, compared with placebo, no intervention or different dosage schedules. Two independent review authors assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the data. We included 1 RCT and 9 CCTs

  5. Screening of plants used in Mayan traditional medicine to treat cancer-like symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caamal-Fuentes, Edgar; Torres-Tapia, Luis W; Simá-Polanco, Paulino; Peraza-Sánchez, Sergio R; Moo-Puc, Rosa

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the potential of plants used in Mayan traditional medicine to treat cancer-like symptoms using the Mayan ethnobotany literature, and evaluate their organic extracts for in vitro cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines. The selection of the plants studied in this investigation was based on the Mayan ethnobotanical information provided by different literature sources. Extracts were obtained by maceration with methanol for 72 h of each plant part used and evaporated in vacuo to give the corresponding dried extract. Each methanol extract was tested for its cytotoxicity using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay performed in 96-well tissue plates on seven cancer cell lines, lung carcinoma (A549), cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), laryngeal carcinoma (Hep-2), nasopharynx carcinoma (KB), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3), and cervix squamous carcinoma cells (SiHa), as well as normal human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293). Cell proliferation/viability was spectrophotometrically assessed at 540 nm after addition of MTT. 51 plants were found in the literature to be used for the treatment of symptoms suggestive of cancer, 21 were chosen to evaluate the cytotoxic activity. Aeschynomene fascicularis root bark extract showed a pronounced cytotoxic activity on Hela and KB cell lines and Bonellia macrocarpa stem and root bark extracts showed similar prominent activities on KB cells. 21 plants were selected according to their use in the treatment of cancer-like symptoms recorded in the ethnobotanical literature. Plant extracts prepared from Aeschynomene fascicularis root bark and Bonellia macrocarpa stem and root bark have been selected for extensive studies leading to the isolation of the active constituents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanotechnology for delivery of gemcitabine to treat pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Gebremariam; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Zandi-Karimi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most deadly and quickly fatal human cancers with a 5-year mortality rate close to 100%. Its prognosis is very poor, mainly because of its hostile biological behavior and late onset of symptoms for clinical diagnosis; these bring limitations on therapeutic interventions. Factors contributing for the difficulties in treating PC include: high rate of drug resistance, fast metastasis to different organs, poor prognosis and relapse of the tumor after therapy. After being approved by US FDA 1997, Gemcitabine (Gem) is the first line and the gold standard drug for all stages of advanced PC till now. However, its efficacy is unsatisfactory, mainly due to; its chemical instability and poor cellular uptake, resulting in an extremely short half-life and low bioavailability. To solve this drawbacks and increase the therapeutic outcome important progress has been achieved in the field of nanotechnology and offers a promising and effective alternative. This review mainly focus on the most commonly investigated nanoparticle (NP) delivery systems of Gem for PC treatment and the latest progresses achieved. Novel nanocarriers with better tumor targeting efficiencies and maximum treatment outcome to treat this deadly due are given much attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Resveratrol Sensitizes Selectively Thyroid Cancer Cell to 131-Iodine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Hosseinimehr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study, the radiosensitizing effect of resveratrol as a natural product was investigated on cell toxicity induced by 131I in thyroid cancer cell. Methods. Human thyroid cancer cell and human nonmalignant fibroblast cell (HFFF2 were treated with 131I and/or resveratrol at different concentrations for 48 h. The cell proliferation was measured by determination of the percent of the survival cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results. Findings of this study show that resveratrol enhanced the cell death induced by 131I on thyroid cancer cell. Also, resveratrol exhibited a protective effect on normal cells against 131I toxicity. Conclusion. This result indicates a promising effect of resveratrol on improvement of cellular toxicity during iodine therapy.

  8. Case Study of Cancer Patients Treated with Herbal Acupuncture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was aimed to validate the Herbal Acupuncture Therapies(HAT for cancer patients. Patients and methods : This retrospective study was performed on 8 patients who were diagnosed as cancer in Korea and treated with HAT in the oriental hospital of Daejeon University, from January 2003 to January 2004. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 8 patients for improvement of symptoms, toxic effects of liver and kidney, myelosupression and changes of Quality of Life(QOL. Results : Analysis of change of chief complaints showed that 75% patients replied moderate relief and 25% replied complete relief in Likert scale. Analysis of Liver Function Test(LFT, Renal Function Test(RFT level showed that HAT does not have toxic effects on liver and kidney. Analysis of Complete Blood Count(CBC level showed that HAT does not have myelosuppression effects on bone marrow. Analysis of QOL showed that 100% patients replied improvement in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status(ECOG status. Conclusion : Our findings suggest that HAT offer potential benefits for cancer patients.

  9. Sexual activity and functioning in women treated for gynaecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit; Hufthammer, Karl Ove; Vika, Margrethe Elin

    2017-02-01

    A description and comparison of sexual activity and function in relation to various gynaecological cancer diagnoses, treatment modalities, age groups, psychological distress and health-related quality of life. Various forms of gynaecological cancer have the potential to negatively influence sexual functioning, but there are few studies that describe and compare sexual activity and functioning according to diagnosis. A descriptive cross-sectional study. The study includes 129 women from an intervention study. The questionnaires addressed sexuality, psychological distress, health-related quality of life and demographics. Disease and treatment characteristics were extracted from medical records. Close to two-thirds of the women were sexually active. However, 54% of the sexually active women reported that they were not satisfied or little satisfied with their sexual activity. About half of the women reported dryness in the vagina, and 41% reported pain and discomfort during penetration. There were no significant differences concerning pleasure and discomfort related to treatment modality, diagnoses or FIGO stage. Health personnel should make a priority of sexuality throughout a patient's cancer treatment and in the follow-up, as sexuality is a vital part of a good life. Since the patients experience relatively low satisfaction with their sexual activity and many report pain during penetration, health personnel need to be sensitive to the woman, her questions, and her needs. Of importance are also the personnel's ability to communicate and their expertise in diagnosing and treating difficulties relating to sexuality. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Environmental temperature affects physiology and survival of nanosecond pulsed electric field-treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shengyong; Miao, Xudong; Zhang, Xueming; Chen, Xinhua; Wen, Hao

    2018-02-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a novel non-thermal tumor ablation technique. However, how nsPEF affect cell physiology at different environmental temperature is still kept unknown. But this issue is of critical clinical practice relevance. This work aim to investigate how nsPEF treated cancer cells react to different environmental temperatures (0, 4, 25, and 37°C). Their cell viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. Lower temperature resulted in higher apoptosis rate, decreased mitochondria membrane potential, and increased ROS levels. Sucrose and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pre-incubation inhibit ROS generation and increase cell survival, protecting nsPEF-treated cells from low temperature-caused cell death. This work provides an experimental basis for hypothermia and fluid transfusion during nsPEF ablation with anesthesia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Audiological profile of patients treated for childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Patricia Helena Pecora; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Schultz, Christiane; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Lopes, Luiz Fernando

    To characterize the hearing loss after cancer treatment, according to the type of treatment, with identification of predictive factors. Two hundred patients who had cancer in childhood were prospectively evaluated. The mean age at diagnosis was 6 years, and at the audiometric assessment, 21 years. The treatment of the participants included chemotherapy without using platinum derivatives or head and neck radiotherapy in 51 patients; chemotherapy using cisplatin without radiotherapy in 64 patients; head and neck radiotherapy without cisplatin in 75 patients; and a combined treatment of head and neck radiotherapy and chemotherapy with cisplatin in ten patients. Patients underwent audiological assessment, including pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and immittancemetry. The treatment involving chemotherapy with cisplatin caused 41.9% and 47.3% hearing loss in the right and left ear, respectively, with a 11.7-fold higher risk of hearing loss in the right ear and 17.6-fold higher in the left ear versus patients not treated with cisplatin (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Children whose cancer diagnosis occurred after the age of 6 have shown an increased risk of hearing loss vs. children whose diagnosis occurred under 6 years of age (p=0.02). The auditory feature found after the cancer treatment was a symmetrical bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Chemotherapy with cisplatin proved to be a risk factor, while head and neck radiotherapy was not critical for the occurrence of hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Apolipoprotein D expression does not predict breast cancer recurrence among tamoxifen-treated patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Klebaner

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein D (ApoD has been proposed as a predictor of breast cancer recurrence among estrogen receptor-positive (ER+, tamoxifen-treated patients.We conducted a population-based case-control study nested in a population of 11,251 women aged 35-69 years at diagnosis with Stage I-III breast cancer between 1985 and 2001 on Denmark's Jutland Peninsula and registered with the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 541 recurrent or contralateral breast cancers cases among women with ER+ disease treated with tamoxifen for at least 1 year and 300 cases in women with ER- disease never treated with tamoxifen. We matched one control subject per case and assessed ApoD expression in the tumor cell nucleus and cytoplasm using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry. We computed the odds ratio (OR associating ApoD expression with recurrence and adjusted for potential confounding using logistic regression.Cytoplasmic ApoD expression was seen in 68% of ER+ tumors, in 66% of ER- tumors, and in 66% of controls across both groups. In women with ER+ tumors, the associations of cytoplasmic ApoD expression with recurrence (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.7 to 1.4 and increasing cytoplasmic expression with recurrence (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.996 to 1.003 were null, as were those for women with ER- tumors. Associations for nuclear ApoD expression and combined nuclear and cytoplasmic expression were similarly near-null.ApoD expression is likely not a predictor of recurrence in tamoxifen-treated patients.This study eliminates the previously suggested marker ApoD as a predictor of recurrence among tamoxifen-treated women.

  13. CD8 T cell persistence in treated HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, J. C.; Lederman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Many treated HIV infected persons maintain persistently high circulating CD8 T cell numbers, even after many years of therapy. Recent reports suggest that persistent CD8 T cell expansion is associated with higher risk of morbid non-AIDS events. Thus, assessing the mechanisms of CD8 T cell expansion and persistence may give insights into a feature of HIV disease that is clinically important. Recent findings Acute HIV infection is associated with activation and expansion of the CD8 T cell compartment. Expanded CD8 T cells persist throughout disease course and, in contrast to the plasticity that typically characterizes immune responses to most other pathogens, circulating CD8 T cell numbers do not normalize in many patients despite pharmacological suppression of HIV replication. We suspect that residual inflammation in treated HIV infection contributes to antigen-independent CD8 T cell expansion and persistence as most of these cells are not HIV-reactive. Summary Circulating CD8 T cell numbers remain abnormally elevated in many treated HIV-infected patients and this elevation is associated with adverse clinical events. Future studies will need to assess the mechanisms of CD8 T cell expansion and to define the role of CD8 lymphocytosis in the clinical course of treated HIV disease. PMID:25010897

  14. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  15. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Lymphocytes Treated with Exosomes Derived from Ovarian Cancer and Ovarian Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells employ many strategies to evade immune defense and to facilitate tumor growth and angiogenesis. As a novel mode of intercellular communication, cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and mediation of lymphocytes within the tumor environment. However, the mechanisms and key molecules mediating the effect of exosomes on lymphocytes are unclear. We treated healthy peripheral blood lymphocytes with exosomes from ovarian cancer and ovarian cysts and screened for differentially expressed genes using the RT2 Profiler Cancer Inflammation and Immunity Crosstalk PCR Array. A total of 26 upregulated genes (mainly pro-inflammatory genes and immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive factor and two downregulated genes (antigen presentation HLA-A/B were identified. Western blotting using lymphocytes from malignant ascites and peritoneal washings of benign ovarian cysts suggested that the interferon and NF-κB signaling pathway were involved in the immune regulation of malignant exosomes. Out of 28 differentially expressed genes detected using the array, 11 were validated by real-time PCR using lymphocytes within ovarian cancer (n = 27 and ovarian cyst (n = 9 environments. In conclusion, our findings indicate that malignant cells secrete exosomes in the tumor microenvironment to recruit lymphocytes in order to suppress antitumor immunity (IL10, Foxp3, and HLA-A/B and enhance tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and dissemination of proinflammatory cytokines (such as IL6 and VEGFA via the interferon and NF-κB signaling pathways. These results clarify lymphocyte-cancer cell cross talk via exosomes and may facilitate the development of effective immunotherapeutic strategies for ovarian cancer.

  16. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  17. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  18. [18F]FDG PET/CT-based response assessment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer treated with paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab with or without nitroglycerin patches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Evelyn E.C. de; Elmpt, Wouter van; Leijenaar, Ralph T.H.; Lambin, Philippe [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groen, Harry J.M. [University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Noort, Vincent van der [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Troost, Esther G.C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is a vasodilating drug, which increases tumor blood flow and consequently decreases hypoxia. Therefore, changes in [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) uptake pattern may occur. In this analysis, we investigated the feasibility of [18F]FDG PET for response assessment to paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab (PCB) treatment with and without NTG patches. And we compared the [18F]FDG PET response assessment to RECIST response assessment and survival. A total of 223 stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were included in a phase II study (NCT01171170) randomizing between PCB treatment with or without NTG patches. For 60 participating patients, a baseline and a second [18F]FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) scan, performed between day 22 and 24 after the start of treatment, were available. Tumor response was defined as a 30 % decrease in CT and PET parameters, and was compared to RECIST response at week 6. The predictive value of these assessments for progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed with and without NTG. A 30 % decrease in SUVpeak assessment identified more patients as responders compared to a 30 % decrease in CT diameter assessment (73 % vs. 18 %), however, this was not correlated to OS (SUVpeak30 p = 0.833; CTdiameter30 p = 0.557). Changes in PET parameters between the baseline and the second scan were not significantly different for the NTG group compared to the control group (p value range 0.159-0.634). The CT-based (part of the [18F]FDG PET/CT) parameters showed a significant difference between the baseline and the second scan for the NTG group compared to the control group (CT diameter decrease of 7 ± 23 % vs. 19 ± 14 %, p = 0.016, respectively). The decrease in tumoral FDG uptake in advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy with and without NTG did not differ between both treatment arms. Early PET-based response assessment showed more tumor responders

  19. The Effect of Biologically Effective Dose and Radiation Treatment Schedule on Overall Survival in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, John M. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ross, Rudi [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Harder, Eileen M.; Mancini, Brandon R. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E.; Shafman, Timothy D.; Dosoretz, Arie P. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Evans, Suzanne B.; Husain, Zain A.; Yu, James B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Decker, Roy H., E-mail: roy.decker@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) and radiation treatment schedule on overall survival (OS) in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using data from 65 treatment centers in the United States, we retrospectively reviewed the records of T1-2 N0 NSCLC patients undergoing SBRT alone from 2006 to 2014. Biologically relevant covariates, including dose per fraction, number of fractions, and time between fractions, were used to quantify BED{sub 10} and radiation treatment schedule. The linear-quadratic equation was used to calculate BED{sub 10} and to generate a dichotomous dose variable of <105 Gy versus ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10}. The primary outcome was OS. We used the Kaplan-Meier method, the log–rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score matching to determine whether prescription BED{sub 10} was associated with OS. Results: We identified 747 patients who met inclusion criteria. The median BED{sub 10} was 132 Gy, and 59 (7.7%) had consecutive-day fractions. Median follow-up was 41 months, and 452 patients (60.5%) had died by the conclusion of the study. The 581 patients receiving ≥105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 28 months, whereas the 166 patients receiving <105 Gy BED{sub 10} had a median survival of 22 months (log–rank, P=.01). Radiation treatment schedule was not a significant predictor of OS on univariable analysis. After adjusting for T stage, sex, tumor histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, BED{sub 10} ≥105 Gy versus <105 Gy remained significantly associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.62-0.98, P=.03). Propensity score matching on imbalanced variables within high- and low-dose cohorts confirmed a survival benefit with higher prescription dose. Conclusions: We found that dose escalation to 105 Gy BED

  20. [18F]FDG PET/CT-based response assessment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer treated with paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab with or without nitroglycerin patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Evelyn E C; van Elmpt, Wouter; Leijenaar, Ralph T H; Hoekstra, Otto S; Groen, Harry J M; Smit, Egbert F; Boellaard, Ronald; van der Noort, Vincent; Troost, Esther G C; Lambin, Philippe; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C

    2017-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is a vasodilating drug, which increases tumor blood flow and consequently decreases hypoxia. Therefore, changes in [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) uptake pattern may occur. In this analysis, we investigated the feasibility of [18F]FDG PET for response assessment to paclitaxel-carboplatin-bevacizumab (PCB) treatment with and without NTG patches. And we compared the [18F]FDG PET response assessment to RECIST response assessment and survival. A total of 223 stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were included in a phase II study (NCT01171170) randomizing between PCB treatment with or without NTG patches. For 60 participating patients, a baseline and a second [18F]FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) scan, performed between day 22 and 24 after the start of treatment, were available. Tumor response was defined as a 30 % decrease in CT and PET parameters, and was compared to RECIST response at week 6. The predictive value of these assessments for progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed with and without NTG. A 30 % decrease in SUVpeak assessment identified more patients as responders compared to a 30 % decrease in CT diameter assessment (73 % vs. 18 %), however, this was not correlated to OS (SUVpeak30 p = 0.833; CTdiameter30 p = 0.557). Changes in PET parameters between the baseline and the second scan were not significantly different for the NTG group compared to the control group (p value range 0.159-0.634). The CT-based (part of the [18F]FDG PET/CT) parameters showed a significant difference between the baseline and the second scan for the NTG group compared to the control group (CT diameter decrease of 7 ± 23 % vs. 19 ± 14 %, p = 0.016, respectively). The decrease in tumoral FDG uptake in advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy with and without NTG did not differ between both treatment arms. Early PET-based response assessment

  1. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  3. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Devon A.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D.; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality1. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours2–5. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown2. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are

  4. Breast cancer circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Joao Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastasization of breast cancer involves various mechanisms responsible for progression from invasive lesion to dissemination in distant organs. Regional lymph node metastasization was considered an initial step in this process, but it is now recognized that hematogenous dissemination is a deviation from lymphatic circulation. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC is an aim in several oncology areas. For this purpose, several techniques have been used to detect CTC, including the use of antibodies and techniques with nucleic acids. This study reviews the published studies considering the detection of breast cancer CTC. There are focused the difficulties in identifying a CTC in a heterogeneous population, the handling of the sample, criteria of positivity, analytical techniques, and specific markers. There are systematized various specific markers of breast cancer cells also the problems with false positive results. Finally, we hypothesize clinical applications either as a prognostic marker or as a therapeutic response monitor.

  5. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  6. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  7. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  8. CD13 is a therapeutic target in human liver cancer stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Mimori, Koshi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Ohkuma, Masahisa; Kim, Ho Min; Akita, Hirofumi; Takiuchi, Daisuke; Hatano, Hisanori; Nagano, Hiroaki; Barnard, Graham F; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    .... Here, we have demonstrated that CD13 is a marker for semiquiescent CSCs in human liver cancer cell lines and clinical samples and that targeting these cells might provide a way to treat this disease. CD13...

  9. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non-small cell lung cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rizvi, N. A; Hellmann, M. D; Snyder, A; Kvistborg, P; Makarov, V; Havel, J. J; Lee, W; Yuan, J; Wong, P; Ho, T. S; Miller, M. L; Rekhtman, N; Moreira, A. L; Ibrahim, F; Bruggeman, C; Gasmi, B; Zappasodi, R; Maeda, Y; Sander, C; Garon, E. B; Merghoub, T; Wolchok, J. D; Schumacher, T. N; Chan, T. A

    2015-01-01

    .... To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non-small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1...

  10. Interleukin-12 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Cancer That Has High Levels of HER2/Neu

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Bone Metastases; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Distal Urethral Cancer; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Liver Metastases; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Occult Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal

  11. Stem cells in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Francesca; Fernandez, Pedro L; Thomson, Timothy M

    2013-06-01

    Tumors constitute complex ecosystems with multiple interactions among neoplastic cells displaying various phenotypes and functions and where the tumoral niche is built with an active participation of the host environment that also impacts the malignant progression of the tumor cells. Irrespective of the cell of origin of prostate adenocarcinoma, mounting evidences support the existence of a hierarchy within neoplastic prostate cells that contributes to the heterogeneity of these tumors. At the origin of this hierarchy are small populations of tumor cells with high self-renewal potential and also capable of generating progeny tumor cells that lose self-renewal properties as they acquire more differentiated phenotypes. These cancer stem cells (CSC) depend on active gene networks that confer them with their self-renewal capacity through symmetrical divisions whereas they can also undergo asymmetrical division and differentiation either as stochastic events or in response to environmental cues. Although new experimental evidences indicate that this is can be a reversible process, thus blurring the distinction between CSCs and non-CSCs, the former are considered as the drivers of tumor growth and evolution, and thus a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Of particular importance in prostate cancer, CSCs may constitute the repository population of androgen-insensitive and chemotherapy-resistant tumor cells responsible for castration-resistant and chemotherapy-insensitive tumors, thus their identification and quantification in primary and metastatic neoplasms could play important roles in the management of this disease.

  12. Cancers in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD: a retrospective analysis of risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petoumenos Kathy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective survey describes types of cancers diagnosed in HIV-infected subjects in Asia, and assesses risk factors for cancer in HIV-infected subjects using contemporaneous HIV-infected controls without cancer. Methods TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD sites retrospectively reviewed clinic medical records to determine cancer diagnoses since 2000. For each diagnosis, the following data were recorded: date, type, stage, method of diagnosis, demographic data, medical history, and HIV-related information. For risk factor analyses, two HIV-infected control subjects without cancer diagnoses were also selected. Cancers were grouped as AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs, and non-ADCs. Non-ADCs were further categorized as being infection related (NADC-IR and unrelated (NADC-IUR. Results A total of 617 patients were included in this study: 215 cancer cases and 402 controls from 13 sites. The majority of cancer cases were male (71%. The mean age (SD for cases was 39 (10.6, 46 (11.5 and 44 (13.7 for ADCs, NADC-IURs and NADCs-IR, respectively. The majority (66% of cancers were ADCs (16% Kaposi sarcoma, 40% non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 9% cervical cancer. The most common NADCs were lung (6%, breast (5% and hepatocellular carcinoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma (2% each. There were also three (1.4% cases of leiomyosarcoma reported in this study. In multivariate analyses, individuals with CD4 counts above 200 cells/mm3 were approximately 80% less likely to be diagnosed with an ADC (p Conclusions The spectrum of cancer diagnoses in the Asia region currently does not appear dissimilar to that observed in non-Asian HIV populations. One interesting finding was the cases of leiomyosarcoma, a smooth-muscle tumour, usually seen in children and young adults with AIDS, yet overall quite rare. Further detailed studies are required to better describe the range of cancers in this region, and to help guide the development of screening programmes.

  13. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, M.M.; Meijer, C.; de Bock, G.H.; Boersma-van Ek, W.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Groen, H.J.M.; Timens, W.; Kruyt, F.A.E.; Hiltermann, T.N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis, and even with localized (limited) disease, the 5-year survival has only been around 20%. Elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been associated with a worse prognosis, and markers of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and

  14. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  15. The Prognostic Value of Plasma YKL-40 in Patients With Chemotherapy-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Treated With Bevacizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Mogens K; Madsen, Christine V; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: YKL-40 is a proangiogenic glycoprotein that is secreted by cancer cells and inflammatory cells. The expression of YKL-40 is induced by vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition. We tested the hypothesis that low baseline plasma YKL-40 is associated with improved outcomes in patient...... treatment is associated with improved outcomes in patients with chemotherapy-refractory advanced ovarian cancer treated with single-agent bevacizumab.......OBJECTIVE: YKL-40 is a proangiogenic glycoprotein that is secreted by cancer cells and inflammatory cells. The expression of YKL-40 is induced by vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition. We tested the hypothesis that low baseline plasma YKL-40 is associated with improved outcomes in patients...... with ovarian cancer treated with bevacizumab. METHODS: One hundred forty patients with chemotherapy-refractory epithelian ovarian cancer were treated with single-agent bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks in a prospective trial. Plasma YKL-40 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and during...

  16. T Cells that Recognize HPV Protein Can Target Virus-Infected Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types. An approach that may be applied to a wider array of cancers involves modifying peripheral blood T cells with chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors (TCR) that target specific tumor antigens. Unfortunately, epithelial cancers, which are the vast majority of cancers diagnosed, have proven difficult to treat this way because most identified antigens are shared with healthy tissues and targeting them leads to toxic side effects. However, cancers caused by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, including cervical, head and neck, anal, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers, may be particularly amenable to the latter form of ACT since the E6 and E7 viral proteins are essential for cancer formation but are not produced in normal tissues. To test this idea, Christian Hinrichs, M.D., and his colleagues examined tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from a patient who experienced a prolonged disease-free period after her second surgical removal of metastatic anal cancer in the hopes of identifying a TCR against one of the HPV oncoproteins.

  17. Advanced Merkel cell cancer and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bird, B R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Merkel cell cancer (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine skin cancer occurring predominantly in elderly Caucasians. It tends to metastasize to regional lymph nodes and viscera and is sensitive to chemotherapy but recurs rapidly. AIM: To report one such case, its response to chemotherapy and briefly review the literature. METHODS: A 73-year-old male with a fungating primary lesion on his left knee and ulcerated inguinal lymph nodes was diagnosed with MCC and treated with chemotherapy. The two largest case series and reviews of case reports were summarised. RESULTS: His ulcer healed after two cycles of carboplatin and etoposide with improvement in quality of life. Overall response rates of nearly 60% to chemotherapy are reported but median survival is only nine months with metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy should be considered for fit elderly patients with MCC who have recurrent or advanced disease.

  18. Evaluation of p53 and Bcl-2 genes and proteins expression in human breast cancer T47D cells treated with extracts of Astrodaucus persicus (Boiss. Drude in comparison to Tamoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Azizi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackground and purpose of the study:Screening of different plant components for new anticancer drugs is one of the main research activities throughout the world. In this study, the anticancer effects of Astrodaucus persicus, an Iranian species of family of Umbelliferae, in human breast cancer T47D cells was investigated. Also since tumorigenesis is thought to result from a series of progressive gene alterations, including activa tion of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppres sor genes, expression of two such genes, p53 and Bcl-2 that are believed to play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and cell death were determined. "nMaterials and Methods: The p53 and Bcl-2 genes and proteins expression alterations in T47D cells at RNA synthesis level was studied by using RT-PCR analysis and protein synthesis using immunocytochemistry technique. "nResults: p53 gene expression increased significantly in the presence of both plant extracts but Bcl-2 expression increased significantly in the presence of aerial and decreased significantly in the presence of root extract. In addition, treatment of T47D cells with plant extracts decreased the nuclear staining of p53 and cytoplasmic staining of Bcl-2 proteins. "nConclusion: These results suggest that the methanolic extracts of Astrodaucus persicus especially its root extract may contains bioactive compounds, probably coumarins that prevents proliferation of T47D breast carcinoma cells by mechanisms such as apoptosis. These data are the first report on the possible molecular mechanisms of action of Astrodaucus persicus extracts in breast cancer cell proliferation.

  19. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  20. Special Section: Preventing, Detecting, and Treating Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... again, when her older sister, Emily, a Virginia Democratic state senator, died of pancreatic cancer in October ... Diseases: www.niddk.nih.gov The American Cancer Society: www.cancer.org The American Society of Colon & ...

  1. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  2. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  3. Targeting autophagic cancer stem-cells to reverse chemoresistance in human triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Guilhem; El Bouchtaoui, Morad; Sophie, Tan; Leboeuf, Christophe; de Bazelaire, Cédric; Ratajczak, Philippe; Giacchetti, Sylvie; de Roquancourt, Anne; Bertheau, Philippe; Verneuil, Laurence; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Espié, Marc; Janin, Anne

    2017-05-23

    There is growing evidence for the role of cancer stem-cells in drug resistance, but with few in situ studies on human tumor samples to decipher the mechanisms by which they resist anticancer agents.Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most severe sub-type of breast cancer, occurring in younger women and associated with poor prognosis even when treated at a localized stage.We investigated here the relationship between complete pathological response after chemotherapy and breast cancer stem-cell characteristics in pre-treatment biopsies of 78 women with triple negative breast carcinoma (TNBC).We found that chemoresistance was associated with large numbers of breast cancer stem-cells, and that these cancer stem-cells were neither proliferative nor apoptotic, but in an autophagic state related to hypoxia. Using relevant pharmacological models of patient-derived TNBC xenografts, we further investigated the role of autophagy in chemoresistance of breast cancer stem-cells. We demonstrated that hypoxia increased drug resistance of autophagic TNBC stem-cells, and showed that molecular or chemical inhibition of autophagic pathway was able to reverse chemoresistance.Our results support breast cancer stem-cell evaluation in pre-treatment biopsies of TNBC patients, and the need for further research on autophagy inhibition to reverse resistance to chemotherapy.

  4. Second cancer incidence in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma treated with methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and bleomycin regimen with or without rituximab and mediastinal radiotherapy: Results from a monoinstitutional cohort analysis of long-term survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Alfò, Marco; Di Rocco, Alice; Ansuinelli, Michela; Russo, Eleonora; Osti, Mattia F; Valeriani, Maurizio; Minniti, Giuseppe; Grapulin, Lavinia; Musio, Daniela; Bracci, Stefano; Spagnoli, Alessandra; Moleti, Maria Luisa; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Martelli, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    Our aim is to assess the incidence of second cancer in long-time surviving primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) patients treated with combined radiochemoimmunotherapy (standard methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and bleomycin with rituximab and mediastinal radiation therapy at a dose of 30 to 36 Gy). For this purpose, 92 points were evaluated. After a median overall survival of 137 months (range 76-212), we recorded second cancer in 3 of 80 long-surviving patients (3.75%) with cumulative incidence of 3.47% at 15 years and 11% at 17 years, with a 17-year second cancer-free survival of 82%. We observed 2 papillary thyroid cancers with a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 7.97 and an absolute excess risk (AER) of 17. 84 and 1 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an SIR of 66.53 and an AER of 10.05. No breast cancer occurred. Although we should take into account the limits of the proposed statistical analysis, combined modality treatment was related to a significant SIR and AER for thyroid cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Doni Jayavelu

    Full Text Available Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs and target genes (TGs. The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA. Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE, mid-early (ME, mid-late (ML and very late (VL. Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  6. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doni Jayavelu, Naresh; Bar, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs) and target genes (TGs). The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA). Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE), mid-early (ME), mid-late (ML) and very late (VL). Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  7. Reprogramming cancer cells: overview & current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian Lam; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with genetic and epigenetic origins, and the possible effects of reprogramming cancer cells using the defined sets of transcription factors remain largely uninvestigated. In the handful of publications available so far, findings have shown that reprogramming cancer cells changed the characteristics of the cells to differ from the parental cancer cells. These findings indicated the possibility of utilizing reprogramming technology to create a disease model in the laboratory to be used in studying the molecular pathogenesis or for drug screening of a particular cancer model. Despite numerous methods employed in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from cancer cells only a few studies have successfully reprogrammed malignant human cells. In this review we will provide an overview on i) methods to reprogram cancer cells, ii) characterization of the reprogrammed cancer cells, and iii) the differential effects of reprogramming on malignancy, epigenetics and response of the cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Continued technical progress in cancer cell reprogramming technology will be instrumental for more refined in vitro disease models and ultimately for the development of directed and personalized therapy for cancer patients in the future.

  8. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116 with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat “SAHA,” sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin. Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells.

  9. Targeting cancer stem cells and signaling pathways by phytochemicals: Novel approach for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandawate, Prasad R; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer diagnosed in women worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. Despite the development of newer diagnostic methods, selective as well as targeted chemotherapies and their combinations, surgery, hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, breast cancer recurrence, metastasis and drug resistance are still the major problems for breast cancer. Emerging evidence suggest the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a population of cells with the capacity to self-renew, differentiate and be capable of initiating and sustaining tumor growth. In addition, CSCs are believed to be responsible for cancer recurrence, anticancer drug resistance, and metastasis. Hence, compounds targeting breast CSCs may be better therapeutic agents for treating breast cancer and control recurrence and metastasis. Naturally occurring compounds, mainly phytochemicals have gained immense attention in recent times because of their wide safety profile, ability to target heterogeneous populations of cancer cells as well as CSCs, and their key signaling pathways. Therefore, in the present review article, we summarize our current understanding of breast CSCs and their signaling pathways, and the phytochemicals that affect these cells including curcumin, resveratrol, tea polyphenols (epigallocatechin-3-gallate, epigallocatechin), sulforaphane, genistein, indole-3-carbinol, 3, 3'-di-indolylmethane, vitamin E, retinoic acid, quercetin, parthenolide, triptolide, 6-shogaol, pterostilbene, isoliquiritigenin, celastrol, and koenimbin. These phytochemicals may serve as novel therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment and future leads for drug development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Effect of sirolimus on urinary bladder cancer T24 cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira Paula A; Ribeiro Eufemia; Botelho Pedro; Pinto-Leite Rosario; Santos Lucios

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sirolimus is recently reported to have antitumour effects on a large variety of cancers. The present study was performed to investigate sirolimus's ability to inhibit growth in T24 bladder cancer cells. Methods T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of sirolimus. MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation inhibitory effect on T24 cell line. The viability of T24 cell line was determined by Trypan blue exclusion analysis. Results Sirolimus in...

  11. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  12. Cancer immunotherapy using γδT cells : dealing with diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    The broad and potent tumour-reactivity of innate-like γδT cells makes them valuable additions to current cancer immunotherapeutic concepts based on adaptive immunity, such as monoclonal antibodies and αβT cells. Nevertheless, clinical success using γδT cells to treat cancer has so far fallen short

  13. In vitro study on effect of germinated wheat on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research investigated the possible anti-cancer effects of germinated wheat flours (GWF) on cell growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In a series of in vitro experiments, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cells were cultured and treated with GWF that wer...

  14. Docetaxel plus nintedanib versus docetaxel plus placebo in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (LUME-Lung 1): a phase 3, double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Mellemgaard, Anders; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Orlov, Sergey; Krzakowski, Maciej; von Pawel, Joachim; Gottfried, Maya; Bondarenko, Igor; Liao, Meilin; Gann, Claudia-Nanette; Barrueco, José; Gaschler-Markefski, Birgit; Novello, Silvia

    2014-02-01

    The phase 3 LUME-Lung 1 study assessed the efficacy and safety of docetaxel plus nintedanib as second-line therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients from 211 centres in 27 countries with stage IIIB/IV recurrent NSCLC progressing after first-line chemotherapy, stratified by ECOG performance status, previous bevacizumab treatment, histology, and presence of brain metastases, were allocated (by computer-generated sequence through an interactive third-party system, in 1:1 ratio), to receive docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) by intravenous infusion on day 1 plus either nintedanib 200 mg orally twice daily or matching placebo on days 2-21, every 3 weeks until unacceptable adverse events or disease progression. Investigators and patients were masked to assignment. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) by independent central review, analysed by intention to treat after 714 events in all patients. The key secondary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention to treat after 1121 events had occurred, in a prespecified stepwise order: first in patients with adenocarcinoma who progressed within 9 months after start of first-line therapy, then in all patients with adenocarcinoma, then in all patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00805194. Between Dec 23, 2008, and Feb 9, 2011, 655 patients were randomly assigned to receive docetaxel plus nintedanib and 659 to receive docetaxel plus placebo. The primary analysis was done after a median follow-up of 7·1 months (IQR 3·8-11·0). PFS was significantly improved in the docetaxel plus nintedanib group compared with the docetaxel plus placebo group (median 3·4 months [95% CI 2·9-3·9] vs 2·7 months [2·6-2·8]; hazard ratio [HR] 0·79 [95% CI 0·68-0·92], p=0·0019). After a median follow-up of 31·7 months (IQR 27·8-36·1), overall survival was significantly improved for patients with adenocarcinoma histology who progressed within 9 months after start of first

  15. Stem cell therapies for treating osteoarthritis: prescient or premature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Banks, Tania A

    2014-12-01

    There has been unprecedented interest in recent years in the use of stem cells as therapy for an array of diseases in companion animals. Stem cells have already been deployed therapeutically in a number of clinical settings, in particular the use of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteoarthritis in horses and dogs. However, an assessment of the scientific literature highlights a marked disparity between the purported benefits of stem cell therapies and their proven abilities as defined by rigorously controlled scientific studies. Although preliminary data generated from clinical trials in human patients are encouraging, therapies currently available to treat animals are supported by very limited clinical evidence, and the commercialisation of these treatments may be premature. This review introduces the three main types of stem cells relevant to veterinary applications, namely, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, and draws together research findings from in vitro and in vivo studies to give an overview of current stem cell therapies for the treatment of osteoarthritis in animals. Recent advances in tissue engineering, which is proposed as the future direction of stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis, are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A recurrent giant cell tumor of bone treated with denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Stadler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the giant cell tumor of bone is generally classified as a benign tumor it can rarely metastasize and has a potential risk of local recurrence. We want to report about a female patient who suffered from a recurrence of a giant cell tumor of bone after the implantation of a total endoprosthesis of the knee joint. We have treated her with denosumab, which is a receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand inhibitor. In this case report we want to present a new option to treat this kind of neoplasm.

  17. Cancer stem cells: the theory and perspectives in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Justyna; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Pesz, Karolina A; Sasiadek, Maria M

    2008-01-01

    The cancer stem cell theory elucidates not only the issue of tumour initiation and development, tumour's ability to metastasise and reoccur, but also the ineffectiveness of conventional cancer therapy. This review examines stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, heterogeneity, and resistance to apoptosis. The 'niche' hypothesis is presented, and mechanisms of division, differentiation, self-renewal and signalling pathway regulation are explained. Epigenetic alterations and mutations of genes responsible for signal transmission may promote the formation of cancer stem cells. We also present the history of development of the cancer stem cell theory and discuss the experiments that led to the discovery and confirmation of the existence of cancer stem cells. Potential clinical applications are also considered, including therapeutic models aimed at selective elimination of cancer stem cells or induction of their proper differentiation.

  18. Mechanical properties of normal versus cancerous breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelser, Amanda M; Macosko, Jed C; O'Dell, Adam P; Smyre, Scott; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2015-11-01

    A cell's mechanical properties are important in determining its adhesion, migration, and response to the mechanical properties of its microenvironment and may help explain behavioral differences between normal and cancerous cells. Using fluorescently labeled peroxisomes as microrheological probes, the interior mechanical properties of normal breast cells were compared to a metastatic breast cell line, MDA-MB-231. To estimate the mechanical properties of cell cytoplasms from the motions of their peroxisomes, it was necessary to reduce the contribution of active cytoskeletal motions to peroxisome motion. This was done by treating the cells with blebbistatin, to inhibit myosin II, or with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, to reduce intracellular ATP. Using either treatment, the peroxisomes exhibited normal diffusion or subdiffusion, and their mean squared displacements (MSDs) showed that the MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly softer than normal cells. For these two cell types, peroxisome MSDs in treated and untreated cells converged at high frequencies, indicating that cytoskeletal structure was not altered by the drug treatment. The MSDs from ATP-depleted cells were analyzed by the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation to estimate the interior viscoelastic modulus G* and its components, the elastic shear modulus G' and viscous shear modulus G", at angular frequencies between 0.126 and 628 rad/s. These moduli are the material coefficients that enter into stress-strain relations and relaxation times in quantitative mechanical models such as the poroelastic model of the interior regions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells.

  19. A cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus shows enhanced suppression of stem-cell like colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, So Young; Bang, Seo Young; Jeong, Su-Nam; Kang, Dae Hwan; Heo, Jeong

    2016-03-29

    Stem cell-like colon cancer cells (SCCs) pose a major challenge in colon cancer treatment because of their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Oncolytic virus-based therapy has shown promising results in uncured cancer patients; however, its effects on SCCs are not well studied yet. Here, we engineered a cancer-favoring oncolytic vaccinia virus (CVV) as a potent biotherapeutic and investigated its therapeutic efficacy in terms of killing SCCs. CVV is an evolved Wyeth strain vaccinia virus (EVV) lacking the viral thymidine kinase. SCC models were established using human or mouse colon cancer spheres, which continuously expressed stemness markers. The cancer-favoring characteristics and different cytotoxic pathways for killing cancer cells successfully overrode general drug resistance, thereby killing colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of SCCs. Subcutaneously injected HT29 spheres showed lower growth in CVV-treated models than in 5-Fu-treated models. Intraperitoneally injected CT26 spheres induced tumor masses in the abdominal region. CVV-treated groups showed higher survival rates and smaller tumor mass formation, compared to 5-Fu-treated groups. Interestingly, the combined treatment of CVV with 5-Fu showed improved survival rates and complete suppression of tumor mass. The CVV developed in this study, thus, effectively suppresses SCCs, which can be synergistically enhanced by simultaneous treatment with the anticancer drug 5-Fu. Our novel CVV is highly advantageous as a next-generation therapeutic for treating colon cancer.

  20. [Hepatic intra-arterial infusion of biological response modifier (BRM)-activated killer immune lymphocytes to treat liver cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Takusaburo

    2012-11-01

    To enable "life with cancer" while maintaining quality of life(QOL) and freedom from adverse effects, we have devised biological response modifier (BRM)-activated killer (BAK) therapy, a new immune cell therapy using CD56-positive lymphocytes designed to treat advanced solid cancers. This treatment is yet to be applied to liver cancer, because BAK cells administered by intravenous infusion are unlikely to reach lesions via the complex vascular and lymphatic systems. Here, we report a case in which the patient, a surgeon, requested that we attempt to deliver BAK cells to cancer lesions in the liver via hepatic intra-arterial infusion. In 2005, with the patient's consent, we injected autologous lymphocytes intra-arterially into the liver using a catheter and confirmed the absence of adverse effects. In December 2008, we began injecting BAK cells intra-arterially into the liver of the patient, a male physician aged 52 years at the time, after identifying liver metastases following surgery for rectal cancer. We injected 10 billion cells intra-arterially into the liver via a catheter once a month for 6 months, and then undertook conventional BAK therapy by monthly intravenous infusion. Based on images obtained by positron emission tomography-computed tomography, BAK therapy led to complete remission and disappearance of the liver metastases. This case highlights the effectiveness of hepatic intra-arterial infusion of BAK cells in cases of liver cancer.

  1. Interventions for treating oral leukoplakia to prevent oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Giovanni; Franchini, Roberto; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Varoni, Elena Maria; Sardella, Andrea; Kerr, Alexander R; Carrassi, Antonio; MacDonald, L C I; Worthington, Helen V

    2016-07-29

    participants because drop-out rates were similar between treatment and control groups. Surgical treatment for oral leukoplakia has not been assessed in an RCT that included a no treatment or placebo comparison. Nor has cessation of risk factors such as smoking been assessed. The available evidence on medical and complementary interventions for treating people with leukoplakia is very limited. We do not currently have evidence of a treatment that is effective for preventing the development of oral cancer. Treatments such as vitamin A and beta carotene may be effective in healing oral lesions, but relapses and adverse effects are common. Larger trials of longer duration are required to properly evaluate the effects of leukoplakia treatments on the risk of developing oral cancer. High-quality research is particularly needed to assess surgical treatment and to assess the effects of risk factor cessation in people with leukoplakia.

  2. [A Case of Recurrent Breast Cancer with Carcinomatous Pleurisy Successfully Treated with Biweekly Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Goto, Yoshinari; Sakiyama, Kana; Kimura, Morihiko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old woman underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for left breast cancer at the age of 43 years, and was diagnosed with breast cancer metastasis to the pleura at the age of 68 years. She had been sequentially treated with hormonal therapies, but complained of a cough and dyspnea after 4 years. Chest radiography showed right pleural effusion, and cytological examination of the pleural effusion revealed adenocarcinoma cells. Biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy was administered. Two months later, the pleural effusion had disappeared. Biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy was continued without any severe adverse events. After 30 months, the patient has remained free of carcinomatous pleurisy recurrence. Therefore, biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy can be safely and effectively administered to elderly patients with carcinomatous pleurisy.

  3. A POX on Renal Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proline oxidase, or POX, is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing the amino acid proline. POX contributes to the regulation of cell death that occurs when cellular systems malfunction, a process called apoptosis. Previous studies have determined that levels of POX are reduced in several types of human cancer. Likewise, many cancer cells become resistant to apoptosis, suggesting a link between POX and cancer cell survival.

  4. Oral adverse events in cancer patients treated with VEGFR-directed multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Anna; Kurtz, Sharyn L; Barysauskas, Constance M; Pilotte, Amy P; Wagner, Andrew J; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2015-11-01

    This study characterized the incidence and clinical features of oral adverse events among cancer patients who received VEGFR-directed multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VR-TKI) therapies. Electronic medical records of adult cancer patients treated with sunitinib, sorafenib, regorafenib, pazopanib, cabozantinib, imatinib, and bevacizumab therapy at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from 2009 to 2012 were reviewed. Data collected included patient characteristics, oral and non-oral adverse events, and time to onset. Time oral adverse event-free was the primary outcome. A total of 747 patients with 806 individual courses of therapy were treated for a median of 3.9months with sunitinib (n=161), sorafenib (n=172), regorafenib (n=15), pazopanib (n=132), cabozantinib (n=23), imatinib (n=144), or bevacizumab (n=159) for lung cancer (21%), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (15%), and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (13%). An oral adverse event was reported in 23.7% of patients at a median of 1.9months after starting therapy. The most commonly reported oral adverse event was oral mucosal sensitivity (dysesthesia), occurring in 12% of patients, typically without clinical findings. Multivariate models showed patients who received VR-TKI therapy were at greater risk of any oral adverse event compared with patients treated with imatinib or bevacizumab. Patients receiving VR-TKI therapy who developed an oral adverse event were also at increased risk for hand-foot skin reaction (15.9%). VR-TKI associated oral adverse events are characterized primarily by dysesthesia with lack of clinical signs. Oral dysesthesia is more commonly associated with VR-TKIs than with bevacizumab or imatinib. Management is largely empirical and requires further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. with esophageal squamous cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively observe and analyze the long-term treatment outcomes of 191 elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC who were treated with californium-252 (252Cf neutron brachytherapy (NBT in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Material and methods : From January 2002 to November 2012, 191 patients with ESCC underwent NBT in combination with EBRT. The total radiation dose to the reference point via NBT was 8-25 Gy-eq in two to five fractions with one fraction per week. The total dose via EBRT was 50-60 Gy, which was delivered over a period of 5 to 6 weeks with normal fractionation. Results : The median survival time for the 191 patients was 23.6 months, and the 5-year rates for overall survival (OS and local-regional control (LRC were 28.7% and 54.2%, respectively. The patients’ age was a factor that was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.010, according to univariate analysis. The 5-year OS (LRC was 37.3% (58.6% for patients aged 70-74 years and 14.5% (47.9% for patients aged > 74 years (p = 0.010 and p = 0.038. In multivariate analysis, age and clinical N stage were associated with OS and LRC (p = 0.011 [0.041] and p = 0.005 [0.005]. From the time of treatment completion to the development of local-regional recurrence or death, 5 (2.6% patients experienced fistula and 15 (7.9% experienced massive bleeding. The incidence of severe late complications was related to older age (p = 0.027, higher NBT dose/fraction (20-25 Gy/5 fractions, and higher total dose (> 66 Gy. Conclusions : The clinical data indicated that NBT in combination with EBRT produced favorable local control and long-term survival rates for elderly patients with ESCC, and that the side effects were tolerable. Patient’s age, clinical stage N status, and radiation dose could be used to select the appropriate treatment for elderly patients.

  6. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer-initiating cells by targeting Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-10-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here, we report that berbamine and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). Furthermore, berbamine inhibited the in vivo tumorigenicity of liver cancer cells in NOD/SCID mice and downregulated the self-renewal abilities of liver cancer-initiating cells. Chemical inhibition or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of CAMKII recapitulated the effects of berbamine, whereas overexpression of CAMKII promoted cancer cell proliferation and increased the resistance of liver cancer cells to berbamine treatments. Western blot analyses of human liver cancer specimens showed that CAMKII was hyperphosphorylated in liver tumors compared with the paired peritumor tissues, which supports a role of CAMKII in promoting human liver cancer progression and the potential clinical use of berbamine for liver cancer therapies. Our data suggest that berbamine and its derivatives are promising agents to suppress liver cancer growth by targeting CAMKII. Mol Cancer Ther; 12(10); 2067-77. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Prognostic implication of HSPA (HSP70) in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadin, Silvina B; Sottile, Mayra L; Montt-Guevara, Maria M; Gauna, Gisel V; Daguerre, Pedro; Leuzzi, Marcela; Gago, Francisco E; Ibarra, Jorge; Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Ciocca, Daniel R; Vargas-Roig, Laura M

    2014-07-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is used in patients with locally advanced breast cancer to reduce tumor size before surgery. Unfortunately, resistance to chemotherapy may arise from a variety of mechanisms. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly expressed in mammary tumor cells, have been implicated in anticancer drug resistance. In spite of the widely described value of HSPs as molecular markers in cancer, their implications in breast tumors treated with anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been poorly explored. In this study, we have evaluated, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of HSP27 (HSPB1) and HSP70 (HSPA) in serial biopsies from locally advanced breast cancer patients (n = 60) treated with doxorubicin (DOX)- or epirubicin (EPI)-based monochemotherapy. Serial biopsies were taken at days 1, 3, 7, and 21, and compared with prechemotherapy and surgical biopsies. After surgery, the patients received additional chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil. High nuclear HSPB1 and HSPA expressions were found in invasive cells after DOX/EPI administration (P 31 % of the cells) and cytoplasmic HSPA expressions (>11 % of the tumor cells) were associated with better DFS (P = 0.0348 and P = 0.0118, respectively). We conclude that HSPA expression may be a useful prognostic marker in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant DOX/EPI chemotherapy indicating the need to change the administered drugs after surgery for overcoming drug resistance.

  8. Cytokinetic study of MCF-7 cells treated with commercial and recombinant bromelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouz, Nour; Amid, Azura; Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women. The available chemotherapy drugs have been associated with many side effects. Bromelain has novel medicinal qualities including anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, fibrinolytic and anti-cancer functions. Commercially available bromelain is obtained through tedious methods; therefore, recombinant bromelain may provide a cheaper and simpler choice with similar quality. This study aimed to assess the effects of commercial and recombinant bromelain on the cytokinetic behavior of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and their potential as therapeutic alternatives in cancer treatment. Cytotoxic activities of commercial and recombinant bromelain were determined using (sulforhodamine) SRB assay. Next, cell viability assays were conducted to determine effects of commercial and recombinant bromelain on MCF-7 cell cytokinetic behavior. Finally, the established growth kinetic data were used to modify a model that predicts the effects of commercial and recombinant bromelain on MCF-7 cells. Commercial and recombinant bromelain exerted strong effects towards decreasing the cell viability of MCF-7 cells with IC50 values of 5.13 μg/mL and 6.25 μg/mL, respectively, compared to taxol with an IC50 value of 0.063 μg/mL. The present results indicate that commercial and recombinant bromelain both have anti-proliferative activity, reduced the number of cell generations from 3.92 to 2.81 for commercial bromelain and to 2.86 for recombinant bromelain, while with taxol reduction was to 3.12. Microscopic observation of bromelain-treated MCF-7 cells demonstrated detachment. Inhibition activity was verified with growth rates decreased dynamically from 0.009 h-1 to 0.0059 h-1 for commercial bromelain and to 0.0063 h-1 for recombinant bromelain. Commercial and recombinant bromelain both affect cytokinetics of MCF-7 cells by decreasing cell viability, demonstrating similar strength to taxol.

  9. Cisplatin and Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-06

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  10. [Small cell lung cancer associated with paraneoplastic bullous pemphigoid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhdar, N; El Khattabi, W; Lahroussi, M; Afif, H; Aichane, A

    2014-06-01

    The broncho-pulmonary small cell carcinoma is the most common cancer provider paraneoplastic syndrome especially neurological and endocrine but also cutaneous syndrome. Paraneoplastic dermatosis do not result from a direct extension of cancer and are not metastases, but their presence is suggestive of an underlying tumor. The evolution of the dermatosis is parallel to that of cancer: treating cancer results in the regression of cutaneous manifestations. We report an observation of a 44-year-old smoker, who was hospitalized for a tissue excavated process associated with bullous dermatosis. The transmural puncture biopsy finds small cell carcinoma. The skin biopsy objective bullous pemphigoid. The evolution under chemotherapy was marked regression of bullous lesions and the patient died later after metastatic extension. Cutaneous paraneoplastic syndrome appears only in a minority of cancer patients, but its recognition is very important for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Prognostic correlation of cell cycle progression score and Ki-67 as a predictor of aggressiveness, biochemical failure, and mortality in men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Iván Henríquez; Parada, David; Gallardo, Pablo; Gascón, Marina; Besora, Arnau; Peña, Karla; Riu, Francesc; Arquez Pianetta, Miquel; Abuchaibe, Oscar; Torres Royò, Laura; Arenas, Meritxell

    2017-01-01

    Ki-67 is a proliferation marker in prostate cancer. A prognostic RNA signature was developed to characterize prostate cancer aggressiveness. The aim was to evaluate prognostic correlation of CCP and Ki-67 with biochemical failure (BF), and survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients (pts) treated with radiation therapy (RT). CCP score and Ki-67 were derived retrospectively from pre-treatment paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue of 33 men diagnosed from 2002 to 2006. CCP score was calculated as an average expression of 31 CCP genes. Ki-67 was determined by IHC. Single pathologist evaluated all tissues. Factors associated to failure and survival were analyzed. Median CCP score was 0.9 (-0-1 - 2.6). CCP 0: 1 pt; CCP 1: 19 pts; CCP 2: 13 pts. Median Ki-67 was 8.9. Ki-67 cutpoint was 15.08%. BF and DSM were observed in 21% and 9%. Ki-67 ≥ 15% predicted BF (p = 0.043). With a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 10-year BF, OS, DM and DSM for CCP 1 vs. CCP 2 was 76-71% (p = 0.83), 83-73% (p = 0.86), 89-85% (p = 0.84), and 94-78% (p = 0.66). On univariate, high Ki-67 was correlated with BF (p = 0.013), OS (p = 0.023), DM (p = 0.007), and DSM (p = 0.01). On Cox MVA, high Ki-67 had a BF trend (p = 0.063). High CCP score was not correlated with DSM. High Ki-67 significantly predicted outcome and provided prognostic information. CCP score may improve accuracy stratification. We did not provide prognostic correlation of CCP and DSM. It should be validated in a larger cohort of pts.

  12. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  13. Outcomes of Sinonasal Cancer Treated With Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagan, Roi, E-mail: rdagan@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Bryant, Curtis; Li, Zuofeng; Yeung, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Justice, Jeb; Dzieglewiski, Peter; Werning, John [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Fernandes, Rui; Pirgousis, Phil [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Lanza, Donald C. [Sinus & Nasal Institute of Florida, St. Petersburg, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To report disease outcomes after proton therapy (PT) for sinonasal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four adult patients without metastases received primary (13%) or adjuvant (87%) PT for sinonasal cancers (excluding melanoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma). Common histologies were olfactory neuroblastoma (23%), squamous cell carcinoma (22%), and adenoid cystic carcinoma (17%). Advanced stage (T3 in 25% and T4 in 69%) and high-grade histology (51%) were common. Surgical procedures included endoscopic resection alone (45%), endoscopic resection with craniotomy (12%), or open resection (30%). Gross residual disease was present in 26% of patients. Most patients received hyperfractionated PT (1.2 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] twice daily, 99%) and chemotherapy (75%). The median PT dose was 73.8 Gy (RBE), with 85% of patients receiving more than 70 Gy (RBE). Prognostic factors were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards regression for multiple regression. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated using logistic regression. Serious, late grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4. The median follow-up was 2.4 years for all patients and 2.7 years among living patients. Results: The local control (LC), neck control, freedom from distant metastasis, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 83%, 94%, 73%, 63%, 70%, and 68%, respectively, at 3 years. Gross total resection and PT resulted in a 90% 3-year LC rate. The 3-year LC rate was 61% for primary radiation therapy and 59% for patients with gross disease. Gross disease was the only significant factor for LC on multivariate analysis, whereas grade and continuous LC were prognostic for overall survival. Six of 12 local recurrences were marginal. Dural dissemination represented 26% of distant recurrences. Late toxicity occurred in 24% of patients (with

  14. PARP inhibitors may affect normal cells in patients with a BRCA mutation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARP inhibition has been approved for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer with BRAC1 and BRAC2 mutations and is being studied in the treatment advanced breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer.  A new study by Center for Cancer Research scientists in the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program and the Laboratory of Genome Integrity, raises concerns that when cancer patients with a BRCA mutation are treated with PARP inhibitors their normal cells may also be affected.  

  15. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  16. The effect of Lactobacillus casei extract on cervical cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Nyung; Lee, Won Moo; Park, Kyoung Sik; Kim, Jong Bin; Han, Dae Jong

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of several types of cancer in vivo, but its effect on cervical cells has not been reported. We incubated cells of the human cervical cell lines Caski and HeLa with extracts of L. casei and investigated its effects on the growth of the cells and possible synergy with anticancer drugs. Material and methods Cell-free extracts of L. casei were prepared and purified. Cultures of Caski and HeLa cells adhering to tissue culture plates were treated with L. casei extract. The effects of L. casei extract on the growth of cancer cells and its possible synergy with anti-cancer drugs in cervical cancer cell lines were investigated. The cells were treated with L. casei extract alone, anti-cancer drugs alone [doxorubicin, paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and cisplatin], or L. casei extract plus anti-cancer drugs. Results L. casei extract had no significant effect on the growth rate of the two cell lines. Anti-cancer drugs alone induced growth inhibition, but there was no synergistic effect of L. casei extract on growth inhibition. Conclusions L. casei extract does not have a potent effect on the viability of cervical cancer cells in vitro. In addition, L. casei extract has no synergistic effect on the inhibition of growth of cancer cells in the presence of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26557779

  17. 980nm laser for difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjabo, A. D.; Cema, I.; Lihacova, I.; Derjabo, L.

    2013-06-01

    Begin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is most common skin cancer over the world. There are around 20 modalities for BCC treatment. Laser surgery is uncommon option. We demonstrate our long term follow up results. Aim: To evaluate long term efficacy of a 980nm diode laser for the difficult-to-treat basal cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods: 167 patients with 173 basal cell carcinoma on the nose were treated with a 980 nm diode laser from May 1999 till May 2005 at Latvian Oncology center. All tumors were morphologically confirmed. 156 patients were followed for more than 5 years. Results: The lowest recurrence rate was observed in cases of superficial BCC, diameterConclusions: 980 nm diode laser is useful tool in dermatology with high long term efficacy, good acceptance by the patients and good cosmetics results.

  18. Identification of MAC1: A Small Molecule That Rescues Spindle Bipolarity in Monastrol-Treated Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Mitchison, Timothy J; Crews, Craig M; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-06-17

    The genetic integrity of each organism is intimately tied to the correct segregation of its genome during mitosis. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are fundamental for both basic research and the development of novel strategies to treat mitosis-relevant diseases such as cancer. Due to their fast mode of action, small molecules are invaluable tools to dissect mitosis. Yet, there is a great demand for novel antimitotic compounds. We performed a chemical genetic suppression screen to identify compounds that restore spindle bipolarity in cells treated with Monastrol, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5. We identified one compound-MAC1-that rescued spindle bipolarity in cells lacking Eg5 activity. Mechanistically, MAC1 induces the formation of additional microtubule nucleation centers, which allows kinesin Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5 activity. Thus, our chemical genetic suppression screen revealed novel unexpected insights into the mechanism of spindle assembly in mammalian cells.

  19. Sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women treated for breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women globally. Early stage diagnosis in young sexually active women, coupled with advances in adjuvant therapy has contributed to an increase in the number of young survivors. A diagnosis of breast cancer may affect the woman's self-esteem, sexuality and intimate ...

  20. Stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a bibliometric analysis of Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy from 2002 to 2011 retrieved from Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed published articles on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy indexed in Web of Science; (b) original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material, and news items; and (c) publication between 2002 and 2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) documents that were not published in the public domain; and (c) corrected papers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to subject areas; (3) distribution according to journals; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; (6) distribution according to institution in China; (7) distribution according to institution that cooperated with Chinese institutions; (8) top-cited articles from 2002 to 2006; (9) top-cited articles from 2007 to 2011. RESULTS: A total of 318 publications on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy were retrieved from Web of Science from 2002 to 2011, of which almost half derived from American authors and institutes. The number of publications has gradually increased over the past 10 years. Most papers appeared in journals with a focus on gene and molecular research, such as Molecular Therapy, Neuromuscular Disorders, and PLoS One. The 10 most-cited papers from 2002 to 2006 were mostly about different kinds of stem cell transplantation for muscle regeneration, while the 10 most-cited papers from 2007 to 2011 were mostly about new techniques of stem cell transplantation

  1. CLASSIFICATION OF CERVICAL CANCER CELLS IN PAP SMEAR SCREENING TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Athinarayanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is second topmost cancers among women but also, it was a curable one. Regular smear test can discover the sign of precancerous cell and treated the patient according to the result. However sometimes the detection errors can be occurred by smear thickness, cell overlapping or by un-wanted particles in the smear and cytotechnologists faulty diagnosis. Therefore the reason automatic cancer detection was developed. This was help to increase cancer cell mindfulness, diagnosis accuracy with low cost. This detection process consists of some techniques of the image preprocessing that is segmentation and effective texture feature extraction with SVM classification. Then the Final Classification Results of this proposed technique was compared to the previous classification techniques of KNN and ANN and the result would be very useful to cytotechnologists for their further analysis

  2. Endothelial cells activate the cancer stem cell-associated NANOGP8 pathway in colorectal cancer cells in a paracrine fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Bhattacharya, Rajat; Ye, Xiangcang; Fan, Fan; Boulbes, Delphine R; Xia, Ling; Ellis, Lee M

    2017-08-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been hypothesized to mediate cell survival and chemoresistance. Previous studies from our laboratory described a role for liver parenchymal endothelial cells (LPECs) in mediating the CSC phenotype in CRC cells in a paracrine/angiocrine fashion. The objectives of this study were to determine whether endothelial cells (ECs) from different organs can induce the CSC phenotype in CRC cells and to elucidate the signaling pathways involved. We treated a newly developed CRC cell line (HCP-1) and established CRC cell lines (HT29 and SW480) with conditioned medium (CM) from primary ECs isolated from nonmalignant liver, lung, colon mucosa, and kidney. Our results showed that CM from ECs from all organs increased the number of CSCs, as determined by sphere formation, and protein levels of NANOG and OCT4 in CRC cells. With the focus of further elucidating the role of the liver vascular network in mediating the CSC phenotype, we demonstrated that CM from LPECs increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. Moreover, we showed that LPEC CM specifically induced NANOGP8 expression in CRC cells by specific enzyme digestion and a luciferase reporter assay using a vector containing the NANOGP8 promoter. Lastly, we found that LPEC CM-induced NANOGP8 expression and sphere formation were mediated by AKT activation. Our studies demonstrated a paracrine role for ECs in regulating the CSC phenotype and chemoresistance in CRC cells by AKT-mediated induction of NANOGP8. These studies suggest a more specific approach to target CSCs by blocking the expression of NANOGP8 in cancer cells. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Molecular Biomarkers for Prediction of Targeted Therapy Response in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Trick or Treat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toss, Angela; Venturelli, Marta; Peterle, Chiara; Piacentini, Federico; Cascinu, Stefano; Cortesi, Laura

    2017-01-04

    In recent years, the study of genomic alterations and protein expression involved in the pathways of breast cancer carcinogenesis has provided an increasing number of targets for drugs development in the setting of metastatic breast cancer (i.e., trastuzumab, everolimus, palbociclib, etc.) significantly improving the prognosis of this disease. These drugs target specific molecular abnormalities that confer a survival advantage to cancer cells. On these bases, emerging evidence from clinical trials provided increasing proof that the genetic landscape of any tumor may dictate its sensitivity or resistance profile to specific agents and some studies have already showed that tumors treated with therapies matched with their molecular alterations obtain higher objective response rates and longer survival. Predictive molecular biomarkers may optimize the selection of effective therapies, thus reducing treatment costs and side effects. This review offers an overview of the main molecular pathways involved in breast carcinogenesis, the targeted therapies developed to inhibit these pathways, the principal mechanisms of resistance and, finally, the molecular biomarkers that, to date, are demonstrated in clinical trials to predict response/resistance to targeted treatments in metastatic breast cancer.

  4. Molecular Biomarkers for Prediction of Targeted Therapy Response in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Trick or Treat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the study of genomic alterations and protein expression involved in the pathways of breast cancer carcinogenesis has provided an increasing number of targets for drugs development in the setting of metastatic breast cancer (i.e., trastuzumab, everolimus, palbociclib, etc. significantly improving the prognosis of this disease. These drugs target specific molecular abnormalities that confer a survival advantage to cancer cells. On these bases, emerging evidence from clinical trials provided increasing proof that the genetic landscape of any tumor may dictate its sensitivity or resistance profile to specific agents and some studies have already showed that tumors treated with therapies matched with their molecular alterations obtain higher objective response rates and longer survival. Predictive molecular biomarkers may optimize the selection of effective therapies, thus reducing treatment costs and side effects. This review offers an overview of the main molecular pathways involved in breast carcinogenesis, the targeted therapies developed to inhibit these pathways, the principal mechanisms of resistance and, finally, the molecular biomarkers that, to date, are demonstrated in clinical trials to predict response/resistance to targeted treatments in metastatic breast cancer.

  5. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p < 0.0001. Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1, protein kinase B (Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2, MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK, and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40, which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  6. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chang, Wei-An; Tsai, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Ho, Ya-Wen; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2017-06-24

    Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak), and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK), and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40), which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  7. Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma successfully treated with pazopanib: impact of TKIs' antiangiogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Giovanni; Monterisi, Santa; Signorelli, Diego; Cona, Silvia; Cassano, Alessandra; Danza, Francesco; Barone, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma, especially without neoplastic thrombosis of the vena cava, is extremely rare. The prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been radically influenced by the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but very few reports in the literature have described their activity in heart metastasis. We report the case of a woman with a left ventricle metastasis from kidney cancer without renal vein involvement, who was treated with pazopanib. The patient achieved a prolonged partial response, with clear signs of metastasis devascularization and a favorable toxicity profile.

  8. Inhibition of breast cancer-cell glutamate release with sulfasalazine limits cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungard, Robert G; Seidlitz, Eric P; Singh, Gurmit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer in bone is frequently a result of metastases from distant sites, particularly from the breast, lung, and prostate. Pain is a common and often severe pathological feature of cancers in bone, and is a significant impediment to the maintenance of quality of life of patients living with bone metastases. Cancer cell lines have been demonstrated to release significant amounts of the neurotransmitter and cell-signalling molecule l-glutamate via the system xC(-) cystine/glutamate antiporter. We have developed a novel mouse model of breast cancer bone metastases to investigate the impact of inhibiting cancer cell glutamate transporters on nociceptive behaviour. Immunodeficient mice were inoculated intrafemorally with the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, then treated 14days later via mini-osmotic pumps inserted intraperitoneally with sulfasalazine, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, or vehicle. Both sulfasalazine and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine attenuated in vitro cancer cell glutamate release in a dose-dependent manner via the system xC(-) transporter. Animals treated with sulfasalazine displayed reduced nociceptive behaviours and an extended time until the onset of behavioural evidence of pain. Animals treated with a lower dose of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine did not display this reduction in nociceptive behaviour. These results suggest that a reduction in glutamate secretion from cancers in bone with the system xC(-) inhibitor sulfasalazine may provide some benefit for treating the often severe and intractable pain associated with bone metastases. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  10. Variable TERRA abundance and stability in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Keo, Ponnarath; Bae, Jaeman; Ko, Jung Hwa; Choi, Joong Sub

    2017-06-01

    Telomeres are transcribed into long non-coding RNA, referred to as telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which plays important roles in maintaining telomere integrity and heterochromatin formation. TERRA has been well characterized in HeLa cells, a type of cervical cancer cell. However, TERRA abundance and stability have not been examined in other cervical cancer cells, at least to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in this study, we measured TERRA levels and stability, as well as telomere length in 6 cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, HeLa S3, C-33A and SNU-17. We also examined the association between the TERRA level and its stability and telomere length. We found that the TERRA level was several fold greater in the SiHa, CaSki, HeLa S3, C-33A and SNU-17 cells, than in the HeLa cells. An RNA stability assay of actinomycin D-treated cells revealed that TERRA had a short half-life of ~4 h in HeLa cells, which was consistent with previous studies, but was more stable with a longer half-life (>8 h) in the other 5 cell lines. Telomere length varied from 4 to 9 kb in the cells and did not correlate significantly with the TERRA level. On the whole, our data indicate that TERRA abundance and stability vary between different types of cervical cancer cells. TERRA degrades rapidly in HeLa cells, but is maintained stably in other cervical cancer cells that accumulate higher levels of TERRA. TERRA abundance is associated with the stability of RNA in cervical cancer cells, but is unlikely associated with telomere length.

  11. Biomarkers of evasive resistance predict disease progression in cancer patients treated with antiangiogenic therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, Andreas; Jöhrer, Karin; Kocher, Florian; Steiner, Normann; Graziadei, Ivo; Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Kremser, Christian; Kern, Johann; Untergasser, Gerold; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Numerous antiangiogenic agents are approved for the treatment of oncological diseases. However, almost all patients develop evasive resistance mechanisms against antiangiogenic therapies. Currently no predictive biomarker for therapy resistance or response has been established. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predicting the development of therapy resistance in patients with hepatocellular cancer (n = 11), renal cell cancer (n = 7) and non-small cell lung cancer (n = 2). Thereby we measured levels of angiogenic growth factors, tumor perfusion, circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and tumor endothelial markers (TEM) in patients during the course of therapy with antiangiogenic agents, and correlated them with the time to antiangiogenic progression (aTTP). Importantly, at disease progression, we observed an increase of proangiogenic factors, upregulation of CEC/CEP levels and downregulation of TEMs, such as Robo4 and endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR), reflecting the formation of torturous tumor vessels. Increased TEM expression levels tended to correlate with prolonged aTTP (ECSCR high = 275 days vs. ECSCR low = 92.5 days; p = 0.07 and for Robo4 high = 387 days vs. Robo4 low = 90.0 days; p = 0.08). This indicates that loss of vascular stabilization factors aggravates the development of antiangiogenic resistance. Thus, our observations confirm that CEP/CEC populations, proangiogenic cytokines and TEMs contribute to evasive resistance in antiangiogenic treated patients. Higher TEM expression during disease progression may have clinical and pathophysiological implications, however, validation of our results is warranted for further biomarker development. PMID:26956051

  12. Experience of ReCell in Skin Cancer Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Gilleard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ReCell system (Avita Medical is a cell culture product that allows the immediate processing of a small split-thickness skin biopsy to produce a complete population of cells including keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and fibroblasts. This series is the first to highlight the reconstructive applications of ReCell following ablative skin cancer surgery. The ReCell system was utilized for three patients following skin cancer excision. In two cases, the cells were applied to forehead flap donor sites following nasal reconstruction. In one case, the cells were applied to the calvarial periosteum following wide local excision of a melanoma scar. Assessment of the treated area was performed using the patient and observer scar assessment scale after 1 year. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS scores for the 2 patients treated with ReCell following forehead flap surgery were 22 and 32. The score for the patient that underwent wide local excision of a melanoma scar was 45. The absence of a donor site, accelerated healing and the satisfactory aesthetic appearance of the mature scars in this series suggest that ReCell may play a useful role in reconstruction following skin cancer excision.

  13. S0514 Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Gallbladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  14. Anti-Cancer Activity of Solanum nigrum (AESN through Suppression of Mitochondrial Function and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Jang Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is the main approach for treating advanced and recurrent carcinoma, but the clinical performance of chemotherapy is limited by relatively low response rates, drug resistance, and adverse effects that severely affect the quality of life of patients. An association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and chemotherapy resistance has been investigated in recent studies. Our recent studies have found that the aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum (AESN is a crucial ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine formulas for treating various types of cancer patients and exhibits antitumor effects. We evaluated the suppression of EMT in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with AESN. The mitochondrial morphology was investigated using Mitotracker Deep-Red FM stain. Our results indicated that AESN markedly inhibited cell viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest mediated by activation of caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, mitochondrial fission was observed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with AESN. In addition to elevation of E-cadherin, downregulations of ZEB1, N-cadherin, and vimentin were found in AESN-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These results suggested that AESN could inhibit EMT of MCF-7 breast cancer cells mediated by attenuation of mitochondrial function. AESN could be potentially beneficial in treating breast cancer cells, and may be of interest for future studies in developing integrative cancer therapy against proliferation, metastasis, and migration of breast cancer cells.

  15. Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Men Initially Treated with Active Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Musunuru, Bindu; Vesprini, Danny; Zhang, Liying; Ghanem, Gabriella; Loblaw, Andrew; Klotz, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    Active surveillance is an approach to low and low intermediate risk prostate cancer that is designed to decrease overtreatment. Despite close monitoring a small subset of patients progress to metastatic disease. We analyzed the clinical and pathological correlates of surveillance in patients who eventually experienced metastasis. This was a single center, prospective cohort study. Eligible patients were treated with an expectant approach. The main outcome measure was metastasis-free survival. Predictive factors for metastasis were identified. Metastasis developed in 30 of 980 patients, of whom 211 were classified at intermediate risk, including 14 who progressed to metastatic disease. Median followup was 6.3 years, median age was 70 years, median prostate specific antigen was 6.2 ng/ml and median time to metastasis was 8.9 years. Metastases developed in bone in 18 patients (60%) and in lymph nodes in 13 (43%). Prostate specific antigen doubling time less than 3 years (HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.4-9.4, p = 0.0006), Gleason score 7 (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.3, p = 0.0018) and a total of 3 or more positive cores (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.8, p = 0.0028) were independent predictors of metastasis. Although the intermediate risk group was at higher risk for metastasis, those with Gleason score 6 and prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml were not at increased risk for metastasis. Metastasis developed in only 2 patients with Gleason score 6 and neither had surgical pathology grading. Active surveillance appears safe in patients at low risk and in select patients at intermediate risk, particularly those with Gleason score 6 and prostate specific antigen greater than 10 ng/ml. Patients with elements of Gleason pattern 4 on diagnostic biopsy are at increased risk for eventual metastasis when treated with an initial conservative approach. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A D Smith

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined.MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography.Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U]glucose.This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism.

  17. Comparison of mediastinal lymph node status and relapse pattern in clinical stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus upfront surgery: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Milan; Kontic, Milica; Ercegovac, Maja; Stojsic, Jelena; Bascarevic, Slavisa; Moskovljevic, Dejan; Kostic, Marko; Vesovic, Radomir; Popevic, Spasoje; Laban, Marija; Markovic, Jelena; Jovanovic, Dragana

    2017-09-01

    In spite of the progress made in neoadjuvant therapy for operable non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many issues remain unsolved, especially in locally advanced stage IIIA. Retrospective data of 163 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC after surgery was analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups: a preoperative chemotherapy group including 59 patients who received platinum-etoposide doublet treatment before surgery, and an upfront surgery group including 104 patients for whom surgical resection was the first treatment step. Adjuvant chemotherapy or/and radiotherapy was administered to 139 patients (85.3%), while 24 patients (14.7%) were followed-up only. The rate of N2 disease was significantly higher in the upfront surgery group ( P   0.05). There was significant difference in preoperative chemotherapy group regarding relapse rate and treatment outcomes related to the lymph node status comparing to the upfront surgery group. Neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemo-therapy is a part of treatment for patients with stage IIIA NSCLC, but further investigation is required to determine optimal treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Cancer Cell Fusion: Mechanisms Slowly Unravel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicite K. Noubissi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways driving invasion and metastasis have been studied for many years, the origin of the population of metastatic cells within the primary tumor is still not well understood. About a century ago, Aichel proposed that cancer cell fusion was a mechanism of cancer metastasis. This hypothesis gained some support over the years, and recently became the focus of many studies that revealed increasing evidence pointing to the possibility that cancer cell fusion probably gives rise to the metastatic phenotype by generating widespread genetic and epigenetic diversity, leading to the emergence of critical populations needed to evolve resistance to the treatment and development of metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the clinical relevance of cancer cell fusion, describe emerging mechanisms of cancer cell fusion, address why inhibiting cancer cell fusion could represent a critical line of attack to limit drug resistance and to prevent metastasis, and suggest one new modality for doing so.

  19. Piperlongumine induces pancreatic cancer cell death by enhancing reactive oxygen species and DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Dhillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers with a nearly 95% mortality rate. The poor response of pancreatic cancer to currently available therapies and the extremely low survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients point to a critical need for alternative therapeutic strategies. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS-inducing agents has emerged as an innovative and effective strategy to treat various cancers. In this study, we investigated the potential of a known ROS inducer, piperlongumine (PPLGM, a bioactive agent found in long peppers, to induce pancreatic cancer cell death in cell culture and animal models. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cell cultures by elevating ROS levels and causing DNA damage. PPLGM-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell death was reversed by treating the cells with an exogenous antioxidant. Similar to the in vitro studies, PPLGM caused a reduction in tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Tumors from the PPLGM-treated animals showed decreased Ki-67 and increased 8-OHdG expression, suggesting PPLGM inhibited tumor cell proliferation and enhanced oxidative stress. Taken together, our results show that PPLGM is an effective inhibitor for in vitro and in vivo growth of pancreatic cancer cells, and that it works through a ROS-mediated DNA damage pathway. These findings suggest that PPLGM has the potential to be used for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Jamming and liquidity in 3D cancer cell aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Linda; Grosser, Steffen; Lippoldt, Jürgen; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol; KäS, Josef A.

    Traditionally, tissues are treated as simple liquids, which holds for example for embryonic tissue. However, recent experiments have shown that this picture is insufficient for other tissue types, suggesting possible transitions to solid-like behavior induced by cellular jamming. The coarse-grained self-propelled Voronoi (SPV) model predicts such a transition depending on cell shape which is thought to arise from an interplay of cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension. We observe non-liquid behavior in 3D breast cancer spheroids of varying metastatic potential and correlate single cell shapes, single cell dynamics and collective dynamic behavior of fusion and segregation experiments via the SPV model.

  1. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  2. Synchrotron FTIR analysis of drug treated ovarian A2780 cells: An ability to differentiate cell response to different drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    Flower, Kevin R.; Khalifa, Intisar; Bassan, Paul; Démoulin, Damien; Jackson, Edward; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; McGown, Alan T.; Miles, Philip; Vaccari, Lisa; Gardner, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Recently a new di-gold(i) organometallic complex [1,3-(Ph 3PAu)2-C6H4] (KF0101) has been synthesised and found to exhibit cytotoxic activity in vitro. Subsequently it has been demonstrated that KF0101 shows little or no cross-resistance against a number of the cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro suggesting a different mode of action for the drug. In this study, syncrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IRMS) has been used on drug treated single A2780 cells in orde...

  3. Herceptin Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Natural Killer Cells on Breast Cancer Cells Expressing Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Tian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal adoptive cell therapy (ACT should contribute to effective cancer treatment. The unique ability of natural killer (NK cells to kill cancer cells independent of major histocompatibility requirement makes them suitable as ACT tools. Herceptin, an antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, is used to treat HER2+ breast cancer. However, it has limited effectiveness and possible severe cardiotoxicity. Given that Herceptin may increase the cytotoxicity of lymphocytes, we explored the possible augmentation of NK cell cytotoxicity against HER2+ breast cancer cells by Herceptin. We demonstrated that Herceptin could interact with CD16 on NK cells to expand the cytotoxic NK (specifically, CD56dim cell population. Additionally, Herceptin increased NK cell migration and cytotoxicity against HER2+ breast cancer cells. In a pilot study, Herceptin-treated NK cells shrunk lung nodular metastasis in a woman with HER2+ breast cancer who could not tolerate the cardiotoxic side effects of Herceptin. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of Herceptin-treated NK cells in patients with HER2+ and Herceptin-intolerant breast cancer.

  4. Gastrointestinal permeability in ovarian cancer and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tichá Alena

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination of platinum derivatives with paclitaxel is currently the standard front line regimen for patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma, and represents also an active regimen in patients with metastatic breast or unknown primary carcinomas. Measurement of intestinal permeability represents one of the potential methods of noninvasive laboratory assessment of gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy, but little is known about intestinal permeability in patients treated with paclitaxel or platinum. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 36 breast and ovarian cancer patients treated with paclitaxel/platinum combination by measuring, using capillary gas chromatography, urinary sucrose, lactulose, xylose and mannitol after oral challenge. The significance of differences during the therapy compared to pre-treatment values was studied by Wilcoxon paired test. The differences between groups of patient were studied by Mann-Whitney U test. Fisher exact test was used to compare the frequency in different subgroups. Results After administration of the first dose, a significant (p Conclusion A transient significant increase in lactulose/monosaccharide and sucrose/monosaccharide ratios was observed in ovarian and breast cancer patients treated with paclitaxel and platinum. Increased lactulose absorption, lactulose/mannitol, sucrose/mannitol and lactulose/xylose ratios were evident in patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity, and increased baseline lactulose/mannitol ratio predicted serious toxicity.

  5. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Wei ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  6. Not only for melanoma. Subcutaneous pseudoprogression in lung squamous-cell carcinoma treated with nivolumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaty, Michal; Moore, Assaf; Dudnik, Elizabeth; Peled, Nir

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pseudoprogression, that is, initial tumor growth followed by subsequent tumor regression, has been well described for immunomodulation therapy in melanoma patients. This phenomenon is not well defined in lung cancer. Nivolumab, an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, was recently approved for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a second-line therapy. Patient concerns and diagnosis: We present a patient with squamous NSCLC, suffering from multiple bone and subcutaneous metastases. Interventions: The patient was treated with nivolumab. Outcomes: A subcutaneous lesion in her upper back grew substantially after the first cycle of nivolumab, and later regressed, with marked improvement in all cancer sites. Lessons: Such pseudoprogression may serve to predict subsequent clinical response. PMID:28121940

  7. Amygdalin induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Ma, Jinshu; Wang, Fang; Hu, Jie; Cui, Ai; Wei, Chengguo; Yang, Qing; Li, Fan

    2013-02-01

    Amygdalin, a naturally occurring substance, has been suggested to be efficacious as an anticancer substance. The effect of amygdalin on cervical cancer cells has never been studied. In this study, we found that the viability of human cervical cancer HeLa cell line was significantly inhibited by amygdalin. 4,6-Diamino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI) staining showed that amygdalin-treated HeLa cells developed typical apoptotic changes. The development of apoptosis in the amygdalin-treated HeLa cells were confirmed by double staining of amygdalin-treated HeLa cells with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) along with increase in caspase-3 activity in these cells. Further studies indicated that antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was downregulated whereas proapoptotic Bax protein was upregulated in the amygdalin-treated HeLa cells implying involvement of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In vivo, amygdalin administration inhibited the growth of HeLa cell xenografts through a mechanism of apoptosis. The results in the present study suggest that amygdalin may offer a new therapeutic option for patients with cervical cancer.

  8. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  9. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Human Papilloma Virus-Related Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  10. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delishaj, Durim; Rembielak, Agata; Manfredi, Bruno; Ursino, Stefano; Pasqualetti, Francesco; Laliscia, Concetta; Orlandi, Francesca; Morganti, Riccardo; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Paiar, Fabiola

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been increasing over the past 30 years. There are different treatment options and surgical excision is the most frequent treatment due to its low rates of recurrence. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative of surgery, and brachytherapy (BT) might be a better therapeutic option due to high radiation dose concentration to the tumor with rapid dose fall-off resulting in normal tissues sparing. The aim of this review was to evaluate the local control, toxicity, and cosmetic outcomes in NMSC treated with high-dose-rate BT (HDR-BT). In May 2016, a systematic search of bibliographic database of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Library with a combination of key words of "skin cancer", "high dose rate brachytherapy", "squamous cell carcinoma", "basal cell carcinoma", and "non melanoma skin cancer" was performed. In this systematic review, we included randomized trials, non-randomized trials, prospective and retrospective studies in patients affected by NMSC treated with HDR-BT. Our searches generated a total of 85 results, and through a process of screening, 10 publications were selected for the review. Brachytherapy was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and high local control rates (median: 97%). Cosmetic outcome was reported in seven study and consisted in an excellent and good cosmetic results in 94.8% of cases. Based on the review data, we can conclude that the treatment of NMSC with HDR-BT is effective with excellent and good cosmetics results, even in elderly patients. The hypofractionated course appears effective with very good local disease control. More data with large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of brachytherapy.

  11. Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Christensen, Mariann

    2012-01-01

    Manganese Superoxide Dismtase Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Population-Based Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Cyclophosphamide Epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil...

  12. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  13. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  14. The role of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake of bone marrow on PET/CT in predicting clinical outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won [Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, International St. Mary' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, International St. Mary' s Hospital, Institute for Integrative Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ki Hyun [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Seog [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cheonan, Chungcheongnam-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between bone marrow (BM) FDG uptake on PET/CT and serum inflammatory markers and to evaluate the prognostic value of BM FDG uptake for predicting clinical outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. One hundred and six NSCLC patients who underwent FDG PET/CT for staging work-up and received chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. Mean BM FDG uptake (BM SUV) and BM-to-liver uptake ratio (BLR) were measured, along with volumetric parameters of PET/CT. The relationship of BM SUV and BLR with hematologic parameters and serum inflammatory markers was evaluated. Prognostic values of BM SUV and BLR for predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed. BM SUV and BLR were significantly correlated with white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level. On univariate analysis, BLR was a significant prognostic factor for both PFS and OS. On multivariate analysis, TNM stage and BLR were independent prognostic factors for PFS, and only TNM stage was an independent prognostic factor for OS. In NSCLC patients, FDG uptake of BM reflects the systemic inflammatory response and can be used as a biomarker to identify patients with poor prognosis. (orig.)

  15. Detection of centrosome aberrations in disease-unrelated cells from patients with tumor treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, Michelle; Leitner, Armin; Haferlach, Claudia; Duesberg, Peter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Hofheinz, Ralf; Seifarth, Wolfgang; Hochhaus, Andreas; Fabarius, Alice

    2010-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) target various pathways associated with proliferation of aberrant clones in malignant diseases. Despite good response and acceptable tolerability, little is known concerning long-term toxicity. Furthermore, the influence of these inhibitors on disease-unrelated cells is not investigated yet. Centrosome aberrations are hallmarks of various cancers. We sought to evaluate the effect of TKIs on centrosomes of disease-unrelated cells. We examined cells of the oral mucosa (OM) and fibroblasts of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with dasatinib and bosutinib. Results were compared with data from patients with CML treated with imatinib or nilotinib and with data from patients suffering from renal and hepatocellular carcinomas (RCC/HCC) treated with sorafenib or sunitinib. Cells of healthy donors served as controls. OM cells (n = 12) and fibroblasts (n = 7) of patients with CML treated with dasatinib and OM cells of three patients with CML treated with bosutinib showed centrosomal alterations (mean, 14%) compared with 16 (10 OM and 6 fibroblasts) controls (mean, 3%). OM cells of five patients with CML and one patient with systemic mastocytosis treated with imatinib or nilotinib and of eight patients with RCC or HCC treated with sorafenib or sunitinib showed centrosome defects in a mean of 15%. Our data have shown that TKI treatment of tumor patients may influence centrosomes in disease-unrelated cells or tissues. This may be important with regard to various observed side effects.

  16. Characterization of the metabolic phenotype of rapamycin-treated CD8+ T cells with augmented ability to generate long-lasting memory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism plays a critical role in regulating T cell responses and the development of memory T cells with long-term protections. However, the metabolic phenotype of antigen-activated T cells that are responsible for the generation of long-lived memory cells has not been characterized. DESIGN AND METHODS: Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV peptide gp33-specific CD8(+ T cells derived from T cell receptor transgenic mice, we characterized the metabolic phenotype of proliferating T cells that were activated and expanded in vitro in the presence or absence of rapamycin, and determined the capability of these rapamycin-treated T cells to generate long-lived memory cells in vivo. RESULTS: Antigen-activated CD8(+ T cells treated with rapamycin gave rise to 5-fold more long-lived memory T cells in vivo than untreated control T cells. In contrast to that control T cells only increased glycolysis, rapamycin-treated T cells upregulated both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. These rapamycin-treated T cells had greater ability than control T cells to survive withdrawal of either glucose or growth factors. Inhibition of OXPHOS by oligomycin significantly reduced the ability of rapamycin-treated T cells to survive growth factor withdrawal. This effect of OXPHOS inhibition was accompanied with mitochondrial hyperpolarization and elevation of reactive oxygen species that are known to be toxic to cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that these rapamycin-treated T cells may represent a unique cell model for identifying nutrients and signals critical to regulating metabolism in both effector and memory T cells, and for the development of new methods to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell cancer therapy.

  17. Curcumin induces chemo/radio-sensitization in ovarian cancer cells and curcumin nanoparticles inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallapu Murali M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo/radio-resistance is a major obstacle in treating advanced ovarian cancer. The efficacy of current treatments may be improved by increasing the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemo/radiation therapies. Curcumin is a naturally occurring compound with anti-cancer activity in multiple cancers; however, its chemo/radio-sensitizing potential is not well studied in ovarian cancer. Herein, we demonstrate the effectiveness of a curcumin pre-treatment strategy for chemo/radio-sensitizing cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. To improve the efficacy and specificity of curcumin induced chemo/radio sensitization, we developed a curcumin nanoparticle formulation conjugated with a monoclonal antibody specific for cancer cells. Methods Cisplatin resistant A2780CP ovarian cancer cells were pre-treated with curcumin followed by exposure to cisplatin or radiation and the effect on cell growth was determined by MTS and colony formation assays. The effect of curcumin pre-treatment on the expression of apoptosis related proteins and β-catenin was determined by Western blotting or Flow Cytometry. A luciferase reporter assay was used to determine the effect of curcumin on β-catenin transcription activity. The poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (Nano-CUR was developed by a modified nano-precipitation method and physico-chemical characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering methods. Results Curcumin pre-treatment considerably reduced the dose of cisplatin and radiation required to inhibit the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. During the 6 hr pre-treatment, curcumin down regulated the expression of Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 pro-survival proteins. Curcumin pre-treatment followed by exposure to low doses of cisplatin increased apoptosis as indicated by annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 9 and PARP. Additionally, curcumin pre

  18. A Case of Orbital Metastasis as Disease Progression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Treated with Crizotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Sakata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital metastasis of lung cancer is rare. It often causes visual disorder. To date, there are only a few case reports. Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor that leads to responses in most patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer. Visual disorder is one of the popular adverse events of crizotinib, but the symptom almost decreases over time. We report a case of orbital metastasis as the disease progression of ALK-positive lung cancer treated with crizotinib. It should be kept in mind that orbital metastasis can be the disease progression of lung adenocarcinoma with ALK translocation treated with crizotinib. When physicians encounter a patient receiving crizotinib with visual disorder, we must distinguish between adverse events and orbital metastasis.

  19. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers...... predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated...... by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p

  20. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  1. Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells: A New Target for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglei Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal disease among all gynecologic malignancies and is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Although the standard combination of surgery and chemotherapy was initially effective in patients with ovarian cancer, disease relapse commonly occurred due to the generation of chemoresistance. It has been reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs are involved in drug resistance and cancer recurrence. Over the past decades, increasing studies have been done to identify CSCs from human ovarian cancer cells. The present paper will summarize different investigations on ovarian CSCs, including isolation, mechanisms of chemoresistance, and therapeutic approaches. Although there are still numerous challenges to translate basic research to clinical applications, understanding the molecular details of CSCs is essential for developing effective strategies to prevent ovarian cancer and its recurrence.

  2. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  3. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, van M.J.; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, van B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  4. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erk, Marjan J; Teuling, Eva; Staal, Yvonne C. M.; Huybers, Sylvie; Van Bladeren, Peter J; Aarts, Jac MMJG; Van Ommen, Ben

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an

  5. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  7. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  9. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inside of the lungs. Enlarge Anatomy of the respiratory system, showing the trachea and both lungs and their ... Cell Lung Cancer Tobacco (includes help with quitting) Cigarette Smoking: Health Risks and How to Quit Secondhand Smoke and Cancer For general cancer information and other ...

  10. Modern oncologic and operative outcomes for oesophageal cancer treated with curative intent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reynolds, J V

    2011-09-01

    The curative approach to oesophageal cancer carries significant risks and a cure is achieved in approximately 20 per cent. There has been a recent trend internationally to observe improved operative and oncological outcomes. This report audits modern outcomes from a high volume centre with a prospective database for the period 2004-08. 603 patients were referred and 310 (52%) were treated with curative intent. Adenocarcinoma represented 68% of the cohort, squamous cell cancer 30%. Of the 310 cases, 227 (73%) underwent surgery, 105 (46%) underwent surgery alone, and 122 (54%) had chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The postoperative mortality rate was 1.7%. The median and 5-year survival of the 310 patients based on intention to treat was 36 months and 36%, respectively, and of the 181 patients undergoing R0 resection, 52 months and 42%, respectively. An in-hospital postoperative mortality rate of less than 2 per cent, and 5-year survival of between 35 and 42% is consistent with benchmarks from international series.

  11. A survey on anticancer effects of artemisinin, iron, miconazole, and butyric acid on 5637 (bladder cancer and 4T1 (Breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Shahbazfar

    2014-01-01

    The groups treated with miconazole showed identical changes, with less severity compared to combination therapy groups. In butyric acid-treated groups, the only detectable changes were, mild cell swelling, few apoptosis, and rare necrosis. Conclusions: A combination therapy with artemisinin can be more effective against cancer cells than monotherapy with that. Butyric acid was not effective on cancer cells. Miconazole deviated the nature of cell death from apoptosis to necrosis and it must be used under caution.

  12. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujillo, Romen; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes in electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electr...

  14. Molecular Biology of Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oishi, Naoki; Yamashita, Taro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    .... The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased...

  15. Troglitazone reverses the multiple drug resistance phenotype in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Davies

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gerald F Davies1, Bernhard HJ Juurlink2, Troy AA Harkness11Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; 2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: A major problem in treating cancer is the development of drug resistance. We previously demonstrated doxorubicin (DOX resistance in K562 human leukemia cells that was associated with upregulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO-1 and histone H3 expression. The thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRG downregulated GLO-1 expression and further upregulated histone H3 expression and post-translational modifications in these cells, leading to a regained sensitivity to DOX. Given the pleiotropic effects of epigenetic changes in cancer development, we hypothesized that TRG may downregulate the multiple drug resistance (MDR phenotype in a variety of cancer cells. To test this, MCF7 human breast cancer cells and K562 cells were cultured in the presence of low-dose DOX to establish DOX-resistant cell lines (K562/DOX and MCF7/DOX. The MDR phenotype was confirmed by Western blot analysis of the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp drug efflux pump multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1, and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. TRG markedly decreased expression of both MDR-1 and BCRP in these cells, resulting in sensitivity to DOX. Silencing of MDR-1 expression also sensitized MCF7/DOX cells to DOX. Use of the specific and irreversible peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 in the nanomolar range not only demonstrated that the action of TRG on MCF/DOX was PPARγ-independent, but indicated that PPARγ may play a role in the MDR phenotype, which is antagonized by TRG. We conclude that TRG is potentially a useful adjunct therapy in chemoresistant cancers. Keywords: chemotherapy, doxorubicin, breast cancer resistance protein-1, multiple drug resistance, multiple drug resistance protein 1

  16. Cancer Stem Cells: Repair Gone Awry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Rangwala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because cell turnover occurs in all adult organs, stem/progenitor cells within the stem-cell niche of each tissue must be appropriately mobilized and differentiated to maintain normal organ structure and function. Tissue injury increases the demands on this process, and thus may unmask defective regulation of pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh, that modulate progenitor cell fate. Hh pathway dysregulation has been demonstrated in many types of cancer, including pancreatic and liver cancers, in which defective Hh signaling has been linked to outgrowth of Hh-responsive cancer stem-initiating cells and stromal elements. Hence, the Hh pathway might be a therapeutic target in such tumors.

  17. Current Approaches of Photothermal Therapy in Treating Cancer Metastasis with Nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Hong; He, Bin; Zeng, Lijuan; Tan, Tao; Cao, Haiqiang; He, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhiwen; Guo, Shengrong; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis accounts for the high mortality of many types of cancer. Owing to the unique advantages of high specificity and minimal invasiveness, photothermal therapy (PTT) has been evidenced with great potential in treating cancer metastasis. In this review, we outline the current approaches of PTT with respect to its application in treating metastatic cancer. PTT can be used alone, guided with multimodal imaging, or combined with the current available therapies for effective treatment of cancer metastasis. Numerous types of photothermal nanotherapeutics (PTN) have been developed with encouraging therapeutic efficacy on metastatic cancer in many preclinical animal experiments. We summarize the design and performance of various PTN in PTT alone and their combinational therapy. We also point out the lacking area and the most promising approaches in this challenging field. In conclusion, PTT or their combinational therapy can provide an essential promising therapeutic modality against cancer metastasis.

  18. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  19. Phenotype and polarization of autologous T cells by biomaterial-treated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H; Babensee, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T-cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T-cell phenotype was investigated. In this study, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T-cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pretreat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T-cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper (Th) types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels as compared with DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared with that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T-cell responses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anticancer activity of midostaurin in hormone refractory human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jun Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We tried a new method of prostate cancer treatment by inducing in vitro differentiation which resulted in reduction of cancer cells growth. A protein kinase inhibitor, midostaurin's ability to trigger the human prostate cancer cell line, DU145 to segregate into nerve cells was studied. Midostaurin (100 nM suppressed the growth of DU145 cells but without change in the number of dead cells. Midostaurin started to extend neurites on DU145 cells after 24 hours and differentiated into nerve cells by 72 hours. The microtubule was stabilized by tau protein and its mRNA expression showed time-dependent increase in midostaurin-treated DU145 cells. At the same time, the amount of acetylcholinesterase was also increased. The midostaurin-treated DU145 cells showed 40% less activity than control in the colony forming assay. The results suggests that midostaurin can induce differentiation of DU145 cells into nerve cells.

  1. NK Cells and Virus-Related Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells become activated during viral infections and can play roles in such infections by attacking virus-infected cells or by regulating adaptive immune responses. Experimental models suggest that NK cells may also have the capacity to restrain virus-induced cancers. Here, we discuss the seven viruses linked to human cancers and the evidence of NK cell involvement in these systems.

  2. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics ......, help us both in the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells and in the further development of therapeutic strategies including tissue engineering...

  3. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Khazim Al-Asmari

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90% in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for

  4. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-