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Sample records for cancer cells role

  1. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  2. Role of microRNAs in maintaining cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence sustains that the establishment and maintenance of many, if not all, human cancers are due to cancer stem cells (CSCs), tumor cells with stem cell properties, such as the capacity to self-renew or generate progenitor and differentiated cells. CSCs seem to play a major role in tumor metastasis and drug resistance, but albeit the potential clinical importance, their regulation at the molecular level is not clear. Recent studies have highlighted several miRNAs to be differentially expressed in normal and cancer stem cells and established their role in targeting genes and pathways supporting cancer stemness properties. This review focuses on the last advances on the role of microRNAs in the regulation of stem cell properties and cancer stem cells in different tumors.

  3. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside TL

    2015-01-01

    Theresa L Whiteside University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, US Abstract: Regulatory T cells (Treg) are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well und...

  4. The Roles of Regulatory B Cells in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory B cells (Bregs, a newly described subset of B cells, have been proved to play a suppressive role in immune system. Bregs can inhibit other immune cells through cytokines secretion and antigen presentation, which give them the role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and cancers. There are no clear criteria to identify Bregs; different markers were used in the different experimental conditions. Massive researches had described the functions of immune cells such as regulatory T cells (Tregs, dendritic cells (DCs, and B cells in the autoimmune disorder diseases and cancers. More and more researches focused on the roles of Bregs and the cytokines such as Interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β secreted by Bregs. The aim of this review is to summarize the characteristics of Bregs and the roles of Bregs in cancer.

  5. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well understood. This review attempts to provide insights into the importance of Treg subsets in cancer development and its progression. It also considers the role of Treg as potential biomarkers of clinical outcome in cancer. The strategies for monitoring Treg in cancer patients are discussed as is the need for caution in the use of therapies which indiscriminately ablate Treg. A greater understanding of molecular pathways operating in various tumor microenvironments is necessary for defining the Treg impact on cancer and for selecting immunotherapies targeting Treg.

  6. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

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    Arif Malik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds.

  7. Emerging role of Notch in stem cells and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Yiwei; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2009-06-28

    The Notch signaling pathway is known to be responsible for maintaining a balance between cell proliferation and death and, as such, plays important roles in the formation of many types of human tumors. Recently, Notch signaling pathway has been shown to control stem cell self-renewal and multi-potency. As many cancers are thought to be developed from a number of cancer stem-like cells, which are also known to be linked with the acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); and thus suggesting an expanding role of Notch signaling in human tumor progression.

  8. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whiteside TL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Theresa L Whiteside University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, US Abstract: Regulatory T cells (Treg are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well understood. This review attempts to provide insights into the importance of Treg subsets in cancer development and its progression. It also considers the role of Treg as potential biomarkers of clinical outcome in cancer. The strategies for monitoring Treg in cancer patients are discussed as is the need for caution in the use of therapies which indiscriminately ablate Treg. A greater understanding of molecular pathways operating in various tumor microenvironments is necessary for defining the Treg impact on cancer and for selecting immunotherapies targeting Treg. Keywords: cancer, regulatory T cells, tumor microenvironment, immune suppression, anti-Treg therapies

  9. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

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    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  10. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  11. DUAL ROLES OF CANCER CELL-EXPRESSED IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN CANCER IMMUNOLOGY

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    Gregory Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the expression of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors on cancer cells has been well-established for decades, the potential roles and mechanisms of action of these cancerous antigen receptors have not been fully elucidated. A monoclonal antibody designated as RP215, which reacts specifically with the carbohydrate-associated epitope located on the heavy chain region of cancerous immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, was used as a unique probe to study the roles of antigen receptors in the immunology of cancer cells. Through extensive cell-based biological and immunological studies, it was found that both anti-antigen receptors and RP215 demonstrated similar actions on the gene regulations involved in the growth/proliferation of cancer cells, as well as on toll-like receptors involved in innate immunity. In addition, RP215-specific cancerous immunoglobulins are believed to capture or neutralize circulating antigen/antibodies which may be harmful to cancer cells within the human body. In contrast to normal B and T cells and their respective receptors in the conventional immune system, cancer cells co-express both immunoglobulins and T cell receptors and immune protection is exercised by unique mechanisms. For example, these cancer cell-expressed antigen receptors display a lack of class switching, limited hyper-mutation, aberrant glycosylations and a strong influence on the toll-like receptors of cancer cells. Therefore, it is hypothesized that both normal and cancerous immune systems may co-exist and operate simultaneously within the human body. The balance of these two immune factors for respective surveillance and protection may be relevant to the outcome of cancer immunotherapy in humans. A potential therapeutic strategy is being developed by using RP215 as a drug candidate to target cancer cells based on these observations.

  12. Role of nuclear receptors in breast cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessio; Papi; Marina; Orlandi

    2016-01-01

    The recapitulation of primary tumour heterogenity and the existence of a minor sub-population of cancer cells,capable of initiating tumour growth in xenografts on serial passages, led to the hypothesis that cancer stem cells(CSCs) exist. CSCs are present in many tumours, among which is breast cancer. Breast CSCs(BCSCs) are likely to sustain the growth of the primary tumour mass, as wellas to be responsible for disease relapse and metastatic spreading. Consequently, BCSCs represent the most significant target for new drugs in breast cancer therapy. Both the hypoxic condition in BCSCs biology and proinflammatory cytokine network has gained increasing importance in the recent past. Breast stromal cells are crucial components of the tumours milieu and are a major source of inflammatory mediators. Recently, the antiinflammatory role of some nuclear receptors ligands has emerged in several diseases, including breast cancer. Therefore, the use of nuclear receptors ligands may be a valid strategy to inhibit BCSCs viability and consequently breast cancer growth and disease relapse.

  13. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  14. The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Cancer Development

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    Hiroshi eYagi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cancer development is still controversial. MSCs may promote tumor progression through immune modulation, but other tumor suppressive effects of MSCs have also been described. The discrepancy between these results may arise from issues related to different tissue sources, individual donor variability, and injection timing of MSCs. The expression of critical receptors such as Toll-like receptor (TLR is variable at each time point of treatment, which may also determine the effects of MSCs on tumor progression. However, factors released from malignant cells, as well as surrounding tissues and the vasculature, are still regarded as a black box. Thus, it is still difficult to clarify the specific role of MSCs in cancer development. Whether MSCs support or suppress tumor progression is currently unclear, but it is clear that systemically administered MSCs can be recruited and migrate toward tumors. These findings are important because they can be used as a basis for initiating studies to explore the incorporation of engineered MSCs as novel anti-tumor carriers, for the development of tumor-targeted therapies.

  15. Intertwining of Activin A and TGFβ Signaling: Dual Roles in Cancer Progression and Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomans, Holli A. [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Andl, Claudia D., E-mail: claudia.andl@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt Digestive Disease Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt Epithelial Biology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2014-12-30

    In recent years, a significant amount of research has examined the controversial role of activin A in cancer. Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily, is best characterized for its function during embryogenesis in mesoderm cell fate differentiation and reproduction. During embryogenesis, TGFβ superfamily ligands, TGFβ, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and activins, act as potent morphogens. Similar to TGFβs and BMPs, activin A is a protein that is highly systemically expressed during early embryogenesis; however, post-natal expression is overall reduced and remains under strict spatiotemporal regulation. Of importance, normal post-natal expression of activin A has been implicated in the migration and invasive properties of various immune cell types, as well as endometrial cells. Aberrant activin A signaling during development results in significant morphological defects and premature mortality. Interestingly, activin A has been found to have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles in cancer. Investigations into the role of activin A in prostate and breast cancer has demonstrated tumor suppressive effects, while in lung and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, it has been consistently shown that activin A expression is correlated with increased proliferation, invasion and poor patient prognosis. Activin A signaling is highly context-dependent, which is demonstrated in studies of epithelial cell tumors and the microenvironment. This review discusses normal activin A signaling in comparison to TGFβ and highlights how its dysregulation contributes to cancer progression and cell invasion.

  16. The Role of Proteasome Inhibition in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

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    Mauricio Escobar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer therapy with current available chemotherapeutic agents is mainly palliative. For these and other reasons there is now a great interest to find targeted therapies that can be effective not only palliating lung cancer or decreasing treatment-related toxicity, but also giving hope to cure these patients. It is already well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system like other cellular pathways is critical for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells; thus, proteosome inhibition has become a very attractive anticancer therapy. There are several phase I and phase II clinical trials now in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer using this potential target. Most of the trials use bortezomib in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. This paper tends to make a state-of-the-art review based on the available literature regarding the use of bortezomib as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

  17. Role of mismatch in mechanical properties in cancer cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Julian; Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments suggest that the mechanical stiffness of cells and their interaction with their surroundings undergo remarkable changes during tumor progression. An intriguing experimental result in this area suggests that the mismatch in the elasticity and adhesive properties between cancer cells and cells that have not yet transformed may lead to enhanced cancer cell motility in a binary cell population. Motivated by this, we study the mechanical response and dynamics of a binary system of active and deformable particles using Langevin Dynamics simulations. We characterize their motility by studying particle trajectories, mean square displacements and correlation functions. Our study may provide an understanding of the interplay of mechanical and statistical mechanical properties underlying the enhanced motility of cancer cells during metastasis. This work was partially supported by a D-RIG grant from the College of Science at Rochester Institute of Technology.

  18. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pratima; Nangia-Makker; Yingjie; Yu; Adhip; PN; Majumdar

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer(CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells(CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of(1) CSC;(2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs;(3) markers of CSC;(4) characteristics; and(5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt.

  19. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip PN

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of (1) CSC; (2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs; (3) markers of CSC; (4) characteristics; and (5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt. PMID:26600965

  20. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcome

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    Zhang, Qunyuan; Ye, Jian; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yanping; Hunborg, Pamela; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft, Daniel F.; Hsueh, Eddy C.; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Immunoediting concept has provided critical insights suggesting dual functions of immune system during the cancer initiation and development. However, the dynamics and roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the pathogenesis of breast cancer remain unclear. Here we utilized two murine breast cancer models (4T1 and E0771) and demonstrated that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were increased and involved in immune responses, but with distinct dynamic trends in breast cancer development. In addition to cell number increases, CD4+ T cells changed their dominant subsets from Th1 in the early stages to Treg and Th17 cells in the late stages of the cancer progression. We also analyzed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration in primary breast cancer tissues from cancer patients. We observed that CD8+ T cells are the key effector cell population mediating effective anti-tumor immunity resulting in better clinical outcomes. In contrast, intra-tumoral CD4+ T cells have negative prognostic effects on breast cancer patient outcomes. These studies indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcomes, which provides new insights relevant for the development of effective cancer immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25968569

  1. The Role of Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Metastasis and Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess the capacity to self-renew and to generate heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise tumors. A substantial body of evidence supports a model in which CSCs play a major role in the initiation, maintenance, and clinical outcome of cancers. In contrast, analysis of the role of CSCs in metastasis has been mainly conceptual and speculative. This review summarizes recent data that support the theory of CSCs as the source of metastatic lesions in breast ca...

  2. The role of the tissue microenvironment in the regulation of cancer cell motility and invasion

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    Brábek Jan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During malignant neoplastic progression the cells undergo genetic and epigenetic cancer-specific alterations that finally lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and restructuring of the microenvironment. The invasion of cancer cells through connective tissue is a crucial prerequisite for metastasis formation. Although cell invasion is foremost a mechanical process, cancer research has focused largely on gene regulation and signaling that underlie uncontrolled cell growth. More recently, the genes and signals involved in the invasion and transendothelial migration of cancer cells, such as the role of adhesion molecules and matrix degrading enzymes, have become the focus of research. In this review we discuss how the structural and biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix and surrounding cells such as endothelial cells influence cancer cell motility and invasion. We conclude that the microenvironment is a critical determinant of the migration strategy and the efficiency of cancer cell invasion.

  3. Emerging role of microRNAs in cancer stem cells:Implications in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minal; Garg

    2015-01-01

    A small subset of cancer cells that act as tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells(CSCs) maintain self-renewal and growth promoting capabilities of cancer and are responsible for drug/treatment resistance,tumor recurrence and metastasis. Due to their potential clinical importance,many researchers have put their efforts over decades to unravel the molecular mechanisms that regulate CSCs functions. Micro RNAs(mi RNAs) which are 21-23 nucleotide long,endogenous noncoding RNAs,regulate gene expression through gene silencing at post-transcriptional level by binding to the 3’-untranslated regions or the open reading frames of target genes,thereby result in target mR NA degradation or its translational repression and serve important role in several cellular,physiological and developmental processes. Aberrant mi RNAs expression and their implication in CSCs regulation by controlling asymmetric cell division,drug/treatment resistance and metastasis make mi RNAs a tool of great therapeutic potential against cancer. Recent advancements on the biological complexities of CSCs,modulation in CSCs properties by mi RNA network and development of mi RNA based treatment strategies specifically targeting the CSCs as an attractive therapeutic targets for clinical application are being critically analysed.

  4. The Role of Lipid Rafts in Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

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    Toshiyuki Murai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane and possess a highly dynamic nature. They have been involved in various cellular functions including the regulation of cell adhesion and membrane signaling through proteins within lipid rafts. The dynamic features of the cancer cell surface may modulate the malignant phenotype of cancer, including adhesion disorders and aggressive phenotypes of migration and invasion. Recently, it was demonstrated that lipid rafts play critical roles in cancer cell adhesion and migration. This article summarizes the important roles of lipid rafts in cancer cell adhesion and migration, with a focus on the current state of knowledge. This article will improve the understanding of cancer progression and lead to the development of novel targets for cancer therapy.

  5. An Anticancer Role of Hydrogen Sulfide in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

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    Li Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S can be synthesized in mammalian cells by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE and/or cystathionine β-synthase (CBS. Both CSE and CBS are expressed in rat gastric tissues but their role in human gastric neoplasia has been unclear. The aims of the present study were to detect CSE and CBS proteins in human gastric cancer and determine the effect of exogenous NaHS on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. We found that both CSE and CBS proteins were expressed in human gastric cancer cells and upregulated in human gastric carcinoma mucosa compared with those in noncancerous gastric samples. NaHS induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by regulating apoptosis related proteins. Also, NaHS inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. An antigastric cancer role of H2S is thus indicated.

  6. The role of mismatch repair in small-cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L T; Thykjaer, T; Ørntoft, T F

    2003-01-01

    The role of mismatch repair (MMR) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial, as the phenotype of a MMR-deficiency, microsatellite instability (MSI), has been reported to range from 0 to 76%. We studied the MMR pathway in a panel of 21 SCLC cell lines and observed a highly heterogeneous...... pattern of MMR gene expression. A significant correlation between the mRNA and protein levels was found. We demonstrate that low hMLH1 gene expression was not linked to promoter CpG methylation. One cell line (86MI) was found to be deficient in MMR and exhibited resistance to the alkylating agent MNNG...

  7. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael S.Mulvihill; Johannes R.Kratz; Patrick Pham; David M.Jablons; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.Recently,advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis.Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury.In this review,we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development.The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed,and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  8. The role of NANOG transcriptional factor in the development of malignant phenotype of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik-Rzemieniewska, Natalia; Bednarek, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    NANOG is a transcription factor that is involved in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells (ES) and is a critical factor for the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of pluripotent cells. Extensive data in the literature show that the NANOG gene is aberrantly expressed during the development of malignancy in cancer cells. ES and cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells within the tumor, are thought to share common phenotypic properties. This review describes the role of NANOG in cancer cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), apoptosis and metastasis. In addition, this paper illustrates a correlation between NANOG and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the maintenance of cancer stem cell properties and multidrug resistance. Together, the available data demonstrate that NANOG is strictly involved in the process of carcinogenesis and is a potential prognostic marker of malignant tumors.

  9. The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Promoting Ovarian Cancer Growth and Spread

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    2014-12-01

    home to tissue injury. Monocyte polarization into the classically activated pro- inflam - matory macrophages (M1) occurs early on in tissue repair, whereas...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0438 TITLE: The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Promoting Ovarian Cancer Growth and Spread PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Promoting Ovarian Cancer Growth and Spread 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0438 5c

  10. Deciphering the role of microRNA 21 in cancer stem cells (CSCs

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    Durairaj Sekar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of positive developments of cancer treatment, the mortality due to various cancers remains high and the mechanisms of cancer initiation and the development also remains mysterious. As we know that microRNAs are considered to be a short noncoding RNA molecules consisting of 21–25 nucleotides (nt in length and they silence their target genes by inhibiting mRNA translation or degrading the mRNA molecules by binding to their 3′-untranslated (UTR region and play a very important role in cancer biology. Recent evidences indicate that miR-21 is over expressed in cancer stem cells and plays a vital role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Even though an increased expression level of miR-21 has been observed in cancer stem cells, studies related to the role of miR-21 in cancer stem cells are limited. The main aim of this mini review is to explain the potency of miR-21 in various cancer stem cells (CSCs and as a new target for therapeutic interventions of cancer progression.

  11. The role of miR-100 in regulating apoptosis of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; He, Tianliang; Yang, Lu; Yang, Geng; Chen, Yulei; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is a serious health problem worldwide. Inhibition of apoptosis plays a major role in breast cancer tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the regulation of apoptosis. However, the regulation of breast cancer apoptosis by miRNAs has not been intensively investigated. To address this issue, the effect of miR-100 on the cell proliferation of different breast cancer cells was characterized in the present study. The results showed that miR-100 was significantly upregulated in SK-BR-3 cells compared with other human breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-453, T47D, HCC1954 and SUM149). Silencing miR-100 expression with anti-miRNA-100 oligonucleotide (AMO-miR-100) initiated apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the overexpression of miR-100 led to the proliferation inhibition of the miR-100-downregulated breast cancer cells. Antagonism of miR-100 in SK-BR-3 cells increased the expression of MTMR3, a target gene of miR-100, which resulted in the activation of p27 and eventually led to G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. The downregulation of miR-100 sensitized SK-BR-3 cells to chemotherapy. Therefore, our finding highlights a novel aspect of the miR-100-MTMR3-p27 pathway in the molecular etiology of breast cancer.

  12. Breast and ovarian cancers: a survey and possible roles for the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E; Couchman, John R;

    2012-01-01

    of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups...

  13. The role of STAT1 for crosstalk between fibroblasts and colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan eKaler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling between tumor cells and the associated stroma has an important impact on cancer initiation and progression. The tumor microenvironment has a paradoxical role in tumor progression and fibroblasts, a major component of the tumor stroma, have been shown to either inhibit or promote cancer development. In this study we established that normal intestinal fibroblasts activate STAT1 signaling in colon cancer cells and, in contrast to cancer- associated fibroblasts, inhibit growth of tumor cells. Treatment of 18Co fibroblasts with the proinflammatory cytokine TNF interfered with their ability to trigger STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. Accordingly, intestinal myofibroblasts isolated from patients with Ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn’s disease (CD, which are activated and produce high levels of TNF, failed to stimulate STAT1 signaling in tumor cells, demonstrating that activated myofibroblasts lose the ability to trigger growth-inhibitory STAT1 signaling in tumor cells. Finally, we confirmed that silencing of STAT1 in tumor cells alters the crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts, suggesting STAT1 as a novel link between intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. We demonstrated that normal fibroblasts restrain the growth of carcinoma cells, at least in part, through the induction of STAT1 signaling in cancer cells. We showed that changes in the microenvironment, as they occur in inflammatory bowel disease, alter the crosstalk between carcinoma cells and fibroblasts, perturb the homeostasis of intestinal tissue and thereby contribute to tumor progression.

  14. Regulatory T Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Progression: Role and Therapeutic Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Belal; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant efforts in understanding and modulating the immune response in cancer. In this context, immunosuppressive cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have come under intense investigation for their proposed roles in suppressing tumor-specific immune responses and establishing an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, thus enabling tumor immune evasion. Additionally, recent evidence indicates that Tregs comprise diverse and heterogeneous subsets; phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating Tregs could contribute differently to cancer prognosis and clinical outcomes. Understanding Treg biology in the setting of cancer, and specifically the tumor microenvironment, is important for designing effective cancer therapies. In this review, we critically examine the role of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment and in cancer progression focusing on human studies. We also discuss the impact of current therapeutic modalities on Treg biology and the therapeutic opportunities for targeting Tregs to enhance anti-tumor immune responses and clinical benefits. PMID:27509527

  15. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients: An Evolving Role in Patient Prognosis and Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Graves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine the role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in breast cancer. CTCs are tumor cells present in the peripheral blood. They are found in many different carcinomas but are not present in patients with benign disease. Recent advances in theories regarding metastasis support the role of early release of tumor cells in the neoplastic process. Furthermore, it has been found that phenotypic variation exists between the primary tumor and CTCs. Of particular interest is the incongruency found between primary tumor and CTC HER2 status in both metastatic and early breast cancer. Overall, CTCs have been shown to be a poor prognostic marker in metastatic breast cancer. CTCs in early breast cancer are not as well studied, however, several studies suggest that the presence of CTCs in early breast cancer may also suggest a poorer prognosis. Studies are currently underway looking at the use of CTC level monitoring in order to guide changes in therapy.

  16. Long Non-coding RNAs and Their Roles in Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Ming Wei; Guang-Biao Zhou

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, lung cancer is a collection of diseases with diverse etiologies which can be broadly classified into small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lung cancer is characterized by genomic and epigenomic alter-ations; however, mechanisms underlying lung tumorigenesis remain to be elucidated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group of non-coding RNAs that consist of P200 nucleotides but possess low or no protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal expres-sion of lncRNAs is associated with tumorigenesis of various cancers, including lung cancer, through multiple biological mechanisms involving epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional alter-ations. In this review, we highlight the expression and roles of lncRNAs in NSCLC and discuss their potential clinical applications as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets.

  17. Mammary stem cells and breast cancer--role of Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2007-06-01

    Adult stem cells are found in numerous tissues of the body and play a role in tissue development, replacement and repair. Evidence shows that breast stem cells are multipotent and can self renew, which are key characteristics of stem cells, and a single cell enriched with cell surface markers has the ability to grow a fully functional mammary gland in vivo. Many groups have extrapolated the cancer stem cell hypothesis from the haematopoietic system to solid cancers, where using in vitro culture techniques and in vivo transplant models have established evidence of cancer stem cells in colon, pancreas, prostate, brain and breast cancers. In the report we describe the evidence for breast cancer stem cells; studies consistently show that stem cell like and breast cancer initiating populations can be enriched using cell surface makers CD44+/CD24- and have upregulated genes which include Notch. Notch signalling has been highlighted as a pathway involved in the development of the breast and is frequently dysregulated in invasive breast cancer. We have investigated the role of Notch in a pre-invasive breast lesion, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and have found that aberrant activation of Notch signalling is an early event in breast cancer. High expression of Notch 1 intracellular domain (NICD) in DCIS also predicted a reduced time to recurrence 5 years after surgery. Using a non-adherent sphere culture technique we have grown DCIS mammospheres from primary DCIS tissue, where self-renewal capacity, measured by the number of mammosphere initiating cells, were increased from normal breast tissue. A gamma-secretase inhibitor, DAPT, which inhibits all four Notch receptors and a Notch 4 neutralising antibody were shown to reduce DCIS mammosphere formation, indicating that Notch signalling and other stem cell self-renewal pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets to prevent recurrence of pre-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

  18. Role of Metallothionein1H in Cisplatin Resistance of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-fang Hou; Qing-xia Fan; Liu-xing Wang; Shi-xin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy has improved greatly patients' outcomes, drug resistance poses a major impediment to the successful use of such an effective agent. Metallothioneins(MTs) are known to play putative roles in cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, drug resistance and prognosis. The present studiy was to investigte the role of metallethioein1H(MT1H) in cisplatin resistance of human non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) cell lines in vitro or its possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: MT1H mRNA expression in A549 and A549/DDP cells was detected by RT-PCR. A recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-MT1H was constructed and transfected into A549 cells which express no MT1H. MT1H siRNA was transfected into A549/DDP cells which express MT1H highly. MT1H expression was detected by RT-PCR and Immunoblot. The chemosensitivity to cisplatin was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis rate was determined by Tunel and FCM. Bcl-2 and Bax were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: MT1H mRNA was expressed in A549/DDP but not in A549. After transfection of MT1H, MT1H expression was enhanced and the chemosensitivity to cisplatin was decreased in A549 cells. Inversely, after transfection of MT1H siRNA, MT1H expression was decreased and the chemosensitivity to cisplatin was increased in A549/DDP. The apoptosis rate induced by cisplatin was increased and Bcl-2 was down-regulated but Bax showed little change in A549/DDP cells interferred with MT1H siRNA. Conclusion: MT1H overexpression can promote drug resistance in A549 cells . Down-regulation of MT1H interfered with siRNA can effectively reverses the drug resistance in A549/DDP cells by down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and increasing cisplatin induced apoptosis. SiRNA targeting MT1H combined with chemotherapy may be a very promising strategy for treatment of lung cancer.

  19. Role for chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan in NEDD9-mediated breast cancer cell growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iida, J.; Dorchak, J.; Clancy, R.; Slavik, J.; Ellsworth, R.; Katagiri, Y.; Pugacheva, E.N.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Mural, R.J.; Cutler, M.L.; Shriver, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    There are lines of evidence demonstrating that NEDD9 (Cas-L, HEF-1) plays a key role in the development, progression, and metastasis of breast cancer cells. We previously reported that NEDD9 plays a critical role for promoting migration and growth of MDA-MB-231. In order to further characterize the

  20. The Role of Biomaterials on Cancer Stem Cell Enrichment and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordikhani, Faride; Kim, Yonghyun; Zustiak, Silviya P.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their role in cancer metastasis, tumorigenicity and resistance to therapy is slowly shifting the emphasis on the search for cancer cure: more evidence is surfacing that a successful therapy should be geared against this rare cancer cell population. Unfortunately, CSCs are difficult to culture in vitro which severely limits the progress of CSC research. This review gives a brief overview of CSCs and their microenvironment, with particular focus on studies that used in vitro biomaterial-based models and biomaterial/CSC interfaces for the enrichment of CSCs. Biomaterial properties relevant to CSC behaviors are also addressed. While the discussed research field is still in its infancy, it appears that in vitro cancer models that include a biomaterial can support CSC enrichment and this has proved indispensable to the study of their biology as well as the development of novel cancer therapies.

  1. Role of stem cell proteins and microRNAs in embryogenesis and germ cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Eini (Ronak); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEmbryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst. These cells can proliferate indefinitely and differentiate into all cell lineages. Germ cell cancers (GCC) mimic embryonic development to a certain extent. The origin of GCC trace back to

  2. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 in cancer cell resistance to gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Fiorini, Claudia; Dando, Ilaria; Menegazzi, Marta; Sgarbossa, Anna; Costanzo, Chiara; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    Cancer cells exhibit an endogenous constitutive oxidative stress higher than that of normal cells, which renders tumours vulnerable to further reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) can mitigate oxidative stress by increasing the influx of protons into the mitochondrial matrix and reducing electron leakage and mitochondrial superoxide generation. Here, we demonstrate that chemical uncouplers or UCP2 over-expression strongly decrease mitochondrial superoxide induction by the anticancer drug gemcitabine (GEM) and protect cancer cells from GEM-induced apoptosis. Moreover, we show that GEM IC(50) values well correlate with the endogenous level of UCP2 mRNA, suggesting a critical role for mitochondrial uncoupling in GEM resistance. Interestingly, GEM treatment stimulates UCP2 mRNA expression suggesting that mitochondrial uncoupling could have a role also in the acquired resistance to GEM. Conversely, UCP2 inhibition by genipin or UCP2 mRNA silencing strongly enhances GEM-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and apoptosis, synergistically inhibiting cancer cell proliferation. These events are significantly reduced by the addition of the radical scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine or MnSOD over-expression, demonstrating a critical role of the oxidative stress. Normal primary fibroblasts are much less sensitive to GEM/genipin combination. Our results demonstrate for the first time that UCP2 has a role in cancer cell resistance to GEM supporting the development of an anti-cancer therapy based on UCP2 inhibition associated to GEM treatment.

  3. BIRC6 protein, an inhibitor of apoptosis: role in survival of human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BIRC6 is a member of the Inhibitors of Apoptosis Protein (IAP family which is thought to protect a variety of cancer cells from apoptosis. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether BIRC6 plays a role in prostate cancer and could be useful as a novel therapeutic target. METHODS: BIRC6 expression in cell lines was assessed using Western blot analysis and in clinical samples using immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. The biological significance of BIRC6 was determined by siRNA-induced reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells followed by functional assays. RESULTS: Elevated BIRC6 protein expression was found in prostate cancer cell lines and clinical specimens as distinct from their benign counterparts. Increased BIRC6 expression was associated with Gleason 6-8 cancers and castration resistance. Reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells led to a marked reduction in cell proliferation which was associated with an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in autophagosome formation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was found to be coupled to a reduction in BIRC6 protein expression. CONCLUSION: The data suggest a role for BIRC6 in prostate cancer progression and treatment resistance, and indicate for the first time that the BIRC6 gene and its product are potentially valuable targets for treatment of prostate cancers.

  4. The role of peroxiredoxin II in chemoresistance of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tieli Wang,1 Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Yun Yen2 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, USA Abstract: Peroxiredoxin (PrxII belongs to a family of redox-active proteins that use redox-sensitive cysteine in the active site to reduce peroxides. PrxII is induced by various oxidative stimuli and plays an important protective role against oxidative radical damage by reactive oxygen species. PrxII expression levels are correlated with resistance to radiation therapy or certain anti-cancer drugs in radioresistant breast cancer cells, glioblastomas, and head and neck cancer cells as well as in tissue isolated from head and neck patients who do not respond to radiation therapy. Small interfering RNA (siRNA that inhibits the PrxII gene expression has been shown to partially reverse the radioresistant phenotype in radiation resistant breast cancer cells and sensitizes glioma cells to oxidative stress, highlighting the potential clinical importance of PrxII in radiation resistance in cancer. This article focuses on the role that PrxII may play in chemoresistant breast cancer cells. Keywords: siRNA, redox, cysteine disulfide bridges, targeted therapy, reactive oxygen species

  5. Roles of micro RNA-140 in stem cell-associated early stage breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence supports a stepwise model for progression of breast cancer from ductal carcinoma in situ(DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma(IDC). Due to the high level of DCIS heterogeneity, we cannot currently predict which patients are at highest risk for disease recurrence or progression. The mechanisms of progression are still largely unknown, however cancer stem cell populations in DCIS lesions may serve as malignant precursor cells intimately involved in progression. While genetic and epigenetic alterations found in DCIS are often shared by IDC, m RNA and mi RNA expression profiles are significantly altered. Therapeutic targeting of cancer stem cell pathways and differentially expressed mi RNA could have significant clinical benefit. As tumor grade increases, mi RNA-140 is progressively downregulated. mi R-140 plays an important tumor suppressive role in the Wnt, SOX2 and SOX9 stem cell regulator pathways. Downregulation of mi R-140 removes inhibition of these pathways, leading to higher cancer stem cell populations and breast cancer progression. mi R-140 downregulation is mediated through both an estrogen response element in the mi R-140 promoter region and differential methylation of Cp G islands. These mechanisms are novel targets for epigenetic therapy to activate tumor suppressor signaling via mi R-140. Additionally, we briefly explored the emerging role of exosomes in mediating intercellular mi R-140 signaling. The purpose of this review is to examine the cancer stem cell signaling pathways involved in breast cancer progression, and the role of dysregulation of mi R-140 in regulating DCIS to IDC transition.

  6. Role of glycosylation in the anticancer activity of antibacterial peptides against breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang-Yang; Liu, Hong-Yan; Han, Dong-Ju; Zong, Xi-Cui; Zhang, Shuang-Quan; Chen, Yu-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Antibacterial peptides (ABPs) with cancer-selective toxicity have received much more attention as alternative chemotherapeutic agents in recent years. However, the basis of their anticancer activity remains unclear. The modification of cell surface glycosylation is a characteristic of cancer cells. The present study investigated the effect of glycosylation, in particular sialic acid, on the anticancer activity of ABPs. We showed that aurein 1.2, buforin IIb and BMAP-28m exhibited selective cytotoxicity toward MX-1 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The binding activity, cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of ABPs were enhanced by the presence of O-, N-glycoproteins, gangliosides and sialic acid on the surface of breast cancer cells. Among N-, O-glycoproteins and ganglioside, O-glycoproteins almost had the strongest effect on the binding and cytotoxicity of the three peptides. Further, up-regulation of hST6Gal1 in CHO-K1 cells enhanced the susceptibility of cells to these peptides. Finally, the growth of MX-1 xenograft tumors in mice was significantly suppressed by buforin IIb treatment, which was associated with induction of apoptosis and inhibition of vascularization. These data demonstrate that the three peptides bind to breast cancer cells via an interaction with surface O-, N-glycoproteins and gangliosides. Sialic acids act as key glycan binding sites for cationic ABP binding to glycoproteins and gangliosides. Therefore, glycosylation in breast cancer cells plays an important role in the anticancer activity of ABPs, which may partly explain their cancer-selective toxicity. Anticancer ABPs with cancer-selective cytotoxicity will be promising candidates for anticancer therapy in the future.

  7. PUTATIVE ROLE OF ADIPOSE TISSUE IN GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF COLON CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty eSchwartz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging data highlight obesity as an important risk factor for developing certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Although evidence supports a link between the two, the mechanisms responsible for this relationship have not yet been fully elucidated. Hypertrophied and dysfunctional adipose tissue of the obese state is characterized by low-grade inflammation. Adipokines and cytokines secreted from adipocytes, together with the abundant availability of lipids from adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment, promote adhesion, migration, and invasion of tumor cells and support tumor progression and uncontrolled growth. One of the predisposed targets of the deleterious effects exerted by secretions from adipose tissue in obesity are the activities associated with the cellular mitochondria. Mitochondrial oxidative metabolism plays a key role in meeting cells' energetic demands by oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos. Here we discuss: (a the dynamic relationship between glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and OxPhos; (b the evidence for impaired OxPhos (i.e. mitochondrial dysfunction in colon cancer; (c the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction can predispose to cancer. We propose that impaired OxPhos increases susceptibility to colon cancer since OxPhos is sensitive to a large number of factors that are intrinsic to the host (e.g. inflammation.Given that adipocytes are a major source of adipokines and energy for the cancer cell, understanding the mechanisms of metabolic symbiosis between cancer cells and adipocytes should reveal new therapeutic possibilities.

  8. TLR4 has a TP53-dependent dual role in regulating breast cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Svasti; Brown, Powel

    2015-06-23

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is important to understand pathways that drive the disease to devise effective therapeutic strategies. Our results show that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) drives breast cancer cell growth differentially based on the presence of TP53, a tumor suppressor. TP53 is mutationally inactivated in most types of cancer and is mutated in 30-50% of diagnosed breast tumors. We demonstrate that TLR4 activation inhibits growth of TP53 wild-type cells, but promotes growth of TP53 mutant breast cancer cells by regulating proliferation. This differential effect is mediated by changes in tumor cell cytokine secretion. Whereas TLR4 activation in TP53 mutant breast cancer cells increases secretion of progrowth cytokines, TLR4 activation in TP53 wild-type breast cancer cells increases type I IFN (IFN-γ) secretion, which is both necessary and sufficient for mediating TLR4-induced growth inhibition. This study identifies a novel dichotomous role for TLR4 as a growth regulator and a modulator of tumor microenvironment in breast tumors. These results have translational relevance, demonstrating that TP53 mutant breast tumor growth can be suppressed by pharmacologic TLR4 inhibition, whereas TLR4 inhibitors may in fact promote growth of TP53 wild-type tumors. Furthermore, using data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium, we demonstrate that the effect of TP53 mutational status on TLR4 activity may extend to ovarian, colon, and lung cancers, among others, suggesting that the viability of TLR4 as a therapeutic target depends on TP53 status in many different tumor types.

  9. THE EMERGING ROLE OF INSULIN AND INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR SIGNALING IN CANCER STEM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eMalaguarnera

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells frequently exploit the IGF signaling, a fundamental pathway mediating development, cell growth and survival. As a consequence, several components of the IGF signaling are deregulated in cancer and sustain cancer progression. However, specific targeting of IGF-IR in humans has resulted efficacious only in small subsets of cancers, making researches wondering whether IGF system targeting is still worth pursuing in the clinical setting. Although no definite answer is yet available, it has become increasingly clear that other components of the IGF signaling pathway, such as IR-A, may substitute for the lack of IGF-IR, and induce cancer resistance and/or clonal selection. Moreover, accumulating evidence now indicates that IGF signaling is a central player in the induction/maintenance of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell stemness, two strictly related programs, which play a key role in metastatic spread and resistance to cancer treatments. Here we review the evidences indicating that IGF signaling enhances the expression of transcription factors implicated in the EMT program and has extensive crosstalk with specific pathways involved in cell pluripotency and stemness maintenance. In turn, EMT and cell stemness activate positive feed-back mechanisms causing upregulation of various IGF signaling components. These findings may have novel translational implications.

  10. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Yumi [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Masaya [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Takakura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ntakaku@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  11. Role of Calcium Ion in Apoptosis of MD Cancer Cells Induced by Arsenic Trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiuli; WANG Jintao; XU Shiwen

    2008-01-01

    In order to observe the role of calcium ion in apoptosis of MD cancer cells induced by arsenic trioxide, inhibition percentage was detected by MTT assay;morphology changes were examined by fluorescence microscope;apoptosis was examined by DNA Ladder;[Ca2+]i was investigated by spectrofluorimeter in vitro on MDCC-MSB1 cells. The results showed that As2O3 inhibited the proliferation of MDCC-MSB1 cells in concentration dependent manner (P<0.05 or P<0.01);typical apoptosis character was observed by fluorescence microscope;DNA Ladder was observed;the [Ca2+]i was elevated significantly after the treatment of As203 (P<0.05 or P<0.01) and showed a dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the calcium may play an important role in apoptosis of MD cancer cells induced by arsenic trioxide.

  12. Vangl1 and Vangl2: planar cell polarity components with a developing role in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Jason; Wald, Jessica H; Printsev, Ignat; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Carraway, Kermit L

    2014-10-01

    Cancers commonly reactivate embryonic developmental pathways to promote the aggressive behavior of their cells, resulting in metastasis and poor patient outcome. While developmental pathways such as canonical Wnt signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition have received much attention, our understanding of the role of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in tumor progression remains rudimentary. Protein components of PCP, including a subset that overlaps with the canonical Wnt pathway, partition in polarized epithelial cells along the planar axis and are required for the establishment and maintenance of lateral epithelial polarity. Significant insight into PCP regulation of developmental and cellular processes has come from analysis of the functions of the core PCP scaffolding proteins Vangl1 and Vangl2. In particular, studies on zebrafish and with Looptail (Lp) mice, which harbor point mutations in Vangl2 that alter its trafficking and localization, point to roles for the PCP pathway in maintaining cell polarization along both the apical-basal and planar axes as well as in collective cell motility and invasiveness. Recent findings have suggested that the Vangls can promote similar processes in tumor cells. Initial data-mining efforts suggest that VANGL1 and VANGL2 are dysregulated in human cancers, and estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients whose tumors exhibit elevated VANGL1 expression suffer from shortened overall survival. Overall, evidence is beginning to accumulate that the heightened cellular motility and invasiveness associated with PCP reactivation may contribute to the malignancy of some cancer subtypes.

  13. The double-edge role of B cells in mediating antitumor T-cell immunity: Pharmacological strategies for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence reveals the controversial role of B cells in antitumor immunity, but the underlying mechanisms have to be explored. Three latest articles published in the issue 521 of Nature in 2015 reconfirmed the puzzling topic and put forward some explanations of how B cells regulate antitumor T-cell responses both positively and negatively. This paper attempts to demonstrate that different B-cell subpopulations have distinct immunological properties and that they are involved in either antitumor responses or immunosuppression. Recent studies supporting the positive and negative roles of B cells in tumor development were summarized comprehensively. Several specific B-cell subpopulations, such as IgG(+), IgA(+), IL-10(+), and regulatory B cells, were described in detail. The mechanisms underlying the controversial B-cell effects were mainly attributed to different B-cell subpopulations, different B-cell-derived cytokines, direct B cell-T cell interaction, different cancer categories, and different malignant stages, and the immunological interaction between B cells and T cells is mediated by dendritic cells. Promising B-cell-based antitumor strategies were proposed and novel B-cell regulators were summarized to present interesting therapeutic targets. Future investigations are needed to make sure that B-cell-based pharmacological strategies benefit cancer immunotherapy substantially.

  14. Colon cancer and the immune system: The role of tumor invading T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maximilian Waldner; Carl C Schimanski; Markus F Neurath

    2006-01-01

    Colon cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the host immune system has been shown to react against tumor cells, mainly through tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and NK cells, tumor cells may utilize different ways to escape anti-tumor immune response. Tumor infiltration of CD8+ and CD4+ (T-bet+)effector T cells has been attributed to a beneficial outcome, and the enhancement of T cell activation through T cell receptor stimulation and co-stimulatory signals provides promising strategies for immunotherapy of colon cancer. Growing evidence supports a role for the Fas/FasL system in tumor immunology, although the mechanisms and consequences of FasL activation in colon cancer are not completely understood. In animal models, depletion of regulatory T cells (CD4+ CD25+T cells) can enhance the anti-tumor immune response under certain conditions. Taken together, recent insights in the immune reaction against colon carcinoma have provided new approaches to immunotherapy,although much remains to be learned about the exact mechanisms.

  15. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  16. Damaged DNA binding protein 2 plays a role in breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilal Kattan

    Full Text Available The Damaged DNA binding protein 2 (DDB2, is involved in nucleotide excision repair as well as in other biological processes in normal cells, including transcription and cell cycle regulation. Loss of DDB2 function may be related to tumor susceptibility. However, hypothesis of this study was that DDB2 could play a role in breast cancer cell growth, resulting in its well known interaction with the proliferative marker E2F1 in breast neoplasia. DDB2 gene was overexpressed in estrogen receptor (ER-positive (MCF-7 and T47D, but not in ER-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 or normal mammary epithelial cell lines. In addition, DDB2 expression was significantly (3.0-fold higher in ER-positive than in ER-negative tumor samples (P = 0.0208 from 16 patients with breast carcinoma. Knockdown of DDB2 by small interfering RNA in MCF-7 cells caused a decrease in cancer cell growth and colony formation. Inversely, introduction of the DDB2 gene into MDA-MB231 cells stimulated growth and colony formation. Cell cycle distribution and 5 Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by flow cytometry analysis showed that the growth-inhibiting effect of DDB2 knockdown was the consequence of a delayed G1/S transition and a slowed progression through the S phase of MCF-7 cells. These results were supported by a strong decrease in the expression of S phase markers (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen, cyclin E and dihydrofolate reductase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that DDB2 can play a role as oncogene and may become a promising candidate as a predictive marker in breast cancer.

  17. The role of the chemokine receptor XCR1 in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Li; Qi, Li Guo; Lin, Feng Juan; Ou, Zhou Luo

    2017-01-01

    Considerable attention has recently been paid to the application of chemokines to cancer immunotherapy due to their complex role in cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and tumorigenesis, which extends beyond the regulation of lymphocyte migration during immune responses. The expression and the function of the chemokine receptor XCR1 on breast cancer have remained elusive to date. In this study, the expressions of XCR1 mRNA were tested by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in one breast epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) and nine breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, 231HM, 231BO, MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, T47D, Bcap-37, ZR-75-30, and SK-BR-3). We established XCR1-overexpressing breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (231/XCR1) in XCR1 low expression cell line MDA-MB-231 (231). The ability of proliferation, invasion, and metastasis was measured by CCK8, plate cloning formation, and transwell analysis, respectively, in XCR1-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines (231/XCR1) and their parental cell line MDA-MB-231/Vector (simplified as “231/Vector”); 5×106/100 μL cells were inoculated in mammary fat pad of BALB/c nude mice. There were six BALB/c nude mice in the experimental group and control group. Protein expression was analyzed by cell immunofluorescence and Western blot. The growth of XCR1-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro was restrained and tumorigenesis in vivo was also extenuated, its mechanism may involve in the inhibition of MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, but increase in LC3 expression. However, the overexpression of XCR1 in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro can promote the migration and invasion partially due to decreasing the protein level of β-catenin. Therefore, XCR1 can affect the biological characteristics of some special breast cancer cells through complex signal transduction pathway.

  18. Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and β-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 μg/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 μg/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was

  19. Exosomes secreted from human colon cancer cells influence the adhesion of neighboring metastatic cells: Role of microRNA-210

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Guasti, Daniele; Cinci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer-secreted exosomes influence tumor microenvironment and support cancer growth and metastasis. MiR-210 is frequently up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues and correlates with metastatic disease. We investigated whether exosomes are actively released by HCT-8 colon cancer cells, the role of exosomal miR-210 in the cross-talk between primary cancer cells and neighboring metastatic cells and its contribution in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). After 7 d of culture, a subpopulation of viable HCT-8 cells detached the monolayer and started to grow in suspension, suggesting anoikis resistance and a metastatic potential. The expression of key proteins of EMT revealed that these cells were E-cadherin negative and vimentin positive further confirming their metastatic phenotype and the acquisition of anoikis resistance. Metastatic cells, in the presence of adherently growing HCT-8, continued to grow in suspension whereas only if seeded in cell-free wells, were able to adhere again and to form E-cadherin positive and vimentin negative new colonies, suggesting the occurrence of MET. The chemosensitivity to 5 fluorouracil and to FOLFOX-like treatment of metastatic cells was significantly diminished compared to adherent HCT-8 cells. Of note, adherent new colonies undergoing MET, were insensitive to both chemotherapeutic strategies. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that adherently growing HCT-8, actually secreted exosomes and that exosomes in turn were taken up by metastatic cells. When exosomes secreted by adherently growing HCT-8 were administered to metastatic cells, MET was significantly inhibited. miR-210 was significantly upregulated in exosomes compared to its intracellular levels in adherently growing HCT-8 cells and correlated to anoikis resistance and EMT markers. Exosomes containing miR-210 might be considered as EMT promoting signals that preserve the local cancer

  20. Biological role of NK cells and immunotherapeutic approaches in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paula Roberti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, tumor surveillance by the immune system and its impact on disease outcomes in cancer patients in general and in breast cancer (BC patients in particular has been documented. Natural killer (NK cells are central components of the innate immunity and existing data indicate that they play a role in preventing and controlling tumor growth and metastasis. Their biological significance was first recognized by their ability to exert direct cellular cytotoxicity without prior sensitization. This is important in tumors, as transforming events are likely to result in downregulation of self-ligands and expression of stress-induced ligands which can be recognized by NK cells. Their activation also leads to secretion of stimulatory cytokines which participate in cancer elimination by several direct mechanisms as well as by stimulating the adaptive immune system. In this regard, it was recently revealed a dendritic cell (DC-NK cell crosstalk which provides another novel pathway linking innate and adaptive immunity. In addition, NK cells are feasible targets of stimulation in immunotherapeutic approaches such as antibody-based strategies and adoptive cell transfer. Nevertheless, NK cells display impaired functionality and capability to infiltrate tumors in BC patients. This review compiles information about NK cell biology in BC and the attempts which aim to manipulate them in novel therapeutic approaches in this pathology.

  1. The Role of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus and Other Human Polyomaviruses in Emerging Hallmarks of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Moens

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyomaviruses are non-enveloped, dsDNA viruses that are common in mammals, including humans. All polyomaviruses encode the large T-antigen and small t-antigen proteins that share conserved functional domains, comprising binding motifs for the tumor suppressors pRb and p53, and for protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. At present, 13 different human polyomaviruses are known, and for some of them their large T-antigen and small t-antigen have been shown to possess oncogenic properties in cell culture and animal models, while similar functions are assumed for the large T- and small t-antigen of other human polyomaviruses. However, so far the Merkel cell polyomavirus seems to be the only human polyomavirus associated with cancer. The large T- and small t-antigen exert their tumorigenic effects through classical hallmarks of cancer: inhibiting tumor suppressors, activating tumor promoters, preventing apoptosis, inducing angiogenesis and stimulating metastasis. This review elaborates on the putative roles of human polyomaviruses in some of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. The reciprocal interactions between human polyomaviruses and the immune system response are discussed, a plausible role of polyomavirus-encoded and polyomavirus-induced microRNA in cancer is described, and the effect of polyomaviruses on energy homeostasis and exosomes is explored. Therapeutic strategies against these emerging hallmarks of cancer are also suggested.

  2. The role of RAD51 in etoposide (VP16) resistance in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg; Lundin, Cecilia; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens;

    2003-01-01

    Etoposide (VP16) is a potent inducer of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is efficiently used in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) therapy. However, acquired VP16 resistance remains an important barrier to effective treatment. To understand the underlying mechanisms for VP16 resistance in SCLC, we...... investigated DSB repair and cellular VP16 sensitivity of SCLC cells. VP16 sensitivity and RAD51, DNA-PK(cs), topoisomerase IIalpha and P-glycoprotein protein levels were determined in 17 SCLC cell lines. In order to unravel the role of RAD51 in VP16 resistance, we cloned the human RAD51 gene, transfected SCLC...... cells with RAD51 sense or antisense constructs and measured the VP16 resistance. Finally, we measured VP16-induced DSBs in the 17 SCLC cell lines. Two cell lines exhibited a multidrug-resistant phenotype. In the other SCLC cell lines, the cellular VP16 resistance was positively correlated with the RAD51...

  3. Role of prostaglandin receptor EP2 in the regulations of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-02-01

    Population studies, preclinical, and clinical trials suggest a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, PTGS2) in tumor formation and progression. The downstream prostanoid receptor signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis are poorly understood, although prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)), a major COX-2 metabolite which is usually upregulated in the involved tissues, presumably plays important roles in tumor biology. Taking advantage of our recently identified novel selective antagonist for the EP2 (PTGER2) subtype of PGE(2) receptor, we demonstrated that EP2 receptor activation could promote prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in vitro, accompanied by upregulation of the tumor-promoting inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-6. Our results suggest the involvement of prostaglandin receptor EP2 in cancer cell proliferation and invasion possibly via its inflammatory actions, and indicate that selective blockade of the PGE(2)-EP2 signaling pathway via small molecule antagonists might represent a novel therapy for tumorigenesis.

  4. The Role of TAM Family Receptors in Immune Cell Function: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Magdalena; Penninger, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—are essential regulators of immune homeostasis. Guided by their cognate ligands Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1), these receptors ensure the resolution of inflammation by dampening the activation of innate cells as well as by restoring tissue function through promotion of tissue repair and clearance of apoptotic cells. Their central role as negative immune regulators is highlighted by the fact that deregulation of TAM signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Importantly, TAM receptors have also been associated with cancer development and progression. In a cancer setting, TAM receptors have a dual regulatory role, controlling the initiation and progression of tumor development and, at the same time, the associated anti-tumor responses of diverse immune cells. Thus, modulation of TAM receptors has emerged as a potential novel strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TAM receptors control immunity, with a particular focus on the regulation of anti-tumor responses and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27775650

  5. Multiscale in situ analysis of the role of dyskerin in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Marcos, Tamara; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Serrano, Diego; Pio, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Dyskerin is one of the three subunits of the telomerase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Very little is known about the role of dyskerin in the biology of the telomeres in cancer cells. In this study, we use a quantitative, multiscale 3D image-based in situ method and several molecular techniques to show that dyskerin is overexpressed in lung cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we show that dyskerin expression correlates with telomere length both at the cell population level--cells with higher dyskerin expression have short telomeres--and at the single cell level--the shortest telomeres of the cell are spatially associated with areas of concentration of dyskerin proteins. Using this in vitro model, we also show that exogenous increase in dyskerin expression confers resistance to telomere shortening caused by a telomerase inactivating drug. Finally, we show that resistance is achieved by the recovery of telomerase activity associated with dyskerin. In summary, using a novel multiscale image-based in situ method, we show that, in lung cancer cell lines, dyskerin responds to continuous telomere attrition by increasing the telomerase RNP activity, which in turn provides resistance to telomere shortening.

  6. The role of Th17 cells in anti-cancer immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Hus

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are a newly identified population of CD4 Th cells characterized by interleukin 17 production and are therefore named “Th17”. Interleukin 17 (IL-17; IL-17A is one of the key cytokines for the activation, recruitment, and migration of neutrophils, so Th17 cells have been suggested to play an important role in responses against extracellular bacteria and fungi, in which granulocyte infiltration is highly protective. Among the other cytokines secreted by Th17 cells are IL-22, IL-26, IL-6, and TNF-α. Th17 cells are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory, autoimmune, and allergic diseases. Th17 cells were found in both mouse and human tumors; however, their role in the tumor microenvironment is still poorly understood IL-17, as a pleiotropic cytokine, may suppress or promote tumor growth since it was shown that it stimulated tumor growth by inducing tumor vascularization or enhancing inflammation, but some other studies revealed also opposite roles for Th17 cells in human tumors. It seems that Th17 cells may play distinct roles in cancer depending of tumor immunogenicity, the stage of development, and the impact of inflammation and angiogenesis on tumor pathogenesis.

  7. The role of cancer stem cells and miRNAs in defining the complexities of brain metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians have been challenged with the development of therapies for the treatment of cancer patients whose tumors metastasized to the brain. Among the most lethal weapons known today, current management of brain metastases involves multiple therapeutic modalities that provide little, if any, for improving the quality of life and overall survival. Recently the role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the development of cancer has been studied extensively, and thus its role in the ...

  8. The diverse and contrasting effects of using human prostate cancer cell lines to study androgen receptor roles in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Qiang Yu; Kuo-Pao Lai; Shu-Jie Xia; Hong-Chiang Chang; Chawnshang Chang; Shuyuan Yeh

    2009-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa).Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in blocking tumor growth,but it eventually leads to the hormonerefractory state.The detailed mechanisms of the conversion from androgen dependence to androgen independence remain unclear.Several PCa cell lines were established to study the role of AR in PCa,but the results were often inconsistent or contrasting in different cell lines,or in the same cell line grown under different conditions.The cellular and molecular alteration of epithelial cells and their microenvironments are complicated,and it is difficult to use a single cell line to address this important issue and also to study the pathophysiological effects of AR.In this paper,we summarize the different effects of AR on multiple cell lines and show the disadvantages of using a single human PCa cell line to study AR effects on PCa.We also discuss the advantages of widely used epithelium-stroma co-culture systems,xenograft mouse models,and genetically engineered PCa mouse models.The combination of in vitro cell line studies and in vivo mouse models might lead to more credible results and better strategies for the study of AR roles in PCa.

  9. The Role of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pichler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the existence of a subset of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties, which are thought to play a significant role in tumor formation, metastasis, resistance to anticancer therapies and cancer recurrence, has gained tremendous attraction within the last decade. These cancer stem cells (CSCs are relatively rare and have been described by different molecular markers and cellular features in different types of cancers. Ten years ago, a novel class of molecules, small non-protein-coding RNAs, was found to be involved in carcinogenesis. These small RNAs, which are called microRNAs (miRNAs, act as endogenous suppressors of gene expression that exert their effect by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of large target messenger RNAs (mRNAs. MicroRNAs trigger either translational repression or mRNA cleavage of target mRNAs. Some studies have shown that putative breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs exhibit a distinct miRNA expression profile compared to non-tumorigenic breast cancer cells. The deregulated miRNAs may contribute to carcinogenesis and self-renewal of BCSCs via several different pathways and can act either as oncomirs or as tumor suppressive miRNAs. It has also been demonstrated that certain miRNAs play an essential role in regulating the stem cell-like phenotype of BCSCs. Some miRNAs control clonal expansion or maintain the self-renewal and anti-apoptotic features of BCSCs. Others are targeting the specific mRNA of their target genes and thereby contribute to the formation and self-renewal process of BCSCs. Several miRNAs are involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which is often implicated in the process of formation of CSCs. Other miRNAs were shown to be involved in the increased chemotherapeutic resistance of BCSCs. This review highlights the recent findings and crucial role of miRNAs in the maintenance, growth and behavior of BCSCs, thus indicating the potential for novel diagnostic, prognostic and

  10. The myoepithelial cell: its role in normal mammary glands and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopel, M

    2010-02-01

    Mammary gland epithelium is composed of an inner layer of secretory cells (luminal) and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells (MEC) bordering the basal lamina which separates the epithelial layer from the extracellular matrix. Mature MECs morphologically resemble smooth muscle cells; however, they exhibit features typical for epithelial cells, such as the presence of specific cytokeratin filaments. During lactation, secretory cells synthesize milk components, which are collected in alveoli and duct lumen, and transported to the nipple as a result of MEC contraction. Although the induction of MEC contraction results from oxytocin action, also other, still unknown auto/paracrine mechanisms participate in the regulation of this process. As well as milk ejection, MECs are involved in mammary gland morphogenesis in all developmental stages, modulating proliferation and differentiation of luminal cells. They take part in the formation of extracellular matrix, synthesizing its components and secreting proteinases and their inhibitors. In addition, MECs are regarded as natural cancer suppressors, stabilizing the normal structure of the mammary gland, they secrete suppressor proteins (e.g. maspin) limiting cancer growth, invasiveness, and neoangiogenesis. The majority of malignant breast cancers are derived from luminal cells, whereas neoplasms of MEC origin are the most seldom and usually benign form of breast tumours. MECs are markedly resistant to malignant transformation and they are able to suppress the transformation of neighboring luminal cells. Therefore, a deeper insight into the role of MECs in the physiology and pathology of mammary glands would allow a better understanding of cancerogenesis mechanisms and possible application of specific MEC markers in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  11. A functional role for tumor cell heterogeneity in a mouse model of small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbo, Joaquim; van Montfort, Erwin; Proost, Natalie; van Drunen, Ellen; Beverloo, H Berna; Meuwissen, Ralph; Berns, Anton

    2011-02-15

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the lung neoplasia with the poorest prognosis, due to its high metastatic potential and chemoresistance upon relapse. Using the previously described mouse model for SCLC, we found that the tumors are often composed of phenotypically different cells with either a neuroendocrine or a mesenchymal marker profile. These cells had a common origin because they shared specific genomic aberrations. The transition from neuroendocrine to mesenchymal phenotype could be achieved by the ectopic expression of oncogenic Ras(V12). Crosstalk between mesenchymal and neuroendocrine cells strongly influenced their behavior. When engrafted as a mixed population, the mesenchymal cells endowed the neuroendocrine cells with metastatic capacity, illustrating the potential relevance of tumor cell heterogeneity in dictating tumor properties.

  12. Role of mesenchymal stem cell-derived fibrinolytic factor in tissue regeneration and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissig, Beate; Dhahri, Douaa; Eiamboonsert, Salita; Salama, Yousef; Shimazu, Hiroshi; Munakata, Shinya; Hattori, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Tissue regeneration during wound healing or cancer growth and progression depends on the establishment of a cellular microenvironment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are part of this cellular microenvironment, where they functionally modulate cell homing, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. MSC recruitment involves detachment of these cells from their niche, and finally MSC migration into their preferred niches; the wounded area, the tumor bed, and the BM, just to name a few. During this recruitment phase, focal proteolysis disrupts the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, breaks cell-matrix interactions with receptors, and integrins, and causes the release of bioactive fragments from ECM molecules. MSC produce a broad array of proteases, promoting remodeling of the surrounding ECM through proteolytic mechanisms. The fibrinolytic system, with its main player plasmin, plays a crucial role in cell migration, growth factor bioavailability, and the regulation of other protease systems during inflammation, tissue regeneration, and cancer. Key components of the fibrinolytic cascade, including the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are expressed in MSC. This review will introduce general functional properties of the fibrinolytic system, which go beyond its known function of fibrin clot dissolution (fibrinolysis). We will focus on the role of the fibrinolytic system for MSC biology, summarizing our current understanding of the role of the fibrinolytic system for MSC recruitment and the functional consequences for tissue regeneration and cancer. Aspects of MSC origin, maintenance, and the mechanisms by which these cells contribute to altered protease activity in the microenvironment under normal and pathological conditions will also be discussed.

  13. Shp2 Plays a Critical Role in IL-6-Induced EMT in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhiyong; Ji, Wei; Tian, Ran; Zhang, Fei; Niu, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    Accumulative evidence demonstrates that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 functions as a powerful tumor promoter in many types of cancers. Abnormal expression of Shp2 has been implicated in many human malignancies. Overexpression of Shp2 in cancer tissues is correlated with cancer metastasis, resistance to targeted therapy, and poor prognosis. The well-known function of Shp2 is its positive role in regulating cellular signaling initiated by growth factors and cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6). Several recent studies have shown that Shp2 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), triggered by growth factors. However, whether Shp2 is involved in IL-6-signaling-promoted breast cancer EMT and progression, remains undefined. In this study, we showed that exogenous and endogenous IL-6 can enhance breast cancer invasion and migration, through the promotion of EMT. IL-6 also induces the activation of Erk1/2 and the phosphorylation of Shp2. Knockdown of Shp2 attenuated the IL-6-induced downregulation of E-cadherin, as well as IL-6-promoted cell migration and invasion. Moreover, by using Shp2 phosphatase mutants, phosphor-tyrosine mimicking, and deficiency mutants, we provided evidence that the phosphatase activity of Shp2 and its tyrosine phosphorylation, are necessary for the IL-6-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Our findings uncover an important function that links Shp2 to IL-6-promoted breast cancer progression. PMID:28208810

  14. Interfering with ROS Metabolism in Cancer Cells: The Potential Role of Quercetin

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Gibellini; Marcello Pinti; Milena Nasi; Sara De Biasi; Erika Roat; Linda Bertoncelli; Andrea Cossarizza

    2010-01-01

    A main feature of cancer cells, when compared to normal ones, is a persistent pro-oxidative state that leads to an intrinsic oxidative stress. Cancer cells have higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than normal cells, and ROS are, in turn, responsible for the maintenance of the cancer phenotype. Persistent ROS stress may induce adaptive stress responses, enabling cancer cells to survive with high levels of ROS and maintain cellular viability. However, excessive ROS levels render canc...

  15. Role of mitochondria-associated hexokinase II in cancer cell death induced by 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Weiqin; Huang, Peng

    2009-05-01

    It has long been observed that cancer cells rely more on glycolysis to generate ATP and actively use certain glycolytic metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Hexokinase II (HKII) is a key glycolytic enzyme that plays a role in the regulation of the mitochondria-initiated apoptotic cell death. As a potent inhibitor of hexokinase, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is known to inhibit cancer cell energy metabolism and trigger cell death, supposedly through depletion of cellular ATP. The current study showed that 3-BrPA caused a covalent modification of HKII protein and directly triggered its dissociation from mitochondria, leading to a specific release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to cytosol and eventual cell death. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed a physical interaction between HKII and AIF. Using a competitive peptide of HKII, we showed that the dissociation of hexokinase II from mitochondria alone could cause apoptotic cell death, especially in the mitochondria-deficient rho(0) cells that highly express HKII. Interestingly, the dissociation of HKII itself did not directly affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the physical association between HKII and AIF is important for the normal localization of AIF in the mitochondria, and disruption of this protein complex by 3-BrPA leads to their release from the mitochondria and eventual cell death.

  16. Role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) in cell proliferation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walesky, Chad; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is an orphan nuclear receptor commonly known as the master regulator of hepatic differentiation, owing to the large number of hepatocyte-specific genes it regulates. Whereas the role of HNF4α in hepatocyte differentiation is well recognized and extensively studied, its role in regulation of cell proliferation is relatively less known. Recent studies have revealed that HNF4α inhibits proliferation not only of hepatocytes but also cells in colon and kidney. Further, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that inhibition or loss of HNF4α promotes tumorigenesis in the liver and colon, and reexpression of HNF4α results in decreased cancer growth. Studies using tissue-specific conditional knockout mice, knock-in studies, and combinatorial bioinformatics of RNA/ChIP-sequencing data indicate that the mechanisms of HNF4α-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation are multifold, involving epigenetic repression of promitogenic genes, significant cross talk with other cell cycle regulators including c-Myc and cyclin D1, and regulation of miRNAs. Furthermore, studies indicate that posttranslational modifications of HNF4α may change its activity and may be at the core of its dual role as a differentiation factor and repressor of proliferation. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of HNF4α in cell proliferation and highlights the newly understood function of this old receptor.

  17. ROLE OF PANCREATIC STELLATE CELLS AND GALECTIN-3 ON PROLIFERATION AND INFILTRATION OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINE SW1990

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hai-biao; XU Ming; WANG Xing-peng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and galectin-3 (GAL-3)on the proliferation and infiltration of pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Methods Human pancreatic cancercell line SW1990 and PSCs were cultured in vitro. Supernatant of cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells was collected.Expressions of GAL-3 in SW1990 cells and PSCs were detected by ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blot. Theproliferation of those cultured PSCs and SW1990 cells were measured by MTT assay and flowcytometry. Infiltrationof SW1990 cells was detected by cell infiltration kit. Results SW1990 cells expressed GAL-3 and the expressionwas up-regulated by the supernatant fluid of cultured PSCs. PSCs did not express GAL-3. SW1990 cells couldstimulate the proliferation of PSCs via GAL-3. GAL-3 antibody could inhibit SW1990 cells proliferation andinfiltration, which indicated that supernatant of PSCs might stimulate the proliferation of SW1990 cells through theinteraction with GAL-3 protein. The supernatant fluid of PSCs could enhance the invasiveness of SW1990 cellsthrough the interaction with GAL-3. Conclusion GAL-3 and PSCs was involved in the proliferation andinfiltration process of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Myeloid derived suppressor cells and their role in tolerance induction in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Taku; Mahnke, Karsten; Enk, Alexander H

    2010-07-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise a phenotypically heterogeneous population of cells, which can be found in tumor-bearing mice and in patients with cancer. MDSCs play a central role in the induction of peripheral tolerance. Together with regulatory T cells (Tregs) they promote an immunosuppressive environment in tumor-bearing hosts. The phenotype of MDSCs differs in humans and mice, and the exact mechanisms of their suppressive function are still controversially discussed. In summary, MDSCs are a group of phenotypically heterogeneous cells of myeloid origin that have common biological activities. In this review, we discuss the definition of MDSCs, the proposed mechanisms of expansion and the recruitment and activation of MDSCs, as well as their biological activities in tumorbearing hosts to assess the potential therapeutic applications.

  19. Clinical implications of circulating tumor cells of breast cancer patients: role of epithelial mesenchymal plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Maria McInnes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in circulating tumor cells (CTCs due to their purported role in breast cancer metastasis, and their potential as a ‘liquid biopsy’ tool in breast cancer diagnosis and management. There are, however, questions with regards to the reliability and consistency of CTC detection and to the relationship between CTCs and prognosis, which is limiting their clinical utility. There is increasing acceptance that the ability of CTCs to alter from an epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype plays an important role in determining the metastatic potential of these cells. This review examines the phenotypic and genetic variation, which has been reported within CTC populations. Importantly, we discuss how the detection and characterization of CTCs provides additional and often differing information from that obtained from the primary tumor, and how this may be utilized in determining prognosis and treatment options. It has been shown for example that hormone receptor status often differs between the primary tumor and CTCs, which may help to explain failure of endocrine treatment. We examine how CTC status may introduce alternative treatment options and also how they may be used to monitor treatment. Finally, we discuss the most interesting current clinical trials involving CTC analysis and note further research that is required before the breast cancer liquid biopsy can be realised.

  20. Role of cytokines in promoting immune escape of FasL-expressing human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Xu; Bao-Cun Sun; Qiang Li; Xi-Shan Hao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of cytokines in promoting Fas ligand (FasL)-expressing colon cancer cells.METHODS: Immunohistochemical SABC method was used to observe the expression of Fas receptor and ligand in SW620 colon cancer cell line and Jurkat T cells in order to provide the morphological evidence for the functions of Fas receptor and ligand. To examine the cytotoxicity of effector cells, CytoTox96(R) non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay was adopted to measure the lactate dehydrogenase-releasing value after SW620 cells were co-cultured with Jurkat T lymphocytes.RESULTS: The FasL of colon cancer SW620 cells was positive. The positive substances were distributed in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. The Fas receptor of colon cancer SW620 cells was negative. The Fas receptor and ligand of Jurkat T lymphocytes tumed out to be positive. The positive substances were distributed in the cell membrane.After phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated Jurkat T lymphocytes were co-cultured with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-plus-ionomycin-stimulated (for 48 h) SW620ceils or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated (for 48 h) SW620 cells or unstimulated SW620 cells for 4 h,the cytotoxicity of SW620 cells to PHA-stimulated Jurkat cells at effector-to-target ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1was 74.6%, 40.8%, 32.4%, and 10.9% (F= 8.19, P<0.05);or 54.9%, 35.3%, 22.0%, and 10.3% (F= 11.12, P<0.05);or 14.9%, 10.5%, 6.9%, and 5.8% (F= 3.45, P<0.05).After PHA-stimulated Jurkat T lymphocytes were co-cultured with unstimulated SW620 cells for 8 h, the cytotoxicity of SW620 cells to PHA-stimulated Jurkat cells at effector-totarget ratios of 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 from the experiment was 83.9%, 74.1%, and 28.5% (F= 137.04, P<0.05)respectively. Non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay showed that the apoptotic rate of Jurkat cells remarkably increased with the increase of planting concentration of SW620 cells and co-culture time after the SW620 cells were co

  1. Acetylation Enhances the Promoting Role of AIB1 in Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dingyun; Zhao, Hongbo; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Lu, Minnan; Yan, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogene nuclear receptor coactivator amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) is a transcriptional coactivator, which is overexpressed in various types of human cancers, including breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating AIB1 function remain largely unknown. In this study, we present evidence demonstrating that AIB1 is acetylated by MOF in human breast cancer cells. Moreover, we also found that the acetylation of AIB1 enhances its function in promoting breast cancer cell proliferation. We further showed that the acetylation of AIB1 is required for its recruitment to E2F1 target genes by E2F1. More importantly, we found that the acetylation levels of AIB1 are greatly elevated in human breast cancer cells compared with that in non-cancerous cells. Collectively, our results shed light on the molecular mechanisms that regulate AIB1 function in breast cancer. PMID:27665502

  2. Novel roles for p53 in the genesis and targeting of tetraploid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaadelger, Batzaya; Shen, Hong; Maki, Carl G

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid (4N) cells are considered important in cancer because they can display increased tumorigenicity, resistance to conventional therapies, and are believed to be precursors to whole chromosome aneuploidy. It is therefore important to determine how tetraploid cancer cells arise, and how to target them. P53 is a tumor suppressor protein and key regulator of tetraploidy. As part of the "tetraploidy checkpoint", p53 inhibits tetraploid cell proliferation by promoting a G1-arrest in incipient tetraploid cells (referred to as a tetraploid G1 arrest). Nutlin-3a is a preclinical drug that stabilizes p53 by blocking the interaction between p53 and MDM2. In the current study, Nutlin-3a promoted a p53-dependent tetraploid G1 arrest in two diploid clones of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Both clones underwent endoreduplication after Nutlin removal, giving rise to stable tetraploid clones that showed increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and cisplatin (CP)-induced apoptosis compared to their diploid precursors. These findings demonstrate that transient p53 activation by Nutlin can promote tetraploid cell formation from diploid precursors, and the resulting tetraploid cells are therapy (IR/CP) resistant. Importantly, the tetraploid clones selected after Nutlin treatment expressed approximately twice as much P53 and MDM2 mRNA as diploid precursors, expressed approximately twice as many p53-MDM2 protein complexes (by co-immunoprecipitation), and were more susceptible to p53-dependent apoptosis and growth arrest induced by Nutlin. Based on these findings, we propose that p53 plays novel roles in both the formation and targeting of tetraploid cells. Specifically, we propose that 1) transient p53 activation can promote a tetraploid-G1 arrest and, as a result, may inadvertently promote formation of therapy-resistant tetraploid cells, and 2) therapy-resistant tetraploid cells, by virtue of having higher P53 gene copy number and expressing twice as many p53-MDM2

  3. The role of microRNAs in the regulation of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryou-u eTakahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs have been reported in many human tumors and are proposed to drive tumor initiation and progression. CSCs share a variety of biological properties with normal somatic stem cells such as the capacity for self-renewal, the propagation of differentiated progeny, and the expression of specific cell markers and stem cell genes. However, CSCs differ from normal stem cells in their chemoresistance and tumorigenic and metastatic activities. Despite their potential clinical importance, the regulation of CSCs at the molecular level is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous non-coding RNAs that play an important role in the regulation of several cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Aberrant miRNA expression is associated with many human diseases including cancer. miRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of CSC properties; therefore, a better understanding of the modulation of CSC gene expression by miRNAs could aid the identification of promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the major findings on the regulation of CSCs by miRNAs and discuss recent advances that have improved our understanding of the regulation of CSCs by miRNA networks and may lead to the development of miRNA therapeutics specifically targeting CSCs.

  4. [The role of surgery in the treatment of small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, F; Urbani, M; Santoprete, S; Ricci, F; Sanguinetti, A; Vinci, D; Ottavi, P; Porcaro, G; Daddi, G

    2001-12-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a biologically aggressive tumor with a low long-term survival rate. SCLC is highly responsive to chemotherapy and surgery has a very limited role in its treatment because the disease is usually widely disseminated at the diagnosis. Good results from surgery have been reported in the small subgroup of T1-2 N0 M0 patients. In N1 peripheral SCLC, surgery in combination with other treatments, can obtain fair results. Surgical treatment does not influence the prognosis in SCLC as stage III and IV.

  5. The role of microRNA-1274a in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer: Accelerating cancer cell proliferation and migration via directly targeting FOXO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo-Jun, E-mail: wwangguojun@163.com; Liu, Guang-Hui; Ye, Yan-Wei; Fu, Yang; Zhang, Xie-Fu

    2015-04-17

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a series of 18–25 nucleotides length non-coding RNAs, which play critical roles in tumorigenesis. Previous study has shown that microRNA-1274a (miR-1274a) is upregulated in human gastric cancer. However, its role in gastric cancer progression remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-1274a on gastric cancer cells. We found that miR-1274a was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues or gastric cancer cells including HGC27, MGC803, AGS, and SGC-7901 by qRT-PCR analysis. Transfection of miR-1274a markedly promoted gastric cancer cells proliferation and migration as well as induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells. Our further examination identified FOXO4 as a target of miR-1274a, which did not influence FOXO4 mRNA expression but significantly inhibited FOXO4 protein expression. Moreover, miR-1274a overexpression activated PI3K/Akt signaling and upregulated cyclin D1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. With tumor xenografts in mice models, we also showed that miR-1274a promoted tumorigenesis of gastric cancer in vivo. In all, our study demonstrated that miR-1274a prompted gastric cancer cells growth and migration through dampening FOXO4 expression thus provided a potential target for human gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • MiR-1274a expression was augmented in gastric cancer. • MiR-1274a promoted proliferation, migration and induced EMT in cancer cells. • MiR-1274a directly targeted FOXO4 expression. • MiR-1274a triggered PI3K/Akt signaling in cancer cells. • MiR-1274a significantly increased tumor xenografts growth.

  6. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancerrole of nivolumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Giulia Zago,1,2,* Mirte Muller,1,* Michel van den Heuvel,1 Paul Baas1 1Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (NKI-AvL, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Medical Oncology 2, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV, Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017 and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057. In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively. Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. Keywords: nivolumab, advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, immunotherapy, anti-PD-1

  7. Biological role of β-arrestin1 in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of β-arrestin1 on proliferation,migration,invasion and apoptosis of human gastric cancer BGC-823 cell line. Methods The expression of β-arrestin1 in human gastric epithelial cell line GES, human gastric cancer cell line BGC-823, MKN-28 and SGC-7901 was detected

  8. Role of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC1) in breast cancer cell migration and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Gupta, Sonal; Dabral, Surbhi; Singh, Shailja; Sehrawat, Seema

    2017-02-16

    Despite the current progress in cancer research and therapy, breast cancer remains the leading cause of mortality among half a million women worldwide. Migration and invasion of cancer cells are associated with prevalent tumor metastasis as well as high mortality. Extensive studies have powerfully established the role of prototypic second messenger cAMP and its two ubiquitously expressed intracellular cAMP receptors namely the classic protein kinaseA/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the more recently discovered exchange protein directly activated by cAMP/cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor (EPAC/cAMP-GEF) in cell migration, cell cycle regulation, and cell death. Herein, we performed the analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset to evaluate the essential role of cAMP molecular network in breast cancer. We report that EPAC1, PKA, and AKAP9 along with other molecular partners are amplified in breast cancer patients, indicating the importance of this signaling network. To evaluate the functional role of few of these proteins, we used pharmacological modulators and analyzed their effect on cell migration and cell death in breast cancer cells. Hence, we report that inhibition of EPAC1 activity using pharmacological modulators leads to inhibition of cell migration and induces cell death. Additionally, we also observed that the inhibition of EPAC1 resulted in disruption of its association with the microtubule cytoskeleton and delocalization of AKAP9 from the centrosome as analyzed by in vitro imaging. Finally, this study suggests for the first time the mechanistic insights of mode of action of a primary cAMP-dependent sensor, Exchange protein activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1), via its interaction with A-kinase anchoring protein 9 (AKAP9). This study provides a new cell signaling cAMP-EPAC1-AKAP9 direction to the development of additional biotherapeutics for breast cancer.

  9. Potential role of immunotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramon Andrade de Mello,1–3 Ana Flávia Veloso,4 Paulo Esrom Catarina,4 Sara Nadine,5 Georgios Antoniou6 1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, University of Algarve, Faro, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 3Research Center, Cearense School of Oncology, Instituto do Câncer do Ceará, 4Oncology & Hematology League, School of Medicine, State University of Ceará (UECE, Fortaleza, Brazil; 5Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar (ICBAS, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 6Department of Medical Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Abstract: Immuno checkpoint inhibitors have ushered in a new era with respect to the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Many patients are not suitable for treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg, gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib or with anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors (eg, crizotinib and ceritinib. As a result, anti-PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors may play a novel role in the improvement of outcomes in a metastatic setting. The regulation of immune surveillance, immunoediting, and immunoescape mechanisms may play an interesting role in this regard either alone or in combination with current drugs. Here, we discuss advances in immunotherapy for the treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer as well as future perspectives within this framework. Keywords: immunotherapy, non-small-cell lung cancer, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, ipilimumab, clinical trials, PD1, PDL1, CTLA4

  10. Roles of Mir-144-ZFX pathway in growth regulation of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangjian Zha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC accounts for most of the lung cancer cases and the prognosis of this disease remains poor despite decades of intensive investigation. Thus new insights into underlying mechanisms by which NSCLC develops are avidly needed as the basis for development of new lines of therapeutic strategies. The past decade has witnessed a growing interest on the regulatory roles of micro RNAs on various categories of malignancies. Related data has been well documented in carcinogenesis and pathophysiology of a variety of malignancies. Even so, there is a relative lack of data on roles of mir-144 in tumor biology and there has been no report showing the involvement of mir-144 in NSCLC development. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDING: From human NSCLC tumor tissue samples and cell culture samples, we found that the expression of mir-144 is associated with malignant phenotype of NSCLC. Further investigations showed that ectopic mir-144 expression dramatically inhibits NSCLC tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis as manifested by elevated apoptotic protein markers and flowcytometry change. Moreover, we also found that ZFX protein expression is also associated with malignant phenotype of NSCLC and knockdown of ZFX protein results in a similar effect as of ectopic mir-144 expression. Finally, we found that ZFX expression is highly adjustable upon presence of mir-144 and ectopic expression of ZFX dramatically dampens mir-144 action of tumor inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: Our results for the first time showed mir-144-ZFX pathway is involved in the development of NSCLC, which sheds a light for further investigations on underlying mechanisms toward better understanding and management of NSCLC.

  11. Hypertonic stress induces VEGF production in human colon cancer cell line Caco-2: inhibitory role of autocrine PGE₂.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana B Gentile

    Full Text Available Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF is a major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF expression is up regulated in response to micro-environmental cues related to poor blood supply such as hypoxia. However, regulation of VEGF expression in cancer cells is not limited to the stress response due to increased volume of the tumor mass. Lipid mediators in particular arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandin (PGE₂ are regulators of VEGF expression and angiogenesis in colon cancer. In addition, increased osmolarity that is generated during colonic water absorption and feces consolidation seems to activate colon cancer cells and promote PGE₂ generation. Such physiological stimulation may provide signaling for cancer promotion. Here we investigated the effect of exposure to a hypertonic medium, to emulate colonic environment, on VEGF production by colon cancer cells. The role of concomitant PGE₂ generation and MAPK activation was addressed by specific pharmacological inhibition. Human colon cancer cell line Caco-2 exposed to a hypertonic environment responded with marked VEGF and PGE₂ production. VEGF production was inhibited by selective inhibitors of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. To address the regulatory role of PGE₂ on VEGF production, Caco-2 cells were treated with cPLA₂ (ATK and COX-2 (NS-398 inhibitors, that completely block PGE₂ generation. The Caco-2 cells were also treated with a non selective PGE₂ receptor antagonist. Each treatment significantly increased the hypertonic stress-induced VEGF production. Moreover, addition of PGE₂ or selective EP₂ receptor agonist to activated Caco-2 cells inhibited VEGF production. The autocrine inhibitory role for PGE₂ appears to be selective to hypertonic environment since VEGF production induced by exposure to CoCl₂ was decreased by inhibition of concomitant PGE₂ generation. Our results indicated that hypertonicity stimulates VEGF production in colon cancer cell lines. Also PGE

  12. Role of manganese superoxide dismutase on growth and invasive properties of human estrogen-independent breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Zilal; Minig, Vanessa; Leroy, Pierre; Dauça, Michel; Becuwe, Philippe

    2008-03-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is known to play a role in cancer. MnSOD exerts a tumor suppressive effect in estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells. In the present study we investigated the in vitro role of MnSOD in the growth of some aggressive and highly metastatic estrogen-independent breast cancer cells, i.e., MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cells. We show that estrogen-independent cells expressed a significantly higher basal MnSOD level compared to estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and T47D). For MDA-MB231 cells, the high-MnSOD level was accompanied by an overproduction of intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and by a low expression of the major H2O2-detoxifying enzymes, catalase, and peroxiredoxin 3, compared to MCF-7 cells. Suppression of MnSOD expression by antisense RNA was associated with a decrease of H2O2 content and caused a stimulation of growth with a reduced cell doubling time but induced a decrease of colony formation. Furthermore, treatment of MDA-MB231 cells with H2O2 scavengers markedly reduced tumor cell growth and colony formation. In addition, MnSOD suppression or treatment with H2O2 scavengers reduced the invasive properties of MDA-MB231 cells up to 43%, with a concomitant decrease of metalloproteinase-9 activity. We conclude that MnSOD plays a role in regulating tumor cell growth and invasive properties of estrogen-independent metastatic breast cancer cells. These action are mediated by MnSOD-dependent H2O2 production. In addition, these results suggest that MnSOD up-regulation may be one mechanism that contributes to the development of metastatic breast cancers.

  13. Adipose-derived stems cells and their role in human cancer development, growth, progression, and metastasis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Kyle E; Kokai, Lauren; Edwards, Robert P; Philips, Brian J; Sheikh, M Aamir; Kelley, Joseph; Comerci, John; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Linkov, Faina

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a well recognized risk factor for several types of cancers, many of which occur solely or disproportionately in women. Adipose tissue is a rich source of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC), which have received attention for their role in cancer behavior. The purpose of this systematic review is to present the existing literature on the role of ASCs in the growth, development, progression, and metastasis of cancer, with an emphasis on malignancies that primarily affect women. To accomplish this goal, the bibliographic database PubMed was systematically searched for articles published between 2001 and 2014 that address ASCs' relationship to human cancer. Thirty-seven articles on ASCs' role in human cancer were reviewed. Literature suggests that ASCs exhibit cancer-promoting properties, influence/are influenced by the tumor microenvironment, promote angiogenesis, and may be associated with pathogenic processes through a variety of mechanisms, such as playing a role in hypoxic tumor microenvironment. ASCs appear to be important contributors to tumor behavior, but research in areas specific to women's cancers, specifically endometrial cancer, is scarce. Also, because obesity continues to be a major health concern, it is important to continue research in this area to improve understanding of the impact adiposity has on cancer incidence.

  14. Expression of γ-synuclein in colorectal cancer tissues and its role on colorectal cancer cell line HCT116

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Ye; Bo Feng; Yuan-Fei Peng; Xue-Hua Chen; Qu Cai; Bei-Qin Yu; Liang-Hui Li; Ming-Yuan Qiu; Bing-Ya Liu; Min-Hua Zheng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of γ-synuclein in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues, and to study the effects of γ-synuclein on CRC cell line HCT116 biological features in vitro.METHODS: The expression pattern of γ-synuclein was determined in 54 CRC tissues and 30 tumormatched nonneoplastic adjacent tissues (NNAT) 5 cm away from the tumor via real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry.The relationship between γ-synuclein protein expression and clinicopathological factors of CRC tissues was analyzed. Three small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting γ-synuclein mRNA plasmids were constructed and transfected into the CRC cell line HCT116. The stable cell lines were selected with G-418 for 28 d, and the biological features of these cells were examined by cell growth curve, soft agar assay, and cell migration and invasion assays in vitro.RESULTS: The expression of γ-synuclein mRNA and protein was much higher in CRC tissue samples than in NNAT samples ( P = 0.02, P = 0.036). There was a significant correlation between the γ-synuclein protein expression and clinical stage and lymph node involvement of CRC ( P = 0.02, P = 0.033). In functional analysis we found that down-regulation of γ-synuclein expression in HCT116 cells could inhibit the growth, colony formation rate, and migration and invasion ability of HCT116 cells.CONCLUSION: Increased expression of γ-synuclein in CRC tissues and the biological effects of reduced γ-synuclein expression on HCT116 cells suggest that γ-synuclein may play a positive role in the progression of CRC.

  15. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  16. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancerrole of nivolumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Giulia; Muller, Mirte; van den Heuvel, Michel; Baas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017) and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057). In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively). Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. PMID:27536062

  17. Macrophages eat cancer cells using their own calreticulin as a guide: roles of TLR and Btk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingye; Chen, James Y; Weissman-Tsukamoto, Rachel; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Ho, Po Yi; McKenna, Kelly M; Cheshier, Samuel; Zhang, Michael; Guo, Nan; Gip, Phung; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-02-17

    Macrophage-mediated programmed cell removal (PrCR) is an important mechanism of eliminating diseased and damaged cells before programmed cell death. The induction of PrCR by eat-me signals on tumor cells is countered by don't-eat-me signals such as CD47, which binds macrophage signal-regulatory protein α to inhibit phagocytosis. Blockade of CD47 on tumor cells leads to phagocytosis by macrophages. Here we demonstrate that the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages synergizes with blocking CD47 on tumor cells to enhance PrCR. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) mediates TLR signaling in macrophages. Calreticulin, previously shown to be an eat-me signal on cancer cells, is activated in macrophages for secretion and cell-surface exposure by TLR and Btk to target cancer cells for phagocytosis, even if the cancer cells themselves do not express calreticulin.

  18. Signals controlling un-differentiated states in embryonic stem and cancer cells: role of the phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskas, Daniel; Ling, Ling Sunny; Woodgett, James Robert

    2014-10-01

    The capacity of embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into cell lineages comprising the three germ layers makes them powerful tools for studying mammalian early embryonic development in vitro. The human body consists of approximately 210 different somatic cell types, the majority of which have limited proliferative capacity. However, both stem cells and cancer cells bypass this replicative barrier and undergo symmetric division indefinitely when cultured under defined conditions. Several signal transduction pathways play important roles in regulating stem cell development, and aberrant expression of components of these pathways is linked to cancer. Among signaling systems, the critical role of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) coupled to the Jak/STAT3 (signal transduction and activation of transcription-3) pathway in maintaining stem cell self-renewal has been extensively reviewed. This pathway additionally plays multiple roles in tumorigenesis. Likewise, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) pathway has been determined to play an important role in both stem cell maintenance and tumor development. This pathway is often induced in cancer with frequent mutational activation of the catalytic subunit of PI3K or loss of a primary PI3K antagonist, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). This review focusses on roles of the PI3K signal transduction pathway components, with emphasis on functions in stem cell maintenance and cancer. Since the PI3K pathway impinges on and collaborates with other signaling pathways in regulating stem cell development and/or cancer, aspects of the canonical Wnt, Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and TGF-β signaling pathways are also discussed.

  19. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  20. Multi-scale modelling of cancer cell intravasation: the role of cadherins in metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2009-03-01

    Transendothelial migration is a crucial process of the metastatic cascade in which a malignant cell attaches itself to the endothelial layer forming the inner wall of a blood or lymph vessel and creates a gap through which it enters into the bloodstream (or lymphatic system) and then is transported to distant parts of the body. In this process both biological pathways involving cell adhesion molecules such as VE-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the biophysical properties of the cells play an important role. In this paper, we present one of the first mathematical models considering the problem of cancer cell intravasation. We use an individual force-based multi-scale approach which accounts for intra- and inter-cellular protein pathways and for the physical properties of the cells, and a modelling framework which accounts for the biological shape of the vessel. Using our model, we study the influence of different protein pathways in the achievement of transendothelial migration and give quantitative simulation results comparable with real experiments.

  1. Novel Roles for P53 in the Genesis and Targeting of Tetraploid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Batzaya Davaadelger; Hong Shen; Maki, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid (4N) cells are considered important in cancer because they can display increased tumorigenicity, resistance to conventional therapies, and are believed to be precursors to whole chromosome aneuploidy. It is therefore important to determine how tetraploid cancer cells arise, and how to target them. P53 is a tumor suppressor protein and key regulator of tetraploidy. As part of the "tetraploidy checkpoint", p53 inhibits tetraploid cell proliferation by promoting a G1-arrest in incipie...

  2. Epidermal stem cells - role in normal, wounded and pathological psoriatic and cancer skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M.; Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this review we focus on epidermal stem cells in the normal regeneration of the skin as well as in wounded and psoriatic skin. Furthermore, we discuss current data supporting the idea of cancer stem cells in the pathogenesis of skin carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Epidermal stem cells present...... or transit amplifying cells constitute a primary pathogenetic factor in the epidermal hyperproliferation seen in psoriasis. In cutaneous malignancies mounting evidence supports a stem cell origin in skin carcinoma and malignant melanoma and a possible existence of cancer stem cells Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  3. The Role of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cancer Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis, Metastasis and Treatment Failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, survival of HNSCC remains unchanged over the last 30 years with treatment failure and metastases being the strongest indicators of poor outcome. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in multiple other solid tumors, including breast, prostate and pancreatic carcinoma. Recently, a subpopulation of tumor cells has been identified in HNSCC based on the...

  4. Posttranscriptional Regulation of Splicing Factor SRSF1 and Its Role in Cancer Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, alternative splicing has been progressively recognized as a major mechanism regulating gene expression patterns in different tissues and disease states through the generation of multiple mRNAs from the same gene transcript. This process requires the joining of selected exons or usage of different pairs of splice sites and is regulated by gene-specific combinations of RNA-binding proteins. One archetypical splicing regulator is SRSF1, for which we review the molecular mechanisms and posttranscriptional modifications involved in its life cycle. These include alternative splicing of SRSF1 itself, regulatory protein phosphorylation events, and the role of nuclear versus cytoplasmic SRSF1 localization. In addition, we resume current knowledge on deregulated SRSF1 expression in tumors and describe SRSF1-regulated alternative transcripts with functional consequences for cancer cell biology at different stages of tumor development.

  5. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the stimulation of cellular invasion and signaling of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D J; Miralem, T; Jiang, S; Steinberg, R; Avraham, H

    2001-03-01

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by breast tumors has been previously correlated with a poor prognosis in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Furthermore, VEGF secretion is a prerequisite for tumor development. Although most of the effects of VEGF have been shown to be attributable to the stimulation of endothelial cells, we present evidence here that breast tumor cells are capable of responding to VEGF. We show that VEGF stimulation of T-47D breast cancer cells leads to changes in cellular signaling and invasion. VEGF increases the cellular invasion of T-47D breast cancer cells on Matrigel/ fibronectin-coated transwell membranes by a factor of two. Northern analysis for the expression of the known VEGF receptors shows the presence of moderate levels of Flt-1 and low levels of Flk-1/KDR mRNAs in a variety of breast cancer cell lines. T-47D breast cancer cells bind 125I-labeled VEGF with a Kd of 13 x 10(-9) M. VEGF induces the activation of the extracellular regulated kinases 1,2 as well as activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase, Akt, and Forkhead receptor L1. These findings in T-47D breast cancer cells strongly suggest an autocrine role for VEGF contributing to the tumorigenic phenotype.

  6. The expression of translocator protein in human thyroid cancer and its role in the response of thyroid cancer cells to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Jensen, Kirk; Bauer, Andrew; Patel, Aneeta; Costello, John; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Hardwick, Matthew J; Vasko, Vasyl V

    2012-08-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), formerly known as a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, exerts pro-apoptotic function via regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential. We examined TSPO expression in human thyroid tumors (25 follicular adenomas (FA), 15 follicular cancers (FC), and 70 papillary cancers (PC)). The role of TSPO in the regulation of cell growth, migration, and apoptosis was examined in thyroid cancer cell lines after TSPO knockdown with siRNA and after treatment with TSPO antagonist (PK11195). Compared with normal thyroid, the level of TSPO expression was increased in FA, FC, and PC in 24, 26.6, and 55.7% of cases respectively. Thyroid cancer cell lines demonstrated variable levels of TSPO expression, without specific association with thyroid oncogene mutations. Treatment with inhibitors of PI3K/AKT or MEK/ERK signaling was not associated with changes in TSPO expression. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproic acid) increased TSPO expression in TSPO-deficient cell lines (FTC236 cells). TSPO gene silencing or treatment with PK11195 did not affect thyroid cancer cell growth and migration but prevented depolarization of mitochondrial membranes induced by oxidative stress. Induction of TSPO expression by valproic acid was associated with increased sensitivity of FTC236 to oxidative stress-inducible apoptosis. Overall, we showed that TSPO expression is frequently increased in PC. In vitro data suggested the role of epigenetic mechanism(s) in the regulation of TSPO in thyroid cells. Implication of TSPO in the thyroid cancer cell response to oxidative stress suggested its potential role in the regulation of thyroid cancer cell response to treatment with radioiodine and warrants further investigation.

  7. The Role of HPV in Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Formation and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Swanson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory proposes that a minority of tumor cells are capable of self-replication and tumorigenesis. It is these minority of cells that are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC. Human papilloma virus (HPV-related cancer of the oropharynx is becoming more prevalent, which makes understanding of the relationship between HPV and CSCs more important than ever. This relationship is critical because CSC behavior can be predicted based on cell surface markers, which makes them a suitable candidate for targeted therapy. New therapies are an exciting opportunity to advance past the stalled outcomes in HNSCC that have plagued patients and clinicians for several decades.

  8. Secretion of extracellular hsp90α via exosomes increases cancer cell motility: a role for plasminogen activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Doug

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis is a multi-step process that is responsible for the majority of deaths in cancer patients. Current treatments are not effective in targeting metastasis. The molecular chaperone hsp90α is secreted from invasive cancer cells and activates MMP-2 to enhance invasiveness, required for the first step in metastasis. Methods We analyzed the morphology and motility of invasive cancer cells that were treated with exogenous exosomes in the presence or absence of hsp90α. We performed mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation to identify plasminogen as a potential client protein of extracellular hsp90α. Plasmin activation assays and migration assays were performed to test if plasminogen is activated by extracellular hsp90α and has a role in migration. Results We found that hsp90α is secreted in exosomes in invasive cancer cells and it contributes to their invasive nature. We identified a novel interaction between hsp90α and tissue plasminogen activator that together with annexin II, also found in exosomes, activates plasmin. Extracellular hsp90α promotes plasmin activation as well as increases plasmin dependent cell motility. Conclusions Our data indicate that hsp90α is released by invasive cancer cells via exosomes and implicates hsp90α in activating plasmin, a second protease that acts in cancer cell invasion.

  9. Potential role for PAD2 in gene regulation in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Cherrington

    Full Text Available The peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD family of enzymes post-translationally convert positively charged arginine residues in substrate proteins to the neutral, non-standard residue citrulline. PAD family members 1, 2, 3, and 6 have previously been localized to the cell cytoplasm and, thus, their potential to regulate gene activity has not been described. We recently demonstrated that PAD2 is expressed in the canine mammary gland epithelium and that levels of histone citrullination in this tissue correlate with PAD2 expression. Given these observations, we decided to test whether PAD2 might localize to the nuclear compartment of the human mammary epithelium and regulate gene activity in these cells. Here we show, for the first time, that PAD2 is specifically expressed in human mammary gland epithelial cells and that a portion of PAD2 associates with chromatin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We investigated a potential nuclear function for PAD2 by microarray, qPCR, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Results show that the expression of a unique subset of genes is disregulated following depletion of PAD2 from MCF-7 cells. Further, ChIP analysis of two of the most highly up- and down-regulated genes (PTN and MAGEA12, respectively found that PAD2 binds directly to these gene promoters and that the likely mechanism by which PAD2 regulates expression of these genes is via citrullination of arginine residues 2-8-17 on histone H3 tails. Thus, our findings define a novel role for PAD2 in gene expression in human mammary epithelial cells.

  10. A role for IGF-1R-targeted therapies in small-cell lung cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gately, Kathy

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is an autocrine growth factor and an attractive therapeutic target in many solid tumors, but particularly in lung cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study examined tumor samples from 23 patients diagnosed with SCLC, 11 resected specimens and 12 nodal biopsies obtained by mediastinoscopy, for expression of IGF-1R using the monoclonal rabbit anti-IGF-1R (clone G11, Ventana Medical Systems, Tucson, AZ) and standard immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS: All 23 tumor samples expressed IGF-1R with a range of stain intensity from weak (1+) to strong (3+). Ten tumors had a score of 3+, 7 tumors 2+, and 6 tumors 1+. Patient survival data were available for all 23 patients. Two patients died < 30 days post biopsy, therefore, the intensity of anti-IGF-1R immunostaining for 21 patients was correlated to survival. Patients with 3+ immunostaining had a poorer prognosis (P = .003). The overall survival of patients who underwent surgical resection was significantly better (median survival not reached) than patients who were not resected (median survival, 7.4 months) (P = .006). CONCLUSION: IGF-1R targeted therapies may have a role in the treatment of SCLC in combination with chemotherapy or as maintenance therapy. Further studies on the clinical benefit of targeting IGF-1R in SCLC are needed.

  11. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  12. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Role of the Soluble Form of Neurotensin Receptor-3/Sortilin in Colorectal Cancer Cell Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béraud-Dufour, Sophie; Devader, Christelle; Massa, Fabienne; Roulot, Morgane; Coppola, Thierry; Mazella, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to unravel the mechanisms of action of the soluble form of the neurotensin (NT) receptor-3 (NTSR3), also called Sortilin, in numerous physiopathological processes including cancer development, cardiovascular diseases and depression. Sortilin/NTSR3 is a transmembrane protein thought to exert multiple functions both intracellularly and at the level of the plasma membrane. The Sortilin/NTSR3 extracellular domain is released by shedding from all the cells expressing the protein. Although the existence of the soluble form of Sortilin/NTSR3 (sSortilin/NTSR3) has been evidenced for more than 10 years, the studies focusing on the role of this soluble protein at the mechanistic level remain rare. Numerous cancer cells, including colonic cancer cells, express the receptor family of neurotensin (NT), and particularly Sortilin/NTSR3. This review aims to summarize the functional role of sSortilin/NTSR3 characterized in the colonic cancer cell line HT29. This includes mechanisms involving signaling cascades through focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key pathway leading to the weakening of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix adhesions, a series of events which could be responsible for cancer metastasis. Finally, some future approaches targeting the release of sNTSR3 through the inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are suggested. PMID:27834811

  14. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Role of the Soluble Form of Neurotensin Receptor-3/Sortilin in Colorectal Cancer Cell Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Béraud-Dufour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to unravel the mechanisms of action of the soluble form of the neurotensin (NT receptor-3 (NTSR3, also called Sortilin, in numerous physiopathological processes including cancer development, cardiovascular diseases and depression. Sortilin/NTSR3 is a transmembrane protein thought to exert multiple functions both intracellularly and at the level of the plasma membrane. The Sortilin/NTSR3 extracellular domain is released by shedding from all the cells expressing the protein. Although the existence of the soluble form of Sortilin/NTSR3 (sSortilin/NTSR3 has been evidenced for more than 10 years, the studies focusing on the role of this soluble protein at the mechanistic level remain rare. Numerous cancer cells, including colonic cancer cells, express the receptor family of neurotensin (NT, and particularly Sortilin/NTSR3. This review aims to summarize the functional role of sSortilin/NTSR3 characterized in the colonic cancer cell line HT29. This includes mechanisms involving signaling cascades through focal adhesion kinase (FAK, a key pathway leading to the weakening of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix adhesions, a series of events which could be responsible for cancer metastasis. Finally, some future approaches targeting the release of sNTSR3 through the inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs are suggested.

  15. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banys, Malgorzata, E-mail: maggybanys@yahoo.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg D-22087 (Germany); Krawczyk, Natalia; Fehm, Tanja [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  16. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  17. Role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the enrichment of colorectal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-ping CHENG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore whether the enrichment of cancer stem cells (CSCs in colorectal cancer by suspension culture method is involved with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods  3D microspheres were cultured by suspension culture method to human colorectal cancer SW620 cells. The 3D microspheres and SW620 cells were used as the research objects. To clarify whether 3D microspheres were enriched with CSCs, we made tumorigenicity experiments in NOD/SCID mice, soft agar cloning experiments, and detected the expression levels of cancer stem cells markers CD44 and Ep-CAM by flow cytometry or by Western blotting. The protein expression levels of EMT markers such as E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin were detected by Western blotting. Results  Compared with the parental SW620 cells, colony formation in vitro (P<0.01 and tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice were significantly enhanced, the percentage of CD44-positive cells and Ep-CAM protein expression levels was significantly increased (P<0.01 in 3D microspheres. The protein expression level of epithelial marker E-cadherin was obviously increased (P<0.01, while the protein expression levels of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin were significantly decreased (P<0.01. Conclusions  Colorectal cancer stem cells can be enriched by suspension culture method, and the process may be related to EMT. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.09.03

  18. An essential role for DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B in cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Normand; Morin, Steves; Chute, Ian C; Robert, Marie-France; Nguyen, Hannah; MacLeod, A Robert

    2002-08-02

    Abnormal methylation and associated silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common feature of many types of cancers. The observation of persistent methylation in human cancer cells lacking the maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 suggests the involvement of other DNA methyltransferases in gene silencing in cancer. To test this hypothesis, we have evaluated methylation and gene expression in cancer cells specifically depleted of DNMT3A or DNMT3B, de novo methyltransferases that are expressed in adult tissues. Here we have shown that depletion of DNMT3B, but not DNMT3A, induced apoptosis of human cancer cells but not normal cells. DNMT3B depletion reactivated methylation-silenced gene expression but did not induce global or juxtacentromeric satellite demethylation as did specific depletion of DNMT1. Furthermore, the effect of DNMT3B depletion was rescued by exogenous expression of either of the splice variants DNMT3B2 or DNMT3B3 but not DNMT1. These results indicate that DNMT3B has significant site selectivity that is distinct from DNMT1, regulates aberrant gene silencing, and is essential for cancer cell survival.

  19. Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Liu, Longhua; Zheng, Louise D.; Payne, Kyle K.; Idowu, Michael O.; Zhang, Jinfeng; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Overactive mitochondrial fission was shown to promote cell transformation and tumor growth. It remains elusive how mitochondrial quality is regulated in such conditions. Here, we show that upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein-1 (Drp1), was accompanied with increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers (PGC1α, NRF1, and Tfam) in breast cancer cells. However, mitochondrial number was reduced, which was associated with lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity in breast cancer cells. This contrast might be owing to enhanced mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, because an increased population of autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria was observed in the cancer cells. Consistently, BNIP3 (a mitochondrial autophagy marker) and autophagic flux were significantly upregulated, indicative of augmented mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). The upregulation of Drp1 and BNIP3 was also observed in vivo (human breast carcinomas). Importantly, inhibition of Drp1 significantly suppressed mitochondrial autophagy, metabolic reprogramming, and cancer cell viability. Together, this study reveals coordinated increase of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in which Drp1 plays a central role regulating breast cancer cell metabolism and survival. Given the emerging evidence of PGC1α contributing to tumor growth, it will be of critical importance to target both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy for effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:27746856

  20. Coordinated Upregulation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells: The Role of Dynamin Related Protein-1 and Implication for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive mitochondrial fission was shown to promote cell transformation and tumor growth. It remains elusive how mitochondrial quality is regulated in such conditions. Here, we show that upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein-1 (Drp1, was accompanied with increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers (PGC1α, NRF1, and Tfam in breast cancer cells. However, mitochondrial number was reduced, which was associated with lower mitochondrial oxidative capacity in breast cancer cells. This contrast might be owing to enhanced mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, because an increased population of autophagic vacuoles engulfing mitochondria was observed in the cancer cells. Consistently, BNIP3 (a mitochondrial autophagy marker and autophagic flux were significantly upregulated, indicative of augmented mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy. The upregulation of Drp1 and BNIP3 was also observed in vivo (human breast carcinomas. Importantly, inhibition of Drp1 significantly suppressed mitochondrial autophagy, metabolic reprogramming, and cancer cell viability. Together, this study reveals coordinated increase of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy in which Drp1 plays a central role regulating breast cancer cell metabolism and survival. Given the emerging evidence of PGC1α contributing to tumor growth, it will be of critical importance to target both mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy for effective cancer therapeutics.

  1. [Role of cancer registries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, P

    1995-05-01

    The first Cancer Registries were created in 1975 in France. Their ulterior development and their scientific production have been furthered by the apparition from 1986 under the aegis of the Health Ministry and of the INSERM, of a National Population Registry Committee. Cancer Registries have seriously contributed to a better knowledge of the cancer problem in our country and to describe the french specificities, in particular the importance of the mouth and pharynx cancers. They insure both a monitoring and an alert role; they also contribute to the medical supervision of the Chernobyl accident effects. French registries play a very active role concerning clinical research. They participate to many European studies of health care evaluation. In other respects, many etiological studies have been realized about professional risks of cancer, risks linked with nutritional habits, and on the etiologic role of the Tamoxifen. Finally, certain registries have created DNA banks. If nowadays their role in health planning remains modest, they very actively contribute in evaluating screening actions of breast, cervix and large bowel cancers. They also attracted the attention of Health Authorities on the cervix cancer screening's incoherencies. They evaluate the pilot project of the breast cancer and the registry of the Côte d'Or country evaluates the efficacity of a randomized colo rectal mass screening study. The main difficulties met by the registries are linked with the development of laws protecting more and more the individual freedoms, making it harder and harder the registration exhaustive character.

  2. The role of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cancer stem cells in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and treatment failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, survival of HNSCC remains unchanged over the last 30 years with treatment failure and metastases being the strongest indicators of poor outcome. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in multiple other solid tumors, including breast, prostate, and pancreatic carcinoma. Recently, a subpopulation of tumor cells has been identified in HNSCC based ...

  3. Role of Autophagy and Apoptosis in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangbo; Pei, Fen; Yang, Fengqing; Li, Lingxiao; Amin, Amit Dipak; Liu, Songnian; Buchan, J. Ross; Cho, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes 85% of all lung cancers, and is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation and chemotherapy warrant further investigation into the molecular mechanisms of NSCLC and the development of new, more efficacious therapeutics. The processes of autophagy and apoptosis, which induce degradation of proteins and organelles or cell death upon cellular stress, are crucial in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The close interplay between autophagy and apoptosis through shared signaling pathways complicates our understanding of how NSCLC pathophysiology is regulated. The apoptotic effect of autophagy is controversial as both inhibitory and stimulatory effects have been reported in NSCLC. In addition, crosstalk of proteins regulating both autophagy and apoptosis exists. Here, we review the recent advances of the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in NSCLC, aiming to provide few insights into the discovery of novel pathogenic factors and the development of new cancer therapeutics. PMID:28208579

  4. The role of monocarboxylate transporters in 3-bromopyruvate effect in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, João Pedro Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Biologia Molecular e Ambiental (área de especialização em Biologia Molecular e Saúde). Cancer is one of the world leading causes of death, being characterized by a set of hallmarks which confer an uncontrolled cellular growth. One of these alterations represents a metabolic reprogramming in which cells rely on glycolysis for energy production over oxidative phosphorylation, even in the presence of oxygen. In several cancers, this activity leads to the production of ...

  5. Role of the Phospholipase A2 Receptor in Liposome Drug Delivery in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) is a member of the C-type lectin superfamily and can internalize secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) via endocytosis in non-cancer cells. sPLA2 itself was recently shown to be overexpressed in prostate tumors and to be a possible mediator of metastasis; however, little is known about the expression of PLA2R1 or its function in prostate cancers. Thus, we examined PLA2R1 expression in primary prostate cells (PCS-440-010) and human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3), and we determined the effect of PLA2R1 knockdown on cytotoxicity induced by free or liposome-encapsulated chemotherapeutics. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the expression of PLA2R1 was higher in prostate cancer cells compared to that in primary prostate cells. Knockdown of PLA2R1 expression in PC-3 cells using shRNA increased cell proliferation and did not affect the toxicity of cisplatin, doxorubicin (Dox), and docetaxel. In contrast, PLA2R1 knockdown increased the in vitro toxicity of Dox encapsulated in sPLA2 responsive liposomes (SPRL) and correlated with increased Dox and SPRL uptake. Knockdown of PLA2R1 also increased the expression of Group IIA and X sPLA2. These data show the novel findings that PLA2R1 is expressed in prostate cancer cells, that PLA2R1 expression alters cell proliferation, and that PLA2R1 modulates the behavior of liposome-based nanoparticles. Furthermore, these studies suggest that PLA2R1 may represent a novel molecular target for controlling tumor growth or modulating delivery of lipid-based nanomedicines. PMID:25189995

  6. Role of serum angiopoietin-2 level in screening for esophageal squamous cell cancer and its precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying-zhi; FANG Xue-qiang; LI Hao; DIAO Yu-tao; YANG Yan-fang; ZHAO De-li; WU Kan; LI Hui-qing

    2007-01-01

    Background Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is one of the critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis. Studies have shown a significant correlation of Ang-2 expression to tumor invasion and metastasis in various human cancers, but little is known about the serum Ang-2 (sAng-2) levels in esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) and its precursors. In this study, we aimed to investigate its role in screening for ESCC and its precursors.Methods We carried out a free endoscopic screening in Feicheng City, a high ESCC incidence area in Shandong Province of China. Serum samples were collected as follows: 91 from normal subjects, 44 from patients with esophagitis,85 from patients with hyperplasia, and 13 from patients with early ESCC. In addition, 28 serum samples were obtained from patients with invasive ESCC undergoing surgery in People's Hospital of Feicheng City. All the subjects of the five groups were diagnosed by histopathology. The sAng-2 levels were tested and compared, and the diagnostic power in early or/and invasive ESCC was calculated in terms of sensitivity and other parameters.Results The sAng-2 levels were (22.0±5.5), (21.3±3.2), (20.5±3.3), (24.0±5.0), and (29.8±5.0) U/ml in normal,esophagitis, hyperplasia, early ESCC, and invasive ESCC groups respectively. It was significantly higher in early ESCC than inhyperplasia group (P=0.009). The invasive ESCC group showed the highest Ang-2 level among all groups (all P=0.000). The sensitivities of sAng-2 to early and invasive ESCC were 23.1% and 78.6% respectively.Conclusion sAng-2 level is related to carcinogenesis and progression of ESCC, but it can not be used to screen for early ESCC.

  7. The Mechanism of Adaptation of Breast Cancer Cells to Hypoxia: Role of AMPK/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, D V; Scherbakov, A M; Yakushina, I A; Semina, S E; Gudkova, M V; Krasil'nikov, M A

    2016-02-01

    We studied the mechanisms of adaptation of human breast cancer cells MCF-7 to hypoxia and analyzed the role of AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in the maintenance of cell proliferation under hypoxic conditions. It was found that long-term culturing (30 days or more) of MCF-7 cells under hypoxic conditions induced their partial adaptation to hypoxia. Cell adaptation to hypoxia was associated with attenuation of hypoxia-dependent AMPK induction with simultaneous constitutive activation of mTOR and Akt. These findings suggest that these proteins can be promising targets for targeted therapy of tumors developing under hypoxic conditions.

  8. Understanding the role of keratins 8 and 18 in neoplastic potential of breast cancer derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna V Iyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a complex disease which cannot be defined merely by clinical parameters like lymph node involvement and histological grade, or by routinely used biomarkers like estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PGR and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 in diagnosis and prognosis. Breast cancer originates from the epithelial cells. Keratins (K are cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins of epithelial cells and changes in the expression pattern of keratins have been seen during malignant transformation in the breast. Expression of the K8/18 pair is seen in the luminal cells of the breast epithelium, and its role in prognostication of breast cancer is not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have modulated K8 expression to understand the role of the K8/18 pair in three different breast epithelium derived cell lines: non-transformed MCF10A, transformed but poorly invasive MDA MB 468 and highly invasive MDA MB 435. The up-regulation of K8 in the invasive MDA MB 435 cell line resulted in a significant decrease in proliferation, motility, in-vitro invasion, tumor volume and lung metastasis. The down-regulation of K8 in MDA MB 468 resulted in a significant increase in transformation potential, motility and invasion in-vitro, while MCF10A did not show any changes in cell transformation assays. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate the role of K8/18 in modulating invasion in breast cancer -its presence correlating with less invasive phenotype and absence correlating with highly invasive, dedifferentiated phenotype. These data may have important implications for prognostication of breast cancer.

  9. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Benjamin; Kang, Yibin

    2011-02-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy. In recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer. In particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ER/PR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/PR(+) tumors.

  10. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Tiede; Yibin Kang

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy, in recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer, in particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ERJPR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/ PR(+) tumors.

  11. The Secret Role of microRNAs in Cancer Stem Cell Development and Potential Therapy: A Notch-Pathway Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopi, Marianna; Kousparou, Christina A; Epenetos, Agamemnon A

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the development of some if not all cancer types and have been identified as attractive targets for prognosis, diagnosis, and therapy of the disease. miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs (20-22 nt in length) that bind imperfectly to the 3'-untranslated region of target mRNA regulating gene expression. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs in cancer, sometimes known as oncomiRNAs, have been shown to play a major role in oncogenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. Amplification of oncomiRNAs during cancer development correlates with the silencing of tumor suppressor genes; on the other hand, down-regulation of miRNAs has also been observed in cancer and cancer stem cells (CSCs). In both cases, miRNA regulation is inversely correlated with cancer progression. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are also involved in the metastatic process by either suppressing or promoting metastasis-related genes leading to the reduction or activation of cancer cell migration and invasion processes. In particular, circulating miRNAs (vesicle-encapsulated or non-encapsulated) have significant effects on tumorigenesis: membrane-particles, apoptotic bodies, and exosomes have been described as providers of a cell-to-cell communication system transporting oncogenic miRNAs from tumors to neighboring cells and distant metastatic sites. It is hypothesized that miRNAs control cancer development in a traditional manner, by regulating signaling pathways and factors. In addition, recent developments indicate a non-conventional mechanism of cancer regulation by stem cell reprograming via a regulatory network consisting of miRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are involved in controlling stem cell functions of CSCs. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNAs in the Notch-pathway and how they regulate CSC self-renewal, differentiation and tumorigenesis by direct/indirect targeting of the Notch-pathway.

  12. The secret role of microRNAs in cancer stem cell development and potential therapy: A Notch-pathway approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna eProkopi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in the development of some if not all cancer types and have been identified as attractive targets for prognosis, diagnosis and therapy of the disease. MiRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs (20-22 nucleotides in length that bind imperfectly to the 3’-untranslated region of target mRNA regulating gene expression. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs in cancer, sometimes known as oncomiRNAs, have been shown to play a major role in oncogenesis, metastasis and drug resistance. Amplification of oncomiRNAs during cancer development correlates with the silencing of tumor suppressor genes; on the other hand, down-regulation of miRNAs has also been observed in cancer and cancer stem cells (CSCs. In both cases, miRNA regulation is inversely correlated with cancer progression. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are also involved in the metastatic process by either suppressing or promoting metastasis-related genes leading to the reduction or activation of cancer cell migration and invasion processes. In particular, circulating miRNAs (vesicle-encapsulated or non-encapsulated have significant effects on tumorigenesis: membrane-particles, apoptotic bodies and exosomes have been described as providers of a cell-to-cell communication system transporting oncogenic miRNAs from tumors to neighboring cells and distant metastatic sites. It is hypothesized that MiRNAs control cancer development in a traditional manner, by regulating signaling pathways and factors. In addition, recent developments indicate a non-conventional mechanism of cancer regulation by stem cell reprogramming via a regulatory network consisting of miRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are involved in controlling stem cell functions of CSCs. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNAs in the Notch pathway and how they regulate CSC self-renewal, differentiation and tumorigenesis by direct/indirect targeting of

  13. miRNA-regulated cancer stem cells: understanding the property and the role of miRNA in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chin, Kok-Yong; Das, Srijit

    2016-10-01

    Over the last few years, microRNAs (miRNA)-controlled cancer stem cells have drawn enormous attention. Cancer stem cells are a small population of tumor cells that possess the stem cell property of self-renewal. Recent data shows that miRNA regulates this small population of stem cells. In the present review, we explained different characteristics of cancer stem cells as well as miRNA regulation of self-renewal and differentiation in cancer stem cells. We also described the migration and tumor formation. Finally, we described the different miRNAs that regulate various types of cancer stem cells, such as prostate cancer stem cells, head and neck cancer stem cells, breast cancer stem cells, colorectal cancer stem cells, lung cancer stem cells, gastric cancer stem cells, pancreatic cancer stem cells, etc. Extensive research is needed in order to employ miRNA-based therapeutics to control cancer stem cell population in various cancers in the future.

  14. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models.

  15. The role of the Wnt signaling pathway in cancer stem cells: prospects for drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Mi Kim,1 Michael Kahn2,3 1Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Pathology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, 3Norris Comprehensive Cancer Research Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also known as tumor initiating cells are now considered to be the root cause of most if not all cancers, evading treatment and giving rise to disease relapse. They have become a central focus in new drug development. Prospective identification, understanding the key pathways that maintain CSCs, and being able to target CSCs, particularly if the normal stem cell population could be spared, could offer an incredible therapeutic advantage. The Wnt signaling cascade is critically important in stem cell biology, both in homeostatic maintenance of tissues and organs through their respective somatic stem cells and in the CSC/tumor initiating cell population. Aberrant Wnt signaling is associated with a wide array of tumor types. Therefore, the ability to safely target the Wnt signaling pathway offers enormous promise to target CSCs. However, just like the sword of Damocles, significant risks and concerns regarding targeting such a critical pathway in normal stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis remain ever present. With this in mind, we review recent efforts in modulating the Wnt signaling cascade and critically analyze therapeutic approaches at various stages of development. Keywords: beta-catenin, CBP, p300, wnt inhibition

  16. The role of exosomes contents on genetic and epigenetic alterations of recipient cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnoush Dehbashi Behbahani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes, as a mediator of cell-to-cell transfer of genetic information, act an important role in intercommunication between tumor cells and their niche including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, adipocytes and monocytes. Several studies have shown that tumor cells can influence their neighboring cells by releasing exosomes. These exosomes provide signaling cues for stimulation, activation, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Exosomes contain mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNA, and proteins that could be transferred to target cells inducing genetic and epigenetic changes. By facilitating the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules such as proteins, RNAs and microRNAs, they are now thought to have vital roles in tumor invasion and metastases, inflammation, coagulation, and stem cell renewal and expansion. The aim of this review article is to discuss the significance of exosome-mediated intercellular communication within the tumor biology.

  17. The role of exosomes contents on genetic and epigenetic alterations of recipient cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Golnoush Dehbashi; Khani, Soghra; Hosseini, Hamideh Mahmoodzadeh; Abbaszadeh-Goudarzi, Kazem; Nazeri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, as a mediator of cell-to-cell transfer of genetic information, act an important role in intercommunication between tumor cells and their niche including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, adipocytes and monocytes. Several studies have shown that tumor cells can influence their neighboring cells by releasing exosomes. These exosomes provide signaling cues for stimulation, activation, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Exosomes contain mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNA), and proteins that could be transferred to target cells inducing genetic and epigenetic changes. By facilitating the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules such as proteins, RNAs and microRNAs, they are now thought to have vital roles in tumor invasion and metastases, inflammation, coagulation, and stem cell renewal and expansion. The aim of this review article is to discuss the significance of exosome-mediated intercellular communication within the tumor biology. PMID:27872698

  18. Development of a highly metastatic model that reveals a crucial role of fibronectin in lung cancer cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xianghuo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The formation of metastasis is the most common cause of death in patients with lung cancer. A major implement to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer metastasis has been the lack of suitable models to address it. In this study, we aimed at establishing a highly metastatic model of human lung cancer and characterizing its metastatic properties and underlying mechanisms. Methods The human lung adeno-carcinoma SPC-A-1 cell line was used as parental cells for developing of highly metastatic cells by in vivo selection in NOD/SCID mice. After three rounds of selection, a new SPC-A-1sci cell line was established from pulmonary metastatic lesions. Subsequently, the metastatic properties of this cell line were analyzed, including optical imaging of in vivo metastasis, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analysis of several epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT makers and trans-well migration and invasion assays. Finally, the functional roles of fibronectin in the invasive and metastatic potentials of SPC-A-1sci cells were determined by shRNA analysis. Results A spontaneously pulmonary metastatic model of human lung adeno-carcinoma was established in NOD/SCID mice, from which a new lung cancer cell line, designated SPC-A-1sci, was isolated. Initially, the highly metastatic behavior of this cell line was validated by optical imaging in mice models. Further analyses showed that this cell line exhibit phenotypic and molecular alterations consistent with EMT. Compared with its parent cell line SPC-A-1, SPC-A-1sci was more aggressive in vitro, including increased potentials for cell spreading, migration and invasion. Importantly, fibronectin, a mesenchymal maker of EMT, was found to be highly expressed in SPC-A-1sci cells and down-regulation of it can decrease the in vitro and in vivo metastatic abilities of this cell line. Conclusions We have successfully established a new human lung cancer cell line with

  19. CXCR4/CXCL12 Axis in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC Pathologic Roles and Therapeutic Potential

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    Ori Wald, Oz M. Shapira, Uzi Izhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Moreover, despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the death rate from lung cancer remains high and the reported overall five-year survival rate is only 15%. Thus, novel treatments for this devastating disease are urgently needed. Chemokines, a family of 48 chemotactic cytokines interacts with their 7 transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, to guide immune cell trafficking in the body under both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Tumor cells, which express a relatively restricted repertoire of chemokine and chemokine receptors, utilize and manipulate the chemokine system in a manner that benefits both local tumor growth and distant dissemination. Among the 19 chemokine receptors, CXCR4 is the receptor most widely expressed by malignant tumors and whose role in tumor biology is most thoroughly studied. The chemokine CXCL12, which is the sole ligand of CXCR4, is highly expressed in primary lung cancer as well as in the bone marrow, liver, adrenal glands and brain, which are all sites for lung cancer metastasis. This review focuses on the pathologic role of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in NSCLC and on the potential therapeutic implication of targeting this axis for the treatment of NSCLC.

  20. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir, E-mail: wsol@faf.cuni.cz

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  1. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of Berberine on molecular markers involved in migration of esophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishan, M A; Ahmadiankia, N; Matin, M M; Heirani-Tabasi, A; Shahriyari, M; Bidkhori, H R; Naderi-Meshkin, H; Bahrami, A R

    2015-12-14

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in several plant species like famous chinese herb, Rhizoma coptidis which has been used locally as a strong gastrointestinal remedy for thousands of years. The inhibitory effects of berberine on tumor progression properties have been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of berberine on an esophageal cancer cell line, KYSE-30 with emphasis on its effects on the expression of certain chemokine receptors. The cytotoxic effect of berberine on KYSE-30 cells was analyzed by MTT assay. In vitro cell migration assay was also applied to the treated cells and the expression levels of the selected chemokine receptors (CXCR4 and CCR7) was measured at mRNA level. A retarded growth, associated with increasing concentrations of berberine, was obvious. On the other hand, the migration rate of the cells was decreased when they were treated with different concentrations of berberine and the expression levels of the two chemokine receptors, involved in the migration and metastasis of esophageal cancer cells, were decreased following the same treatments. With these results, we tend to conclude that berberine might be a proper candidate for further investigations, by targeting the chemokine receptors, and possible applications as anti-metastatic agent in cancer studies.

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  4. Critical Role of AMPK/FoxO3A Axis in Globular Adiponectin-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anup; Nepal, Saroj; Kim, Mi Jin; Chang, Jae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Park, Gyu Hwan; Jung, Sunghee; Lim, Jaecheong; Cho, Eunha; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Adiponectin predominantly secreted from adipose tissue has exhibited potent anti-proliferative properties in cancer cells via modulating cell cycle and apoptosis. FoxO3A, a Forkhead box O member of the transcription factor, plays a critical role in modulating expression of genes involved in cell death and/or survival. In this study, we investigated the role of FoxO3A signaling in anti-cancer activities of adiponectin. Herein, we have shown that treatment with globular adiponectin (gAcrp) increases p27 but decreases cyclinD1 expression in human hepatoma (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. Gene ablation of FoxO3A prevented gAcrp-induced increase in p27 and decreased in cyclin D1 expression, and further ameliorated cell cycle arrest by gAcrp, indicating a critical role of FoxO3A in gAcrp-induced cell cycle arrest of cancer cells. Moreover, treatment with gAcrp also induced caspase-3/7 activation and increased Fas ligand (FasL) expression in both HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. Transfection with FoxO3A siRNA inhibited gAcrp-induced caspase-3/7 activation and FasL expression, suggesting that FoxO3A signaling also plays an important role in gAcrp-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. We also found that gene silencing of AMPK prevented gAcrp-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO3A in HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, suppression of AMPK also blocked gAcrp-induced cell cycle arrest and further attenuated gAcrp-induced caspase-3/7 activation, indicating that AMPK signaling plays a pivotal role in both gAcrp-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via acting as an upstream signaling of FoxO3A. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that AMPK/FoxO3A axis plays a cardinal role in anti-proliferative effect of adiponectin in cancer cells.

  5. Role of AXL expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaohan; Liu, Jinlu; Zhong, Xinwen; Li, Xi; Zhang, Qigang

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression profile of AXL in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical significance. The current study included 257 NSCLC patients, tyrosine-protein kinase receptor UFO (AXL) expression in paired lung cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues of NSCLC patients were compared by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). These methods were used to detect the expression of the AXL gene and protein in fresh tissues from 35 patients. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into the H1299 lung cancer cell line to knock down AXL expression; the effects of AXL-siRNA on cell proliferation and migration were examined by MTT and Transwell migration assay, respectively. It was found that AXL staining density in lung cancer tissues was significantly increased compared with adjacent normal lung tissues (55.25 vs. 26.85%; P<0.01); and the expression level of AXL in NSCLC patients was significantly associated with the degree of tumor differentiation (P<0.01) and the clinical stage of disease (P<0.01). Western blotting and qPCR showed that AXL expression was significantly higher in cancer tissues compared with that in adjacent lung tissue (P<0.05). Additionally, the current study also showed that AXL-siRNA inhibited H1299 cell proliferation and migration in vitro. The present study demonstrates the association between increased expression of AXL in NSCLC and the low differentiation phenotype, and its effects on cell proliferation and migration, suggesting its potential clinical values for the prognosis of NSCLC.

  6. Mechanism of neem limonoids-induced cell death in cancer: Role of oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Neelu; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Rahul; Srivastava, Pragya; Sun, Leimin; Rapali, Peter; Marlowe, Timothy; Schneider, Andrea; Inigo, Joseph R; O'Malley, Jordan; Londonkar, Ramesh; Gogada, Raghu; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadava, Nagendra; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that neem limonoids (neem) induce multiple cancer cell death pathways. Here we dissect the underlying mechanisms of neem-induced apoptotic cell death in cancer. We observed that neem-induced caspase activation does not require Bax/Bak channel-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Neem enhanced mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial biomass. While oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) Complex-I activity was decreased, the activities of other OXPHOS complexes including Complex-II and -IV were unaltered. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were associated with an increase in mitochondrial biomass and apoptosis upon neem exposure. Complex-I deficiency due to the loss of Ndufa1-encoded MWFE protein inhibited neem-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, but cell death induction was enhanced. Complex II-deficiency due to the loss of succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit C (SDHC) robustly decreased caspase activation, apoptosis, and cell death. Additionally, the ablation of Complexes-I, -III, -IV, and -V together did not inhibit caspase activation. Together, we demonstrate that neem limonoids target OXPHOS system to induce cancer cell death, which does not require upregulation or activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  7. The role of pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santabarbara, Giuseppe; Maione, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Gridelli, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death cancer related worldwide. The standard therapies have unmet medical needs both due to the limited activity and relevant toxicity of platinum-based chemotherapy and to the low frequency of specific alterations required to use targeted therapies. Immune checkpoint inhibition due to restoring the immune system's capacity to eradicate tumors is undergoing in extensive investigation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a new treatment approach. Programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have recently led to significantly and durable improvements in the clinical outcome of several kind of tumors including lung cancer. Pembrolizumab, approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of advanced NSCLC progressed after other therapies and with expression of PD-L1, has demonstrated durable response and prolonged overall survival (OS) especially in patients with high PD-L1 expression. Further investigation are needed to improve treatment outcomes through combination of immunotherapy or combined with other targeted therapies.

  8. The role of immune system exhaustion on cancer cell escape and anti-tumor immune induction after irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Fernando; Domingues, Cátia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Estrela, Jéssica; Encarnação, João; Pires, Ana Salomé; Laranjo, Mafalda; Alves, Vera; Teixo, Ricardo; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Immune surveillance seems to represent an effective tumor suppressor mechanism. However, some cancer cells survive and become variants, being poorly immunogenic and able to enter a steady-state phase. These cells become functionally dormant or remain hidden clinically throughout. Neoplastic cells seem to be able to instruct immune cells to undergo changes promoting malignancy. Radiotherapy may act as a trigger of the immune response. After radiotherapy a sequence of reactions occurs, starting in the damage of oncogenic cells by multiple mechanisms, leading to the immune system positive feedback against the tumor. The link between radiotherapy and the immune system is evident. T cells, macrophages, Natural Killer cells and other immune cells seem to have a key role in controlling the tumor. T cells may be dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell exhaustion, nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, being able to be mobilized to become highly functional. The lack of clinical trials on a large scale makes data a little robust, in spite of promising information, there are still many variables in the studies relating to radiation and immune system. The clarification of the mechanisms underlying immune response to radiation exposure may contribute to treatment improvement, gain of life quality and span of patients.

  9. Licensed and unlicensed NK cells: Differential roles in cancer and viral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Tu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are known for their well characterized ability to control viral infections and eliminate tumor cells. Through their repertoire of activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cells are able to survey different potential target cells for various surface markers, such as MHC-I—which signals to the NK cell that the target is healthy—as well as stress ligands or viral proteins, which alert the NK cell to the aberrant state of the target and initiate a response. According to the licensing hypothesis, interactions between self-specific MHC-I receptors—Ly49 in mice and KIR in humans—and self-MHC-I molecules during NK cell development is crucial for NK cell functionality. However, there also exists a large proportion of NK cells in mice and humans which lack self-specific MHC-I receptors and are consequentially ‘unlicensed’. While the licensed NK cell subset plays a major role in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, this review will go on to highlight the important role of the unlicensed NK cell subset in the control of MHC-I-expressing tumors, as well as in viral control. Unlike the licensed NK cells, unlicensed NK cells seem to benefit from the lack of self-specific inhibitory receptors, which could otherwise be exploited by some aberrant cells for immunoevasion by upregulating the expression of ligands or mimic ligands for these receptors.

  10. RIN1-Ras-ERK pathway plays an important role in carcinogenesis in colon cancer cell line LoVo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Goi, Takanori; Hirono, Yasuo; Katayama, Kanji; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2011-01-01

    The RIN1 protein has SH2, three domains, and H-Ras binding domains; thus, it is presumed to be an important molecule in an intracellular signaling pathway. We examined the effect of the introduction of a membrane protein-encoding, mutated (S351A)RIN1 gene into a colon cancer. In the LoVo colon cancer cell line, endogenous RIN1 protein was strongly expressed in the cytoplasmic fraction, and the RIN1 protein in the cytoplasmic fraction was strongly bound to the 14-3-3 protein. In the mutated (S351A)RIN1-transfected LoVo cells, the mutated (S351A)RIN1 protein was identified in the cell membrane, and was bound to HRas protein. Also, in vitro the proliferative capacity of the mutated (S351A)RIN1-transfected LoVo cells was significantly inhibited, compared with that of their empty vector-transfected counterparts. In the mutated (S351A)RIN1-transfected LoVo cells, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins downstream of the H-Ras molecule was inhibited, compared with the counterparts. This study is the first to show that the localization of RIN1 protein plays an important role in the carcinogenesis in colon cancer cells LoVo (i.e., signal transduction in the Ras-ERK pathway).

  11. Potential roles of self-reactive T cells in autoimmunity: lessons from cancer immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-12-01

    The immune system is a complex arrangement of cells and molecules that preserve the integrity of the organism by eliminating all elements judged to be dangerous. Several regulatory mechanisms function to terminate immune responses to antigens, return the immune system to a basal state after the antigen has been cleared, and maintain unresponsiveness, or tolerance, to self-antigens. In recent years, reports have described T cell responses to several proteins involved in regulating the immune system, particularly under malignant conditions. The present review highlights specific T cells that recognize proteins involved in three, well-defined immunosuppressive mechanisms: (1) inhibitory T cell pathways (i.e., PD-L1), (2) regulatory T cells (i.e., Foxp3(+)), and (3) metabolic enzymes, like indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase. Cytotoxic T cells can eliminate regulatory cells, thereby suppressing and/or delaying local immune suppression; conversely, regulatory CD4(+) and non-cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells enhance target-mediated immune suppression. The apparent lack of tolerance against endogenous proteins expressed by regulatory cells is intriguing, because it suggests that self-reactive T cells play a general role of fine-tuning the immune system. Thus, T cell responses may be generally used to maintain the homeostasis of the immune system. Further exploration is warranted to investigate the potential role of auto-reactive T cells under different physiological and/or pathological conditions.

  12. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays common and different roles in cancerous colon HCT116 cell and noncancerous NCM460 colon cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Briske-Anderson, Mary; Wu, Min; Moyer, Mary P

    2012-01-01

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer action, and differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on cancerous and noncancerous cells may play an important role. In this study, the submicromolar concentrations of methylselenol were generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to methylselenol. Methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 colon cells. Similarly, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) signaling status revealed that methylselenol inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the expression of c-Myc in HCT116 cells, but also to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. The other finding is that methylselenol inhibits sarcoma kinase phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. In contrast, methylselenol upregulated the phosphorylation of sarcoma and focal adhesion kinase survival signals in the noncancerous NCM460 cells. Collectively, methylselenol's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation/survival signals in the cancerous HCT116 cells when compared with that in noncancerous NCM460 cells may partly explain the potential of methylselenol's anticancer action.

  13. Emerging roles of microRNAs as molecular switches in the integrated circuit of the cancer cell

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    Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Pampalakis, Georgios; Lianidou, Evi; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2009-01-01

    Transformation of normal cells into malignant tumors requires the acquisition of six hallmark traits, e.g., self-sufficiency in growth signals, insensitivity to antigrowth signals and self-renewal, evasion of apoptosis, limitless replication potential, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis, which are common to all cancers (Hanahan and Weinberg 2000). These new cellular traits evolve from defects in major regulatory microcircuits that are fundamental for normal homeostasis. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) as a new class of small non-protein-coding RNAs that control gene expression post-transcriptionally by binding to various mRNA targets suggests that these tiny RNA molecules likely act as molecular switches in the extensive regulatory web that involves thousands of transcripts. Most importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that numerous microRNAs are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. In this review, we discuss the emergent roles of microRNAs as switches that function to turn on/off known cellular microcircuits. We outline recent compelling evidence that deregulated microRNA-mediated control of cellular microcircuits cooperates with other well-established regulatory mechanisms to confer the hallmark traits of the cancer cell. Furthermore, these exciting insights into aberrant microRNA control in cancer-associated circuits may be exploited for cancer therapies that will target deregulated miRNA switches. PMID:19561119

  14. Drosophila as a model to study the role of blood cells in inflammation, innate immunity and cancer

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    Lihui eWang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila has a blood system with three types of haemocytes which function throughout different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Haemocytes play essential roles in tissue modelling during embryogenesis and morphogenesis, and also in innate immunity. The open circulatory system of Drosophila makes haemocytes ideal signal mediators to cells and tissues in response to events such as infection, wounding and tumour formation. In this context, Drosophila is now used for screening and investigation of genes implicated in human leukaemia and also in modelling development of solid tumours. This line of research offers promising opportunities to determine the seemingly conflicting roles of blood cells in tumour progression and invasion. This review provides an overview of the signalling pathways conserved in Drosophila during haematopoiesis, haemostasis, innate immunity, wound healing and inflammation. We also review the most recent progress in the use of Drosophila as a cancer research model with an emphasis on the roles haemocytes can play in various cancer models and in the links between inflammation and cancer.

  15. Drosophila as a model to study the role of blood cells in inflammation, innate immunity and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihui; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2014-01-09

    Drosophila has a primitive yet effective blood system with three types of haemocytes which function throughout different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Haemocytes play essential roles in tissue modeling during embryogenesis and morphogenesis, and also in innate immunity. The open circulatory system of Drosophila makes haemocytes ideal signal mediators to cells and tissues in response to events such as infection and wounding. The application of recently developed and sophisticated genetic tools to the relatively simple genome of Drosophila has made the fly a popular system for modeling human tumorigensis and metastasis. Drosophila is now used for screening and investigation of genes implicated in human leukemia and also in modeling development of solid tumors. This second line of research offers promising opportunities to determine the seemingly conflicting roles of blood cells in tumor progression and invasion. This review provides an overview of the signaling pathways conserved in Drosophila during haematopoiesis, haemostasis, innate immunity, wound healing and inflammation. We also review the most recent progress in the use of Drosophila as a cancer research model with an emphasis on the roles haemocytes can play in various cancer models and in the links between inflammation and cancer.

  16. Roles of Fas signaling pathway in vitamin E succinate-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Yao Li; Yan Zhao; Yu-Juan Shan; Wei Xia; Wei-Ping Yu; Lan Zhao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles of Fas signaling pathway in vitamin E succinate-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.METHODS: Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells were treated with VES at 5, 10, 20 mg@L-1, succinic acid and vitamin E as vehicle control and condition media only as untreated (UT) control. Apoptotic morphology was observed by DAPI staining. Western blot analysis was applied to measure the expression of Fas, FADD and caspase-8 proteins. After the cells were transiently transfected with Fas and FADD antisense oligonucleotides, respectively, caspase-8 activity was determined by flurometric method.RESULTS: The morphologically apoptotic changes were observed after VES treatment by DAPI staining. 23.7 % and 89.6 % apoptosis occurred after 24 h and 48 h of 20 mg@L-1 VES treatment, respectively. The protein levels of Fas, FADD and caspase-8 were evidently increased in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h of VES treatment. The blockage of Fas by transfection with Fas antisense oligonucleotides obviously inhibited the expression of FADD protein. After SGC-7901 cells were transfected with Fas and FADD antisense oligonucleotides, caspase-8 activity was obviously decreased (P<0.01), whereas Fas blocked more than FADD.CONCLUSION: VES-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells involves Fas signaling pathway including the interaction of Fas, FADD and caspase-8.

  17. Mechanism of Akt1 inhibition of breast cancer cell invasionreveals a protumorigenic role for TSC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.; Zhang, Hui; Fata, Jimmie; Roth, Richard A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-07

    Akt1 is frequently upregulated in human tumors, and has been shown to accelerate cell proliferation and to suppress programmed cell death; consequently, inhibiting the activity of Akt1 has been seen as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Paradoxically, hyperactivation of the Akt1 oncogene can also prevent the invasive behavior that underlies progression to metastasis. Here we show that overexpression of activated myr-Akt1 in human breast cancer cells phosphorylates and thereby targets the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) for degradation, leading to reduced Rho-GTPase activity, decreased actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, and reduced motility and invasion. Overexpression of TSC2 rescues the migration phenotype of myr-Akt1-expressing tumor cells, and high levels of TSC2 in breast cancer patients correlate with increased metastasis and reduced survival. These data indicate that the functional properties of genes designated as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes depends on the context of the cell type and the tissues studied, and suggest the need for caution in designing therapies targeting the function of individual genes in epithelial tissues.

  18. Role of sympathetic nerves in the establishment of metastatic breast cancer cells in bone

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    Florent Elefteriou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The bone marrow microenvironment is characterized by its multicellular nature, and perhaps less obviously by the high mobility of multiple transient and stationary cell lineages present in this environment. The trafficking of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells between the bone marrow and blood compartments is regulated by a number of bone marrow-derived factors. It is suspected that transformed metastatic cells “hijack” these processes to engraft into the skeleton and eventually cause the skeletal complications associated with metastatic disease. In this short review, experimental and association data supporting the contribution of a less recognized cell type of the bone marrow – the nerves of the sympathetic nervous system – to early events of the breast cancer bone metastatic process, are summarized.

  19. Novel role for tumor-induced expansion of myeloid-derived cells in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alex G; Cuenca, Angela L; Winfield, Robert D; Joiner, Dallas N; Gentile, Lori; Delano, Matthew J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Matheny, Michael K; Scarpace, Philip J; Vila, Lizette; Efron, Philip A; LaFace, Drake M; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2014-06-15

    Cancer progression is associated with inflammation, increased metabolic demand, infection, cachexia, and eventually death. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) commonly expand during cancer and are associated with adaptive immune suppression and inflammatory metabolite production. We propose that cancer-induced cachexia is driven at least in part by the expansion of MDSCs. MDSC expansion in 4T1 mammary carcinoma-bearing hosts is associated with induction of a hepatic acute-phase protein response and altered host energy and fat metabolism, and eventually reduced survival to polymicrobial sepsis and endotoxemia. Similar results are also seen in mice bearing a Lewis lung carcinoma and a C26 colon adenocarcinoma. However, a similar cachexia response is not seen with equivalent growth of the 66C4 subclone of 4T1, in which MDSC expansion does not occur. Importantly, reducing MDSC numbers in 4T1-bearing animals can ameliorate some of these late responses and reduce susceptibility to inflammation-induced organ injury and death. In addition, administering MDSCs from both tumor- and nontumor-bearing mice can produce an acute-phase response. Thus, we propose a previously undescribed mechanism for the development of cancer cachexia, whereby progressive MDSC expansion contributes to changes in host protein and energy metabolism and reduced resistance to infection.

  20. Tailoring treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer by tissue type: role of pemetrexed

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    Steven F Powell

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Powell1, Arkadiusz Z Dudek21Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Pemetrexed (ALIMTA, LY231514, MTA is a novel multitargeted antifolate that is currently approved for the treatment of metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Recent evidence reveals that the drug’s efficacy is limited to nonsquamous lung cancer histology. As we further understand the drug’s mechanisms of action, new genomic and proteomic evidence is shedding light on why some patients respond while others do not. The first goal of this review is to briefly review pemetrexed’s mechanism of action, resistance patterns, toxicity profile, and pharmacokinetics. We will also review the clinical trials that led to its use in NSCLC, with special attention to data showing that pemetrexed has greater efficacy in nonsquamous histologies of NSCLC. Furthermore, we will discuss the hypotheses for the genomic and proteomic basis for this variation in efficacy. Finally, we will report the future directions for pemetrexed as a personalized agent for nonsquamous NSCLC.Keywords: nonsmall cell lung cancer, pemetrexed, antifoliate

  1. Role of ErbB receptors in cancer cell migration and invasion

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    Aline eAppert-Collin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Growth factors mediate their diverse biologic responses (regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by binding to and activating cell-surface receptors with intrinsic protein kinase activity named Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs. About 60 RTKs have been identified and can be classified into more than 16 different receptor families. Their activity is normally tightly controlled and regulated. Overexpression of RTK proteins or functional alterations caused by mutations in the corresponding genes or abnormal stimulation by autocrine growth factor loops contribute to constitutive RTK signaling, resulting in alterations in the physiological activities of cells. The ErbB receptor family of RTKs comprises four distinct receptors: the EGFR (also known as ErbB1/HER1, ErbB2 (neu, HER2, ErbB3 (HER3 and ErbB4 (HER4. ErbB family members are often overexpressed, amplified, or mutated in many forms of cancer, making them important therapeutic targets. EGFR has been found to be amplified in gliomas and non-small-cell lung carcinoma while ErbB2 amplifications are seen in breast, ovarian, bladder, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, as well as several other tumor types. Several data have shown that ErbB receptor family and its downstream pathway regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, and tumor invasion by modulating extracellular matrix components. Recent findings indicate that extracellular matrix components such as matrikines bind specifically to EGF receptor and promote cell invasion. In this review, we will present an in-depth overview of the structure, mechanisms, cell signaling, and functions of ErbB family receptors in cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, we will describe in a last part the new strategies developed in anti-cancer therapy to inhibit ErbB family receptor activation.

  2. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  3. A role of ZnO nanoparticle electrostatic properties in cancer cell cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Denise; Louka, Panagiota; Anders, Catherine B; Zhang, Jianhui; Punnoose, Alex

    2016-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have previously been shown to exhibit selective cytotoxicity against certain types of cancerous cells suggesting their potential use in biomedical applications. In this study, we investigate the effect of surface modification of ZnO NPs on their cytotoxicity to both cancerous and primary T cells. Our results show that polyacrylic acid capping produces negatively charged ZnO NPs that are significantly more toxic compared to uncapped positively charged NPs of identical size and composition. In contrast, the greatest selectivity against cancerous cells relative to normal cells is observed with cationic NPs. In addition, differences in NP cytotoxicity inversely correlate with NP hydrodynamic size, propensity for aggregation, and dissolution profiles. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also observed in the toxicity mechanism with anionic NPs generating higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide without appreciably affecting glutathione levels. Additional experiments evaluated the combined effects of charged ZnO NPs and nontoxic cationic or anionic CeO2 NPs. Results show that the CeO2 NPs offer protective effects against cytotoxicity from anionic ZnO NPs via antioxidant properties. Altogether, study data indicate that surface modification of NPs and resulting changes in their surface charge affect the level of intracellular ROS production, which can be ameliorated by the CeO2 ROS scavenger, suggesting that ROS generation is a dominant mechanism of ZnO NP cytotoxicity. These findings demonstrate the importance of surface electrostatic properties for controlling NP toxicity and illustrate an approach for engineering NPs with desired properties for potential use in biological applications. PMID:27486313

  4. Emerging role of cancer stem cells in the biology and treatment of ovarian cancer: basic knowledge and therapeutic possibilities for an innovative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomao, Federica; Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Strudel, Martina; Vici, Patrizia; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Tomao, Silverio

    2013-08-01

    In 2013 there will be an estimated 22,240 new diagnoses and 14,030 deaths from ovarian cancer in the United States. Despite the improved surgical approach and the novel active drugs that are available today in clinical practice, about 80% of women presenting with late-stage disease have a 5-year survival rate of only 30%. In the last years a growing scientific knowledge about the molecular pathways involved in ovarian carcinogenesis has led to the discovery and evaluation of several novel molecular targeted agents, with the aim to test alternative models of treatment in order to overcome the clinical problem of resistance. Cancer stem cells tend to be more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents and radiation than more differentiated cellular subtypes from the same tissue. In this context the study of ovarian cancer stem cells is taking on an increasingly important strategic role, mostly for the potential therapeutic application in the next future. In our review, we focused our attention on the molecular characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells, in particular on possible targets to hit with targeted therapies.

  5. Role of Natural Killer T Cells In Immunogenic Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    28–38. 5. Godfrey, D. I., and M. Kronenberg . 2004. Going both ways: immune regulation via CD1d-dependent NKT cells. J. Clin. Invest. 114: 1379–1388. 6...Hong, D. C. Scherer, I. Serizawa, N. Burdin, M. Kronenberg , Y. Koezuka, and L. Van Kaer. 1999. Cutting edge: activation of NK T cells by CD1d and a...Y. Kinjo, and M. Kronenberg . 2007. The unique role of natural killer T cells in the response to microorganisms. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 5: 405– 417. 45

  6. A role of ZnO nanoparticle electrostatic properties in cancer cell cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wingett D

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Denise Wingett,1–3 Panagiota Louka,1 Catherine B Anders,2 Jianhui Zhang,4 Alex Punnoose2,41Department of Biological Sciences, 2Biomolecular Sciences PhD Program, Boise State University, Boise, ID, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 4Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, ID, USA Abstract: ZnO nanoparticles (NPs have previously been shown to exhibit selective cytotoxicity against certain types of cancerous cells suggesting their potential use in biomedical applications. In this study, we investigate the effect of surface modification of ZnO NPs on their cytotoxicity to both cancerous and primary T cells. Our results show that polyacrylic acid capping produces negatively charged ZnO NPs that are significantly more toxic compared to uncapped positively charged NPs of identical size and composition. In contrast, the greatest selectivity against cancerous cells relative to normal cells is observed with cationic NPs. In addition, differences in NP cytotoxicity inversely correlate with NP hydrodynamic size, propensity for aggregation, and dissolution profiles. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was also observed in the toxicity mechanism with anionic NPs generating higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide without appreciably affecting glutathione levels. Additional experiments evaluated the combined effects of charged ZnO NPs and nontoxic cationic or anionic CeO2 NPs. Results show that the CeO2 NPs offer protective effects against cytotoxicity from anionic ZnO NPs via antioxidant properties. Altogether, study data indicate that surface modification of NPs and resulting changes in their surface charge affect the level of intracellular ROS production, which can be ameliorated by the CeO2 ROS scavenger, suggesting that ROS generation is a dominant mechanism of ZnO NP cytotoxicity. These findings demonstrate the importance of surface electrostatic

  7. Role of ADAM17 in invasion and migration of CD133-expressing liver cancer stem cells after irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Woo; Hur, Wonhee; Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Jung-Hee; Hwang, Daehee; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the biological role of CD133-expressing liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) enriched after irradiation of Huh7 cells in cell invasion and migration. We also explored whether a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17) influences the metastatic potential of CSC-enriched hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells after irradiation. A CD133-expressing Huh7 cell subpopulation showed greater resistance to sublethal irradiation and specifically enhanced cell invasion and migration capabilities. We also demonstrated that the radiation-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzyme activities as well as the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were increased more predominantly in Huh7CD133+ cell subpopulations than Huh7CD133− cell subpopulations. Furthermore, we showed that silencing ADAM17 significantly inhibited the migration and invasiveness of enriched Huh7CD133+ cells after irradiation; moreover, Notch signaling was significantly reduced in irradiated CD133-expressing liver CSCs following stable knockdown of the ADAM17 gene. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CD133-expressing liver CSCs have considerable metastatic capabilities after irradiation of HCC cells, and their metastatic capabilities might be maintained by ADAM17. Therefore, suppression of ADAM17 shows promise for improving the efficiency of current radiotherapies and reducing the metastatic potential of liver CSCs during HCC treatment. PMID:26993601

  8. ROLE OF PI3K-AKT-mTOR AND Wnt SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN G1-S TRANSITION OF CELL CYCLE IN CANCER CELLS

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    LAKSHMIPATHI eVADLAKONDA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K–Akt pathway together with one of its downstream targets, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is a highly deregulated pathway in cancers. There is a reciprocal relation between the Akt phosphorylation and mTOR complexes. Akt phosphorylated at T308 activates mTORC1 by inhibition of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1/2, where as mTORC2 is recognized as the kinase that phosphorylates Akt at S473. Recent developments in the research on regulatory mechanisms of autophagy places mTORC1 mediated inhibition of autophagy at the central position in activation of proliferation and survival pathways in cells. Autophagy is a negative regulator of Wnt signaling pathway and the downstream effectors of Wnt signaling pathway, cyclin D1 and the c-Myc, are the key players in initiation of cell cycle and regulation of the G1-S transition in cancer cells. Production of reaction oxygen species (ROS, a common feature of a cancer cell metabolism, activates several downstream targets like the transcription factors FoxO, which play key roles in promoting the progression of cell cycle. A model is presented on the role of PI3K -Akt - mTOR and Wnt pathways in regulation of the progression of cell cycle through Go-G1-and S phases.

  9. Role of DNA methylation in miR-200c/141 cluster silencing in invasive breast cancer cells

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    Wernet Peter

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The miR-200c/141 cluster has recently been implicated in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT process. The expression of these two miRNAs is inversely correlated with tumorigenicity and invasiveness in several human cancers. The role of these miRNAs in cancer progression is based in part on their capacity to target the EMT activators ZEB1 and ZEB2, two transcription factors, which in turn repress expression of E-cadherin. Little is known about the regulation of the mir200c/141 cluster, whose targeting has been proposed as a promising new therapy for the most aggressive tumors. Findings We show that the miR-200c/141 cluster is repressed by DNA methylation of a CpG island located in the promoter region of these miRNAs. Whereas in vitro methylation of the miR-200c/141 promoter led to shutdown of promoter activity, treatment with a demethylating agent caused transcriptional reactivation in breast cancer cells formerly lacking expression of miR-200c and miR-141. More importantly, we observed that DNA methylation of the identified miR-200c/141 promoter was tightly correlated with phenotype and the invasive capacity in a panel of 8 human breast cancer cell lines. In line with this, in vitro induction of EMT by ectopic expression of the EMT transcription factor Twist in human immortalized mammary epithelial cells (HMLE was accompanied by increased DNA methylation and concomitant repression of the miR-200c/141 locus. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that expression of the miR-200c/141 cluster is regulated by DNA methylation, suggesting epigenetic regulation of this miRNA locus in aggressive breast cancer cell lines as well as untransformed mammary epithelial cells. This epigenetic silencing mechanism might represent a novel component of the regulatory circuit for the maintenance of EMT programs in cancer and normal cells.

  10. Hypoxia counteracts taxol-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells: role of autophagy and JNK activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notte, A; Ninane, N; Arnould, T; Michiels, C

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell resistance against chemotherapy is still a heavy burden to improve anticancer treatments. Autophagy activation and the development of hypoxic regions within the tumors are known to promote cancer cell resistance. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the role of autophagy and hypoxia on the taxol-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The results showed that taxol induced apoptosis after 16 h of incubation, and that hypoxia protected MDA-MB-231 cells from taxol-induced apoptosis. In parallel, taxol induced autophagy activation already after 2 h of incubation both under normoxia and hypoxia. Autophagy activation after taxol exposure was shown to be a protective mechanism against taxol-induced cell death both under normoxia and hypoxia. However, at longer incubation time, the autophagic process reached a saturation point under normoxia leading to cell death, whereas under hypoxia, autophagy flow still correctly took place allowing the cells to survive. Autophagy induction is induced after taxol exposure via mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, which is more important in cells exposed to hypoxia. Taxol also induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and phosphorylation of its substrates B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and BCL2-like 1 (BclXL) under normoxia and hypoxia very early after taxol exposure. Bcl2 and BclXL phosphorylation was decreased more importantly under hypoxia after long incubation time. The role of JNK in autophagy and apoptosis induction was studied using siRNAs. The results showed that JNK activation promotes resistance against taxol-induced apoptosis under normoxia and hypoxia without being involved in induction of autophagy. In conclusion, the resistance against taxol-induced cell death observed under hypoxia can be explained by a more effective autophagic flow activated via the classical mTOR pathway and by a mechanism involving JNK, which could be dependent on Bcl2 and BclXL phosphorylation but

  11. Hypoxia counteracts taxol-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells: role of autophagy and JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notte, A; Ninane, N; Arnould, T; Michiels, C

    2013-05-16

    Cancer cell resistance against chemotherapy is still a heavy burden to improve anticancer treatments. Autophagy activation and the development of hypoxic regions within the tumors are known to promote cancer cell resistance. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the role of autophagy and hypoxia on the taxol-induced apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The results showed that taxol induced apoptosis after 16 h of incubation, and that hypoxia protected MDA-MB-231 cells from taxol-induced apoptosis. In parallel, taxol induced autophagy activation already after 2 h of incubation both under normoxia and hypoxia. Autophagy activation after taxol exposure was shown to be a protective mechanism against taxol-induced cell death both under normoxia and hypoxia. However, at longer incubation time, the autophagic process reached a saturation point under normoxia leading to cell death, whereas under hypoxia, autophagy flow still correctly took place allowing the cells to survive. Autophagy induction is induced after taxol exposure via mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, which is more important in cells exposed to hypoxia. Taxol also induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and phosphorylation of its substrates B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and BCL2-like 1 (BclXL) under normoxia and hypoxia very early after taxol exposure. Bcl2 and BclXL phosphorylation was decreased more importantly under hypoxia after long incubation time. The role of JNK in autophagy and apoptosis induction was studied using siRNAs. The results showed that JNK activation promotes resistance against taxol-induced apoptosis under normoxia and hypoxia without being involved in induction of autophagy. In conclusion, the resistance against taxol-induced cell death observed under hypoxia can be explained by a more effective autophagic flow activated via the classical mTOR pathway and by a mechanism involving JNK, which could be dependent on Bcl2 and BclXL phosphorylation but independent of

  12. TNF{alpha} induced FOXP3-NF{kappa}B interaction dampens the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3 in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Weina; Zhang, Cun; Qin, Xin; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Meng; Shu, Zhen; Xu, Tianjiao; Xu, Yujin; Wang, Weihua [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, School of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: Zhangw90@fmmu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, School of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Yingqi, E-mail: Zhangyqh@fmmu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, School of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FOXP3 inhibition of cell proliferation is p21-dependent under basal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation induced by TNF{alpha} inhibits the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between p65 and FOXP3 inhibits p21 transcription activation. -- Abstract: Controversial roles of FOXP3 in different cancers have been reported previously, while its role in gastric cancer is largely unknown. Here we found that FOXP3 is unexpectedly upregulated in some gastric cancer cells. To test whether increased FOXP3 remains the tumor suppressor role in gastric cancer as seen in other cancers, we test its function in cell proliferation both at basal and TNF{alpha} mimicked inflammatory condition. Compared with the proliferation inhibitory role observed in basal condition, FOXP3 is insufficient to inhibit the cell proliferation under TNF{alpha} treatment. Molecularly, we found that TNF{alpha} induced an interaction between FOXP3 and p65, which in turn drive the FOXP3 away from the promoter of the well known target p21. Our data here suggest that although FOXP3 is upregulated in gastric cancer, its tumor suppressor role has been dampened due to the inflammation environment.

  13. Role of gefitinib in the targeted treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Meng-Jiao Li, Qing He, Mei Li, Feng Luo, Yong-Song Guan Department of Oncology, Center of Oncology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer. Conventional treatment options have limited efficacy because most cases are in the advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown its good antitumor activities in treating NSCLC in a number of studies. This paper reviews its role in the targeted treatment of NSCLC in Chinese patients. Keywords: pulmonary carcinoma, therapy, EGFR-TK inhibitor, status, People’s Republic of China 

  14. The Emerging Role of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/ Akt/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Network in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

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    James A. McCubrey

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell theory entails the existence of a hierarchically organized, rare population of cells which are responsible for tumor initiation, self-renewal/maintenance, and mutation accumulation. The cancer stem cell proposition could explain the high frequency of cancer relapse and resistance to currently available therapies. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway regulates a wide array of physiological cell functions which include differentiation, proliferation, survival, metabolism, autophagy, and motility. Dysregulated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling has been documented in many types of neoplasias. It is now emerging that this signaling network plays a key role in cancer stem cell biology. Interestingly, cancer stem cells displayed preferential sensitivity to pathway inhibition when compared to healthy stem cells. This observation provides the proof-of-principle that functional differences in signaling pathways between neoplastic stem cells and healthy stem cells could be identified. In this review, we present the evidence which links the signals emanating from the PI3K/Akt/mTOR cascade with the functions of cancer stem cells, both in solid and hematological tumors. We then highlight how targeting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling with small molecules could improve cancer patient outcome.

  15. Human enhancer of filamentation 1-induced colorectal cancer cell migration: Role of serine phosphorylation and interaction with the breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 3 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Rama; Lemoine, Antoinette; Bertoglio, Jacques; Raingeaud, Joël

    2015-07-01

    Human enhancer of filamentation 1 (HEF1) is a member of the p130Cas family of docking proteins involved in integrin-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization associated with cell migration. Elevated expression of HEF1 promotes invasion and metastasis in multiple cancer cell types. To date, little is known on its role in CRC tumor progression. HEF1 is phosphorylated on several Ser/Thr residues but the effects of these post-translational modifications on the functions of HEF1 are poorly understood. In this manuscript, we investigated the role of HEF1 in migration of colorectal adeno-carcinoma cells. First, we showed that overexpression of HEF1 in colo-carcinoma cell line HCT116 increases cell migration. Moreover, in these cells, HEF1 increases Src-mediated phosphorylation of FAK on Tyr-861 and 925. We then showed that HEF1 mutation on Ser-369 enhances HEF1-induced migration and FAK phosphorylation as a result of protein stabilization. We also, for the first time characterized a functional mutation of HEF1 on Arg-367 which mimics the effect of Ser-369 to Ala mutation. Finally through mass spectrometry experiments, we identified BCAR3 as an essential interactor and mediator of HEF1-induced migration. We demonstrated that single amino acid mutations that prevent formation of the HEF1-BCAR3 complex impair HEF1-mediated migration. Therefore, amino-acid substitutions that impede Ser-369 phosphorylation stabilize HEF1 which increases the migration of CRC cells and this latter effect requires the interaction of HEF1 with the NSP family adaptor protein BCAR3. Collectively, these data reveal the importance of HEF1 expression level in cancer cell motility and then support the utilization of HEF1 as a biomarker of tumor progression.

  16. Role of YAP and TAZ in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and in stellate cells associated with cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvaridi, Susan; Dhall, Deepti; Greene, Mark I; Pandol, Stephen J; Wang, Qiang

    2015-11-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a fibrotic and inflammatory microenvironment that is formed primarily by activated, myofibroblast-like, stellate cells. Although the stellate cells are thought to contribute to tumorigenesis, metastasis and drug resistance of PDAC, the signaling events involved in activation of the stellate cells are not well defined. Functioning as transcription co-factors, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and its homolog transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) modulate the expression of genes involved in various aspects of cellular functions, such as proliferation and mobility. Using human tissues we show that YAP and TAZ expression is restricted to the centroacinar and ductal cells of normal pancreas, but is elevated in cancer cells. In particular, YAP and TAZ are expressed at high levels in the activated stellate cells of both chronic pancreatitis and PDAC patients as well as in the islets of Langerhans in chronic pancreatitis tissues. Of note, YAP is up regulated in both acinar and ductal cells following induction of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice. These findings indicate that YAP and TAZ may play a critical role in modulating pancreatic tissue regeneration, neoplastic transformation, and stellate cell functions in both PDAC and pancreatitis.

  17. Roles of Krüppel-like factor 4 in normal homeostasis, cancer and stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul M Evans; Chunming Liu

    2008-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc finger-type trans cription factor expressed in a variety of tissues,including the epithelium of the intestine and the skin,and it plays an important role in differentiation and cell cycle arrest.Depending on the gene targeted,KLF4 can both activate and repress transcription.Moreover,in certain cellular contexts,KLF4 can function as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene.Finally,KLF4 is important in reprogramming differentiated fibroblasts into inducible pluripotent stem cells,which highly resemble embryonic stem cells.This review summarizes what is known about the diverse functions of KLF4 as well as their molecular mechanisms.

  18. Induction of PDCD4 tumor suppressor gene expression by RAR agonists, antiestrogen and HER-2/neu antagonist in breast cancer cells. Evidence for a role in apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonja, Olubunmi; Juste, Dominique; Das, Sharmistha; Matsuhashi, Sachiko; Samuels, Herbert H

    2004-10-21

    The growth of human breast tumor cells is regulated through signaling involving cell surface growth factor receptors and nuclear receptors of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor gene family. Retinoic acid receptors (RARs), members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor gene family, are ligand-dependent transcription factors, which have in vitro and in vivo growth inhibitory activity against breast cancer cells. RAR-agonists inhibit the proliferation of many human breast cancer cell lines, particularly those whose growth is stimulated by estradiol (E2) or growth factors. Additionally, RAR-agonists and synthetic retinoids such as Ferentinide have been shown to induce apoptosis in malignant breast cells but not normal breast cells. To better define the genes involved in RAR-mediated growth inhibition of breast cancer cells, we used oligonucleotide microarray analysis to create a database of genes that are potentially regulated by RAR-agonists in breast cancer cells. We found that PDCD4 (programmed cell death 4), a tumor suppressor gene presently being evaluated as a target for chemoprevention, was induced about three-fold by the RARalpha-selective agonist Am580, in T-47D breast cancer cells. RAR pan-agonists and Am580, but not retinoid X receptors (RXR)-agonists, stimulate the expression of PDCD4 in a wide variety of retinoid-inhibited breast cancer cell lines. RAR-agonists did not induce PDCD4 expression in breast cancer cell lines, which were not growth inhibited by retinoids. We also observed that antiestrogen and the HER-2/neu antagonist, Herceptin (Trastuzumab), also induced PDCD4 expression in T-47D cells, suggesting that PDCD4 may play a central role in growth inhibition in breast cancer cells. Transient overexpression of PDCD4 in T-47D (ER+, RAR+) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-, RAR-) cells resulted in apoptotic death, suggesting a role for PDCD4 in mediating apoptosis in breast cancer cells. PDCD4 protein expression has previously been reported in small ductal

  19. Expression of Peroxisome Proferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) in Human Transitional Bladder Cancer and its Role in Inducing Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The present study examined the expression and role of the thiazolidinedione (TZD)-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), in human bladder cancers. In situ hybridization shows that PPARγ mRNA is highly expressed in all human transitional epithelial cell cancers (TCCa's) studied (n=11). PPARγ was also expressed in five TCCa cell lines as determined by RNase protection assays and immunoblot. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), a 9-cis-retinoic acid stimul...

  20. Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ) in Human Transitional Bladder Cancer and its Role in Inducing Cell Death1

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The present study examined the expression and role of the thiazolidinedione (TZD)-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), in human bladder cancers. In situ hybridization shows that PPARγ mRNA is highly expressed in all human transitional epithelial cell cancers (TCCa's) studied (n=11). PPARγ was also expressed in five TCCa cell lines as determined by RNase protection assays and immunoblot. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), a 9-cis-retinoic acid stimul...

  1. The role of a novel protein ligand hMSH 2 in Vγ9δ2 T cell-mediated anti-cervix cancer immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代玉梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of hMSH2,a novel endogenous tumor-associated protein ligand recognized by Vγ9δ2 T cells,in innate anti-cervix cancer immunity.Methods hMSH2 that expressed on the surface of cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells was blocked by specific antibody.Then the differences in their effects on Vγ9δ2T cells before and after antibody blockage were evaluated by cytotoxicity of Vγ9δ2 T cells and cytokines secretion.

  2. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  3. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  4. Chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung epithelial cancer cell lines: The role of glutathione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechbuhl, Heather M. [Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado (United States); Kachadourian, Remy; Min, Elysia [Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado (United States); Chan, Daniel [Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center (United States); Day, Brian J., E-mail: dayb@njhealth.org [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center (United States); Immunology, University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center (United States); Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center (United States); Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that flavonoid-induced glutathione (GSH) efflux through multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs) and subsequent intracellular GSH depletion is a viable mechanism to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapies. This concept was demonstrated using chrysin (5–25 μM) induced GSH efflux in human non-small cell lung cancer lines exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX). Treatment with chrysin resulted in significant and sustained intracellular GSH depletion and the GSH enzyme network in the four cancer cell types was predictive of the severity of chrysin induced intracellular GSH depletion. Gene expression data indicated a positive correlation between basal MRP1, MRP3 and MRP5 expression and total GSH efflux before and after chrysin exposure. Co-treating the cells for 72 h with chrysin (5–30 μM) and DOX (0.025–3.0 μM) significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to DOX as compared to 72-hour DOX alone treatment in all four cell lines. The maximum decrease in the IC{sub 50} values of cells treated with DOX alone compared to co-treatment with chrysin and DOX was 43% in A549 cells, 47% in H157 and H1975 cells and 78% in H460 cells. Chrysin worked synergistically with DOX to induce cancer cell death. This approach could allow for use of lower concentrations and/or sensitize cancer cells to drugs that are typically resistant to therapy. -- Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms by which chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced toxicity in cancer cells. Highlights: ► Chyrsin sustains a significant depletion of GSH levels in lung cancer cells. ► Chyrsin synergistically potentiates doxorubicin-induced cancer cell cytotoxicity. ► Cancer cell sensitivity correlated with GSH and MRP gene network expression. ► This approach could allow for lower side effects and targeting resistant tumors.

  5. Role of ornithine decarboxylase in regulation of estrogen receptor alpha expression and growth in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingsong; Jin, Lihua; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that specific polyamine analogues, oligoamines, down-regulated the activity of a key polyamine biosynthesis enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and suppressed expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in human breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism underlying the potential regulation of ERα expression by polyamine metabolism has not been explored. Here, we demonstrated that RNAi-mediated knockdown of ODC (ODC KD) down-regulated the polyamine pool, and hindered growth in ERα-positive MCF7 and T47D and ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. ODC KD significantly induced the expression and activity of the key polyamine catabolism enzymes, spermine oxidase (SMO) and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT). However, ODC KD-induced growth inhibition could not be reversed by exogenous spermidine or overexpression of antizyme inhibitor (AZI), suggesting that regulation of ODC on cell proliferation may involve the signaling pathways independent of polyamine metabolism. In MCF7 and T47D cells, ODC KD, but not DFMO treatment, diminished the mRNA and protein expression of ERα. Overexpression of antizyme (AZ), an ODC inhibitory protein, suppressed ERα expression, suggesting that ODC plays an important role in regulation of ERα expression. Decrease of ERα expression by ODC siRNA altered the mRNA expression of a subset of ERα response genes. Our previous analysis showed that oligoamines disrupt the binding of Sp1 family members to an ERα minimal promoter element containing GC/CA-rich boxes. By using DNA affinity precipitation and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified ZBTB7A, MeCP2, PARP-1, AP2, and MAZ as co-factors of Sp1 family members that are associated with the ERα minimal promoter element. Taken together, these data provide insight into a novel antiestrogenic mechanism for polyamine biosynthesis enzymes in breast cancer. PMID:22976807

  6. A critical role for FBXW8 and MAPK in cyclin D1 degradation and cancer cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okabe

    Full Text Available Cyclin D1 regulates G1 progression. Its transcriptional regulation is well understood. However, the mechanism underlying cyclin D1 ubiquitination and its subsequent degradation is not yet clear. We report that cyclin D1 undergoes increased degradation in the cytoplasm during S phase in a variety of cancer cells. This is mediated by phosphorylation at Thr286 through the activity of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK cascade and the F-box protein FBXW8, which is an E3 ligase. The majority of FBXW8 is expressed in the cytoplasm during G1 and S phase. In contrast, cyclin D1 accumulates in the nucleus during G1 phase and exits into the cytoplasm in S phase. Increased cyclin D1 degradation is linked to association with FBXW8 in the cytoplasm, and enhanced phosphorylation of cyclin D1 through sustained ERK1/2 signaling. Depletion of FBXW8 caused a significant accumulation of cyclin D1, as well as sequestration of CDK1 in the cytoplasm. This resulted in a severe reduction of cell proliferation. These effects could be rescued by constitutive nuclear expression of cyclin D1-T286A. Thus, FBXW8 plays an essential role in cancer cell proliferation through proteolysis of cyclin D1. It may present new opportunities to develop therapies targeting destruction of cyclin D1 or its regulator E3 ligase selectively.

  7. Approaches that ascertain the role of dietary compounds in colonic cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bordonaro, M.; Venema, K.; Putri, A.K.; Lazarova, D.

    2014-01-01

    Preventive approaches against cancer have not been fully developed and applied. For example, the incidence of some types of cancer, including colon cancer, is highly dependent upon lifestyle, and therefore, amenable to prevention. Among the lifestyle factors, diet strongly affects the incidence of c

  8. The role of glutathione in resistance to cisplatin in a human small cell lung cancer cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, C.; Mulder, N. H.; Hospers, G. A.; Uges, D.R.; de Vries, E. G.

    1990-01-01

    The role of glutathione (GSH) in resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) was studied in a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line (GLC4) and a CDDP-resistant subline (GLC4-CDDP). In addition to studying the steady state of GSH, the kinetics of this defence system were also studied via the monitoring of the GSH status of the cells under continuous pressure of CDDP. GLC4-CDDP maintained its elevated GSH level whereas GLC4 (under pressure of CDDP) quickly synthesised GSH to about twice its initial leve...

  9. Molecular switch role of Akt in Polygonatum odoratum lectin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyang; Chen, Jie; Lu, Bangmin; Shi, Zheng; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Kailiang; Qi, Wei; Bao, Jinku; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Polygonatum odoratum lectin (POL), isolated from traditional Chinese medicine herb (Mill.) Druce, has drawn rising attention due to its wide biological activities. In the present study, anti-tumor effects, including apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing properties of POL, were determined by a series of cell biology methods such as MTT, cellular morphology observation, flow cytometry, immunoblotting. Herein, we found that POL could simultaneously induce apoptosis and autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. POL initiated apoptosis through inhibiting Akt-NF-κB pathway, while POL triggered autophagy via suppressing Akt-mTOR pathway, suggesting the molecular switch role of Akt in regulating between POL-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Moreover, ROS was involved in POL-induced inhibition of Akt expression, and might therefore mediate both apoptosis and autophagy in A549 cells. In addition, POL displayed no significant cytotoxicity toward normal human embryonic lung fibroblast HELF cells. Due to the anti-tumor activities, POL might become a potent anti-cancer drug in future therapy, which might pave the way for exploring GNA-related lectins into effective drugs in cancer treatment.

  10. The role of maintenance proteins in the preservation of epithelial cell identity during mammary gland remodeling and breast cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradini, Danila; Oriana, Saro

    2014-02-01

    During normal postnatal mammary gland development and adult remodeling related to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and lactation, ovarian hormones and peptide growth factors contribute to the delineation of a definite epithelial cell identity. This identity is maintained during cell replication in a heritable but DNA-independent manner. The preservation of cell identity is fundamental, especially when cells must undergo changes in response to intrinsic and extrinsic signals. The maintenance proteins, which are required for cell identity preservation, act epigenetically by regulating gene expression through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Among the maintenance proteins, the Trithorax (TrxG) and Polycomb (PcG) group proteins are the best characterized. In this review, we summarize the structures and activities of the TrxG and PcG complexes and describe their pivotal roles in nuclear estrogen receptor activity. In addition, we provide evidence that perturbations in these epigenetic regulators are involved in disrupting epithelial cell identity, mammary gland remodeling, and breast cancer initiation.

  11. Opposite prognostic roles of HIF1β and HIF2β expressions in bone metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szendroi, Attila; Szász, A. Marcell; Kardos, Magdolna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognostic markers of bone metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer (ccRCC) are poorly established. We tested prognostic value of HIF1β/HIF2β and their selected target genes in primary tumors and corresponding bone metastases. RESULTS: Expression of HIF2β was lower in mRCC both at m......RNA and protein level in 59 non-metastatic ccRCCs (nmRCC), 40 bone metastatic primary ccRCCs (mRCC) and 55 corresponding bone metastases. Results were validated in 399 ccRCCs from the TCGA project. CONCLUSIONS: We identified HIF2β protein as an independent marker of the metastatic potential of ccRCC, however...

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stroma: Pathophysiology and the Roles in Cancer Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Mitsuko [Department of Pathology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan)

    2012-07-18

    Ovarian cancer represents one of the cancers with the worst prognostic in adult women. More than half of the patients who present with clinical signs such as abdominal bloating and a feeling of fullness already show advanced stages. The majority of ovarian cancers grow as cystic masses, and cancer cells easily spread into the pelvic cavity once the cysts rupture or leak. When the ovarian cancer cells disseminate into the peritoneal cavity, metastatic nests may grow in the cul-de-sac, and in more advanced stages, the peritoneal surfaces of the upper abdomen become the next largest soil for cancer progression. Ascites is also produced frequently in ovarian cancers, which facilitates distant metastasis. Clinicopathologic, epidemiologic and molecular studies on ovarian cancers have improved our understanding and therapeutic approaches, but still further efforts are required to reduce the risks in the patients who are predisposed to this lethal disease and the mortality of the patients in advanced stages. Among various molecules involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, special genes such as TP53, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been well investigated. These genes are widely accepted as the predisposing factors that trigger malignant transformation of the epithelial cells of the ovary. In addition, adnexal inflammatory conditions such as chronic salpingitis and ovarian endometriosis have been great research interests in the context of carcinogenic background of ovarian cancers. In this review, I discuss the roles of stromal cells and inflammatory factors in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancers.

  13. The multifaceted role of the embryonic gene Cripto-1 in cancer, stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Castro, Nadia P; Rangel, Maria Cristina; Spike, Benjamin T; Gray, Peter C; Bertolette, Daniel; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David

    2014-12-01

    Cripto-1 (CR-1)/Teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor1 (TDGF-1) is a cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked glycoprotein that can function either in cis (autocrine) or in trans (paracrine). The cell membrane cis form is found in lipid rafts and endosomes while the trans acting form lacking the GPI anchor is soluble. As a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)/Cripto-1-FRL-1-Cryptic (CFC) family, CR-1 functions as an obligatory co-receptor for the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members, Nodal and growth and differentiation factors 1 and 3 (GDF1/3) by activating Alk4/Alk7 signaling pathways that involve Smads 2, 3 and 4. In addition, CR-1 can activate non-Smad-dependent signaling elements such as PI3K, Akt and MAPK. Both of these pathways depend upon the 78kDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78). Finally, CR-1 can facilitate signaling through the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch/Cbf-1 pathways by functioning as a chaperone protein for LRP5/6 and Notch, respectively. CR-1 is essential for early embryonic development and maintains embryonic stem cell pluripotentiality. CR-1 performs an essential role in the etiology and progression of several types of human tumors where it is expressed in a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this context, CR-1 can significantly enhance tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Collectively, these facts suggest that CR-1 may be an attractive target in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of several types of human cancer.

  14. The multifaceted role of the embryonic gene Cripto-1 in cancer, stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauzinska, Malgorzata; Castro, Nadia P.; Rangel, Maria Cristina; Spike, Benjamin T.; Gray, Peter C.; Bertolette, Daniel; Cuttitta, Frank; Salomon, David

    2014-01-01

    Cripto-1 (CR-1)/Teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor1 (TDGF-1) is a cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked glycoprotein that can function either in cis (autocrine) or in trans (paracrine). The cell membrane cis form is found in lipid rafts and endosomes while the trans acting form lacking the GPI anchor is soluble. As a member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)/Cripto-1-FRL-1-Cryptic (CFC) family, CR-1 functions as an obligatory co-receptor for the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members, Nodal and growth and differentiation factors 1 and 3 (GDF1/3) by activating Alk4/Alk7 signaling pathways that involve Smads 2, 3 and 4. In addition, CR-1 can activate non-Smad-dependent signaling elements such as PI3K, Akt and MAPK. Both of these pathways depend upon the 78 kDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78). Finally, CR-1 can facilitate signaling through the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and Notch/Cbf-1 pathways by functioning as a chaperone protein for LRP5/6 and Notch, respectively. CR-1 is essential for early embryonic development and maintains embryonic stem cell pluripotentiality. CR-1 performs an essential role in the etiology and progression of several types of human tumors where it is expressed in a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this context, CR-1 can significantly enhance tumor cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Collectively, these facts suggest that CR-1 may be an attractive target in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of several types of human cancer. PMID:25153355

  15. The role of Gefitinib in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita Anilkumar Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, represents a new treatment option for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We analyzed the data of patients who received Gefitinib for NSCLC in a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three patients with advanced NSCLC who had received Gefitinib either after failure of conventional chemotherapy or were previously not treated as they were unfit or unwilling for conventional treatment were included in the analysis. Results: The median follow-up for the cohort was 311 days (range 11-1544 days. Median time to progression was 161 (range 9-883 days. Complete and partial remission was seen in 1 (2% and 6 (9% patients, respectively, with overall response rate of 11%. Twenty-four (38% patients had stable disease. Gefitinib was well tolerated with no significant side effects. Conclusion: Gefitinib shows anti-tumor activity in pretreated or previously untreated patients with advanced NSCLC. It has a favorable toxicity profile and is well tolerated. Gefitinib should be considered as a viable therapy in patients with NSCLC.

  16. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  17. Inhibition of myeloid cell differentiation in cancer: the role of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2003-08-01

    It is well established that tumor growth is associated with accumulation of immature myeloid cells (ImC). They play an important role in tumor-associated immune suppression. ImC accumulate not only in tumor-bearing hosts but also in immunized, tumor-free hosts or hosts infected with bacterial pathogens. The kinetics of ImC in these mice is different. If in tumor-bearing mice, the number of ImC continues to increase with tumor progression in tumor-free mice after an initial spike, it decreases to the control level. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms of ImC accumulation in tumor-bearing hosts by comparing differentiation of ImC obtained from tumor-free and tumor-bearing mice. In the presence of appropriate growth factors, ImC isolated from tumor-free mice quickly differentiated in vitro into mature dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, and granulocytes. In contrast, differentiation of ImC from tumor-bearing mice was significantly delayed. Similar results were obtained in vivo after adoptive transfer of ImC into naïve, congeneic mice. ImC transferred into tumor-bearing recipients failed to differentiate into DC or macrophages. ImC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than ImC obtained from tumor-free mice. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) but not superoxide radical anions was found to be the major part of this increased ROS production. In vitro experiments demonstrated that scavenging of H(2)O(2) with catalase induced differentiation of ImC from tumor-bearing mice into macrophages. Thus, this is a first demonstration that tumors may prevent differentiation of antigen-presenting cells by increasing the level of endogenous H(2)O(2) in immature myeloid cells.

  18. Synthesis and Pharmacophore Modelling of 2,6,9-Trisubstituted Purine Derivatives and Their Potential Role as Apoptosis-Inducing Agents in Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Calderón-Arancibia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine derivatives have been synthesized and investigated for their potential role as antitumor agents. Twelve compounds were obtained by a three step synthetic procedure using microwave irradiation in a pivotal step. All compounds were evaluated in vitro to determine their potential effect on cell toxicity by the MTT method and flow cytometry analysis on four cancer cells lines and Vero cells. Three out of twelve compounds were found to be promising agents compared to a known and effective anticancer drug, etoposide, in three out of four cancer cell lines assayed with considerable selectivity. Preliminary flow cytometry data suggests that compounds mentioned above induce apoptosis on these cells. The main structural requirements for their activity for each cancer cell line were characterized with a preliminary pharmacophore model, which identified aromatic centers, hydrogen acceptor/donor center and a hydrophobic area. These features were consistent with the cytotoxic activity of the assayed compounds.

  19. Liver Cancer and Its Tumor Microenvironment: the Role of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and SMADs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.Y. Hernanda (Pratika)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Liver cancer is one of most devastating malignancies. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for >90% of primary liver malignancies and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma include infection with

  20. Role of emmprin in endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Keiichiro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (Emmprin/CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Enriched on the surface of many tumor cells, emmprin promotes tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. We evaluated the clinical importance of emmprin and investigated its role in endometrial cancer. Methods Emmprin expression was examined in uterine normal endometrium, endometrial hyperplasia and cancer specimens by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the biological functions and inhibitory effects of an emmprin knockdown were investigated in HEC-50B and KLE endometrial cancer cell lines. Results The levels of emmprin expression were significantly increased in the endometrial cancer specimens compared with the normal endometrium and endometrial hyperplasia specimens (p p p  Conclusions The present findings suggest that low emmprin expression might be a predictor of favorable prognosis in endometrial cancer patients, and that emmprin may represent a potential therapeutic target for endometrial cancer.

  1. The Role of Cancer Stem Cells in the Organ Tropism of Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Mechanistic Balance between the “Seed” and the “Soil”?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease worldwide, and the majority of deaths occur due to metastatic disease. Clinical studies have identified a specific pattern for the metastatic spread of breast cancer, termed organ tropism; where preferential secondary sites include lymph node, bone, brain, lung, and liver. A rare subpopulation of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells (CSCs), has been hypothesized to be responsible for metastatic disease and therapy resistance. Current treatments are highly in...

  2. Involvement of caveolin-1 in low shear stress-induced breast cancer cell motility and adhesion: Roles of FAK/Src and ROCK/p-MLC pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Niya; Li, Shun; Tang, Kai; Bai, Hongxia; Peng, Yueting; Yang, Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells translocating to distant sites are subjected to hemodynamic shear forces during their passage in the blood vessels. Low shear stress (LSS) plays a critical role in the regulation of various aspects of tumor cells functions, including motility and adhesion. Beyond its structural role, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the important component of caveolae, represents a modulator of several cancer-associated functions as tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of Cav-1 in regulating tumor cells response to shear stress remains poorly explored. Here, we characterized the role of LSS and Cav-1 in mediating cell motility and adhesion on human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. We first showed that LSS exposure promoted cell polarity and focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, thus indicating elevated cell migration. Silencing of Cav-1 leaded to a significantly lower formation of stress fibers. However, LSS exposure was able to rescue it via the alteration of actin-associated proteins expression, including ROCK, p-MLC, cofilin and filamin A. Time-lapse migration assay indicated that Cav-1 expression fostered MDA-MB-231 cells motility and LSS triggered cells to rapidly generate new lamellipodia. Furthermore, Cav-1 and LSS significantly influenced cell adhesion. Taken together, our findings provide insights into mechanisms underlying LSS triggered events mediated by downstream Cav-1, including FAK/Src and ROCK/p-MLC pathways, involved in the reorganization of the cytoskeleton, cell motility, FA dynamics and breast cancer cell adhesion.

  3. Preliminary Evidence on the Diagnostic and Molecular Role of Circulating Soluble EGFR in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Lococo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of biological diagnostic factors providing clinically-relevant information to guide physician decision-making are still needed for diseases with poor outcomes, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a promising molecule in the clinical management of NSCLC. While the EGFR transmembrane form has been extensively investigated in large clinical trials, the soluble, circulating EGFR isoform (sEGFR, which may have a potential clinical use, has rarely been considered. This study investigates the use of sEGFR as a potential diagnostic biomarker for NSCLC and also characterizes the biological function of sEGFR to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the course of action of this protein. Plasma sEGFR levels from a heterogeneous cohort of 37 non-advanced NSCLC patients and 54 healthy subjects were analyzed by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The biological function of sEGFR was analyzed in vitro using NSCLC cell lines, investigating effects on cell proliferation and migration. We found that plasma sEGFR was significantly decreased in the NSCLC patient group as compared to the control group (median value: 48.6 vs. 55.6 ng/mL respectively; p = 0.0002. Moreover, we demonstrated that sEGFR inhibits growth and migration of NSCLC cells in vitro through molecular mechanisms that included perturbation of EGF/EGFR cell signaling and holoreceptor internalization. These data show that sEGFR is a potential circulating biomarker with a physiological protective role, providing a first approach to the functional role of the soluble isoform of EGFR. However, the impact of these data on daily clinical practice needs to be further investigated in larger prospective studies.

  4. Non-small cell lung cancer. The role of chemoimmunoradiotherapy after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kshivets, O. [Siauliai Cancer Center, Dept. of Surgery, Siauliai (Lithuania)

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine expediency of adjuvant chemoimmunoradiotherapy for radically operated non-small cell lung cancer patients (LCP) with pathologic stage II-III (T1-4N0-2M0G1-3). In retrospective trial (1985-1998) a 5-year survival of 54 consecutive radically operated LCP after radical procedures (group C) and with therapy (group A) was compared with 5-year survival of 264 LCP, after radical procedures (group C) and with 5-year survival of 86 radically operated LCP after postoperative radiotherapy (group B) (45-50 Gy). 1 cycle of chemoimmunotherapy was given on day 10-14 after complete resections. Radiotherapy (45-50 Gy) was administered since day 7 after 1 cycle. After irradiation 3-4 courses of CAVT were repeated every 21-28 day. Variables selected for 5-year survival and life span study were sex, age, TNMG, cell type, tumor size. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in curves between groups of LCP were evaluated using a logrank test. Multivariate proportional hazard Cox regression, multi-factor clustering, structural equation modeling and Monte Carlo simulation were used to determine any significant overall regularity. 5-year survival was superior in group A (64.8%: 35 out of 54 LCP with N0-2: life span=1998.2{+-}156.9 days) compared with group B (45.3%: 39 out of 86 LCP with N0-2; life span=1296.4{+-}109.5 days) (P<0.001). 5-year survival of group C was 63.6% (168 out of 264 LCP with N02; life span=1738.3{+-}63.4 days) (P>0.05 for group A and P<0.001 for group B). For LCP with N1-2 5-year survival was significantly superior for group A (63.6%: 21 from 33; life span=1934.0{+-}189.9 days) compared with group C (28.1%: 25 out of 89; life span=1056.9{+-}91.1 days) (P<0.001) and with group B (35.6%: 21 out of 59; life span=1051.7{+-}119.6 days) (P<0.001). Structural equation modeling and Monte Carlo simulation confirmed significant overall differences between 5-year survival (P<0.05) and life span (P<0.001) of LCP

  5. Insulin receptor what role in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A

    1997-10-01

    It is commonly believed that the insulin receptor mainly mediates the metabolic effects of insulin, whereas the closely related IGF-I receptor is considered a major factor for the regulation of cell proliferation. Experimental and epidemiological evidence indicates, however, that insulin and insulin receptors may play an important role in breast cancer. This article reviews evidence indicating that (a) insulin receptors are overexpressed in human breast cancer, (b) insulin stimulates growth in breast cancer cells, (c) cells transfected with human insulin receptor may acquire a ligand-dependent transformed phenotype, and (d) breast cancer is associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. These findings may open new possibilities in breast cancer prevention, prognosis assessment, and therapy. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:306-312). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  6. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  7. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pokrywczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  8. Emerging role of cell polarity proteins in breast cancer progression and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee SJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudipa June Chatterjee, Luke McCaffrey Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Centre, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases that frequently exhibits loss of growth control, and disrupted tissue organization and differentiation. Several recent studies indicate that apical–basal polarity provides a tumor-suppressive function, and that disrupting polarity proteins affects many stages of breast cancer progression from initiation through metastasis. In this review we highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which loss of apical–basal polarity deregulates apoptosis, proliferation, and promotes invasion and metastasis in breast cancer. Keywords: apical, basal, oncogene, tumor suppressor, proliferation, apoptosis

  9. Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway play important roles in activating liver cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghua; Sun, Qian; Wang, Peng; Liu, Man; Xiong, Si; Luo, Jing; Huang, Hai; Du, Qiang; Geller, David A; Cheng, Bin

    2016-02-02

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is driven and maintained by liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) that display stem cell properties. These LCSCs are promoted by the intersecting of Notch and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that LCSCs with markers CD90, CD24, CD13, and CD133 possess stem properties of self-renewal and tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice. The increased expression of these markers was correlated with advanced disease stage, larger tumors, and worse overall survival in 61 HCC cases. We also found that both Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways played important roles in increasing the stem-ness characteristics of LCSCs. Our data suggested that Notch1 was downstream of Wnt/β-catenin. The active form of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) expression depended on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Moreover, Notch1 negatively contributed to Wnt/β-catenin signaling modulation. Knock down of Notch1 with lentivirus N1ShRNA up-regulated the active form of β-catenin. Ectopic expression of NICD with LV-Notch1 in LCSCs attenuated β-catenin/TCF dependent luciferase activity significantly. In addition, there was a non-proteasome mediated feedback loop between Notch1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LCSCs. The central role of Notch and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in LCSCs may provide an attractive therapeutic strategy against HCC.

  10. Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway play important roles in activating liver cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghua; Sun, Qian; Wang, Peng; Liu, Man; Xiong, Si; Luo, Jing; Huang, Hai; Du, Qiang; Geller, David A.; Cheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is driven and maintained by liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) that display stem cell properties. These LCSCs are promoted by the intersecting of Notch and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that LCSCs with markers CD90, CD24, CD13, and CD133 possess stem properties of self-renewal and tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice. The increased expression of these markers was correlated with advanced disease stage, larger tumors, and worse overall survival in 61 HCC cases. We also found that both Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways played important roles in increasing the stem-ness characteristics of LCSCs. Our data suggested that Notch1 was downstream of Wnt/β-catenin. The active form of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) expression depended on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Moreover, Notch1 negatively contributed to Wnt/β-catenin signaling modulation. Knock down of Notch1 with lentivirus N1ShRNA up-regulated the active form of β-catenin. Ectopic expression of NICD with LV-Notch1 in LCSCs attenuated β-catenin/TCF dependent luciferase activity significantly. In addition, there was a non-proteasome mediated feedback loop between Notch1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LCSCs. The central role of Notch and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in LCSCs may provide an attractive therapeutic strategy against HCC. PMID:26735577

  11. The Role of AR- and VDR-Modulated miRNAs in Sensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    100 U/mL penicillin and 100 μg/mL streptomycin. Cells were maintained at 37°C in a humi- dified atmosphere of 95% air/5% CO2. For all the experi...Mohler JL, et al. Androgen receptor stabilization in recurrent prostate cancer is associated with hypersensitivity to low androgen. Cancer Res 2001; 61

  12. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balraj; Lucci, Anthony

    2002-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2, is expressed in normal brain and kidney, activated macrophages, synoviocytes during inflammation, and malignant epithelial cells. COX-2 expression is stimulated by a number of inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, oncogenes, lipopolysaccharides, and tumor promoters. There is evidence that COX-2 plays a key role in tumorigenesis through stimulating epithelial cell proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, stimulating angiogenesis, enhancing cell invasiveness, mediating immune suppression, and by increasing the production of mutagens. Results of several studies using mouse models of colon cancer and the results of clinical trials have shown COX-2 to be a useful target for the prevention and treatment of colon cancer. Studies with several other epithelial cancers involving different organ sites, e.g., breast, prostate, bladder, lung, and pancreas, suggest that COX-2 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these cancers. In this review, we summarize the studies that pertain to the involvement of COX-2 in breast cancer. COX-2 overexpression affects the physiological processes at different organ sites in a similar manner, although specific effectors and targets of COX-2 may differ at different sites. Thus in reviewing the data on the involvement of COX-2 in breast cancer, we have also considered the findings regarding the role of COX-2 in other organ sites. Studies from mouse models of mammary tumorigenesis and from human breast cancer cell lines provide evidence that COX-2 overexpression plays an important role in the pathogenesis of malignant breast cancer in humans. Because of availability of effective and relatively safe COX-2 inhibitors, it should be soon possible to evaluate their effectiveness in the clinic for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. It is likely that the COX-2 inhibitors will be effective in the treatment regimens involving combination

  13. Bioinformatics Analyses of the Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

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    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to identify the expression pattern of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to explore its potential correlation with the progression of NSCLC.Gene expression profile GSE39345 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Twenty healthy controls and 32 NSCLC samples before chemotherapy were analyzed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Then pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed and protein-protein interaction networks were constructed. Particularly, VEGF genes and the VEGF signaling pathway were analyzed. The sub-network was constructed followed by functional enrichment analysis.Total 1666 up-regulated and 1542 down-regulated DEGs were identified. The down-regulated DEGs were mainly enriched in the pathways associated with cancer. VEGFA and VEGFB were found to be the initiating factor of VEGF signaling pathway. In addition, in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, VEGFA and VEGFB associated sub-network, kinase insert domain receptor (KDR, fibronectin 1 (FN1, transforming growth factor beta induced (TGFBI and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA were found to interact with at least two of the three hub genes. The DEGs in this sub-network were mainly enriched in Gene Ontology terms related to cell proliferation.EGFR, KDR, FN1, TGFBI and PCNA may interact with VEGFA to play important roles in NSCLC tumorigenesis. These genes and corresponding proteins may have the potential to be used as the targets for either diagnosis or treatment of patients with NSCLC.

  14. Breast cancer stem cell-like cells are more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-stem cells: role of ATM.

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    Seog-Young Kim

    Full Text Available There are contradictory observations about the different radiosensitivities of cancer stem cells and cancer non-stem cells. To resolve these contradictory observations, we studied radiosensitivities by employing breast cancer stem cell (CSC-like MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB453 cells as well as their corresponding non-stem cells. CSC-like cells proliferate without differentiating and have characteristics of tumor-initiating cells [1]. These cells were exposed to γ-rays (1.25-8.75 Gy and survival curves were determined by colony formation. A final slope, D(0, of the survival curve for each cell line was determined to measure radiosensitivity. The D(0 of CSC-like and non-stem MDA-MB-453 cells were 1.16 Gy and 1.55 Gy, respectively. Similar results were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells (0.94 Gy vs. 1.56 Gy. After determination of radiosensitivity, we investigated intrinsic cellular determinants which influence radiosensitivity including cell cycle distribution, free-radical scavengers and DNA repair. We observed that even though cell cycle status and antioxidant content may contribute to differential radiosensitivity, differential DNA repair capacity may be a greater determinant of radiosensitivity. Unlike non-stem cells, CSC-like cells have little/no sublethal damage repair, a low intracellular level of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and delay of γ-H2AX foci removal (DNA strand break repair. These results suggest that low DNA repair capacity is responsible for the high radiosensitivity of these CSC-like cells.

  15. Extraction and identification of exosomes from drug-resistant breast cancer cells and their potential role in cell-to-cell drug-resistance transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许金金

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether docetaxel-resistant cells(MCF-7/Doc)and doxorubicin-resistant cells(MCF-7/ADM)can secrete Exosomes and their potential role in cell-cell drug-resistance transfer.Methods Exosomes were extracted from the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7/Doc and MCF-7/ADM cells by fractionation ultracentrifugation,and were identified by transmission

  16. Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Renal Cell Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Angel I.; Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Amato, Robert J., E-mail: Robert.amato@uth.tmc.edu [Division of Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-10-26

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is traditionally considered to be radioresistant; therefore, conventional radiotherapy (RT) fraction sizes of 1.8 to 2 Gy are thought to have little role in the management of primary RCC, especially for curative disease. In the setting of metastatic RCC, conventionally fractionated RT has been an effective palliative treatment in 50% of patients. Recent technological advances in radiation oncology have led to the clinical implementation of image-guided radiotherapy, allowing biologically potent doses to the tumors intra- and extra-cranially. As predicted by radiobiologic modeling, favorable outcomes have been observed with highly hypofractionated schemes modeled after the experience with intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for RCC brain metastases with reported local control rates averaging 85%. At present, both primary and metastatic RCC tumors may be successfully treated using stereotactic approaches, which utilize steep dose gradients to maximally preserve function and avoid toxicity of adjacent organs including liver, uninvolved kidney, bowel, and spinal cord regions. Future endeavors will combine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with novel targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and targeted rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, to maximize both local and systemic control.

  17. Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Renal Cell Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel I. Blanco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is traditionally considered to be radioresistant; therefore, conventional radiotherapy (RT fraction sizes of 1.8 to 2 Gy are thought to have little role in the management of primary RCC, especially for curative disease. In the setting of metastatic RCC, conventionally fractionated RT has been an effective palliative treatment in 50% of patients. Recent technological advances in radiation oncology have led to the clinical implementation of image-guided radiotherapy, allowing biologically potent doses to the tumors intra- and extra-cranially. As predicted by radiobiologic modeling, favorable outcomes have been observed with highly hypofractionated schemes modeled after the experience with intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS for RCC brain metastases with reported local control rates averaging 85%. At present, both primary and metastatic RCC tumors may be successfully treated using stereotactic approaches, which utilize steep dose gradients to maximally preserve function and avoid toxicity of adjacent organs including liver, uninvolved kidney, bowel, and spinal cord regions. Future endeavors will combine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT with novel targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and targeted rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, to maximize both local and systemic control.

  18. The role of microRNA-21 in predicting brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Zhi; Gu, Tao; Xu, Shu-Feng; Dong, Li-Xin; Li, Xin; Fu, Bao-Hong; Fu, Zhan-Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at exploring the role of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in predicting brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A total of 132 NSCLC patients, including 68 patients with BM and 64 patients without BM, were included in the study. NSCLC cells were collected and assigned to the inhibitor (IN) group, the mock group, and the negative control (NC) group. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the miR-21 expression. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were detected by colony-forming assay, MTT assay, transwell assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Angiogenesis was measured by endothelial cell tube formation assay. Results The miR-21 expression was higher in NSCLC patients with BM than in those without BM. The miR-21 expression in the IN group was lower than that in the NC and mock groups. Compared with the NC and mock groups, the values of optical density (OD) and the colony-forming number decreased in the IN group. Compared with the NC and mock groups, cell invasion and migration abilities significantly reduced in the IN group. The IN group had higher apoptosis rate than the NC and mock groups. The tube length was shorter and the number of junction points was less in the IN group in comparison to the NC and mock groups. Conclusion miR-21 might be a potential biomarker for the development of BM in NSCLC patients and could promote the proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of NSCLC cells.

  19. The Roles of 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana on the Nrf2-Anti-Oxidant System and the Cell Cycle in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chieh Yu; You, Bang Jau; Lee, Chia Lin; Wu, Yang Chang; Lin, Wen Hsin; Lu, Te Ling; Chang, Fei-Ching; Lee, Hong Zin

    2016-01-01

    4[Formula: see text]-Hydroxywithanolide E is an active component of the extract of Physalis peruviana that has been reported to exhibit antitumor effects. Although the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM)-dependent DNA damage signaling pathway in 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced apoptosis of breast cancer MCF-7 cells was demonstrated in our previous study, the relationship between ROS production and the cellular defense system response in 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced cell death requires further verification. The present study suggests that ROS play an important role in 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced MCF-7 cell death in which anti-oxidants, such as glutathione or N-acetylcysteine, can resist the 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced accumulation of ROS and cell death. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine or glutathione can reverse the 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced changes in the cell cycle distribution and the expression of cell cycle regulators. We found that the 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced ROS accumulation was correlated with the upregulation of Nrf2 and Nrf2-downstream genes, such as antioxidative defense enzymes. In general, the activity of Nrf2 is regulated by the Ras signalling pathway. However, we demonstrated that Nrf2 was activated during 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced MCF-7 cell death in spite of the 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced inhibition of the Ras/Raf/ERK pathway. The activity and protein expression of superoxide dismutase and catalase were involved in the 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E-induced ROS production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, 4[Formula: see text]-hydroxywithanolide E was demonstrated to significantly reduce the sizes of the tumor nodules in the human breast cancer MDA-MB231 xenograft tumor model.

  20. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation

  1. Role of PSMA in Aberrant Cell Cycle Progression in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    development and progression. While a high- fat diet has 10 been linked to prostate cancer the identity of other food products contributing to...m etastatic PCa. One of the critical ingredients of processed m eat is the high level of sodium from salt, food preservatives, and flavoring

  2. Expression of Peroxisome Proferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ in Human Transitional Bladder Cancer and its Role in Inducing Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Fei Guan

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the expression and role of the thiazolidinedione (TZD-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, in human bladder cancers. In situ hybridization shows that PPARγ mRNA is highly expressed in all human transitional epithelial cell cancers (TCCa's studied (n=11. PPARγ was also expressed in five TCCa cell lines as determined by RNase protection assays and immunoblot. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα, a 9-cis-retinoic acid stimulated (9-cis-RA heterodimeric partner of PPARγ, was also co-expressed in all TCCa tissues and cell lines. Treatment of the T24 bladder cancer cells with the TZD PPARγ agonist troglitazone, dramatically inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation and induced cell death. Addition of the RXRα ligands, 9-cis-RA or LG100268, sensitized T24 bladder cancer cells to the lethal effect of troglitazone and two other PPARγ activators, ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15dPGJ2. Troglitazone treatment increased expression of two cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21wAF1/CIP1 and p16INK4, reduced cyclin D1 expression, consistent with G1 arrest. Troglitazone also induced an endogenous PPARγ target gene in T24 cells, adipocyte-type fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP, the expression of which correlates with bladder cancer differentiation. In situ hybridization shows that A-FABP expression is localized to normal uroepithelial cells as well as some TCCa's. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPARγ is expressed in human TCCa where it may play a role in regulating TCCa differentiation and survival, thereby providing a potential target for therapy of uroepithelial cancers.

  3. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) in human transitional bladder cancer and its role in inducing cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y F; Zhang, Y H; Breyer, R M; Davis, L; Breyer, M D

    1999-10-01

    The present study examined the expression and role of the thiazolidinedione (TZD)-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), in human bladder cancers. In situ hybridization shows that PPARgamma mRNA is highly expressed in all human transitional epithelial cell cancers (TCCa's) studied (n=11). PPARgamma was also expressed in five TCCa cell lines as determined by RNase protection assays and immunoblot. Retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha), a 9-cis-retinoic acid stimulated (9-cis-RA) heterodimeric partner of PPARgamma, was also co-expressed in all TCCa tissues and cell lines. Treatment of the T24 bladder cancer cells with the TZD PPARgamma agonist troglitazone, dramatically inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation and induced cell death. Addition of the RXRalpha ligands, 9-cis-RA or LG100268, sensitized T24 bladder cancer cells to the lethal effect of troglitazone and two other PPAR- activators, ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-PGJ2 (15dPGJ(2)). Troglitazone treatment increased expression of two cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and p16(INK4), and reduced cyclin D1 expression, consistent with G1 arrest. Troglitazone also induced an endogenous PPARgamma target gene in T24 cells, adipocyte-type fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP), the expression of which correlates with bladder cancer differentiation. In situ hybridization shows that A-FABP expression is localized to normal uroepithelial cells as well as some TCCa's. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPARgamma is expressed in human TCCa where it may play a role in regulating TCCa differentiation and survival, thereby providing a potential target for therapy of uroepithelial cancers.

  4. Novel role of microRNAs in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jun-jie; XIA Shu-jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss the novel biomarkers of microRNAs in prostate cancer.Data sources The literatures about microRNAs and prostate cancer cited in this review were obtained mainly from Pubmed published in English from 2004 to 2012.Study selection Original articles regarding the novel role of microRNAs in prostate cancer were selected.Results MicroRNAs play an important role in prostate cancer such as cell differentiation,proliferation,apoptosis,and invasion.Especially microRNAs correlate with prostate cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT),cancer stem cells (CSCs),drug sensitivity,cancer microenvironment,energy metabolism,androgen independence transformation,and diagnosis prediction.Conclusions MicroRNAs are involved in various aspects of prostate cancer biology.The role of microRNA in the initiation and development of prostate cancer deserves further study.

  5. Amino acids and immune response: a role for cysteine, glutamine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and arginine in T-cell function and cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikalidis, Angelos K

    2015-01-01

    While proteins are critical for immunity, T-cells constitute a critical component of adaptive immunity by clearing cancerous cells among other abnormal cells. However, cancer cells exhibit a potential to escape T-cell control by employing mechanisms not completely delineated. Interesting work has investigated how certain amino acids affect the proliferation rate of T-cells as well as their effectiveness in clearing tumors. The role of amino acids cysteine, glutamine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and arginine in immunomodulation and particularly regarding T-cell proliferation and activation is discussed. The redox balance is reported to affect T-cell proliferation via modulation of cysteine availability. In addition antigen presenting cells (APCs), similar to myeloid cells determine the availability of amino acids in the extracellular microenvironment affecting T-cell proliferation and activation. A better mechanistic understanding of T-cell function modulation via amino acid signaling or metabolic properties may be helpful towards optimization of adaptive immunity with implications for cancer prognosis and treatment.

  6. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  7. A novel role for peptidylarginine deiminases in microvesicle release reveals therapeutic potential of PAD inhibition in sensitizing prostate cancer cells to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Kholia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Protein deimination, defined as the post-translational conversion of protein-bound arginine to citrulline, is carried out by a family of 5 calcium-dependent enzymes, the peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs and has been linked to various cancers. Cellular microvesicle (MV release, which is involved in cancer progression, and deimination have not been associated before. We hypothesize that elevated PAD expression, observed in cancers, causes increased MV release in cancer cells and contributes to cancer progression. Background: We have previously reported that inhibition of MV release sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. PAD2 and PAD4, the isozymes expressed in patients with malignant tumours, can be inhibited with the pan-PAD-inhibitor chloramidine (Cl-am. We sought to investigate whether Cl-am can inhibit MV release and whether this pathway could be utilized to further increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to drug-directed treatment. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (PC3 were induced to release high levels of MVs upon BzATP stimulation of P2X7 receptors. Western blotting with the pan-protein deimination antibody F95 was used to detect a range of deiminated proteins in cells stimulated to microvesiculate. Changes in deiminated proteins during microvesiculation were revealed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry identified deiminated target proteins with putative roles in microvesiculation. Conclusion: We report for the first time a novel function of PADs in the biogenesis of MVs in cancer cells. Our results reveal that during the stimulation of prostate cancer cells (PC3 to microvesiculate, PAD2 and PAD4 expression levels and the deimination of cytoskeletal actin are increased. Pharmacological inhibition of PAD enzyme activity using Cl-am significantly reduced MV release and abrogated the deimination of cytoskeletal actin. We demonstrated that combined Cl-am and methotrexate (MTX treatment of

  8. Oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaini, Giancarlo; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial metabolism may play a key role in controlling cancer cells life and proliferation. Recent evidence also indicates how the altered contribution of these organelles to metabolism and the resistance of cancer mitochondria against apoptosis-associated permeabilization are closely related. The hallmarks of cancer growth, increased glycolysis and lactate production in tumours, have raised attention due to recent observations suggesting a wide spectrum of oxidative phosphorylation deficit and decreased availability of ATP associated with malignancies and tumour cell expansion. More specifically, alteration in signal transduction pathways directly affects mitochondrial proteins playing critical roles in controlling the membrane potential as UCP2 and components of both MPTP and oxphos complexes, or in controlling cells life and death as the Bcl-2 proteins family. Moreover, since mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics, are also involved in processes of cells life and death, proper regulation of these mitochondrial functions is crucial for tumours to grow. Therefore a better understanding of the key pathophysiological differences between mitochondria in cancer cells and in their non-cancer surrounding tissue is crucial to the finding of tools interfering with these peculiar tumour mitochondrial functions and will disclose novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. Here, we review the peculiarity of tumour mitochondrial bioenergetics and the mode it is linked to the cell metabolism, providing a short overview of the evidence accumulated so far, but highlighting the more recent advances.

  9. The Role of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Conventional breast cancer extirpation involves resection of parts of or the whole gland, resulting in asymmetry and disfiguration. Given the unsatisfactory aesthetic outcomes, patients often desire postmastectomy reconstructive procedures. Autologous fat grafting has been proposed for reconstructive purposes for decades to restore form and anatomy after mastectomy. Fat has the inherent advantage of being autologous tissue and the most natural-appearing filler, but given its inconsistent eng...

  10. The role of adipose-derived stem cells in breast cancer progression and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Conventional breast cancer extirpation involves resection of parts of or the whole gland, resulting in asymmetry and disfiguration. Given the unsatisfactory aesthetic outcomes, patients often desire postmastectomy reconstructive procedures. Autologous fat grafting has been proposed for reconstructive purposes for decades to restore form and anatomy after mastectomy. Fat has the inherent advantage of being autologous tissue and the most natural-appearing filler, but given its inconsistent engr...

  11. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays a critical role in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. In this study, submicromolar methylselenol was generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and both colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to...

  12. Role of PELP1 in EGFR-ER Signaling Crosstalk in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    tumors [23]. Cells that mimic PELP1/MNAR cytoplasmic localization in tumors (PELP1-cyto cells) were hypersensitive to E2 but resistant to tamoxifen. The... hypersensitivity of tumor cells to low levels of estradiol. This would promote, tumorigenesis, hormonal independence and metastasis 6 Clin Exp Metastasis...serum (Hyclone Laboratories Ltd.), 100 U/mL penicillin G, and 100 mg/mL streptomycin (Life Technologies, Inc.). Antibodies against vinculin were

  13. Differential role of Sloan-Kettering Institute (Ski) protein in Nodal and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-induced Smad signaling in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, BaoHan T; Cody, Bianca; Cao, Yang; Khan, Shafiq A

    2012-11-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways contain both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting activities. We have demonstrated that Nodal, another member of the TGF-β superfamily, and its receptors are expressed in prostate cancer cells. Nodal and TGF-β exerted similar biological effects on prostate cells; both inhibited proliferation in WPE, RWPE1 and DU145 cells, whereas neither had any effect on the proliferation of LNCaP or PC3 cells. Interestingly, Nodal and TGF-β induced migration in PC3 cells, but not in DU145 cells. TGF-β induced predominantly phosphorylation of Smad3, whereas Nodal induced phosphorylation of only Smad2. We also determined the expression and differential role of Ski, a corepressor of Smad2/3, in Nodal and TGF-β signaling in prostate cancer cells. Similar levels of Ski mRNA were found in several established prostate cell lines; however, high levels of Ski protein were only detected in prostate cancer cells and prostate cancer tissue samples. Exogenous Nodal and TGF-β had no effects on Ski mRNA levels. On the other hand, TGF-β induced a rapid degradation of Ski protein mediated by the proteasomal pathway, whereas Nodal had no effect on Ski protein. Reduced Ski levels correlated with increased basal and TGF-β-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Knockdown of endogenous Ski reduced proliferation in DU145 cells and enhanced migration of PC3 cells. We conclude that high levels of Ski expression in prostate cancer cells may be responsible for repression of TGF-β and Smad3 signaling, but Ski protein levels do not influence Nodal and Smad2 signaling.

  14. Atypical cell populations associated with acquired resistance to cytostatics and cancer stem cell features: the role of mitochondria in nuclear encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Carballo, David; Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  15. Role of TMS1 Silencing in the Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells to Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    culture dishes are coated with poly(2- hydroxyethyl-methacrylate), which is a hydrogel used to prevent adhesion of cells to growth surfaces. Seeding...Procaspase-8m* Cleaved Caspase-8 - 22. TMS1 ’ Amp -WM fk-ubulin m- Figure 6. Loss of TMS 1 expression in MB468 cells causes a reduction in caspase-8

  16. Role of ornithine decarboxylase in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wensheng Deng; Xian Jiang; Yu Mei; Jingzhong Sun; Rong Ma; Xianxi Liu; Hui Sun; Hui Tian; Xueying Sun

    2008-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis that decarboxylates ornithine to putrescine, has become a promising target for cancer research. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of ODC in breast cancer. We detected expression of ODC in breast cancer tissues and four breast cancer cell lines, and transfected breast cancer cells with an adenoviral vector carrying antisense ODC (rAd-ODC/Ex3as) and examined their growth and migration.ODC was overexpressed in breast cancer tissues and cell lines compared with non-tumor tissues and normal breast epithelial celis,and there was a positive correlation between the level of ODC mRNA and the staging of tumors.The expression of ODC correlated with cyclin D1,a cell cycle protein,in synchronized breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.Gene transfection of rAd-ODC/Ex3as markedly down-regulated expression Of ODC and cyclin D1,resulting in suppression of proliferation and cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 phase,and the inhibifion of colony formation,an anchorage-independent growth pattern,and the migratory ability of MDA-MB-231 cells.rAd-ODC/Ex3as also markedly reduced the concentration of putrescine,but not spermidine or spermine,in MDA-MB-231 cells.The results suggested that the ODC gene might act as aprognostic factor for breast cancer and it could be a promising therapeutic target.

  17. Roles of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes BRCA’s in Mammary Epithelial Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    associated factor 3 - 3.0 IFNAR1 AA133989 interferon (alpha, beta and omega) receptor 1 -3.1 PDXK AW449022 pyridoxal ( pyridoxine , vitamin B6...IFNAR1 AA133989 Interferon (, , and ) receptor 1 3.1 PDXK AW449022 Pyridoxal ( pyridoxine , vitamin B6) kinase 4.0 HTATIP2 BC002439 HIV-1 Tat...evaluate the risk of breast cancer. N Engl J Med 336, 1409-1415. 26 Cullmann, G., Fien, K., Kobayashi, R., and Stillman, B. (1995). Characterization

  18. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yunguang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zheng Siyuan [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Carbone, David P. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zhao Zhongming, E-mail: zhongming.zhao@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Lu Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  19. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples.

  20. Regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway by an androgen receptor-mTOR-mediated mechanism and its role in prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouko, E; Khan, A S; White, M A; Han, J J; Shi, Y; Merchant, F A; Sharpe, M A; Xin, L; Frigo, D E

    2014-05-26

    Cancer cells display an increased demand for glucose. Therefore, identifying the specific aspects of glucose metabolism that are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer may uncover novel therapeutic nodes. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the role of the pentose phosphate pathway in cancer. This metabolic pathway is advantageous for rapidly growing cells because it provides nucleotide precursors and helps regenerate the reducing agent NADPH, which can contribute to reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging. Correspondingly, clinical data suggest glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, is upregulated in prostate cancer. We hypothesized that androgen receptor (AR) signaling, which plays an essential role in the disease, mediated prostate cancer cell growth in part by increasing flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. Here, we determined that G6PD, NADPH and ribose synthesis were all increased by AR signaling. Further, this process was necessary to modulate ROS levels. Pharmacological or molecular inhibition of G6PD abolished these effects and blocked androgen-mediated cell growth. Mechanistically, regulation of G6PD via AR in both hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant models of prostate cancer was abolished following rapamycin treatment, indicating that AR increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated upregulation of G6PD. Accordingly, in two separate mouse models of Pten deletion/elevated mTOR signaling, Pb-Cre;Pten(f/f) and K8-CreER(T2);Pten(f/f), G6PD levels correlated with prostate cancer progression in vivo. Importantly, G6PD levels remained high during progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that AR signaling can promote prostate cancer through the upregulation of G6PD and therefore, the flux of sugars through the pentose phosphate pathway. Hence, these findings support a

  1. Active Roles of Tumor Stroma in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa I. Khamis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of death for breast cancer patients. Tumors are heterogenous cellular entities composed of cancer cells and cells of the microenvironment in which they reside. A reciprocal dynamic interaction occurs between the tumor cells and their surrounding stroma under physiological and pathological conditions. This tumor-host communication interface mediates the escape of tumor cells at the primary site, survival of circulating cancer cells in the vasculature, and growth of metastatic cancer at secondary site. Each step of the metastatic process is accompanied by recruitment of stromal cells from the microenvironment and production of unique array of growth factors and chemokines. Stromal microenvironment may play active roles in breast cancer metastasis. Elucidating the types of cells recruited and signal pathways involved in the crosstalk between tumor cells and stromal cells will help identify novel strategies for cotargeting cancer cells and tumor stromal cells to suppress metastasis and improve patient outcome.

  2. Role of ERRF, a novel ER-related nuclear factor, in the growth control of ER-positive human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dan; Fu, Xiaoying; Fan, Songqing; Wu, Xiao; Wang, Xin-Xin; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Ni, Jianping Jenny; Fu, Li; Zhu, Zhengmao; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2012-03-01

    Whereas estrogen-estrogen receptor α (ER) signaling plays an important role in breast cancer growth, it is also necessary for the differentiation of normal breast epithelial cells. How this functional conversion occurs, however, remains unknown. Based on a genome-wide sequencing study that identified mutations in several breast cancer genes, we examined some of the genes for mutations, expression levels, and functional effects on cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. We present the data for C1orf64 or ER-related factor (ERRF) from 31 cell lines and 367 primary breast cancer tumors. Whereas mutation of ERRF was infrequent (1 of 79 or 1.3%), its expression was up-regulated in breast cancer, and the up-regulation was more common in lower-stage tumors. In addition, increased ERRF expression was significantly associated with ER and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, which was still valid in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors. In ER-positive tumors, ERRF expression was inversely correlated with HER2 status. Furthermore, higher ERRF protein expression was significantly associated with better disease-free survival and overall survival, particularly in ER- and/or PR-positive and HER2-negative tumors (luminal A subtype). Functionally, knockdown of ERRF in two ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, T-47D and MDA-MB-361, suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in xenograft models. These results suggest that ERRF plays a role in estrogen-ER-mediated growth of breast cancer cells and could, thus, be a potential therapeutic target.

  3. Role of Natural Killer T Cells in Immunogenic Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Classification: Biological sciences; Immunology Key-words: γδT cells, IL-17, IL-23, IL-1β, invariant TCR, microbiome , RORγt, alpha- galactosylceramide...beneficial or harmful to the host depending upon to the disease . For example, IL-17 is an important anti-microbial cytokine predominantly due to its...the microbiome , we have investigated the potential involvement of the commensal flora on the homeostasis of this particular subset of γδT cells. In

  4. Regulatory roles of tumor-suppressor proteins and noncoding RNA in cancer and normal cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, Alan; Song, Xu

    2008-04-15

    We describe a mechanism for reversible regulation of gene transcription, mediated by a family of tumor-suppressor proteins (TSP) containing a DNA-binding domain (DBD) that binds to a gene and represses transcription, and RNA-binding domains (RBDs) that bind RNA, usually a noncoding RNA (ncRNA), forming a TSP/RNA complex that releases the TSP from a gene and reverses repression. This mechanism appears to be involved in the regulation of embryogenesis, oncogenesis, and steroidogenesis. Embryonic cells express high levels of RNA that bind to a TSP and prevent repression of proto-oncogenes that drive cell proliferation. The level of the RNA subsequently decreases in most differentiating cells, enabling a TSP to repress proto-oncogenes and stop cell proliferation. Oncogenesis can result when the level of the RNA fails to decrease in a proliferating cell or increases in a differentiated cell. This mechanism also regulates transcription of P450scc, the first gene in the steroidogenic pathway.

  5. The roles of beta-adrenergic receptors in tumorigenesis and the possible use of beta-adrenergic blockers for cancer treatment: possible genetic and cell-signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luong KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Khanh vinh quốc Lương, Lan Thi Hoàng NguyễnVietnamese American Medical Research Foundation, Westminster, California, USAAbstract: Cancer is the leading cause of death in the USA, and the incidence of cancer increases dramatically with age. Beta-adrenergic blockers appear to have a beneficial clinical effect in cancer patients. In this paper, we review the evidence of an association between β-adrenergic blockade and cancer. Genetic studies have provided the opportunity to determine which proteins link β-adrenergic blockade to cancer pathology. In particular, this link involves the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the renin–angiotensin system, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Beta-adrenergic blockers also exert anticancer effects through non-genomic factors, including matrix metalloproteinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide synthase. In conclusion, β-adrenergic blockade may play a beneficial role in cancer treatment. Additional investigations that examine β-adrenergic blockers as cancer therapeutics are required to further elucidate this role.Keywords: β-adrenergic blocker, neoplasm, β-adrenergic antagonism, non-genomic factor

  6. Role of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in the cell cycle progression of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Zhang, Zhuo; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-10-31

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men. Recent studies demonstrated that PI3K signaling is an important intracellular mediator which is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, anti-apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. In the present study, we demonstrate that the inhibition of PI3K activity by LY294002, inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation and induced the G(1) cell cycle arrest. This effect was accompanied by the decreased expression of G(1)-associated proteins including cyclin D1, CDK4, and Rb phosphorylation at Ser780, Ser795, and Ser807/811, whereas expression of CDK6 and beta-actin was not affected by LY294002. The expression of cyclin kinase inhibitor, p21(CIP1/WAF1), was induced by LY294002, while levels of p16(INK4) were decreased in the same experiment. The inhibition of PI3K activity also inhibited the phosphorylation and p70(S6K), but not MAPK. PI3K regulates cell cycle through AKT, mTOR to p70(S6K). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has similar inhibitory effects on G(1) cell cycle progression and expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and Rb phosphorylation. These results suggest that PI3K mediates G(1) cell cycle progression and cyclin expression through the activation of AKT/mTOR/p70(S6K) signaling pathway in the prostate cancer cells.

  7. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  8. Identification of Max binding protein as a novel binding protein of Nck1 and characterization of its role in inhibiting human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi; HUANG Tao; WANG Ya-feng; ZHANG Kun-sun; CHEN Dong; PENG Bao-gang

    2012-01-01

    Background The tendency of tumor cells to disperse throughout the liver is a distinct feature of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Nck family adaptor proteins function to regulate actin cytoskeletal reorganization that leads to cell motility.We previously found that Max binding protein (MNT) was differentially expressed in HCC,and interacted with Nck1 by 2-DE.MNT is a protein member of the Myc/Max/Mad network which plays roles in cell proliferation,differentiation,and death.We investigated the effects of MNT on migration of human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells to study the migration regulatory role of MNT in HCC cells.Methods Interaction between MNT and Nck1 was further validated in hepatoma cells by GST-pull down assay and immunoprecipitation,siRNAs specific to MNT (MNT siRNA) were used to knockdown MNT expression.Western blotting,transwell assay were used to determine the migration potential of cells.Results Interaction between MNT and Nck1 was validated in hepatoma cells.MNT knockdown promoted the migration of human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells (P <0.01 ).Conclusion The results suggest that MNT,via interaction with Nck1,inhibits hepatoma cell migration.

  9. The Role of MEKK3 Signaling Pathway in the Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells to TNF-(alpha)-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    breast cancer cell lines and in primary breast cancer tissues (2-3). Activated signal transduction pathways including the mitogen-activated protein ...TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation. Nat Immunol 2: 620-4. 12. Qin, X.F., D.S. An, I.S. Chen, and D. Baltimore. 2003. Inhibiting HIV -1 infection in...human T cells by lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA against CCR5 . Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100: 183-8. 13. Huang, Q. Jianhua Yang

  10. Critical Review Upon the Role and Potential of Fluorescence and Near-Infrared Imaging and Absorption Spectroscopy in Cancer Related Cells, Serum, Saliva, Urine and Tissue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Christian W; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Huck-Pezzei, Verena A

    2016-01-01

    During the last years, non-invasive or minimally invasive diagnostic tools in cancer diagnostics have become more important. Many fluorescence spectroscopic methodologies have been established for nearly all different kinds of cancer. The reason therefore is its high sensitivity, low amount of sample required, short testing time, and the suitability for in situ testing. The potential influence factors for cancer diagnostics and the subsequent suitability of the method to different applications are well described. Near-Infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on differences of endogenous chromophores between cancer and normal tissues using either oxyhaemoglobin or deoxy-haemoglobin, lipid or water bands, or a combination of two or more of these diagnostic markers. These marker bands are known to provide the fundamental for the diagnosis of several cancers and the spectroscopic setup can be applied for the analysis of cells, urine and tissue. For the preparation of this review the literature published during the last fifteen years has been taken into consideration. It will provide an overview on the importance of the fluorescence and NIRS tools in cancer analysis giving hints about how these techniques can play a crucial role in cancer diagnosis, treatment decisions and therapy. The two techniques, fluorescence and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) are faced to each other and individual advantages and/or drawbacks are discussed. Finally, it will be taken into consideration; how the synergistic combination of different approaches can give additional information related to development and progression stages of cancer.

  11. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs.

  12. EGFR-ras-raf signaling in epidermal stem cells: roles in hair follicle development, regeneration, tissue remodeling and epidermal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Eszter; Rupp, Christian; Baccarini, Manuela

    2013-09-25

    The mammalian skin is the largest organ of the body and its outermost layer, the epidermis, undergoes dynamic lifetime renewal through the activity of somatic stem cell populations. The EGFR-Ras-Raf pathway has a well-described role in skin development and tumor formation. While research mainly focuses on its role in cutaneous tumor initiation and maintenance, much less is known about Ras signaling in the epidermal stem cells, which are the main targets of skin carcinogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss the properties of the epidermal stem cells and review the role of EGFR-Ras-Raf signaling in keratinocyte stem cells during homeostatic and pathological conditions.

  13. Role of lymphangiogenesis in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Jankowska

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer represents one of the most frequent causes of death due to neoplastic disease in Poland and around the world. The high mortality which accompany neoplastic diseases used to be ascribed mainly to dissemination of cancerous cells. Studies on animal models suggest that tumour lymphangiogenesis represents the principal factor in the process of metastases formation. Lymphangiogenesis involves a process of formation of new lymphatic vessels from already existing lymphatic capillaries. Lymphangiogenesis is stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF and other, recently reported factors, such as, e.g., cyclooxygenase 2, fibroblast growth factor 2, angiopoetin-1 and the insulin-resembling growth factor. In lymphangiogenesis a key role is played by neutropilin 2 or podoplanin and this promoted development of studies on lymphangiogenesis. Activation of VEGF-C/VEGF-D/VEGFR-3 axis increases motility and invasiveness of neoplastic cells, promotes development of metastases in several types of tumours such as, e.g., lung cancer, mammary carcinoma, cancers of the neck, prostate and large intestine. In recent years lymphangiogenesis provided topic of many studies. A positive correlation was detected between expressions of VEGF-C/D and VEGFR-3 in non-small cell lung cancer. In patients with lung cancer with high expression of VEGF-C a markedly abbreviated survival was noted. Positive correlation was detected between expression of VEGF-C and VEGF-D on one hand and expression of LYVE-1 on the other in sentinel lymph nodes with metastases of neoplastic cells in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Also, high density of lymphatic vessels and high density of intraneoplastic microvessels proved to be independent poor prognostic indices in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Extensive hope is linked to studies on inhibitors of lymphangiogenesis, which may improve results of treatment also in tumour patients.

  14. Role of Wnt Co-receptor LRP6 in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlu; Lu, Wenyan; Chen, Dongquan; Xu, Bo; Li, Yonghe

    2017-03-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Although studies have shown an increased expression of LRP6 in several types of cancer, its function in tumor development and progression remains to be elucidated. We herein demonstrated that LRP6 expression is up-regulated in human triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients and human TNBC cell lines, and that knockdown of LRP6 expression and treatment of recombinant Mesd protein (a specific inhibitor of LRP6) significantly decreased cell migration and invasion of TNBC MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Interestingly, the effects of LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment on TNBC cell migration and invasion were more prominent than on TNBC cell proliferation/viability. Mechanistically, LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling and decreased the expression of S100A4, a mediator of cancer metastasis and a specific target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, in TNBC cells. Together, our data suggest that LRP6 promotes TNBC cell migration and invasion by regulating the expression and function of S100A4 via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer.

  16. Prognostic role of syncytin expression in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Holck, Susanne; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer cells were recently found to produce syncytin, an endogenous retroviral protein implicated in cell fusion, immune regulation, and nitric oxide synthase expression. To determine whether syncytin has a prognostic role in breast cancer, we investigated a series of 165 premenopausal lymph...... prognostic indicator for recurrence-free survival. In addition, we examined a second series of 54 consecutively operated breast cancer patients of all categories and the results supported the conclusions made from the first study. Thus, syncytin expression constitutes a positive prognostic factor in breast...... cancer - a phenomenon that may be related to the involvement of syncytin in mediating fusions between breast cancer cells and entodhelial cells....

  17. Role of TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun signaling in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakonda, Girish; Vu, Trung; Jin, Lin; Samanta, Debangshu; Datta, Pran K

    2016-10-01

    Claudin-4 has been identified as an integral member of tight junctions and has been found to be upregulated in various types of cancers especially in metastatic cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of the upregulation of Claudin-4 and its role in lung tumorigenesis are unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of Claudin-4 on migration and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells and to examine the regulatory effects of TGF-β on Claudin-4 expression. We have observed that TGF-β induces the expression of Claudin-4 dramatically in lung cell lines in a time dependent manner. TGF-β-induced Smad signaling is important for enhancing Claudin-4 mRNA level through inducing its promoter activity. Treatment with curcumin, a c-Jun inhibitor, or stable knockdown of c-Jun abrogates TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression suggesting an involvement of the c-Jun pathway. Notably, TGF-β-induced Claudin-4 expression through c-Jun pathway plays a role in TGF-β-mediated motility and tumorigenicity of these cells. In support of these observations, we have uncovered that Claudin-4 is upregulated in 14 of 24 (58%) lung tumors when compared with normal lung tissue. This is the first study to show how TGF-β regulates the expression of Claudin-4 through c-Jun signaling and how this pathway contributes to the migratory and tumorigenic phenotype of lung tumor cells.

  18. Role of Radiotherapy in Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has had important role in the palliation of NSCLC. Randomized trials tend to suggest that, in general, short regimens give similar palliation and toxicity compared to longer regimens. The benefit of combining chemotherapy to radiosensitize the palliative radiation treatment is an open question, but so far it has not been proved to be very useful in NSCLC. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants careful consideration for every single case and probably should not be used as a routine management.Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT are modern techniques being used each time more frequently in the treatment of single or oligometastases. In general, they offer good tumour control with little toxicity (with a more expensive cost compared to the traditionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens.

  19. The Role of Integrins and IGFBPs in the IGF-1 Stimulated Migration of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    animals, the investigator(s) adhered to the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals," prepared by the Committee on Care and use of...Arteaga, C.L., L.J. Kitten , E.B. Coronado, et al. 1989. Blockage of the Type I Somatomedin Receptor Inhibits Growth of Human Breast Cancer Cells in

  20. Role of the Chemokine MCP-1 in Sensitization of PKC-Medicated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    prostate cancer cells. Lack of proteolytic cleavage of PKCδ. J. Biol. Chem. 275: 7574-7582 (2000). 5. Garcia -Bermejo, M.L., Leskow, F.C., Fujii, T., Wang...Q., Blumberg, P.M., Ohba, M., Kuroki, T., 5 Han, K.C., Lee, J., Marquez , V.E., and Kazanietz, M.G. Diacylglycerol (DAG)-lactones, a new class of

  1. Role of TGR-B1-Mediated Down Regulation of NF-kB/Rel Activity During Growth Arrest of Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Rogers, P. Toselli , D. Sherr, and G. E. Sonenshein. ROLE OF NF-KB/REL, AHR AND C-MYC IN BREAST CANCER. DOD ERA OF HOPE CONFERENCE 20001, ATLANTA GA...Mo!. Toselli PA, Kim DW, Rogers AE, Sonenshein CE and Cell. Bio!., 4, 1039 1044. Sherr DR. (2000). Breast Cancer Research andl Treatment, Ma Q and...Shneider AM, Toselli P, Lnriiron. Health Persp~ect., 88, 13-- 25. Trombino AF, Yang 5, Hafer Li, Mann KK, Tao XJ, Nebert DW, Petersen DD and PLaga A. (1991

  2. RAR agonists stimulate SOX9 gene expression in breast cancer cell lines: evidence for a role in retinoid-mediated growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonja, Olubunmi; Raaka, Bruce M; Huang, Ambrose; Das, Sharmistha; Zhao, Xinyu; Helmer, Elizabeth; Juste, Dominique; Samuels, Herbert H

    2002-11-01

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors which are members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor gene family. RAR-agonists inhibit the proliferation of many human breast cancer cell lines, particularly those whose growth is stimulated by estradiol (E2) or growth factors. PCR-amplified subtractive hybridization was used to identify candidate retinoid-regulated genes that may be involved in growth inhibition. One candidate gene identified was SOX9, a member of the high mobility group (HMG) box gene family of transcription factors. SOX9 gene expression is rapidly stimulated by RAR-agonists in T-47D cells and other retinoid-inhibited breast cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, a database search indicates that SOX9 is expressed as an EST in breast tumor cells. SOX9 is known to be expressed in chondrocytes where it regulates the transcription of type II collagen and in testes where it plays a role in male sexual differentiation. RAR pan-agonists and the RARalpha-selective agonist Am580, but not RXR agonists, stimulate the expression of SOX9 in a wide variety of retinoid-inhibited breast cancer cell lines. RAR-agonists did not stimulate SOX9 in breast cancer cell lines which were not growth inhibited by retinoids. Expression of SOX9 in T-47D cells leads to cycle changes similar to those found with RAR-agonists while expression of a dominant negative form of SOX9 blocks RA-mediated cell cycle changes, suggesting a role for SOX9 in retinoid-mediated growth inhibition.

  3. Cytotoxic effect of microbial biosurfactants against human embryonic kidney cancerous cell: HEK-293 and their possible role in apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2014-11-01

    Two different microbial biosurfactants S9BS and CHBS were isolated from Lysinibacillus fusiformis S9 and Bacillus tequilensis CH. Cytotoxicity effect of these biosurfactants on human embryonic kidney cancerous cell (HEK-293) were studied with the help of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl-)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and morphological changes were observed under inverted microscope. The biosurfactants exhibited positive cytotoxic effect on HEK-293 cell line. It was found that LC50 of S9BS and CHBS were 75 and 100 μg ml(-1), respectively. Further cell cycle and apoptosis analysis of biosurfactant-treated HEK-293 cell line were done by FACS. In this study, cytotoxic effect of glycolipid biosurfactant against HEK-293 cell lines is reported for the first time. Mechanism towards increased membrane permeability of biosurfactant-treated cancer cell may be the incorporation of its lipid moiety into the plasma membrane leading to formation of pores and membrane disruption. Hence, these microbial biosurfactants can prove to be significant biomolecule for cancer treatment.

  4. Cell cycle- and cancer-associated gene networks activated by Dsg2: evidence of cystatin A deregulation and a potential role in cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilasha Gupta

    Full Text Available Cell-cell adhesion is paramount in providing and maintaining multicellular structure and signal transmission between cells. In the skin, disruption to desmosomal regulated intercellular connectivity may lead to disorders of keratinization and hyperproliferative disease including cancer. Recently we showed transgenic mice overexpressing desmoglein 2 (Dsg2 in the epidermis develop hyperplasia. Following microarray and gene network analysis, we demonstrate that Dsg2 caused a profound change in the transcriptome of keratinocytes in vivo and altered a number of genes important in epithelial dysplasia including: calcium-binding proteins (S100A8 and S100A9, members of the cyclin protein family, and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA. CSTA is deregulated in several skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC and loss of function mutations lead to recessive skin fragility disorders. The microarray results were confirmed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. CSTA was detected at high level throughout the newborn mouse epidermis but dramatically decreased with development and was detected predominantly in the differentiated layers. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of Dsg2 by siRNA or shRNA reduced CSTA expression. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of CSTA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of Dsg2, perturbed cytokeratin 14 staining and reduced levels of desmoplakin in response to mechanical stretching. Both knockdown of either Dsg2 or CSTA induced loss of cell adhesion in a dispase-based assay and the effect was synergistic. Our findings here offer a novel pathway of CSTA regulation involving Dsg2 and a potential crosstalk between Dsg2 and CSTA that modulates cell adhesion. These results further support the recent human genetic findings that loss of function mutations in the CSTA gene result in skin fragility due to impaired cell-cell adhesion: autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis or acral peeling skin syndrome.

  5. Formation and role of exosomes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Lindsey T; Sloane, Hillary S; Kester, Mark; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2015-02-01

    Exosomes offer new insight into cancer biology with both diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Because of their cell-to-cell communication, exosomes influence tumor progression, metastasis, and therapeutic efficacy. They can be isolated from blood and other bodily fluids to reveal disease processes occurring within the body, including cancerous growth. In addition to being a reservoir of cancer biomarkers, they can be re-engineered to reinstate tumor immunity. Tumor exosomes interact with various cells of the microenvironment to confer tumor-advantageous changes that are responsible for stromal activation, induction of the angiogenic switch, increased vascular permeability, and immune escape. Exosomes also contribute to metastasis by aiding in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and formation of the pre-metastatic niche. Furthermore, exosomes protect tumor cells from the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy drugs and transfer chemoresistance properties to nearby cells. Thus, exosomes are essential to many lethal elements of cancer and it is important to understand their biogenesis and role in cancer.

  6. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  7. Role of XIAP in the malignant phenotype of transitional cell cancer (TCC) and therapeutic activity of XIAP antisense oligonucleotides against multidrug-resistant TCC in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilim, Vladimir; Kasahara, Takashi; Hara, Noboru; Takahashi, Kota; Tomita, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    XIAP directly inhibits executor caspases, making it the most downstream antiapoptotic molecule. Here, we examined the expression and function of XIAP in normal urothelium and TCC. We also examined the therapeutic effect of xiap AS PODN on the cell cycle and apoptosis of multidrug-resistant T24 bladder cancer cells. XIAP was moderately expressed in normal transitional epithelium with prominent expression on the superficial layer cells. Seventy-nine of 108 (73.15%) tumor samples were positive for XIAP protein, but XIAP positivity was not correlated with tumor stage or grade. Moreover, 4 bladder cancer cell lines (SCaBER, HT1376, T24 and RT4) expressed similar levels of XIAP. xiap AS PODN dose-dependently reduced the XIAP protein level and induced apoptosis, leading to decreased cell viability by 87%. Combined administration with doxorubicin resulted in marked cytotoxicity due to escalation of apoptosis. Overexpression of XIAP in T24 cells resulted in a modest but statistically significant (p TCC, and endogenous XIAP levels are sufficient to protect cells from apoptosis. Our results suggest that XIAP may play an important role early in human TCC carcinogenesis. xiap AS may be a candidate for use as a cancer therapy for overcoming drug resistance in highly malignant TCC.

  8. Phosphoproteome analysis demonstrates the potential role of THRAP3 phosphorylation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Yoko; Arakawa, Noriaki; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the androgen-independent growth mechanism is critical for developing effective treatment strategies to combat androgen-independent prostate cancer. We performed a comparative phosphoproteome analysis using a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, and an LNCaP-derived androgen-independent cell line, LNCaP-AI, to identify phosphoproteins involved in this mechanism. We performed quantitative comparisons of the phosphopeptide levels in tryptic digests of protein extracts from these cell lines using MS. We found that the levels of 69 phosphopeptides in 66 proteins significantly differed between LNCaP and LNCaP-AI. In particular, we focused on thyroid hormone receptor associated protein 3 (THRAP3), which is a known transcriptional coactivator of the androgen receptor. The phosphorylation level of THRAP3 was significantly lower at S248 and S253 in LNCaP-AI cells. Furthermore, pull-down assays showed that 32 proteins uniquely bound to the nonphosphorylatable mutant form of THRAP3, whereas 31 other proteins uniquely bound to the phosphorylation-mimic form. Many of the differentially interacting proteins were identified as being involved with RNA splicing and processing. These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of THRAP3 at S248 and S253 might be involved in the mechanism of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth by changing the interaction partners.

  9. The role of ELK3 to regulate peritumoral lymphangiogenesis and VEGF-C production in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Nuri; Park, Ji-In; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Dong Ryul; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2017-03-18

    Tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis, a major conduit for cancer cell dissemination from the primary tumor site to lymph nodes and beyond, eventually leads to metastasis in cancer patients. Given the recent evidence revealing that the suppression of ELK3 inhibits the metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer cells, we aimed to study the underlying mechanism of impaired metastasis in ELK3-suppressed MDA-MB-231 cells (ELK3 KD) with regard to lymphangiogenesis. We found that the secretome of ELK3 KD cells inhibited tube formation, whereas it promoted the migration and invasion of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in vitro. In vivo analysis revealed that peritumoral lymphatic vessels were not developed around the xenografted tumors of ELK3 KD. We further revealed that the suppression of NF-κB signaling in ELK3 KD was the primary cause of the reduced VEGFC expression. Taken together, we suggest that ELK3 is an upstream regulator of the NF-κB signaling pathway, the inhibition of which leads to the suppression of peritumoral lymphatic vessel development, possibly due to a low VEGFC expression.

  10. The Essential Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A Study From the Rare Cancer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Institute of Oncology (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philipp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zaucha, Renata [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University, Gdansk (Poland); Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Lagrange, Jean L. [Service de Radiotherapie, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Oezsoy, Orhan [Department of Radiation Oncology, CHCVs-RSV, Sion (Switzerland); Nguyen, Tan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Baize, Adele [Department de Radio-Oncologie, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Boujelbene, Noureddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Collen, Timothy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Scandolaro, Luciano [Radioterapia, Azienda Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Untereiner, Michel [Centre Francois Baclesse, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Goldberg, Hadassah [Oncology Departement, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Pesce, Gianfranco A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Opedale San Giovanni, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Anacak, Yavuz [Department of Radiation Oncology, EGE University, Izmir (Turkey); Friedrich, Esther E.; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern (Switzerland); Beer, Karl T. [Radio Onkologiezentrum Biel (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective multicenter study was performed in 180 patients with MCC treated between February 1988 and September 2009. Patients who had had surgery alone were compared with patients who received surgery and postoperative RT or radical RT. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS), regional relapse-free survival (RRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were assessed together with disease-free survival (DFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Results: Seventy-nine patients were male and 101 patients were female, and the median age was 73 years old (range, 38-93 years). The majority of patients had localized disease (n = 146), and the remaining patients had regional lymph node metastasis (n = 34). Forty-nine patients underwent surgery for the primary tumor without postoperative RT to the primary site; the other 131 patients received surgery for the primary tumor, followed by postoperative RT (n = 118) or a biopsy of the primary tumor followed by radical RT (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 0.2-16.5 years). Patients in the RT group had improved LRFS (93% vs. 64%; p < 0.001), RRFS (76% vs. 27%; p < 0.001), DMFS (70% vs. 42%; p = 0.01), DFS (59% vs. 4%; p < 0.001), and CSS (65% vs. 49%; p = 0.03) rates compared to patients who underwent surgery for the primary tumor alone; LRFS, RRFS, DMFS, and DFS rates remained significant with multivariable Cox regression analysis. However OS was not significantly improved by postoperative RT (56% vs. 46%; p = 0.2). Conclusions: After multivariable analysis, postoperative RT was associated with improved outcome and seems to be an important component in the multimodality treatment of MCC.

  11. BRCA1--conductor of the breast stem cell orchestra: the role of BRCA1 in mammary gland development and identification of cell of origin of BRCA1 mutant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Niamh E; Mullan, Paul B

    2012-09-01

    Breast cancer treatment has been increasingly successful over the last 20 years due in large part to targeted therapies directed against different subtypes. However, basal-like breast cancers still represent a considerable challenge to clinicians and scientists alike since the pathogenesis underlying the disease and the target cell for transformation of this subtype is still undetermined. The considerable similarities between basal-like and BRCA1 mutant breast cancers led to the hypothesis that these cancers arise from transformation of a basal cell within the normal breast epithelium through BRCA1 dysfunction. Recently, however, a number of studies have called this hypothesis into question. This review summarises the initial findings which implicated the basal cell as the cell of origin of BRCA1 related basal-like breast cancers, as well as the more recent data which identifies the luminal progenitor cells as the likely target of transformation. We compare a number of key studies in this area and identify the differences that could explain some of the contradictory findings. In addition, we highlight the role of BRCA1 in breast cell differentiation and lineage determination by reviewing recent findings in the field and our own observations suggesting a role for BRCA1 in stem cell regulation through activation of the p63 and Notch pathways. We hope that through an increased understanding of the BRCA1 role in breast differentiation and the identification of the cell(s) of origin we can improve treatment options for both BRCA1 mutant and basal-like breast cancer subgroups.

  12. Role of IGF-1/IGF-1R in regulation of invasion in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikali, Zeina; Setya, Hemani; Singh, Gurmit; Persad, Sujata

    2008-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer progression to androgen independence is the primary cause of mortality by this tumor type. The IGF-1/IGF-1R axis is well known to contribute to prostate cancer initiation, but its contribution to invasiveness and the downstream signalling mechanisms that are involved are unclear at present. Results We examined the invasive response of androgen independent DU145 prostate carcinoma cells to IGF-1 stimulation using Matrigel assays. We then examined the signaling mechanisms and protease activities that are associated with this response. IGF-1 significantly increased the invasive capacity of DU145 cells in vitro, and this increase was inhibited by blocking IGF-1R. We further demonstrated that specific inhibitors of the MAPK and PI3-K pathways decrease IGF-1-mediated invasion. To determine potential molecular mechanisms for this change in invasive capacity, we examined changes in expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We observed that IGF-1 increases the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in DU145 cells. These changes in activity are due to differences in expression in the case of MMP-9 but not in the case of MMP-2. This observation is corroborated by the fact that correlated changes of expression in a regulator of MMP-2, TIMP-2, were also seen. Conclusion This work identifies a specific effect of IGF-1 on the invasive capacity of DU145 prostate cancer cells, and furthermore delineates mechanisms that contribute to this effect. PMID:18598360

  13. Role of IGF-1/IGF-1R in regulation of invasion in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setya Hemani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer progression to androgen independence is the primary cause of mortality by this tumor type. The IGF-1/IGF-1R axis is well known to contribute to prostate cancer initiation, but its contribution to invasiveness and the downstream signalling mechanisms that are involved are unclear at present. Results We examined the invasive response of androgen independent DU145 prostate carcinoma cells to IGF-1 stimulation using Matrigel assays. We then examined the signaling mechanisms and protease activities that are associated with this response. IGF-1 significantly increased the invasive capacity of DU145 cells in vitro, and this increase was inhibited by blocking IGF-1R. We further demonstrated that specific inhibitors of the MAPK and PI3-K pathways decrease IGF-1-mediated invasion. To determine potential molecular mechanisms for this change in invasive capacity, we examined changes in expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We observed that IGF-1 increases the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in DU145 cells. These changes in activity are due to differences in expression in the case of MMP-9 but not in the case of MMP-2. This observation is corroborated by the fact that correlated changes of expression in a regulator of MMP-2, TIMP-2, were also seen. Conclusion This work identifies a specific effect of IGF-1 on the invasive capacity of DU145 prostate cancer cells, and furthermore delineates mechanisms that contribute to this effect.

  14. Role of recombinant interferon-gamma maintenance in responding patients with small cell lung cancer. A randomised phase III study of the EORTC lung cancer cooperative group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanZandwijk, N; Groen, HJM; Postmus, PE; Burghouts, JTW; tenVelde, GPM; Ardizzoni, A; Smith, IE; Baas, P; Sahmoud, T; Kirkpatrick, A; Dalesio, O; Giaccone, G

    1997-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) given every other day as maintenance therapy could prolong the survival of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) who achieved a complete or nearly-complete response to induction therapy. A secondary endpoint wa

  15. A transcriptional repressive role for epithelial-specific ETS factor ELF3 on oestrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Samanthapudi, Venkata Subramanyam Kumar; Pulaganti, Madhusudana; Khumukcham, Saratchandra Singh; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakhsmi; Guruprasad, Lalitha; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-04-15

    Oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that primarily mediates oestrogen (E2)-dependent gene transcription required for mammary gland development. Coregulators critically regulate ERα transcription functions by directly interacting with it. In the present study, we report that ELF3, an epithelial-specific ETS transcription factor, acts as a transcriptional repressor of ERα. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis demonstrated that ELF3 strongly binds to ERα in the absence of E2, but ELF3 dissociation occurs upon E2 treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner suggesting that E2 negatively influences such interaction. Domain mapping studies further revealed that the ETS (E-twenty six) domain of ELF3 interacts with the DNA binding domain of ERα. Accordingly, ELF3 inhibited ERα's DNA binding activity by preventing receptor dimerization, partly explaining the mechanism by which ELF3 represses ERα transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression of ELF3 decreases ERα transcriptional activity as demonstrated by oestrogen response elements (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay or by endogenous ERα target genes. Conversely ELF3 knockdown increases ERα transcriptional activity. Consistent with these results, ELF3 ectopic expression decreases E2-dependent MCF7 cell proliferation whereas ELF3 knockdown increases it. We also found that E2 induces ELF3 expression in MCF7 cells suggesting a negative feedback regulation of ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. A small peptide sequence of ELF3 derived through functional interaction between ERα and ELF3 could inhibit DNA binding activity of ERα and breast cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that ELF3 is a novel transcriptional repressor of ERα in breast cancer cells. Peptide interaction studies further represent a novel therapeutic option in breast cancer therapy.

  16. The role of the cancer stem cell marker CD271 in DNA damage response and drug resistance of melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, T; Walz, I; Klinger, B; Khouja, S; Welte, Y; Schäfer, R; Regenbrecht, C

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that stemness and acquired resistance to targeted inhibitors or chemotherapeutics are mechanistically linked. Here we observed high cell surface and total levels of nerve growth factor receptor/CD271, a marker of melanoma-initiating cells, in sub-populations of chemoresistant cell lines. CD271 expression was increased in drug-sensitive cells but not resistant cells in response to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics etoposide, fotemustine and cisplatin. Comparative analysis of melanoma cells engineered to stably express CD271 or a targeting short hairpin RNA by expression profiling provided numerous genes regulated in a CD271-dependent manner. In-depth analysis of CD271-responsive genes uncovered the association of CD271 with regulation of DNA repair components. In addition, gene set enrichment analysis revealed enrichment of CD271-responsive genes in drug-resistant cells, among them DNA repair components. Moreover, our comparative screen identified the fibroblast growth factor 13 (FGF13) as a target of CD271, highly expressed in chemoresistant cells. Further we show that levels of CD271 determine drug response. Knock-down of CD271 in fotemustine-resistant cells decreased expression of FGF13 and at least partly restored sensitivity to fotemustine. Together, we demonstrate that expression of CD271 is responsible for genes associated with DNA repair and drug response. Further, we identified 110 CD271-responsive genes predominantly expressed in melanoma metastases, among them were NEK2, TOP2A and RAD51AP1 as potential drivers of melanoma metastasis. In addition, we provide mechanistic insight in the regulation of CD271 in response to drugs. We found that CD271 is potentially regulated by p53 and in turn is needed for a proper p53-dependent response to DNA-damaging drugs. In summary, we provide for the first time insight in a CD271-associated signaling network connecting CD271 with DNA repair, drug response and metastasis. PMID

  17. Role of volume-regulated and calcium-activated anion channels in cell volume homeostasis, cancer and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Sauter, Daniel Rafael Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Volume-regulated channels for anions (VRAC) / organic osmolytes (VSOAC) play essential roles in cell volume regulation and other cellular functions, e.g. proliferation, cell migration and apoptosis. LRRC8A, which belongs to the leucine rich-repeat containing protein family, was recently shown to ...

  18. Sensitization of Cervical Cancer Cells to Cisplatin by Genistein: The Role of NFB and Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is among the top causes of death from cancer in women. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival; however, cisplatin treatment is associated with toxicity to healthy cells. Genistein has been used as an adjunct to chemotherapy to enhance the activity of chemotherapeutic agents without causing increased toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of genistein (25 μM on antitumor activity of cisplatin (250 nM on HeLa cervical cancer cells. We have examined the alterations in expression of NF-B, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K1, p-4E-BP1, and p-Akt protein levels in response to treatment. The combination of 25 μM genistein with 250 nM cisplatin resulted in significantly greater growth inhibition (. Genistein enhanced the antitumor activity of cisplatin and reduced the expression of NF-B, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K1, p-4E-BP1, and p-Akt. The results in the present study suggest that genistein could enhance the activity of cisplatin via inhibition of NF-κB and Akt/mTOR pathways. Genistein is a promising nontoxic nutritional agent that may enhance treatment outcome in cervical cancer patients when given concomitantly with cisplatin. Clinical trials of genistein and cisplatin combination are warranted to test this hypothesis.

  19. Characterization of adult α- and β-globin elevated by hydrogen peroxide in cervical cancer cells that play a cytoprotective role against oxidative insults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hemoglobin (Hgb is the main oxygen and carbon dioxide carrier in cells of erythroid lineage and is responsible for oxygen delivery to the respiring tissues of the body. However, Hgb is also expressed in nonerythroid cells. In the present study, the expression of Hgb in human uterine cervix carcinoma cells and its role in cervical cancer were investigated. METHODOLOGY: The expression level of Hgb in cervical cancer tissues was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR. We applied multiple methods, such as RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical analysis, to confirm Hgb expression in cervical cancer cells. The effects of ectopic expression of Hgb and Hgb mutants on oxidative stress and cell viability were investigated by cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS analysis and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH array, respectively. Both Annexin V staining assay by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay were used, respectively, to evaluate cell apoptosis. RESULTS: qRT-PCR analysis showed that Hgb-α- (HBA1 and Hgb-β-globin (HBB gene expression was significantly higher in cervical carcinoma than in normal cervical tissues, whereas the expression of hematopoietic transcription factors and erythrocyte specific marker genes was not increased. Immunostaining experiments confirmed the expression of Hgb in cancer cells of the uterine cervix. Hgb mRNA and protein were also detected in the human cervical carcinoma cell lines SiHa and CaSki, and Hgb expression was up-regulated by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Importantly, ectopic expression of wild type HBA1/HBB or HBA1, rather than mutants HBA1(H88R/HBB(H93R unable to bind hemo, suppressed oxidative stress and improved cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings show for the first time that Hgb is expressed in cervical carcinoma cells and may act as an antioxidant, attenuating oxidative stress-induced damage in cervical cancer cells. These data provide a

  20. Pregnancy and its role in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Correia Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Early full-term pregnancy is the only recognized factor able to prevent breast cancer. There are several hypotheses to explain the mechanisms of this protection, namely an altered hormonal milieu, a differentiation process or a switch in stem cell properties. To explore them, authors have been using animal models, mainly in rodents. Hormonal administration with estrogen and progesterone was the most widely used process to mimic the mammary changes during pregnancy. We have recently proposed that this enigmatic protective role of a full-term birth in breast cancer is carried out by tumor inhibition mediated by differentiated mammary epithelial cells. This explanation may give a new perspective of breast cancer prevention and treatment.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  2. Inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth by an avocado extract: role of lipid-soluble bioactive substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Arteaga, James R; Zhang, Qifeng; Huerta, Sergio; Go, Vay Liang W; Heber, David

    2005-01-01

    Although the avocado is known as a rich source of monounsaturated fatty acids, there has been far less attention given to its content of other bioactive substances including carotenoids, which might contribute to cancer preventive properties similar to those attributed to other fruits and vegetables. The yellow-green color of the avocado prompted us to study the carotenoid content of this fruit using established methods in our laboratory. The California Hass avocado (Persea americana Mill.) was selected for study, because it is the most commonly consumed variety in the southwest United States. These avocados were found to contain the highest content of lutein among commonly eaten fruits as well as measurable amounts of related carotenoids (zeaxanthin, alpha-carotene, and beta-carotene). Lutein accounted for 70% of the measured carotenoids, and the avocado also contained significant quantities of vitamin E. An acetone extract of avocado containing these carotenoids and tocopherols was shown to inhibit the growth of both androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3) prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. Incubation of PC-3 cells with the avocado extract led to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest accompanied by an increase in p27 protein expression. Lutein alone did not reproduce the effects of the avocado extract on cancer cell proliferation. In common with other colorful fruits and vegetables, the avocado contains numerous bioactive carotenoids. Because the avocado also contains a significant amount of monounsaturated fat, these bioactive carotenoids are likely to be absorbed into the bloodstream, where in combination with other diet-derived phytochemicals they may contribute to the significant cancer risk reduction associated with a diet of fruits and vegetables.

  3. Prostate Cancer Cell Growth: Stimulatory Role of Neurotensin and Mechanism of Inhibition by Flavonoids as Related to Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    contribute to the malignant state [61–63]. In a prior study [28], we found that NTstimulates PC3 cells to release HB -EGF, which presumably transactivates...growth factor EGFR, EGF receptor ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase FAK, focal adhesion kinase GPCR, G protein-coupled receptor Hb -EGF, heparin...al. reported that levels of NT but not CCK (measured by immunoassay ) in fasted sera from patients with pancreatic cancer were significantly elevated in

  4. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; LIN, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding tran...

  5. Cross-Talk between Cancer Cells and the Tumour Microenvironment: The Role of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gillian Y.; Pidgeon, Graham P.

    2017-01-01

    5-lipoxygenase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of a range of bioactive lipids signalling molecules known collectively as eicosanoids. 5-lipoxygenase metabolites such as 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) and a number of leukotrienes are mostly derived from arachidonic acid and have been shown to be lipid mediators of inflammation in different pathological states including cancer. Upregulated 5-lipoxygenase expression and metabolite production is found in a number of cancer types and has been shown to be associated with increased tumorigenesis. 5-lipoxygenase activity is present in a number of diverse cell types of the immune system and connective tissue. In this review, we discuss potential routes through which cancer cells may utilise the 5-lipoxygenase pathway to interact with the tumour microenvironment during the development and progression of a tumour. Furthermore, immune-derived 5-lipoxygenase signalling can drive both pro- and anti-tumour effects depending on the immune cell subtype and an overview of evidence for these opposing effects is presented. PMID:28125014

  6. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  7. The role of innate immunity in spontaneous regression of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature has provided us with infections - acute and chronic - and these infections have both harmful and beneficial effects on the human system. Worldwide, a number of chronic infections are associated with a risk of cancer, but it is also known that cancer regresses when associated with acute infections such as bacterial, viral, fungal, protozoal, etc. Acute infections are known to cure chronic diseases since the time of Hippocrates. The benefits of these fever producing acute infections has been applied in cancer vaccinology such as the Coley′s toxins. Immune cells like the natural killer cells, macrophages and dendritic cells have taken greater precedence in cancer immunity than ever before. This review provides an insight into the benefits of fever and its role in prevention of cancer, the significance of common infections in cancer regression, the dual nature of our immune system and the role of the often overlooked primary innate immunity in tumor immunology and spontaneous regression of cancer.

  8. Personalized treatment strategies for non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: the role of crizotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu FY

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fei-Yu Niu,1,2 Yi-Long Wu2 1Graduate School, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangement is an oncogene targeted with approved drugs second to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in lung cancer. Crizotinib was developed and introduced into clinical practice rapidly and successfully after the discovery of ALK rearrangement in non-small-cell lung cancer. Chinese and other Asian patients treated with crizotinib seem to have lower toxicity and higher efficacy compared with other ethnicities. Crizotinib showed potent antitumor activity and manageable toxicity in mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor (c-Met/ROS1-positive non-small-cell lung cancer patients, but prospective clinical trials are still needed to confirm its efficacy and safety. Crizotinib appears to be effective against tumors originating from various organs that harbor ALK abnormalities. In the near future, we would classify the tumors by their genetic information beyond organs, such as ALKoma, EGFRoma, and RAFoma, and a single compound could be used for many different types of cancer in different organs. The major challenge of the widespread use of crizotinib in clinical practice is establishing convenient diagnostic techniques for the detection of ALK/c-Met/ROS1. In the present study, we reviewed the application of crizotinib in Chinese patients. Keywords: NSCLC, crizotinib, ALK, c-Met, ROS1

  9. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    stem cells ( BMDC ), which then acts in a paracrine fashion on the cancer cells to enhance their invasion [7]. Interestingly the group of Karnoub showed...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-1-0523 TITLE: Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in...DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2008 – 31 Jul 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis 5b. GRANT

  10. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta,1 Rodney Shackelford2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Science Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. Keywords: crizotinib, EML4

  11. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  12. Metastatic function of BMP-2 in gastric cancer cells: The role of PI3K/AKT, MAPK, the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and MMP-9 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myoung Hee [Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Cheul [Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Joo [Department of Pathology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Han Na; Kim, Jung Lim [Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Suk [Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young A., E-mail: ydanbi@korea.ac.kr [Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastatic progression in various types of cancer cells, but the role and cellular mechanism in the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells is not known. Herein, we determined the roles of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in BMP-2-mediated metastatic function in gastric cancer. We found that stimulation of BMP-2 in gastric cancer cells enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Accompanying activation of AKT and ERK kinase, BMP-2 also enhanced phosphorylation/degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and the nuclear translocation/activation of NF-{kappa}B. Interestingly, blockade of PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling using LY294002 and PD98059, respectively, significantly inhibited BMP-2-induced motility and invasiveness in association with the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Furthermore, BMP-2-induced MMP-9 expression and enzymatic activity was also significantly blocked by treatment with PI3K/AKT, ERK, or NF-{kappa}B inhibitors. Immunohistochemistry staining of 178 gastric tumor biopsies indicated that expression of BMP-2 and MMP-9 had a significant positive correlation with lymph node metastasis and a poor prognosis. These results indicate that the BMP-2 signaling pathway enhances tumor metastasis in gastric cancer by sequential activation of the PI3K/AKT or MAPK pathway followed by the induction of NF-{kappa}B and MMP-9 activity, indicating that BMP-2 has the potential to be a therapeutic molecular target to decrease metastasis.

  13. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, V.W.; Griffin, B.R.; Livingston, R.B. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease in the United States. Only the few tumors detected very early are curable, but there has been some progress in the management of more advanced non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in regionally inoperable disease. Prevention of central nervous system relapse is an important issue in this group of patients because brain metastases ultimately develop in 20% to 25% of them. Seventy-three patients with regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were entered into a Phase II trial of neutron chest radiotherapy sandwiched between four cycles of chemotherapy including cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin C. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered concurrently with chest radiotherapy (3000 cGy in 10 fractions in 15 patients; 3600 cGy in 18 fractions in the remaining 50 patients). Patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the brain before treatment and every 3 months after treatment. The initial overall response rate was 79%, but 65 of the 73 patients have subsequently died of recurrent disease. Median follow-up is 9 months for all 73 patients and 26 months for eight long-term survivors. No patient who completed the prophylactic cranial irradiation program had clinical or radiologic brain metastases. Toxic reactions to prophylactic cranial irradiation included reversible alopecia in all patients, progressive dementia in one patient, and possible optic neuritis in one patient. Both of these patients received 300 cGy per fraction of irradiation. The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation has been controversial, but its safety and efficacy in this trial supports its application in a group of patients at high risk for central nervous system relapse. Further evaluation of prophylactic cranial irradiation in clinical trials for regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is warranted.

  14. Oncogenic potential of histone-variant H2A.Z.1 and its regulatory role in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Doo; Kim, Pum-Joon; Eun, Jung Woo; Shen, Qingyu; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2016-03-08

    H2A.Z is a highly conserved H2A variant, and two distinct H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, have been identified as products of two non-allelic genes, H2AFZ and H2AFV. H2A.Z has been reported to be overexpressed in breast, prostate and bladder cancers, but most studies did not clearly distinguish between isoforms. One recent study reported a unique role for the H2A.Z isoform H2A.Z.2 as a driver of malignant melanoma. Here we first report that H2A.Z.1 plays a pivotal role in the liver tumorigenesis by selectively regulating key molecules in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). H2AFZ expression was significantly overexpressed in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, and high expression of H2AFZ was significantly associated with their poor prognosis. H2A.Z.1 overexpression was demonstrated in a subset of human HCC and cell lines. H2A.Z.1 knockdown suppressed HCC cell growth by transcriptional deregulation of cell cycle proteins and caused apoptotic cell death of HCC cells. We also observed that H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the metastatic potential of HCC cells by selectively modulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulatory proteins such as E-cadherin and fibronectin. In addition, H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the in vivo tumor growth rate in a mouse xenograft model. In conclusion, our findings suggest the oncogenic potential of H2A.Z.1 in liver tumorigenesis and that it plays established role in accelerating cell cycle transition and EMT during hepatocarcinogenesis. This makes H2A.Z.1 a promising target in liver cancer therapy.

  15. Oncogenic potential of histone-variant H2A.Z.1 and its regulatory role in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Jung Woo; Shen, Qingyu; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2016-01-01

    H2A.Z is a highly conserved H2A variant, and two distinct H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, have been identified as products of two non-allelic genes, H2AFZ and H2AFV. H2A.Z has been reported to be overexpressed in breast, prostate and bladder cancers, but most studies did not clearly distinguish between isoforms. One recent study reported a unique role for the H2A.Z isoform H2A.Z.2 as a driver of malignant melanoma. Here we first report that H2A.Z.1 plays a pivotal role in the liver tumorigenesis by selectively regulating key molecules in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). H2AFZ expression was significantly overexpressed in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, and high expression of H2AFZ was significantly associated with their poor prognosis. H2A.Z.1 overexpression was demonstrated in a subset of human HCC and cell lines. H2A.Z.1 knockdown suppressed HCC cell growth by transcriptional deregulation of cell cycle proteins and caused apoptotic cell death of HCC cells. We also observed that H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the metastatic potential of HCC cells by selectively modulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulatory proteins such as E-cadherin and fibronectin. In addition, H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the in vivo tumor growth rate in a mouse xenograft model. In conclusion, our findings suggest the oncogenic potential of H2A.Z.1 in liver tumorigenesis and that it plays established role in accelerating cell cycle transition and EMT during hepatocarcinogenesis. This makes H2A.Z.1 a promising target in liver cancer therapy. PMID:26863632

  16. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity.

  17. Structure-activity relationship and role of oxygen in the potential antitumour activity of fluoroquinolones in human epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Paola; Savio, Monica; Cazzalini, Ornella; Mocchi, Roberto; Maccario, Cristina; Sommatis, Sabrina; Ferraro, Daniela; Pizzala, Roberto; Pretali, Luca; Fasani, Elisa; Albini, Angelo; Stivala, Lucia Anna

    2014-11-01

    The photobehavior of ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin and ofloxacin fluoroquinolones was investigated using several in vitro methods to assess their cytotoxic, antiproliferative, and genotoxic potential against two human cancer cell lines. We focused our attention on the possible relationship between their chemical structure, O₂ partial pressure and photobiological activity on cancer cells. The three molecules share the main features of most fluoroquinolones, a fluorine in 6 and a piperazino group in 7, but differ at the key position 8, unsubstituted in ciprofloxacin, a fluorine in lomefloxacin and an alkoxy group in ofloxacin. Studies in solution show that ofloxacin has a low photoreactivity; lomefloxacin reacts via aryl cation, ciprofloxacin reacts but not via the cation. In our experiments, ciprofloxacin and lomefloxacin showed a high and comparable potential for photodamaging cells and DNA. Lomefloxacin appeared the most efficient molecule in hypoxia, acting mainly against tumour cell proliferation and generating DNA plasmid photocleavage. Although our results do not directly provide evidence that a carbocation is involved in photodamage induced by lomefloxacin, our data strongly support this hypothesis. This may lead to new and more efficient anti-tumour drugs involving a cation in their mechanism of action. This latter acting independently of oxygen, can target hypoxic tumour tissue.

  18. Inflammation and cancer: role of annexin A1 and FPR2/ALX in proliferation and metastasis in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Santana Gastardelo

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory protein annexin A1 (ANXA1 has been associated with cancer progression and metastasis, suggesting its role in regulating tumor cell proliferation. We investigated the mechanism of ANXA1 interaction with formylated peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX in control, peritumoral and tumor larynx tissue samples from 20 patients, to quantitate the neutrophils and mast cells, and to evaluate the protein expression and co-localization of ANXA1/FPR2 in these inflammatory cells and laryngeal squamous cells by immunocytochemistry. In addition, we performed in vitro experiments to further investigate the functional role of ANXA1/FPR2 in the proliferation and metastasis of Hep-2 cells, a cell line from larynx epidermoid carcinoma, after treatment with ANXA1(2-26 (annexin A1 N-terminal-derived peptide, Boc2 (antagonist of FPR and/or dexamethasone. Under these treatments, the level of Hep-2 cell proliferation, pro-inflammatory cytokines, ANXA1/FPR2 co-localization, and the prostaglandin signalling were analyzed using ELISA, immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR. An influx of neutrophils and degranulated mast cells was detected in tumor samples. In these inflammatory cells of peritumoral and tumor samples, ANXA1/FPR2 expression was markedly exacerbated, however, in laryngeal carcinoma cells, this expression was down-regulated. ANXA1(2-26 treatment reduced the proliferation of the Hep-2 cells, an effect that was blocked by Boc2, and up-regulated ANXA1/FPR2 expression. ANXA1(2-26 treatment also reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and affected the expression of metalloproteinases and EP receptors, which are involved in the prostaglandin signalling. Overall, this study identified potential roles for the molecular mechanism of the ANXA1/FPR2 interaction in laryngeal cancer, including its relationship with the prostaglandin pathway, providing promising starting points for future research. ANXA1 may contribute to the regulation of tumor growth

  19. RPR-115135, a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, increases 5-FU- cytotoxicity in ten human colon cancer cell lines: role of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Patrizia; Malacarne, Davide; Falugi, Carla; Trombino, Sonya; O'Connor, Patrick M

    2002-07-20

    A new non peptidic farnesyltransferase inhibitor, RPR-115135, in combination with 5-FU was studied in 10 human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116, RKO, DLD-1, Colo-320, LoVo, SW-620, HT-29, HCT-15, Colo-205 and KM-12) carrying several mutations but well characterized for p53 and Ras status. We found that there was a slight tendency (not statistically significant) for the p53 inactivated cells to be less sensitive to 5-FU after 6 days continuous treatment. Simultaneous administration of RPR-115135 and 5-FU, at subtoxic concentrations, resulted in a synergistic enhancement of 5-FU cytotoxicity in the p53 wildtype cells (HCT-116, RKO, DLD-1, Colo-320, LoVo). In the p53 mutated cells (SW-620, HT-29, HCT-15, Colo-205, KM-12) the effect was very complicated. In HCT-15 the combination resulted in antagonism, in KM-12 in antagonism or in synergy (at different concentrations) and in SW-620, HT-29 and Colo-205 cells in synergy but only when 5-FU was administered at high concentrations. Growth inhibition could be accounted for on the basis of a specific cell cycle arrest phenotype (G2-M arrest), as assayed by flow cytometry, only in the p53 functioning cell lines. The combination RPR-115135 + 5-FU increases apoptotic events only in these cell lines. In the mutated cell lines no major alterations on cell cycle arrest phenotype and no induction of apoptosis was observed. Although RPR-115135 can potentiate the effect of 5-FU in cells in which p53 function is disrupted, these data suggest strongly that RPR-115135 significantly enhances the efficacy of 5-FU only when p53 is functioning.

  20. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  1. Dual role of LRRC8A-containing transporters on cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Dam, Celina Støving; Stürup, Stefan;

    2016-01-01

    component of volume sensitive channels for organic osmolytes (VSOAC) and volume regulated anion channels (VRAC), which are activated during the apoptotic process. Here we illustrate that cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780) correlates with a reduced expression of LRRC8A and copper...... transporter receptor 1 (CTR1), as well as a concomitant increased expression of copper-transporting P-type ATPases (ATP7A/ATP7B). We also find that cisplatin (Pt) accumulation correlates with LRRC8A protein expression and channel activity, i.e., the cellular Pt content is high when VSOAC is activated...... expression in cisplatin-resistant A2780 cells ensures cell survival through limitation in cisplatin accumulation and a concomitant reduction in osmolytes loss via VSOAC/VRAC and hence instigation of the apoptotic process....

  2. Is there a role for surgery in stage Ⅲ A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul E. VAN SCHIL; Michèle DE WAELE; Jeroen M. HENDRIKS; Patrick R. LAUWERS

    2008-01-01

    The role of surgery in stage Ⅲ A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial.Most important prognostic factors are mediastinal downstaging and complete surgical resection. Different restaging techniques exist to evaluate response after induction therapy and these are subdivided into non-invasive, invasive and alternative or minimally invasive techniques. In contrast to imaging or functional studies, remediastinoscopy provides pathological evidence of response after induction therapy. Although technically more challenging than a first procedure,remediastinoscopy can select patients for subsequent thoracotomy and provides prognostic information. An alternative approach consists of the use of minimally invasive staging procedures as endobronchial or endoscopic esophageal ultrasound to obtain an initial proof of mediastinal nodal involvement. Mediastinoscopy is subsequently performed after induction therapy to evaluate response. In this way, a technically more difficult remediastinoscopy can be avoided. Stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC represents a heterogenous spectrum of locally advanced disease and different subsets exist. When N2 disease is discovered during thoracotomy after negative, careful preoperative staging a resection should be performed if this can be complete. Postoperative radiotherapy will decrease local recurrence rate but not overall survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy increases survival and is presently recommended in these cases. Most patients with pathologically proven N2 disease detected during preoperative work-up will be treated by induction therapy followed by surgery or radiotherapy.In two large, recently completed, phase Ill trials there was no difference in overall survival between the surgical and radiotherapy arm, but in one trial there was a difference in progression-free survival in favor of the surgical arm. In the surgery ann the rate of local recurrences was also lower in beth trials. Surgical resection may be recommended in those

  3. All-trans-retinoic Acid Modulates the Plasticity and Inhibits the Motility of Breast Cancer Cells: ROLE OF NOTCH1 AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR (TGFβ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Adriana; Affatato, Roberta; Centritto, Floriana; Fratelli, Maddalena; Kurosaki, Mami; Barzago, Maria Monica; Bolis, Marco; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Paroni, Gabriela

    2015-07-17

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is a natural compound proposed for the treatment/chemoprevention of breast cancer. Increasing evidence indicates that aberrant regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a determinant of the cancer cell invasive and metastatic behavior. The effects of ATRA on EMT are largely unknown. In HER2-positive SKBR3 and UACC812 cells, showing co-amplification of the ERBB2 and RARA genes, ATRA activates a RARα-dependent epithelial differentiation program. In SKBR3 cells, this causes the formation/reorganization of adherens and tight junctions. Epithelial differentiation and augmented cell-cell contacts underlie the anti-migratory action exerted by the retinoid in cells exposed to the EMT-inducing factors EGF and heregulin-β1. Down-regulation of NOTCH1, an emerging EMT modulator, is involved in the inhibition of motility by ATRA. Indeed, the retinoid blocks NOTCH1 up-regulation by EGF and/or heregulin-β1. Pharmacological inhibition of γ-secretase and NOTCH1 processing also abrogates SKBR3 cell migration. Stimulation of TGFβ contributes to the anti-migratory effect of ATRA. The retinoid switches TGFβ from an EMT-inducing and pro-migratory determinant to an anti-migratory mediator. Inhibition of the NOTCH1 pathway not only plays a role in the anti-migratory action of ATRA; it is relevant also for the anti-proliferative activity of the retinoid in HCC1599 breast cancer cells, which are addicted to NOTCH1 for growth/viability. This effect is enhanced by the combination of ATRA and the γ-secretase inhibitor N-(N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester, supporting the concept that the two compounds act at the transcriptional and post-translational levels along the NOTCH1 pathway.

  4. Mast cells and cancer: enemies or allies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyduch, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells are a component of cancer microenvironment the role of which is complex and poorly understood. Mast cells promote cancer growth by stimulation of neoangiogenesis, tissue remodeling and by modulation of the host immune response. The mediators of cancer promotion include protease-activated receptors, mitogen activated protein kinases, prostaglandins and histamine. Histamine may induce tumor proliferation and immunosuppression through H1 and H2 receptors, respectively. The mast cell-derived modulators of immune response include also interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and CD30L. Possibly stimulation of angiogenesis is the most important. Mast cells release potent proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), TNF- α and IL-8, and mast cells' enzymes, like metaloproteinases (MMPs), tryptase and chymase participate in vessels' formation. The anti-cancer actions of mast cells include direct growth inhibition, immunologic stimulation, inhibition of apoptosis and decreased cell mobility; the mediators of these processes include chymase, tryptase, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. The very same mediators may exert both pro- or anti-cancer effects depending on concentration, presence of cofactors or location of secreting cells. In fact, peri- and intra-tumoral mast cells may have dissimilar effects. Understanding of the role of mast cells in cancer could lead to improved prognostication and development of therapeutic methods targeting the mast cells.

  5. The role of captopril and losartan in prevention and regression of tamoxifen-induced resistance of breast cancer cell line MCF-7: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Soha; Rostami-Yalmeh, Javad; Sahebi, Ebrahim; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Razmkhah, Mahboobeh; Hosseini, Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Innate and acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer is an important problem in adjuvant endocrine therapy. The underlying mechanisms of TAM resistance is yet unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the acquisition of TAM resistance in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, and the potential role of captopril and captopril+losartan combination in the prevention and reversion of the TAM resistant phenotype. MCF-7 cells were continuously exposed to 1 μmol/L TAM to develop TAM resistant cells (TAM-R). MTT cell viability assay was used to determine the growth response of MCF-7 and TAM-R cells, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to assess angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II receptor type-1 and type-2 (AGTR1 and AGTR2) mRNA expressions. Preventive and therapeutic effects of RAS blockers - captopril and losartan - were examined on MCF-7 and TAM-R cells. Based on qRT-PCR, TAM-R cells compared to MCF-7 cells, had a mean ± SD fold increase of 319.1 ± 204.1 (P = 0.002) in production of ACE mRNA level, 2211.8 ± 777.9 (P = 0.002) in AGTR1 mRNA level, and 265.9 ± 143.9 (P = 0.037) in production of AGTR2 mRNA level. The combination of either captopril or captopril+losartan with TAM led to the prevention and even reversion of TAM resistant phenotype.

  6. JunD Is Required for Proliferation of Prostate Cancer Cells and Plays a Role in Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β)-induced Inhibition of Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millena, Ana Cecilia; Vo, BaoHan T; Khan, Shafiq A

    2016-08-19

    TGF-β inhibits proliferation of prostate epithelial cells. However, prostate cancer cells in advanced stages become resistant to inhibitory effects of TGF-β. The intracellular signaling mechanisms involved in differential effects of TGF-β during different stages are largely unknown. Using cell line models, we have shown that TGF-β inhibits proliferation in normal (RWPE-1) and prostate cancer (DU145) cells but does not have any effect on proliferation of prostate cancer (PC3) cells. We have investigated the role of Jun family proteins (c-Jun, JunB, and JunD) in TGF-β effects on cell proliferation. Jun family members were expressed at different levels and responded differentially to TGF-β treatment. TGF-β effects on JunD protein levels, but not mRNA levels, correlated with its effects on cell proliferation. TGF-β induced significant reduction in JunD protein in RWPE-1 and DU145 cells but not in PC3 cells. Selective knockdown of JunD expression using siRNA in DU145 and PC3 cells resulted in significant reduction in cell proliferation, and forced overexpression of JunD increased the proliferation rate. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun or JunB had little, if any, effect on cell proliferation; overexpression of c-Jun and JunB decreased the proliferation rate in DU145 cells. Further studies showed that down-regulation of JunD in response to TGF-β treatment is mediated via the proteasomal degradation pathway. In conclusion, we show that specific Jun family members exert differential effects on proliferation in prostate cancer cells in response to TGF-β, and inhibition of cell proliferation by TGF-β requires degradation of JunD protein.

  7. The role of 14-3-3{beta} in transcriptional activation of estrogen receptor {alpha} and its involvement in proliferation of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoonseo; Kim, Hyungjin; Jang, Sung-Wuk [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jesang, E-mail: jesangko@korea.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} 14-3-3{beta} interacts with ER{alpha} and the interaction is Akt-dependent. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} regulates the transcriptional activity of ER{alpha} in a ligand-dependent manner. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} increases expressions of ER{alpha} target genes. {yields} 14-3-3{beta} increases breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The estrogen receptor (ER) functions as a transcription factor that mediates the effects of estrogen. ER{alpha}, which plays a crucial role in the development and progression of breast cancer, is activated by estrogen binding, leading to receptor phosphorylation, dimerization, and recruitment of co-activators and chaperons to the estrogen-bound receptor complex. The 14-3-3 proteins bind to target proteins via phosphorylation and influence many cellular events by altering their subcellular localization or acting as a chaperone. However, regulation of ER{alpha} expression and transactivation by the 14-3-3 proteins has not been reported. We demonstrate that 14-3-3{beta} functions as a positive regulator of ER{alpha} through a direct protein-protein interaction in an estrogen-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of 14-3-3{beta} stimulated ER{alpha}-mediated transcriptional activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Enhanced ER{alpha} transcriptional activity due to 14-3-3{beta} increased the expressions of the endogenous ER{alpha} target genes, leading to proliferation of breast cancer cells. We suggest that 14-3-3{beta} has oncogenic potential in breast cancer via binding to ER{alpha} and activation of the transcriptional activity of ER{alpha}.

  8. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  9. Teriflunomide (Leflunomide Promotes Cytostatic, Antioxidant, and Apoptotic Effects in Transformed Prostate Epithelial Cells: Evidence Supporting a Role for Teriflunomide in Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numsen Hail, Jr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Teriflunomide (TFN is an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis and the active metabolite of leflunomide. Leflunomide is prescribed to patients worldwide as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory disease-modifying prodrug. Leflunomide inhibited the growth of human prostate cancer xenographs in mice, and leflunomide or TFN promoted cytostasis and/or apoptosis in cultured cells. These findings suggest that TFN could be useful in prostate cancer chemoprevention. We investigated the possible mechanistic aspects of this tenet by characterizing the effects of TFN using premalignant PWR-1E and malignant DU-145 human prostate epithelial cells. TFN promoted a dose- and time-dependent cytostasis or apoptosis induction in these cells. The cytostatic effects of TFN, which were reversible but not by the presence of excess uridine in the culture medium, included diminished cellular uridine levels, an inhibition in oxygen consumption, a suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, S-phase cell cycle arrest, and a conspicuous reduction in the size and number of the nucleoli in the nuclei of these cells. Conversely, TFN's apoptogenic effects were characteristic of catastrophic mitochondrial disruption (i.e., a dissipation of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, enhanced ROS production, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, and cytoplasmic vacuolization and followed by DNA fragmentation. The respiration-deficient derivatives of the DU-145 cells, which are also uridine auxotrophs, were markedly resistant to the cytostatic and apoptotic effects of TFN, implicating de novo pyrimidine synthesis and mitochondrial bioenergetics as the primary targets for TFN in the respiration competent cells. These mechanistic findings advocate a role for TFN and mitochondrial bioenergetics in prostate cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Role of MiR-3619-5p in β-Catenin-Mediated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Growth and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuecai Niu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The malignancy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is largely due to its fast growth and invasion. WNT/β-catenin signaling plays a critical role in regulating NSCLC carcinogenesis. Hence, suppression of β-catenin signal transduction in NSCLC cells may improve the therapeutic outcome. Methods: We analyzed the levels of β-catenin and miR-3619-5p in NSCLC specimens, compared to paired non-tumor normal lung tissue (NT. We did Bioinformatics analyses on the binding sites of 3'-UTR of β-catenin mRNA by miR-3619-5p. We modified the levels of miR-3619-5p in NSCLC cells and examined their effects on β-catenin levels, and on the growth and invasion of NSCLC cells in an MTT assay and a transwell cell migration assay, respectively. Results: NSCLC specimens had significant higher levels of β-catenin, and significantly lower levels of miR-3619-5p, compared to NT. The levels of β-catenin and miR-3619-5p were inversely correlated in NSCLC specimens. Bioinformatics analyses showed that miR-3619-5p bound to 3'-UTR of β-catenin mRNA in NSCLC cells to inhibit its translation. Overexpression of miR-3619-5p decreased β-catenin protein, while depletion of miR-3619-5p increased β-catenin protein in NSCLC cells, without altering β-catenin mRNA levels. Overexpression of miR-3619-5p in NSCLC cells inhibited cell growth and invasion, while depletion of miR-3619-5p in NSCLC lines increased cell growth and invasion. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for miR-3619-5p in suppression of β-catenin-mediated cancer growth and invasion in NSCLC cells, and highlight miR-3619-5p as a novel cancer suppressor in NSCLC.

  11. A switch role of Src in the biphasic EGF signaling of ER-negative breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XinTian Zhang

    Full Text Available It is well established that epidermal growth factor (EGF is a potent mitogen in cells expressing EGF receptor (EGFR. However, a body of evidence indicated that the effects of mitogenic EGF signaling exhibit a non-monotonic, or biphasic dose response curve; EGF at low concentrations elicits a mitogenic signaling pathway to stimulate cell proliferation while at high concentrations, EGF inhibits cell growth. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this paradoxical effect of EGF on cell proliferation remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the biphasic EGF signaling in ER-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436 cells, both of which express endogenous EGFR. We found that EGF at low concentrations induced the phosphorylation of the Src-Y416 residue, an event to activate Src, while at high concentrations allowed Src-Y527 phosphorylation that inactivates Src. EGF at 10 ng/ml also induced phosphorylation of the MAPK/ERK and activated cyclin D1 promoter activity through the Src/EGFR/STAT5 pathways but not at a higher concentration (500 ng/ml. Our results thus demonstrated that Src functions as a switch of EGF signaling depending on concentrations of EGF.

  12. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    , vinculin and FAK synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Finally, the knowledge of the mechanical properties of invasive and non-invasive cells could provide a source for future drug developments to inhibit formation of metastases. This special section also includes two papers from the group of Martin Herrmann, a research paper and a review paper. The research paper by Janko et al deals with the cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to phosphatidylserines on apoptotic cell membranes [6]. This could not alone serve as an 'eat me' signal for macrophages as healthy cells also express Annexin A5 on their cell surface. The authors suggest that the cooperative binding is altered and subsequently the fluidity of Annexin A5 on the membrane. Together this may serve as a signal for phagocytic cells to eat apoptotic cells and leave healthy ones untouched. The paper by Biermann et al reviews the role of biophysical signals in the clearance of apoptotic cells [7]. In addition to the acto-myosin cytoskeleton, the keratin network seems to play a role in cancer research. The paper from the Beil and the Marti group demonstrates that microrheology is a valuable tool to determine the viscoelastic properties of polymer networks such as the keratin network in cells and an arbitrary in vitro network [8]. They describe how the topology of the keratin network affects the overall mechanical behavior of cells. It seems that the field of physical oncology will continue to grow in the future and more research will address the mechanical properties of cancer cells and whole tissues. Biophysical methods will need to be further improved and adapted to the needs of cancer research. References [1] Coughlin M F and Fredberg J J 2013 Phys. Biol. 10 065001 [2] Krause M, te Riet J and Wolf K 2013 Phys. Biol. 10 065002 [3] Munn L L 2013 Phys. Biol. 10 065003 [4] Bordeleau F, Tang L N and Reinhart-King C A 2013 Phys. Biol. 10 065004 [5

  13. Role of Heparan Sulfate 2-O-Sulfotransferase in Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation, Invasion, and Growth Factor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent W. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparan-sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs are required for maximal growth factor signaling in prostate cancer progression. The degree of sulfate modification on the covalently attached heparan sulfate (HS chains is one of the determining factors of growth factor-HSPG interactions. Sulfate groups are transferred to HS chains via a series of O-sulfotransferases. In the present study, we demonstrate that Heparan sulfate 2-O-sulfotransferase (2OST is essential for maximal proliferation and invasion of prostate cancer cells in the LNCaP-C4-2B model. We also show that a decrease in invasion due to 2OST siRNA is associated with an increase in actin and E-cadherin accumulation at the cell surface. 2OST expression correlates with increasing metastatic potential in this model. We demonstrate that 2OST expression is upregulated by the stress-inducible transcription factors HIF1α, ATF2, and NFκB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis suggests that HIF1α and ATF2 act directly on the 2OST promoter, while NFκB acts indirectly.

  14. The role of IL-11 in immunity and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dixon H; Zhu, Ziwen; Wakefield, Mark R; Xiao, Huaping; Bai, Qian; Fang, Yujiang

    2016-04-10

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a member of the glycoprotein-130 (GP-130) cytokines that utilizes the GP-130 signaling pathway shared by other cytokines of the same family. Traditionally regarded as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-11 also demonstrates its role as a proinflammatory cytokine, suggesting its complex role in immune response. In recent years, IL-11 has an emerging role in various inflammation-associated cancers. In this review, we aim to discuss IL-11 signaling pathway, to explore the role of IL-11 in immunity and various cancers, and to provide a therapeutic perspective of strategies utilized to interfere IL-11 signaling in cancer cells.

  15. CSPG4 in cancer: multiple roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Wang, Y; Yu, L; Sakakura, K; Visus, C; Schwab, J H; Ferrone, C R; Favoino, E; Koya, Y; Campoli, M R; McCarthy, J B; DeLeo, A B; Ferrone, S

    2010-06-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), also known as High Molecular Weight-Melanoma Associated Antigen, is a cell surface proteoglycan which has been recently shown to be expressed not only by melanoma cells, but also by various types of human carcinoma and sarcoma. Furthermore, at least in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck and in basal breast carcinoma, CSPG4 is expressed by cancer stem cells. CSPG4 plays an important role in tumor cell growth and survival. These CSPG4-associated functional properties of tumor cells are inhibited by CSPG4-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in vitro. Moreover, CSPG4-specific mAb can also inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. The anti-tumor effects of CSPG4-specific mAb are likely to reflect the blocking of important migratory, mitogenic and survival signaling pathways in tumor cells. These results indicate that CSPG4 is a promising new target to implement mAb-based immunotherapy of various types of cancer.

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  17. Drosophila as a model to study the role of blood cells in inflammation, innate immunity and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has a blood system with three types of haemocytes which function throughout different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Haemocytes play essential roles in tissue modelling during embryogenesis and morphogenesis, and also in innate immunity. The open circulatory system of Drosophila makes haemocytes ideal signal mediators to cells and tissues in response to events such as infection, wounding and tumour formation. In this context, Drosophila is now used for screening an...

  18. Drosophila as a model to study the role of blood cells in inflammation, innate immunity and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has a primitive yet effective blood system with three types of haemocytes which function throughout different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Haemocytes play essential roles in tissue modeling during embryogenesis and morphogenesis, and also in innate immunity. The open circulatory system of Drosophila makes haemocytes ideal signal mediators to cells and tissues in response to events such as infection and wounding. The application of recently developed and sophistic...

  19. The role of maintenance proteins in the preservation of epithelial cell identity during mammary gland remodeling and breast cancer initiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danila Coradini; Saro Oriana

    2014-01-01

    During normal postnatal mammary gland development and adult remodeling related to the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and lactation, ovarian hormones and peptide growth factors contribute to the delineation of a definite epithelial cellidentity. This identity is maintained during cellreplication in a heritable but DNA-independent manner. The preservation of cellidentity is fundamental, especialy when cels must undergo changes in response to intrinsic and extrinsic signals. The maintenance proteins, which are required for cellidentity preservation, act epigenetically by regulating gene expression through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Among the maintenance proteins, the Trithorax (TrxG) and Polycomb (PcG) group proteins are the best characterized. In this review, we summarize the structures and activities of the TrxG and PcG complexes and describe their pivotal roles in nuclear estrogen receptor activity. In addition, we provide evidence that perturbations in these epigenetic regulators are involved in disrupting epithelial cellidentity, mammary gland remodeling, and breast cancer initiation.

  20. Proteoglycans and their roles in brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Anna; Robinson, Aaron E; Engler, Jane R; Petritsch, Claudia; James, C David; Phillips, Joanna J

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma, a malignant brain cancer, is characterized by abnormal activation of receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathways and a poor prognosis. Extracellular proteoglycans, including heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, play critical roles in the regulation of cell signalling and migration via interactions with extracellular ligands, growth factor receptors and extracellular matrix components, as well as intracellular enzymes and structural proteins. In cancer, proteoglycans help drive multiple oncogenic pathways in tumour cells and promote critical tumour-microenvironment interactions. In the present review, we summarize the evidence for proteoglycan function in gliomagenesis and examine the expression of proteoglycans and their modifying enzymes in human glioblastoma using data obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (http://cancergenome.nih.gov/). Furthermore, we demonstrate an association between specific proteoglycan alterations and changes in receptor tyrosine kinases. Based on these data, we propose a model in which proteoglycans and their modifying enzymes promote receptor tyrosine kinase signalling and progression in glioblastoma, and we suggest that cancer-associated proteoglycans are promising biomarkers for disease and therapeutic targets.

  1. An update on the biology of cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bueno, José María; Ocaña, Alberto; Castro-García, Paola; Gil Gas, Carmen; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Poblet, Enrique; Serrano, Rosario; Calero, Raúl; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells are defined as cancer cells with self-renewal capacity. These cells represent a small subpopulation endowed with the ability to form new tumours when injected in nude mice. Markers of differentiation have been used to identify these cancer cells. In the case of breast cancer, CD44+/CD24- select a population with stem cell properties. The fact that these cells have self-renewal ability has suggested that this population could be responsible for new tumour formation and cancer relapse. These cells have been shown to be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than normal cancer cells. The identification of the molecular druggable alterations responsible for the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells is an important goal. In this article we will review all these points with special emphasis on the possible role of new drugs designed to interact with molecular pathways of cancer stem cells.

  2. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  3. Laryngeal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the head and neck region with an increased incidence rate worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a group of cells with eternal life or infinite self-renewal ability, which have high migrating, infiltrative, and metastatic abilities. Though CSCs only account for a small proportion in tumors, the high resistance to traditional therapy exempts them from therapy killing and thus they can reconstruct tumors. Our current knowledge, about CSCs in the LSCC, largely depends on head and neck studies with a lack of systematic data about the evidences of CSCs in tumorigenesis of LSCC. Certainly, the combination of therapies aimed at debulking the tumour (e.g. surgery, conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy together with targeted therapies aimed at the elimination of the CSCs might have a positive impact on the long-term outcome of patients with laryngeal cancer (LC in the future and may cast a new light on the cancer treatment.

  4. Emerging roles of exosomes in cancer invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soung, Young Hwa; Nguyen, Thalia; Cao, Hans; Lee, Janet; Chung, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that nano-sized vesicles called "exosomes" mediate the interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment and play a critical role in the development of cancers. Exosomes contain cargo consisting of proteins, lipids, mRNAs, and microRNAs that can be delivered to different types of cells in nascent as well as distant locations. Cancer cell-derived exosomes (CCEs) have been identified in body fluids such as urine, plasma, and saliva from patients with cancer. Although their content depends on tumor type and stage, CCEs merit consideration as prognostic and diagnostic markers, as vehicles for drug delivery, and as potential therapeutic targets because they could transport various oncogenic elements. In this review, we summarize recent advances regarding the role of CCEs in cancer invasion and metastasis, as well as its potential clinical applications.

  5. The role of nitric oxide in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic regulator, critical to numerous biological processes, including va-sodilatation, neurotransmission and macrophage-mediated immunity. The family of nitric oxide synthases(NOS) comprises inducible NOS (iNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and neuronal NOS (nNOS). Interest-ingly, various studies have shown that all three isoforms can be involved in promoting or inhibiting theetiology of cancer. NOS activity has been detected in tumour cells of various histogenetic origins and hasbeen associated with tumour grade, proliferation rate and expression of important signaling componentsassociated with cancer development such as the oestrogen receptor. It appears that high levels of NOSexpression (for example, generated by activated macrophages) may be cytostatic or cytotoxic for tumorcells, whereas low level activity can have the opposite effect and promote tumour growth. Paradoxicallytherefore, NO (and related reactive nitrogen species) may have both genotoxic and angiogenic properties.Increased NO-generation in a cell may select mutant p53 cells and contribute to tumour angiogenesis byupregulating VEGF. In addition, NO may modulate tumour DNA repair mechanisms by upregulating p53,poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). An understand-ing at the molecular level of the role of NO in cancer will have profound therapeutic implications for thediagnosis and treatment of disease.

  6. Role of glutathione in cancer progression and chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Nicola; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents.

  7. Role of CEACAM1, ECM, and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Orthotopic Model of Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Samineni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1 is a morphogen in an in vitro model for lumen formation and plays a similar role in breast epithelial cells implanted in humanized mammary fat pads in NOD-SCID mice. Although extra cellular matrix alone is sufficient to stimulate lumen formation in CEACAM1 transfected MCF-7 cells grown in 3D culture, there is an additional requirement for stromal or mesenchymal cells (MSCs for these cells to form xenografts with glandular structures in an orthotopic site. We demonstrate that optimal in vitro conditions include both Matrigel and MSCs and that the inclusion of collagen I inhibits xenograft differentiation. Additionally, there is no need to remove the nascent murine mammary gland. The previously observed difference in gland development between the long and short cytoplasmic domain isoforms of CEACAM1 is no longer observed in pregnant NOD/SCID mice suggesting that stimulation of the mammary fat pad by pregnancy critically affects xenograft differentiation.

  8. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  9. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Koido; Eiichi Hara; Sadamu Homma; Yoshihisa Namiki; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Jianlin Gong; Hisao Tajiri

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived...

  10. Neurotrophin signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Valérie; Lagadec, Chann; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Le Bourhis, Xuefen

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), are thought to be at the origin of tumor development and resistance to therapies. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of CSC stemness is essential to the design of more effective therapies for cancer patients. Cancer cell stemness and the subsequent expansion of CSCs are regulated by micro-environmental signals including neurotrophins. Over the years, the roles of neurotrophins in tumor development have been well established and regularly reviewed. Especially, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reported to stimulate tumor cell proliferation, survival, migration and/or invasion, and favors tumor angiogenesis. More recently, neurotrophins have been reported to regulate CSCs. This review briefly presents neurotrophins and their receptors, summarizes their roles in different cancers, and discusses the emerging evidence of neurotrophins-induced enrichment of CSCs as well as the involved signaling pathways.

  11. Stem Cells and Cancer; Celulas madre y cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrelles, C.; Paraminio, J. M.; Lorz, C.

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  12. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  13. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  14. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggestin...

  15. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  16. Cytokines and Growth Factors Stimulate Hyaluronan Production: Role of Hyaluronan in Epithelial to Mesenchymal-Like Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Chow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the role of hyaluronan (HA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC since close association between HA level and malignancy has been reported. HA is an abundant extracellular matrix component and its synthesis is regulated by growth factors and cytokines that include epidermal growth factor (EGF and interleukin-1β (IL-1β. We showed that treatment with recombinant EGF and IL-1β, alone or in combination with TGF-β, was able to stimulate HA production in lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. TGF-β/IL-1β treatment induced epithelial to mesenchymal-like phenotype transition (EMT, changing cell morphology and expression of vimentin and E-cadherin. We also overexpressed hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3 in epithelial lung adenocarcinoma cell line H358, resulting in induced HA expression, EMT phenotype, enhanced MMP9 and MMP2 activities and increased invasion. Furthermore, adding exogenous HA to A549 cells and inducing HA H358 cells resulted in increased resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitor, Iressa. Together, these results suggest that elevated HA production is able to induce EMT and increase resistance to Iressa in NSCLC. Therefore, regulation of HA level in NSCLC may be a new target for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  18. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  20. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  1. The role of GAGE cancer/testis antigen in metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Terp, Mikkel Green; Hansen, Malene Bredahl;

    2016-01-01

    with migratory and invasive properties and were found to be upregulated in cancer cells with metastasizing potential in a gastric cancer model. METHODS: We have addressed the direct role of GAGE proteins in supporting metastasis using an isogenic metastasis model of human cancer, consisting of 4 isogenic cell......) and moderately metastatic clones (LM3), stable downregulation of GAGE expression did not affect the ability of CL16 cells to establish primary tumors and form metastasis in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that GAGE proteins per se do not support metastasis and that further...

  2. Cancer and deregulation of stem cells pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Correia Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells may have an important etiological role in cancer. Their classic regulatory pathways are deregulated in tumors, strengthening the stem cell theory of cancer. In this manuscript, we review Wnt, Notch and Hedhehog pathways, describing which of their factors may be responsible for the neoplastic development. Furthermore, we classify these elements as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, demonstrating their mutation implications in cancer. The activation of these pathways is associated with the expression of certain genes which maintain proliferation and apoptosis inhibition. Further work should be carried out in the future in order to control tumor development by controlling these signaling cascades.

  3. Emerging role for leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors LGR5 and LGR4 in cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nakata S; Phillips E; Goidts V

    2014-01-01

    Susumu Nakata,1 Emma Phillips,2 Violaine Goidts21Division of Oncological Pathology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan; 2Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: The concept of cancer stem cells has gained considerable interest in the last few decades, partly because of their potential implication in therapy resistance. However, the lack of specific cellular surface markers for these cells has impeded their isolation, makin...

  4. Emerging role for leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptors LGR5 and LGR4 in cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakata S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Susumu Nakata,1 Emma Phillips,2 Violaine Goidts21Division of Oncological Pathology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan; 2Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: The concept of cancer stem cells has gained considerable interest in the last few decades, partly because of their potential implication in therapy resistance. However, the lack of specific cellular surface markers for these cells has impeded their isolation, making the characterization of this cellular subpopulation technically challenging. Recent studies have indicated that leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 4 and 5 (LGR4 and LGR5 expression in multiple organs may represent a global marker of adult stem cells. This review aims to give an overview of LGR4 and LGR5 as cancer stem cell markers and their function in development.Keywords: glioblastoma, colorectal cancer, tissue stem cell marker

  5. Expression of TIMP-3 Gene by Construction of a Eukaryotic Cell Expression Vector and Its Role in Reduction of Metastasis in a Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xichun Han; Hong Zhang; Mingku Jia; Gang Han; Weidong Jiang

    2004-01-01

    The present study is aimed at studying the gene for TIMP-3, a mammalian tissue inhibitor, by constructing a recombinant eukaryotic cell vector for gene therapy in human breast cancer. We obtained the TIMP-3 gene from the human placent by RT-PCR. TIMP-3 gene was subcloned into pcDNA3.1 vetor from pMD18T vector by means of gene cloning to construct pcDNA3.1 recombinant vector. Human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453 was transfected with pcDNA3.1-TIMP3 recombinant vector using lipofectamine reagent. Then the expression of TIMP-3 and the effect on the metastasis of MDA-MB-453 were examined. The correct construction of pcDNA-TIMP3 was identified by means of restriction enzyme analysis, PCR amplication and nucleotide sequencing. Western blotting showed that the transfected cells were able to express TIMP-3,indicating that our construction of the pcDNA-TIMP3 eukaryotic expression vector was constructed successfully. Our experiments further indicated that the potential of metastasis was significantly reduced for the transfected cell line MDA-MB-453.

  6. Expression of TIMP-3 Gene by Construction of a Eukaryotic Cell Expression Vector and Its Role in Reduction of Metastasis in a Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XichunHan; HongZhang; MingkuJia; GangHan; WeidongJiang

    2004-01-01

    The present study is aimed at studying the gene for TIMP-3, a mammalian tissue inhibitor, by constructing a recombinant eukaryotic cell vector for gene therapy in human breast cancer. We obtained the TIMP-3 gene from the human placent by RT-PCR. TIMP-3 gene was subcloned into pcDNA3.1 vetor from pMD18T vector by means of gene cloning to construct pcDNA3.1 recombinant vector. Human breast cancer cell lineMDA-MB-453 was transfected with pcDNA3.1-TIMP3 recombinant vector using lipofectamine reagent. Then the expression of TIMP-3 and the effect on the metastasis of MDA-MB-453 were examined. The correct construction of pcDNA-TIMP3 was identified by means of restriction enzyme analysis, PCR amplication and nucleotide sequencing. Western blotting showed that the transfected cells were able to express TIMP-3, indicating that our construction of the pcDNA-TIMP3 eukaryotic expression vector was constructed successfully. Our experiments further indicated that the potential of metastasis was significantly reduced for the transfected cell line MDA-MB-453. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  7. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  8. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chao Xu,1,* Hong Zhao,1,* Haitao Chen,1 Qinghua Yao2,3 1First Clinical College of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 2Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 3Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4, also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12. CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, CXCR4, drug target, chemokine, angiogenesis

  9. Potential role of gene-environment interactions in ion transport mechanisms in the etiology of renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Ivette A. G.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van Engeland, Manon; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; Keszei, András P.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ion transport mechanism (ITM) in renal cell cancer (RCC) etiology using gene-environment interactions between candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated environmental factors, including dietary intakes of sodium, potassium and fluid, hypertension and diuretic medication. A literature-based selection of 13 SNPs in ten ITM genes were successfully genotyped in toenail DNA of 3,048 subcohort members and 419 RCC cases from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Diet and lifestyle were measured with baseline questionnaires. Cox regression analyses were conducted for main effects and gene-environment interactions. ADD1_rs4961 was significantly associated with RCC risk, showing a Hazard Ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.01–1.53) for the GT + TT (versus GG) genotype. Four of 65 tested gene-environment interactions were statistically significant. Three of these interactions clustered in SLC9A3_rs4957061, including the ones with fluid and potassium intake, and diuretic medication. For fluid intake, the RCC risk was significantly lower for high versus low intake in participants with the CC genotype (HR(95% CI): 0.47(0.26–0.86)), but not for the CT + TT genotype (P-interaction = 0.002). None of the main genetic effects and gene-environment interactions remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Data do not support the general hypothesis that the ITM is a disease mechanism in RCC etiology. PMID:27686058

  10. Proteomic analysis of media from lung cancer cells reveals role of 14-3-3 proteins in cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eMcLean

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: At the time of diagnosis, 60% of lung cancer patients present with cachexia, a severe wasting syndrome that increases morbidity and mortality. Tumors secrete multiple factors that contribute to cachectic muscle wasting, and not all of these factors have been identified. We used Orbitrap electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify novel cachexia-inducing candidates in media conditioned with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LCM. Results: One-hundred and fifty-eight proteins were confirmed in three biological replicates. Thirty-three were identified as secreted proteins, including 14-3-3 proteins, which are highly conserved adaptor proteins known to have over 200 binding partners. We confirmed the presence of extracellular 14-3-3 proteins in LCM via western blot and discovered that LCM contained less 14-3-3 content than media conditioned with C2C12 myotubes. Using a neutralizing antibody, we depleted extracellular 14-3-3 proteins in myotube culture medium, which resulted in diminished myosin content. We identified the proposed receptor for 14-3-3 proteins, CD13, in differentiated C2C12 myotubes and found that inhibiting CD13 via Bestatin also resulted in diminished myosin content. Conclusions: Our novel findings show that extracellular 14-3-3 proteins may act as previously unidentified myokines and may signal via CD13 to help maintain muscle mass.

  11. The role of the insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer and other solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Novello, Silvia

    2012-06-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and its downstream signaling components have become increasingly recognized as having a driving role in the development of malignancy, and consequently IGF-1R has become a potential target for cancer therapy. Several inhibitors of IGF-1R are in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These IGF-1R-targeted agents include monoclonal antibodies such as cixutumumab (IMC-A12), AMG-479, AVE1642, BIIB022, dalotuzumab (MK-0646), and robatumumab (Sch717454), the ligand neutralizing antibody Medi-573, and the small molecule inhibitors BMS-754807, linsitinib (OSI-906), XL228, and AXL1717. Two phase III trials of the anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody, figitumumab (CP-751,871), were discontinued in 2010 as it was considered unlikely either trial would meet their primary endpoints. In light of disappointing clinical data with figitumumab and other targeted agents, it is likely that the use of molecular markers will become important in predicting response to treatment. This review outlines the role of IGF-1R signaling in solid tumors with a particular focus on NSCLC, and provides an overview of clinical data.

  12. Noncoding RNAs in cancer and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianzhi Huang; Angel Alvarez; Bo Hu; Shi-Yuan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are of crucial importance for human cancer. The functional relevance of ncRNAs is particularly evident for microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). miRNAs are endogenously expressed small RNA sequences that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been extensively studied for their roles in cancers, whereas lncRNAs are emerging as important players in the cancer paradigm in recent years. These noncoding genes are often aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, the biological functions of most ncRNAs remain largely unknown. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing how ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells harboring self-renewal and differentiation capacities. These studies provide insight into the functional roles that ncRNAs play in tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapies, and they suggest ncRNAs as attractive therapeutic targets and potential y useful diagnostic tools.

  13. Induction of cancer cell stemness by chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingwang; Ghisolfi, Laura; Keates, Andrew C; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Lee, Dong-ki; Li, Chiang J

    2012-07-15

    Recent studies indicate that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in most hematological and solid tumors. CSCs are characterized by their ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into the multitude of cells that comprise the tumor mass. Moreover, these cells have been shown to be intrinsically resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Despite their fundamental role in cancer pathogenesis, the cellular origin of CSCs remains highly controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether heterogeneous cancer cells can acquire stem cell-like properties in response to chemotherapy. We demonstrate that carboplatin can induce the self-renewal (spherogenesis) and pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct3/4 expression) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells grown under stem cell culture conditions. Moreover, we show that non-CSC cells, obtained by side population flow cytometric sorting using Hoechst 33342, can acquire stem-like properties after exposure to carboplatin. Finally, we show that knockdown of Sox2 and Oct3/4 gene expression in HCC cells can reduce carboplatin-mediated increases in sphere formation and increase cellular sensitivity to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data indicate that bulk cancer cells may be an important source of CSCs during tumor development, and that targeting Sox2 and/or Oct3/4 may be a promising approach for targeting CSCs in clinical cancer treatment.

  14. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-03

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  16. Critical appraisal of the role of gefitinib in the management of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ying Yuan, Xiao-Fen Li, Jia-Qi Chen, Cai-Xia Dong, Shan-Shan Weng, Jian-Jin HuangDepartment of Medical Oncology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Past studies have demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors can significantly improve clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and sensitive EGFR gene mutations. Gefitinib (Iressa®, the first oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to be more effective and better tolerated than chemotherapy either in first-line or second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC harboring sensitive EGFR mutations. Conversely, among patients with wild-type EGFR, gefitinib is inferior to standard chemotherapy in both the first-line and second-line settings. Further, gefitinib is effective in patients with brain metastases because of its low molecular weight and excellent penetration of the blood–brain barrier. In this review, we summarize the current data from clinical trials with gefitinib and appraise its role in the management of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC.Keywords: gefitinib, non-small cell lung cancer, epidermal growth factor receptor, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  17. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  18. Colorectal cancer cell lines made resistant to SN38-and Oxaliplatin: Roles of altered ion transporter function in resistance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandra, Christensen; Jensen, Niels Frank; Stoeckel, Johanne Danmark;

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 3rd most common cancer globally, with 5year survival rates of ~50%. Response rates to standard treatments (irinotecan (SN38) or Oxaliplatin (Oxp)) are 31–56% and drug resistance is a major problem. Thus, we established in vitro CRC models to investigate SN38 and Oxp...

  19. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we...... a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors....

  20. MET: roles in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stemness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hye-Min

    2017-01-01

    In a number of cancers, deregulated MET pathway leads to aberrantly activated proliferative and invasive signaling programs that promote malignant transformation, cell motility and migration, angiogenesis, survival in hypoxia, and invasion. A better understanding of oncogenic MET signaling will help us to discover effective therapeutic approaches and to identify which tumors are likely to respond to MET-targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we will summarize the roles of MET signaling in cancer, with particular focus on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stemness. Then, we will provide update on MET targeting agents and discuss the challenges that should be overcome for the development of an effective therapy. PMID:28164090

  1. Role of the Crosstalk between Autophagy and Apoptosis in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfei Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy and apoptosis are catabolic pathways essential for organismal homeostasis. Autophagy is normally a cell-survival pathway involving the degradation and recycling of obsolete, damaged, or harmful macromolecular assemblies; however, excess autophagy has been implicated in type II cell death. Apoptosis is the canonical programmed cell death pathway. Autophagy and apoptosis have now been shown to be interconnected by several molecular nodes of crosstalk, enabling the coordinate regulation of degradation by these pathways. Normally, autophagy and apoptosis are both tumor suppressor pathways. Autophagy fulfils this role as it facilitates the degradation of oncogenic molecules, preventing development of cancers, while apoptosis prevents the survival of cancer cells. Consequently, defective or inadequate levels of either autophagy or apoptosis can lead to cancer. However, autophagy appears to have a dual role in cancer, as it has now been shown that autophagy also facilitates the survival of tumor cells in stress conditions such as hypoxic or low-nutrition environments. Here we review the multiple molecular mechanisms of coordination of autophagy and apoptosis and the role of the proteins involved in this crosstalk in cancer. A comprehensive understanding of the interconnectivity of autophagy and apoptosis is essential for the development of effective cancer therapeutics.

  2. Isolating the Role of Bevacizumab in Elderly Patients With Previously Untreated Nonsquamous Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A.; Patel, Jyoti D.; Sandler, Alan B.; Schiller, Joan H.; Leon, Larry; Hazard, Sebastien J.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-level data from 2 phase III studies in patients with previously untreated, advanced-stage, nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were pooled to examine outcomes with bevacizumab and chemotherapy based on age. Methods: Data from patients randomized to paclitaxel–carboplatin (PC)+bevacizumab in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 4599 (E4599) and PointBreak studies were pooled and compared with E4599 patients randomized to PC alone. Patients were grouped by age: below 65, 65 to 74, 70 to 74, below 75, and 75 years or above. A multivariable model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using time-to-event outcomes. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed by age group in each study. Results: The PC+bevacizumab and PC arms comprised 901 and 444 patients, respectively. PC+bevacizumab was associated with significant increases in overall survival relative to PC in patients below 65 years (hazards ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.89), 65 to 74 years (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-1.00), 70 to 74 years (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48-0.96), and below 75 years (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.68-0.89) but not in those aged 75 years or above (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.70-1.57). Increased incidence of grade ≥3 AEs was reported with PC+bevacizumab versus PC in patients below 75 years (63% vs. 48%; P<0.05) and 75 years or above (81% vs. 56%; P <0.05) in E4599. Conclusions: This analysis suggests that the survival benefits associated with PC+bevacizumab extend to patient subgroups below 75 years with advanced-stage NSCLC; no benefit, however, was observed for bevacizumab-eligible patients who were 75 years or above. PMID:25628268

  3. The Smad family and its role in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P; Wig, J D; Srinivasan, R

    2011-01-01

    One of the major signaling pathways that determine the tumor aggression and patient outcome in pancreatic cancer is the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß) pathway. It is inactivated at various levels in pancreatic cancer and plays a dual role in tumor initiation and progression. The Smad family of proteins transduce signals from the TGF-ß superfamily ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and death through activation of receptor serine/threonine kinases. This review discusses the structure, function and regulation of various participating Smad family members, and their individual roles in determining the progression and outcome of pancreatic cancer patients, with a special emphasis on Smad4.

  4. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  5. Critical appraisal of the role of gefitinib in the management of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Chen, Jia-Qi; Dong, Cai-Xia; Weng, Shan-Shan; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors can significantly improve clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and sensitive EGFR gene mutations. Gefitinib (Iressa(®)), the first oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to be more effective and better tolerated than chemotherapy either in first-line or second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC harboring sensitive EGFR mutations. Conversely, among patients with wild-type EGFR, gefitinib is inferior to standard chemotherapy in both the first-line and second-line settings. Further, gefitinib is effective in patients with brain metastases because of its low molecular weight and excellent penetration of the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarize the current data from clinical trials with gefitinib and appraise its role in the management of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC.

  6. Cell-of-Origin of Cancer versus Cancer Stem Cells: Assays and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Tang, Dean G

    2015-10-01

    A tumor originates from a normal cell that has undergone tumorigenic transformation as a result of genetic mutations. This transformed cell is the cell-of-origin for the tumor. In contrast, an established clinical tumor is sustained by subpopulations of self-renewing cancer cells operationally called cancer stem cells (CSC) that can generate, intraclonally, both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells. Identifying and characterizing tumor cell-of-origin and CSCs should help elucidate tumor cell heterogeneity, which, in turn, should help understand tumor cell responses to clinical treatments, drug resistance, tumor relapse, and metastatic spread. Both tumor transplantation and lineage-tracing assays have been helpful in characterizing these cancer cell populations, although each system has its strengths and caveats. In this article, we briefly review and summarize advantages and limitations of both assays in support of a combinatorial approach to accurately define the roles of both cancer-initiating and cancer-propagating cells. As an aside, we also wish to clarify the definitions of cancer cell-of-origin and CSCs, which are often interchangeably used by mistake.

  7. Neuropeptide-induced androgen independence in prostate cancer cells: roles of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases Etk/Bmx, Src, and focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L F; Guan, J; Qiu, Y; Kung, H J

    2001-12-01

    The bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) family of neuropeptides has been implicated in various in vitro and in vivo models of human malignancies including prostate cancers. It was previously shown that bombesin and/or neurotensin (NT) acts as a survival and migratory factor(s) for androgen-independent prostate cancers. However, a role in the transition from an androgen-dependent to -refractory state has not been addressed. In this study, we investigate the biological effects and signal pathways of bombesin and NT on LNCaP, a prostate cancer cell line which requires androgen for growth. We show that both neurotrophic factors can induce LNCaP growth in the absence of androgen. Concurrent transactivation of reporter genes driven by the prostate-specific antigen promoter or a promoter carrying an androgen-responsive element (ARE) indicate that growth stimulation is accompanied by androgen receptor (AR) activation. Furthermore, neurotrophic factor-induced gene activation was also present in PC3 cells transfected with the AR but not in the parental line which lacks the AR. Given that bombesin does not directly bind to the AR and is known to engage a G-protein-coupled receptor, we investigated downstream signaling events that could possibly interact with the AR pathway. We found that three nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, and Etk/BMX play important parts in this process. Etk/Bmx activation requires FAK and Src and is critical for neurotrophic factor-induced growth, as LNCaP cells transfected with a dominant-negative Etk/BMX fail to respond to bombesin. Etk's activation requires FAK, Src, but not phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Likewise, bombesin-induced AR activation is inhibited by the dominant-negative mutant of either Src or FAK. Thus, in addition to defining a new G-protein pathway, this report makes the following points regarding prostate cancer. (i) Neurotrophic factors can activate the AR, thus circumventing the normal growth

  8. Late activation of apoptotic pathways plays a negligible role in mediating the cytotoxic effects of discodermolide and epothilone B in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Linda E; Huisman, Cynthia; Ferreira, Carlos G; Rodriguez, José A; Kruyt, Frank A E; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2002-07-15

    Discodermolide and epothilone B are promising novel chemotherapeutic agentsthat induce cell death through potent stabilization of microtubules. In this study, we investigated the cellular and molecular events underlying the cytotoxicity of these drugs in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, focusing on apoptotic characteristics. IC80 concentrations of either drug effectively disrupted the microtubule cytoskeleton of H460 cells and induced cell cycle disturbances with early accumulation in the G2-M phase and development of a hypodiploid cell population in both H460 and SW1573 cells. These events were followed by abnormal chromosome segregation during mitosis and subsequent appearance of multinucleated cells. At later time points, the cells displayed several apoptotic features, such as nuclear condensation and fragmentation as well as Annexin V staining, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and the activation of caspases. To examine the contribution of apoptotic pathways to the cytotoxic effects of these agents, the involvement of the mitochondria and death receptor routes was studied. At 48 h after treatment, both agents disrupted mitochondria of H460 cells, as indicated by cytochrome c release. Nonetheless, H460 cells stably overexpressing antiapoptotic Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL did not show any protective effect from cell death induced by either drug. Possible death receptor dependency was investigated in H460 cells stably overexpressing dominant-negative FADD, which failed to reduce the cytotoxic effects of discodermolide and epothilone B. To study the role of caspases more directly, the effect of stable overexpression of the caspase-8 inhibitor cytokine response modifier A was studied in H460 cells. Furthermore, the effect of the pancaspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone was investigated in a panel of lung carcinoma cell lines. Interestingly, caspase inhibition did not rescue cells from discodermolide or epothilone B-induced cell death. In

  9. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  10. Critical role of CAV1/caveolin-1 in cell stress responses in human breast cancer cells via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yin; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Na-Di; Koo, Gi-Bang; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Parton, Robert G; Hill, Michelle M; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Kim, You-Sun; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CAV1 (caveolin 1, caveolae protein, 22kDa) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae, a specialized plasma membrane structure. Relatively, the caveolae-independent function of CAV1 is less studied. Autophagy is a process known to involve various membrane structures, including autophagosomes, lysosomes, and autolysosomes for degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Currently, the function of CAV1 in autophagy remains largely elusive. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that CAV1 deficiency promotes both basal and inducible autophagy. Interestingly, the promoting effect was found mainly in the late stage of autophagy via enhancing lysosomal function and autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Notably, the regulatory function of CAV1 in lysosome and autophagy was found to be caveolae-independent, and acts through lipid rafts. Furthermore, the elevated autophagy level induced by CAV1 deficiency serves as a cell survival mechanism under starvation. Importantly, downregulation of CAV1 and enhanced autophagy level were observed in human breast cancer cells and tissues. Taken together, our data reveal a novel function of CAV1 and lipid rafts in breast cancer development via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy.

  11. Primary cultures of human colon cancer as a model to study cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, Sergey; Danilova, Anna; Raskin, Grigory; Petrov, Nikolai; Bajenova, Olga; O'Brien, Stephen J; Tomilin, Alexey; Tolkunova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The principal cause of death in cancer involves tumor progression and metastasis. Since only a small proportion of the primary tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are the most aggressive, have the capacity to metastasize and display properties of stem cells, it is imperative to characterize the gene expression of diagnostic markers and to evaluate the drug sensitivity in the CSCs themselves. Here, we have examined the key genes that are involved in the progression of colorectal cancer and are expressed in cancer stem cells. Primary cultures of colorectal cancer cells from a patient's tumors were studied using the flow cytometry and cytological methods. We have evaluated the clinical and stem cell marker expression in these cells, their resistance to 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan, and the ability of cells to form tumors in mice. The data shows the role of stem cell marker Oct4 in the resistance of primary colorectal cancer tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil.

  12. High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Screening Reveals a Role for Junctional Adhesion Molecule A as a Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lathia, Justin D; Li, Meizhang; Sinyuk, Maksim

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells reside in niches that regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. The identity of a stem cell is linked with the ability to interact with its niche through adhesion mechanisms. To identify targets that disrupt cancer stem cell (CSC) adhesion, we performed a flow...

  13. The role of IL-21 in immunity and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew R; Zhu, Ziwen; Hansen, Dwayne M; Bai, Qian; Fang, Yujiang

    2015-03-28

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21), produced predominantly by CD4+ T cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells, is a newly discovered member of the common γ-chain family of cytokines. It has been implicated in many immunological processes and has been linked to autoimmune diseases, allergies and other inflammatory diseases. In recent years, the role for IL-21 in the pathogenesis of cancer has also been extensively studied. In this review, we will discuss recent advances concerning the role of IL-21 in immunological processes and the pathogenesis of cancer.

  14. Forcing Cancer Cells to Commit Suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Mees, Gilles; Peeters, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis plays a crucial role in the normal development, homeostasis of multicellular organisms, carcinogenic process, and response of cancer cells to anticancer drugs. It is a genetically strictly regulated process, controlled by the balance between pro-and antiapoptotic proteins. Resistance to st

  15. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  16. The role of vitamin D in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Tu Aung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The biological role of vitamin D outside of calcium homeostasis is still under evaluation. The ability of vitamin D to inhibit cell proliferation and induce differentiation makes it a potential modifier of neoplastic transformation. Vitamin D affects the cell cycle, apoptosis, hormone receptors, angiogenesis, and hypoxia, all of which are related to the breast cancer growth, progression and metastasis. A large percentage of the industrial-world population is deficient in vitamin D. Epidemiological evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of breast cancer. Vitamin D may have synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effects when combined with other therapeutic agents against breast cancer. Vitamin D appears to depress aromatase inhibitor by acting through cytochrome P 450. This evidence along with pre-clinical and clinical studies, justify the inclusion of vitamin D in future clinical trials related to breast cancer in order to determine its efficacy as a part of the breast cancer therapeutic armament.

  17. The role of inflammation in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vivar Chevez, Antonio Roma; Finke, James; Bukowski, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) constitutes more than 90 % of primary kidney tumors with the development of metastatic disease in the lung, bone, liver, and brain. Clear-cell RCC (CCRCC) is the most common histologic form of sporadic kidney cancer where the majority of tumors have inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor gene resulting in the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) leading to dysregulation of cell growth and angiogenesis. Understanding of the genetic changes in RCC and the downstream events have led to the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target HIF-regulated proteins which currently represents front-line therapy for metastatic disease although resistance develops in most patients overtime. Despite the fact that RCC is an immunogenic tumor, there is mounting evidence that immune cells and inflammatory pathways can enhance tumor growth and immune escape. However, recent studies are beginning to uncover the mechanisms of immune escape in RCC, and the role inflammatory immune cells and cytokines play is this process. These new findings have led to renewed interest in the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of this disease that includes strategies to regulate inflammatory responses. Here, we will discuss the different inflammatory signaling pathways (e.g., VHL, hypoxia, TNF-α, STAT, and TGF-β) and the downstream transcription factors, cytokines, and chemokines involved in tumor development, and disease progression. This will include assessment of the role inflammatory molecules (e.g., pVHL, TGFb, IL6, select chemokines/chemokine receptors) play in promoting cell transformation, survival, proliferation of tumor cells, and metastasis derived from in vitro and in vivo studies. Included is a section on how select inflammatory cells (TAM, MDSC, and neutrophils) promote tumor evasion of immune cells. We also provide examples of molecules/cells that correlate negatively (CXCL12, CXCR4, and MMP, neutrophils, and

  18. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong ZHANG; Ai-zhen CAI; Xue-ming WEI; Li DING; Feng-zhi LI; Ai-ming ZHENG; Da-jiang DAI

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer.Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells,including several gastric cancer cell lines.This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.Methods:We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells.Results:This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells.Five stemness-related gene expression profiles,including OCT-4,SOX-2,NANOG,CD44,and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2,were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells.Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells.When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice,SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells.Conclusions:These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  19. Role of Notch signaling pathway in gastric cancer pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling pathway is activated dynamically during evolution playing significant role in cell fate determination and differentiation. It has been known that alterations of this pathway may lead to human malignancies, including gastric cancer. Despite a decline in the overall incidence, this disease still remains an important global health problem. Therefore, a better understanding of the molecular alterations underlying gastric cancer may contribute to the development of rationally desig...

  20. Salinomycin treatment reduces metastatic tumor burden by hampering cancer cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Herrmann, Annika; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tumor spreading is the major threat for cancer patients. The recently published anti-cancer drug salinomycin raised hope for an improved treatment by targeting therapy-refractory cancer stem cells. However, an unambiguous role of salinomycin against cancer cell migration and metastasis formation remains elusive. Findings: We report that salinomycin effectively inhibits cancer cell migration in a variety of cancer types as determined by Boyden chamber assays. Additionally, cells we...

  1. Role of KCNMA1 in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Oeggerli

    Full Text Available KCNMA1 encodes the α-subunit of the large conductance, voltage and Ca(2+-activated (BK potassium channel and has been reported as a target gene of genomic amplification at 10q22 in prostate cancer. To investigate the prevalence of the amplification in other human cancers, the copy number of KCNMA1 was analyzed by fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization (FISH in 2,445 tumors across 118 different tumor types. Amplification of KCNMA1 was restricted to a small but distinct fraction of breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer with the highest prevalence in invasive ductal breast cancers and serous carcinoma of ovary and endometrium (3-7%. We performed an extensive analysis on breast cancer tissue microarrays (TMA of 1,200 tumors linked to prognosis. KCNMA1 amplification was significantly associated with high tumor stage, high grade, high tumor cell proliferation, and poor prognosis. Immunofluorescence revealed moderate or strong KCNMA1 protein expression in 8 out of 9 human breast cancers and in the breast cancer cell line MFM223. KCNMA1-function in breast cancer cell lines was confirmed by whole-cell patch clamp recordings and proliferation assays, using siRNA-knockdown, BK channel activators such as 17ß-estradiol and the BK-channel blocker paxilline. Our findings revealed that enhanced expression of KCNMA1 correlates with and contributes to high proliferation rate and malignancy of breast cancer.

  2. Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Role of RGD Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women of all ages worldwide. With advances in molecular imaging procedures, it has been possible to detect breast cancer in its early stage, determine the extent of the disease to administer appropriate therapeutic protocol and also monitor the effects of treatment. By accurately characterizing the tumor properties and biological processes involved, molecular imaging can play a crucial role in minimizing the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer. The integrin αvβ3 plays an important role in breast cancer angiogenesis and is expressed on tumor endothelial cells as well as on some tumor cells. It is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins with the exposed arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide sequence and therefore RGD peptides can preferentially bind to integrin αvβ3. In this context, targeting tumor vasculature or tumor cells by RGD-based probes is a promising strategy for molecular imaging of breast cancer. Using RGD-based probes, several preclinical studies have employed different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and optical imaging for visualization of integrin αvβ3 expression in breast cancer models. Limited clinical trials using (18)F-labeled RGD peptides have also been initiated for non-invasive detection and staging of breast cancer. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. The reported strategies for molecular imaging of breast cancer using RGD peptide-based probes holds promise for making clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in improved quality of life for breast cancer patients.

  3. Methylselenol, a Selenium Metabolite, Plays Common and Different Roles in Colonic Cancer and Nontumorigenic Colonic Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as cancer-chemopreventive compounds, and methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. To determine differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on col...

  4. Top Notch cancer stem cells by paracrine NF-κB signaling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhou; Grivennikov, Sergei I

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are likely to play critical roles in metastasis, therapy resistance, and recurrence of hematological and solid malignancies. It is well known that the stem cell niche plays a key role for asymmetric division and homeostasis of normal stem cells, whereas cancer stem cells seem to use these niches. Among many pathways involved in self-renewal of cancer stem cells, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling has been documented to promote their expansion in a cell-autonomous fashion. A recent study, however, suggests that paracrine NF-κB activation promotes the expansion of cancer stem cells through the activation of Notch in basal-type breast cancer cells.

  5. Cervical Cancer Cell Line Secretome Highlights the Roles of Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein ig-h3, Peroxiredoxin-2, and NRF2 on Cervical Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoidakis, Jerome; Makridakis, Manousos; Lygirou, Vasiliki; Mermelekas, George; Vougas, Konstantinos; Drakakis, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire unique secretome compositions that contribute to tumor development and metastasis. The aim of our study was to elucidate the biological processes involved in cervical cancer, by performing a proteomic analysis of the secretome from the following informative cervical cell lines: SiHa (HPV16+), HeLa (HPV18+), C33A (HPV−), and HCK1T (normal). Proteins were analyzed by 2D gel electrophoresis coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS. Enrichment of secreted proteins with characteristic profiles for each cell line was followed by the identification of differentially expressed proteins. Particularly, transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein ig-h3 (Beta ig-h3) and peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2) overexpression in the secretome of cancer cell lines was detected and confirmed by Western blot. Bioinformatics analysis identified the transcription factor NRF2 as a regulator of differentially expressed proteins in the cervical cancer secretome. NRF2 levels were measured by both Western blot and Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) in the total cell extract of the four cell lines. NRF2 was upregulated in SiHa and C33A compared to HCK1T. In conclusion, the secreted proteins identified in cervical cancer cell lines indicate that aberrant NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (OSR) is a prominent feature of cervical carcinogenesis.

  6. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  7. Role of the Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressors in cerebellar development, stem cells and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk-Lingbeek, Merel Esmée

    2005-01-01

    In order to take proper cell fate decisions, cells have to guide their biochemical machinery through the appropriate decisions in both differentiation and proliferation. Especially for stem cells such decisions are critical as they have the capacity to self-renew, i.e. give rise to new daughter stem

  8. The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryou-u [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hiroaki [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Showa University School of Dentistry, 1-5-8 Hatanodai Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Ochiya, Takahiro, E-mail: tochiya@ncc.go.jp [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2015-04-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers.

  9. The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryou-u Takahashi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers.

  10. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-03-07

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  11. Cancer stem cells and field cancerization of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple, M; Suresh, Amritha; Das, Debashish; Kuriakose, Moni A

    2015-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a high propensity for local failure, which is attributed to recurrence at the primary site or the development of second primary tumors (SPT). Field cancerization that refers to the existence of transformed cells in areas adjacent to the primary tumor, has been attributed to be one of the probable reasons underlying disease relapse. The carcinogenic process necessitates multiple molecular events for the transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. This implies that only the long-time residents of the epithelium, such as the stem cells, might be the candidates capable of accumulating these genetic hits. These transformed stem cells- the 'Cancer stem cells' (CSCs), are further known to be equipped with the properties of tumor initiation and migration, both of which are essential for orchestrating field cancerization. The concept that the CSCs might be responsible for field cancerization in OSCC has not been explored extensively. If the role of CSCs as the primary units of field cancerization process is established, their presence in the mucosa adjacent to the tumor may be an indicator for local recurrence and/or development of second primary tumors. In this review, we examine the available evidence in literature exploring the possibilities of CSCs driving the process of field cancerization and thereby being the underlying mechanism for disease recurrence and development of SPT.

  12. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  14. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  15. Enteric Bacteria and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacteria can contribute to cell proliferation and cancer development, particularly in chronic infectious diseases in which bacteria and/or bacterial components might interfere with cell function. The number of microbial cells within the gut lumen is estimated to be 100 trillion, which is about 10-times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells in the human body. Because of the complexity of the gut flora, identifying the specific microbial agents related to human diseases remains challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that the stemness of colon cancer cells is, in part, orchestrated by the microenvironment and is defined by high Wnt activity. In this review article, we will discuss recent progress with respect to intestinal stem cells, cancer stem cells, and the molecular mechanisms of enteric bacteria in the activation of the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the roles of other pathways, including JAK-STAT, JNK, and Notch, in regulating stem cell niches during bacterial infections using Drosophila models. Insights gained from understanding how host-bacterial interaction during inflammation and cancer may serve as a paradigm for understanding the nature of self-renewal signals.

  16. TGF-beta and BMP in breast cancer cell invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, Hildegonda Petronella Henriëtte

    2012-01-01

    TGF-beta and BMPs are members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines which play an important role in a multitude of processes. In cancer, TGF-beta is known for its dual role: in early stages it inhibits cancer cell proliferation, whereas in later stages it promotes invasion and metastasis. In this

  17. RhoC and ROCKs regulate cancer cell interactions with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Nicolas; Im, Jae Hong; Garg, Ritu; Cox, Susan; Soyer, Magali; Riou, Philippe; Colomba, Audrey; Muschel, Ruth J; Ridley, Anne J

    2015-06-01

    RhoC is a member of the Rho GTPase family that is implicated in cancer progression by stimulating cancer cell invasiveness. Here we report that RhoC regulates the interaction of cancer cells with vascular endothelial cells (ECs), a crucial step in the metastatic process. RhoC depletion by RNAi reduces PC3 prostate cancer cell adhesion to ECs, intercalation between ECs as well as transendothelial migration in vitro. Depletion of the kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2, two known RhoC downstream effectors, similarly decreases cancer interaction with ECs. RhoC also regulates the extension of protrusions made by cancer cells on vascular ECs in vivo. Transient RhoC depletion is sufficient to reduce both early PC3 cell retention in the lungs and experimental metastasis formation in vivo. Our results indicate RhoC plays a central role in cancer cell interaction with vascular ECs, which is a critical event for cancer progression.

  18. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  19. Protective Role of Selenium Compounds on the Proliferation, Apoptosis, and Angiogenesis of a Canine Breast Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzhi; Li, Wenyu; Guo, Mengyao; Li, Chengye; Qiu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    We herein examined the effects of different doses, forms, and compatibilities of selenium on a canine mammary gland tumor cell line, CTM1211, and explored the related mechanisms. Three selenium compounds, sodium selenite (SSE), methylseleninic acid (MSA), and methylselenocysteine (MSC), were selected for these experiments, and cyclophosphamide (CTX) served as a positive control. In the cell viability assay, the cell viability of each group at 48/72 h decreased significantly compared with the control group (p selenium on cell proliferation was time-dependent but not concentration-dependent. In the cell apoptosis assay, the apoptosis values of each group increased significantly compared with the control group, and the apoptosis values of the CTX + MSA group increased the most significantly (p selenium compounds, especially MSA, could significantly inhibit the viability and growth of the CTM1211 cell line, which is partly due to the induction of apoptosis and regulation of tumor angiogenesis.

  20. Notch reporter activity in breast cancer cell lines identifies a subset of cells with stem cell activity

    OpenAIRE

    D’Angelo, Rosemarie C.; Ouzounova, Maria; Davis, April; Choi, Daejin; Tchuenkam, Stevie M.; Kim, Gwangil; Luther, Tahra; Quraishi, Ahmed A.; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Conley, Sarah J; Shawn G Clouthier; Hassan, Khaled A.; Wicha, Max S; Korkaya, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental pathways such as Notch play a pivotal role in tissue specific stem cell self-renewal as well as in tumor development. However, the role of Notch signaling in breast cancer stem cells (CSC) remains to be determined. We utilized a lentiviral Notch reporter system to identify a subset of cells with a higher Notch activity (Notch+) or reduced activity (Notch-) in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Using in vitro and mouse xenotransplantation assays we investigated the role of Notch ...

  1. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have the potential of accumulating more years of cell phone exposure than adults do. Thus far, the data from studies in children with cancer do not support this theory. The first published analysis came from a large ...

  2. A novel activating role of SRC and STAT3 on HGF transcription in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Bruce E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have previously determined that the HGF promoter can be transactivated by a combination of activated Src and wild-type Stat3 in the mouse breast cell lines HC11 and SP1. To determine if this pathway is of relevance for the human disease, a series of human breast and other human cells lines were examined, and the status of key proteins in these cells determined. All of the human breast cell lines exhibited strong transactivation by a combination of activated Src and Stat3. This activation was dependent on a Stat3 recognition element present at nt-95. The exception was the ErbB2 over-expressing cell line SK-BR-3 where Stat3 alone could transactivate HGF though Src augmented this effect. Increased phosphorylation of Stat3 tyrosine 705 was also observed in this line. Analysis of three ovarian cell lines revealed that Src/Stat3 expression was not able to activate the HGF promoter in two of these lines (SKOV3 and IOSE-80PC. Src/Stat3 expression did activate HGF transcription in OVCAR3 cells, but this effect was not mediated by the Stat3 site at nt-95. Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 was observed in IOSE-80PC cells, but was insufficient to allow for activation of the HGF promoter. Human kidney (HEK293 and cervical carcinoma (HeLa cells were also not Src/Stat3 permissive, despite high levels of Stat3 phospho-Y705. These results suggest that human breast cells are a uniquely permissive environment for HGF transactivation by Src/Stat3 which may allow for the inappropriate activation of HGF transcription during the early stages of breast transformation. This could lead to paracrine or autocrine activation of the Met receptor in breast carcinoma cells.

  3. IL-33 facilitates endocrine resistance of breast cancer by inducing cancer stem cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyan; Sun, Jiaxing; Wang, Chunhong; Bu, Xiangmao; Liu, Xiangping; Mao, Yan; Wang, Haibo

    2017-02-16

    Breast cancers with estrogen receptor (ER) expressions account for the majority of all clinical cases. Due to hormone therapy with tamoxifen, prognoses of patients with ER-positive breast cancer are significantly improved. However, endocrine resistance to tamoxifen is common and inevitable, leading to compromised efficacy of hormone therapy. Herein, we identify a crucial role of IL-33 in inducing endocrine resistance of breast cancer. IL-33 overexpression in breast cancer cells results in resistance to tamoxifen-induced tumor growth inhibition, while IL-33 knockdown corrects this problem. Mechanistically, IL-33 induces breast cancer stem cell properties evidenced by mammosphere formation and xenograft tumorigenesis, as well as expression of cancer stem cell genes including ALDH1A3, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2. In breast cancer patients, higher serum IL-33 levels portend advanced clinical stages, poorly differentiated cancer cells and tumor recurrence. IL-33 expression levels in patients' freshly isolated breast cancer cells predicts tamoxifen resistance and cancer stem cell features in individual patient. Collectively, IL-33 induces endocrine resistance of breast cancer by promoting cancer stem cell properties. These findings provide novel mechanisms connecting IL-33 with cancer pathogenesis and pinpoint IL-33 as a promising target for optimizing hormone therapy in clinical practice.

  4. Prostate Cancer Cell Growth: Stimulatory Role of Neurotensin And Mechanism of Inhibition by Flavonoids as Related to Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    administrator. All other uses, reproduction and distribution, including without limitation commercial reprints, selling or licensing copies or access, or posting...cannabinoid receptors expressed in prostate PC-3 cells. Involvement in Raf-1 stimulation and NGF induction. Cell Signal 2003;15:851–9. [71] Sauer LA, Dauchy

  5. Tumor-derived exosomes and their role in cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells actively produce, release and utilize exosomes to promote tumor growth. Mechanisms through which tumor-derived exosomes subserve the tumor are under intense investigation. These exosomes are information carriers, conveying molecular and genetic messages from tumor cells to normal or other abnormal cells residing at close or distant sites. Tumor-derived exosomes are found in all body fluids. Upon the contact with target cells, they alter phenotypic and functional attributes of recipients, reprogramming them into active contributors to angiogenesis, thrombosis, metastasis and immunosuppression. Exosomes produced by tumors carry cargos that in part mimic contents of parent cells and are of potential interest as non-invasive biomarkers of cancer. Their role in inhibiting the host antitumor responses and in mediating drug resistance is important for cancer therapy. Tumor-derived exosomes may interfere with cancer immunotherapy, but they also could serve as adjuvants and antigenic components of antitumor vaccines. Their biological roles in cancer development or progression as well as cancer therapy suggest that tumor-derived exosomes are critical components of oncogenic transformation. PMID:27117662

  6. Tumor-Derived Exosomes and Their Role in Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells actively produce, release, and utilize exosomes to promote tumor growth. Mechanisms through which tumor-derived exosomes subserve the tumor are under intense investigation. These exosomes are information carriers, conveying molecular and genetic messages from tumor cells to normal or other abnormal cells residing at close or distant sites. Tumor-derived exosomes are found in all body fluids. Upon contact with target cells, they alter phenotypic and functional attributes of recipients, reprogramming them into active contributors to angiogenesis, thrombosis, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Exosomes produced by tumors carry cargos that in part mimic contents of parent cells and are of potential interest as noninvasive biomarkers of cancer. Their role in inhibiting the host antitumor responses and in mediating drug resistance is important for cancer therapy. Tumor-derived exosomes may interfere with cancer immunotherapy, but they also could serve as adjuvants and antigenic components of antitumor vaccines. Their biological roles in cancer development or progression as well as cancer therapy suggest that tumor-derived exosomes are critical components of oncogenic transformation.

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, D; Brown, H K; Tellez-Gabriel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and...

  8. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinthalapally V Rao; Altaf Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of allcancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressivetreatment. Recently, there have been important advancesin the molecular, pathological and biological understandingof pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recentnew targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeuticcombinations, no treatment option is viable in patients withadvanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to targetprogression of PC is of intense interest. A small populationof pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been foundto be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation,progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recentlyachieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors,including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads tofocus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. Thefocus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention andtreatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salientdevelopments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here,we provide a review of current updates and new insightson the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression withspecial emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathwaysaltered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention andtreatment of PC.

  9. Aspirin and P2Y12 inhibition attenuate platelet-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, Niamh M

    2015-09-09

    Platelet-cancer cell interactions play a key role in successful haematogenous metastasis. Disseminated malignancy is the leading cause of death among ovarian cancer patients. It is unknown why different ovarian cancers have different metastatic phenotypes. To investigate if platelet-cancer cell interactions play a role, we characterized the response of ovarian cancer cell lines to platelets both functionally and at a molecular level.

  10. Critical role of △DNMT3B4/2 in regulating RASSF1A promoter specific DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-hang; LIU Nin-hong; WANG Jie; BAI Hua; MAO Li

    2008-01-01

    Background △DNMT3B (a new DNMT3B subfamily) expression is initiated through a novel promoter.We identified at least 7 transcription variants of △DNMT3B as a result of alternative pre-mRNA processing.The aim of this study was to detect the expression pattern of △DNMT3B variants in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to explore the role of △DNMT3B variants in regulating the promoter-specific DNA methylation.Methods Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets were designed to distinguish individual △DNMT3B variants according to their splicing pattems.The expressions of seven △DNMT3B variants were measured in 13 cell lines,109 NSCLC patients,and the corresponding normal lung tissues using reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR).The status of the p16 and RASSF1A promoter methylations in the tumors was detected using a methylation specific PCR (MSP).The relationships of the expression patterns of the △DNMT3B variants were analyzed by observing the status of p16 and RASSF1A promoter methylations in the tumors.The siRNA and the anti-sense oligo-dioxynucleotide specifically targeting the junction of exon 5 and 7 of △DNMT3B were designed and transfected by lipofectmane 2000 into H1299 and H358 cell lines.RASSF1A promoter methylation from cells treated by siRNA-△DNMT3B4/2 was detected using MSP and Bisulfite sequencing,and Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of DNMT3B and △DNMT3B.Cell growth and cell cycle distribution were measured by applying real-time cell growth analysis and flowcytometry,respectively.Results △DNMT3B variants,not DNMT3B,were the predominant transcripts in both NSCLC cell lines and primary tumors.The expression of △DNMT3B4 strongly correlated to the promoter methylation status of RASSFIA in a primary NSCLC.The knockdown of △DNMT3B4/2 by RNA-interference or anti-sense approaches resulted in a complete demethylation of RASSF1A promoter with the reactJvation of a RASSFIA gene expression in less than 12

  11. Role of the Copper(II) Complex Cu[15]pyN5 in Intracellular ROS and Breast Cancer Cell Motility and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S; Flórido, Ana; Saraiva, Nuno; Cerqueira, Sara; Ramalhete, Sérgio; Cipriano, Madalena; Cabral, Maria Fátima; Miranda, Joana P; Castro, Matilde; Costa, Judite; Oliveira, Nuno G

    2015-10-01

    Multiple mechanisms related to metastases undergo redox regulation. Cu[15]pyN5 is a redox-active copper(II) complex previously studied as a chemotherapy sensitizer in mammary cells. The effects of a cotreatment with Cu[15]pyN5 and doxorubicin (dox) were evaluated in two human breast cancer cell lines: MCF7 (low aggressiveness) and MDA-MB-231 (highly aggressive). Cu[15]pyN5 decreased MCF7-directed cell migration. In addition, a cotreatment with dox and Cu[15]pyN5 reduced the proteolytic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell detachment was not affected by exposure to these agents. Cu[15]pyN5 and dox significantly increased intracellular ROS in both cell lines. This increase could be at least partially due to H2 O2 accumulation. The combination of Cu[15]pyN5 with dox may be beneficial in breast cancer treatment as it could help reduce cancer cell migration and invasion. Moreover, the ligand [15]pyN5 has a high affinity for copper(II) and displays potential anti-angiogenic properties. Overall, we present a potential drug that might arrest the progression of breast cancer by different and complementary mechanisms.

  12. Type 3 deiodinase: role in cancer growth, stemness and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico eCiavardelli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases are selenoenzymes that catalyze thyroid hormones (THs activation (type 1 and type 2, D1 and D2 respectively or inactivation (type 3, D3. THs are essential for proper body development and cellular differentiation. Their intra- and extra-cellular concentrations are tightly regulated by deiodinases with a pre-receptorial control thus generating active or inactive form of THs. Changes in deiodinases expression are anatomically and temporally regulated and influence the downstream TH signaling. D3 overexpression is a feature of proliferative tissues such as embryo or cancer tissues. The enhanced TH degradation by D3 induces a local hypothyroidism thus inhibiting THs transcriptional activity. Of note, overexpression of D3 is a feature of several highly proliferative cancers. In this paper we review recent advances in the role of D3 in cancer growth, stemness and metabolic phenotype. In particular we focus on the main signalling pathways that result in the overexpression of D3 in cancer cells and are known to be relevant to cancer development, progression, and recurrence. We also discuss the potential role of D3 in cancer stem cells metabolic phenotype, an emerging topic in cancer research.

  13. Adipose tissue, obesity and adipokines: role in cancer promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrea; Magnuson, Aaron; Fouts, Josephine; Foster, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a complex organ with endocrine, metabolic and immune regulatory roles. Adipose depots have been characterized to release several adipocytokines that work locally in an autocrine and paracrine fashion or peripherally in an endocrine fashion. Adipocyte hypertrophy and excessive adipose tissue accumulation, as occurs during obesity, dysregulates the microenvironment within adipose depots and systemically alters peripheral tissue metabolism. The term "adiposopathy" is used to describe this promotion of pathogenic adipocytes and associated adipose - elated disorders. Numerous epidemiological studies confirm an association between obesity and various cancer forms. Proposed mechanisms that link obesity/adiposity to high cancer risk and mortality include, but are not limited to, obesity-related insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, sustained hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, oxidative stress, inflammation and/or adipocktokine production. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between specific circulating adipocytokines and cancer risk. The aim of this review is to define the function, in normal weight and obesity states, of well-characterized and novel adipokines including leptin, adiponectin, apelin, visfatin, resistin, chemerin, omentin, nesfatin and vaspin and summarize the data that relates their dysfunction, whether associated or direct effects, to specific cancer outcomes. Overall research suggests most adipokines promote cancer cell progression via enhancement of cell proliferation and migration, inflammation and anti-apoptosis pathways, which subsequently can prompt cancer metastasis. Further research and longitudinal studies are needed to define the specific independent and additive roles of adipokines in cancer progression and reoccurrence.

  14. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  15. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  16. Multifaceted Role of Calcium in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Shankargouda

    2017-01-01

    Role of calcium in bone remodeling and tooth remineral-ization is well known. However, calcium also plays a very imperative role in many biochemical reactions, which are essential for normal functioning of cells. The calcium associated tissue homeostasis encompasses activities like proliferation, cell death, cell motility, oxygen, and nutrient supply.

  17. A New Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein and Its Role in Breast Cancer and Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    cells (Figure 7). Aim 2: Experiments for promoter studies: library screening and clone analysis. Previous Work/Background (August 1996-August 1998) A...Experiments for promoter studies: library screening and clone analysis. * Two clones isolated from genomic library screen enriched for chromosome 4 contain 42

  18. Viral oncogenesis and its role in nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tuttleton Arron, S

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the contribution of viruses to cutaneous oncogenesis has steadily gained recognition. The archetype is human herpesvirus 8, which is well established as the causative agent in Kaposi sarcoma. Other viruses believed to play a role in nonmelanoma skin cancer include human papillomavirus and the recently described Merkel cell polyomavirus. We review the mechanisms by which these three viruses interact with the host cell, ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression to result in carcinogenesis.

  19. Notch信号通路及其在卵巢癌细胞中的作用%Notch signaling pathway and its role in ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊爱为; 谢静燕

    2015-01-01

    Notch is a evolutionarily conserved transmembrane receptor family, which accelerates the proliferation and differentiation of ovarian cancer cells by activating Notch intracellular domain ( NICD ) at lower part of Notch signaling pathway and thus affects drug resistance characteristics.Combined with different ligand binding, Notch plays different roles in different cellular environment, which indicates the variety of pathway activation.This review focused on the effect of Notch signaling pathway to activate NICD by combining different ligand binding.%Notch是一条进化上高度保守的跨膜受体家族,通过对Notch信号通路下游胞内活性成分( NICD)的激活来促进卵巢癌细胞的增殖和分化,影响细胞耐药特性。 Notch通过与不同配体结合,在不同细胞环境中发挥不同作用,提示其通路活化的多样性。该文主要对Notch信号通路通过不同配体结合激活NICD而发挥不同的作用进行综述。

  20. Ki-67 is required for maintenance of cancer stem cells but not cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidado, Justin; Wong, Hong Yuen; Rosen, D. Marc; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Garay, Joseph P.; Fessler, Abigail G.; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Hicks, Jessica; Cochran, Rory L.; Croessmann, Sarah; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Mohseni, Morassa; Beaver, Julia A.; Chu, David; Cravero, Karen; Christenson, Eric S.; Medford, Arielle; Mattox, Austin; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Argani, Pedram; Chawla, Ajay; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-01-01

    Ki-67 expression is correlated with cell proliferation and is a prognostic marker for various cancers; however, its function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that genetic disruption of Ki-67 in human epithelial breast and colon cancer cells depletes the cancer stem cell niche. Ki-67 null cells had a proliferative disadvantage compared to wildtype controls in colony formation assays and displayed increased sensitivity to various chemotherapies. Ki-67 null cancer cells showed decreased and delayed tumor formation in xenograft assays, which was associated with a reduction in cancer stem cell markers. Immunohistochemical analyses of human breast cancers revealed that Ki-67 expression is maintained at equivalent or greater levels in metastatic sites of disease compared to matched primary tumors, suggesting that maintenance of Ki-67 expression is associated with metastatic/clonogenic potential. These results elucidate Ki-67's role in maintaining the cancer stem cell niche, which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for human malignancies. PMID:26823390

  1. RNA Interference and its Role in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Mansoori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In todays’ environment, it is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the role of cancer in social health. Although a huge budget is allocated on cancer research every year, cancer remains the second global cause of death. And, exclusively, less than 50% of patients afflicted with advanced cancer live one year subsequent to standard cancer treatments. RNA interference (RNAi is a mechanism for gene silencing. Such mechanism possesses uncanny ability in targeting cancer-related genes. A majority of gene products involved in tumorigenesis have recently been utilized as targets in RNAi based therapy. The evidence from these studies indicates that RNAi application for targeting functional carcinogenic molecules, tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy is required in today’s cancer treatment. Knock downing of gene products by RNAi technology exerts antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects upon cell culture systems, animal models and in clinical trials in the most studies. The recognition of RNAi mechanism and the progress in this field leaded several new RNAi-based drugs to Clinical Trial phases. This has also developed genome based personalized cancer therapeutics. Hopefully, this type of treatment will work as one of the efficient one for cancer patients.

  2. Dual roles of PKM2 in cancer metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songfang Wu; Huangying Le

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells have distinct metabolism that highly depends on glycolysis instead of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation alone,known as aerobic glycolysis.Pyruvate kinase (PK),which catalyzes the final step of glycolysis,has emerged as a potential regulator of this metabolic phenotype.Expression of PK type M2 (PKM2) is increased and facilitates lactate production in cancer cells,which determines whether the glucose carbons are degraded to pyruvate and lactate or are channeled into synthetic processes.Modulation of PKM2 catalytic activity also regulates the synthesis of DNA and lipids that are required for cell proliferation.However,the mechanisms by which PKM2 coordinates high-energy requirements with high anabolic activities to support cancer cell proliferation are still not completely understood.This review summarizes the biological characteristics of PKM2 and discusses the dual role in cancer metabolism as well as the potential therapeutic applications.Given its pleiotropic effects on cancer biology,PKM2 represents an attractive target for cancer therapy.

  3. Improving Therapeutic Outcomes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer not Suitable for Curative Intent Therapy - A Review of the Role of Radiation Therapy in an Era of Increasing Systemic Therapy Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is the highest cause of mortality from cancer worldwide. Most patients present with disease not suitable for curative therapeutic options. In these patients, radiation therapy provides durable palliation of symptoms due to intrathoracic disease, whereas systemic chemotherapy improves survival compared with best supportive care. Over recent years the systemic therapeutic options available for the non-curative management of advanced lung cancer, particularly non-small cell lung cancer, have expanded to include molecularly targeted agents and immune modulating agents. The aim of this overview is to review the role and future of radiation therapy in this era of increasing systemic therapy options with particular emphasis on how radiation therapy can be used to improve therapeutic outcomes.

  4. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... expression of ion transporters and channels is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, it is timely to consider this especially for epithelia. Epithelial cells are highly proliferative and epithelial cancers, carcinomas, account for about 90% of all cancers. In this review we will focus on ion...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed....

  5. Role of NF-κB activation in matrix metalloproteinase 9, vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin 8 expression and secretion in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caijuan; Guo, Sufen; Shi, Tiemei

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effects and potential mechanisms of parthenolide on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin 8 (IL-8) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. After incubation with different concentrations of parthenolide for 24 h, MDA-MB-231 cells were collected, and the expressions of VEGF, IL-8 and MMP-9 were measured by real-time PCR and Western blot. The secretions of VEGF, IL-8 and MMP-9 in culture supernatant of MDA-MB-231 cells were then measured with ELISA assays. The NF-κB DNA-binding activity of breast cancer cells treated with parthenolide was analyzed using electrophoretic mobility assays. The real-time PCR and Western blot data showed that the expressions of VEGF, IL-8 and MMP-9 were significantly inhibited by parthenolide at both transcription level and protein level in MDA-MB-231 cells. ELISA results also confirmed these effects at a secretion level. The electrophoretic mobility assay results demonstrated that parthenolide can inhibit NF-κB DNA-binding activity of the breast cancer cells. Hence, the expression of VEGF, IL-8 and MMP-9 may be suppressed by parthenolide through the inhibition of NF-κB DNA-binding activity in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  6. Regulation of breast cancer stem cell activity by signaling through the Notch4 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Hannah; Farnie, Gillian; Howell, Sacha J.; Rock, Rebecca E; Stylianou, Spyros; Brennan, Keith R.; Bundred, Nigel J; Clarke, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. We assessed the role of Notch receptors in stem cell activity in breast cancer cell lines and nine primary human tumor samples. Stem cells were enriched by selection of anoikis-resistant cells or cells expressing the membrane phenotype ESA+/CD44+/CD24low. Using these breast cancer stem cell populations, we compared the activation status of Notch...

  7. The role of the tumor stroma in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eDavidson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment, consisting of stromal myofibroblasts, endothelial cells and leukocytes, is growingly perceived to be a major contributor to the pathogenesis and disease progression in practically all cancer types. Stromal myofibroblasts produce angiogenic factors, proteases, growth factors, immune response-modulating proteins, anti-apoptotic proteins and signaling molecules, and express surface receptors and respond to stimuli initiated in the tumor cells to establish a bi-directional communication network in the microenvironment to promote tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Many of these molecules are candidates for targeted therapy and the cancer stroma has been recently regarded as target for biological intervention. This review provides an overview of the biology and clinical role of the stroma in ovarian cancer.

  8. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types.

  9. CRISPR/Cas9n-Mediated Deletion of the Snail 1Gene (SNAI1 Reveals Its Role in Regulating Cell Morphology, Cell-Cell Interactions, and Gene Expression in Ovarian Cancer (RMG-1 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Haraguchi

    Full Text Available Snail1 is a transcription factor that induces the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. During EMT, epithelial cells lose their junctions, reorganize their cytoskeletons, and reprogram gene expression. Although Snail1 is a prominent repressor of E-cadherin transcription, its precise roles in each of the phenomena of EMT are not completely understood, particularly in cytoskeletal changes. Previous studies have employed gene knockdown systems to determine the functions of Snail1. However, incomplete protein knockdown is often associated with these systems, which may cause incorrect interpretation of the data. To more precisely evaluate the functions of Snail1, we generated a stable cell line with a targeted ablation of Snail1 (Snail1 KO by using the CRISPR/Cas9n system. Snail1 KO cells show increased cell-cell adhesion, decreased cell-substrate adhesion and cell migration, changes to their cytoskeletal organization that include few stress fibers and abundant cortical actin, and upregulation of epithelial marker genes such as E-cadherin, occludin, and claudin-1. However, morphological changes were induced by treatment of Snail1 KO cells with TGF-beta. Other transcription factors that induce EMT were also induced by treatment with TGF-beta. The precise deletion of Snail1 by the CRISPR/Cas9n system provides clear evidence that loss of Snail1 causes changes in the actin cytoskeleton, decreases cell-substrate adhesion, and increases cell-cell adhesion. Treatment of RMG1 cells with TGF-beta suggests redundancy among the transcription factors that induce EMT.

  10. NK cell phenotypic modulation in lung cancer environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jin

    Full Text Available Nature killer (NK cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunotherapy. But it indicated that tumor cells impacted possibly on NK cell normal functions through some molecules mechanisms in tumor microenvironment.Our study analyzed the change about NK cells surface markers (NK cells receptors through immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real-time PCR, the killed function from mouse spleen NK cell and human high/low lung cancer cell line by co-culture. Furthermore we certificated the above result on the lung cancer model of SCID mouse.We showed that the infiltration of NK cells in tumor periphery was related with lung cancer patients' prognosis. And the number of NK cell infiltrating in lung cancer tissue is closely related to the pathological types, size of the primary cancer, smoking history and prognosis of the patients with lung cancer. The expression of NK cells inhibitor receptors increased remarkably in tumor micro-environment, in opposite, the expression of NK cells activated receptors decrease magnificently.The survival time of lung cancer patient was positively related to NK cell infiltration degree in lung cancer. Thus, the down-regulation of NKG2D, Ly49I and the up-regulation of NKG2A may indicate immune tolerance mechanism and facilitate metastasis in tumor environment. Our research will offer more theory for clinical strategy about tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Adamo; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar, E-mail: pilar.roca@uib.es [Grupo Multidisciplinar de Oncología Traslacional, Institut Universitari d' Investigació en Ciències de la Salut, Universitat de les Illes Balears/Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears (Spain)

    2010-04-16

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance.

  12. Survivin: Potential role in diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Wang; Xiao-Ping Qian; Bao-Rui Liu

    2007-01-01

    Survivin is a protein that is highly expressed in a vast number of malignancies, but is minimally expressed in normal tissues. It plays a role as an inhibitor of cell death in cancer cells, thus facilitating the growth of these cells.Tn the case of gastric cancer, survivin is over-expressed in tumor cells and plays a role in the carcinogenesis process. Several studies on gastric cancer have indicated that there is a relationship between survivin expression and the ultimate behavior of the carcinoma. Since the expression pattern of survivin is selective to cancer cells,it has been described as an "ideal target" for cancer therapy. Currently, several pre-clinical and clinical trials are on-going to investigate the effects of interfering with survivin function in cancer cells as a biologic therapy. Survivin is a potentially significant protein in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of gastric tumors.

  13. The Role of Sialyl-Tn in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Munkley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Activation of an aberrant glycosylation pathway in cancer cells can lead to expression of the onco-foetal sialyl-Tn (sTn antigen. STn is a truncated O-glycan containing a sialic acid α-2,6 linked to GalNAc α-O-Ser/Thr and is linked with an adverse outcome and poor prognosis in cancer patients. The biosynthesis of the sTn antigen has been linked to the expression of the sialytransferase ST6GalNAc1, and also to mutations in and loss of heterozygosity of the COSMC gene. sTn neo- or over-expression occurs in many types of epithelial cancer including gastric, colon, breast, lung, oesophageal, prostate and endometrial cancer. sTn is believed to be carried by a variety of glycoproteins and may influence protein function and be involved in tumour development. This review discusses how the role of sTn in cancer development and tumour cell invasiveness might be organ specific and occur through different mechanisms depending on each cancer type or subtype. As the sTn-antigen is expressed early in carcinogenesis targeting sTn in cancer may enable the targeting of tumours from the earliest stage.

  14. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a central role in attenuated Listeria monocytogenes-based immunotherapy against metastatic breast cancer in young and old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, D; Jahangir, A; Quispe-Tintaya, W; Einstein, M H; Gravekamp, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are present in large numbers in blood of mice and humans with cancer, and they strongly inhibit T-cell and natural killer (NK) cell responses, at young and old age. We found that a highly attenuated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat)-infected MDSC and altered the immune-suppressing function of MDSC. Methods: Young (3 months) and old (18 months) BALB/cByJ mice with metastatic breast cancer (4T1 model) were immunised with Listeriaat semi-therapeutically (once before and twice after tumour development), and analysed for growth of metastases and primary tumour, in relation to MDSC-, CD8 T-cell and NK cell responses. Results: We found that Listeriaat-infected MDSC, which delivered Listeriaat predominantly to the microenvironment of metastases and primary tumours, where they spread from MDSC into tumour cells (infected tumour cells will ultimately become a target for Listeria-activated immune cells). Immunotherapy with Listeriaat significantly reduced the population of MDSC in blood and primary tumours, and converted a remaining subpopulation of MDSC into an immune-stimulating phenotype producing IL-12, in correlation with significantly improved T-cell and NK cell responses to Listeriaat at both ages. This was accompanied with a dramatic reduction in the number of metastases and tumour growth at young and old age. Conclusions: Although preclinical studies show that immunotherapy is less effective at old than at young age, our study demonstrates that Listeriaat-based immunotherapy can be equally effective against metastatic breast cancer at both young and old age by targeting MDSC. PMID:23640395

  15. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination.

  16. Cancer nursing in Ontario: defining nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Margaret I; Mings, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of cancer care in Ontario is facing unprecedented challenges. Shortages in nursing, as in all professional disciplines, are having an impact on the delivery of cancer care. Oncology nurses have a major role to play in the delivery of optimum cancer care. Oncology nursing, when adequately defined and supported, can benefit the cancer delivery system, patients, and families. A primary nursing model is seen as being key to the delivery of optimum cancer care. Primary nursing as a philosophy facilitates continuity of care, coordination of a patient's care plan, and a meaningful ongoing relationship with the patient and his/her family. Primary nursing, when delivered in the collaboration of a nurse-physician team, allows for medical resources to be used appropriately. Defined roles enable nurses to manage patients within their scope of practice in collaboration with physicians. Enacting other nursing roles, such as nurse practitioners and advanced practice nurses, can also enable the health care system to manage a broader number of patients with more complex needs. This article presents a position paper originally written as the basis for an advocacy and education initiative in Ontario. It is shared in anticipation that the work may be useful to oncology nurses in other jurisdictions in their efforts to advance oncology nursing and improvement of patient care.

  17. Metformin inhibition of mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells: Dependence on glucose concentration and role of AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Kisfalvi, Krisztina; Kui, Robert [Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center, David Geffen School of Medicine and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rozengurt, Enrique, E-mail: erozengurt@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center, David Geffen School of Medicine and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin inhibits cancer cell growth but the mechanism(s) are not understood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that the potency of metformin is sharply dependent on glucose in the medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK activation was enhanced in cancer cells incubated in physiological glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reciprocally, metformin potently inhibited mTORC1, DNA synthesis and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through AMPK. -- Abstract: Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, is emerging as a potential anticancer agent but the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that the potency of metformin induced AMPK activation, as shown by the phosphorylation of its substrates acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser{sup 79} and Raptor at Ser{sup 792}, was dramatically enhanced in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cultured in medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose (5 mM), as compared with parallel cultures in medium with glucose at 25 mM. In physiological glucose, metformin inhibited mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation of PDAC cells stimulated by crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors and insulin/IGF signaling systems, at concentrations (0.05-0.1 mM) that were 10-100-fold lower than those used in most previous reports. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of the {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} catalytic subunits of AMPK, we demonstrated that metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Our results emphasize the importance of using medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells and other cancer cell types.

  18. The Role of Lecithin: Retinol Acyltransferase (LRAT)-Mediated Esterification of Vitamin A in Regulating Human Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Rhim, J.S., Nanus, D.M., and Gudas, L.J. 2002. Retinol metabolism and lecithin:retinol acyltransferase levels are reduced in cultured human prostate...tested LRAT mRNA levels in Wt and RARγ -/- F9 cells, an epithelialtype of cell, which can synthesize retinyl esters. The RT-PCR analysis indicated...that LRAT expression was lost in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, we did not observe RA associated increase in LRAT mRNA levels in

  19. Induction of iPS cells and of cancer stem cells: the stem cell or reprogramming hypothesis of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article as designed to examine whether the "stoichiometric" or "elite models" of the origin of the "induced pluripotent stem" (iPS) cells fits some experiment facts from the developmental biology of adult stem cells and from the field of cancer research. In brief, since the evidence presented to support the stoichiometric model failed to recognize the factual existence of adult organ specific stem cells, the model has not been rigorously tested. In addition, the demonstration of a subset of cells (MUSE cells) in normal primary in vitro cultures of human fibroblasts (the usual source of iPS cells) seems to be the origin of the iPS cells. Moreover, from the field of carcinogenesis, the "stem cell" versus "de-differentiation" or "reprogramming" hypotheses were examined. Again, using the role of glycolysis, known to be associated with the Warburg effect in cancer cells, a list of experiments showing that (a) normal stem cells, which have few mitochondria, metabolize via glycolysis; (b) the stem cells are targets for "initiation" or "immortalization" or the blockage of differentiation and apoptosis of the stem cells by "immortalizing viruses"; (c) Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), when expressed, is associated with glycolysis and therefore, must be expressed in normal adult stem cells, as well as in cancer cells; and (d) p53, depleted or rendered dysfunctional by SV40 Large T antigen, is associated with the reduction of mitochondrial function and mass and is associated with the Warburg effect. Together, these observations from the iPS and "cancer stem cell" fields support the idea that both iPS cells and cancer stem cell are derived from adult organ-specific stem cells that do not restore or switch their metabolism of glucose from oxidative metabolism to glycolysis but, rather, in both cases, the adult stem cell, which metabolizes by glycolysis, is prevented from differentiation or from metabolizing by oxidative phosphorylation.

  20. Role of ABC transporters in cancer chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Li Sun; Atish Patel; Priyank Kumar; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells can significantly attenuate the response to chemotherapy and increase the likelihood of mortality.The major mechanism involved in conferring MDR is the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters,which can increase efflux of drugs from cancer cells,thereby decreasing intracellular drug concentration.Modulators of ABC transporters have the potential to augment the efficacy of anticancer drugs.This editorial highlights some major findings related to ABC transporters and current strategies to overcome MDR.

  1. The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Emiko [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yana, Ikuo [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Japan Development Center, Osaka 540-8645 (Japan); Fujita, Chisato; Irifune, Aiko; Takeda, Maki; Madachi, Ayako; Mori, Seiji; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Kawaguchi, Naomasa [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuura, Nariaki, E-mail: Matsuura@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-03-05

    The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression remains to be elucidated in spite of many reports on MT1-MMP. Using a human fibrosarcoma cell, HT1080 and a human gastric cancer cell, TMK-1, endogenous expression of MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP was suppressed by siRNA induction to examine the influence of cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. In HT1080 cells, positive both in MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP, the migration as well as the invasion was impaired by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression. Also cell proliferation in three dimensional (3D) condition was inhibited by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression and tumor growth in the nude mice transplanted with tumor cells were reduced either MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression with a prolongation of survival time in vivo. MT2-MMP suppression induces more inhibitory effects on 3D proliferation and in vivo tumor growth than MT1-MMP. On the other hand, TMK-1 cells, negative in MT1-MMP and MMP-2 but positive in MT2-MMP, all the migratory, invasive, and 3D proliferative activities in TMK-1 are decreased only by MT2-MMP suppression. These results indicate MT2-MMP might be involved in the cancer progression more than or equal to MT1-MMP independently of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP.

  2. The role of adhesive molecules in endometrial cancer: part II

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    Andrzej Malinowski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenesis is a result of both functional and structural disorders in the tissue. It initiates as a mutationin a gene encoding protein that is essential for cellular function. The subsequent cascade of eventsleads to accumulation of mutations and loss of cellular function. The cell loses its tissue-specific morphology,disconnects from other cells and extracellular matrix and migrates – the invasion begins. It is now clear thatadhesive molecules are a key player in this cascade. These proteins of the cell membrane surface are responsiblefor attachment of the cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix. These interactions are crucial forboth structural and functional tissue organization. Lack of this homeostasis destroys the tissue architectureand impairs its function and results in invasion. Abnormal expression of adhesive molecules was reported in allexamined cancers, including endometrial cancer.Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although in many casesdiagnosed and treated in early stages, and thus with good results, some patients cannot be cured. Completeknowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease will be helpful in identifying the patients with negative prognosticfactors, increased risk of recurrence and, perhaps, to find other therapeutic options. In the paper we are trying tosum up the up-to-date knowledge of the role of adhesive molecules in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

  3. The role of adhesive molecules in endometrial cancer: part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Wojciechowski

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenesis is a result of both functional and structural disorders in the tissue. It initiates as a mutation in a gene encoding protein that is essential for cellular function. The subsequent cascade of events leads to accumulation of mutations and loss of cellular function. The cell loses its tissue-specific morphology, disconnects from other cells and extracellular matrix and migrates – the invasion begins. It is now clear that adhesive molecules are a key player in this cascade. These proteins of the cell membrane surface are responsible for attachment of the cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix. These interactions are crucial for both structural and functional tissue organization. Lack of this homeostasis destroys the tissue architecture, impairs its function and results in invasion. Abnormal expression of adhesive molecules was reported in all examined cancers, including endometrial cancer.Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although in many cases it is diagnosed and treated in early stages, and thus with good results, some patients cannot be cured. A complete knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease will be helpful in identifying patients with negative prognostic factors, increased risk of recurrence and, perhaps, finding other therapeutic options. In the paper we are trying to sum up the up-to-date knowledge of the role of adhesive molecules in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

  4. The Smad family and its role in pancreatic cancer

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    P Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major signaling pathways that determine the tumor aggression and patient outcome in pancreatic cancer is the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß pathway. It is inactivated at various levels in pancreatic cancer and plays a dual role in tumor initiation and progression. The Smad family of proteins transduce signals from the TGF-ß superfamily ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and death through activation of receptor serine/threonine kinases. This review discusses the structure, function and regulation of various participating Smad family members, and their individual roles in determining the progression and outcome of pancreatic cancer patients, with a special emphasis on Smad4.

  5. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

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    Xiayu Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6 is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, methionine synthase reductase (MTRR, and methionine synthase (MS, in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV. To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state. SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer.

  6. The interaction between LYVE-1 with hyaluronan on the cell surface may play a role in the diversity of adhesion to cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Du

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA, a simple disaccharide unit, can polymerize and is considered a primary component of the extracellular matrix, which has a wide range of biological functions. In recent years, HA was found on the surface of tumor cells. According to previous reports, differing HA content on the cell surface of tumor cells is closely related to lymph node metastases, but the mechanisms mediating this process remained unclear. This research intended to study the surface content of HA on tumor cells and analyze cell adhesive changes caused by the interaction between HA and its lymphatic endothelial receptor (LYVE-1. We screened and observed high HA content on HS-578T breast cells and low HA content on MCF-7 breast cells through particle exclusion, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry experiments. The expression of LYVE-1, the lymph-vessel specific HA receptor, was consistent with our previous report and enhanced the adhesion of HA(high-HS-578T cells to COS-7(LYVE-1(+ through HA in cell static adhesion and dynamic parallel plate flow chamber experiments. MCF-7 breast cells contain little HA on the surface; however, our results showed little adhesion difference between MCF-7 cells and COS-7(LYVE-1(+ and COS-7(LYVE-1(- cells. Similar results were observed concerning the adhesion of HS-578T cells or MCF-7 cells to SVEC4-10 cells. Furthermore, we observed for the first time that the cell surface HA content of high transfer tumor cells was rich, and we visualized the cross-linking of HA cable structures, which may activate LYVE-1 on lymphatic endothelial cells, promoting tumor adhesion. In summary, high-low cell surface HA content of tumor cells through the interaction with LYVE-1 leads to adhesion differences.

  7. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  8. Tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells possess cancer stem-like cell properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui; ZHANG Heng-wei; SUN Xian-fu; GUO Xu-hui; HE Ya-ning; CUI Shu-de; FAN Qing-xia

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cause of cancer recurrence because they are resistant to conventional therapy and contribute to cancer growth and metastasis.Endocrinotherapy is the most common breast cancer therapy and acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is the main reason for endocrinotherapy failure during such therapy.Although acquired resistance to endocrine treatment has been extensively studied,the underlying mechanisms are unclear.We hypothesized that breast CSCs played an important role in TAM-induced resistance during breast cancer therapy.Therefore,we investigated the biological characteristics of TAM-resistant (TAM-R) breast cancer cells.Methods Mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity of wild-type (WT) and TAM-R MCF7 cells were tested by a mammosphere assay and mouse tumor xenografts respectively.Stem-cell markers (SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were tested by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR.Morphological observation was performed to characterize EMT.Results After induction of TAM resistance,TAM-R MCF7 cells exhibited increased proliferation in the presence of TAM compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05),indicating enhanced TAM resistance of TAM-R MCF7 cells compared to that of WT MCF7 cells.TAM-R MCF7 cells showed enhanced mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity in nude mice compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.01),demonstrating the elevated CSC properties of TAM-R MCF7 cells.Consistently,qRT-PCR revealed that TAM-R MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of stem cell markers including SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133,compared to those of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05).Morphologically,TAM-R MCF7 cells showed a fibroblastic phenotype,but WT MCF7 cells were epithelial-like.After induction of TAM resistance,qRT-PCR indicated that MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of Snail,vimentin,and N-cadherin and decreased levels of E-cadherin,which are considered as EMT characteristics (P <0

  9. A multi-phenotypic cancer model with cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Da; Wang, Yue; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    The conventional cancer stem cell (CSC) theory indicates a hierarchy of CSCs and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), that is, CSCs can differentiate into NSCCs but not vice versa. However, an alternative paradigm of CSC theory with reversible cell plasticity among cancer cells has received much attention very recently. Here we present a generalized multi-phenotypic cancer model by integrating cell plasticity with the conventional hierarchical structure of cancer cells. We prove that under very weak assumption, the nonlinear dynamics of multi-phenotypic proportions in our model has only one stable steady state and no stable limit cycle. This result theoretically explains the phenotypic equilibrium phenomena reported in various cancer cell lines. Furthermore, according to the transient analysis of our model, it is found that cancer cell plasticity plays an essential role in maintaining the phenotypic diversity in cancer especially during the transient dynamics. Two biological examples with experimental data show that the phenotypic conversions from NCSSs to CSCs greatly contribute to the transient growth of CSCs proportion shortly after the drastic reduction of it. In particular, an interesting overshooting phenomenon of CSCs proportion arises in three-phenotypic example. Our work may pave the way for modeling and analyzing the multi-phenotypic cell population dynamics with cell plasticity.

  10. The Role of Matrine and Mitogen-Ativated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signal Transduction in the Inhibition of the Proliferation and Migration of Human Umbilical Veins Endothelial Cells Induced by Lung Cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming BAI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Matrine, one of the major alkaloid components of the traditional Chinese medicine Sophora roots, has a wide range of pharmacological effects including anti-inflammatory activities, growth inhibition and induction of cell differentiation and apoptosis. Motigen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK has found to be a crucial signaling pathway in endothelial cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of Matrine and MAPK/ERK signal transduction in the inhibition of the proliferation and migration of human umbilical veins endothelial cells (HUVECs induced by lung cancer cells. Methods HUVECs were cultured with A549CM. Mat or PD98059 (i.e PD, specific inhibitor of MAPK/ERK, was added into the A549CM. The proliferation of the HUVECs was measured by cell counting. The migration of the HUVECs was observed by wound healing assay. The expression levels of ERK and p-ERK protein were detected by Western Blot analysis. Results On 24 hours after intervention, the A549CM significantly stimulated the proliferation, migration and expression of p-ERK of HUVECs. Compared with the A549CM group, Mat significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and p-ERK expression of HUVECs induced by A549CM. While PD only decreased the proliferation and p-ERK expression of HUVECs induced by A549CM. PD had no effect in the migration of HUVECs. Conclusion The results demonstrated that Mat and PD98059 can effectively decrease proliferation and expression of p-ERK of HUVECs induced by A549CM. Furthermore Mat can also inhibit migration of HUVECs induced by A549CM that did not changed by PD98059. These data implied that suppressing MAPK/ERK signal transduction may play the crucial role in resisting lung cacinoma angiogenesis with Mat.

  11. Emerging targets in cancer management: role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis

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    Cojoc M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Monica Cojoc,1 Claudia Peitzsch,1 Franziska Trautmann,1 Leo Polishchuk,2 Gennady D Telegeev,2 Anna Dubrovska11OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany; 2Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, UkraineAbstract: The chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1 and its cell surface receptor CXCR4 were first identified as regulators of lymphocyte trafficking to the bone marrow. Soon after, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was proposed to regulate the trafficking of breast cancer cells to sites of metastasis. More recently, it was established that CXCR4 plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and dissemination in the majority of malignant diseases. The stem cell concept of cancer has revolutionized the understanding of tumorigenesis and cancer treatment. A growing body of evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells, referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs, plays a critical role in tumor initiation, metastatic colonization, and resistance to therapy. Although the signals generated by the metastatic niche that regulate CSCs are not yet fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests a key role of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. In this review we focus on physiological functions of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling pathway and its role in cancer and CSCs, and we discuss the potential for targeting this pathway in cancer management.Keywords: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cancer stem cells, metastasis

  12. The prognostic role of mTOR and p-mTOR for survival in non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR are potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, the association between mTOR/p-mTOR expression and NSCLC patients' prognosis remains controversial. Thus, a meta-analysis of existing studies evaluating the prognostic role of mTOR/p-mTOR expression for NSCLC was conducted.A systemically literature search was performed via Pubmed, Embase, Medline as well as CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure. Studies were included that reported the hazard ratio (HR and 95%CI for the association between mTOR/p-mTOR expression and NSCLC patients' survival. Random-effects model was used to pool HRs.Ten eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis, with 4 about m-TOR and 7 about p-mTOR. For mTOR, the pooled HR of overall survival (OS was 1.00 (95%CI 0.5 to 1.99 by univariate analysis and 1.22 (95%CI 0.53 to 2.82 by multivariate analysis. For p-mTOR, the pooled HR was 1.39 (95%CI 0.97 to 1.98 by univariate analysis and 1.42 (95%CI 0.56 to 3.60 by multivariate analysis.The results indicated that no statistically significant association was found between mTOR/p-mTOR expression and NSCLC patients' prognosis.

  13. The cancer-germline antigen SSX2 causes cell cycle arrest and DNA damage in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2011-01-01

    The SSX family of cancer and germline antigens is mainly expressed in the germ cells of healthy individuals as well as wide range of cancers and is therefore potential targets for immunotherapy. However, little is known about the role of SSX proteins in tumorigenesis and normal cell function. Here......, we show that SSX2 is involved in regulation of cancer cell growth. We found that ectopic expression of SSX2 in melanoma and colon cancer cells strongly reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis in vitro. Importantly, in a xenograft mouse model, the growth of tumors derived from SSX2 overexpressing...... an increase in the number of gamma-H2AX ‘DNA damage foci’, indicating replicative stress, which may lead to genomic instability. As the p53 tumor suppressor is an inducer of G1 arrest after DNA damage and often deregulated in cancer cells, we investigated if the growth reduction due to SSX2 expression was p53...

  14. MMTV-PyMT and Derived Met-1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells as Models for Studying the Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jessica L; Butterfield, Kiel T; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Norris, John D; Josan, Jatinder S; Pollock, Julie A; McDonnell, Donald P; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Richer, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a faster rate of metastasis compared to other breast cancer subtypes, and no effective targeted therapies are currently FDA-approved. Recent data indicate that the androgen receptor (AR) promotes tumor survival and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in TNBC. Studies of AR in disease progression and the systemic effects of anti-androgens have been hindered by the lack of an AR-positive (AR+) immunocompetent preclinical model. In this study, we identified the transgenic MMTV-PyMT (mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle tumor-antigen) mouse mammary gland carcinoma model of breast cancer and Met-1 cells derived from this model as tools to study the role of AR in breast cancer progression. AR protein expression was examined in late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice as well as in Met-1 cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Sensitivity of Met-1 cells to the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and anti-androgen therapy was examined using cell viability, migration/invasion, and anchorage-independent growth assays. Late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice and Met-1 cells expressed abundant nuclear AR protein, while negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Met-1 sensitivity to DHT and AR antagonists demonstrated a reliance on AR for survival, and AR antagonists inhibited invasion and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that the MMTV-PyMT model and Met-1