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Sample records for cancer cells radioresistant

  1. Establishment of a radioresistant human lung cancer cell subline and its mechanism of radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To establish a radioresistant cell subline from a human A549 lung cancer cell line and investigate the mechanism of radioresistance. Methods: Two proposals were applied for the non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells irradiated with X-rays: A group of A549 cell line was irradiated five times, the fractionated dose was 600 cGy, and the other group was exposed 15 times, the fractionated dose was 200 cGy. After the completion of irradiation, two monoclones were obtained from the survival of cells and named the subline A549-S1 and A549-S2. The radiosensitivity and cell cycle distribution of these two clones, together with its parental A549 cells were measured by clone formation assay and flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein levels of Notchl in A549 cell line and the sublines were determined by RT-PCR and Western-blots. Results: Compared with the parental A549 cells, A549-S1 cells showed significant resistance to radiation with D0, Dq and N values increased, and a broader initial shoulder as well as 1.38-fold increased value of SF2. The A549-S1 subline also showed higher percentage of cells in S phase and G2/M phase, but lower percentages in G1/G1 phase (P0, Dq and N values decreased and a curve initial shoulder. The ratio of cells in S and G0/G1 phase ratio was lower than that in parental A549 cells, but that in G2/M phase ratio was higher significantly (P<0.05). The expression of Notchl had no marked change compared to A549 cell. Conclusions: The radioresistance of the A549 cell subline is correlated with the irradiation program. The cell subline shows a different cell cycle distribution from their parental line. The cell cycle distribution has a close correlaiton with the expression of Notchl. (authors)

  2. Vitamin K2-derived compounds induce growth inhibition in radioresistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, Helfi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Suzuki, Yoko; Demizu, Yusuke; Bito, Toshinori; Nishimura, Hideki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    A strategy to overcome radioresistance in cancer treatment has been expected. To evaluate the strategy, appropriate experimental models are needed. Radioresistant tumour models were originally established from human colon cancer cells, and we evaluated their molecular basis. Next, the growth inhibitory effects of newly synthesized vitamin K2 (VK2)-related compounds were tested. Here, we showed that these novel compounds have growth inhibitory effects not only on cancer cells of various origins, but also on radioresistant cells, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Human colon, lung, and breast cancer cell lines were used for testing the growth inhibitory activities of several chemical compounds. Radioresistant tumour models were established by fractionated radiation exposure. Irradiated cells were selected by a single cell cloning method, and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation was evaluated by a colony-forming assay. The VK2 derivatives (named MQ-1, MQ-2, and MQ-3) were chemically synthesized. To evaluate the generation of ROS, flow cytometer analyses were performed. A radioresistant tumour model was established from the HCT116 human colon cancer cell line. The radioresistant cells from HCT116 also showed resistance to cisplatin. In the radioresistant cells, NF-κB was highly activated. MQ-1, MQ-2, and MQ-3 showed greater growth inhibitory activities than VK2 not only in various cancer cells but also in radioresistant cells through the generation of ROS. In conclusion, a radioresistant tumour model was originally established from colon cancer cell lines through NF-κB activation, and it could be a useful tool for evaluating anti-tumour agents. Newly synthesized VK2 derivatives (MQ-1, MQ-2 and MQ-3) seemed to be potential anti-tumour agents in various cancers and radioresistant cancers. The efficacy of those compounds was related to the generation of ROS. These findings together might pave the way for the treatment of radioresistant or

  3. Radiotherapy diagnostic biomarkers in radioresistant human H460 lung cancer stem-like cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Song, Jie-Young; Park, In-Chul; KIM, JAE-SUNG; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor cell radioresistance is a major contributor to radiotherapy failure, highlighting the importance of identifying predictive biomarkers for radioresistance. In this work, we established a radioresistant H460 (RR-H460) cell line from parental radiosensitive H460 lung cancer cells by exposure to fractionated radiation. The radiation-resistant, anti-apoptotic phenotype of RR-H460 cell lines was confirmed by their enhanced clonogenic survival and increased expression of the radioresi...

  4. Radiotherapy diagnostic biomarkers in radioresistant human H460 lung cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Song, Jie-Young; Park, In-Chul; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cell radioresistance is a major contributor to radiotherapy failure, highlighting the importance of identifying predictive biomarkers for radioresistance. In this work, we established a radioresistant H460 (RR-H460) cell line from parental radiosensitive H460 lung cancer cells by exposure to fractionated radiation. The radiation-resistant, anti-apoptotic phenotype of RR-H460 cell lines was confirmed by their enhanced clonogenic survival and increased expression of the radioresistance genes Hsp90 and Her-3. RR-H460 cells displayed characteristics of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), including induction of the surface marker CD44 and stem cell markers Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. RR-H460 cells also exhibited sphere formation and malignant behavior, further supporting a CSC phenotype. Using proteomic analyses, we identified 8 proteins that were up-regulated in RR-H460 CSC lines and therefore potentially involved in radioresistance and CSC-related biological processes. Notably, 4 of these-PAI-2, NOMO2, KLC4, and PLOD3-have not been previously linked to radioresistance. Depletion of these individual genes sensitized RR-H460 cells to radiotoxicity and additively enhancing radiation-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest the possibility of integrating molecular targeted therapy with radiotherapy as a strategy for resolving the radioresistance of lung tumors. PMID:26901847

  5. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

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    Ke, Chien-Chih [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Yang, An-Hang [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ching-Sheng [National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Chi, Chin-Wen [National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China); Tseng, Ling-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Tsai, Yi-Fan [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Ho, Jennifer H. [Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Center for Stem Cell Research, Taipei (China); Lee, Chen-Hsen [NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Lee, Oscar K. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Stem Cell Research Center, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 131}I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133{sup +} cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and higher radioresistance. After {gamma}-irradiation of the cells, the CD133{sup +} population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133{sup -} cells. In vivo {sup 131}I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133{sup +} cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133{sup +} cells. (orig.)

  6. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    131I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133+ cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133+ cells and higher radioresistance. After γ-irradiation of the cells, the CD133+ population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133- cells. In vivo 131I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133+ cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133+ cells. (orig.)

  7. Beclin1-induced autophagy abrogates radioresistance of lung cancer cells by suppressing osteopontin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteopontin (OPN) serves as an indicator of resistance to radiotherapy. However, the role of OPN in the development of acquired radioresistance in human lung cancer cells has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the potential importance of OPN as a marker of lung cancer with a potential significant role in the development of radioresistance against repeated radiotherapy has prompted us to define the pathways by which OPN regulates lung cancer cell growth. In addition, autophagy has been reported to play a key role in the radiosensitization of cancer cells. Here, we report that increased OPN expression through induction of nuclear p53 following irradiation was inhibited by exogenous beclin-1 (BECN1). Our results clearly show that BECN1 gene expression led to induction of autophagy and inhibition of cancer cell growth and angiogenesis. Our results suggest that the induction of autophagy abrogated the radioresistance of the cancer cells. Interestingly, we showed that knockdown of OPN by lentivirus-mediated shRNA induced the autophagy of human lung cancer cell. Taken together, these results suggest that OPN and BECN1 can be molecular targets for overcoming radioresistance by controlling autophagy. (author)

  8. Identification of radioresistance-related molecules in laryngeal cancer cells using proteomic and EST data mining approach

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    Kim, Jae Sung; Hong, Eun Hee; Yoon, Hong Sik; Yang, Kyung Mi; Hwang, Sang Gu [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Laryngeal cancer is the largest subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the sixth most prevalent cancer in the world. Radiotherapy is known as a major treatment modality of laryngeal caner in conjunction with surgery and chemotherapy. Clinical radiotherapy is generally based on the treatment of fractionated radiation (commonly 2 Gy daily to total 60-70 Gy) to the cancer. This chronic treatment can trigger tumor-adaptive radioresistance contributing cancer recurrence following radiotherapy. Unfortunately, approximately 15 % of laryngeal cancers after radiotherapy acquire radioresistance. However, little is known about the molecular markers and mechanisms underlying tumor-adaptive radioresistance. In the present study, we established the radioresistant model system using HEp-2 cell line and identified radioresistance-related molecules by using the analysis of laryngeal cancer expressed sequence tag (EST) data bases and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE)

  9. Identification of radioresistance-related molecules in laryngeal cancer cells using proteomic and EST data mining approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laryngeal cancer is the largest subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the sixth most prevalent cancer in the world. Radiotherapy is known as a major treatment modality of laryngeal caner in conjunction with surgery and chemotherapy. Clinical radiotherapy is generally based on the treatment of fractionated radiation (commonly 2 Gy daily to total 60-70 Gy) to the cancer. This chronic treatment can trigger tumor-adaptive radioresistance contributing cancer recurrence following radiotherapy. Unfortunately, approximately 15 % of laryngeal cancers after radiotherapy acquire radioresistance. However, little is known about the molecular markers and mechanisms underlying tumor-adaptive radioresistance. In the present study, we established the radioresistant model system using HEp-2 cell line and identified radioresistance-related molecules by using the analysis of laryngeal cancer expressed sequence tag (EST) data bases and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE)

  10. ABT-737 reverses the acquired radioresistance of breast cancer cells by targeting Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL

    OpenAIRE

    Li Ji-Yu; Li Yu-Yang; Jin Wei; Yang Qing; Shao Zhi-Ming; Tian Xing-Song

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Acquired radioresistance of cancer cells remains a fundamental barrier to attaining the maximal efficacy of radiotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. Anti-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, play an important role in the radioresistance of cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to determine if ABT-737, a BH3-only mimic, could reverse the acquired radioresistance of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231R by targeting Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Methods The rad...

  11. P17.17INHIBITION OF DNA DAMAGE RESPONSE ABROGATES GLIOBLASTOMA CANCER STEM CELL RADIORESISTANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Carruthers, R.; Ahmed, S.; Chalmers, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    GBM recurrence following radiotherapy is due to a subset of tumour propagating cells with stem like characteristics (cancer stem cells, CSC). CSCs have the ability to recapitulate the tumour of origin whereas the majority of tumour cells (tumour bulk) do not. CSCs in GBM have been reported to exhibit an upregulated DNA damage response (DDR) and a radioresistant phenotype. However, literature and opinion regarding GBM CSC radiosensitivity is conflicting. The prospect of influencing GBM CSC rad...

  12. Discovery of the cancer stem cell related determinants of radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors are known to be heterogeneous containing a dynamic mixture of phenotypically and functionally different tumor cells. The two concepts attempting to explain the origin of intratumor heterogeneity are the cancer stem cell hypothesis and the clonal evolution model. The stochastic model argues that tumors are biologically homogenous and all cancer cells within the tumor have equal ability to propagate the tumor growth depending on continuing mutations and selective pressure. By contrast, the stem cells model suggests that cancer heterogeneity is due to the hierarchy that originates from a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are biologically distinct from the bulk tumor and possesses self-renewal, tumorigenic and multilineage potential. Although these two hypotheses have been discussed for a long time as mutually exclusive explanations of tumor heterogeneity, they are easily reconciled serving as a driving force of cancer evolution and diversity. Recent discovery of the cancer cell plasticity and heterogeneity makes the CSC population a moving target that could be hard to track and eradicate. Understanding the signaling mechanisms regulating CSCs during the course of cancer treatment can be indispensable for the optimization of current treatment strategies

  13. Contextual regulation of pancreatic cancer stem cell phenotype and radioresistance by pancreatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is promoted by desmoplasia induced by pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). Contributory to this progression is epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), which shares many characteristics with the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis. We investigated the role of these processes on the radioresponse and tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells. Materials and methods: We used an in vitro sphere model and in vivo xenograft model to examine the role of PSC in EMT and CSC processes. Results: We demonstrated that PSC enhanced the CSC phenotype and radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, the expression of several EMT and CSC markers supported enhanced processes in our models and that translated into remarkable in vivo tumorigenicity. Multi-dose TGFβ neutralizing antibody inhibited the EMT and CSC processes, sensitized cells to radiation and reduced in vivo tumorigenicity. A proteomic screen identified multiple novel factors that were regulated by PSC in pancreatic cells. Conclusion: These results are critical in highlighting the role of PSC in tumor progression and radioresistance by manipulating the EMT and CSC processes. TGFβ and the novel factors identified are important targets for better therapeutic outcome in response to PSC mediated mechanisms

  14. Reprogramming mediated radio-resistance of 3D-grown cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro 3D growth of tumors is a new cell culture model that more closely mimics the features of the in vivo environment and is being used increasingly in the field of biological and medical research. It has been demonstrated that cancer cells cultured in 3D matrices are more radio-resistant compared with cells in monolayers. However, the mechanisms causing this difference remain unclear. Here we show that cancer cells cultured in a 3D microenvironment demonstrated an increase in cells with stem cell properties. This was confirmed by the finding that cells in 3D cultures upregulated the gene and protein expression of the stem cell reprogramming factors such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 and miR-302a, compared with cells in monolayers. Moreover, the expression of β-catenin, a regulating molecule of reprogramming factors, also increased in 3D-grown cancer cells. These findings suggest that cancer cells were reprogrammed to become stem cell-like cancer cells in a 3D growth culture microenvironment. Since cancer stem cell-like cells demonstrate an increased radio-resistance and chemo-resistance, our results offer a new perspective as to why. Our findings shed new light on understanding the features of the 3D growth cell model and its application in basic research into clinical radiotherapy and medicine. (author)

  15. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  16. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo. PMID:26458317

  17. Cancer Stem Cell Radioresistance and Enrichment: Where Frontline Radiation Therapy May Fail in Lung and Esophageal Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies have highlighted the role cancer stem cells (CSC) play in the development and progression of various types of cancer including lung and esophageal cancer. More recently, it has been proposed that the presence of CSCs affects treatment efficacy and patient prognosis. In reviewing this new area of cancer biology, we will give an overview of the current literature regarding lung and esophageal CSCs and radioresistance of CSC, and discuss the potential therapeutic applications of these findings

  18. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Yang; Wenbo Wang; Liu Hu; Xiaoxi Yang; Juan Zhong; Zheng Li; Hui Yang; Han Lei; Haijun Yu; ZhengKai Liao; Fuxiang Zhou; Conghua Xie; Yunfeng Zhou

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telo...

  19. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Wenbo; Hu, Liu; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhong, Juan; Li, Zheng; Yang, Hui; Lei, Han; Yu, Haijun; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. Principal Findings In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telome...

  20. Wild-type p53 gene expression sensitizes radioresistant esophageal cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To define the radiosensitizing effect of wild-type p3 (Wt-p53) on human radioresistant esophageal cancer cell lines and the application of p53 gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. Methods: The human esophageal cancer cell lines TE-13 and its radioresistant variant TE-13R50 derived from repeated irradiation were initially transfected with Ad5CMV-p53, a recombined adenovirus vector containing human Wt-p53 cDNA and cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The impact of Ad5CMV-p53 expression on radiation sensitivity was observed and analyzed both after transfected cell lines (in vitro) and their transplanted tumors (in vivo) had been irradiated. Results: Significant difference in radiosensitivity between the TE-13 (D0= 1.38 Gy) and TE-13R50 (D0 = 2.48 Gy) cell lines was confirmed. When Ad5CMV-p53 had been transfected and expressed in there cells, their sensitivity to irradiation was enhanced obviously, with declined D0 values of 0.97 Gy and 1.14 Gy, respectively. On the other hand, the growth rate of transplanted tumors in nude mice was more suppressed by combined radiation and injection of Ad5CMV-p53, as compared with irradiation alone, especially for TE-13R50. Conclusion: The potentiation of adenovirus-mediated wt-p53 gene expression has a significant impact on improving the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cell lines

  1. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

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    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  2. Investigating the Radioresistant Properties of Lung Cancer Stem Cells in the Context of the Tumor Microenvironment.

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    Chan, Ryan; Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; McGarry, Ronald; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer. While recent research has shown that cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit radioresistant and chemoresistant properties, current cancer therapy targets the bulk of the tumor burden without accounting for the CSC and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. CSC interaction with the stroma enhances NSCLC survival, thus limiting the efficacy of treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of CSC and the microenvironment in conferring radio- or chemoresistance in an in vitro tumor model for NSCLC. The novel in vitro three-dimensional (3D) NSCLC model of color-coded tumor tissue analogs (TTA) that we have developed is comprised of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and NSCLC cancer stem cells maintained in low oxygen conditions (5% O2) to recapitulate the physiologic conditions in tumors. Using this model, we demonstrate that a single 5 Gy radiation dose does not inhibit growth of TTA containing CSC and results in elevated expression of cytokines (TGF-α, RANTES, ENA-78) and factors (vimentin, MMP and TIMP), indicative of an invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, combined treatment of single dose or fractionated doses with cisplatin was found to either attenuate or decrease the proliferative effect that radiation exposure alone had on TTA containing CSC maintained in hypoxic conditions. In summary, we utilized a 3D NSCLC model, which had characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and tumor cell heterogeneity, to elucidate the multifactorial nature of radioresistance in tumors. PMID:26836231

  3. Investigation of radiation-induced transcriptome profile of radioresistant non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells using RNA-seq.

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    Hee Jung Yang

    Full Text Available Radioresistance is a main impediment to effective radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Despite several experimental and clinical studies of resistance to radiation, the precise mechanism of radioresistance in NSCLC cells and tissues still remains unclear. This result could be explained by limitation of previous researches such as a partial understanding of the cellular radioresistance mechanism at a single molecule level. In this study, we aimed to investigate extensive radiation responses in radioresistant NSCLC cells and to identify radioresistance-associating factors. For the first time, using RNA-seq, a massive sequencing-based approach, we examined whole-transcriptome alteration in radioresistant NSCLC A549 cells under irradiation, and verified significant radiation-altered genes and their chromosome distribution patterns. Also, bioinformatic approaches (GO analysis and IPA were performed to characterize the radiation responses in radioresistant A549 cells. We found that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, migration and inflammatory processes could be meaningfully related to regulation of radiation responses in radioresistant A549 cells. Based on the results of bioinformatic analysis for the radiation-induced transcriptome alteration, we selected seven significant radiation-altered genes (SESN2, FN1, TRAF4, CDKN1A, COX-2, DDB2 and FDXR and then compared radiation effects in two types of NSCLC cells with different radiosensitivity (radioresistant A549 cells and radiosensitive NCI-H460 cells. Interestingly, under irradiation, COX-2 showed the most significant difference in mRNA and protein expression between A549 and NCI-H460 cells. IR-induced increase of COX-2 expression was appeared only in radioresistant A549 cells. Collectively, we suggest that COX-2 (also known as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2 could have possibility as a putative biomarker for radioresistance in NSCLC cells.

  4. Radioresistance of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate radiation sensitivity of dendritic cells in comparison with lymphocytes. T lymphocytes captured from peripheral blood were irradiated by 0 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy. Apoptosis was measured by flowcytometry for staining of annexin V 4 hours after irradiation. Immature and mature dendritic cells processed from blood hematopoietic stem cell were irradiated by 0 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy, 100 Gy respectively and apoptosis was measured by flowcytometry with time differences as 4h, 24h and 48h after irradiation. Morphometric analysis by percent nucleus was measured in three cell groups, also. Lymphocytes showed radiation sensitivity by increasing apoptotic fraction according to radiation dose. However, both mature and immature dendritic cells showed consistent fraction of apoptosis in spite of increasing radiation dose. Percent nucleus ratio is significantly higher in lymphocytes than that of mature or immature dendritic cells. Stimulation of T-cell by dendritic cells was not changed after irradiation. Dendritic cells showed radioresistance which was associated with small size of nucleus in comparison with lymphocytes and this result would be used as a basal data of radio-labelling for the cellular trafficking studies in nuclear medicine fields

  5. Involvement of cdc25c in cell cycle alteration of a radioresistant lung cancer cell line established with fractionated ionizing radiation.

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    Li, Jie; Yang, Chun-Xu; Mei, Zi-Jie; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Shi-Min; Sun, Shao-Xing; Zhou, Fu-Xiang; Zhou, Yun-Feng; Xie, Cong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Cancer patients often suffer from local tumor recurrence after radiation therapy. Cell cycling, an intricate sequence of events which guarantees high genomic fidelity, has been suggested to affect DNA damage responses and eventual radioresistant characteristics of cancer cells. Here, we established a radioresistant lung cancer cell line, A549R , by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated γ-ray irradiation with a total dose of 60 Gy. The radiosensitivity of A549 and A549R was confirmed using colony formation assays. We then focused on examination of the cell cycle distribution between A549 and A549R and found that the proportion of cells in the radioresistant S phase increased, whereas that in the radiosensitive G1 phase decreased. When A549 and A549R cells were exposed to 4 Gy irradiation the total differences in cell cycle redistribution suggested that G2-M cell cycle arrest plays a predominant role in mediating radioresistance. In order to further explore the possible mechanisms behind the cell cycle related radioresistance, we examined the expression of Cdc25 proteins which orchestrate cell cycle transitions. The results showed that expression of Cdc25c increased accompanied by the decrease of Cdc25a and we proposed that the quantity of Cdc25c, rather than activated Cdc25c or Cdc25a, determines the radioresistance of cells. PMID:24289569

  6. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  7. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human cancer-derived cell lines (HeLa, Si

  8. Molecular mechanisms of radioresistance: applications for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant part of head and neck cancers is clinically radioresistant. The mechanisms of acquired or intrinsic radioresistance of head and neck tumors are still unclear. More recently molecular research focused on alterations in cell cycle control and resistance to programmed cell death in tumor cells as possible mechanisms of radioresistance. Some molecular targets of radiosensitivity or radioresistance (e.g. specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes) are known in specific tumor cells or tumor model systems. Such key targets for head and neck cancer cells are also emerging in in vitro studies. However, it is unclear so far if the modification of such molecular targets in vivo leads to an increased tumor selective radiosensitivity. Nevertheless, selected molecular targets could be potential novel tools for modifying radiosensitivity through gene therapy in patients with radioresistant head and neck cancers. (orig.)

  9. Role of replication protein A in the radioresistance of esophageal cancer cell line and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of replication protein A (RPA) gene suppression on the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cells (TE-1R) and underlying mechanism. Methods: A radioresistant human esophageal cancer cell line TE-1 R was screened out by fractionated irradiation to TE-1 cells, then siRPA1 or siRPa2 was transfected to TE-1R cells. The untransfected (Con) group and nonsense siRNA transfected (NC) group were set as control groups. The survival was measured with colony-forming assay and the cell cycle distribution was measured with flow cytometry. Results: Compared with the Con and NC groups, the protein expression of RPA1 and RPA2 decreased significantly 48 h after siRPA1 and siRPA2 transfection. The D0, Dq, and SF2 values reduced from 2.09, 1.70, 0.85 in NC group to 1.67, 0.71, 0.44 and 1.82, 0.89, 0.51 in siRPAl and siRPA2 transfection groups, respectively. Accordingly, the sensitization enhancement ratios of Dq were 2.39 and 1.91, respectively. The G2/M arrest in siRPA1 and siRPA2 transfection groups increased from (18.701 3.14)% of NC group to (26.95 ± 3.96)% and (25.28 ± 2.74) % (t=2.827, 2.853, P<0.05), respectively. Conclusions: Knocking down of RPA1 or RPA2 genes can enhance the radiosensitivity of human esophageal cancer cells TE-1R, where the inhibition of radiation-induced sublethal damage repair may be involved. Accordingly, RPA may become a new target of radiosensitization in esophageal cancer. (authors)

  10. WE-E-BRE-10: Level of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Correlated with Tumor Radioresistence: An Indication for Individualized Breast Cancer Therapy Adapted to Cancer Stem Cell Fractions

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    Qi, S; Pajonk, F; McCloskey, S; Low, D; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purposes: The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in a solid tumor could result in poor tumor control probability. The purposes are to study CSC radiosensitivity parameters α and β and their correlation to CSC levels to understand the underlying radioresistance mechanisms and enable individualized treatment design. Methods: Four established breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, and SUM159PT) were irradiated in vitro using single radiation doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. The fractions of CSCs in each cell lines were determined using cancer stem cell markers. Mammosphere assays were also performed to better estimate the number of CSCs and represent the CSC repopulation in a human solid tumor. The measured cell surviving fractions were fitted using the Linear-quadratic (LQ) model with independent fitting parameters: α-TC, β-TC (TCs), α-CSC, β-CSC (CSCs), and fs (the percentage of CSCs in each sample). Results: The measured fs increased following the irradiation by MCF-7 (0.1%), T47D (0.9%), MDA-MB-231 (1.18%) and SUM159T (2.46%), while decreasing surviving curve slopes were observed, indicating greater radioresistance, in the opposite order. The fitting yielded the radiosensitive parameters for the MCF-7: α-TC=0.1±0.2Gy{sup −1}, β-TC= 0.08 ±0.14Gy{sup −2}, α-CSC=0.04±0.07Gy{sup −1}, β-CSC =0.02±0.3Gy{sup −2}; for the SUM159PT, α-TC=0.08±0.25 Gy{sup −1}, β-TC=0.02±0.02Gy{sup −2}, α-CSC=0.04±0.18Gy{sup −1}, β-CSC =0.004±0.24Gy{sup −2}. In the mammosphere assay, where fs were higher than the corresponding cell line assays, there was almost no shoulder found in the surviving curves (more radioresistant in mammosphere assays) yielding β-CSC of approximately 0. Conclusion: Breast cancer stem cells were more radioresistant characterized by smaller α and β values compared to differentiated breast cancer cells. Percentage of breast cancer stem cells strongly correlated to overall tumor radioresistance. This observation

  11. WE-E-BRE-10: Level of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Correlated with Tumor Radioresistence: An Indication for Individualized Breast Cancer Therapy Adapted to Cancer Stem Cell Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purposes: The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in a solid tumor could result in poor tumor control probability. The purposes are to study CSC radiosensitivity parameters α and β and their correlation to CSC levels to understand the underlying radioresistance mechanisms and enable individualized treatment design. Methods: Four established breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, and SUM159PT) were irradiated in vitro using single radiation doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. The fractions of CSCs in each cell lines were determined using cancer stem cell markers. Mammosphere assays were also performed to better estimate the number of CSCs and represent the CSC repopulation in a human solid tumor. The measured cell surviving fractions were fitted using the Linear-quadratic (LQ) model with independent fitting parameters: α-TC, β-TC (TCs), α-CSC, β-CSC (CSCs), and fs (the percentage of CSCs in each sample). Results: The measured fs increased following the irradiation by MCF-7 (0.1%), T47D (0.9%), MDA-MB-231 (1.18%) and SUM159T (2.46%), while decreasing surviving curve slopes were observed, indicating greater radioresistance, in the opposite order. The fitting yielded the radiosensitive parameters for the MCF-7: α-TC=0.1±0.2Gy−1, β-TC= 0.08 ±0.14Gy−2, α-CSC=0.04±0.07Gy−1, β-CSC =0.02±0.3Gy−2; for the SUM159PT, α-TC=0.08±0.25 Gy−1, β-TC=0.02±0.02Gy−2, α-CSC=0.04±0.18Gy−1, β-CSC =0.004±0.24Gy−2. In the mammosphere assay, where fs were higher than the corresponding cell line assays, there was almost no shoulder found in the surviving curves (more radioresistant in mammosphere assays) yielding β-CSC of approximately 0. Conclusion: Breast cancer stem cells were more radioresistant characterized by smaller α and β values compared to differentiated breast cancer cells. Percentage of breast cancer stem cells strongly correlated to overall tumor radioresistance. This observation suggested the feasibility of individualized

  12. Microarray analysis of DNA damage repair gene expression profiles in cervical cancer cells radioresistant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhen-Zhou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to obtain stable radioresistant sub-lines from the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by prolonged exposure to 252Cf neutron and X-rays. Radioresistance mechanisms were investigated in the resulting cells using microarray analysis of DNA damage repair genes. Methods HeLa cells were treated with fractionated 252Cf neutron and X-rays, with a cumulative dose of 75 Gy each, over 8 months, yielding the sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR. Radioresistant characteristics were detected by clone formation assay, ultrastructural observations, cell doubling time, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis assay. Gene expression patterns of the radioresistant sub-lines were studied through microarray analysis and verified by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Results The radioresistant sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR were more radioresisitant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays than parental HeLa cells by detecting their radioresistant characteristics, respectively. Compared to HeLa cells, the expression of 24 genes was significantly altered by at least 2-fold in HeLaNR cells. Of these, 19 genes were up-regulated and 5 down-regulated. In HeLaXR cells, 41 genes were significantly altered by at least 2-fold; 38 genes were up-regulated and 3 down-regulated. Conclusions Chronic exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induces adaptive responses that enhance tolerance of ionizing radiation and allow investigations of cellular radioresistance mechanisms. The insights gained into the molecular mechanisms activated by these "radioresistance" genes will lead to new therapeutic targets for cervical cancer.

  13. Radiations, human cancerization and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active oxygen species have been implicated in inflammatory diseases, cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Experiments studying their direct (for instance, by ionizing radiation) or indirect influence (for instance, by the decrease(s) in activity of cellular defence enzymes), in vivo, and/or, in cell cultures (fibroblasts, keratinocytes, hepatocytes,...) have been positive. To the contrary, reactions or products, which decrease level(s) of free radicals/H2O2 (i) directly, (ii) indirectly by an increase of SOD, catalase, and peroxydase activites suppress the above-described phenomena. This is the case for the domain number 2 (that contains copper, MW 53KDa) of the Scorpion's blood pigment (hemocyanin), which possesses SOD-, catalase-, and peroxydase-like properties, resistant to, at least, 4000 Gy, and thus may explain the especially high radioresistance of scorpions. Enzymatic decrease(s) and the domain number 2 of hemocyanin are under current investigation in several laboratories

  14. CREB mediates ICAM-3: inducing radio-resistance, cell growth and migration/invasion of the human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICAM family proteins comprises cell surface molecules that are homologous to NCAM and are members of the single passed type 1 immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) that are anchored at the cellular membrane. The ICAM family consists of five subfamilies (ICAM-1 to ICAM-5) of heavily glycosylated cell surface receptors with common functional or structural homology. The extracellular domains of ICAM protein have roles in immune response and inflammation through various cell-cell interactions. The cytoplasmic tail residues of ICAM-3 participate in intracellular signaling such as calcium mobilization and tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, the ICAM proteins appear to have a dual role in cancer. ICAM molecules may target and block tumor progression by stimulation of an immune response such as leukocyte activation. Conversely, other investigations have shown that ICAM molecules are involved in cancer malignancy because their increased expressions are associated with a poor diagnosis, lower survival rates and invasion in several cancers including melanoma, breast cancer and leukemia. We have also reported that an increase of ICAM-3 expression in several cancer cells and specimens of cervical cancer patient induce enhanced radio-resistance by the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote cancer cell proliferation by the activation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK. Therefore, these previous reports imply that ICAM-3 has various undefined roles in cancer. In this study, we investigated whether ICAM-3 increase cell migration and invasion through CREB activation and CREB has a role of increase of radioresistance and cell growth

  15. CREB mediates ICAM-3: inducing radio-resistance, cell growth and migration/invasion of the human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; So, Kwang Sup; Bae, In Hwa; Um, Hong Duck [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The ICAM family proteins comprises cell surface molecules that are homologous to NCAM and are members of the single passed type 1 immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) that are anchored at the cellular membrane. The ICAM family consists of five subfamilies (ICAM-1 to ICAM-5) of heavily glycosylated cell surface receptors with common functional or structural homology. The extracellular domains of ICAM protein have roles in immune response and inflammation through various cell-cell interactions. The cytoplasmic tail residues of ICAM-3 participate in intracellular signaling such as calcium mobilization and tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, the ICAM proteins appear to have a dual role in cancer. ICAM molecules may target and block tumor progression by stimulation of an immune response such as leukocyte activation. Conversely, other investigations have shown that ICAM molecules are involved in cancer malignancy because their increased expressions are associated with a poor diagnosis, lower survival rates and invasion in several cancers including melanoma, breast cancer and leukemia. We have also reported that an increase of ICAM-3 expression in several cancer cells and specimens of cervical cancer patient induce enhanced radio-resistance by the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote cancer cell proliferation by the activation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK. Therefore, these previous reports imply that ICAM-3 has various undefined roles in cancer. In this study, we investigated whether ICAM-3 increase cell migration and invasion through CREB activation and CREB has a role of increase of radioresistance and cell growth.

  16. miRNA-148b regulates radioresistance in non-small lung cancer cells via regulation of MutL homologue 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Guangsheng; Li, Gaozhong; Xu, Bo; Jia, Tongfu; Sun, Yinping; Zheng, Jianbo; Li, Jianbin

    2016-07-01

    Radioresistance represents a major obstacle in cancer treatment, the underlying mechanism of which is complex and not well understood. miR-148b has been reported to be implicated regulating radioresistance in lymphoma cells. However, this function has not been investigated in lung cancer cells. Microarray analysis was performed in A549 cells 48 h after exposure to 8 Gy of γ-irradiation or sham irradiation to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. miR-148b mimic and inhibitor were transfected, followed by clonogenic survival assay to examine response to irradiation in A549 cells. Western Blot and luciferase assay were performed to investigate the direct target of miR-148b Xenograft mouse models were used to examine in vivo function of miR-148b Our data showed that expression of miR-148b was significantly down-regulated in both serum and cancerous tissues of radioresistant lung cancer patients compared with radiosensitive patients. Overexpression of miR-148b reversed radioresistance in A549 cells. MutL homologue 1 (MLH1) is the direct target of miR-148b which is required for the regulatory role of miR-148b in radioresistance. miR-148b mimic sensitized A549 xenografts to irradiation in vivo Our study demonstrated that miR-148b regulates radioresistance of lung cancer cells by modulating MLH1 expression level. miR-148b may represent a new therapeutic target for the intervention of lung cancer. PMID:26759383

  17. PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors enhance radiosensitivity in radioresistant prostate cancer cells through inducing apoptosis, reducing autophagy, suppressing NHEJ and HR repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L; Graham, P H; Hao, J; Ni, J; Bucci, J; Cozzi, P J; Kearsley, J H; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has a central role in cancer metastasis and radiotherapy. To develop effective therapeutics to improve radiosensitivity, understanding the possible pathways of radioresistance involved and the effects of a combination of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors with radiotherapy on prostate cancer (CaP) radioresistant cells is needed. We found that compared with parent CaP cells, CaP-radioresistant cells demonstrated G0/G1 and S phase arrest, activation of cell cycle check point, autophagy and DNA repair pathway proteins, and inactivation of apoptotic proteins. We also demonstrated that compared with combination of single PI3K or mTOR inhibitors (BKM120 or Rapamycin) and radiation, low-dose of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors (BEZ235 or PI103) combined with radiation greatly improved treatment efficacy by repressing colony formation, inducing more apoptosis, leading to the arrest of the G2/M phase, increased double-strand break levels and less inactivation of cell cycle check point, autophagy and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)/homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway proteins in CaP-radioresistant cells. This study describes the possible pathways associated with CaP radioresistance and demonstrates the putative mechanisms of the radiosensitization effect in CaP-resistant cells in the combination treatment. The findings from this study suggest that the combination of dual PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors (BEZ235 or PI103) with radiotherapy is a promising modality for the treatment of CaP to overcome radioresistance. PMID:25275598

  18. Inflammation-induced radioresistance is mediated by ROS-dependent inactivation of protein phosphatase 1 in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanyeon; Youn, HyeSook; Kang, ChulHee; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in modulating the radiation responsiveness of tumors. We determined that an inflammation response prior to irradiation contributes to radiotherapy resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. In the clonogenic survival assay, activation of the inflammation response by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreased the degree of radiosensitivity in NCI-H460 cells (relatively radiosensitive cells), but had no effect in A549 cells (relatively radioresistant cells). LPS-induced radioresistance of NCI-H460 cells was also confirmed with a xenograft mouse model. The radioresistant effect observed in NCI-H460 cells was correlated with inhibition of apoptotic cell death due to reduced Caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, we found that the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were synergistically elevated in NCI-H460 cells by treatment with LPS and radiation. Increased ROS generation negatively affected the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Decreased PP1 activity did not lead to Bad dephosphorylation, consequently resulting in the inhibition of irradiation-induced mitochondrial membrane potential loss and apoptosis. We confirmed that pre-treatment with a PP1 activator and LPS sensitized NCI-H460 cells to radiation. Taken together, our findings provided evidence that PP1 activity is critical for radiosensitization in NSCLC cells and PP1 activators can serve as promising radiosensitizers to improve therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26033480

  19. Epothilone B Confers Radiation Dose Enhancement in DAB2IP Gene Knock-Down Radioresistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In metastatic prostate cancer, DOC-2/DAB2 interactive protein (DAB2IP) is often downregulated and has been reported as a possible prognostic marker to predict the risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Our preliminary results show that DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells are radioresistant. In this study, we investigated the anticancer drug Epothilone B (EpoB) for the modulation of radiosensitivity in DAB2IP-deficient human PCa cells. Methods and Materials: We used a stable DAB2IP-knock down human PCa cell line, PC3 shDAB2IP, treated with EpoB, ionizing radiation (IR), or the combined treatment of EpoB and IR. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined by surviving fraction, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. For in vivo studies, the PC3shDAB2IP xenograft model was used in athymic nude mice. Results: Treatment with EpoB at IC50 dose (33.3 nM) increased cellular radiosensitivity in the DAB2IP-deficient cell line with a dose enhancement ratio of 2.36. EpoB delayed the DSB repair kinetics after IR and augmented the induction of apoptosis in irradiated cells after G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of EpoB and radiation enhanced tumor growth delay with an enhancement factor of 1.2. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a significant radiation dose enhancement using EpoB in DAB2IP-deficient prostate cancer cells. This radiosensitization can be attributed to delayed DSB repair, prolonged G2 block, and increased apoptosis in cells entering the cell cycle after G2/M arrest.

  20. Berberine Inhibited Radioresistant Effects and Enhanced Anti-Tumor Effects in the Irradiated-Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying enhanced radiosensitivity to 60Co γ-irradiation in human prostate PC-3 cells pretreated with berberine. The cytotoxic effect of the combination of berberine and irradiation was superior to that of berberine or irradiation alone. Cell death and Apoptosis increased significantly with the combination of berberine and irradiation. Additionally, ROS generation was elevated by berberine with or without irradiation. The antioxidant NAC inhibited berberine and radiation-induced cell death. Bax, caspase-3, p53, p38, and JNK activation increased, but activation of Bcl-2, ERK, and HO-1 decreased with berberine treatment with or without irradiation. Berberine inhibited the anti-apoptotic signal pathway involving the activation of the HO-1/NF-κB-mediated survival pathway, which prevents radiation-induced cell death. Our data demonstrate that berberine inhibited the radioresistant effects and enhanced the radiosensitivity effects in human prostate cancer cells via the MAPK/caspase-3 and ROS pathways

  1. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with the Radio-resistance of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Juan Cong; Gao, Hui; Zuo, Si Yao; Zhang, Hai Qin; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Shi Long; Han, Hai Ling; Jin, Lin Lin; Shao, Li Hong; Wei, Wei; Jin, Shun Zi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between over-expression of the neuropilin 1 (NRP1) gene and growth, survival, and radio-sensitivity of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. 3-[4,5-dimethylthylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium broide (MTT) and colony assays were then performed to determine the effect of NRP1 inhibition on the in vitro growth of NSCLC cells. The Annexin V-Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC) apoptosis detection assay was performed to analyse the effect of NRP1 enhancement on apoptosis of NSCLC cells. Transwell invasion and migration assays were employed to examine the metastatic ability of A549 cells post X-ray irradiation. In addition, Western blot assays were carried out to detect the protein level of VEGFR2, PI3K and NF-κB. Finally, to examine the effect of shNRP1 on proliferation and radio-sensitivity in vivo, a subcutaneous tumour formation assay in nude mice was performed. Microvessel density in tumour tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The stable transfected cell line (shNRP1-A549) showed a significant reduction in colony-forming ability and proliferation not only in vitro, but also in vivo. Moreover, shRNA-mediated NRP1 inhibition also significantly enhanced the radio-sensitivity of NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. The over-expression of NRP1 was correlated with growth, survival and radio-resistance of NSCLC cells via the VEGF-PI3K- NF-κB pathway, and NRP1 may be a molecular therapeutic target for gene therapy or radio-sensitization of NSCLC. PMID:26147006

  2. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  3. Prognostic significance of survivin expression in renal cell cancer and its correlation with radioresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Geng, Zhang; Guo-Jun, Wu; He, Wang; Jian-Lin, Yuan

    2010-11-01

    Survivin, an important inhibitor of apoptosis, has been found to play an important role in the initiation, progression, and chemoradioresistance of human malignancies. Previously, we have reported that upregulation of survivin in oral squamous cell carcinoma correlates with poor prognosis and chemoresistance. The aim of this study was to assess prognostic significance of survivin protein expression in RCC and analyze its correlation with radiosensitivity of RCC cells. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were performed to detect survivin mRNA and protein expression in normal human kidney epithelial cell line (HKEC) or RCC cell lines. The expression of survivin mRNA in RCC and corresponding nontumor kidney tissues was also detected by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine survivin protein expression in 75 cases of RCC tissue samples. Moreover, the association of survivin protein expression with clinicopathogical factors and prognosis of RCC patients was statistically analyzed. Small interfering RNA was used to knockdown the endogenous survivin expression in RCC cell line (ACHN) and evaluate the effects of survivin knockdown on proliferation, apoptosis, and radiosensitivity of RCC cell line. RCC cells showed sufficient expression of survivin mRNA and protein, but the expression of survivin gene was not detected in normal HKEC. Moreover, the expression level of survivin mRNA in RCC tissues was significantly higher than that in corresponding nontumor kidney tissues. The immunostaining of survivin protein was mainly located in cytoplasm of RCC tumor cells. Tumor pathological stage (P = 0.028), grade (P = 0.004), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.017) of RCC patients were significantly correlated with survivin protein expression. In addition, patients with high survivin levels had a significantly shorter overall survival than those with low levels (P < 0.001), and the expression of survivin protein was an independent prognostic factor for RCC patients (P = 0

  4. 肺癌A549放射抗拒细胞亚系的建立及抗拒机制的研究%Establishment of a radioresistant human lung cancer cell subline and its mechanism of radioresistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟; 王琼; 刘莉; 石星; 丁乾; 伍钢

    2008-01-01

    Objective To establish a radioresistant cell subline from a human A549 lung cancer cell line and investigate the mechanism of radioresistance. Methods Two proposals were applied for the non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells irradiated with X-rays:A group of A549 cell line was irradiated five times, the fractionated dose was 600 cGy, and the other group was exposed 15 times, the fractionated dose was 200 cGy. After the completion of irradiation, two monoclones were obtained from the survival of cells and named the subline A549-S1 and A549-S2. The radiosensitivity and cell cycle distribution of these two clones,together with its parental A549 cells were measured by clone formation assay and flow cytometry.The mRNA and protein levels of Notch1 in A549 cell line and the sublines were determined by RT-PCR and Western-blots. Results Compared with the parental A549 cells, A549-S1 cells showed significant resistance to radiation with D0, Dq and N values increased, and a broader initial shoulder as well as 1.38-fold increased value of SF2. The A549-S1 subline also showed higher percentage of cells in S phase and G2/M phase, but lower percentages in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05). The expression of Notch1 in A549-S1 was enhanced obviously than in A549 cells. But for A549-S2 the radioseasitivity was slightly increased compared with the parental cells with D0, Dq and N values decreased and a curve initial shoulder. The ratio of cells in S and G0/G1 phase ratio was lower than that in parental A549 cells, but that in G2/M phase ratio was higher significantly (P<0.05) .The expression of Notch1 had no marked change compared to A549 cell. Conclusions The radioresistance of the A549 cell subline is correlated with the irradiation program. The cell subline shows a different cell cycle distribution from their parental line. The cell cycle distribution has a close correlation with the expression of Notch1.%目的 建立肺癌细胞系A549的放射抗拒模型并探

  5. Radioresistance-related signaling pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the difference of gene expression profile between the radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and CNE-2, and to screen the signaling pathway associated with radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: The radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R was constructed from the original cell line CNE-2. CNE-2R and CNE-2 cells were cultured and administered with 60Co γ-ray irradiation at the dose of 400 cGy for 15 times. Human-6v 3.0 whole genome expression profile was used to screen the differentially expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify the pathways related to radioresistance. Results: The number of the differentially expressed genes that were found in these 2 experiments was 374. The Kegg pathway and Biocarta pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes showed the biological importance of Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and IL-1 R-mediated signal transduction pathway to the radioresistance of the CNE-2R cells and the significant differences of 13 genes in these 2 pathways,including JUN, MYD88, CCL5, CXCL10, STAT1, LY96, FOS, CCL3, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IRAK2 (t=13.47-66.57, P<0.05). Conclusions: Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and IL-1R-mediated signal transduction pathway might be related to the occurrence of radioresistance. (authors)

  6. Smad2/3-Regulated Expression of DLX2 Is Associated with Radiation-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Radioresistance of A549 and MDA-MB-231 Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo-Jin Choi

    Full Text Available The control of radioresistance and metastatic potential of surviving cancer cells is important for improving cancer eradication by radiotheraphy. The distal-less homeobox2 (DLX2 gene encodes for a homeobox transcription factor involved in morphogenesis and its deregulation was found in human solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Here we investigated the role of DLX2 in association with radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and stem cell-like properties and its regulation by Smad2/3 signaling in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 human cancer cell lines. In irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells, EMT was induced as demonstrated by EMT marker expression, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and migratory and invasive ability. Also, irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells showed increased cancer stem cells (CSCs marker. Interestingly, DLX2 was overexpressed upon irradiation. Therefore, we examined the role of DLX2 in radiation-induced EMT and radioresistance. The overexpression of DLX2 alone induced EMT, migration and invasion, and CSC marker expression. The reduced colony-forming ability in irradiated cells was partially restored by DLX2 overexpression. On the other hand, the depletion of DLX2 using si-RNA abolished radiation-induced EMT, CSC marker expression, and phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Also, depletion of DLX2 increased the radiation sensitivity in both cell lines. Moreover, knockdown of Smad2/3, a key activator of TGF-β1 pathway, abrogated the radiation-induced DLX2 expression, indicating that radiation-induced DLX2 expression is dependent on Smad2/3 signaling. These results demonstrated that DLX2 plays a crucial role in radioresistance, radiation-induced EMT and CSC marker expression, and the expression of DLX2 is regulated by Smad2/3 signaling in A549 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines.

  7. Smad2/3-Regulated Expression of DLX2 Is Associated with Radiation-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Radioresistance of A549 and MDA-MB-231 Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeo-Jin; Baek, Ga-Young; Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee

    2016-01-01

    The control of radioresistance and metastatic potential of surviving cancer cells is important for improving cancer eradication by radiotheraphy. The distal-less homeobox2 (DLX2) gene encodes for a homeobox transcription factor involved in morphogenesis and its deregulation was found in human solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Here we investigated the role of DLX2 in association with radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell-like properties and its regulation by Smad2/3 signaling in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 human cancer cell lines. In irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells, EMT was induced as demonstrated by EMT marker expression, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and migratory and invasive ability. Also, irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells showed increased cancer stem cells (CSCs) marker. Interestingly, DLX2 was overexpressed upon irradiation. Therefore, we examined the role of DLX2 in radiation-induced EMT and radioresistance. The overexpression of DLX2 alone induced EMT, migration and invasion, and CSC marker expression. The reduced colony-forming ability in irradiated cells was partially restored by DLX2 overexpression. On the other hand, the depletion of DLX2 using si-RNA abolished radiation-induced EMT, CSC marker expression, and phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in irradiated A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Also, depletion of DLX2 increased the radiation sensitivity in both cell lines. Moreover, knockdown of Smad2/3, a key activator of TGF-β1 pathway, abrogated the radiation-induced DLX2 expression, indicating that radiation-induced DLX2 expression is dependent on Smad2/3 signaling. These results demonstrated that DLX2 plays a crucial role in radioresistance, radiation-induced EMT and CSC marker expression, and the expression of DLX2 is regulated by Smad2/3 signaling in A549 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:26799321

  8. Fractionated irradiation-induced EMT-like phenotype conferred radioresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongfang; Luo, Honglei; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Yue, Jing; Hou, Qiang; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy, one major treatment modality for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is severely attenuated by radioresistance. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process that determines therapy response and tumor progression. However, whether EMT is induced by ionizing radiation and involved in tumor radioresistance has been less studied in ESCC. Using multiple fractionated irradiation, the radioresistant esophageal squamous cancer cell line KYSE-150R had been established from its parental cell line KYSE-150. We found KYSE-150R displayed a significant EMT phenotype with an elongated spindle shape and down-regulated epithelial marker E-cadherin and up-regulated mesenchymal marker N-cadherin in comparison with KYSE-150. Furthermore, KYSE-150R also possessed some stemness-like properties characterized by density-dependent growth promotion and strong capability for sphere formation and tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. Mechanical studies have revealed that WISP1, a secreted matricellular protein, is highly expressed in KYSE-150R and mediates EMT-associated radioresistance both in ESCC cells and in xenograft tumor models. Moreover, WISP1 has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the EMT phenotype observed in ESCC patients and to be an independent prognosis factor of ESCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Our study highlighted WISP1 as an attractive target to reverse EMT-associated radioresistance in ESCC and can be used as an independent prognostic factor of patients treated with radiotherapy. PMID:27125498

  9. Cell lysis and superoxide dismutase activities of highly radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highly radioresistant bacterium, Arthrobacter radiotolerans, has been isolated from the radioactive hot spring of Misasa, and it does not sporulate, it is Gram-positive, and its color is pink to red. This bacterium shows the highest resistance to gamma-ray among Gram-positive resistants, but the lytic enzyme capable of lysing the cells of strong radioresistants and the surface structure of the cells are little known except those about Micrococcus radiodurans. The cells of the M. radiodurans can be lysed by Achramobacter lyticus enzyme, and electron microscopic observation and chemical analysis revealed the mutilayered surface structure of the cells consisting of an inner membrane, a mucopeptide wall layer and a very outer layer. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was studied, and the relatively high SOD activity of the M. radiodurans was found. The SOD function acts against the threat posed by the reactive superoxide radical being generated biologically, photochemically and radiochemically in the presence of molecular oxygen. In this paper, it is reported that the lytic enzyme No.2 obtained from Cytophaga sp., containing N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, peptidase and endopeptidase, and showing broad lytic spectra, was able to lyse the cells of A. radiotolerans and four radioresistant micrococci, and the radioresistant bacteria showed relatively high SOD activity except M. sp. 248. It is well known that superoxide anions are generated by aerobic irradiation, and are toxic to microbial cells. (Kako, I.)

  10. Berberine Inhibited Radioresistant Effects and Enhanced Anti-Tumor Effects in the Irradiated-Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, Jung-Mu; Kim, Dongho

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying enhanced radiosensitivity to 60Co γ-irradiation in human prostate PC-3 cells pretreated with berberine. The cytotoxic effect of the combination of berberine and irradiation was superior to that of berberine or irradiation alone. Cell death and Apoptosis increased significantly with the combination of berberine and irradiation. Additionally, ROS generation was elevated by berberine with or without irradiation. The antioxidant ...

  11. Chemosensitivity of radioresistant cells in the multicellular spheroids of A549 lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Gang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relapse of cancer after radiotherapy is a clinical knotty problem. Previous studies have demonstrated that the elevation of several factors is likely in some way to lead to the development of treatment tolerance, so it is necessary to further explore the problem of re-proliferated radioresistant cells to chemotherapeutic agents. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the chemosensitivity of radioresistant cells originated from the multicellular spheroids of A549 lung adenocarcinoma. Methods After irradiated with 25 Gy of 6 MV X-ray to A549 multicellular spheroids, whose 10th re-proliferated generations were employed as radioresistant cells, and the control groups were A549 parental cells and MCF7/VCR resistant cells. The chemo-sensitivity test was made by six kinds of chemotherapeutic drugs which were DDP, VDS, 5-Fu, HCP, MMC and ADM respectively, while verapamil (VPL was used as the reversal agent. Then the treatment effect was evaluated by MTT assay, and the multidrug resistant gene expressions of mdr1 and MRP were measured by RT-PCR. Results Both A549 parental cells and A549 derived radioresistant cells were resistant to DDP, but sensitive to VDS, 5-Fu, HCP, MMC and ADM. The inhibitory rates of VPL to these two types of cell were 98% and 25% respectively (P Mdr1/β2-MG and MRP/β2-MG of all A549 cells were about 0 and 0.7 respectively, and those of MCF7/VCR cells were 35 and 4.36. Conclusion The chemosensitivity of A549 radioresistant cells had not changed markedly, and the decreased sensitivity to VPL could not be explained by the gene expression of mdr1 and MRP. It is possible that the changes in the cell membrane and decreased proliferate ability might be attributed to the resistance. Unlike multidrug resistance induced by chemotherapy, VPL may be not an ideal reverser to radioresistant cells. Therefore, the new biological strategy needs to be developed to treat recurring radioresistant tumor in combination

  12. Development of bio-selective strategies to radio-resistant tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the established treatments for solid tumors. Investigation of tumor radioresistance is important for future tumor radiotherapy. Biological bases on the resistance have not been fully understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that there is a small fraction in solid tumor which is highly resistant to ionizing radiation and the radioresistant tumor cells often expressed some stem cell markers. Resistance of tumors to both radiation and chemotherapeutic agents can be attributed to the features of the cancer stem cells. In the present study, we show that a human glioblastoma cell line A172 transiently becomes to ''stem cell-like appearance'' when cultured with non-serum media supplemented with the growth factors. The treated cells were found significantly resistant to X-rays compared with the cells cultured in normal media. Phosphorylation of histon H2Ax was induced in both forms, however, stem cell-like cells contained subpopulation which is more registant to IR than the parental A172 cells. Our result is consistent with the hypothesis that cancer stemness contribute to the radioresistance probably by their efficient repair activity on DNA double-strand breaks. (author)

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis on radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discover radioresistance-associated proteins by performing comparative proteomic analysis on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Methods: The total proteins were extracted from radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and its parental cell line CNE-2, respectively. These proteins were separated by high quality two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and then the 2-DE profiles were screened for differentially expressed protein spots by the Image Master 5.0 software. Those spots were identified by a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Results: 32 significantly differentially expressed protein spots were screened in two different radiosensitivity cell lines and 11 proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry, among which 3 proteins were up-regulated in radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and the other 8 proteins were down-regulated. Conclusions: The differentially expressed proteins of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells with different radiosensitivity were mainly involved in apoptosis regulation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle regulation, RNA transcription, cell signaling, cytoskeleton formation and radiation stress responses. (authors)

  14. Transient elevation of glycolysis confers radio-resistance by facilitating DNA repair in cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Rai, Yogesh; Singh, Saurabh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Bilikere S Dwarakanath

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis for ATP production (the Warburg effect) and macromolecular biosynthesis; it is also linked with therapeutic resistance that is generally associated with compromised respiratory metabolism. Molecular mechanisms underlying radio-resistance linked to elevated glycolysis remain incompletely understood. Methods We stimulated glycolysis using mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs viz. di-nitro phenol, DNP; Photosan-3, PS3; Methylene blue, MB)...

  15. Role of glutathione in natural and modified radioresistance of yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the dependence of different natural and modified radioresistance upon glutathione content of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia guillierondii). It was shown that glutathione was only involved in the formation of natural radioresistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. It was also shown that the increase in the radioresistance of yeast cells under the effect of 2-amino-2-thiasoline was accompanied by the increase in the level of total glutathione in them

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) confers radioresistance through the DNA repair gene, O6-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase, in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shaohua Chen; Yu Zhang; Daohai Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to radiotherapy is a major clinical problem in cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance to radiotherapy and identification of novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for cancer patients. Our previous studies have demonstrated a significant role of ERp29 in breast cancer cell survival against doxorubicin-induced genotoxic stress. We here reported that ERp29 expression in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 ...

  17. Increased SHP-1 expression results in radioresistance, inhibition of cellular senescence, and cell cycle redistribution in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioresistance is the main limit to the efficacy of radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). SHP-1 is involved in cancer progression, but its role in radioresistance and senescence of NPC is not well understood. This study aimed to assess the role of SHP-1 in the radioresistance and senescence of NPC cells. SHP-1 was knocked-down and overexpressed in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells using lentiviruses. Cells were irradiated to observe their radiosensitivity by colony forming assay. BrdU incorporation assay and flow cytometry were used to monitor cell cycle. A β-galactosidase assay was used to assess senescence. Western blot was used to assess SHP-1, p21, p53, pRb, Rb, H3K9Me3, HP1γ, CDK4, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and p16 protein expressions. Compared with CNE-1-scramble shRNA cells, SHP-1 downregulation resulted in increased senescence (+107 %, P < 0.001), increased radiosensitivity, higher proportion of cells in G0/G1 (+33 %, P < 0.001), decreased expressions of CDK4 (−44 %, P < 0.001), cyclin D1 (−41 %, P = 0.001), cyclin E (−97 %, P < 0.001), Rb (−79 %, P < 0.001), and pRb (−76 %, P = 0.001), and increased expression of p16 (+120 %, P = 0.02). Furthermore, SHP-1 overexpression resulted in radioresistance, inhibition of cellular senescence, and cell cycle arrest in the S phase. Levels of p53 and p21 were unchanged in both cell lines (all P > 0.05). SHP-1 has a critical role in radioresistance, cell cycle progression, and senescence of NPC cells. Down-regulating SHP-1 may be a promising therapeutic approach for treating patients with NPC

  18. Enhanced radiation response in radioresistant MCF-7 cells by targeting peroxiredoxin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz AJG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Daniel Tamae,2 Yun Yen,3 JianJian Li,4 Tieli Wang1 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University at Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 2Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: In our previous study, we identified that a protein target, peroxiredoxin II (PrxII, is overexpressed in radioresistant MCF+FIR3 breast-cancer cells and found that its expression and function is associated with breast-cancer radiation sensitivity or resistance. Small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PrxII gene expression was able to sensitize MCF+FIR3 radioresistant breast-cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The major focus of this work was to investigate how the radiation response of MCF+FIR3 radioresistant cells was affected by the siRNA that inhibits PrxII gene expression. Our results, presented here, show that silencing PrxII gene expression increased cellular toxicity by altering cellular thiol status, inhibiting Ca2+ efflux from the cells, and perturbing the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. By combining radiotherapy and siRNA technology, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies that may have potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents due to this technology's property of targeting to specific cancer-related genes. Keywords: siRNA, PrxII, radiation resistance, Ca2+, MCF+FIR3

  19. Transient elevation of glycolysis confers radio-resistance by facilitating DNA repair in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis for ATP production (the Warburg effect) and macromolecular biosynthesis; it is also linked with therapeutic resistance that is generally associated with compromised respiratory metabolism. Molecular mechanisms underlying radio-resistance linked to elevated glycolysis remain incompletely understood. We stimulated glycolysis using mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs viz. di-nitro phenol, DNP; Photosan-3, PS3; Methylene blue, MB) in established human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1). Glucose utilization and lactate production, levels of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes were investigated as indices of glycolysis. Clonogenic survival, DNA repair and cytogenetic damage were studied as parameters of radiation response. MRMs induced the glycolysis by enhancing the levels of two important regulators of glucose metabolism GLUT-1 and HK-II and resulted in 2 fold increase in glucose consumption and lactate production. This increase in glycolysis resulted in resistance against radiation-induced cell death (clonogenic survival) in different cell lines at an absorbed dose of 5 Gy. Inhibition of glucose uptake and glycolysis (using fasentin, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate) in DNP treated cells failed to increase the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells, suggesting that radio-resistance linked to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is glycolysis dependent. Elevated glycolysis also facilitated rejoining of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to a reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. These findings suggest that enhanced glycolysis generally observed in cancer cells may be responsible for the radio-resistance, partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage

  20. [Radioresistance parameters in head and neck cancers and methods to radiosensitize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biau, J; Chautard, E; Miroir, J; Lapeyre, M

    2015-08-01

    Head and neck cancers have been widely studied concerning their sensitivity to radiation therapy. Several parameters affect tumour response to radiation therapy. Some parameters are linked to the tumour. Large or invasive tumours, localization, such as oral cavity or adenopathy, are factors of radioresistance. Others parameters are linked to the patients themselves. Tobacco intoxication during radiotherapy and a low hemoglobin level contribute to radioresistance. More recently, a positive human papilloma virus (HPV) status has been reported to positively affect radiosensitivity. Finally, other parameters are related to tumour biology. Hypoxia, intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumour cells, tumour differentiation and repopulation (provided by Ki-67 index or EGFR level) are components of radiosensitivity. Currently, concurrent chemoradiotherapy is one of the gold standard treatments to overcome clinical outcome of locally advanced head and neck cancer. This combination increases locoregional control and survival. Taxane-based induction chemotherapy can also be an alternative. Another validated approach is the association of radiotherapy with cetuximab (EGFR targeting) but only one randomized study has been published. Fractionation modifications, especially hyperfractionation, have given positive results on both tumour control and survival. Strategies targeting hypoxia improve locoregional control but have less clinical impact. PMID:26119219

  1. Bcl-w, a Radio-resistant Protein, Promotes the Gastric Cancer Cell Migration by inducing the phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading malignancies in many countries and lethal for the high incidence of recurrence even after drastic surgical resection. Because local invasion and subsequent metastasis contributes to the failure of anticancer treatments of gastric cancer, a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in tumor invasiveness within the stomach seems to be essential for the control of this disease. Bcl-w is a prosurvival member of the Bcl-2 protein family, and thus protects cells from γ-irradiation. Recent reports suggest that Bcl-w can be upregulated in gastric cancer cells in a manner associated with the infiltrative (diffuse) types of the tumor. An analysis of Bcl-w function consistently revealed that Bcl-w can also promote the migratory and invasive potentials of gastric cancer cells. While it was shown that Bcl-w increases the invasiveness of cancer cells by sequentially inducing PI3K, Akt, SP1, and MMP-2, cellular components involved in Bcl-w-induced cell migration remain to be determined. This was the reason why we undertook the present study, which shows that FAK is a critical mediator of the cell migration induced by Bcl-w

  2. Association of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1L isoform expression with radioresistance of oral squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral cancer is a common cancer and a major health problem in the Indian subcontinent. At our laboratory Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family has been demonstrated to be overexpressed in oral cancers and to predict outcome in oral cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. To study the role of Mcl-1 isoforms in radiation response of oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC), we investigated in the present study, the association of Mcl-1 isoform expression with radiosensitivity of OSCC, using siRNA strategy. The time course expression of Mcl-1 splice variants (Mcl-1L, Mcl-1S & Mcl-1ES) was studied by RT-PCR, western blotting & immunofluorescence, post-irradiation in oral cell lines [immortalized FBM (radiosensitive) and tongue cancer AW8507 & AW13516 (radioresistant)]of relatively differing radiosensitivities. The effect of Mcl-1L knockdown alone or in combination with ionizing radiation (IR) on cell proliferation, apoptosis & clonogenic survival, was investigated in AW8507 & AW13516 cells. Further the expression of Mcl-1L protein was assessed in radioresistant sublines generated by fractionated ionizing radiation (FIR). Three to six fold higher expression of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1L versus pro-apoptotic Mcl-1S was observed at mRNA & protein levels in all cell lines, post-irradiation. Sustained high levels of Mcl-1L, downregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax & Bak and a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in apoptosis was observed in the more radioresistant AW8507, AW13516 versus FBM cells, post-IR. The ratios of anti to pro-apoptotic proteins were high in AW8507 as compared to FBM. Treatment with Mcl-1L siRNA alone or in combination with IR significantly (P < 0.01) increased apoptosis viz. 17.3% (IR), 25.3% (siRNA) and 46.3% (IR plus siRNA) and upregulated pro-apoptotic Bax levels in AW8507 cells. Combination of siRNA & IR treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced cell proliferation and clonogenic survival of radioresistant AW8507 & AW13516 cells

  3. AKT-mediated enhanced aerobic glycolysis causes acquired radioresistance by human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Cellular radioresistance is a major impediment to effective radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to fractionated radiation conferred acquired radioresistance to tumor cells due to AKT-mediated enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Material and methods: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were established by long-term exposure to fractionated radiation with 0.5 Gy of X-rays. Glucose uptake was inhibited using 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a non-metabolizable glucose analog. Aerobic glycolysis was assessed by measuring lactate concentrations. Cells were then used for assays of ROS generation, survival, and cell death as assessed by annexin V staining. Results: Enhanced aerobic glycolysis was shown by increased glucose transporter Glut1 expression and a high lactate production rate in acquired radioresistant cells compared with parental cells. Inhibiting the AKT pathway using the AKT inhibitor API-2 abrogated these phenomena. Moreover, we found that inhibiting glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose suppressed acquired tumor cell radioresistance. Conclusions: Long-term fractionated radiation confers acquired radioresistance to tumor cells by AKT-mediated alterations in their glucose metabolic pathway. Thus, tumor cell metabolic pathway is an attractive target to eliminate radioresistant cells and improve radiotherapy efficacy

  4. Stable radioresistance in ataxia-telangiectasia cells containing DNA from normal human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SV40-transformed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells were transfected with a cosmid containing a normal human DNA library and selectable marker, the neo gene, which endows successfully transformed mammalian cells with resistance to the antibiotic G418. Cells from this line were irradiated with 50 Gy of X-rays and fused with non-transfected AT cells. Among the G418-resistant colonies recovered was one stably resistant to radiation. Resistance to ionizing radiation of both primary transfectant line and its fusion derivative was intermediate between that of AT cells and normal cells, as assayed by colony-forming ability and measurement of radiation-induced G2 chromatic aberrations; both cell lines retained AT-like radioresistant DNA synthesis. Results suggest that, because radioresistance in transfected cells was not as great as in normal human cells, two hallmarks of AT, radiosensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis, may still be the result of a single defective AT gene. (author)

  5. Proteomics of the Radioresistant Phenotype in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Gp96 as a Novel Prediction Marker and Sensitizing Target for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is an integral part of the treatment modality for head-neck cancer (HNC), but in some cases the disease is radioresistant. We designed this study to identify molecules that may be involved in this resistance. Methods and Materials: Two radioresistant sublines were established by fractionated irradiation of the HNC cell lines, to determine differentially proteins between parental and radioresistant cells. Proteomic analysis and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were used to identify and confirm the differential proteins. The siRNA knockdown experiments were applied to examine cellular functions of a radioresistant gene, with investigation of the alterations in colonogenic survival, cell cycle status, and reactive oxygen species levels. Xenografted mouse tumors were studied to validate the results. Results: IN all, 64 proteins were identified as being potentially associated with radioresistance, which are involved in several cellular pathways, including regulation of stimulus response, cell apoptosis, and glycolysis. Six genes were confirmed to be differentially expressed in both radioresistant sublines, with Gp96, Grp78, HSP60, Rab40B, and GDF-15 upregulated, and annexin V downregulated. Gp96 was further investigated for its functions in response to radiation. Gp96-siRNA transfectants displayed a radiation-induced growth delay, reduction in colonogenic survival, increased cellular reactive oxygen species levels, and increased proportion of the cells in the G2/M phase. Xenograft mice administered Gp96-siRNA showed significantly enhanced growth suppression in comparison with radiation treatment alone (p = 0.009). Conclusions: We identified 64 proteins and verified 6 genes that are potentially involved in the radioresistant phenotype. We further demonstrated that Gp96 knockdown enhances radiosensitivity both in cells and in vivo, which may lead to a better prognosis of HNC treatment.

  6. MiR-95 induces proliferation and chemo- or radioresistance through directly targeting sorting nexin1 (SNX1) in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Chen, Shaomu; Hang, Weijie; Huang, Haitao; Ma, Haitao

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as a class of small regulatory RNAs whose specific roles and significant functions in the majority of carcinomas have yet to be entirely illustrated. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of miR-95 and determine whether miR-95 could be a potential therapeutic target for human non-small cell lung cancer. First of all, our study showed that miR-95 was highly expressed in both NSCLC cell lines (compared with normal cells) and tumor tissues (compared with corresponding normal tissues), whereas the protein level of SNX1 was downregulated in NSCLC cell lines. Next, we found that ectopic overexpression of miR-95 in A549 or H226 contributed to tumor growth in xenograft mouse models. In addition, the results also indicated that upregulation of miR-95 could significantly enhance the susceptibilities of NSCLC cells to chemo- or radiotherapy. Furthermore, using the luciferase reporter, we demonstrated that SNX1 is a direct target of miR-95. Meanwhile, overexpression of SNX1 could abrogate the growth of NSCLC cells induced by miR-95. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-95 functions as an oncogene role in NSCLC cells by directly targeting SNX1. PMID:24835695

  7. Increase of corneal epithelium cell radioresistance during regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study of the radiosensitivity of the normal and regenerating cornea epithelium of C57Bl mice was performed on the cellular level, the duration of the cell cycle being taken into account. Criteria of radiation injuries were the number of chromosome aberrations, mitotic index and duration of mitotic block. The anterior part of the head was irradiated singly with 1.75, 3.5 or 7.0 Gy and also repeatedly 3.5 + 3.5 at a 24-hours interval. The corneas were fixed 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after irradiation. In all cases of irradiated mice the regenerating epithelium showed a shorter mitotic block and significantly lower cytogenetic injury as compared with the controls. Effects of fractionated irradiation were only shown in the regenerating epithelium. The results obtained indicate that regenerating epithelium cells of the cornea are significantly more radioresistant than normal epithelium due to activation of post-radiation recovery, and also, possibly, due to an increase in the content of endogenous radioprotectors. (author)

  8. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl2 confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype

  9. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Nobutaka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ogawa, Ryohei, E-mail: ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Cui, Zheng-Guo [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko [New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  10. Ataxia-telangiectasia cell extracts confer radioresistant DNA synthesis on control cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated in greater detail the radioresistant DNA synthesis universally observed in cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). The approach employed in this study was to permeabilize cells with lysolecithin after gamma-irradiation and thus facilitate the introduction of cell extract into these cells. This permeabilization can be reversed by diluting the cells in growth medium. Cells treated in this way show the characteristic inhibition (control cells) or lack of it (A-T cells) after exposure to ionizing radiation. Introduction of A-T cells extracts into control cells prevented the radiation-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis normally observed in these cells. A-T cell extracts did not change the level of radioresistant DNA synthesis in A-T cells. Control cell extracts on the other hand did not influence the pattern of inhibition of DNA synthesis in either cell type. It seems likely that the agent involved is a protein because of its heat lability and sensitivity to trypsin digestion. It has a molecular weight (MW) in the range 20-30 000 D. The development of this assay system for a factor conferring radioresistant DNA synthesis on control cells provides a means of purifying this factor, and ultimately an approach to identifying the gene responsible

  11. Targeting of tumor endothelial cells combining 2 Gy/day of X-ray with Everolimus is the effective modality for overcoming clinically relevant radioresistant tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; MORI, Miyuki; Kitahara, Shuji; Fukumoto, Motoi; Ezaki, Taichi; Mori, Shiro; Echigo, Seishi; Ohkubo, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used to treat cancer because it has the advantage of physically and functionally conserving the affected organ. To improve radiotherapy and investigate the molecular mechanisms of cellular radioresistance, we established a clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cell line, SAS-R, from SAS cells. SAS-R cells continue to proliferate when exposed to fractionated radiation (FR) of 2 Gy/day for more than 30 days in vitro. A xenograft tumor model of SAS-R was also resistant ...

  12. Effect of heavy ion beams on intratumoral radioresistant tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the radiobiological effect of heavy ion beams on radioresistant and radiosensitive human tumor cells. Tumors of human origin, an ependymoblastoma (EB) with wild-type (wt) p53, a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) with wt p53, and a glioblastoma (GB) with mutant-type (mt) p53, were transplanted to nude mice, and the mice were irradiated with carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u) or 200 kV X-rays. Tumors were excised 4, 6, or 24 hours after 2 Gy irradiation. A part of each tumor was fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Thin sections were stained with H.E., GFAP or TUNEL for microscopic study. Total RNA was extracted for cDNA microarray analysis. In wt-p53 tumors, apoptosis increased 4 or 6 hours after irradiation. The tumors with wt-p53 showed significant changes in gene expression following 2 Gy irradiation. Pathway analysis of up- and down-regulated genes demonstrated that apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, and cell cycle are involved significantly. There was little difference between the gene expression profiles induced by carbon ion beams and those by X-rays. In contrast, the tumor with mt-p53 showed much less change in gene expression after 2 Gy irradiation. But, the tumor showed significant changes 4, 6, or 24 hours after 8 Gy or 16 Gy irradiation, and the gene expression profiles induced by carbon ion beams were different from those by X-rays. p53, caspases, Fas, and TRAIL were not involved in the pathways, but NF-kB and IAP were suggested to be involved. (author)

  13. Mechanisms of radio-resistance and its modification by chemicals. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several membrane specific drugs have been tested for their radiosensitizing effects under hypoxia/anoxia using E.Coli cells. Among these chlorpromazine (CPZ) proved most effective. Investigations on its mechanism of action revealed partial involvement of radiolytic transients and its inhibitory effect on DNA repair and synthesis. A ''coctail'' consisting of CPZ and other drugs like procaine lignocaine, or telsacaine sensitized hypoxic bacteria beyond ''oxygen effect''. CPZ also showed preferential cytotoxicity to anoxic/hypoxic bacteria. Prolonged treatment of cells with CPZ under hypoxia at elevated temperatures (up to 390C) proved more lethal and the surviving cells showed extreme radiosensitivity (DMF=0.11). These results therefore wave situ extension of investigations to tumours. Two animal tumours viz a fibrosarcoma and sarcoma 180 were grown on Swiss mice. CPZ enhanced the radiation induced regression of these solid tumours. CPZ on its own showed chemotherapeutic effect and controlled the growth of these tumours. The chemotherapeutic effect was further enhanced at hyperthermic temperatures (41 and 420C). Pharmokinetic investigations on distribution and retention of CPZ in plasma, tumours and other organs have been completed using S-35 labelled CPZ. Clinical trials with human patients are being initiated. Attempts are also being made to target such drugs to tumour sites by encapsulating them in artificial liposomes and blood cells

  14. Pretreatment P53 immunoreactivity does not infer radioresistance in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test, in a clinical context, the hypothesis that p53 aberrations, assessed by immunoreactivity, are related to radioresistance as suggested by several experimental studies. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with prostate cancer who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate or biopsy prior to definitive external beam therapy were retrospectively identified. The endpoint in the study was cancer specific survival. The nuclear accumulation of the aberrant p53 protein was evaluated by immunohistochemistry with the pantropic, monoclonal Ab-6 anti-p53 antibody (clone DO-1) on pretreatment biopsies. Immunoreactivity was related to stage, grade, and cancer-specific survival. Results: There was a correlation between p53 immunoreactivity and low tumor stage (p < 0.001), but no relation between p53 status and grade was found. Moreover, no significant difference was found in cancer-specific survival between the p53 positive tumors (109 months) and the p53 negative tumors (99 months). Conclusions: No disadvantage regarding survival was seen for patients with p53 immunoreactive tumors, implicating that p53 immunoreactivity does not infer radioresistance in prostate cancer. This suggests that the p53 inactivation may be a less important determinant of tumor response to radiotherapy in some human cancers than in the previously studied experimental situations. Thus, other mechanisms may be more important in determining outcome after radiation. However, the series is small and data should be interpreted with caution

  15. Dysregulation of IRP1-mediated iron metabolism causes gamma ray-specific radioresistance in leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtis J Haro

    Full Text Available Iron is required for nearly all organisms, playing important roles in oxygen transport and many enzymatic reactions. Excess iron, however, can be cytotoxic. Emerging evidence suggests that radioresistance can be achieved in lower organisms by the protection of proteins, but not DNA, immediately following ionizing radiation (IR exposure, allowing for improved DNA repair. One potential mechanism for protein protection is controlling and limiting the amount of free iron in cells, as has been demonstrated in the extremophile Deinococcus Radiodurans, reducing the potential for oxidative damage to proteins during exposure to IR. We found that iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1 expression was markedly reduced in human myeloid leukemia HL60 cells resistant to low linear energy transfer (LET gamma rays, but not to high LET alpha particles. Stable knockdown of IRP1 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA interference in radiosensitive parental cells led to radioresistance to low LET IR, reduced intracellular Fenton chemistry, reduced protein oxidation, and more rapid DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. The mechanism of radioresistance appeared to be related to attenuated free radical-mediated cell death. Control of intracellular iron by IRPs may be a novel radioresistance mechanism in mammalian cells.

  16. Radioresistance of cells responsible for delayed hypersensitivity reactions in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cells responsible for delayed hypersensitivity reactivity in the mouse act in a radioresistant fashion only if such irradiated cells are injected directly into the site of antigen challenge. Intravenous transfer of irradiated, primed spleen cells does not achieve a transfer of sensitivity to show delayed type hypersensitivity reactions. Transfer of sensitivity by the intravenous route can be effected by injection of non-irradiated spleen cells from primed mice. (U.S.)

  17. 9-β-arabinofuranosyladenine preferentially sensitizes radioresistant squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of 9-β-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) on sensitivity to the deleterious effects of x-rays was studied in six squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Three lines were relatively radioresistant, having D0 values of 2.31 to 2.89 Gy, and the other three lines were relatively radiosensitive, having D0 values of between 1.07 and 1.45 Gy. Ara-A (50 or 500 μM) was added to cultures 30 min prior to irradiation and removed 30 min after irradiation, and sensitivity was measured in terms of cell survival. The radiosensitizing effect of ara-A was very dependent on the inherent radiosensitivity of the tumor cell line. Fifty micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized only the two most radioresistant lines, SCC-12B.2 and JSQ-3. Five hundred micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized the more sensitive cell lines, SQ-20B and SQ-9G, but failed to have any effect on the radiation response of the two most sensitive cell lines, SQ-38 and SCC-61. Concentrations of ara-A as low as 10 μM were equally efficient in inhibiting DNA synthesis in all six cell lines. These results suggest that the target for the radiosensitizing effect of ara-A is probably related to the factor controlling the inherent radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. Therefore, ara-A might be useful in overcoming radiation resistance in vivo

  18. MET inhibitor PHA-665752 suppresses the hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tongxin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Qi [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Gastroenterology, Department of Gastroenterology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Sun, Quanquan; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Hua; Wang, Rong; Chen, Longhua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wang, Wei, E-mail: wangwei9500@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation. • The aberrant MET signal mediated by HGF induced proliferation and radioresistance of NPC cells. • MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. • PHA-665752 suppressed the three downstream pathway of HGF/MET signal in a dose-dependent manner. - Abstract: Although ionizing radiation (IR) has provided considerable improvements in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), in subsets of patients, radioresistance is still a major problem in the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation, and the aberrant MET signal mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced radioresistance. We also found that MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. Further investigation indicated that PHA-665752 suppressed the phosphorylation of the Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Our data indicated that the combination of IR with a MET inhibitor, such as PHA-665752, might be a promising therapeutic strategy for NPC.

  19. Radioresistant cell strain of human fibrosarcoma cells obtained after long-term exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioresistant cell strain from human fibrosarcoma HT1080 has been obtained after prolonged exposure to x-rays for 7 months (2 Gy per day, 5 days per week). This new strain, HT1080R, differs from HT1080 in a significantly increased ability of clonogenical survival, with coefficient α decreasing from 0.161 to 0.123 Gy-1 and coefficient β decreasing from 0.0950 to 0.0565 Gy-2. Furthermore, the radioresistance of HT1080R proved to be stable in long-term passaged cultures as well as in frozen samples. Differences between the two cell lines are also observed in the G-banded karyotype; the new cell line shows monosomy of chromosome 17 and loss of 5p+ and 11q+ present in the parental cells. These data suggest that the radioresistance may have been caused by radiation-induced cell mutation and that the resistant cells may have been selected by repeated irradiations. In order to characterize this new strain, the ability of the cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks, the cell cycle distribution and the amount of apoptosis after irradiation have been estimated; however, no differences are observed between these two cell strains. Although the mechanism of the elevated radioresistance remains unknown, this pair of cell strains can provide a new model system for further investigations with regard to the mechanisms of cellular radioresistance. The results also show that any type of irradiation similar to the schedules used in radiotherapy can lead to the formation and selection of more radioresistant cell clones in vitro, a phenomenon with possible implications for radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. The Brain Microenvironment Preferentially Enhances the Radioresistance of CD133+ Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jamal

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor xenografts initiated from glioblastoma (GBM CD133+ tumor stem-like cells (TSCs are composed of TSC and non-TSC subpopulations, simulating the phenotypic heterogeneity of GBMs in situ. Given that the discrepancies between the radiosensitivity of GBM cells in vitro and the treatment response of patients suggest a role for the microenvironment in GBM radioresistance, we compared the response of TSCs and non-TSCs irradiated under in vitro and orthotopic conditions. As a measure of radioresponse determined at the individual cell level, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci were quantified in CD133+ cells and their differentiated (CD133- progeny. Under in vitro conditions, no difference was detected between CD133+ and CD133- cells in foci induction or dispersal after irradiation. However, irradiation of orthotopic xenografts initiated from TSCs resulted in the induction of fewer γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in CD133+ cells compared to their CD133- counterparts within the same tumor. Xenograft irradiation resulted in a tumor growth delay of approximately 7 days with a corresponding increase in the percentage of CD133+ cells at 7 days after radiation, which persisted to the onset of neurologic symptoms. These results suggest that, although the radioresponse of TSCs and non-TSCs does not differ under in vitro growth conditions, CD133+ cells are relatively radioresistant under intracerebral growth conditions. Whereas these findings are consistent with the suspected role for TSCs as a determinant of GBM radioresistance, these data also illustrate the dependence of the cellular radioresistance on the brain microenvironment.

  1. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: radioresistant IgE antibody-forming cells in infected rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats, anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody production was observed at 20 weeks postinfection, long after the worms, as a source of antigen, had been expelled. The persistent IgE production was not abrogated after whole body irradiation (800 R) administered at 12 or 20 weeks, suggesting the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells. Help of T cells and recruitment of B memory cells in the irradiated rats seems to be ruled out by the findings that the irradiation completely inhibited the initiation of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE production in rats shortly after the infection with N. brasiliensis or after primary and secondary immunization with N. brasiliensis-antigen. Moreover, clearance of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody from circulation did not seem to be crucially affected by the irradiation. The radioresistant cells forming anti-N. brasiliensis IgE were most productive in mesenteric lymph nodes as compared to other lymph nodes. The recognition of antigens fractionated by chromatography on Sephadex G-200 was the same for IgE-forming cells from rats 12 weeks after infection as for those from 3 weeks after infection. Based on these results, one of the mechanisms of persistent elevation of IgE antibody in the host infected with helminth parasites might be explained by the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells

  2. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: radioresistant IgE antibody-forming cells in infected rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, N.; Kobayashi, A.

    1989-02-01

    In Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats, anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody production was observed at 20 weeks postinfection, long after the worms, as a source of antigen, had been expelled. The persistent IgE production was not abrogated after whole body irradiation (800 R) administered at 12 or 20 weeks, suggesting the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells. Help of T cells and recruitment of B memory cells in the irradiated rats seems to be ruled out by the findings that the irradiation completely inhibited the initiation of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE production in rats shortly after the infection with N. brasiliensis or after primary and secondary immunization with N. brasiliensis-antigen. Moreover, clearance of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody from circulation did not seem to be crucially affected by the irradiation. The radioresistant cells forming anti-N. brasiliensis IgE were most productive in mesenteric lymph nodes as compared to other lymph nodes. The recognition of antigens fractionated by chromatography on Sephadex G-200 was the same for IgE-forming cells from rats 12 weeks after infection as for those from 3 weeks after infection. Based on these results, one of the mechanisms of persistent elevation of IgE antibody in the host infected with helminth parasites might be explained by the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells.

  3. Dexamethasone-induced radioresistance occurring independent of human papilloma virus gene expression in cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HPV 18 E6 and E7 gene products with respect to radiosensitivity of two cervical carcinoma cell lines. The two cervical carcinoma lines C4-1 and SW 756 were used in which treatment with dexamethasone allows to modulate expression levels of HPV 18 E6 and E7 genes: Upregulation in C4-1, down-regulation in SW 756. Effects of treatment with dexamethasone on plating efficiency and radiosensitivity were assessed using a clonogenic assay. Treatment with dexamethasone increased plating efficiency of the C4-1 cells, but did not affect plating efficiency of SW 756 cells. Treatment with dexamethasone induced enhanced radioresistance in both cell lines. Thus, in C4-1 cells the observed changes in radioresistance correlate to the enhancement in expression of HPV 18 genes E6/E7, whereas in SW 756, a reduced expression correlates negatively with the enhanced radioresistance. (orig./MG)

  4. Alterations in radioresistance of eucaryotic cells after the transfer of genomic wildtype DNA and metallothionein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented paper describes experiments concerning the alteration of radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after gene transfer. Ionizing radiation (γ- or X-ray) induces DNA single- or double strand breaks, which are religated by an unknown repair system. Repair deficient cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. In the experiments described, cells from a patient with the heritable disease Ataxia telangiectasia were used as well as two X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell lines. After gene transfer of an intact human DNA repair gene or a metallothionein gene the cells should regain radioresistance. (orig.)

  5. Bimodal cell death induced by high radiation doses in the radioresistant sf9 insect cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study was conducted to investigate the mode(s) of cell death induced by high radiation doses in the highly radioresistant Sf9 insect ovarian cell line. Methods: Cells were exposed to γ-radiation doses 200Gy and 500Gy, harvested at various time intervals (6h-72h) following irradiation, and subjected to cell morphology assay, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) and Annexin-V labeling for the detection of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization. Cell morphology was assessed in cells entrapped and fixed in agarose gel directly from the cell suspension, thus preventing the possible loss of fragments/ apoptotic bodies. Surviving fraction of Sf9 cells was 0.01 at 200Gy and 98%) undergoing extensive DNA fragmentation at 500Gy, whereas the frequency of cells with DNA fragmentation was considerably less (∼12%) at 200Gy. Conclusions: While the mode of cell death at 200Gy seems to be different from typical apoptosis, a dose of 500Gy induced bimodal cell death, with typical apoptotic as well as the atypical cell death observed at 200Gy

  6. Targeting of tumor endothelial cells combining 2 Gy/day of X-ray with Everolimus is the effective modality for overcoming clinically relevant radioresistant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is widely used to treat cancer because it has the advantage of physically and functionally conserving the affected organ. To improve radiotherapy and investigate the molecular mechanisms of cellular radioresistance, we established a clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cell line, SAS-R, from SAS cells. SAS-R cells continue to proliferate when exposed to fractionated radiation (FR) of 2 Gy/day for more than 30 days in vitro. A xenograft tumor model of SAS-R was also resistant to 2 Gy/day of X-rays for 30 days. The density of blood vessels in SAS-R tumors was higher than in SAS tumors. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, sensitized microvascular endothelial cells to radiation, but failed to radiosensitize SAS and SAS-R cells in vitro. Everolimus with FR markedly reduced SAS and SAS-R tumor volumes. Additionally, the apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs) increased in SAS-R tumor tissues when both Everolimus and radiation were administered. Both CD34-positive and tomato lectin-positive blood vessel densities in SAS-R tumor tissues decreased remarkably after the Everolimus and radiation treatment. Everolimus-induced apoptosis of vascular ECs in response to radiation was also followed by thrombus formation that leads to tumor necrosis. We conclude that FR combined with Everolimus may be an effective modality to overcome radioresistant tumors via targeting tumor ECs

  7. MicroRNA-17-92 significantly enhances radioresistance in human mantle cell lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microRNA-17-92 (miRNA-17-92) cluster, at chromosome 13q31-q32, also known as oncomir-1, consists of seven miRNAs that are transcribed as a polycistronic unit. Over-expression of miRNA-17-92 has been observed in lymphomas and other solid tumors. Whether miRNA-17-92 expression affects the response of tumor cells to radiotherapy is not addressed so far. In the present study, we studied the effects of miRNA-17-92 on the radiosensitivity of human mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells Z138c. Over-expression of miRNA-17-92 significantly increased survival cell number, cell proliferation and decreased cell death of human MCL cells after different doses of radiation. Immunoblot analysis showed that phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN) and PHLPP2 was down-modulated and pAkt activity was enhanced in MCL cells after over-expressing miRNA-17-92 after irradiation. These findings are the first direct evidence that over-expression of miRNA-17-92 cluster significantly increases the radioresistance of human MCL cells, which offers a novel target molecule for improving the radiotherapy of MCL in clinic

  8. Different Mechanisms of Cell Death in Radiosensitive and Radioresistant P53 Mutated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines Exposed to Carbon Ions and X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We initiated studies on the mechanisms of cell death in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HNSCC) since recent clinical trials have shown that local treatment of HNSCC by carbon hadrontherapy is less efficient than it is in other radioresistant cancers. Methods and Materials: Two p53-mutated HNSCC cell lines displaying opposite radiosensitivity were used. Different types of cell death were determined after exposure to carbon ions (33.6 and 184 keV/μm) or X-rays. Results: Exposure to radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) induced clonogenic cell death for SCC61 (radiosensitive) and SQ20B (radioresistant) cells, the latter systematically showing less sensitivity. Activation of an early p53-independent apoptotic process occurred in SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation, which increased with time, dose and LET. In contrast, SQ20B cells underwent G2/M arrest associated with Chk1 activation and Cdc2 phosphorylation. This inhibition was transient after X-rays, compared with a more prolonged and LET-dependent accumulation after carbon irradiation. After release, a LET-dependent increase of polyploid and multinucleated cells, both typical signs of mitotic catastrophe, was identified. However, a subpopulation of SQ20B cells was able to escape mitotic catastrophe and continue to proliferate. Conclusions: High LET irradiation induced distinct types of cell death in HNSCC cell lines and showed an increased effectiveness compared with X-rays. However, the reproliferation of SQ20B may explain the potential locoregional recurrence observed among some HNSCC patients treated by hadrontherapy. An adjuvant treatment forcing the tumor cells to enter apoptosis may therefore be necessary to improve the outcome of radiotherapy.

  9. Radiation-induced Akt activation modulates radioresistance in human glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is a primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a common and devastating brain tumor in humans. IR has been shown to induce PI3K-Akt activation in many cell types, and activation of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway has been correlated with radioresistance. Initially, the effects of IR on Akt activation were assessed in multiple human GBM cell lines. Next, to evaluate a potential causative role of IR-induced Akt activation on radiosensitivity, Akt activation was inhibited during IR with several complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches, and radiosensitivity measured using clonogenic survival assays. Three of the eight cell lines tested demonstrated IR-induced Akt activation. Further studies revealed that IR-induced Akt activation was dependent upon the presence of a serum factor, and could be inhibited by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Inhibition of PI3K activation with LY294002, or with inducible wild-type PTEN, inhibition of EGFR, as well as direct inhibition of Akt with two Akt inhibitors during irradiation increased the radiosensitivity of U87MG cells. These results suggest that Akt may be a central player in a feedback loop whereby activation of Akt induced by IR increases radioresistance of GBM cells. Targeting the Akt signaling pathway may have important therapeutic implications when used in combination with IR in the treatment of a subset of brain tumor patients

  10. Radioresistant DNA synthesis in cells of patients showing increased chromosomal sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of DNA synthesis after γ-irradiation was studied either by analysis of the steady-state distribution of daughter [3H]DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients or by direct assay of the amount of [3H]thymidine incorporated into DNA of fibroblasts derived from a normal donor (LCH882) and from Down's syndrome (LCH944), Werner's syndrome (WS1LE) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP2LE) patients with chromosomal sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Doses of γ-irradiation that markedly inhibited the rate of DNA synthesis in normal human cells caused almost no inhibition of DNA synthesis in the cells from the affected individuals. The radioresistant DNA synthesis in Down's syndrome cells was mainly due to a much lower inhibition of replicon initiation than that in normal cells; these cells were also more resistant to damage that inhibited replicon elongation. Our data suggest that radioresistant DNA synthesis may be an intrinsic feature of all genetic disorders showing increased radiosensitivity in terms of chromosome aberrations. (orig.)

  11. Radioresistance of mice cells immobilized by adhesion in glass layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phagocytic leukocytes are involved in bio compatibility and biodegradation processes at which materials utilized in different at which materials utilized in different types of implants are submitted. In this work round shape glass cover slips were implanted subcutaneously in 45-day-old C57B1J 6 mice and later irradiated with a 60 Co sublethal whole-body dose of 4.0 Gy. Cover slips were removed 1,3,7 and 14 days post-implant and dyed by the hematoxylin-eosin technique. Macrophage and giant cell estimations were done in a microscope by means of an integrator eyepiece. The modifications found permit to conclude that they to exist significant differences in macrophages as a function of time after implant but not as a consequence of irradiation. (author)

  12. Radioresistance of granulation tissue-derived cells from skin wounds combined with total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tingyu; Chen, Zelin; Tan, Li; Shi, Chunmeng

    2016-04-01

    Combined radiation and wound injury (CRWI) occurs following nuclear explosions and accidents, radiological or nuclear terrorism, and radiation therapy combined with surgery. CRWI is complicated and more difficult to heal than single injuries. Stem cell‑based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for CRWI, however, sourcing stem cells remains a challenge. In the present study, the granulation tissue-derived cells (GTCs) from the skin wounds (SWs) of CRWI mice (C‑GTCs) demonstrated a higher radioresistance to the damage caused by combined injury, and were easier to isolate and harvest when compared with bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs). Furthermore, the C-GTCs exhibited similar stem cell-associated properties, such as self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity, when compared with neonatal dermal stromal cells (DSCs) and GTCs from unirradiated SWs. Granulation tissue, which is easy to access, may present as an optimal autologous source of stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic applications in CRWI. PMID:26936439

  13. Dexamethasone-induced radioresistance occurring independent of human papilloma virus gene expression in cervical carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutz, H.P.; Mariotta, M.; Mirimanoff, R.O. [Lab. de Radiobiologie, Service de Radio-Oncologie, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Knebel Doeberitz, M. von [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Virusforschung

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HPV 18 E6 and E7 gene products with respect to radiosensitivity of two cervical carcinoma cell lines. The two cervical carcinoma lines C4-1 and SW 756 were used in which treatment with dexamethasone allows to modulate expression levels of HPV 18 E6 and E7 genes: Upregulation in C4-1, down-regulation in SW 756. Effects of treatment with dexamethasone on plating efficiency and radiosensitivity were assessed using a clonogenic assay. Treatment with dexamethasone increased plating efficiency of the C4-1 cells, but did not affect plating efficiency of SW 756 cells. Treatment with dexamethasone induced enhanced radioresistance in both cell lines. Thus, in C4-1 cells the observed changes in radioresistance correlate to the enhancement in expression of HPV 18 genes E6/E7, whereas in SW 756, a reduced expression correlates negatively with the enhanced radioresistance. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Das Ziel dieser Studie lag darin, die Rolle der HPV-18-Gene E6 und E7 in bezug auf die Strahlenempfindlichkeit von menschlichen Zervixkarzinomzellen zu untersuchen. Wir verwendeten zwei menschliche Zervixkarzinomzellinien, C4-1 und SW 756, in welchen die Expression der viralen Gene HPV 18 E6 und E7 mit Dexamethason moduliert werden kann: In C4-1 bewirkt die Behandlung mit Dexamethason eine Erhoehung der Expression dieser Gene, in SW 756 eine Verminderung. Die Wirkung auf die Wachstumsfaehigkeit der Zellen und auf die Wachstumshemmung durch die Bestrahlung wurde unter Verwendung eines klonogenen Assays bestimmt. Dexamethason bewirkte eine erhoehte Wachstumsfaehigkeit der C4-1 Zellen, ohne die Wachstumsfaehigkeit der SW-756-Zellen zu beeinflussen, wie schon frueher beschrieben. Die Resistenz beider Zellinien gegenueber Bestrahlung wurde erhoeht. Somit besteht in den C4-1-Zellen eine Korrelation der Expression der viralen Gene mit der Zunahme der Strahlenresistenz, wogegen in den SW-756-Zellen die Abnahme der Expression im Gegensatz zu

  14. Hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance and bystander effects in rodent and human cells as a function of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two decades, a body of experimental evidences in vitro has shown the presence of a plethora of phenomena occurring after low-dose irradiation [including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance (IRR), adaptive response, bystander effect (BE) and genomic instability], which might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the linear no-threshold model for cancer risk assessment in such a dose region. In this framework, a systematic investigation have been undertaken on non-linear effects at low doses as a function of different radiation quality and cellular radiosensitivity and in terms of different biological end points. The present article reports the recent results on hyper-radiosensitivity and IRR and BE phenomena, in terms of clonogenic survival in V79 Chinese hamster cells and T98G human glioblastoma cells irradiated with protons and carbon ions with different energy, as a function of dose (and fluence). (authors)

  15. Critical analysis of salvage radical prostatectomy in the management of radioresistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabra, Daniel; Faria, Eliney; Dauster, Breno; Rodrigues, Gunther; Fava, Gilberto [Pio XII Foundation, Barretos, SP (Brazil). Section of Urology], e-mail: daniel.seabra@terra.com.br

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To critically evaluate salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) in the treatment of patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and Methods: From January 2005 to June 2007, we assessed patients with recurrent localized PCa. Recurrence was suspected when there were three or more successive increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) after nadir. After the routine imagery examinations, and once localized PCa was confirmed, patients were offered SRP. Following surgery, we evaluated bleeding, rectal injury, urinary incontinence or obstruction and impotence. PSA values were measured at 1, 3, 6, months and thereafter twice a year. Results: Forty-two patients underwent SRP. The average age was 61 years. Following radiotherapy , the mean PSA nadir was 1.5 ng/mL (0.57-5.5). The mean prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT) was 14 months (6-20). Prior to SRP, the mean PSA was 5.7 ng/mL (2.9-18). The pathologic staging was pT2a: 13%; pT2b: 34%; pT2c: 27%; pT3a: 13%; and pT3b: 13%. Bleeding > 600 mL occurred in 14% of the cases; urethral stenosis in 50%; and urinary incontinence (two or more pads/day) in 72%. The mean follow-up post-SRP ranged from 6 to 30 months. The PSA level rose in 9, of which 6 had PSA-DT < 10 months. Conclusions: SRP is a feasible method in the management of localized radioresistant PCa. PSA-DT has shown to be important for the selection and SRP should not be performed if PSA-DT > 10 months. Due to its increased morbidity, SRP should be only offered to the patients who are more concerned about survival rather than quality of life. (author)

  16. Increased radioresistance in spheroids of ionically coupled cells: Cytogenetic and biochemical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggregates (spheroids) of cultured mammalian cells, exposed to ionizing radiation, show an increased radioresistance compared to single cells (monolayer) provided that the cells can undergo intercellular communication via gap junctions. To characterize the phenomenon of 'contact resistance' (CR) further its effects on cell cycle kinetics, mutagenesis, chromosome damage and DNA-repair were investigated. Whereas the repair of DNA strand breaks remained unchanged, in all other tests CR reduced cytogenetic damage, irrespective of the proliferative status of the cell line used. Furthermore, CR could be induced in spheroids not yet resistant by activators of adenylate cyclase (e.g. prostaglandine E1). However, no induction could be achieved in monolayers. Basal adenylate cyclase activity in different cell lines correlate with the activity of the gap junctions. This suggested that a regulation of this enzyme (and thereby of cAMP) might be mediated by the gap junctions. These properties of CR exhibit a remarkable analogy to processes associated with cytodifferentiation. Thus CR appears to be a basic property of three dimensionally organized tissues of communicating cells. (orig.)

  17. Chk1 phosphorylated at serine345 is a predictor of early local recurrence and radio-resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubhi, Nouf; Middleton, Fiona; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Stephens, Peter; Doherty, Rachel; Arora, Arvind; Moseley, Paul M; Chan, Stephen Y T; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Martin, Stewart G; Curtin, Nicola J; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage activates the DNA damage response (DDR). DDR up-regulation may predict radio-resistance and increase the risk of early local recurrence despite radiotherapy in early stage breast cancers. In 1755 early stage breast cancers, DDR signalling [ATM, ATR, total Ckh1, Chk1 phosphorylated at serine(345) (pChk1), Chk2, p53], base excision repair [PARP1, POLβ, XRCC1, FEN1, SMUG1], non-homologous end joining (Ku70/Ku80, DNA-PKcs) and homologous recombination [RAD51, BRCA1, γH2AX, BLM, WRN, RECQL5, PTEN] protein expression was correlated to time to early local recurrence. Pre-clinically, radio-sensitization by inhibition of Chk1 activation by ATR inhibitor (VE-821) and inhibition of Chk1 (V158411) were investigated in MDA-MB-231 (p53 mutant) and MCF-7 (p53 wild-type) breast cancer cells. In the whole cohort, 208/1755 patients (11.9%) developed local recurrence of which 126 (61%) developed local recurrence within 5 years of initiation of primary therapy. Of the 20 markers tested, only pChk1 and p53 significantly associated with early local recurrence (p value = 0.015 and 0.010, respectively). When analysed together, high cytoplasmic pChk1-nuclear pChk1 (p = 0.039), high cytoplasmic pChk1-p53 (p = 0.004) and high nuclear pChk1-p53 (p = 0.029) co-expression remain significantly linked to early local recurrence. In multivariate analysis, cytoplasmic pChk1 level independently predicted early local recurrence (p = 0.025). In patients who received adjuvant local radiotherapy (n = 949), p53 (p = 0.014) and high cytoplasmic pChk1-p53 (p = 0.017) remain associated with early local recurrence. Pre-clinically, radio-sensitisation by VE-821 or V158411 was observed in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and was more pronounced in MCF-7 cells. We conclude that pChk1 is a predictive biomarker of radiotherapy resistance and early local recurrence. PMID:26459098

  18. Isolation of x-ray-inducible transcripts from radioresistant human melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothman, D.A.; Lee, S.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Meyers, M.; Fukunaga, N. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Twelve x-ray-induced transcripts (xips), differentially expressed 8- to 230-fold in x-irradiated versus unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, were isolated as cDNA clones (xip1 through xip12) after four rounds of differential hybridization. Northern analyses revealed rare, medium, and abundant xips, ranging in size from 1.2 to 10 kb. All transcripts were transiently expressed and induced by low, but not by high (>600 cGy), doses of radiation. Three transcripts (xip4, -7, and -12) were induced only by ionizing radiation, and many (i.e., xip1, -2, -3, -5, -6, -8, -9, -10, and -11) were also induced by UV irradiation or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Heat shock did not induce any of the xips, but it decreased basal levels of xip4, -7, -11, and -12. Three xip cDNA clones were identified as encoding thymidine kinase, DT diaphorase, and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The remaining nine cDNA clones showed little homology to known genes. Three clones contained regions homologous to c-fes/fps protooncongene, recombination activating gene 1, or the human angiogenesis factor gene. X-ray-inducible genes may function in damaged cells to regulate DNA repair, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis.

  19. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs

  20. P53-mediated radioresistance does not correlate with metastatic potential in tumorigenic rat embryo cell lines following oncogene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Changes in wild-type p53 protein function occur in the majority of human tumors, and may alter genomic stability and the cellular response to ionizing radiation. Whether oncoproteins can render tumor cells both radioresistant and metastatic, may have implications for clinical strategies designed to improve local tumor control. In the studies reported here, we tested the hypothesis that acquired radioresistance correlates with metastatic potential within a large panel of transformed rat embryo cell (REF) lines following transfection with activated H-ras, mutant p53, and HPV16-E7 alleles. Methods and Materials: Rat embryo cells (REF cells) were transfected using the calcium-phosphate technique with an activated H-ras gene alone, or in combination with human papillomavirus HPV16-E7 and/or human or murine mutant p53 sequences. Other rat embryo cell clones expressing transfected HPV-E7 and activated ras sequences subsequently acquired endogenous p53 gene mutations during culture in vitro. The relative expression of p21ras and p53 protein for each REF transformant was determined by Western blot analysis following transfection. REF clones were phenotypically characterized at early passage (i.e., passages 5-7) and late passage (i.e., passages 10-20) for their: (a) relative tumor growth rate, and (b) their ability to undergo spontaneous metastasis following intramuscular injection into the hind legs of SCID mice. In vivo phenotypic end points were then compared to previously measured parameters of in vitro radiosensitivity for each cell line. Additionally, the expression of the cellular protease, plasminogen activator, was determined for a number of metastatic and nonmetastatic cell lines. Results: We found no evidence that selected oncogene-transfected REF transformants that were radioresistant in culture had a greater spontaneous metastatic potential than nonradioresistant REF transformants. Neither the level of expression of the p21ras protein nor that of the p

  1. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in "DNA damage response", "direct p53 effectors" and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols. PMID:27245205

  2. Cytogenetic Effects of Low Dose Radiation in Mammalian Cells Analysis of the Phenomenon Hypersensitivity and Induced Radioresistence

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Nasonova, E A; Krasavin, E A; Rsjanina, A V

    2001-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic damage after irradiation of chinese hamster cells and human melanoma cells within dose range 1-200 cGy was studied. The anaphase and metaphase analysis of chromosome damage and micronuclei test were applied. The hypersensitivity (HRS) at doses below 20 cGy and the increased radioresistence at higher doses (IR) were shown with all cytogenetic criteria for both cell lines. The phenomenon of HRS/IR was reproduced in synchronic as well as in asynchronic population of chinese hamster cells. This fact shows that HRS was caused by high radiosensitivity of all cells and can not be explained by any differential sensitivity of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. So it was supposed that the increasing radioresistence is determined by the inclusion of the inducible repair processes in all cells. This conclusion agress with the fact that there was no evidence of HRS on dose-effect curves and that some part of pre-existent damage was repaired after preliminary irradiation with low dose...

  3. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit inhibitor reverses acquired radioresistance in lung adenocarcinoma by suppressing DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Li, Hang; Peng, Wen; He, Xin-Yun; Huang, Min; Qiu, Dong; Xue, Ying-Bo; Lu, Liang

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying lung cancer radioresistance remain to be fully elucidated. The DNA repair pathway is a predominant target of radiotherapy, which is considered to be involved in the acquired radioresistance of cancer cells. The present study aimed to establish a radioresistant cell model using the A549 human lung cancer cell line, and to further investigate the potential mechanisms underlying the radioresistance. The A549R radioresistant lung cancer cell variant was established by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated γ-ray irradiation at a total dose of 60 Gy. Colony formation assays were then used to determine cell survival following γ-ray exposure. The established radioresistant cells were subsequently treated with or without the NU7026 DNA-PKcs inhibitor. The levels of DNA damage were determined by counting the number of fluorescent γ-H2AX foci in the cells. The cellular capacity for DNA repair was assessed using antibodies for the detection of various DNA repair pathway proteins. The radioresistant sub-clones exhibited significantly decreased survival following NU7026 treatment, compared with the parental cells, as determined by colony formation assays (P<0.05), and this finding was found to be dose-dependent. Treatment with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitor significantly reduced γ-H2AX foci formation (P<0.05) following acute radiation exposure in the radioresistant sub-clones, compared with the parental control cells. The decreased levels of γ-H2AX were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells in the radioresistant cell line following post-radiation treatment with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor. The expression levels of proteins associated with the DNA repair pathway were altered markedly in the cells treated with NU7026. The results of the present study suggested that radioresistance may be associated with enhanced DNA repair following exposure to radiation, resulting in reduced apoptosis. Therefore, the

  4. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hong Shik; Hong, Eun-Hee [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jeong-Hwa [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Woo [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu, E-mail: sgh63@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer.

  5. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer

  6. Intrathymic radioresistant stem cells follow an IL-2/IL-2R pathway during thymic regeneration after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethally irradiated mice undergo thymic regeneration which follows a phenotypic pattern of events similar to that observed during normal fetal development. Thymic regeneration after irradiation is the product of a limited pool of intrathymic radioresistant stem cells undergoing simultaneous differentiation. We show that in this model of T cell development, thymic regeneration follows a pathway in which the IL-2R is transiently expressed on CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-2R expression occurred during the exponential growth period of thymic regeneration, and IL-2R blocking prevented this explosive growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the IL-2R blockade affected primarily the development of the immature CD3-/CD4-/CD8- (triple negative) cells and their ability to generate CD3+/CD4+/CD8+ or CD3+/CD4+/CD8- and CD3+/CD4-/CD8+ thymocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that blocking of the IL-2R resulted in an arrest in proliferation and differentiation by intrathymic radioresistant stem cells, indicating that the IL-2/IL-2R pathway is necessary for the expansion of immature triple negative T cells

  7. The effect of oxygen on low-dose hypersensitivity and increased radioresistance in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated in air are hypersensitive to X-ray doses less than 0.5 Gy and show an increased radioresistance over the dose range 0.5-1 Gy. Of considerable interest from both a mechanistic and clinical viewpoint is the response of hypoxic cells over this dose range. The data presented here indicate that hypoxic cells are also hypersensitive to low X-ray doses and exhibit an increased radioresistant response, albeit triggered at a somewhat higher dose (0.69 Gy, SEM ± 0.18 Gy) than observed in oxygenated cells (0.5 Gy, SEM ± 0.21 Gy). These data indicate that the triggering event for increased radioresistance may be independent of oxygen. As reported by others previously, the oxygen enhancement ratio was found to decrease with a decreasing X-ray dose. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. Cancer stem cell and its relevance to tumors resistance to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gradually accumulated information and knowledge regarding cancer stem cell or stem-like cancer cell greatly potentiated the research progression of radiation oncology and biology. In recent years, a series studies have uncovered that the cancer stem cell and cancer quiescent cell could be the major cells origin attributed to the radioresistance and recurrence of tumors in the course of radiotherapy. A rapid research progression has already been achieved respecting the radiosensitivity and related mechanisms of these two subsets of cancer cells, and which provides an idea strategy for development of the measures targeting tumor radioresistance. This paper reviewed and discussed the cellular basis and molecular mechanism of the tumor radioresistance from the aspects of cancer cells subsets and the radiobiological characteristics. (authors)

  9. CD133 expression is not selective for tumor-initiating or radioresistant cell populations in the CRC cell lines HCT-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: CD133 is controversially discussed as putative (surrogate) marker for cancer stem/tumor-initiating cell populations (CSC/TIC) in epithelial tumors including colorectal carcinomas (CRCs). We studied CD133 expression in established CRC cell lines and examined in vitro behavior, radioresponse and in vivo tumor formation of CD133+/- subpopulations of one cell line of interest. Materials and methods: Ten CRC cell lines were analyzed for CD133 expression using flow cytometry and Western blotting. CD133+ and CD133- HCT-116 subpopulations were separated by FACS and studied in 2-D and 3-D culture and colony formation assays after irradiation. Subcutaneous xenograft formation was monitored in NMRI (nu/nu) mice. Results and conclusions: CRC cell lines could be classified into three groups: (i) CD133-, (ii) CD133+ and (iii) those with two distinct CD133+ and CD133- subpopulations. Isolated CD133+/- HCT-116 subpopulations were studied relative to the original fraction. No difference was found in 2-D growth, spheroid formation or radioresponse in vitro. Also, tumor formation and growth rate did not differ for the sorted subpopulations. However, a subset of xenografts originated from CD133- HCT-116 showed a striking enrichment in the CD133+ fraction. Our data show that CD133 expression is not selective for sphere forming, tumor-initiating or radioresistant subpopulations in the HCT-116 CRC cell lines. This implies that CD133 cannot be regarded as a CSC/TIC marker in all CRC cell lines and that functional measurements of tumor formation have to generally accompany CSC/TIC-directed mechanistic or therapeutic studies.

  10. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ∼10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells.

  11. Targeting cancer stem cells: a new therapy to cure cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yapeng; Fu, Liwu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been defined as cells within tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. They have been identified in blood, breast, brain, colon, melanoma, pancreatic, prostate, ovarian, lung cancers and so on. It is often considered to be associated with chemo-resistance and radio-resistance that lead to the failure of traditional therapies. Most therapies are directed at the fast growing tumor ...

  12. Does the cell radioresistance acquired by low dose-rate gamma irradiation depend on genetic factors or physiological changes. Study carried out on inactive cells of the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa CHICK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactive cells of the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa CHICK were used to test the following hypothesis: the radioresistance acquired by these cells after irradiation at low dose rate (0.06 Gy/mn) is due to the selection or induction of radioresistant clones. Clone cultures were grown mainly from colonies exhibiting defects (high cell loss, slowed growth, pigment deficiency). Of thirty clones studied, three only of second and third separations possessed the radioresistance of their original population. On the basis of these results, backed up by a first experiment which shows the loss of cell radioresistance when continuous irradiation is stopped, the initial hypothesis may be dismissed and research directed towards changes relative to cell restoration processes by irradiation at low dose rates

  13. MiR-20a Induces Cell Radioresistance by Activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the role of miR-20a in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell radioresistance, which may reveal potential strategies to improve treatment. Methods and Materials: The expression of miR-20a and PTEN were detected in HCC cell lines and paired primary tissues by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell radiation combined with colony formation assays was administrated to discover the effect of miR-20a on radiosensitivity. Bioinformatics prediction and luciferase assay were used to identify the target of miR-20a. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was used to inhibit phosphorylation of Akt, to verify whether miR-20a affects HCC cell radioresistance through activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway. Results: MiR-20a levels were increased in HCC cell lines and tissues, whereas PTEN was inversely correlated with it. Overexpression of miR-20a in Bel-7402 and SMMC-7721 cells enhances their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation, and the inhibition of miR-20a in HCCLM3 and QGY-7701 cells sensitizes them to it. PTEN was identified as a direct functional target of miR-20a for the induction of radioresistance. Overexpression of miR-20a activated the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Additionally, the kinase inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the effect of miR-20a–induced radioresistance. Conclusion: MiR-20a induces HCC cell radioresistance by activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway, which suggests that miR-20a/PTEN/PI3K/Akt might represent a target of investigation for developing effective therapeutic strategies against HCC

  14. MiR-20a Induces Cell Radioresistance by Activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Zheng, Lin [Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Department of Pathology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Ding, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Li, Qi [Department of Gastroenterology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Wang, Rong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Liu, Tongxin; Sun, Quanquan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Yang, Hua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanhai Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Peng, Shunli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Wang, Wei, E-mail: wangwei9500@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Chen, Longhua, E-mail: chenlhsmu@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of miR-20a in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell radioresistance, which may reveal potential strategies to improve treatment. Methods and Materials: The expression of miR-20a and PTEN were detected in HCC cell lines and paired primary tissues by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell radiation combined with colony formation assays was administrated to discover the effect of miR-20a on radiosensitivity. Bioinformatics prediction and luciferase assay were used to identify the target of miR-20a. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was used to inhibit phosphorylation of Akt, to verify whether miR-20a affects HCC cell radioresistance through activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway. Results: MiR-20a levels were increased in HCC cell lines and tissues, whereas PTEN was inversely correlated with it. Overexpression of miR-20a in Bel-7402 and SMMC-7721 cells enhances their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation, and the inhibition of miR-20a in HCCLM3 and QGY-7701 cells sensitizes them to it. PTEN was identified as a direct functional target of miR-20a for the induction of radioresistance. Overexpression of miR-20a activated the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Additionally, the kinase inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the effect of miR-20a–induced radioresistance. Conclusion: MiR-20a induces HCC cell radioresistance by activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway, which suggests that miR-20a/PTEN/PI3K/Akt might represent a target of investigation for developing effective therapeutic strategies against HCC.

  15. A study of the relationship of the radioresistance of esophageal carcinoma cell line TE13R120 with HDAC3, NF-kB and NRAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of the radioresistance of esophageal carcinoma with genes HDAC3, NF-kB and NRAGE. Methods: Two cell lines are chosen for the study, esophageal carcinoma cell line TE13 and esophageal carcinomatous radioresistant cell line TE13R120 which is derived from TE13 by fractionated ionizing radiation. The protein expression of genes HDAC3, NF-kB and NRAGE were measured by Western blotting in the two cell lines at different time intervals and 12 h after different radiating dosages. Apoptotic cell population and cell cycle distribution of the two cell lines were detected by FCM through the same time and dosage-courses with above. Results: The protein expressions of NF-kB and HDAC3 in TE13R120 cells were elevated before and after radiation compared with those of TE13 cells. No change of NRAGE expression had been found in cytoplasma of TE13R120 cells compared with TE13 cells. The percentages of TE13R120 cells in G2 phase were increased at 4, 16 and 24 h after 4 Gy radiation and at 12 h after 2, 6 and 10 Gy radiation. In contrast, no significant change had been observed in TE13 in G2 phage after radiation. Additionally, the percentages of TE13R120 cells in S phage were significantly higher than those of TE13 cells before and 12 h after different doses radiation. The apoptosis percentages of TE13R120 cell is slightly higher than those of TE13. Conclusion: The increasing protein expression of HDAC3 and NF-kB in TE13R120 suggest a very important and possibly, a cooperative effect of these two genes to induce the radioresistance of TE13R120 cell. Further study should be done to reveal the relationship of NRAGE with the radioresistance of esophageal carcinoma. (authors)

  16. Increase of radioresistance of hemopoietic stem cells (CFUs) of femoral bone marrow in mice after administration of dextran sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of a single i.p. injection of dextran sulfate (DS) on the radiosensitivity of the hemopoietic stem cells (CFUs) of the femoral bone marrow of mice was investigated. The administration of DS induced an increase of the proliferative activity and the number of CFUs in the spleen and femoral bone marrow, and an elevation of the number of CFUs in the circulatory blood. An enhanced survival of CFUs in the femoral bone marrow and increased numbers of endogenous colonies of the hemopoietic tissue in the spleens were found after the administration of DS 24 and 72 hours before sublethal irradiation. The dose reduction factor of the substance calculated from the equieffective exposure for the decrease of CFUs in the femoral bone marrow was for both intervals of DS injection 2.2. DS increased the radioresistance of mice which is manifested by an increased survival of the animals after lethal whole-body gamma irradiation. (author)

  17. High linear-energy-transfer radiation can overcome radioresistance of glioma stem-like cells to low linear-energy-transfer radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is applied as the standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, radiotherapy remains merely palliative, not curative, because of the existence of glioma stem cells (GSCs), which are regarded as highly radioresistant to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) photons. Here we analyzed whether or not high-LET particles can overcome the radioresistance of GSCs. Glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) were induced from the GBM cell line A172 in stem cell culture medium. The phenotypes of GSLCs and wild-type cells were confirmed using stem cell markers. These cells were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays or reactor neutron beams. Under neutron-beam irradiation, high-LET proton particles can be produced through elastic scattering or nitrogen capture reaction. Radiosensitivity was assessed by a colony-forming assay, and the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were assessed by a histone gamma-H2AX focus detection assay. In stem cell culture medium, GSLCs could form neurosphere-like cells and express neural stem cell markers (Sox2 and Musashi) abundantly in comparison with their parental cells. GSLCs were significantly more radioresistant to gamma rays than their parental cells, but neutron beams overcame this resistance. There were significantly fewer gamma-H2AX foci in the A172 GSLCs 24 h after irradiation with gamma rays than in their parental cultured cells, while there was no apparent difference following neutron-beam irradiation. High-LET radiation can overcome the radioresistance of GSLCs by producing unrepairable DNA DSBs. High-LET radiation therapy might have the potential to overcome GBM's resistance to X-rays in a clinical setting. (author)

  18. High radiosensitivity of induction in contrast to radioresistance of expression of cells mediating delayed-type hypersensitivity during response to sheep red blood cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction observed in mice primed i.v. with low doses of sheep red blood cells was greatly decreased when mice were irradiated with 300 rad before priming. An estimation of the radiosensitivity of DTH-mediating cells (DTH-C) was performed using a titration assay after local adoptive transfer of these cells mixed with antigen into the footpad of unprimed mice. A high radiosensitivity of the induction of DTH-C was observed with a D37 of approximately 50 rad. In contrast, the expression of DTH-C appeared radioresistant, as the D37 was approximately 2000 rad. (author)

  19. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Bernier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  20. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Bernier, Gilbert, E-mail: gbernier.hmr@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Developmental Biology Laboratory, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 Boul. l' Assomption, Montreal, H1T 2M4 (Canada); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2011-03-30

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings.

  1. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings

  2. Radiation hypersensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with the autosomal recessive genetic disease, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), are cancer-prone and hypersensitive to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. In an attempt to isolate the gene(s) responsible for the hypersensitivity of A-T cells, they were transfected with normal human DNA in cosmid vectors containing a rescuable marker (G-418 resistance), and revertants to normal sensitivity were isolated and characterized. The failure of radioresistant revertants to demonstrate a reversion of the phenotype, radioresistant DNA synthesis, shows that this feature is dependent on a gene separate from the one conferring resistance to cell killing. Cells from every A-T patient thus far examined demonstrate both hypersensitivity, in terms of radiation-induced cell killing, and radioresistant DNA synthesis. The results reported here, however, show that the former is not a result of the latter, as previously proposed. Moreover, the fact that these two characteristics can be uncoupled obscures the role(s) that either of them plays in the etiology of the disease, or in the development in its other features, including cancer-proneness

  3. The repair fidelity of restriction enzyme-induced double strand breaks in plasmid DNA correlates with radioresistance in human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of DNA repair may play a role in determining the cytotoxic effect of ionizing radiation. Repair, as measured by DNA strand breakage, often shows little difference between tumor cell lines of widely different radiosensitivity. The mechanism by which DNA fragments are rejoined is poorly understood. This study used plasmid transfection as a probe to assess the balance between correct repair and misrepair. A general trend for sensitive cells to show lower repair fidelity relative to resistant cells was observed. The type of double-strand cleavage of the plasmid (staggered or blunt) made little difference to the measured repair fidelity, in contrast to published studies in which restriction-enzyme breaks had been introduced into DNA within chromatin. Specific comparison of parent lines and their radiosensitive clones showed significant differences in repair fidelity for a relatively small change in radiation response, which was in line with the overall correlation. These same pairs have previously been shown to have no difference in the loss of DNA fragmentation with time after irradiation, and Southern analysis had confirmed the integrated plasmid copy number was similar in the cell lines compared. The number of intact copies of the damaged gene relative to the undamaged gene mirrored the observed repair fidelity. However, in one cell line out of the 10 studied, an exception to the observed trend was found. In comparison of two equally radioresistant bladder cancer cell lines, large differences in repair fidelity were observed. Again, no difference in the integrated copy number was found, and the damaged gene was highly rearranged or deleted in the cell line with low repair fidelity. It is suggested that repair fidelity can be, but is not invariably, a measure of correct repair relative to misrepair, resulting from the processing of double-strand breaks and, hence, the response to ionizing radiation. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Cell death induced by ionizing radiations in human radio-resistant tumours: in-vitro and in-vivo study of mechanisms involved in its induction by different types of radiations and pharmacological modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whereas chemo-radiotherapy protocols revealed to be very efficient when taking tumours into care, the treatment of some tumours remains very limited due to their critical location or to the weak radio-sensitivity to conventional radiations. One way to work around this problem is to use high linear energy transfer radiations or hadron therapy, in combination with radio-sensitizers. This research thesis reports the assessment of radio-sensitizer effects of different molecules on human radio-resistant cell lines and more particularly the SK-Hep1 line from a hepatocellular carcinoma. In vitro studies have been performed and then in vivo studies by using fast neutron irradiation on a mice liver sample. Observations made by optic fibre confocal microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed in vitro observations: the prevailing cell death after such an irradiation is the autophagic cell death. It shows the importance of the autophagic phenomenon induced by radiations with high linear transfer energy. This could lead to new therapeutic protocols for radio-resistant cancers

  5. On the role of endogenous substances in creating enhanced radioresistance background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dependence of cell radioresistance on endogenous amine content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity has been studied. More radioresistant budding yeast cells (12-hr-old culture) have been found to exhibit a higher serotonin and histamine content as compared to less radioresistant nonbudding cells (7-day-old culture). It has been shown on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, race 12, that an increased SOD activity is characteristic of more radioresistant cells

  6. Radioresistance studies in Methylobacterium spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Fatima; Botelho, M. Luisa; Tenreiro, Rogerio

    1998-06-01

    Methylobacterium extorquens was isolated and was found as one of the most resistant microorganisms in the original bioburden of ophthalmic cotton dressings to be submitted to {gamma} radiation sterilization. Radiation survival curves were simultaneously performed in phosphate buffer and in test-pieces on two isolates, one obtained before irradiation (wild strain) and the other after irradiation at 20 kGy (rad strain), as well as on three type strains of Methylobacterium spp. (M. extorquens{sup T}, M. radiotolerans{sup T} and M. fujisawaense{sup T}). The radiation resistance was compared using D{sub values}. To analyze the effect of non linearity on radioresistance other measures were applied, such as intercept point, fraction of surviving cells at a selected dose and area. The ranking of strains with these approaches showed to be different, pointing out the need of an integrated measure of radioresistance. Therefore, an index of relative survival (IRS) is proposed.

  7. IL-6 signaling promotes DNA repair and prevents apoptosis in CD133+ stem-like cells of lung cancer after radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuhchyau; Zhang, Fuquan; Tsai, Ying; Yang, Xiadong; Yang, Li; Duan, Shanzhou; Wang, Xin; Keng, Peter; Lee, Soo Ok

    2015-01-01

    Background Local tumor control by standard fractionated radiotherapy (RT) remains poor because of tumor resistance to radiation (radioresistance). It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are more radioresistant than non-CSCs. In previous studies, we have shown IL-6 promotes self-renewal of CD133+ CSC-like cells. In this study, we investigated whether IL-6 plays roles not only in promoting self-renewal of CD133+ cells after radiation, but also in conferring radioresistance of CD133...

  8. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wu, Kaijie [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Gao, Dexuan [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated with Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Xinyang; Chen, Yule; Du, Yuefeng; Song, Wenbin; Ma, Zhenkun [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Authement, Craig; Saha, Debabrata [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong, E-mail: jt.hsieh@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); He, Dalin, E-mail: dalinhe@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment.

  9. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment

  10. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V. [Inst. of Radiobiology, Medical Academy of the German Armed Forces, Munich (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit {beta}1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the {beta}1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  11. Cyclic nucleotides and radioresistance. Communication 3. Influence of catecholamines and cyclic nucleotides on radioresistance of bone marroW stem cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments in vitro on bone marrow stem cells of mice it is demonstrated that physiological concentrations of catecholamines (CA) and N6,02'-dibutyryl-cAMP (DBcAMP) have a radioprotective effect. Nonacylated cyclic nucleotides, like cAMP and cGMP, fail to protect stem cells from radiation. A protein inhibitor of protein kinase totally prevents the protective action of DBcAMP which is indicative of the role of the protein kinase mechanism in the observed effect

  12. Canonical autophagy does not contribute to cellular radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: (Pre)clinical studies indicate that autophagy inhibition increases response to anti-cancer therapies. Although promising, due to contradicting reports, it remains unclear if radiation therapy changes autophagy activity and if autophagy inhibition changes the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity. Discrepancies may result from different assays and models through off-target effects and influencing other signaling routes. In this study, we directly compared the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy after irradiation in human cancer cell lines. Materials and methods: Changes in autophagy activity after ionizing radiation (IR) were assessed by flux analysis in eight cell lines. Clonogenic survival, DNA damage (COMET-assay) and H2AX phosphorylation were assessed after chloroquine or 3-methyladenine pretreatment and after ATG7 or LC3b knockdown. Results: IR failed to induce autophagy and chloroquine failed to change intrinsic radiosensitivity of cells. Interestingly, 3-methyladenine and ATG7- or LC3b-deficiency sensitized cancer cells to irradiation. Surprisingly, the radiosensitizing effect of 3-methyladenine was also observed in ATG7 and LC3b deficient cells and was associated with attenuated γ-H2AX formation and DNA damage repair. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that the anti-tumor effects of chloroquine are independent of changes in intrinsic radioresistance. Furthermore, ATG7 and LC3b support radioresistance independent of canonical autophagy that involves lysosomal degradation

  13. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  14. APOBEC3G enhances lymphoma cell radioresistance by promoting cytidine deaminase-dependent DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Wilner, Ofer I; Cheshin, Ori; Shahar, Or D; Kenig, Edan; Baraz, Leah; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Arnon; Harris, Reuben S; Goldberg, Michal; Willner, Itamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-07-12

    APOBEC3 proteins catalyze deamination of cytidines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), providing innate protection against retroviral replication by inducing deleterious dC > dU hypermutation of replication intermediates. APOBEC3G expression is induced in mitogen-activated lymphocytes; however, no physiologic role related to lymphoid cell proliferation has yet to be determined. Moreover, whether APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase activity transcends to processing cellular genomic DNA is unknown. Here we show that lymphoma cells expressing high APOBEC3G levels display efficient repair of genomic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation and enhanced survival of irradiated cells. APOBEC3G transiently accumulated in the nucleus in response to ionizing radiation and was recruited to DSB repair foci. Consistent with a direct role in DSB repair, inhibition of APOBEC3G expression or deaminase activity resulted in deficient DSB repair, whereas reconstitution of APOBEC3G expression in leukemia cells enhanced DSB repair. APOBEC3G activity involved processing of DNA flanking a DSB in an integrated reporter cassette. Atomic force microscopy indicated that APOBEC3G multimers associate with ssDNA termini, triggering multimer disassembly to multiple catalytic units. These results identify APOBEC3G as a prosurvival factor in lymphoma cells, marking APOBEC3G as a potential target for sensitizing lymphoma to radiation therapy. PMID:22645179

  15. Detection of DNA strand breaks in mammalian cells using the radioresistant bacterium PprA protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously found that the PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans possesses ability to recognize DNA carrying strand breaks. In the present study, we attempted to visualize radiation-induced DNA strand breaks with PprA protein using immunofluorescence technique to elucidate the DNA damage response mechanism in mammalian cultured cells. As a result, colocalization of Cy2 and DAPI fluorescent signals was observed. This observation suggests that DNA strand breaks in the nucleus of CHO-K1 cells were effectively detected using the PprA protein. The amount of DNA strand breaks (integrated density of Cy2 fluorescent signals) was increased with the increase in the radiation dose. (author)

  16. Increased radioresistance of offspring in rats after maternal stimulation with benzene blood cell extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzene extracts from human blood cells were inoculated intraperitoneally into female rats on days 13, 17 and 21 of pregnancy. Their offspring at 13 to 15 weeks of age were irradiated with gamma rays for 49 h, with a total dose of 15.6 Gy. The number of survivors 30 days after irradiation was significantly greater in offspring from mothers treated with extracts as compared with controls. (author). 1 tab., 8 refs

  17. CD133 expression is not selective for tumor initiating or radioresistant cell populations in the CRC line HCT-116

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis of certain subpopulations of cancer cells with stem-cell like characteristics that might be responsible for treatment resistance and recurrence of disease is still challenging and under quite controversial discussion. In most studies, surrogate cell surface antigens such as the 92-110 kDa transmembrane glycoprotein CD133 (human Prominin-1) were labeled to isolate particular small cancer cell populations for studying their tumorigenic potential. In colorectal carcinomas (CRC) for example, a small CD133 positive (CD133+) cell population has recently been described to be enriched for tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (TIC/CSC) as compared to the CD133 negative (CD133) population. Furthermore, it was documented that the CD133+ subpopulation could exclusively be maintained in culture as spheres under serum-free conditions. Addition of serum resulted in cell differentiation, growth in 2-D and downregulation of CD133 expression. This would imply that established colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines that have been grown under adherent, serum-supplemented conditions for years should be devoid of CD133+ cells and TIC/CSC, respectively, which seems contradictory to the finding that many CRC lines produce tumors in nude mice models. In order to gain insight into this paradox, we studied the expression of CD133 in numerous established CRC lines under standard culture conditions and chose one particular cell line based on its expression pattern to study the behavior of CD133+ / CD133- subpopulations

  18. Cell division cycle 25 homolog c effects on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance at elevated dosage in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The underlying mechanisms behind both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and induced radioresistance (IRR), generally occurring at elevated radiation levels, remain unclear; however, elucidation of the relationship between cell cycle division 25 homolog c (Cdc25c) phosphatase and HRS/IRR may provide important insights into this process. Two cell lines with disparate HRS status, A549 and SiHa cells, were selected as cell models for comparison of dose-dependent Cdc25c phosphatase expression subsequent to low-dose irradiation. Knockdown of Cdc25c in A549 cells was mediated by transfection with a pGCsi-RAN-U6neo vector containing hairpin siRNA sequences. S216-phosphorylated Cdc25c protein [p-Cdc25c (Ser216)], cell survival and mitotic ratio were measured by western blot, colony-forming assay and histone H3 phosphorylation analysis. Variant p-Cdc25c (Ser216) expression was observed in the two cell lines after irradiation. The p-Cdc25c (Ser216) expression noted in SiHa cells after administration of 0-1 Gy radiation was similar to the radioresistance model; however, in A549 cells, the dose response for the phosphorylation of the Cdc25c Ser216 residue overlapped the level required to overcome the HRS response. Furthermore, Cdc25c repression prior to low-dose radiation induced more distinct HRS and prevented the development of IRR. The dose required to overcome the HRS response coincided with the effect of early G2-phase checkpoint arrest in A549 cells (approximately 0.3 Gy), and Cdc25c knockdown in A549 cells (approximately 0.5 Gy) corresponded to the phosphorylation of the Cdc25c Ser216 residue. Resultant data confirmed that dose-dependent Cdc25c phosphatase does effectively act as an early G2-phase checkpoint, thus indicating mechanistic importance in the HRS to IRR transition in A549 cells. (author)

  19. Combination of nicotinamide and hyperthermia to eliminate radioresistant chronically and acutely hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction among nicotinamide, radiation, and heat was studied in vivo using a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice. Response following local tumor treatment was assessed by tumor control and regrowth delay. Nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg i.p.) produced maximal radiosensitization when injected 30 min to 2 h before irradiation [enhancement ratios (ERs), 1.2-1.5]. Radiation damage was also increased by heating tumors (43.5 degrees C for 60 min) 4 h after irradiation (ERs = 1.6-2.6). This combined radiation and heat treatment was enhanced by nicotinamide but the effect depended on the assay procedure, such that although a significant increase was observed with the tumor control assay, only a slight increase was seen using regrowth delay as the end point. The development of moist desquamation in normal feet was used to estimate skin damage after irradiation. Nicotinamide and heat both resulted in a small yet significant increase in skin damage (ERs less than 1.2 and 1.1, respectively). A combined treatment resulted in a greater ER of 1.7, but when compared to the tumor response it still gave a therapeutic gain. A histological fluorescent staining technique was used to assess functional tumor vasculature at two periods in time separated by 20 min. Under normal conditions 7.7% of the vessels in this tumor were functional at one time but not the other. This value was reduced to 2.8% after nicotinamide administration. Since these fluctuations in blood flow can result in acute hypoxia we conclude that while heat eliminates chronically hypoxic tumor cells, nicotinamide probably removes the presence of acute hypoxia

  20. SHP1-mediated cell cycle redistribution inhibits radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioresistance is the common cause for radiotherapy failure in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the degree of radiosensitivity of tumor cells is different during different cell cycle phases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cell cycle redistribution in the establishment of radioresistance in NSCLC, as well as the signaling pathway of SH2 containing Tyrosine Phosphatase (SHP1). A NSCLC subtype cell line, radioresistant A549 (A549S1), was induced by high-dose hypofractionated ionizing radiations. Radiosensitivity-related parameters, cell cycle distribution and expression of cell cycle-related proteins and SHP1 were investigated. siRNA was designed to down-regulate SHP1expression. Compared with native A549 cells, the proportion of cells in the S phase was increased, and cells in the G0/G1 phase were consequently decreased, however, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase did not change in A549S1 cells. Moreover, the expression of SHP1, CDK4 and CylinD1 were significantly increased, while p16 was significantly down-regulated in A549S1 cells compared with native A549 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of SHP1 by siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of A549S1 cells, induced a G0/G1 phase arrest, down-regulated CDK4 and CylinD1expressions, and up-regulated p16 expression. SHP1 decreases the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells through affecting cell cycle distribution. This finding could unravel the molecular mechanism involved in NSCLC radioresistance

  1. MicroRNA-221 and microRNA-222 regulate gastric carcinoma cell proliferation and radioresistance by targeting PTEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can function as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes via regulation of cell proliferation and/or apoptosis. MiR-221 and miR-222 were discovered to induce cell growth and cell cycle progression via direct targeting of p27 and p57 in various human malignancies. However, the roles of miR-221 and miR-222 have not been reported in human gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of miR-221 and miR-222 on human gastric cancer cells, and identified target genes for miR-221 and miR-222 that might mediate their biology. The human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 was transfected with AS-miR-221/222 or transduced with pMSCV-miR-221/222 to knockdown or restore expression of miR-221 and miR-222, respectively. The effects of miR-221 and miR-222 were then assessed by cell viability, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, transwell, and clonogenic assay. Potential target genes were identified by Western blot and luciferase reporter assay. Upregulation of miR-221 and miR-222 induced the malignant phenotype of SGC7901 cells, whereas knockdown of miR-221 and miR-222 reversed this phenotype via induction of PTEN expression. In addition, knockdonwn of miR-221 and miR-222 inhibited cell growth and invasion and increased the radiosensitivity of SGC7901 cells. Notably, the seed sequence of miR-221 and miR-222 matched the 3'UTR of PTEN, and introducing a PTEN cDNA without the 3'UTR into SGC7901 cells abrogated the miR-221 and miR-222-induced malignant phenotype. PTEN-3'UTR luciferase reporter assay confirmed PTEN as a direct target of miR-221 and miR-222. These results demonstrate that miR-221 and miR-222 regulate radiosensitivity, and cell growth and invasion of SGC7901 cells, possibly via direct modulation of PTEN expression. Our study suggests that inhibition of miR-221 and miR-222 might form a novel therapeutic strategy for human gastric cancer

  2. Energetic heavy ions overcome tumor radioresistance caused by overexpression of Bcl-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Overexpression of Bcl-2 is frequent in human cancers and has been associated with radioresistance. Here we investigated the potential impact of heavy ions on Bcl-2 overexpressing tumors. Materials and methods: Bcl-2 cells (Bcl-2 overexpressing HeLa cells) and Neo cells (neomycin resistant gene-expressing HeLa cells) exposed to γ-rays or heavy ions were assessed for the clonogenic survival, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. Results: Whereas Bcl-2 cells were more resistant to γ-rays (0.2 keV/μm) and helium ions (16.2 keV/μm) than Neo cells, heavy ions (76.3-1610 keV/μm) yielded similar survival regardless of Bcl-2 overexpression. Carbon ions (108 keV/μm) decreased the difference in the apoptotic incidence between Bcl-2 and Neo cells, and prolonged G2/M arrest that occurred more extensively in Bcl-2 cells than in Neo cells. Conclusions: High-LET heavy ions overcome tumor radioresistance caused by Bcl-2 overexpression, which may be explained at least in part by the enhanced apoptotic response and prolonged G2/M arrest. Thus, heavy-ion therapy may be a promising modality for Bcl-2 overexpressing radioresistant tumors

  3. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  4. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  5. HIF-1α inhibition by siRNA or chetomin in human malignant glioma cells: effects on hypoxic radioresistance and monitoring via CA9 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bache Matthias

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia induces activation of the HIF-1 pathway and is an essential characteristic of malignant gliomas. Hypoxia has been linked to tumor progression, therapy resistance and poor prognosis. However, little is known about the impact of HIF-1α inhibition on radioresistance of malignant glioma. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of the inhibition of HIF-1α on cell survival and radiosensitivity in U251MG and U343MG glioma cells, using two different strategies. HIF-1α inhibition was achieved by siRNA targeting of HIF-1α or via chetomin, a disruptor of interactions between HIF-1α and p300. The inhibition of the HIF-1 pathway was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses of the expression levels of HIF-1α and CA9. CA9 expression was investigated as a potential indicator of the efficacy of HIF-1 inhibition and the resulting radiosensitivity of malignant glioma cell lines was determined by clonogenic assay after irradiation under normoxic (2-10 Gy or hypoxic (2-15 Gy conditions. Results Although siRNA and chetomin show distinct modes of action, both attenuated the hypoxia-induced radioresistance of malignant glioma cell lines U251MG (DMF10: 1.35 and 1.18 and U343MG (DMF10: 1.78 and 1.48. However, siRNA and chetomin showed diverse effects on radiosensitivity under normoxic conditions in U251MG (DMF10: 0.86 and 1.35 and U343MG (DMF10: 1.33 and 1.02 cells. Conclusions Results from this in vitro study suggest that inhibition of HIF-1α is a promising strategy to sensitize human malignant gliomas to radiotherapy and that CA9 could serve as an indicator of effective HIF-1-related radiosensitization.

  6. Role of endogenous substances in enhancing radioresistance background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of ''wild type'' diploid cells (more radioresistant than haploid ones) are characterized by a higher content of endogenous biologically active substances, which possess a radioprotective ability (biogenous amines and SOD), and a lower level of radiosensitizing substances (hydroperoxides of higher unsaturated fatty acids). With Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bearing mutation rad 51, not all the components of the radioresistance background shoW this dependence, which is indicative of the presence of additional factors affecting radioresistance of these cells

  7. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili, E-mail: commasll@163.com; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  8. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1

  9. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... earliest form of squamous cell cancer is called Bowen disease (or squamous cell carcinoma in situ). This type ... cancer; Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin Images Bowen's disease on the hand Keratoacanthoma Keratoacanthoma Skin cancer, squamous ...

  10. Inhibitory effects of Hedyotis diffusa Willd. on colorectal cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guodong; Wei, Lihui; FENG, JIANYU; LIN, JIUMAO; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are proposed to be closely correlated with the development and progression of tumors, as well as with chemo- and radioresistance. Targeting CSCs may therefore be a promising potential strategy for the treatment of cancer. Currently, natural products have received great interest due to their therapeutic efficacy and reduced adverse effects compared with modern chemotherapeutics. As a significant component of a number of traditional Chinese medicine formulas, the medici...

  11. SirT1 confers hypoxia-induced radioresistance via the modulation of c-Myc stabilization on hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intratumoral hypoxia is an important contributory factor to tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy. SirT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent histone/protein deacetylase, has been linked to the decrease of radiation-induced DNA damage and seems to be critical for cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SirT1 in hypoxia-induced radiation response on hepatoma cells. It was found that the administration with resveratrol, a putative SirT1 activator, enhanced the resistance of HepG2 cells against radiation-induced DNA damage of MN formation under hypoxia condition; while nicotinamide, a well-known SirT1 inhibitor, sensitized this radiation damage. Nevertheless, pretreatment of cells with 10058-F4, a specific inhibitor of c-Myc, almost eliminated the nicotinamide-induced radiosensitive effect. Further studies revealed that resveratrol inhibited c-Myc protein accumulation via up-regulation of SirT1 expression and deacetylase activity, and this loss of c-Myc protein was abolished by inhibiting its degradation in the presence of MG132, a potent inhibitor of proteasome. In contrast, nicotinamide attenuated c-Myc protein degradation induced by radiation under hypoxia through inhibition of SirT1 deacetylase activity. Our findings suggest that SirT1 could serve as a novel potent target of radiation-induced DNA damage and thus as a potential strategy to advance the efficiency of radiation therapy in hepatoma entities. (author)

  12. The mechanisms of Micrococcus radiodurans radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern representations on molecular mechanisms of Micrococcus radiodurans viability under the effect of ionizing radiation have been considered. Factors conditioning a high level of micrococcus cell radiostability have been analyzed: peculiarities of structure of a cell wall, DNA, membranes; excess of genetic information; multiplicity of DNA implantation points to a membrane; high level of antioxidation and antiradical systems. It has been shown that on efficiency of accurate, properly balanced system of DNA repair combined with above Micrococcus radiodurant properties provide a high microorganism radioresistance

  13. Cancer stem cells and resistance to chemo and radio therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Babar; Nie, Daotai

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumor initiating cells) are responsible for tumor initiation. If cancer treatment kills most of cancer cells in the stage of transit amplifying and differentiation without killing the stem cells, the surviving CSCs will eventually lead to recurrence of tumors. Studies have suggested that CSCs may be the primary mediators of resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, leading to failure in cancer therapy. Numerous targets are being investigated for their potential involvement in the self-renewal and chemo- and radio-resistance of cancer cells. However, despite the intensive efforts invested into characterizing the role of cancer stem cells, there is a sense of uncertainty regarding the identity and number of these cells as well as the implications in cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss the identification of CSCs by cell surface markers, the biology of CSCs, and the role of CSCs in resistance to radio- and chemo-therapy. This review will discuss the advances in targeting CSCs to improve the efficacy of chemo- and radio-therapy. PMID:22202026

  14. Tumor heterogeneity, tumor size, and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutant clonogenic cells, resistant to individual chemotherapeutic agents, are known to play a central role in clinical chemotherapy failure. The possibility that mutant cells, resistant to conventionally fractionated megavoltage photon radiotherapy, exist in human tumors is considered. Applying the mutation theory of Luria and Delbruck to describe the appearance of resistant cells, several conclusions follow: (a) the mean number of resistant cells in a tumor will be determined by the tumor size and the mutation rate; (b) a wide variation in radiosensitivity in tumors of the same histology is expected, because of a large variation in the number of resistant cells that they contain; (c) the presence of a resistant clone will not reduce the tumor-control probability until the tumor becomes sufficiently large; (d) initial response will not be a reliable predictor of long-term control; (e) clonogenic assays may not accurately predict treatment outcomes; (f) the mutation rate may be the most accurate predictor of tumor aggressiveness and resistance to various treatment modalities; (g) tumors with a low mutation rate, which may include seminoma, Hodgkin's disease and many pediatric tumors would be curable by either chemotherapy or radiation; (h) pleomorphic tumors with a high mutation rate, which may include glioblastoma multiforme, would be difficult to cure by any means. Clinical and experimental evidence is reviewed for the existence of radioresistant cell lines in human and animal tumors, and further experiments are proposed to test this hypothesis. Treatment strategies for targeting radioresistant clones are discussed

  15. The small-molecule Bcl-2 inhibitor HA14-1 sensitizes cervical cancer cells, but not normal fibroblasts, to heavy-ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first study to demonstrate that the small-molecule Bcl-2 inhibitor HA14-1 renders human cervical cancer cells and their Bcl-2 overexpressing radioresistant counterparts, but not normal fibroblasts, more susceptible to heavy ions. Thus, Bcl-2 may be an attractive target for improving the efficacy of heavy-ion therapy

  16. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  17. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parisha; Bhatia; Koji; Tsumagari; Zakaria; Y; Abd; Elmageed; Paul; Friedlander; Joseph; F; Buell; Emad; Kandil

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  18. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  19. Cancer stem cell overexpression of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase enhances cellular radiation resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Andrea, Filippo P.; Safwat, Akmal; Kassem, Moustapha; Gautier, Laurent; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundCancer stem cells are thought to be a radioresistant population and may be the seeds for recurrence after radiotherapy. Using tumorigenic clones of retroviral immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell with small differences in their phenotype, we investigated possible genetic expression...... analysis found the genes involved in cancer, proliferation, DNA repair and cell death. ConclusionsThe higher radiation resistance in clone CE8 is likely due to NNMT overexpression. The higher levels of NNMT could affect the cellular damage resistance through depletion of the accessible amounts of...... nicotinamide, which is a known inhibitor of cellular DNA repair mechanisms....

  20. Inductoin of Radioresistance by Overexpression of Glutathione S-Transferase K1 (hGSTK1) in MCF-7 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sei One [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    Purpose : This study was conducted to assess the effects of x-irradiation on the expression of the novel glutathione S-transferase K1 gene. Materials and methods : Human glutathione S-transferase K1 (hGSTK1) DNA was purified and ligated to a pcDNA3.1/Myc-His(+) vector for the overexpression of hGSTK1 gene. MCF-7 cells were transfected with or without the recombinant hGSTK1 gene, and irradiated with 6 MV x-ray. After incubation of 14 days, cell survival was measured and compared. The expression of hGSTK1 and the effect of x- irradiation on hGSTK1 expression were also estimated in MCF-7 cells transfected with or without the hGSTK1 gene by RT-PCR. Results : Following 2 to 12 Gy of x-irradiation, the cell survivals were higher in the MCF-7 cells transfected with the hGSTK1 gene than in those without transfection. Despite the higher cell survival in the hGSTK1-transfected cells, RT-PCR for hGSTK1 mRNA revealed no significant differences according to radiation dose, fractionation, and time after irradiation. Conclusion : The MCF-7 cells transfected with the hGSTK1 gene showed higher cell survival than those without transfection of the gene. The hGSTK1 gene might be associated with the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cell line and further analysis should be needed.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Wieczorek; Jolanta Niewiarowska

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory gains increasingly greater significance in the world of medicine. Numerous findings of scientific research in vivo and in vitro indicate that it is the population of undifferentiated, self-renewing cells which is responsible for recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Similarly to normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) function in the environment of the other cells of the organism, called the niche, where they receive signals for differentiation and proliferation proc...

  2. Heavy-ion irradiation induced alteration in histopathology and cancer stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether carbon ion irradiation (IR) had beneficial effects by targeting putative human colon cancer stem cells, cancer stem-like cells sorted from HCT116 were treated with or without carbon ion or X-ray IR and then colony formation assay, spheroid formation assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, as well as xenograft tumor growth control analyses were performed. CD133+, CD44+/ESA+ cells significantly have higher number of colony, spheroid compared to CD133-, CD44-/ESA-cells. CD133+, CD44+/ESA+ cells were showed radioresistance to both X-ray and carbon ion IR, but the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values calculated at the D10 level for cancer stem-like cells were 2.05 to 2.09. CD133+, CD44+/ESA+ cells have shown more potential to form tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice than CD133-, CD44-/ESA-cells, and carbon ion IR has more effectively eradicate xenograft tumors compared to X-rays. In conclusion, heavy ion IR has a great potential to effectively target radioresistant putative human colon cancer stem cells. (author)

  3. Inhibition of mTOR enhances radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells and protects normal lung cells against radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hang; Wang, Miao; Wu, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Nan, Hai-Jun; Sun, He

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for a long time as a standard therapy for cancer; however, there have been no recent research breakthroughs. Radioresistance and various side-effects lead to the unexpected outcomes of radiation therapy. Specific and accurate targeting as well as reduction of radioresistance have been major challenges for irradiation therapy. Recent studies have shown that rapamycin shows promise for inhibiting tumorigenesis by suppressing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We found that the combination of rapamycin with irradiation significantly diminished cell viability and colony formation, and increased cell apoptosis, as compared with irradiation alone in lung cancer cell line A549, suggesting that rapamycin can enhance the effectiveness of radiation therapy by sensitizing cancer cells to irradiation. Importantly, we observed that the adverse effects of irradiation on a healthy lung cell line (WI-38) were also offset. No enhanced protein expression of mTOR signaling was observed in WI-38 cells, which is normally elevated in lung cancer cells. Moreover, DNA damage was significantly less with the combination therapy than with irradiation therapy alone. Our data suggest that the incorporation of rapamycin during radiation therapy could be a potent way to improve the sensitivity and effectiveness of radiation therapy as well as to protect normal cells from being damaged by irradiation. PMID:26999331

  4. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, Sharon R.; Blair Marshall; Lyuba Varticovski

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation p...

  5. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in radiosensitive and radioresistant human tumour cells measured by field inversion gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced DNA damage induction and repair was measured in two human squamous carcinoma cell lines with differing radiosensitivities. Experiments were carried out with field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), adapted to measure DNA double strand break (DSB) induction and repair in unlabelled cells. The sensitivity of the method was increased by introducing a hybridization membrane into the agarose gel. Damaged DNA accumulated on one spot on the membrane resulting in high local concentrations. This DNA was quantified using radioactively-labelled total human DNA as a probe. Radiosensitivity differences at physiological temperatures could not be explained by differences in either induction or repair of DNA damage as measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. (author)

  6. Innovative therapeutic strategies against chemo and radio-resistant cancers : hydrogenated Nanodiamonds and Metal organic frameworks. An in vitro study in 2D and 3D systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Grall, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on nanoparticles and their great skills for oncology therapies. Two kinds of nanoparticles have been studied in order to biologically validate and characterize their features. The use of hydrogenated Nanodiamonds (H-NDs) as radio sensitizer is based on a physic-chemical postulate where they act as oxidative stress generator through interaction with irradiation. Thus we validated this hypothesis in radio resistant kidney and breast cancer cell lines and identify senesc...

  7. Breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to th...

  8. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  9. Nitric oxide induces cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongsanguanchai, Nuttida; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Rojanasakul, Yon; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-15

    Even though tremendous advances have been made in the treatment of cancers during the past decades, the success rate among patients with cancer is still dismal, largely because of problems associated with chemo/radioresistance and relapse. Emerging evidence has indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are behind the resistance and recurrence problems, but our understanding of their regulation is limited. Rapid reversible changes of CSC-like cells within tumors may result from the effect of biological mediators found in the tumor microenvironment. Here we show how nitric oxide (NO), a key cellular modulator whose level is elevated in many tumors, affects CSC-like phenotypes of human non-small cell lung carcinoma H292 and H460 cells. Exposure of NO gradually altered the cell morphology toward mesenchymal stem-like shape. NO exposure promoted CSC-like phenotype, indicated by increased expression of known CSC markers, CD133 and ALDH1A1, in the exposed cells. These effects of NO on stemness were reversible after cessation of the NO treatment for 7 days. Furthermore, such effect was reproducible using another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. Importantly, inhibition of NO by the known NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5 tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide strongly inhibited CSC-like aggressive cellular behavior and marker expression. Last, we unveiled the underlying mechanism of NO action through the activation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), which is upregulated by NO and is responsible for the aggressive behavior of the cells, including anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent cell growth, and increased cell migration and invasion. These findings indicate a novel role of NO in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors through Cav-1 upregulation. PMID:25411331

  10. Gastric Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Timothy C Wang

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as the unique subpopulation in the tumors that possess the ability to initiate tumor growth and sustain self-renewal as well as metastatic potential. Accumulating evidence in recent years strongly indicate the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors of a wide variety of organs. In this review, we will discuss the possible existence of a gastric cancer stem cell. Our recent data suggest that a subpopulation with a defined marker shows spheroid colony format...

  11. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Pestell, Richard G.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now viewed as a stem cell disease. There is still no consensus on the metabolic characteristics of cancer stem cells, with several studies indicating that they are mainly glycolytic and others pointing instead to mitochondrial metabolism as their principal source of energy. Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes. Deter...

  12. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  13. miR-193a-3p regulation of chemoradiation resistance in oesophageal cancer cells via the PSEN1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fang; Qian, Liting; Lv, Lei; Ding, Bojin; Zhou, Gieping; Cheng, Xu; Niu, Sanqiang; Liang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Chemoradiation therapy is an important component of the curative treatment for oesophageal carcinomas. These therapeutic effects are prevented in patients according to radioresistance and multi-drug resistance, and the cause of such resistance remains unclear. In this study, we identified the role of miR-193a-3p in modulating the radioresistance and chemoresistance of oesophageal cancer cells. We found that KYSE150 and KYSE410 cells could be characterized as relatively radiation-sensitive and radiation-resistant cells, respectively. Similarly, KYSE150 and KYSE410 cells were found to be chemosensitive and chemoresistant, respectively. Over-expression of miR-193a-3p increased the radioresistance and chemoresistance of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. In contrast, the down-regulation of miR-193a-3p decreased the radioresistance and chemoresistance of ESCC cells. In addition, miR-193a-3p inducing DNA damage has also been demonstrated through measuring the level of gamma-H2AX associated with miR-193a-3p. Moreover, a small interfering RNA(siRNA)-induced repression of the PSEN1 gene had an effect similar to that of miR-193a-3p up-regulation. The above processes also inhibited oesophageal cancer cells apoptosis. These findings suggest that miR-193a-3p contributes to the radiation and chemotherapy resistance of oesophageal carcinoma by down-regulating PSEN1. Thus, miR-193a-3p and PSEN1 might be potential biomarkers for chemoradiation resistant cancers. PMID:26743123

  14. DNA methylome analysis identifies epigenetic silencing of FHIT as a determining factor for radiosensitivity in oral cancer: an outcome-predicting and treatment-implicating study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hon-Yi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Huang, Tze-Ta; Tseng, Chih-En; Shih, Liang-Yu; Lin, Ru-Inn; Lin, Jora M.J.; Lai, Yi-Hui; Chang, Chia-Bin; Hsu, Feng-Chun; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Su, Yu-Chieh; Li, Szu-Chi; Lai, Hung-Chih; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Tai, Chien-Kuo; Wu, Shu-Fen; Chan, Michael W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Radioresistance is still an emerging problem for radiotherapy of oral cancer. Aberrant epigenetic alterations play an important role in cancer development, yet the role of such alterations in radioresistance of oral cancer is not fully explored. Using a methylation microarray, we identified promoter hypermethylation of FHIT (fragile histidine triad) in radioresistant OML1-R cells, established from hypo-fractionated irradiation of parental OML1 radiosensitive oral cancer cells. Further analysis confirmed that transcriptional repression of FHIT was due to promoter hypermethylation, H3K27me3 and overexpression of methyltransferase EZH2 in OML1-R cells. Epigenetic interventions or depletion of EZH2 restored FHIT expression. Ectopic expression of FHIT inhibited tumor growth in both in vitro and in vivo models, while also resensitizing radioresistant cancer cells to irradiation, by restoring Chk2 phosphorylation and G2/M arrest. Clinically, promoter hypermethylation of FHIT inversely correlated with its expression and independently predicted both locoregional control and overall survival in 40 match-paired oral cancer patient samples. Further in vivo therapeutic experiments confirmed that inhibition of DNA methylation significantly resensitized radioresistant oral cancer cell xenograft tumors. These results show that epigenetic silencing of FHIT contributes partially to radioresistance and predicts clinical outcomes in irradiated oral cancer. The radiosensitizing effect of epigenetic interventions warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25460508

  15. Gene Expression Profile of Proton Beam Irradiated Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells. The mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, including to proton beam, remain unclear. They showed that a subset of cells expressing CD44 with weak or no CD24 expression could establish new tumors in xenograft mice. Recently, BCSC-targeting therapies have been evaluated by numerous groups. Strategies include targeting BCSC self-renewal, indirectly targeting the microenvironment, and directly killing BCSCs by chemical agents that induce differentiation, immunotherapy, and oncolytic viruses. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. The identification of CSC-related gene expression patterns would make up offer data for better understanding CSCs properties. In this study we investigated the gene expression profile of BCSCs isolation from MCF-7 cell line. Reducing BCSC resistance to pulsed proton beams is essential to improve therapeutic efficacy and decrease the 5-year recurrence rate. In this respect, the information of the level of gene expression patterns in BCSCs is attractive for understanding molecular mechanisms of radio-resistance of BCSCs.

  16. Gene Expression Profile of Proton Beam Irradiated Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells. The mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, including to proton beam, remain unclear. They showed that a subset of cells expressing CD44 with weak or no CD24 expression could establish new tumors in xenograft mice. Recently, BCSC-targeting therapies have been evaluated by numerous groups. Strategies include targeting BCSC self-renewal, indirectly targeting the microenvironment, and directly killing BCSCs by chemical agents that induce differentiation, immunotherapy, and oncolytic viruses. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. The identification of CSC-related gene expression patterns would make up offer data for better understanding CSCs properties. In this study we investigated the gene expression profile of BCSCs isolation from MCF-7 cell line. Reducing BCSC resistance to pulsed proton beams is essential to improve therapeutic efficacy and decrease the 5-year recurrence rate. In this respect, the information of the level of gene expression patterns in BCSCs is attractive for understanding molecular mechanisms of radio-resistance of BCSCs

  17. MicroRNAs in Cervical Cancer: Evidences for a miRNA Profile Deregulated by HPV and Its Impact on Radio-Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham Pedroza-Torres; Eduardo López-Urrutia; Verónica García-Castillo; Nadia Jacobo-Herrera; Herrera, Luis A.; Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza; César López-Camarillo; David Cantú De Leon; Jorge Fernández-Retana; Jorge F. Cerna-Cortés; Carlos Pérez-Plasencia

    2014-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma (CC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly demonstrated a causal role of high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in CC initiation and progression, affecting the cellular processes by targeting and inactivating p53 and pRB host proteins. HR-HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncoproteins have the ability to deregulate several cellular processes, mostly apoptosis, cell cycle control, migra...

  18. Cyclophilin B Expression Is Associated with In Vitro Radioresistance and Clinical Outcome after Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Williams

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The tools for predicting clinical outcome after radiotherapy are not yet optimal. To improve on this, we applied the COXEN informatics approach to in vitro radiation sensitivity data of transcriptionally profiled human cells and gene expression data from untreated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and bladder tumors to generate a multigene predictive model that is independent of histologic findings and reports on tumor radiosensitivity. The predictive ability of this 41-gene model was evaluated in patients with HNSCC and was found to stratify clinical outcome after radiotherapy. In contrast, this model was not useful in stratifying similar patients not treated with radiation. This led us to hypothesize that expression of some of the 41 genes contributes to tumor radioresistance and clinical recurrence. Hence, we evaluated the expression the 41 genes as a function of in vitro radioresistance in the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel and found cyclophilin B (PPIB, a peptidylprolyl isomerase and target of cyclosporine A (CsA, had the strongest direct correlation. Functional inhibition of PPIB by small interfering RNA depletion or CsA treatment leads to radiosensitization in cancer cells and reduced cellular DNA repair. Immunohistochemical evaluation of PPIB expression in patients with HNSCC was found to be associated with outcome after radiotherapy. This work demonstrates that a novel 41-gene expression model of radiation sensitivity developed in bladder cancer cell lines and human skin fibroblasts predicts clinical outcome after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients and identifies PPIB as a potential target for clinical radiosensitization.

  19. INPP4B-mediated tumor resistance is associated with modulation of glucose metabolism via hexokinase 2 regulation in laryngeal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Joong Won [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Il [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Noh, Woo Chul [Department of Surgery, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hong Bae [Biomedical Research Institute, MEDIPOST Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-Hyung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong Su [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: jaesung@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •HIF-1α-regulated INPP4B enhances glycolysis. •INPP4B regulates aerobic glycolysis by inducing HK2 via Akt-mTOR pathway. •Blockage of INPP4B and HK2 sensitizes radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to radiation and anticancer drug. •INPP4B is associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) was recently identified as a tumor resistance factor in laryngeal cancer cells. Herein, we show that INPP4B-mediated resistance is associated with increased glycolytic phenotype. INPP4B expression was induced by hypoxia and irradiation. Intriguingly, overexpression of INPP4B enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Of the glycolysis-regulatory genes, hexokinase 2 (HK2) was mainly regulated by INPP4B and this regulation was mediated through the Akt-mTOR pathway. Notably, codepletion of INPP4B and HK2 markedly sensitized radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to irradiation or anticancer drug. Moreover, INPP4B was significantly associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. Therefore, these results suggest that INPP4B modulates aerobic glycolysis via HK2 regulation in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells.

  20. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Increases Radiosensitivity of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Prolonging Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Khoram, Nastaran Masoudi; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Nikoofar, Alireza; Goliaei, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is an important cause of death among women. The development of radioresistance in breast cancer leads to recurrence after radiotherapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a polyphenolic compound of honeybee propolis, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether CAPE enhanced the radiation sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and T47D (estrogen receptor-positive) cell lines. Methods The cytotoxic effect of CAPE on MDA-MB-2...

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory modifiers confer survival advantage by facilitating DNA repair in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High rate of aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), one of the primary hallmarks of cancer cells, acquired during the multistep development of tumors is also responsible for therapeutic resistance. Underlying this hallmark is the compromised respiratory metabolism that contributes to the acquisition of the glycolytic phenotype for sustained ATP production and cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying the glycolysis-linked radio-resistance in cancer cells remain elusive. In this study, we transiently elevated glycolysis by treating human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1) with mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs) viz. 2,4-dinitrophenol, Photosan-3, and Methylene blue to examine if transient stimulation of glycolysis before irradiation using MRMs is sufficient to confer radioresistance. Treatment with MRMs led to a significant (two-fold) increase in glucose consumption and lactate production together with a robust increase in the protein levels of two key regulators of glucose metabolism, i.e. GLUT-1 and HK-II. MRMs also enhanced the clonogenic survival and facilitated DNA repair by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. Inhibition of glucose uptake by inhibitors like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), 3-bromo pyruvate (3-BP) and fasentin under conditions of stimulated glycolysis not only reversed the effect but also sensitized the cells to radiation more profoundly. The inhibition of glycolysis using 2-DG also reduced the levels of Ku 70 (NHEJ) and Rad-51 (HR) proteins. Thus, our results suggest that enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells may confer radio-resistance and offers survival advantage partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage. (author)

  2. Cancer Stem Cells, Cancer Cell Plasticity and Radiation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be ...

  3. Ionizing radiation, human carcinogenesis and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H2O2 and free radicals are correlated with inflammatory diseases, cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Experiments studying their direct or indirect influence in vivo, and/or, in cell cultures were still positive. In the contrary, reactions or products, which decrease level(s) of free radicals/H2O2 (i) directly, (ii) indirectly by an increase of SOD, catalase and peroxydase activities zeroed the above described phenomena. It is the case of the domain number 2 (that contains copper) of the Scorpion's blood pigment (hemocyanin), (i) which possesses SOD-, catalase-and peroxyde-like properties, resistant, at least, at 4000Gy, furthermore explaining the especially high radioresistance of scorpions. (author)

  4. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MatthewJNaylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  5. Radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease in patients with spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla; Dunst, Juergen; Rades, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Basic, Hiba [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Karstens, Johann H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr Univ. of Bochum (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Background: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Patients with relatively radioresistant tumors and oligometastatic disease may benefit from more intensive therapies (surgery, high-precision radiotherapy). If such therapies are not available, one can speculate whether patients benefit from dose escalation beyond the standard regimen 30 Gy in ten fractions. Patients and methods: Of 206 patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors (renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, malignant melanoma), 51 had oligometastatic disease (no visceral or other bone metastases, involvement of only one to three vertebrae). In this subset, 21 patients receiving 30 Gy in ten fractions were retrospectively compared to 30 patients receiving higher doses. Seven further potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy of MSCC, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 52% of patients after 30 Gy and 40% after higher doses (p = 0.44). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.020). 1-year local control rates were 84% after 30 Gy and 82% after higher doses (p = 0.75). No factor was associated with local control. 1-year survival rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 63% after higher doses (p = 0.52). On multivariate analysis, survival was associated with performance status (p = 0.022) and interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.039), and almost with pretreatment ambulatory status (p = 0.069). Conclusion: Dose escalation beyond 30 Gy in ten fractions did not improve motor function, local control, and survival in MSCC patients with oligometastatic disease from relatively radioresistant tumors. (orig.)

  6. MicroRNAs in Cervical Cancer: Evidences for a miRNA Profile Deregulated by HPV and Its Impact on Radio-Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Pedroza-Torres

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical carcinoma (CC is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly demonstrated a causal role of high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV types in CC initiation and progression, affecting the cellular processes by targeting and inactivating p53 and pRB host proteins. HR-HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncoproteins have the ability to deregulate several cellular processes, mostly apoptosis, cell cycle control, migration, immune evasion, and induction of genetic instability, which promote the accumulation of mutations and aneuploidy. In this scenario, genomic profiles have shown that aberrant expression of cellular oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNAs have an important role in CC carcinogenesis. It has been stated that HPV infection and E6/E7 expression are essential but not sufficient to lead to CC development; hence other genetic and epigenetic factors have to be involved in this complex disease. Recent evidence suggests an important level of interaction among E6/E7 viral proteins and cellular miRNA, and other noncoding RNAs. The aim of the current review is to analyze recent data that mainly describe the interaction between HR-HPV established infections and specific cellular miRNAs; moreover, to understand how those interactions could affect radio-therapeutic response in tumor cells.

  7. MicroRNAs in cervical cancer: evidences for a miRNA profile deregulated by HPV and its impact on radio-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; López-Urrutia, Eduardo; García-Castillo, Verónica; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Herrera, Luis A; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; López-Camarillo, César; De Leon, David Cantú; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; Cerna-Cortés, Jorge F; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma (CC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly demonstrated a causal role of high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in CC initiation and progression, affecting the cellular processes by targeting and inactivating p53 and pRB host proteins. HR-HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncoproteins have the ability to deregulate several cellular processes, mostly apoptosis, cell cycle control, migration, immune evasion, and induction of genetic instability, which promote the accumulation of mutations and aneuploidy. In this scenario, genomic profiles have shown that aberrant expression of cellular oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNAs have an important role in CC carcinogenesis. It has been stated that HPV infection and E6/E7 expression are essential but not sufficient to lead to CC development; hence other genetic and epigenetic factors have to be involved in this complex disease. Recent evidence suggests an important level of interaction among E6/E7 viral proteins and cellular miRNA, and other noncoding RNAs. The aim of the current review is to analyze recent data that mainly describe the interaction between HR-HPV established infections and specific cellular miRNAs; moreover, to understand how those interactions could affect radio-therapeutic response in tumor cells. PMID:24840898

  8. High expression of HIF-2α and its anti-radiotherapy effect in lung cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J C; He, F; Yi, W; Wan, M H; Li, R; Wei, X; Wu, R; Niu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) has been shown to regulate cell stemness, although the expression and effects of HIF-2α in lung cancer stem cells remained unclear. This study investigated HIF-2α expression in lung cancer stem cells, as well as the relationship between HIF-2α expression and radioresistance in lung cancer cells. Stem-like cells (CD133(+)) in the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549 were enriched by serum-free culture conditions, and CD133(+) cells were sorted via fluorescence-activated cell sorting. A549 cells were treated with middle-infrared radiation, and the level of HIF-2α expression was determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and western blot analysis. The level of HIF-2α expression in tissue sections from 50 cases of clinically confirmed non-small-cell lung cancer was determined via immunohistochemical analysis, and its correlation with prognosis after radiotherapy was analyzed. HIF-2α levels in CD133(+) cells were significantly higher than those in CD133(-) cells (P = 0.032). However, after radiation treatment, these levels were significantly upregulated in both CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells (P = 0.031 and P = 0.023, respectively). After irradiation, the proportions of apoptotic, dead, and autophagic CD133(+) A549 cells were considerably lower than those of CD133(-) A549 cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the recovery of carcinoembryonic antigen to pre-radiation levels was more rapid in lung cancer patients with high levels of HIF-2α expression, and these patients had shorter survival times (P = 0.018). HIF-2α is highly expressed in lung cancer stem cells, which may lead to radioresistance. In conclusion, HIF-2α is a potential prognostic marker for lung cancer. PMID:26782458

  9. Radiation-Induced Glycogen Accumulation Detected by Single Cell Raman Spectroscopy Is Associated with Radioresistance that Can Be Reversed by Metformin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Matthews

    Full Text Available Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumor cells and contributes to a host of properties associated with resistance to radiotherapy. Detection of radiation-induced biochemical changes can reveal unique metabolic pathways affecting radiosensitivity that may serve as attractive therapeutic targets. Using clinically relevant doses of radiation, we performed label-free single cell Raman spectroscopy on a series of human cancer cell lines and detected radiation-induced accumulation of intracellular glycogen. The increase in glycogen post-irradiation was highest in lung (H460 and breast (MCF7 tumor cells compared to prostate (LNCaP tumor cells. In response to radiation, the appearance of this glycogen signature correlated with radiation resistance. Moreover, the buildup of glycogen was linked to the phosphorylation of GSK-3β, a canonical modulator of cell survival following radiation exposure and a key regulator of glycogen metabolism. When MCF7 cells were irradiated in the presence of the anti-diabetic drug metformin, there was a significant decrease in the amount of radiation-induced glycogen. The suppression of glycogen by metformin following radiation was associated with increased radiosensitivity. In contrast to MCF7 cells, metformin had minimal effects on both the level of glycogen in H460 cells following radiation and radiosensitivity. Our data demonstrate a novel approach of spectral monitoring by Raman spectroscopy to assess changes in the levels of intracellular glycogen as a potential marker and resistance mechanism to radiation therapy.

  10. Radiation-Induced Glycogen Accumulation Detected by Single Cell Raman Spectroscopy Is Associated with Radioresistance that Can Be Reversed by Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Quinn; Isabelle, Martin; Harder, Samantha J; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G; Jirasek, Andrew; Lum, Julian J

    2015-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumor cells and contributes to a host of properties associated with resistance to radiotherapy. Detection of radiation-induced biochemical changes can reveal unique metabolic pathways affecting radiosensitivity that may serve as attractive therapeutic targets. Using clinically relevant doses of radiation, we performed label-free single cell Raman spectroscopy on a series of human cancer cell lines and detected radiation-induced accumulation of intracellular glycogen. The increase in glycogen post-irradiation was highest in lung (H460) and breast (MCF7) tumor cells compared to prostate (LNCaP) tumor cells. In response to radiation, the appearance of this glycogen signature correlated with radiation resistance. Moreover, the buildup of glycogen was linked to the phosphorylation of GSK-3β, a canonical modulator of cell survival following radiation exposure and a key regulator of glycogen metabolism. When MCF7 cells were irradiated in the presence of the anti-diabetic drug metformin, there was a significant decrease in the amount of radiation-induced glycogen. The suppression of glycogen by metformin following radiation was associated with increased radiosensitivity. In contrast to MCF7 cells, metformin had minimal effects on both the level of glycogen in H460 cells following radiation and radiosensitivity. Our data demonstrate a novel approach of spectral monitoring by Raman spectroscopy to assess changes in the levels of intracellular glycogen as a potential marker and resistance mechanism to radiation therapy. PMID:26280348

  11. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy.

  12. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy

  13. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  14. Evidence and analysis of radioresistance induced by protracted gamma irradiation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa chick, green unicellular alga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorella cells, unicellular green algae, are a suitable living material to study radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after acute or protracted gamma irradiations. Cell survival and survival curves are taken as end-points. Methods of irradiation were defined taking in account interferences of the different factors which can intervene during the experimentation. Survival curves after protracted irradiation of Chlorella cell cultures in plateau-phase have a shape that can be explained by radioresistance. The population of surviving cells becomes radioresistant in front of protracted and acute irradiations, acute irradiation allowing us to analyze radioresistance. Radioresistance increases with the total dose of protracted irradiation. The decrease of radiosensitivity with aging of cells is not able to explain the phenomenon. It is not due to selection of radioresistance cells by protracted irradiation. All the cells get radioresistance. Radioresistance decreases with the time when protracted irradiation is suppressed. It is not found in offspring. It is not a mutation but perhaps the effect of a stimulation of repair processes, but not potentially lethal damage repair

  15. Prostate cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate glandular formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative AR− status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade ther...

  16. Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2-mediated transfer of the human superoxide-dismutase gene does not confer radioresistance on HeLa cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The success rate of any therapeutic approach depends on the therapeutic window, which can be increased by either raising the resistance of the normal tissue without protecting the tumor cells or by sensitizing the tumor cells but not the normal cells. Two promising candidate genes for normal tissue protection against radiation-induced damage may be the copper-zinc (CuZnSOD) and manganese superoxide-dismutase genes (MnSOD). The recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV-2) offers attractive advantages over other vector systems: low immunogenicity, ability to infect dividing and non-dividing tissues and a low chance of insertional mutagenesis, due to extra-chromosomal localization. We report the production of novel rAAV-2-SOD vectors and the investigation of their modulating effects on HeLa-RC cells after irradiation. Material and methods: rAAV-2 vectors were cloned containing the human CuZnSOD or MnSOD as transgene and vector stocks were produced. In the initial experiments human cervix carcinoma (HeLa-RC) cells were chosen for their susceptibility to rAAV-2. On day 0, cells were seeded and transduced with the rAAV-2-SOD vectors. On day 3, cells were harvested, irradiated (0.5-8 Gy) and reseeded in different assays (FACS, SOD, MTT and colony assays). Results: Although >70% of all cells expressed SOD and significant amounts of functional SOD protein were detected, no radioprotective effect of SOD was observed after transduction of HeLa-RC cells. Conclusions: Novel rAAV-2-SOD vectors that could be produced at high titer, were able to efficiently infect cells and express the SOD genes. The absence of a radioprotective effect in HeLa-RC cancer cells indicates an additional safety feature and suggests that rAAV-mediated MnSOD overexpression might contribute to increasing the therapeutic index when applied for normal tissue protection

  17. Characterization and application of radiation-sensitizing genes by DNA methylation in lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Il Lae; Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan

    2011-03-15

    The sensitivity or resistance of cancer cells and normal tissues to ionizing radiation plays an important role in the clinical setting of lung cancer treatment. However, to date the exact molecular mechanisms of intrinsic radiosensitivity have not been well explained. In this study, we compared the radiosensitivity or radioresistance in two non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), H460 and A549, and investigated the signaling pathways that confer radioresistance. H460 cells showed a significant G2/M arrest after 12 h of irradiation (5 Gy), reaching 60% of G2/M phase arrest. A549 cells also showed a significant G2/M arrest after 12 h of exposure; however, this arrest completely disappeared after 24 h of exposure. A549 has higher methylated CpG sites in PTEN, which is correlated with tumor radioresistance in some cancer cells, than H460 cells, and the average of the extent of the methylation was {approx}4.3 times higher in A549 cells than in H460 cells. As a result, PTEN expression was lower in A549 than in H460. Conducting Western blot analysis, we found that PTEN acted as a negative regulator for pAkt, and the pAkt acted as a negative regulator for p53 expression. According to the above results, we concluded that the radiosensitivity shown in H460 cells may be due to the higher expression of PTEN through p53 signaling pathway. The expression of the Wnt-antagonist Dickkopf gene (DKK) is downregulated in several types of tumors as a consequence of epigenetic DNA modification; four DKK members, DKK1, DKK2, DKK3, and DKK4, have been identified. In this study, we investigated another function of DKK3 in non-small cell lung cancer H460 cells, in which DKK3 was hypermethylated (44%) but still expressed, by interfering with DKK3 expression using DKK3-silencing RNA (SiRNA). We found that knockdown of DKK3 expression by DKK3 SiRNA transfection led to the detachment of H460 cells from the bottom of the culture plate and caused apoptosis. The expression of cyclindependent kinases

  18. Stem Cells and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  19. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer

  20. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aurelio Lorico; Eric Deutsch; Bo Lu; Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of cells within tumors with capabilities of self-renewal, differentiation, and tumorigenicity when transplanted into an animal host. A number of cell surface markers such as CD44, CD24, and CD133 are often used to identify and enrich CSCs. A regulatory network consisting of microRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways controls the CSC properties. The clinical relevance of CSCs has been strengthened by emerging evidence,...

  1. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fumitaka Takeshita; Tomohiro Fujiwara; Takahiro Ochiya; Makiko Ono; Ryou-u Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is generally acknowledged as an important field of cancer research, not only as an academic matter but also as a crucial aspect of clinical practice. CSCs share a variety of biological properties with normal somatic stem cells in self-renewal, the propagation of differentiated progeny, the expression of specific cell markers and stem cell genes, and the utilization of common signaling pathways and the stem cell niche. However, CSCs differ from normal stem cel...

  2. Mechanism of heavy ion radiation-induced cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that the carbon beam triggers apoptosis in radio-resistant cancer cell lines via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and mitochondrial Bcl-2 family protein-dependant mechanism. Here, we further examined the further apoptosis-inducing mechanism of carbon beam in two glioma cell lines (T98G, U251). ERK1/2 knockdown experiments revealed that ERK regulates this apoptosis-inducing machinery upstream of mitochondria. Furthermore, we also found that both T98G cell and U251 cell stably expressing dominant-negative ERK2 suppress cell death induced by carbon beam irradiation. We also found proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 dynamically chang their expression levels corresponding to ERK activation after CB irradiation in U251 cell, and knockdown of PUMA decreased CB-induced U251 cell death. These data suggest that kinase action of ERK is essential for CB-induced glioma cell death, and proapoptotic PUMA and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 might be downstream targets of ERK in CB-induced glioma cell death mechanism. (author)

  3. Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testicular Cancer Resource Center Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC) 95% of all testicular tumors are germ cell ... seen in young adults. Patients with mediastinal nonseminomatous EGC are typically classed as poor risk patients because ...

  4. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer. PMID:25901861

  5. Cancer stem cells in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Moltzahn, Felix; Thalmann, George N

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (P-Ca) remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Lately, increasing evidence for a hierarchically organized cancer stem cell (CSC) model emerged for different tumors entities, including P-Ca. CSCs are defined by several characteristics including self-renewal, pluripotency and tumorigenicity and are thought to be responsible for tumor recurrence, metastasis and cancer related death. In this review we discuss the recent research in the field of CSCs, its limitation...

  6. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karl-Walter Jauch; Hendrik Seeliger; Hanno Niess; Qi Bao; Andrea Renner; Yue Zhao; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC t...

  7. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  8. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  9. Effect of BRCA1 on radiosensitivity of different lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects BRCA1 on sensitivity of lung cancer cells to γ-irradiation. Methods: A mammalian expression pcDNA3 vectors encoding a full-length of BRCA1 cDNA and BRCA1 siRNA were transfected into lung cancer cells. Western blot, MTT and clonogenic assays were used to determine BRCA1 protein expression and cell survival following γ-irradiation respectively. Results: There is a close relationship between BRCA1 level and radiosensitivity in different lung cancer cell lines. Compared with the control cells transfected with the 'empty' pcDNA3 vector and parental cells, the more survival of cells transfected with BRCA1 was observed after irradiation. The BRCA1-caused radioresistance were observed in both A549 and HTB-58 lung cancer lines. However, NIH-H2170 cells transfected with BRCA1 siRNA became more sensitive to γ-irradiation. Conclusion: This study, for the first time, demonstrates that the alteration of BRCA1 expression significantly affects radiosensitivity of lung cancer, indicating that BRCA1 may be an important mediator in radiotherapy of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  10. Ethanol decreases radiosensitivity of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of ethanol on radiosensitivity of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods: Human breast cancer MCF-7 cells were divided into four groups including control group,ethanol treatment group, X-ray exposed group,and ethanol combined with X-ray group. Clonogenic assay was used to determine cell survival. Flow cytometry was employed to analyze cell cycle progression. Annexin V-FITC kit was used to determine cell apoptosis induction.Results Ethanol (50 and 100 mmol/L, 50 h) had no influence on MCF-7 cell growth (t=0.82, 1.15, P>0.05). The radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cells was reduced when the cells were pretreated with 50 mmol/L ethanol (t=4.15, P<0.05) and 100 mmol/L ethanol (t=10.28, P<0.05) for 2 h. Compared with irradiation with X-ray alone, ethanol treatment decreased G2/M phase arrest (t=7.18, P<0.05) and sub-G1 population (an indicator of apoptosis induction) (t=5.39, P<0.05). A decrease of advanced and early apoptosis in the cells pretreated with ethanol was also confirmed by Annexin V-FITC apoptosis assay (t=4.86, 7.59, P<0.05). Conclusions: Ethanol causes radioresistance in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, where the decreases of radiation-induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis may be involved. (authors)

  11. EGFR-dependent Impact of Indol-3-Carbinol on Radiosensitivity 
of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao XIAO

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Indole-3-carbinol (I3C is a naturally occurring phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of I3C on radiosensitivity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-positive and EGFR-negative lung cancer cell lines. Methods Human lung adenocarcinoma NIH-H1975 cells and human lung squamous carcinoma NIH-H226 and NIH-H520 cells were routinely cultured in RPMI-1640. MTT assay and clonogenic assay were used to detect cell growth and survival, respectively. Western blot and RT-PRC assay was employed to detect EGFR protein and mRNA expression. Results 5 μmol/L of I3C significantly reduced radiosensitivity of EGFR-positive NIH-H1975 and NIH-H226 cells, but failed to affect radiosensitivity of EGFR-negative NIH-H520 cells. Furthermore, I3C caused an increased expression of total EGFR and pEGFR (Y845 protein in NIH-H1975 and NIH-H226 cell lines, but not in NIH-H520 cell line. A reduction of EGFR expression by EGFR-siRNA significantly inhibited I3C-caused radioresistance in NIH-H1975 cells. Conclusion Our data presented here for the first time demonstrate that I3C reduces radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells by mediating EGFR expression, indicating that EGFR may be an important target for I3C-mediated radioresistance in lung cancer.

  12. Radiosensitizing Effect of TRPV1 Channel Inhibitors in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Keisuke; Tanamachi, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Yuto; Ide, Shunta; Kojima, Shuji; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2016-07-01

    Radiosensitizers are used in cancer therapy to increase the γ-irradiation susceptibility of cancer cells, including radioresistant hypoxic cancer cells within solid tumors, so that radiotherapy can be applied at doses sufficiently low to minimize damage to adjacent normal tissues. Radiation-induced DNA damage is repaired by multiple repair systems, and therefore these systems are potential targets for radiosensitizers. We recently reported that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in early responses to DNA damage after γ-irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that TRPV1 channel inhibitors would have a radiosensitizing effect by blocking repair of radiation-induced cell damage. Here, we show that pretreatment of A549 cells with the TRPV1 channel inhibitors capsazepine, AMG9810, SB366791 and BCTC suppressed the γ-ray-induced activation of early DNA damage responses, i.e., activation of the protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and accumulation of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1). Further, the decrease of survival fraction at one week after γ-irradiation (2.0 Gy) was enhanced by pretreatment of cells with these inhibitors. On the other hand, inhibitor pretreatment did not affect cell viability, the number of apoptotic or necrotic cells, or DNA synthesis at 24 h after irradiation. These results suggest that inhibition of DNA repair by TRPV1 channel inhibitors in irradiated A549 cells caused gradual loss of proliferative ability, rather than acute facilitation of apoptosis or necrosis. TRPV1 channel inhibitors could be novel candidates for radiosensitizers to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with other types of radiosensitizers. PMID:27150432

  13. Sphingosine analog fingolimod (FTY720) increases radiation sensitivity of human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvaso, Giulia; Barone, Agnese; Amodio, Nicola; Raimondi, Lavinia; Agosti, Valter; Altomare, Emanuela; Scotti, Valerio; Lombardi, Angela; Bianco, Roberto; Bianco, Cataldo; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2014-06-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective therapeutic strategies for breast cancer patients, although its efficacy may be reduced by intrinsic radiation resistance of cancer cells. Recent investigations demonstrate a link between cancer cell radio-resistance and activation of sphingosine kinase (SphK1), which plays a key role in the balance of lipid signaling molecules. Sphingosine kinase (SphK1) activity can alter the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/ceramide ratio leading to an imbalance in the sphingolipid rheostat. Fingolimod (FTY720) is a novel sphingosine analog and a potent immunosuppressive drug that acts as a SphK1 antagonist, inhibits the growth, and induces apoptosis in different human cancer cell lines. We sought to investigate the in vitro radiosensitizing effects of FTY720 on the MDA-MB-361 breast cancer cell line and to assess the effects elicited by radiation and FTY720 combined treatments. We found that FTY720 significantly increased anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects induced by a single dose of ionizing radiation while causing autophagosome accumulation. At the molecular level, FTY720 significantly potentiated radiation effects on perturbation of signaling pathways involved in regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, such as PI3K/AKT and MAPK. In conclusion, our data highlight a potent radiosensitizing effect of FTY720 on breast cancer cells and provide the basis of novel therapeutic strategies for breast cancer treatment. PMID:24657936

  14. DNA repair mechanism in radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from various sources which are not in high background field. Since Deinococcus radiodurans had been isolated first in 1956, studies on the mechanism for radioresistance were carried out mostly using this bacterium. DNA in this bacterium isn't protected against injury induced by not only ionizing radiation but also ultraviolet light. Therefore, DNA damages induced by various treatments are efficiently and accurately repaired in this cells. Damages in base and/or sugar in DNA are removed by endonucleases which, if not all, are synthesized during postirradiation incubation. Following the endonucleolytic cleavage the strand scissions in DNA are seemed to be rejoined by a process common for the repair of strand scissions induced by such as ionizing radiations. Induce protein(s) is also involved in this rejoining process of strand scissions. DNA repair genes were classified into three phenotypic groups. (1)Genes which are responsible for the endonucleolytic activities. (2) Genes involved in the rejoining of DNA strand scissions. (3) Genes which participate in genetic recombination and repair. Three genes belong to (1) and (2) were cloned onto approximately 1 kbp DNA fragments which base sequences have been determined. (author)

  15. Cancer stem cell subsets and their relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Pan Yi-Fei; Yang Han; Chen Chong; Liu Hai-Guang; Zhang Xiao-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells account for the initiation and progression of cancer. While many types of cancer stem cells with specific markers have been isolated and identified, a variety of differences among them began to be appreciated. Cancer stem cells are hierarchical populations that consist of precancerous stem cells, primary cancer stem cells, migrating cancer stem cells and chemoradioresistant cancer stem cells, playing different roles in cancer initiati...

  16. Autophagy Inhibition to Increase Radiosensitization in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Diana Hwang; El-Zein, Randa; Dave, Bhuvanesh

    2015-01-01

    Currently, many breast cancer patients with localized breast cancer undergo breast-conserving therapy, consisting of local excision followed by radiation therapy. Following radiation therapy, breast cancer cells are noted to undergo induction of autophagy, development of radioresistance, and enrichment of breast cancer stem cell subpopulations. It is hypothesized that inhibition of the cytoprotective autophagy that arises following radiation therapy increases radiosensitivity and confers long...

  17. Decursin reduce radio-resistance of hypoxic regions under the proton beam therapy by induced HIF-1α degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Protons induce cancer-cell apoptosis in vitro and block blood vessel formation in vivo through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The fact that proton severely inhibits blood vessel development in zebrafish embryos suggests a higher sensitivity of vascular endothelial cells to proton beam. Decursin, a coumarin compound, was originally isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai (Dang Gui). A. gigas root has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine for the treatment of anemia and other common diseases. In previous reports, decursin was reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells and to inhibit the activities of the androgen and androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway in prostate cancer, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, bladder, and colon cancer cells. Decursin also inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis through the suppression of the VEGFR-2-signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of decursin mediates change of HIF-1α activities is not clear. In this research, we identified regulations of the HIF-1α and the anti-angiogenesis effects of decursin in proton-beam-irradiated human lung cancer, prostate cancer and Hepatic cancer cells. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of positive effects of protonbeam-induced anti-angiogenesis. Our data indicate that the groups co-treated with decursin and a proton-beam had significant reduced HIF-1α activity compared with the groups treated with only a proton beam under the hypoxic condition caused by DFX(desferrioxamine). Decursin was found to induced HIF-1α degradation. Therefore, we suggest that decursin may be a potential candidate for use as a sensitizer for proton-beaminduced cell apoptosis. Here we have shown that decursin successfully reduced HIF-1α stability under hypoxic condition by induced desferrioxamine. We showed novel candidates for anti-angiogenic compound, decursin, leading to complete inhibition of radio-resistance

  18. Urothelial Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Dimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence supporting the idea that tumors, similar to normal adult tissues, arise from a specific stem-like cell population, the cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are considered as the real driving force behind tumor growth, the ability to metastasize, as well as resistance to conventional antitumor therapy. The concept that cancer growth recapitulates normal proliferative and/or regenerative processes, even though in very dysfunctional ways, has tremendous implications for cancer therapy. The rapid development of the CSC field, shoulder to shoulder with powerful genome-wide screening techniques, has provided cause for optimism for the development of more reliable therapies in the future. However, several important issues still lie ahead. Recent identification of a highly tumorigenic stem-like compartment and existence of urothelial differentiation programs in urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs raised important questions about UCC initiation and development. This review examines the present knowledge on CSCs in UCCs regarding the similarities between CSCs and the adult urothelial stem cells, potential origin of urothelial CSCs, main regulatory pathways, surface markers expression, and the current state of CSC-targeting therapeutic strategies.

  19. KNK437, abrogates hypoxia-induced radioresistance by dual targeting of the AKT and HIF-1{alpha} survival pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oommen, Deepu, E-mail: oommen1978@gmail.com [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437, a benzylidene lactam compound, is a novel radiosensitizer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 inhibits AKT signaling and abrogates the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} under hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KNK437 abrogates hypoxia induced resistance to radiation. -- Abstract: KNK437 is a benzylidene lactam compound known to inhibit stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs promote radioresistance and play a major role in stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}). HIF-1{alpha} is widely responsible for tumor resistance to radiation under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that KNK437 sensitizes cancer cells to radiation and overrides hypoxia-induced radioresistance via destabilizing HIF-1{alpha}. Treatment of human cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T98G with KNK437 sensitized them to ionizing radiation (IR). Surprisingly, IR did not induce HSPs in these cell lines. As hypothesized, KNK437 abrogated the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells. However, there was no induction of HSPs under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, the proteosome inhibitor MG132 did not restore HIF-1{alpha} levels in KNK437-treated cells. This suggested that the absence of HIF-1{alpha} in hypoxic cells was not due to the enhanced protein degradation. HIF-1{alpha} is mainly regulated at the level of post-transcription and AKT is known to modulate the translation of HIF-1{alpha} mRNA. Interestingly, pre-treatment of cells with KNK437 inhibited AKT signaling. Furthermore, down regulation of AKT by siRNA abrogated HIF-1{alpha} levels under hypoxia. Interestingly, KNK437 reduced cell survival in hypoxic conditions and inhibited hypoxia-induced resistance to radiation. Taken together, these data suggest that KNK437 is an effective radiosensitizer that targets multiple pro-survival stress response pathways.

  20. KNK437, abrogates hypoxia-induced radioresistance by dual targeting of the AKT and HIF-1α survival pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► KNK437, a benzylidene lactam compound, is a novel radiosensitizer. ► KNK437 inhibits AKT signaling and abrogates the accumulation of HIF-1α under hypoxia. ► KNK437 abrogates hypoxia induced resistance to radiation. -- Abstract: KNK437 is a benzylidene lactam compound known to inhibit stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs promote radioresistance and play a major role in stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). HIF-1α is widely responsible for tumor resistance to radiation under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that KNK437 sensitizes cancer cells to radiation and overrides hypoxia-induced radioresistance via destabilizing HIF-1α. Treatment of human cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T98G with KNK437 sensitized them to ionizing radiation (IR). Surprisingly, IR did not induce HSPs in these cell lines. As hypothesized, KNK437 abrogated the accumulation of HIF-1α in hypoxic cells. However, there was no induction of HSPs under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, the proteosome inhibitor MG132 did not restore HIF-1α levels in KNK437-treated cells. This suggested that the absence of HIF-1α in hypoxic cells was not due to the enhanced protein degradation. HIF-1α is mainly regulated at the level of post-transcription and AKT is known to modulate the translation of HIF-1α mRNA. Interestingly, pre-treatment of cells with KNK437 inhibited AKT signaling. Furthermore, down regulation of AKT by siRNA abrogated HIF-1α levels under hypoxia. Interestingly, KNK437 reduced cell survival in hypoxic conditions and inhibited hypoxia-induced resistance to radiation. Taken together, these data suggest that KNK437 is an effective radiosensitizer that targets multiple pro-survival stress response pathways.

  1. Resistance of colorectal cancer cells to radiation and 5-FU is associated with MELK expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → MELK expression significantly increased when the cells are exposed to radiation or 5-FU. → Suppression of MELK caused cell cycle changes and decrease in proliferation. → Radiation or 5-FU treatment after MELK suppression by siRNA induced growth inhibition. -- Abstract: It was reported that the local recurrence would be caused by cancer stem cells acquiring chemo- and radio-resistance. Recently, one of the potential therapeutic targets for colorectal and other cancers has been identified, which is maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). MELK is known as an embryonic and neural stem cell marker, and associated with the cell survival, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, SNU-503, which is a rectal cancer cell line, was treated with radiation or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and elevation of the MELK expression level was observed. Furthermore, the cell line was pre-treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MELK mRNA before treatment of radiation or 5-FU and its effects on cell cycle and proliferation were observed. We demonstrated that knockdown of MELK reduced the proliferation of cells with radiation or 5-FU treatment. In addition, MELK suppression caused changes in cell cycle. In conclusion, MELK could be associated with increased resistance of colorectal cancer cells against radiation and 5-FU.

  2. Heavy-ion irradiation induced alteration in histopathology and cancer stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether carbon ion irradiation had beneficial effects by targeting cancer stem cells, human colon cancer cells were treated in vitro and in vivo by carbon ion or X-rays irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of carbon ion relative to X-rays was calculated to be 1.6 in vitro (D10 survival fraction) and 3.82 in vivo (tumor regrowth delay). FACS data provide evidence that cancer stem-like CD133+, CD44+ and EpCAM+ cells were highly enriched after low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays compared to high LET carbon ion irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. At an isodose of 30 Gy, carbon ion irradiation predominantly induced xenograft tumor cell cavitation and fibrosis, whereas X-rays irradiation only partially destroyed the tumor cell mass. The expression of cancer stem-like cell markers, CD133, EpCAM, and CD44 were significantly suppressed following carbon ion irradiation. In contrast, X-rays actually increased the expression of these proteins. Heavy ion irradiation has a great potential to effectively target radioresistant cancer stem cells. This is considered to be one of the major contributing factors for the high radiocurability of heavy ion cancer treatment. (author)

  3. Tumor cells with low proteasome subunit expression predict overall survival in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and clinical data suggest that solid cancers contain treatment-resistant cancer stem cells that will impair treatment efficacy. The objective of this study was to investigate if head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) also contain cancer stem cells that can be identified by low 26S proteasome activity and if their presence correlates to clinical outcome. Human HNSCC cells, engineered to report lack of proteasome activity based on accumulation of a fluorescent fusion protein, were separated based on high (ZsGreen-cODCneg) or low (ZsGreen-cODCpos) proteasome activity. Self-renewal capacity, tumorigenicity and radioresistance were assessed. Proteasome subunit expression was analyzed in tissue microarrays and correlated to survival and locoregional cancer control of 174 patients with HNSCC. HNSCC cells with low proteasome activity showed a significantly higher self-renewal capacity and increased tumorigenicity. Irradiation enriched for ZsGreen-cODCpos cells. The survival probability of 82 patients treated with definitive radio- or chemo-radiotherapy exhibiting weak, intermediate, or strong proteasome subunit expression were 21.2, 28.8 and 43.8 months (p = 0.05), respectively. Locoregional cancer control was comparably affected. Subpopulations of HNSCC display stem cell features that affect patients’ tumor control and survival. Evaluating cancer tissue for expression of the proteasome subunit PSMD1 may help identify patients at risk for relapse

  4. Role of lipids in bacterial radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioresistance of three bacterial isolates was determined. S. aureus was the most sensitive one (D10 value 0.14 KGy), B. coagulans was moderate resistant (D10 value 3.3 KGy) and the most resistant one was B.megaterium (D10 value 3.7 KGy). Total lipids and lipid patterns of these bacteria were determined and the role of lipids in radioresistance was investigated. Least amount of total lipids was detected in the most sensitive organism (S. aureus). The increase in the bacterial content of total lipids was concomitant with high degrees of radioresistance. The most resistant organism (B. megaterium was characterized by high content of methyl esters of fatty acids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, followed by appreciable amounts in the moderate resistant (B. coagulans) and the least amounts were detected in the most sensitive organism (S.aureus).6 fig., 3 tab

  5. Electro pulse mediated enhancement of radiation response of murine cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiotherapy is an important modality of cancer treatment but most often clinicians face some limitations. The major problems in cancer treatment are the radioresistance and chemoresistance of cancer cells which poses challenge to researchers and clinicians. To overcome these problems, a search for achieving the improved treatment of cancer is highly warranted. Electroporation is a biophysical technique that involves transient increase in cell membrane permeability by application of high voltage pulses of short duration. In recent years, cell membrane has been considered as a common target for ionizing radiation and electroporation. In our laboratory, we have investigated the combined treatment of gamma radiation and electric pulses to cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments have been conducted in vitro using Ehlrich Ascites carcinoma cells with 60Co gamma irradiation and electric pulses. Results have shown significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of cells on combined treatment with radiation and electroporation. In vivo studies have been carried out using murine fibrosarcoma as a model system. Mice were segregated into following treatment groups: Control, radiation, electroporation, and radiation plus electroporation. Studies on tumor growth kinetics indicated a significant tumor growth delay when the transplanted tumor was treated with the a radiation followed by electroporation. It is suggested that optimization of parameters of electroporation and radiation may prove a powerful treatment modality for cancer in clinic

  6. Differentiation of breast cancer stem cells by knockdown of CD44: promising differentiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Phuc V

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs are the source of breast tumors. Compared with other cancer cells, cancer stem cells show high resistance to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeting of BCSCs is thus a potentially promising and effective strategy for breast cancer treatment. Differentiation therapy represents one type of cancer stem-cell-targeting therapy, aimed at attacking the stemness of cancer stem cells, thus reducing their chemo- and radioresistance. In a previous study, we showed that down-regulation of CD44 sensitized BCSCs to the anti-tumor agent doxorubicin. This study aimed to determine if CD44 knockdown caused BCSCs to differentiate into breast cancer non-stem cells (non-BCSCs. Methods We isolated a breast cancer cell population (CD44+CD24- cells from primary cultures of malignant breast tumors. These cells were sorted into four sub-populations based on their expression of CD44 and CD24 surface markers. CD44 knockdown in the BCSC population was achieved using small hairpin RNA lentivirus particles. The differentiated status of CD44 knock-down BCSCs was evaluated on the basis of changes in CD44+CD24- phenotype, tumorigenesis in NOD/SCID mice, and gene expression in relation to renewal status, metastasis, and cell cycle in comparison with BCSCs and non-BCSCs. Results Knockdown of CD44 caused BCSCs to differentiate into non-BCSCs with lower tumorigenic potential, and altered the cell cycle and expression profiles of some stem cell-related genes, making them more similar to those seen in non-BCSCs. Conclusions Knockdown of CD44 is an effective strategy for attacking the stemness of BCSCs, resulting in a loss of stemness and an increase in susceptibility to chemotherapy or radiation. The results of this study highlight a potential new strategy for breast cancer treatment through the targeting of BCSCs.

  7. Curcumin Modulates the Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells by Suppressing Constitutive and Inducible NF-κB Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is an integral part of the preoperative treatment of rectal cancers. However, only a minority of patients achieve a complete pathologic response to therapy because of resistance of these tumors to radiation therapy. This resistance may be mediated by constitutively active pro-survival signaling pathways or by inducible/acquired mechanisms in response to radiation therapy. Simultaneous inhibition of these pathways can sensitize these tumors to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal cancer cells were exposed to clinically relevant doses of gamma rays, and the mechanism of their radioresistance was investigated. We characterized the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation as a mechanism of inducible radioresistance in colorectal cancer and used curcumin, the active ingredient in the yellow spice turmeric, to overcome this resistance. Results: Curcumin inhibited the proliferation and the post-irradiation clonogenic survival of multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. Radiation stimulated NF-κB activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas curcumin suppressed this radiation-induced NF-κB activation via inhibition of radiation-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of κB alpha, inhibition of inhibitor of κB kinase activity, and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Curcumin also suppressed NF-κB-regulated gene products (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2, cyclooxygenase-2, and cyclin D1). Conclusions: Our results suggest that transient inducible NF-κB activation provides a prosurvival response to radiation that may account for development of radioresistance. Curcumin blocks this signaling pathway and potentiates the antitumor effects of radiation therapy.

  8. Radioresistance of human glioma spheroids and expression of HSP70, p53 and EGFr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is routinely prescribed for high-grade malignant gliomas. However, the efficacy of this therapeutic modality is often limited by the occurrence of radioresistance, reflected as a diminished susceptibility of the irradiated cells to undergo cell death. Thus, cells have evolved an elegant system in response to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage, where p53, Hsp70 and/or EGFr may play an important role in the process. In the present study, we investigated whether the content of p53, Hsp70 and EGFr are associated to glioblastoma (GBM) cell radioresistance. Spheroids from U-87MG and MO59J cell lines as well as spheroids derived from primary culture of tumor tissue of one GBM patient (UGBM1) were irradiated (5, 10 and 20 Gy), their relative radioresistance were established and the p53, Hsp70 and EGFr contents were immunohistochemically determined. Moreover, we investigated whether EGFr-phospho-Akt and EGFr-MEK-ERK pathways can induce GBM radioresistance using inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059) and Akt (wortmannin). At 5 Gy irradiation UGBM1 and U-87MG spheroids showed growth inhibition whereas the MO59J spheroid was relatively radioresistant. Overall, no significant changes in p53 and Hsp70 expression were found following 5 Gy irradiation treatment in all spheroids studied. The only difference observed in Hsp70 content was the periphery distribution in MO59J spheroids. However, 5 Gy treatment induced a significant increase on the EGFr levels in MO59J spheroids. Furthermore, treatment with inhibitors of activation of ERK (PD098059) and Akt (wortmannin) leads to radiosensitization of MO59J spheroids. These results indicate that the PI3K-Akt and MEK-ERK pathways triggered by EGFr confer GBM radioresistance

  9. Autophagy contributes to resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Autophagy signaling is a novel important target to improve anticancer therapy. To study the role of autophagy on resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR), breast cancer cell lines differing in their intrinsic radiosensitivity were used. Materials and methods: Breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HBL-100 were examined with respect to clonogenic cell survival and induction of autophagy after radiation exposure and pharmacological interference of the autophagic process. As marker for autophagy the appearance of LC3-I and LC3-II proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Formation of autophagic vacuoles was monitored by immunofluorescence staining of LC3. Results: LC3-I and LC3-II formation differs markedly in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 versus radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Western blot analyses of LC3-II/LC3-I ratio indicated marked induction of autophagy by IR in radioresistant MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in radiosensitive HBL-100 cells. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of LC3-II positive vacuoles confirmed this differential effect. Pre-treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) antagonized IR-induced autophagy. Likewise, pretreatment of radioresistant MDA-231 cells with autophagy inhibitors 3-MA or chloroquine (CQ) significantly reduced clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Conclusion: Our data clearly indicate that radioresistant breast tumor cells show a strong post-irradiation induction of autophagy, which thus serves as a protective and pro-survival mechanism in radioresistance.

  10. Effect of microenviroment hypoxia on glioma cells radiosensitivity through cancer stem cell pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of microenviroment hypoxia on glioma cells radiosensitivity through cancer stem pathway, and to explore the related mechanism. Methods: Glioma cell lines SHG44 and U251 were cultured in normoxia (20% O2) or continuous hypoxia (1% O2) for 12 and 24 h. The fraction of glioma cells with positive expression of CD133 was assayed by flow cytometry. The radiosensitivity of glioma cells was determined by clonogenic cell assay. Western blotting was used to investigate the expressions of HIF-1 α and its downstream gene Notch 1. Results: The fraction of glioma cells with positive expression of CD133 was higher after hypoxic culture for 12 and 24 h than that of the corresponding cells cultured in normoxia. Compared to the cells cultured in normoxia, SF2 (survival fraction at 2 Gy) were enhanced significantly in SHG44 and U251 cells cultured in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h. The OER (oxygen-enhancement ratio) of SHG44 cells in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h was 1.54 and 1.38, respectively. The OER of U251 cells was 1.44 and 1.23, respectively. The radiosensitivity of these two cell line was decreased in hypoxia. The protein expressions of HIF-1 α and Notch 1 genes were elevated more significantly for cells cultured in hypoxia for 12 and 24 h than for those in normoxia. Conclusions: Microenviroment hypoxia could increase the radioresistance of glioma cells through enrichment of cancer stem cells, and HIF-1 α-Notch 1 signal pathway may play an important role in this process. (authors)

  11. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Min Zhu; Li-Hua Yuan; Ke-Feng Pu; Bing Dong; An-Xin Wang; Li-Sha Chen

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell resea...

  12. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  13. On the role of endogeneous substances in creating enhanced radioresistance background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Action of radioprotectors, namely, serotonin and MEA, on exogenous serotonin and histamine content of bone marrow cells has been studied. It has been shown that the increase in radioresistance, determined by a colony-forming ability of bone marrow cells, is accompanied by the growth of the content of endogenous serotonin and histamine, i.e. the substances that possess radioprotective properties

  14. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza P.; Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs fr...

  15. Radio-adaptive survival response in mice: Hematological studies on the acquired radio-resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported that X-ray pre-irradiation induced two types of radio-resistance (improved 30-day survival rate after mid-lethal irradiation) in C57BL and ICR strains of mice. The dose- effects were distinguished into the following 4 dose ranges in ICR mice: (1) below 2.5 cGy: no radio-resistance is induced 2 months later, (2) 5 to 10 cGy: significant radio-resistance 2 to 2.5 months later by whole-body pre-irradiation, (3) 15 to 20 cGy: no radio-resistance at any time between 2 weeks to 2 months later, and (4) 30 to 50 cGy: significant radio-resistance 2 weeks later by partial-body pre-irradiation of the trunk as well as whole-body pre-irradiation. We previously reported that the recovery of blood cell counts of erythrocytes, leukocytes and thrombocytes was enhanced by the pre-irradiation in C57BL, but not in ICR mice. In the present study, hematological changes were examined on blood coagulation time and hemorrhaging tendency in case of pre-irradiation with 45 cGy in ICR mice. Blood coagulation time prolonged on day 12 after sub-lethal irradiation, but it was not restored by the pre- irradiation, while occult blood appearance in feces collected on days 10 to 12 after sub-lethal irradiation was decreased by the pre-irradiation in ICR mice. (author)

  16. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3H--thymidine (3H--TdR) and incorporation of 3H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  17. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  18. Prostate stem cells and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitin, Alexander Y.; Matoso, A; Roy-Burman, P

    2007-01-01

    Properties shared by neoplastic and stem cells indicate a possibility that somatic stem cells or transit-amplifying cells that have reacquired stem cell properties, particularly the ability for self-renewal, represent favorable targets for malignant transformation. In this review we discuss significance of the stem cell model for understanding prostate cancer pathogenesis and describe relevant studies in animals. It is proposed that dissemination of rare cancer stem ce...

  19. Hardening and radioresistance of Triticum aestivum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat seedlings revealed a markedly greater radioresistance to X-rays after heat treatment. After cold treatment there was no difference in growth of X-irradiated and unirradiated germs. Increasing water content of the wheat seedlings was correlated with increasing radiosensitivity to X-rays

  20. Radioresistance and radiosensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the mechanisms controlling radioresistant in Drosophila the sensibility of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster to sex-linked recessive lethal mutations induced by 5kR Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 0,006 M EMS or 0,25% of caffeine was determined. (M.A.C.)

  1. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  2. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  4. MG132 enhances the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Nie, Jihua; Sheng, Wenjiong; Cao, Han; Shen, Wenhao; Dong, Aijing; Zhou, Jundong; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for lung cancer, however, radioresistance remains a fundamental barrier to attaining the maximal efficacy. Cancer cells take advantage of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for increased proliferation and decreased apoptotic cell death. MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal‑H), a specific and selective reversible inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, has shown anticancer effect in multiple types of cancers. Previously, we have reported that MG132 enhances the anti‑growth and anti-metastatic effects of irradiation in lung cancer cells. However, whether MG132 can enhance the radiosensitivity in lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. In this study, we found that MG132 increased apoptosis and dicentric chromosome ratio of A549 and H1299 cells treated by irradiation. Radiation-induced NF-κB expression and IκBα phosphorylation was attenuated in MG132 plus irradiation-treated cells. The in vivo model of H1299 xenografts of nude mice showed that the tumor size of MG132 plus irradiation treated xenografts was smaller than that of irradiation, MG132 or the control group. Moreover, MG132 plus irradiation group showed significant reduced Ki67 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MG132 enhances the radiosensitivity through multiple mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26238156

  5. Ovarian cancer: emerging concept on cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnusamy Moorthy P; Batra Surinder K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence suggests that the capacity of a tumor to grow and propagate is dependent on a small subset of cells within a tumor, termed cancer stem cells. In fact, cancer cells, like stem cells, can proliferate indefinitely through a dysregulated cellular self-renewal capacity. Cancer stem cells may originate due to the distribution into self-renewal and differentiation pathways occurring in multi-potential stem cells, tissue-specific stem cells, progenitor cells and cancer cell...

  6. Exploring Spatial Overlap of High-Uptake Regions Derived From Dual Tracer Positron Emission Tomography–Computer Tomography Imaging Using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-Fluorodeoxythymidine in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jing; Li, Chengqiang; Hu, Man; Lu, Jie; Shi, Xiaorong; XING, LIGANG; Sun, Xindong; FU, ZHENG; YU, JINMING; MENG, XUE

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interest is growing in radiotherapy to nonuniformly boost radioresistant regions within nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using molecular imaging techniques. The complexity of tumor behavior is beyond the ability of any single radiotracer to reveal. We hold dual tracer positron emission tomography–computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluorodeoxythymidine (FLT) for NSCLC patients to offer an integrated overlook of tumor biological behaviors quantitati...

  7. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Horn L, Eisenberg R, Gius D, et al. Cancer of the lung. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan ...

  8. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of s...

  9. Correlation between residual level of DNA double-strand breaks and the radiosensitivity of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To understand the variation of the DNA double-strand break rejoining capacity among different cultured cancer cell lines and the primary cancer cells from brain cancer patients, and to explore the predictor of radiotherapy responses of cancers. Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were induced by 60Co γ-irradiation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the initial production and rejoining of DNA DSBs. Radiosensitivity was determined by in vitro assay of clonogenic-forming capacity. Results: A wide variation of radiosensitivity, e.g. the survival parameter of Do varied from 0.65 to 2.15 Gy, was displayed among the eight cell lines derived from different type of cancers. Although differential level of initial DNA DSBs induced by 20 Gy γ-rays was observed among various cell lines, it was not correlated with the radiosensitivity. The deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining in radiosensitive cell lines was shown either in the early rapid-rejoining phase (SX-10 cells) or in the late slow-rejoining phase (A2780 cells). A significant relationship was observed between the residual level of DNA DSBs measured at 2 h post-20 Gy irradiation and the cellular radiosensitivity (D0 or SF2). The kinetic curves of rejoining DNA DSBs in the primary human brain tumor cells indicated a variation on DSB rejoining capacity among different individual tumor. The residual level of DNA DSBs after 2 h of rejoining post 20 Gy irradiation in primary human brain tumor cells is compatible to the results obtained in vitro culture cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The residual level of DNA DSBs is correlated with radioresistance of cancer cells, and the residual DNA damage is a useful parameter in predicting the response of tumor tissue to radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  11. Radio-sensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells by Monensin Treatment and its associated Gene Expression Profiling Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Radio-resistant or recurrent prostate cancer represents a serious health risk for approximately 20%-30% of patients treated with primary radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Here, we investigated the effect of monensin on sensitizing radiation mediated cell killing of two radio-resistant prostate cell lines Lncap (P53+ and AR+) and PC3 (P53- and AR-). Treatment with monensin alone (5 micromoles-20 micromoles) showed a significant direct cell killing of Lncap (10-30%), but not PC3 cells. Monensin was also shown to successfully sensitize Lncap cells to X-ray radiation (2Gy-10Gy) mediated cell death, up to 50% of killing with the combined treatment. To better understand the mechanisms of radio-resistance of these two cell lines and their different response to monensin, the apoptosis related gene expression profiles in both cell lines were analyzed using cDNA PCR array. Without any treatment, PC3 showed a much higher expression level of antiapoptosis genes than Lncap in the BCL2 family, the caspase/card family and the TNF ligand/receptor family. At 2 hr after 20 micormolar monensin treatment alone, only the TRAF and CIDE family showed a greater induction in Lncap cells than in PC3. Exposures to 10 Gy X-rays alone of Lncap cells significantly induced gene expression levels in the death and death receptor domain family, the TNF ligand and receptor family, and apoptotic group of BCL2 family; whereas exposures of PC3 induced only the expression of genes in the anti-apoptosis group of CASP and CARD family. Furthermore, we selectively suppressed the expression of several anti-apoptosis genes (BCL-xl, Bcl2A1, BIRC2, BIRC3 and CASP2) in PC3 cells by using the siRNA treatment. Exposure to 10Gy X-rays alone showed an enhanced cell killing (about 15%) in BCL-x1 silenced cells, but not in cells with siRNA treatment targeting other anti-apoptosis genes. We also exposed PC3 cells to protons in the Bragg peak region to compare the effectiveness of cell killing

  12. Radioresistance related genes screened by protein-protein interaction network analysis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discover radioresistance associated molecular biomarkers and its mechanism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma by protein-protein interaction network analysis. Methods: Whole genome expression microarray was applied to screen out differentially expressed genes in two cell lines CNE-2R and CNE-2 with different radiosensitivity. Four differentially expressed genes were randomly selected for further verification by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis with self-designed primers. The common differentially expressed genes from two experiments were analyzed with the SNOW online database in order to find out the central node related to the biomarkers of nasopharyngeal carcinoma radioresistance. The expression of STAT1 in CNE-2R and CNE-2 cells was measured by Western blot. Results: Compared with CNE-2 cells, 374 genes in CNE-2R cells were differentially expressed while 197 genes showed significant differences. Four randomly selected differentially expressed genes were verified by RT-PCR and had same change trend in consistent with the results of chip assay. Analysis with the SNOW database demonstrated that those 197 genes could form a complicated interaction network where STAT1 and JUN might be two key nodes. Indeed, the STAT1-α expression in CNE-2R was higher than that in CNE-2 (t=4.96, P<0.05). Conclusions: The key nodes of STAT1 and JUN may be the molecular biomarkers leading to radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and STAT1-α might have close relationship with radioresistance. (authors)

  13. Silibinin attenuates ionizing radiation-induced pro-angiogenic response and EMT in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K. [Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); Rajamani, Paulraj [School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); Singh, Rana P., E-mail: rana_singh@mail.jnu.ac.in [Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); School of Life Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar (India)

    2015-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Potential model showing mechanism of silibinin-mediated attenuation of IR-induced angiogenic phenotype and EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin counters radiation induced invasive and migratory phenotype of cancer cells by down-regulating mitogenic pathways activated by IR, leading to inhibition of molecules including VEGF, iNOS, MMPs and N-cadherin. Silibinin also reverses IR mediated E-cadherin down-regulation, inhibiting EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin also radiosensitizes endothelial cells, reduces capillary tube formation by targeting various pro-angiogenic molecules. Further, silibinin may inhibit autocrine and paracrine signaling between tumor and endothelial cells by decreasing the levels of VEGF and other signaling molecules activated in response to IR. - Highlights: • Silibinin radiosensitizes endothelial cells. • Silibinin targets ionization radiation (IR)-induced EMT in PCa cells. • Silibinin is in phase II clinical trial in PCa patients, hence clinically relevant. - Abstract: Radiotherapy of is well established and frequently utilized in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. However, recurrence following therapy and distant metastases are commonly encountered problems. Previous studies underline that, in addition to its therapeutic effects, ionizing radiation (IR) increases the vascularity and invasiveness of surviving radioresistant cancer cells. This invasive phenotype of radioresistant cells is an upshot of IR-induced pro-survival and mitogenic signaling in cancer as well as endothelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a plant flavonoid, silibinin can radiosensitize endothelial cells by inhibiting expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Combining silibinin with IR not only strongly down-regulated endothelial cell proliferation, clonogenicity and tube formation ability rather it strongly (p < 0.001) reduced migratory and invasive properties of PCa cells which were otherwise marginally affected by IR treatment alone. Most of the pro

  14. Silibinin attenuates ionizing radiation-induced pro-angiogenic response and EMT in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Potential model showing mechanism of silibinin-mediated attenuation of IR-induced angiogenic phenotype and EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin counters radiation induced invasive and migratory phenotype of cancer cells by down-regulating mitogenic pathways activated by IR, leading to inhibition of molecules including VEGF, iNOS, MMPs and N-cadherin. Silibinin also reverses IR mediated E-cadherin down-regulation, inhibiting EMT in tumor cells. Silibinin also radiosensitizes endothelial cells, reduces capillary tube formation by targeting various pro-angiogenic molecules. Further, silibinin may inhibit autocrine and paracrine signaling between tumor and endothelial cells by decreasing the levels of VEGF and other signaling molecules activated in response to IR. - Highlights: • Silibinin radiosensitizes endothelial cells. • Silibinin targets ionization radiation (IR)-induced EMT in PCa cells. • Silibinin is in phase II clinical trial in PCa patients, hence clinically relevant. - Abstract: Radiotherapy of is well established and frequently utilized in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. However, recurrence following therapy and distant metastases are commonly encountered problems. Previous studies underline that, in addition to its therapeutic effects, ionizing radiation (IR) increases the vascularity and invasiveness of surviving radioresistant cancer cells. This invasive phenotype of radioresistant cells is an upshot of IR-induced pro-survival and mitogenic signaling in cancer as well as endothelial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a plant flavonoid, silibinin can radiosensitize endothelial cells by inhibiting expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Combining silibinin with IR not only strongly down-regulated endothelial cell proliferation, clonogenicity and tube formation ability rather it strongly (p < 0.001) reduced migratory and invasive properties of PCa cells which were otherwise marginally affected by IR treatment alone. Most of the pro

  15. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia (≥24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia (≤6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1α. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  16. Mouse models for cancer stem cell research

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Le; Ramesh, Anirudh V.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Choi, Jinhyang; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cell concept assumes that cancers are mainly sustained by a small pool of neoplastic cells, known as cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells, which are able to reproduce themselves and produce phenotypically heterogeneous cells with lesser tumorigenic potential. Cancer stem cells represent an appealing target for development of more selective and efficient therapies. However, direct testing of the cancer stem cell concept and assessment of its therapeutic implications in human...

  17. Strategies To Assess Hypoxic/HIF-1-Active Cancer Cells for the Development of Innovative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local tumor recurrence and distant tumor metastasis frequently occur after radiation therapy and result in the death of cancer patients. These problems are caused, at least in part, by a tumor-specific oxygen-poor microenvironment, hypoxia. Oxygen-deprivation is known to inhibit the chemical ionization of both intracellular macro-molecules and water, etc., and thus reduce the cytotoxic effects of radiation. Moreover, DNA damage produced by free radicals is known to be more repairable under hypoxia than normoxia. Hypoxia is also known to induce biological tumor radioresistance through the activation of a transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Several potential strategies have been devised in radiation therapy to overcome these problems; however, they have not yet achieved a complete remission. It is essential to reveal the intratumoral localization and dynamics of hypoxic/HIF-1-active tumor cells during tumor growth and after radiation therapy, then exploit the information to develop innovative therapeutic strategies, and finally damage radioresistant cells. In this review, we overview problems caused by hypoxia/HIF-1-active cells in radiation therapy for cancer and introduce strategies to assess intratumoral hypoxia/HIF-1 activity

  18. Eradicating cancer cells: struggle with a chameleon

    OpenAIRE

    Di, Jiabo; Boer, Tjitske Duiveman-de; Figdor, Carl G.; Torensma, Ruurd

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of cancer stem cells to abrogate tumor growth is a new treatment modality. However, like normal cells cancer cells show plasticity. Differentiated tumor stem cells can acquire stem cell properties when they gain access to the stem cell niche. This indicates that eradicating of stem cells (emptying of the niche) alone will not lead to eradication of the tumor. Treatment should be directed to cancer stem cells ànd more mature cancer cells.

  19. Thermoresistance in radioresistant strains of 'Drosophila nebulosa'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of thermoresistance in radioresistant strains of 'D. nebulosa' is described, as well as some conclusions on the genetic nature of these differences are presented. The strains used in this experiment were MF 204, from 'Morro de Ferro', in Pocos de Caldas (MG) (one of the biggest radioactive anomalies in the world) whose radioresistance is due to its additive genetic components (Kratz, 1973 and 1975); 85(87) R, an induced radioresistant strain; and MF K a control 'pooled' strain obtained near 'Morro do Ferro'. Survival tests, 72 hours after temperature shocks, performed in the interval of 360C to 390C showed a decreasing gradient of thermoresistance with the following regression coefficients: MF 204 b=-5,4; 85(87)R b=-7,2 and MF K b=-7,9. Bifactorial analysis (strains and sexes) performed at 380C and 390C confirmed differences among strains (P<01 and P<0,5, respectively) suggesting a poligenic control of the thermoresistance. Consitent and verified relations among strains, being simultaneously resistant to different kinds of mutagenic factors, are considered evidence of the existence of general mechanisms in mutagenic control. Therefore, the results, together with results of Tsukamoto, Ogaki and Kikkawa 1957, Ogaki 1962 and Nakashima-Tanaka 1966, Parsons 1969, add to the hypotheses of the existence of general mechanisms in mutagenic control

  20. New radio-nano-medicine strategies for targeting stem-like cancer cells in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Although only palliative, external beam radiation remains to date the standard treatment of dramatic brain glioblastoma (GBM). Radiotherapy effectiveness is indeed largely limited by resistance mechanisms combining intrinsic properties of tumour cells to the influence of the microenvironment in which they develop (e.g. hypoxia). The recent discovery of stem-like cancer cells (SLCC) in GBM supports the presumption that the failure of conventional antitumor strategies could be attributed to a problem of target cells. Thus, the present work deals with the development of a new-targeted internal radiotherapy to radio-resistant SLCC through the use of nano-carriers loaded with α- or β- radiation emitters. As CXCR4 receptor has been associated with radio-resistance and with SLCC occurrence, we focused on the targeting of these proteins in a human GBM models known to express it: A172. We primarily developed 50 nm lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) functionalized with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against CXCR4 (or iso-type control) [Ref.1]. LNCs will then be combined to 188Re (beta emitter) and 211At (α-emitter) for further evaluation. By using blocking antibodies, our investigations merged the interest of targeting SLCC associated epitopes to the one of inhibiting CXCR4 signaling pathways to overcome radioresistance. In line with this, by using immunofluorescence flow cytometry, we found that CXCR4 expression is correlated with radiation doses: we found 41% expression when are radiated at 32 Gy versus 10% expression when they are radiated at 0 Gy. Finally, new encapsulation of 125I (β-emitter and halogen), which will help for the development of 211At (halogen), has been developed. Preliminary results show a relatively stable SIB encapsulation over time in different medium. Efficacies of β- versus α-nano-carrier based radio-therapies will then be compared in vivo after ortho-topic implantation of human GBM cells in immuno deprived

  1. Effects of recombinant epidermal growth factor receptor antisense adenovirus combined with irradiation on breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a recombinant antisense adenovirus for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) combined with irradiation on breast cancer cells. Methods: Human EGFR cDNA fragment was subcloned in the opposite orientation to the cytomegaloviral promoter and inserted into a E1/E3-deleted type 5 adenoviral vector to obtain AdE5 construct which expresses EGFR antisense RNA. Combined with γ-ray irradiation, its effects on clonogenicity and cell cycle phase distribution were studied in a human breast cancer line MDA-MB-23. Results: EGFR protein expression was dramatically inhibited in MDA-MB-231 cells after AdE5 infection. The post-irradiation clonogenicity was reduced by AdE5 in a viral and irradiation dose-dependent manner. Further cytometric analysis showed that AdE5 infection at a MOI of 300 pfu/cell induced a cell cycle progression from radio-resistant G0 + G1 phases to radiosensitive G2 + M phases, resulting in a synergistic effect after combination of these two treatments. Conclusions: The transduction of EGFR antisense RNA by adenoviral vector is effective for antisense strategy targeting EGFR, and increases the cell-killing effect of ionizing radiation on breast cancer cells.(authors)

  2. Radiobiological characteristics of cancer stem cells from esophageal cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jian-Lin; Yu, Jing-Ping; Zhi-qiang SUN; Sun, Su-Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the cancer stem cell population in esophageal cancer cell lines KYSE-150 and TE-1 and identify whether the resulting stem-like spheroid cells display cancer stem cells and radiation resistance characteristics.

  3. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cance...

  4. Single cancer cell analysis on a chip

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yoonsun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells in blood may represent “a real time liquid biopsy” through the interrogation of single cancer cells thereby determining the outspread of their heterogeneity and guiding therapy. In this thesis, we focused on single cancer cell analysis downstream of the isolation of cancer cells from blood. We designed and developed various microfluidic devices for genetic and phenotypic characterization of single cancer cells. The limited DNA content in a single cell requires DNA amplification t...

  5. Cell of origin of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Jennifer M.; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and current therapies are disappointing. Elucidation of the cell(s) of origin of lung cancer may lead to new therapeutics. In addition, the discovery of putative cancer-initiating cells with stem cell properties in solid tumors has emerged as an important area of cancer research that may explain the resistance of these tumors to currently available therapeutics. Progress in our understanding of normal tissue stem cells, tumor cell o...

  6. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signalin...

  7. Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis: Implication for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meiliana; Nurrani Mustika Dewi; Andi Wijaya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer is a disease of genomic instability, evasion of immune cells, and adaptation of the tumor cells to the changing environment. Genetic heterogeneity caused by tumors and tumor microenvironmental factors forms the basis of aggressive behavior of some cancer cell populations. CONTENT: Cancers arise in self-renewing cell populations and that the resulting cancers, like their normal organ counterparts, are composed of hierarchically organized cell populations. Self–renewing “...

  8. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  9. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara Jaworska; Wojciech Król; Ewelina Szliszka

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve th...

  10. Innovative therapeutic strategies against chemo and radio-resistant cancers: hydrogenated nano-diamonds and metal organic frameworks. An in vitro study in 2D and 3D systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work focuses on nanoparticles and their great skills for oncology therapies. Two kinds of nanoparticles have been studied in order to biologically validate and characterize their features. The use of hydrogenated Nano-diamonds (H-NDs) as radio sensitizer is based on a physic-chemical postulate where they act as oxidative stress generator through interaction with irradiation. Thus we validated this hypothesis in radio resistant kidney and breast cancer cell lines and identify senescence as the main pathway after co-treatment with H-NDs and irradiation. Metal organic frameworks are also of particular interest for drug delivery because of their very important loading capacities. Here we demonstrate the biocompatibility of the empty compounds in four lung and hepatic cancer cell lines, a main point before their involvement in drug delivery strategies. Finally, following international guidelines encouraging to make animal testing more ethic, we developed a new 3D cell culture mimicking mucinous lung adenocarcinoma. This well characterized model will be used for the study of cancer development and drug screening. (author)

  11. ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meidanchi, Alireza [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, Omid, E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoei, Samideh [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, Ali A. [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University (PNU), P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajikarimi, Zahra [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khansari, Nakisa [Department of Cardiology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ∼ 1 min for 2 mg mL{sup −1} of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (∼ 1 T). The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of {sup 60}Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL{sup −1}, in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2 Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL{sup −1} ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles resulted in ∼ 53% inactivation of the cells (∼ 17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24 h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnetic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with high-Z elements as radiosensitizers • Fast separation of the nanoparticles from solutions by applying a magnetic field • Application of the nanoparticles in efficient

  12. Local control rates of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the bone using stereotactic body radiation therapy: Is RCC truly radioresistant?′

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlon, Maria T.; Bedrick, Edward; Bhatia, Shilpa; Kessler, Elizabeth R.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Fisher, Christine M.; Kavanagh, Brian D; Lam, Elaine T.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report the radiographic and clinical response rate of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) compared with conventional fractionated external beam radiation therapy (CF-EBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone lesions treated at our institution. Methods and materials Forty-six consecutive patients were included in the study, with 95 total lesions treated (50 SBRT, 45 CF-EBRT). We included patients who had histologic confirmation of primary RCC and radiographic evidence of metastatic bone lesions. The most common SBRT regimen used was 27 Gy in 3 fractions. Results Median follow-up was 10 months (range, 1-64 months). Median time to symptom control between SBRT and CF-EBRT were 2 (range, 0-6 weeks) and 4 weeks (range, 0-7 weeks), respectively. Symptom control rates with SBRT and CF-EBRT were significantly different (P = .020) with control rates at 10, 12, and 24 months of 74.9% versus 44.1%, 74.9% versus 39.9%, and 74.9% versus 35.7%, respectively. The median time to radiographic failure and unadjusted pain progression was 7 months in both groups. When controlling for gross tumor volume, dose per fraction, smoking, and the use of systemic therapy, biologically effective dose ≥80 Gy was significant for clinical response (hazard ratio [HR], 0.204; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.043-0.963; P = .046) and radiographic (HR, 0.075; 95% CI, 0.013-0.430; P = .004). When controlling for gross tumor volume and total dose, biologically effective dose ≥80 Gy was again predictive of clinical local control (HR, 0.140; 95% CI, 0.025-0.787; P = .026). Toxicity rates were low and equivalent in both groups, with no grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported. Conclusions SBRT is both safe and effective for treating RCC bone metastases, with rapid improvement in symptoms after treatment and more durable clinical and radiographic response rate. Future prospective trials are needed to further define efficacy and toxicity of treatment, especially in the setting of targeted agents

  13. [The role of genetic factors in human radioresistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel'nov, V I

    2005-01-01

    The role of genetic factors in the development of chronic radiation disease (CRD), mostly caused by occupational external gamma-exposure, was evaluated. The data of molecular genetic survey of a cohort of 985 workers at the nuclear power plant, the Mayak PA, were analyzed. Among the genetic markers tested, an association between the haptoglobin (Hp) genetic system and the development of CRD was established. It was demonstrated that the contribution of genetic factors to the CRD onset was realized not within the whole, but in a relatively narrow dose interval (70 to 400 cGy), i.e., was relative. Furthermore, at equal irradiation doses, relatively higher risk of CRD was observed among the Hp 2-2 phenotype carriers (1.96) compared to lower risk among the Hp 1-1 and Hp 2-1 phenotype carriers (0.64). It was shown that with the increase of the irradiation dose, genotypic differences in the CRD frequency decreased to the point of their complete disappearance. Comparison of the roles of the genetic factors in the onset of such deterministic irradiation effect as CRD, with their roles in the onset of lung cancer in tobacco smokers revealed similar patterns. A scheme of the relationships between the effector intensity and the differences in the genetically determined radioresistance is presented. The data obtained do not support the idea that the survivals of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the most radioresistant individuals, who are not representative for evaluating the radiation risk. PMID:15771255

  14. Exosomes Derived from Squamous Head and Neck Cancer Promote Cell Survival after Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mutschelknaus

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles that are believed to function as intercellular communicators. Here, we report that exosomes are able to modify the radiation response of the head and neck cancer cell lines BHY and FaDu. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of irradiated as well as non-irradiated head and neck cancer cells by serial centrifugation. Quantification using NanoSight technology indicated an increased exosome release from irradiated compared to non-irradiated cells 24 hours after treatment. To test whether the released exosomes influence the radiation response of other cells the exosomes were transferred to non-irradiated and irradiated recipient cells. We found an enhanced uptake of exosomes isolated from both irradiated and non-irradiated cells by irradiated recipient cells compared to non-irradiated recipient cells. Functional analyses by exosome transfer indicated that all exosomes (from non-irradiated and irradiated donor cells increase the proliferation of non-irradiated recipient cells and the survival of irradiated recipient cells. The survival-promoting effects are more pronounced when exosomes isolated from irradiated compared to non-irradiated donor cells are transferred. A possible mechanism for the increased survival after irradiation could be the increase in DNA double-strand break repair monitored at 6, 8 and 10 h after the transfer of exosomes isolated from irradiated cells. This is abrogated by the destabilization of the exosomes. Our results demonstrate that radiation influences both the abundance and action of exosomes on recipient cells. Exosomes transmit prosurvival effects by promoting the proliferation and radioresistance of head and neck cancer cells. Taken together, this study indicates a functional role of exosomes in the response of tumor cells to radiation exposure within a therapeutic dose range and encourages that exosomes are useful objects of study for a better

  15. Modification of chemo-radiosensitivity of a human lung cancer cell line by introduction of the glutathione S-transferase π gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have suggested that glutathione S-transferase π (GST-π) may play a role in determining tumor sensitivities to cytotoxic drugs. In order to better understand the role of this enzyme in chemo- and/or radioresistance of lung cancer cells, we examined whether introduction of GST-π cDNA into a chemo- and radiosensitive lung cancer cell line altered its sensitivities to various chemotherapeutic agents and/or ionizing radiation, which are often used in the management of lung cancers. Modestly increased resistance of the GST-π transfectants preferentially to sublethal damage caused by ionizing radiation as well as to adriamycin (ADM) was observed. In contrast, resistances to cisplatin (CDDP), etoposide (VP-16), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) and paclitaxel were virtually unaltered. These results suggest that GST-π may not play a major role in chemo- and radioresistance of lung cancers, although it could afford selective and limited protection against ADM- and ionizing radiation-induced damage. (author)

  16. CHMP4C Disruption Sensitizes the Human Lung Cancer Cells to Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human lung cancer is highly invasive and the most malignant among human tumors. Adenocarcinoma as a specific type of non-small cell lung cancer occurs with high frequency and is also highly resistant to radiation therapy. Thus, how to avoid radiation resistance and improve radiotherapy effectiveness is a crucial question. In the present study, human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells were irradiated using γ-rays from a Co60 irradiator. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. Surviving fraction was determined by colony formation assay. γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation were examined by fluorescence microscopy. In the results, we show that CHMP4C, a subunit of Endosomal sorting complex-III (ESCRT-III, is involved in radiation-induced cellular response. Radiation-induced Aurora B expression enhances CHMP4C phosphorylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, maintaining cell cycle check-point and cellular viability as well as resisting apoptosis. CHMP4C depletion enhances cellular sensitivity to radiation, delays S-phase of cell cycle and reduces ionizing radiation (IR-induced γH2AX foci formation. We found that Aurora B targets CHMP4C and inhibition of Aurora B exhibits similar effects with silencing of CHMP4C in radioresistance. We also confirm that CHMP4C phosphorylation is elevated after IR both in p53-positive and-negative cells, indicating that the close correlation between CHMP4C and Aurora B signaling pathway in mediating radiation resistance is not p53 dependent. Together, our work establishes a new function of CHMP4C in radiation resistance, which will offer a potential strategy for non-small cell lung cancer by disrupting CHMP4C.

  17. CHMP4C Disruption Sensitizes the Human Lung Cancer Cells to Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Liu, Jianxiang; Tian, Mei; Gao, Gang; Qi, Xuesong; Pan, Yan; Ruan, Jianlei; Liu, Chunxu; Su, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Human lung cancer is highly invasive and the most malignant among human tumors. Adenocarcinoma as a specific type of non-small cell lung cancer occurs with high frequency and is also highly resistant to radiation therapy. Thus, how to avoid radiation resistance and improve radiotherapy effectiveness is a crucial question. In the present study, human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells were irradiated using γ-rays from a Co60 irradiator. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. Surviving fraction was determined by colony formation assay. γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation were examined by fluorescence microscopy. In the results, we show that CHMP4C, a subunit of Endosomal sorting complex-III (ESCRT-III), is involved in radiation-induced cellular response. Radiation-induced Aurora B expression enhances CHMP4C phosphorylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, maintaining cell cycle check-point and cellular viability as well as resisting apoptosis. CHMP4C depletion enhances cellular sensitivity to radiation, delays S-phase of cell cycle and reduces ionizing radiation (IR)-induced γH2AX foci formation. We found that Aurora B targets CHMP4C and inhibition of Aurora B exhibits similar effects with silencing of CHMP4C in radioresistance. We also confirm that CHMP4C phosphorylation is elevated after IR both in p53-positive and-negative cells, indicating that the close correlation between CHMP4C and Aurora B signaling pathway in mediating radiation resistance is not p53 dependent. Together, our work establishes a new function of CHMP4C in radiation resistance, which will offer a potential strategy for non-small cell lung cancer by disrupting CHMP4C. PMID:26712741

  18. Stem cells in human breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Oliveira, Lucinei; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Ribeiro Silva, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing data support cancer as a stem cell-based disease. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have beenfound in different human cancers, and recent evidenceindicates that breast cancer originates from and ismaintained by its own CSCs, as well as the normalmammary gland. Mammary stem cells and breast CSCshave been identified and purified in in vitroculturesystems, transplantation assays and/or by cell surfaceantigen identification. Cell surface markers enable thefunctional isolation of stem cells that...

  19. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine;

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues......, the last part of the review discusses future directions of this intriguing new research field in the context of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities....

  20. Metformin kills and radiosensitizes cancer cells and preferentially kills cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang W. Song; Hyemi Lee; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Brent Williams; John Powers; Troy Dos Santos; Bo-Hwa Choi; Heon Joo Park

    2012-01-01

    The anti-cancer effects of metformin, the most widely used drug for type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation were studied with MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and FSaII mouse fibrosarcoma cells. Clinically achievable concentrations of metformin caused significant clonogenic death in cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer stem cells relative to non-cancer stem cells. Metformin increased the radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, ...

  1. Prediction of response to radiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer using stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cell marker expressing cells can be identified that predict for the response of esophageal cancer (EC) to CRT. Materials and methods: EC cell-lines OE-33 and OE-21 were used to assess in vitro, stem cell activity, proliferative capacity and radiation response. Xenograft tumors were generated using NOD/SCID mice to assess in vivo proliferative capacity and tumor hypoxia. Archival and fresh EC biopsy tissue was used to confirm our in vitro and in vivo results. Results: We showed that the CD44+/CD24− subpopulation of EC cells exerts a higher proliferation rate and sphere forming potential and is more radioresistant in vitro, when compared to unselected or CD44+/CD24+ cells. Moreover, CD44+/CD24− cells formed xenograft tumors faster and were often located in hypoxic tumor areas. In a study of archival pre-neoadjuvant CRT biopsy material from EC adenocarcinoma patients (N = 27), this population could only be identified in 50% (9/18) of reduced-responders to neoadjuvant CRT, but never (0/9) in the complete responders (P = 0.009). Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation into the possible clinical benefit of CD44+/CD24− as a predictive marker in EC patients for the response to chemoradiation

  2. Sister chromatid exchanges in X-ray irradiated blood lymphocytes from patients with hereditary diseases with radioresistant DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray irradiation induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in blood lymphocytes from patient with Down's syndrome and adult progeria (in both the cases radioresistant DNA synthesis takes place). In normal lymphocytes (in which ionizing radiation inhibits the replicative synthesis of DNA) the rate of SCE rises with the rise of radiation dose. Thus, the rate of SCE in X-ray irradiated lymphocytes is in reverse dependence with radioresistance of replicative synthesis of DNA. The data obtained are explained in accordance with the replicative hypothesis of the SCE nature (Painter, 1980a): in cells of patients with Down's syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum from 2 and progeria of adults the time of existence of partly replicated clusters of replicons is decreased due to radioresistant replicative synthesis of DNA, but the presence of partly replicated clusters of replicons in necessary for SCE formation. Therefore the rate of SCF in X-irradiated cells of these patients decreases

  3. Adenovirus-mediated expression of UHRF1 reduces the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer HeLa cells to γ-irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-li LI; Qing-hui MENG; Sai-jun FAN

    2009-01-01

    Aim:An in vitro study was carried out to determine the effect of UHRF1 overexpression on radiosensitivity in human cervical cancer HeLa ceUs using adenovirus-mediated UHRF1 gene transfer (Ad5-UHRF1). Methods: Cell survival was evaluated using the clonogenic survival assay and the MTT assay; apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were monitored by flow cytometry. Protein levels were measured by Western blotting. Silencing XRCC4 expression was performed by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA).Results: Increased expression of UHRF1 by AdS-UHRF1 significantly reduced the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. The UHRF1-mediated radioresistance was correlated with increased DNA repair capability and increased expression of the DNA damage repair protein, XRCC4. Knocking down XRCC4 expression in the cells using XRCC4 siRNA markedly reduced the UHRFl-mediated radioresistance. Conclusion: These results provide the first evidence for revealing a functional role of UHRF1 in human cervical cancer cells as a negative regulator of radiosensitivity.

  4. Nanomechanical analysis of cells from cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jianyu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-12-01

    Change in cell stiffness is a new characteristic of cancer cells that affects the way they spread. Despite several studies on architectural changes in cultured cell lines, no ex vivo mechanical analyses of cancer cells obtained from patients have been reported. Using atomic force microscopy, we report the stiffness of live metastatic cancer cells taken from the body (pleural) fluids of patients with suspected lung, breast and pancreas cancer. Within the same sample, we find that the cell stiffness of metastatic cancer cells is more than 70% softer, with a standard deviation over five times narrower, than the benign cells that line the body cavity. Different cancer types were found to display a common stiffness. Our work shows that mechanical analysis can distinguish cancerous cells from normal ones even when they show similar shapes. These results show that nanomechanical analysis correlates well with immunohistochemical testing currently used for detecting cancer.

  5. Role of cancer stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bo; Jacob, Samson T.

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in cancer stem cells (CSCs) among cancer biologists and clinicians, most likely because of their role in the heterogeneity of cancer and their potential application in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies suggest that CSCs play a key role in liver carcinogenesis. A small subpopulation of cancer cells with CSC properties has been identified and characterized from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, animal models and human primary HCCs. Considering the...

  6. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  7. A role of TGFß1 dependent 14-3-3σ phosphorylation at Ser69 and Ser74 in the regulation of gene transcription, stemness and radioresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Zakharchenko

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ is a potent regulator of tumorigenesis, although mechanisms defining its tumor suppressing and tumor promoting activities are not understood. Here we describe phosphoproteome profiling of TGFβ signaling in mammary epithelial cells, and show that 60 identified TGFβ-regulated phosphoproteins form a network with scale-free characteristics. The network highlighted interactions, which may distribute signaling inputs to regulation of cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation and cell organization. In this report, we identified two novel and TGFβ-dependent phosphorylation sites of 14-3-3σ, i.e. Ser69 and Ser74. We observed that 14-3-3σ phosphorylation is a feed-forward mechanism in TGFβ/Smad3-dependent transcription. TGFβ-dependent 14-3-3σ phosphorylation may provide a scaffold for the formation of the protein complexes which include Smad3 and p53 at the Smad3-specific CAGA element. Furthermore, breast tumor xenograft studies in mice and radiobiological assays showed that phosphorylation of 14-3-3σ at Ser69 and Ser74 is involved in regulation of cancer progenitor population and radioresistance in breast cancer MCF7 cells. Our data suggest that TGFβ-dependent phosphorylation of 14-3-3σ orchestrates a functional interaction of TGFβ/Smad3 with p53, plays a role in the maintenance of cancer stem cells and could provide a new potential target for intervention in breast cancer.

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  9. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  10. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  11. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may...

  12. What makes cancer stem cell markers different?

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten, Uwe; Goletz, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Since the cancer stem cell concept has been widely accepted, several strategies have been proposed to attack cancer stem cells (CSC). Accordingly, stem cell markers are now preferred therapeutic targets. However, the problem of tumor specificity has not disappeared but shifted to another question: how can cancer stem cells be distinguished from normal stem cells, or more specifically, how do CSC markers differ from normal stem cell markers? A hypothesis is proposed which might help to solve t...

  13. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  14. K-RAS(V12) Induces Autocrine Production of EGFR Ligands and Mediates Radioresistance Through EGFR-Dependent Akt Signaling and Activation of DNA-PKcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is known that postirradiation survival of tumor cells presenting mutated K-RAS is mediated through autocrine activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study the molecular mechanism of radioresistance of cells overexpressing mutated K-RAS(V12) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu) presenting wild-type K-RAS were transfected with empty vector or vector expressing mutated K-RAS(V12). The effect of K-RAS(V12) on autocrine production of EGFR ligands, activation of EGFR downstream pathways, DNA damage repair, and postirradiation survival was analyzed. Results: Conditioned medium collected from K-RAS(V12)–transfected cells enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase–Akt pathway and increased postirradiation survival of wild-type K-RAS parental cells when compared with controls. These effects were reversed by amphiregulin (AREG)–neutralizing antibody. In addition, secretion of the EGFR ligands AREG and transforming growth factor α was significantly increased upon overexpression of K-RAS(V12). Expression of mutated K-RAS(V12) resulted in an increase in radiation-induced DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation at S2056. This increase was accompanied by increased repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Abrogation of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation by serum depletion or AREG-neutralizing antibody underscored the role of autocrine production of EGFR ligands, namely, AREG, in regulating DNA-PKcs activation in K-RAS mutated cells. Conclusions: These data indicate that radioresistance of K-RAS mutated tumor cells is at least in part due to constitutive production of EGFR ligands, which mediate enhanced repair of DNA double-strand breaks through the EGFR–phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase–Akt cascade.

  15. Mutant KRAS associated malic enzyme 1 expression is a predictive marker for radiation therapy response in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an aggressive tumor that is treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation if the patient is not a candidate for surgery. Predictive biomarkers for response to radiotherapy are lacking in this patient population, making it a non-tailored therapy regimen with unknown outcome. Twenty to 30 % of NSCLC harbor an activating mutation in KRAS that may confer radioresistance. We hypothesized that mutant KRAS can regulate glutamine metabolism genes in NSCLC and maintain tumor redox balance through transamination reactions that generate cytosolic NADPH via malic enzyme 1 (ME1), which may contribute to radioresistance. A doxycycline-inducible mouse model of KRASG12D driven NSCLC and patient data was analyzed from multiple publicly accessible databases including TCGA, CCLE, NCBI GEO and Project Achilles. ME1 expression was found to be mutant KRAS associated in both a NSCLC mouse model and human NSCLC cancer cell lines. Perturbing glutamine metabolism sensitized mutant KRAS, but not wild-type KRAS NSCLC cell lines to radiation treatment. NSCLC survival analysis revealed that patients with elevated ME1 and GOT1 expression had significantly worse outcomes after radiotherapy, but this was not seen after chemotherapy alone. KRAS driven glutamine metabolism genes, specifically ME1 and GOT1 reactions, may be a predictive marker and potential therapeutic target for radiotherapy in NSCLC. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0457-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance

  17. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoon Koo; Yoo, Young Do

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance.

  18. Implication of Mn-SOD in radio-resistance of Rubrobacter radiotolerans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Rubrobacter radiotolerans is the most radio-resistant bacterium among known eubacteria without sporulation. D37 for gamma-rays is 16,000 Gy. We previously reported that it had no significant recovery of DNA damage after ionizing irradiation. It suggests that the activity to remove reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by ionizing radiation is more important than DNA repair for the radio-resistance of this species. In this study, we purified, characterized, and cloned a superoxide dismutase (SOD) of this organism, and also examined the implication in the radio-resistance. The cell pellets of this organism were lysed by treatment with lysozyme and achromopeptidase, and sonication. A supernatant after centrifugation was recovered as crude cell extract. The crude cell extract was subjected to DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, showing one major and another minor SOD fractions. The major one was further subjected to hydroxyapatite, gel-filtration and second DEAE-cellulose chromatographies. After these chromatography steps, SOD was purified showing a single band on silver-stained gel of SDS-PAGE. This SOD seems to form a tetramer constructed by 24,000 Da-monomers. Both KCN and H2O2did not inhibit activity of the enzyme. The sequence of the limited region of the protein was determined, and the gene was cloned using the sequences. The result of homology search showed that the SOD belongs to Mn-SOD family. The amino acid sequence identity and similarity to the most closed species of SOD was 64.7% and 88.4%, respectively. To elucidate the implication of SOD in the radio-resistance, the SOD gene is introduced into E. coli strains, and the radio-sensitivity of the transformants are evaluated

  19. Radiosensitivity in lung cancer with focus on p53

    CERN Document Server

    Bergqvist, M

    2002-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 2800 new lung cancer patients are diagnosed every year. Radiotherapy is used with curative intention in certain groups of patients. The aim of this thesis is to study the basis of differences in radioresistance and the possibility to predict response to radiotherapy. In the first study we investigated, using the comet assay, four lung cancer cell lines with different sensitivity towards radiation. A clear dose-response relationship for radiation-induced DNA single strand and double strand breaks were found. All cell lines showed a remarkably efficient repair of both the DNA single strand and double strand breaks one hour after irradiation. However, further studies in one radioresistant and one radiosensitive cell line demonstrated that repair during the first 15 min had the best accordance with radiosensitivity measured as surviving fraction. In the second and third study, sequencing studies of the p53 gene were performed on cell lines as well as on tumour material. Cell lines that wer...

  20. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool

  1. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Pokrywczyńska; Jan Adamowicz; Jakub Tworkiewicz; Zbigniew Wolski; Tomasz Drewa

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  2. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pokrywczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  3. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy

  4. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  5. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Horsman, Michael Robert; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cancer stem cells are believed to be more radiation resistant than differentiated tumour cells of the same origin. It is not known, however, whether normal nontransformed adult stem cells share the same radioresistance as their cancerous counterpart. Material and methods....... Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under...... intercellular matrix. These results also indicate that cancer stem cells are more radiation resistant than stem cells of the same origin....

  6. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  7. Understanding the cancer stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bomken, S; Fišer, K; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J

    2010-01-01

    The last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in the cancer stem cell (CSC). Although it was initially believed that only a rare population of stem cells are able to undergo self-renewing divisions and differentiate to form all populations within a malignancy, a recent work has shown that these cells may not be as rare as thought first, at least in some malignancies. Improved experimental models are beginning to uncover a less rigid structure to CSC biology, in which the concepts of fun...

  8. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  9. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  10. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind; Meijer, Coby; de Bock, Geertruida H; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Groen, Harry J M; Timens, Wim; Kruyt, Frank A E; Hiltermann, T Jeroen N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis, and even with localized (limited) disease, the 5-year survival has only been around 20%. Elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been associated with a worse prognosis, and markers of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epitheli

  11. Extinction Models for Cancer Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet ,; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tool...

  12. Cancer stem cells: the lessons from pre-cancerous stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Jian-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract How a cancer is initiated and established remains elusive despite all the advances in decades of cancer research. Recently the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis has been revived, challenging the long-standing model of ‘clonal evolution’ for cancer development and implicating the dawning of a potential cure for cancer [1]. The recent identification of pre-cancerous stem cells (pCSCs) in cancer, an early stage of CSC development, however, implicates that the clonal evolution is not con...

  13. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Breast cancer stem cells: implications for therapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Schmidt, Chris W.; Lakhani, Sunil R; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lopez, J. Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumour-associated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to...

  15. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models......There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...

  16. Cancer Stem Cells Converted from Pluripotent Stem Cells and the Cancerous Niche

    OpenAIRE

    Kasai, T; Chen, L.; Mizutani, AZ; Kudoh, T.; Murakami, H; Fu, L.; Seno, M

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the cancer stem cells are considered to be significantly responsible for growth, metastasis, invasion and recurrence of all cancer. Cancer stem cells are typically characterized by continuous proliferation and self-renewal as well as by differentiation potential, while stem cells are considered to differentiate into tissue- specific phenotype of mature cells under the influence of micro-environment. Cancer stem cells should be traced to the stem cells under the influence of a micro-...

  17. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Trapasso S; Allegra E

    2012-01-01

    Eugenia Allegra, Serena TrapassoOtolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal), giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differe...

  18. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Lennard, Thomas W.J.; Meeson, Annette P; Britton, Kelly M.; Kirby, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative....

  20. Response of multiple myeloma cells and its cancer stem cell to X rays and carbon ion radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full text of the publication follows. Study of the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential to improve the treatment of cancer, as most of current therapies are targeting DDR pathway. Interestingly, DDR has been shown to be over-activated in cancer stem cells (CSC), contributing herein to the resistance of the overall tumor towards radiation. The CSC from multiple myeloma (MM), a haematological malignancy, has been isolated [1]. MM is particularly resistant to treatments inducing DNA damages. This suggests that the DDR is altered in these cells and might be one of the causes of tumorigenesis. However, DDR of MM remains poorly studied. We undertook the study of the DDR after X rays and carbon ions radiations, more energetic, in cell lines, CSC and clinical specimens of MM. Our preliminary results obtained in MM cell lines suggest that radiation-induced DNA damages lead to an over-activation of the cell cycle checkpoint proteins in MM cells, which remain consequently blocked in G2/M of the cell cycle. This contributes to MM radioresistance and the underlying molecular mechanisms are being investigated. Besides, based on the activity of ALDH, we confirm that in the MM cancer cells population exists a subpopulation, which displays stem cell properties. This subpopulation of CSC was isolated based on the expression of the surface marker CD138 as previously described [2]. We confirmed that CD138- cells are mostly quiescent cells, while cells CD138+ are cycling. Furthermore, CD138- cells are able to clone in vitro more efficiently than CD138+ cells. This shows unambiguously that MM CD138- cells possess stem cell properties. The response of the CSC, CD138+, to radiations are currently being investigated. With this study, we hope to gain further understanding on the DNA damage response in MM and thereby design new therapeutic strategies. References: [1] Matsui et al, Blood. 2004 Mar 15;103(6):2332-6; [2] Matsui et al, Cancer Res. 2008 Jan 1; 68(1):190-7. (authors)

  1. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schild Steven E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the radiation dose was investigated. Methods Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control. Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA class. Results Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 32% and 19%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, WBI doses >30 Gy (p = 0.038, KPS ≥70 (p Conclusions Improved outcomes were associated with WBI doses >30 Gy, better performance status, fewer brain metastases, lack of extracerebral metastases, and lower RPA class. Patients receiving WBI alone appear to benefit from WBI doses >30 Gy. However, such a benefit is limited to RPA class 1 or 2 patients.

  2. Cancer stem cells, tumor dormancy, and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    EmilyChen

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells can persist undetectably for an extended period of time in primary tumors and in disseminated cancer cells. Very little is known about why and how these tumors persist for extended periods of time and then evolve to malignancy. The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human tumors challenges our current understanding of tumor recurrence, drug resistance, and metastasis, and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignanc...

  3. Cancer stem cells and brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Castillo, Ana; Aguilar Morante, Diana; Morales-García, José A.; Dorado, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Besides the role of normal stem cells in organogenesis, cancer stem cells are thought to be crucial for tumorigenesis. Most current research on human tumors is focused on molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and, more recently, in solid tumors suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. In recent years, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in different brain tumors. These neural cancer stem ...

  4. Cancer Immunotherapy Using Engineered Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gschweng, Eric Hans

    2015-01-01

    Engineering the immune system against cancer ideally provides surgical precision against the antigen bearing target cell while avoiding the systemic, off-target toxicity of chemotherapy. Successful treatment of patients in the clinic has been achieved by the expression of anti-cancer T-cell receptors (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) in T cells followed by infusion of these cells into cancer patients. Unfortunately, while many patients initially respond showing anti-tumor efficacy, t...

  5. Metastasis-Initiating Cells in Renal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Mohammed I.; Czarnecka, Anna M; Duchnowska, Renata; Kukwa, Wojciech; Szczylik, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that propagates cells from the primary or initial site of the cancer occurrence to distant parts of the body. Cancer cells break from the cancer site and circulate through the bloodstream or lymph vessels, allowing them to reach nearly all parts of the body. These circulating tumour cells (CTCs) contain specialized metastasis-initiating cells (MICs) that reside in the biological heterogeneous primary tumour. Researchers have hypothesized that metastasis of rena...

  6. Mitotic Control of Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Venere, Monica; Miller, Tyler E.; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are self-renewing, tumorigenic cells at the apex of tumor hierarchies, and postulated to be quiescent in many tumor types. This issue of Cancer Discovery highlights a study that links the presentation of kinetochores within mitosis to an essential requirement for BUB1B/BubR1, broadening our understanding of the cell-cycle machinery in cancer stem cells.

  7. Head and neck cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S; Nör, J E

    2012-04-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signaling events are critical for the survival and self-renewal of these stem cells. Markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD133, and CD44 have been successfully used to identify highly tumorigenic cancer stem cells in HNSCC. This review briefly describes the orosphere assay, a method for in vitro culture of undifferentiated head and neck cancer stem cells under low attachment conditions. Notably, recent evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are exquisitely resistant to conventional therapy and are the "drivers" of local recurrence and metastatic spread. The emerging understanding of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas might have a profound impact on the treatment paradigms for this malignancy. PMID:21933937

  8. Implications of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells for Understanding Fomation and Therapy of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Li; Donglin Wang

    2005-01-01

    Most cancers are heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There is increasing evidence suggesting that only a minority of cancer cells, tumorigenic or tumor initiating cells, possess the capacity to proliferate extensively and form new hematopoietic cancer or solid tumors. Tumor initiating cells share characteristics required for normal stem cells. The dysregulation of self-renewal and proliferation of stem cells is a likely requirement for cancer development. This review formulates a model for the origin of cancer stem cells and regulating self-renewal which influences the way we study and treat cancer.

  9. Gossypol Induced Cell Death in DU 145 Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kennelly, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Cancer Biology Tumourigenesis is a multistep process which includes the transformation of healthy cells into extremely malignant cells, caused by the disruption of normal tissue homeostasis. Hanahan and Weinberg propose that there are a common set of 'acquired capabilities' that most if not all cancers posses's in order to survive and proliferate despite changes in their normal cell physiology during cancer development (Hanahan and Weinberg, 2000). These "Hallmarks of Cancer", according to...

  10. Apoptosis and radiosensitivity induced by N-acety1 phytosphingosine, in human cancer cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, K. S.; Han, Y. S.; Jeon, S. J.; Song, J. Y.; Jung, I. S.; Hong, S. H.; Yun, Y. S. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. S. [Doosan Biotech, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Ceramide is a key lipid molecule in signal transduction with a role in various regulatory pathways including differentiation, proliferation and especially apoptosis. Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is associated with accumulation of ceramide, and the sphingomyelinase deficiency results in radioresistance. We investigated the exogenous treatment of N-acetyl-phytosphingosine (NAPS), an analogue of N-acetyl-sphingosine (C{sub 2}-Ceramide), and C{sub 2}-ceramide exert apoptotic effect on human T cell lymphoma Jurkat cells and breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. NAPS and C{sub 2}-Ceramide has cytotoxic effect in time- and dose-dependent manner, and increased caspase-3, 8 activity. However, NAPS induced apoptosis more effectively, and increased caspase activity induced by NAPS is more higher than C{sub 2}-ceramide. Moreover, NAPS decreased clonogenicity of irradiated cells and increased radiation-induced apoptosis significantly. Increased cell death by irradiation in the presence of NAPS is owing to the increase of caspase activity. These data suggest that NAPS might be used for lead as a new type of radiosensitizing agent increasing radiation-induced apoptosis.

  11. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are curr...

  12. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  13. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  14. Cell of origin of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and current therapies are disappointing. Elucidation of the cell(s of origin of lung cancer may lead to new therapeutics. In addition, the discovery of putative cancer-initiating cells with stem cell properties in solid tumors has emerged as an important area of cancer research that may explain the resistance of these tumors to currently available therapeutics. Progress in our understanding of normal tissue stem cells, tumor cell of origin, and cancer stem cells has been hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease, the lack of good in vivo transplantation models to assess stem cell behavior, and an overall incomplete understanding of the epithelial stem cell hierarchy. As such, a systematic computerized literature search of the MEDLINE database was used to identify articles discussing current knowledge about normal lung and lung cancer stem cells or progenitor cells. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the role of cancer-initiating cells and normal stem cells in the development of lung tumors.

  15. Elimination of head and neck cancer initiating cells through targeting glucose regulated protein78 signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chih-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a highly lethal cancer that contains cellular and functional heterogeneity. Previously, we enriched a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic head and neck cancer initiating cells (HN-CICs from HNSCC. However, the molecular mechanisms by which to govern the characteristics of HN-CICs remain unclear. GRP78, a stress-inducible endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, has been reported to play a crucial role in the maintenance of embryonic stem cells, but the role of GRP78 in CICs has not been elucidated. Results Initially, we recognized GRP78 as a putative candidate on mediating the stemness and tumorigenic properties of HN-CICs by differential systemic analyses. Subsequently, cells with GRP78 anchored at the plasma membrane (memGRP78+ exerted cancer stemness properties of self-renewal, differentiation and radioresistance. Of note, xenotransplantation assay indicated merely 100 memGRP78+ HNSCCs resulted in tumor growth. Moreover, knockdown of GRP78 significantly reduced the self-renewal ability, side population cells and expression of stemness genes, but inversely promoted cell differentiation and apoptosis in HN-CICs. Targeting GRP78 also lessened tumorigenicity of HN-CICs both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, co-expression of GRP78 and Nanog predicted the worse survival prognosis of HNSCC patients by immunohistochemical analyses. Finally, depletion of GRP78 in HN-CICs induced the expression of Bax, Caspase 3, and PTEN. Conclusions In summary, memGRP78 should be a novel surface marker for isolation of HN-CICs, and targeting GRP78 signaling might be a potential therapeutic strategy for HNSCC through eliminating HN-CICs.

  16. CD24 negative lung cancer cells, possessing partial cancer stem cell properties, cannot be considered as cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Haineng; Mu, Jiasheng; Xiao, Jing; Wu, Xiangsong; Li, Maolan; Liu, Tianrun; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play vital role in lung cancer progression, resistance, metastasis and relapse. Identifying lung CSCs makers for lung CSCs targeting researches are critical for lung cancer therapy. In this study, utilizing previous identified lung CSCs as model, we compared the expression of CD24, CD133 and CD44 between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells. Increased ratio of CD24- cells were found in CSCs. CD24- cells were then sorted by flow cytometry and their proliferative ability, che...

  17. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  18. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies. PMID:17645413

  19. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  20. Radiation-induced-radioresistance: mechanisms and modification radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The term radiation-induced-radioresistance (RIR) has been chosen to explain a particular class of resistance against lethal doses of radiation, which is transient and is induced by pre-exposure to low doses of radiation. This is a genetically governed phenomenon and is different from adaptation which in one of its several senses, refers to evolutionary transformation into new behavioural patterns. RIR is understood to be an evolutionarily conserved fundamental cellular defense mechanism. Small doses of radiation acting as stress stimuli evoke a concerted action of molecular pathways which help the organism to cope-up with the genotoxic effects of lethal doses of radiation given subsequently. Such molecular pathways are a complex interplay of genetic and biochemical entities and are increasingly becoming the focus of research world over. Most of our information on this subject has been gathered from prokaryotes, simpler eukaryotes, human cells and the epidemiological studies. A number of genes such as GADD 45, CDKN1A, PBP74, DIR1, DDR have been reported by to participate in RIR. However, till date, the mechanism of RIR remain poorly understood. In this deliberation some of our findings on mechanisms of RIR will be presented. Further, modification of RIR by a metabolic modifier, presently under clinical investigations for tumor radiotherapy, will also be presented

  1. Cancer Stem Cells: From Bench to Bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Richard J.; Matsui, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective clinical responses to anticancer treatments often do not translate into substantial improvements in overall survival. Recent data suggesting many cancers arise from rare self-renewing cells (cancer stem cells) that are biologically distinct from their more numerous differentiated progeny, may explain this paradox. Current anticancer therapies have been developed to target the bulk of the tumor mass (i.e., the differentiated cancer cells). Although treatments directed against the bul...

  2. Dielectrophoretic separation of colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, Hong; Bulkhaults, Phillip; Wood, Patricia; Hrushesky, William; Wang, Guiren

    2010-01-01

    Separation of colorectal cancer cells from other biological materials is important for stool-based diagnosis of colorectal cancer. In this paper, we use conventional dielectrophoresis in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and isolate HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. It is noticed that at a particular alternating current frequency band, the HCT116 cells are clearly deflected to a side channel from the main channel after the electric activation of an electrode pair. This motion caused by negative...

  3. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  4. MicroRNA expression profiles in human cancer cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs are regulators of central cellular processes and are implicated in the pathogenesis and prognosis of human cancers. MicroRNAs also modulate responses to anti-cancer therapy. In the context of radiation oncology microRNAs were found to modulate cell death and proliferation after irradiation. However, changes in microRNA expression profiles in response to irradiation have not been comprehensively analyzed so far. The present study's intend is to present a broad screen of changes in microRNA expression following irradiation of different malignant cell lines. 1100 microRNAs (Sanger miRBase release version 14.0) were analyzed in six malignant cell lines following irradiation with clinically relevant doses of 2.0 Gy. MicroRNA levels 6 hours after irradiation were compared to microRNA levels in non-irradiated cells using the 'Geniom Biochip MPEA homo sapiens'. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed a pattern, which significantly (p = 0.014) discerned irradiated from non-irradiated cells. The expression levels of a number of microRNAs known to be involved in the regulation of cellular processes like apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, local immune response and radioresistance (e. g. miR-1285, miR-24-1, miR-151-5p, let-7i) displayed 2 - 3-fold changes after irradiation. Moreover, several microRNAs previously not known to be radiation-responsive were discovered. Ionizing radiation induced significant changes in microRNA expression profiles in 3 glioma and 3 squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. The functional relevance of these changes is not addressed but should by analyzed by future work especially focusing on clinically relevant endpoints like radiation induced cell death, proliferation, migration and metastasis

  5. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continue...

  6. Characterization of new radioresistant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to investigate 4 new mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii induced in respect to their radioresistance at different levels: cellular, molecular and biochemical. A comparison between radioresistance of the strains, DNA-ssb repair activity and pigment contents (chl 'a', chl 'b' and carotenoids) is made. Strain 137C(+) and mutant strains GK-1(+), GK-2(+), GK-3(+), and AKK-9-9(-) are used. The radioresistance has been assessed according to colony forming ability of the strains after irradiation with gamma rays (60C0, I=12.4 rads-1 doses 10, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 Gy). The data obtained reveal that there is a relationship between radioresistance, DNA-ssb repair efficiency and plastid pigment content in the tested Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains. This relationship is most pronounced in strain AK-9-9 which displays the highest level of radioresistance. On the basis of data obtained the authors propose mutant strain AK-9-9 to be included in the existing collection of mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

  7. Properties of bacterial radioresistance observed in sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in radiosensitivities of bacteria in sludge were investigated. The coliforms are more radioresistant in raw sludge than in cake (dewatered sludge). This radioresistance of coliforms was observed not only in raw sludge but also in the cake diluted with water. The radioresistance was independent of the difference of treatment plant, kind of sludge, and season. The oxygen effect on the radioresistance was not observed, but the resistance was changed during storage of sludge. Escherichia coli isolated from sludge was radiosensitive in buffer, but its radiosensitivity was protected by the water-extracts of sludge. On the other hand, radioresistant bacteria were present in total bacteria of sludge irradiated at 2 Mrad. However, the dominant flora in the irradiated sludge consisted of radiosensitive bacteria (mainly Pseudomonas). When a strain of radiosensitive Pseudomonas was irradiated in raw sludge and diluted cake, the radiosensitivity was remarkably protected. From these results, it is suggested that a factor affecting the radiosensitivity of bacteria is present in sludge. (author)

  8. Putative radioresistant bacterial isolate from sewage water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewage water was collected from a stagnant body of water in Balara, Quezon City. approximately 150 ml was aseptically transferred into eight Erlenmeyer flasks. Seven flasks were then subjected to different doses of radiation at the 60Co irradiation facility, PNRI (Philippine Nuclear Research Institute) which are as follows: 0.01 kGy, 0.1 kGy, 0.5 kGy, 1 kGy, 5 kGy, 10 kGy, and 15 kGy. The remaining flask was used as the control. After irradiation, all the different treatments were subjected to colony count at the culture collection laboratory, NSRI. Results showed that the colonies from sewage water treatments irradiated at 0.01 kGy (treatment A), 0.10 kGy (treatment B), and 0.50 kGy (treatment C) exhibited a decreasing trend with colony counts 4.60 x 103 CFU/ml, and 1.30 x 103 CFU/ml, and 26 CFU/ml, respectively. Contrastingly, at 1 kGy (treatment D), high colony count of 2.95 x 103 CFU/ml was observed which is even higher compared to the control (1.02 x 103 CFU/ml). Treatment E that was irradiated at 5 kGy manifested low survival rate (25 CFU/ml) indicating the presence of few putative intermediate radioresistant bacteria. Radiation dose treatments higher than 5 kGy (i.e., 10 kGy and 15 kGy) exhibited no bacterial survival. (Author)

  9. Role of stem cells in cancer therapy and cancer stem cells: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Sales Kevin; Chaib Boussad; Sagar Jayesh; Winslet Marc; Seifalian Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Abstract For over 30 years, stem cells have been used in the replenishment of blood and immune systems damaged by the cancer cells or during treatment of cancer by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Apart from their use in the immuno-reconstitution, the stem cells have been reported to contribute in the tissue regeneration and as delivery vehicles in the cancer treatments. The recent concept of 'cancer stem cells' has directed scientific communities towards a different wide new area of research fi...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  11. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  12. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  13. Docetaxel induced-JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway increases degradation of HIF-1α and causes cancer cell death under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Taex; Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Sun; Park, Heon Joo

    2016-01-01

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates the expression of more than 70 genes involved in angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance. Thus, there is growing interest in using HIF-1 inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Docetaxel, a Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer drug, is reported to enhance HIF-1α degradation. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel pretreatment enhanced the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of HIF-1α, and increased cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel also activated the prolyl hydroxylase, PHD1, in hypoxia, and pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD1 prevented docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death. Additionally, siRNA-mediated JNK2 knockdown blocked docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death by inhibiting PHD1 activation. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that inhibition of the JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway significantly increased the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 in docetaxel-treated cancer cells under hypoxia. Consistent with these results, docetaxel-treated JNK2-knockdown tumors grew much faster than control tumors through inhibition of docetaxel-induced PHD1 activation and degradation of HIF-1α. Our results collectively show that, under hypoxic conditions, docetaxel induces apoptotic cell death through JNK2/PHD1 signaling-mediated HIF-1α degradation. PMID:27263528

  14. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  15. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  16. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  17. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  18. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; ZHOU, SHU-FENG; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illu...

  19. Dexamethasone-induced enhancement of resistance to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Dexamethasone-induced changes in radioresistance have previously been observed by several authors. Here, we examined effects of dexamethasone on resistance to ionizing radiation in 10 additional human cell lines and strains, and on resistance to carboplatin and paclitaxel in 13 fresh tumor samples. Material and Methods: Eight human carcinoma cell lines, a glioblastoma cell line and a strain of normal human diploid fibroblasts were arbitrarily chosen for these in-vitro studies. Effects on radiosensitivity were assessed using a conventional colony formation assay. Effects on resistance to the drugs were investigated prospectively (ATP cell viability assay) using 13 fresh tumor samples from consecutive patients operated for ovarian cancer within the context of a Swiss nation-wide randomized prospective clinical trial (SAKK 45/94). Results: Dexamethasone promoted proliferation of 1 of the cell lines without affecting radiosensitivity, while it completely inhibited proliferation of another cell line (effects on radiosensitivity could thus not be examined). Furthermore, dexamethasone induced enhanced radioresistance in 1 of the 8 carcinoma cell lines examined. In the glioblastoma cell line, there was no effect on growth or radioresistance, nor in the fibroblasts. Treatment with dexamethasone enhanced resistance of the malignant cells to carboplatin in 4 of the 13 fresh tumor samples examined, while no enhancement in resistance to paclitaxel was observed. Conclusions: In agreement with previous reports, we found that dexamethasone may induce radioresistance in human carcinoma cells. Including the published data from the literature, dexamethasone induced enhancement in radioresistance in 4 of 12 carcinoma cell lines (33%), but not in 3 glioblastoma cell lines, nor in 3 fibroblast strains. Dexamethasone also induced enhanced resistance to carboplatin with a similar probability in fresh samples of ovarian cancer evaluated prospectively (in 4 of 13 samples; 31

  20. Selenium-containing thioredoxin reductase inhibitor ethaselen sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Yu; Jin, Cun-Jing; Ren, Xiao-Yuan; Tan, Qiang; Li, Jing; Yin, Han-Wei; Xiong, Kun; Wang, Tian-Yu; Liu, Xin-Min; Zeng, Hui-Hui

    2011-09-01

    It has been proposed that thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a mediator that allows non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to develop resistance to irradiation; however, little is known regarding the detailed mechanisms of action. Thus, ethaselen {1, 2-[bis (1,2-benzisoselenazolone-3 (2H)-ketone)] ethane, BBSKE}, a novel organoselenium TR inhibitor, is currently being investigated in a phase I clinical trial in China. However, its radiosensitizing effect remains unexplored. In this study, we found that the activity of TR increased dramatically in both A549 and H1299 cells after radiation, and moreover, could be inhibited by pretreatment with BBSKE (5 μmol/l). As a TR inhibitor, BBSKE enhanced the efficacy of radiation therapy both in vivo and in vitro without observable toxicity. BBSKE was found to suppress irradiation-induced NF-κB activation dramatically when using A549 cells stably transfected with NF-κB luciferase reporter. These results show the critical role of TR in the radioresistance of NSCLC and suggest that BBSKE is a potentially promising agent for the treatment of patients with NSCLC clinically. PMID:21562407

  1. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  2. Markers of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma SK; Taneja Tarvinder

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; however, no specific serum biomarker is available till date for detection of early lung cancer. Despite good initial response to chemotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers that might influence survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. The review aims to summarize the current knowledge of serum biomarkers in SCLC to improve diagnostic effi...

  3. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  4. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guocan; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Wei, Wenyi

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant neoplasm in men and the second most frequent cause of cancer death for males in the United States. Recently, emerging evidence suggests that prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a critical role in the development and progression of PCa. Therefore, targeting prostate CSCs for the prevention of tumor progression and treatment of PCa could become a novel strategy for better treatment of patients diagnosed with PCa. In this review article, ...

  5. Metastatic renal cell cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, C N

    2003-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been considered to be resistant to chemotherapy, with responses observed in only limited numbers of patients. For this reason, therapeutic options have ranged from no treatment, to immunotherapy with cytokines such as IL-2 and interferon-alpha, chemotherapy alone or in combination with cytokines, and to a variety of new investigational approaches. Interferon and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have led to long-term survival in selected patients. Immunotherapy with cytokines, monoclonal antibodies, new agents, dendritic cell therapy, and allotransplantation offer promise. Novel therapeutic strategies include combining cytokines, and antiangiogenic approaches such as thalidomide and antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Pathologic, cytogenic and molecular studies have proven that renal cell carcinoma is not a single tumor entity. Efforts to improve results also include the identification of prognostic factors, which allow treatment to be better directed towards those patients most likely to benefit. Increasing understanding of cancer biology is beginning to allow for a more targeted approach to the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Adequate positioning of known treatments is essential and many trials of new targeted therapies are underway. PMID:14988745

  6. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapasso S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia Allegra, Serena TrapassoOtolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal, giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division. A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on

  7. Tracheal metastasis of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    De, Sajal

    2009-01-01

    Endotracheal metastases of primary lung cancer are rare. Only one case of tracheal metastasis from small cell lung cancer has been reported in literature. Here, we report a rare case of a 45-year-old woman who was admitted for sudden-onset breathlessness with respiratory failure and required ventilatory support. Endotracheal growth was identified during bronchoscopy, and biopsy revealed endotracheal metastasis of small cell lung cancer.

  8. Repopulation of Ovarian Cancer Cells After Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Telleria, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    The high mortality rate caused by ovarian cancer has not changed for the past thirty years. Although most patients diagnosed with this disease respond to cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy and undergo remission, foci of cells almost always escape therapy, manage to survive, and acquire the capacity to repopulate the tumor. Repopulation of ovarian cancer cells that escape front-line chemotherapy, however, is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here I analyze cancer-initiating ce...

  9. Cell phones - do they cause cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007151.htm Cell phones and cancer To use the sharing features ... adults. For this reason, some agencies and government organizations recommend that children avoid prolonged use of cell phones. REDUCING RISKS Although health problems related to ...

  10. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and sup...

  11. Enrichment and Function Research of Large Cell Lung Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wenke YUE; JIAO, FENG; Liu, Bin; Jiacong YOU; Zhou, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective There are no universal method to recognize and screen for lung cancer stem cell markers and indicators. Commonly used methods are flow Cytometry and learning from other cancer stem cell sorting tags to sort lung cancer stem cells. But this method has low specificity screening, the workload is huge. In this study, Serum-free suspension culture was used to enrich lung cancer stem cells, and explore method for lung cancer stem cell screening. Methods Human large lung can...

  12. Isolation and characterization of radioresistant mutants in Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus thuringiensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegetative cells of Bac. thuringiensis var. galleriae (the wild-type strain 351) are much more sensitive to lethal effects of UV light and 60Co-γ-rays than those of Bac. subtilis (the wild-type strain 168). This difference is less pronounced for spores of these strains. By means of repeated γ-irradiation-regrowth cycles radioresistant mutants Bac. thuringiensis Gamsup(r) 14 and Bac. subtilis Gamsup(r) 9 were selected. The vegetative cells of these mutants are correspondingly 19 times and 3.9 times more resistant to lethal effects of γ-radiation than the cells of the parental strains. The resistance of the Gamsup(r) mutant cells to lethal effects of UV light and H2O2 is also increased. The spores of the Gamsup(r) 14 mutant are 1.5-1.7 times more resistant to γ-radiation and UV light than the wild-type spores. The radioresistant mutants and the parental strains do not vary in their capacity for host-cell reactivation of UV- or γ-irradiated phages Tg13 and 105

  13. ICAM-3, radiation resistance gene, activates PI3K/Akt-CREB-MMPs pathway and promotes migration/invasion of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell NCI-H1299

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Park, Seon Ho; Hong, Sung Hee; Um, Hong Duck [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Cancer cell is characterized by various distinctive functions difference from normal cell. The one of specific properties of cancer is invasion and metastasis. Invasion and metastasis is a multi-step process involving over-expression of proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and critically dependent on the ability of cells to move away from the primary tumor to gain access to the vascular or lymphatic systems which disperses cells to distant sites, where they can grow in a permissive microenvironment at a secondary location. All of these processes are critically dependent upon the ability of cancer cells to breach the basement membrane and to migrate through neighboring tissues. Cancer cell invasion is an important, tightly regulated process that is related with development, immune response and wound healing. This invasive response is dependent on activation of signaling pathways that result in both short-term and long-term cellular responses. The gene expressions of the cancer cell invasion related-proteolytic enzymes are regulated at the transcriptional level (through AP-1 and NF-kB via mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and PI3K-Akt pathways) and post-transcriptional levels, and the protein level via their activators or inhibitors, and their cell surface localization. Therefore, the related proteins such as MMPs, MAPK, PI3K, Akt and their regulatory pathway have been considered as promising targets for anti-cancer drugs. In previous reports, Intercellular adherin molecule-3 (ICAM-3) showed increase of radio-resistance and proliferation. We have made ICAM-3 overexpressed cancer cells which shows elevated level of invasion compared with normal cancer cells and its invasion capacity was down regulated with treatment of specific inhibitor for PI3K. These results suggest that ICAM-3 related invasion is associated with PI3K signaling pathway.

  14. ICAM-3, radiation resistance gene, activates PI3K/Akt-CREB-MMPs pathway and promotes migration/invasion of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell NCI-H1299

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer cell is characterized by various distinctive functions difference from normal cell. The one of specific properties of cancer is invasion and metastasis. Invasion and metastasis is a multi-step process involving over-expression of proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and critically dependent on the ability of cells to move away from the primary tumor to gain access to the vascular or lymphatic systems which disperses cells to distant sites, where they can grow in a permissive microenvironment at a secondary location. All of these processes are critically dependent upon the ability of cancer cells to breach the basement membrane and to migrate through neighboring tissues. Cancer cell invasion is an important, tightly regulated process that is related with development, immune response and wound healing. This invasive response is dependent on activation of signaling pathways that result in both short-term and long-term cellular responses. The gene expressions of the cancer cell invasion related-proteolytic enzymes are regulated at the transcriptional level (through AP-1 and NF-kB via mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and PI3K-Akt pathways) and post-transcriptional levels, and the protein level via their activators or inhibitors, and their cell surface localization. Therefore, the related proteins such as MMPs, MAPK, PI3K, Akt and their regulatory pathway have been considered as promising targets for anti-cancer drugs. In previous reports, Intercellular adherin molecule-3 (ICAM-3) showed increase of radio-resistance and proliferation. We have made ICAM-3 overexpressed cancer cells which shows elevated level of invasion compared with normal cancer cells and its invasion capacity was down regulated with treatment of specific inhibitor for PI3K. These results suggest that ICAM-3 related invasion is associated with PI3K signaling pathway

  15. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  16. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  17. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis

  18. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer. PMID:27355964

  19. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  20. Fentanyl inhibits cell viability in human pancreatic cancer cell line and tumor growth in pancreatic cancer cell-transplanted mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Jianxia; Wang, Liangrong; Chen, Lei; Yang, Tao; Jin, Lida; Lin, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a kind of devastating disease with a high mortality rate. Fentanyl has been widely applied to anesthesia and analgesia in pancreatic cancer therapy, and is also demonstrated to inhibit the growth of some kinds of cancer cells in existed studies. To investigate the functions of fentanyl in pancreatic cancer, we conducted a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments using human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990 and fentanyl treatment. The cells were transplanted to BALB/c nude...

  1. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  2. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS genes are silenced by DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation and regulate response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family is an important negative regulator of cytokine signaling and deregulation of SOCS has been involved in many types of cancer. All cervical cancer cell lines tested showed lower expression of SOCS1, SOCS3, and SOCS5 than normal tissue or cell lines. The immunohistochemistry result for SOCS proteins in human cervical tissue also confirmed that normal tissue expressed higher level of SOCS proteins than neighboring tumor. Similar to the regulation of SOCS in other types of cancer, DNA methylation contributed to SOCS1 downregulation in CaSki, ME-180, and HeLa cells. However, the expression of SOCS3 or SOCS5 was not recovered by the inhibition of DNA methylation. Histone deacetylation may be another regulatory mechanism involved in SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression, however, SOCS5 expression was neither affected by DNA methylation nor histone deacetylation. Ectopic expression of SOCS1 or SOCS3 conferred radioresistance to HeLa cells, which implied SOCS signaling regulates the response to radiation in cervical cancer. In this study, we have shown that SOCS expression repressed by, in part, epigenetically and altered SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression could contribute to the radiosensitive phenotype in cervical cancer.

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  4. GSK3β and β-Catenin Modulate Radiation Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Watson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of factors and mechanisms contributing to the inherent radioresistance of pancreatic cancer may improve cancer treatment. Irradiation inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β by phosphorylation at serine 9. In turn, release of cytosolic membrane β-catenin with subsequent nuclear translocation promotes survival. Both GSK3β and β-catenin have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to death. METHODS: We investigated pancreatic cancer cell survival after radiation in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on the role of the function of the GSK3β/β-catenin axis. RESULTS: Lithium chloride, RNAi-medicated silencing of GSK3β, or the expression of a kinase dead mutant GSK3β resulted in radioresistance of Panc1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3β resulted in radiosensitization of Panc1 cells. GSK3β silencing increased radiation-induced β-catenin target gene expression asmeasured by studies of AXIN2 and LEF1 transcript levels. Western blot analysis of total and phosphorylated levels of GSK3β and β-catenin showed that GSK3β inhibition resulted in stabilization of β-catenin. Xenografts of both BxPC3 and Panc1 with targeted silencing of GSK3β exhibited radioresistance in vivo. Silencing of β-catenin resulted in radiosensitization, whereas a nondegradable β-catenin construct induced radioresistance. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the hypothesis that GSK3β modulates the cellular response to radiation in a β-catenin-dependent mechanism. Further understanding of this pathway may enhance the development of clinical trials combining drugs inhibiting β-catenin activation with radiation and chemotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  6. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  7. Ultrasound Effect on Cancerous versus Non-Cancerous Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagury, Aharon; Amar-Lewis, Eliz; Yudilevitch, Yana; Isaacson, Carol; Laster, Brenda; Kost, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have found that cancer cells whose metastatic potential is low are more vulnerable to mechanical stress-induced trauma to their cytoskeleton compared with benign cells. Because ultrasound induces mechanical stresses on cells and tissues, it is postulated that there may be a way to apply ultrasound to tumors to reduce their ability to metastasize. The difference between low-malignant-potential cancer cells and benign cells could be a result of their different responses to the mechanical stress insonation induced. This hypothesis was tested in vitro and in vivo. Low-malignant-potential cells were found to be more sensitive to insonation, resulting in a significantly higher mortality rate compared with that of benign cells, 89% versus 21%, respectively. This effect can be controlled by varying ultrasound parameters: intensity, duration, and duty cycle. Thus, the results presented in this study suggest the application of ultrasound to discriminate between benign and malignant cells. PMID:27067417

  8. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is ...

  9. Hallmarks of cancer stem cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Patricia; Barneda, David; Heeschen, Christopher

    2016-06-14

    Cancer cells adapt cellular metabolism to cope with their high proliferation rate. Instead of primarily using oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), cancer cells use less efficient glycolysis for the production of ATP and building blocks (Warburg effect). However, tumours are not uniform, but rather functionally heterogeneous and harbour a subset of cancer cells with stemness features. Such cancer cells have the ability to repopulate the entire tumour and thus have been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour-initiating cells (TICs). As opposed to differentiated bulk tumour cells relying on glycolysis, CSCs show a distinct metabolic phenotype that, depending on the cancer type, can be highly glycolytic or OXPHOS dependent. In either case, mitochondrial function is critical and takes centre stage in CSC functionality. Remaining controversies in this young and emerging research field may be related to CSC isolation techniques and/or the use of less suitable model systems. Still, the apparent dependence of CSCs on mitochondrial function, regardless of their primary metabolic phenotype, represents a previously unrecognised Achilles heel amendable for therapeutic intervention. Elimination of highly chemoresistant CSCs as the root of many cancers via inhibition of mitochondrial function bears the potential to prevent relapse from disease and thus improve patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27219018

  10. Every Single Cell Clones from Cancer Cell Lines Growing Tumors In Vivo May Not Invalidate the Cancer Stem Cell Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fengzhi

    2009-01-01

    We present the result of our research on the tumorigenic ability of single cell clones isolated from an aggressive murine breast cancer cell line in a matched allografting mouse model. Tumor formation is basically dependent on the cell numbers injected per location. We argue that in vivo tumor formation from single cell clones, isolated in vitro from cancer cell lines, may not provide conclusive evidence to disprove the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory without additional data.

  11. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Eugenia; Trapasso, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also called "cells that start the tumor," represent in themselves one of the most topical and controversial issues in the field of cancer research. Tumor stem cells are able to self-propagate in vitro (self-renewal), giving rise both to other tumor stem cells and most advanced cells in the line of differentiation (asymmetric division). A final characteristic is tumorigenicity, a fundamental property, which outlines the tumor stem cell as the only cell able to initiate the formation of a tumor when implanted in immune-deficient mice. The hypothesis of a hierarchical organization of tumor cells dates back more than 40 years, but only in 1997, thanks to the work of John Dick and Dominique Bonnet, was there the formal proof of such an organization in acute myeloid leukemia. Following this, many other research groups were able to isolate CSCs, by appropriate selection markers, in various malignancies, such as breast, brain, colon, pancreas, and liver cancers and in melanoma. To date, however, it is not possible to isolate stem cells from all types of neoplasia, particularly in solid tumors. From a therapeutic point of view, the concept of tumor stem cells implies a complete revision of conventional antineoplastic treatment. Conventional cytotoxic agents are designed to target actively proliferating cells. In the majority of cases, this is not sufficient to eliminate the CSCs, which thanks to their reduced proliferative activity and/or the presence of proteins capable of extruding chemotherapeutics from the cell are not targeted. Therefore, the theory of cancer stem cells can pose new paradigms in terms of cancer treatment. Potential approaches, even in the very early experimental stages, relate to the selective inhibition of pathways connected with self-renewal, or more specifically based on the presence of specific surface markers for selective cytotoxic agent vehicles. Finally, some research groups are trying to induce these cells to

  12. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Narumol Bhummaphan; Pithi Chanvorachote

    2015-01-01

    As cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent ...

  13. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  14. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  15. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  16. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  17. AKT Inhibition Promotes Nonautonomous Cancer Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salony; Solé, Xavier; Alves, Cleidson P; Dey-Guha, Ipsita; Ritsma, Laila; Boukhali, Myriam; Lee, Ju H; Chowdhury, Joeeta; Ross, Kenneth N; Haas, Wilhelm; Vasudevan, Shobha; Ramaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog) signaling are being evaluated in patients with various cancer types, but have so far proven therapeutically disappointing for reasons that remain unclear. Here, we treat cancer cells with subtherapeutic doses of Akti-1/2, an allosteric small molecule AKT inhibitor, in order to experimentally model pharmacologic inhibition of AKT signaling in vitro. We then apply a combined RNA, protein, and metabolite profiling approach to develop an integrated, multiscale, molecular snapshot of this "AKT(low)" cancer cell state. We find that AKT-inhibited cancer cells suppress thousands of mRNA transcripts, and proteins related to the cell cycle, ribosome, and protein translation. Surprisingly, however, these AKT-inhibited cells simultaneously upregulate a host of other proteins and metabolites posttranscriptionally, reflecting activation of their endo-vesiculo-membrane system, secretion of inflammatory proteins, and elaboration of extracellular microvesicles. Importantly, these microvesicles enable rapidly proliferating cancer cells of various types to better withstand different stress conditions, including serum deprivation, hypoxia, or cytotoxic chemotherapy in vitro and xenografting in vivo. These findings suggest a model whereby cancer cells experiencing a partial inhibition of AKT signaling may actually promote the survival of neighbors through non-cell autonomous communication. PMID:26637368

  18. Stem Cells and Cancer; Celulas madre y cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrelles, C.; Paraminio, J. M.; Lorz, C.

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  19. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK(+) and CK18(+) CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7(+) or TTF-1(+), (CK20/ CDX2)(+), or (PSA/ PSMA)(+) corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  20. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  2. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  3. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  5. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. ► Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. ► Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. ► Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. ► This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called “cancer stem cells”, within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the “stemness” of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  6. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  7. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  8. T Cells in Gastric Cancer: Friends or Foes

    OpenAIRE

    Mario M. D'Elios; Elena Silvestri; Chiara Della Bella; Amedeo Amedei; Domenico Prisco

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for gastric cancer. As for any type of cancer, T cells are crucial for recognition and elimination of gastric tumor cells. Unfortunately T cells, instead of protecting from the onset of cancer, can contribute to oncogenesis. Herein we review the different types, “friend or foe”, of T-cell response in gastric cancer.

  9. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM's cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  10. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology.

  11. Learning about Cancer by Studying Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Learning About Cancer by Studying Stem Cells By Sharon ... culture. Credit: Anne Weston, London Research Institute, CRUK (image available under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, ...

  12. Cancer: repositioned to kill stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holyoake, Tessa; Vetrie, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem cells make it hard to cure many forms of the disease. Repositioning an existing drug to tackle this problem could significantly improve treatment for one form of leukaemia.

  13. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  14. Stemming Cancer: Functional Genomics of Cancer Stem Cells in Solid Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Regenbrecht, C. R. A.; Lehrach, H; Adjaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) were discovered about 15 years ago in hematopoietic cancers. Subsequently, cancer stem cells were discovered in various solid tumors. Based on parallels with normal stem cells, a developmental process of cancer stem cells follows paths of organized, hierarchical structure of cells with different degrees of maturity. While some investigators have reported particular markers as identification of cancer stem cells, these markers require further research. In this review, ...

  15. Targeting head and neck cancer stem cells to overcome resistance to photon and carbon ion radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Gérald; Maalouf, Mira; Boivin, Antony; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Beuve, Michael; Levy, Antonin; Jalade, Patrice; Fournier, Claudia; Ardail, Dominique; Magné, Nicolas; Alphonse, Gersende; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2014-02-01

    Although promising new radiation therapy techniques such as hadrontherapy are currently being evaluated in the treatment of head and neck malignancies, local control of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains low. Here, we investigated the involvement of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in a radioresistant HNSCC cell line (SQ20B). Stem-like cells SQ20B/SidePopulation(SP)/CD44(+)/ALDH(high) were more resistant to both photon and carbon ion irradiation compared with non-CSCs. This was confirmed by a BrdU labeling experiment, which suggests that CSCs were able to proliferate and to induce tumorigenicity after irradiation. SQ20B/SP/CD44(+)/ALDH(high) were capable of an extended G2/M arrest phase in response to photon or carbon ion irradiation compared with non-CSCs. Moreover, our data strongly suggest that resistance of CSCs may result from an imbalance between exacerbated self-renewal and proliferative capacities and the decrease in apoptotic cell death triggering. In order to modulate these processes, two targeted pharmacological strategies were tested. Firstly, UCN-01, a checkpoint kinase (Chk1) inhibitor, induced the relapse of G2/M arrest and radiosensitization of SQ20B-CSCs. Secondly, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) resulted in an inhibition of ALDH activity, and induction of the differentiation and radiosensitization of SQ20B/SP/CD44(+)/ALDH(high) cells. The combination of ATRA and UCN-01 treatments with irradiation drastically decreased the surviving fraction at 2Gy of SQ20B-CSCs from 0.85 to 0.38 after photon irradiation, and from 0.45 to 0.21 in response to carbon ions. Taken together, our results suggest that the combination of UCN-01 and ATRA represent a promising pharmacological-targeted strategy that significantly sensitizes CSCs to photon or carbon ion radiation. PMID:23955575

  16. Limited small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the prognosis of patients with limited small cell lung cancer (LSCLC) not achieving complete response (CR) to induction combination chemotherapy (ICC) but who achieve CR after thoracic irradiation (TI). Twenty-four patients had CRs to ICC (CR- ICC) of two cycles of cytoxan, Adriamycin, and vincristine alternating with two cycles of cisplatin with VP-16. Another 24 had CR after consolidation with subsequent T1 (CR-T1): 45 Gy in daily fractions of 2.5 Gy or twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy. The CR-ICC and CR-TI patients had similar prognostic factors and treatment. Comparing CR-ICC and CR-TI, survival was 40% versus 26% at 2 years and 35% versus 4% at 5 years (P < .05). There were eight (33%) long-term survivors (≥3 years) in the CR-ICC group versus three (13%) in the CR-TI group. Local control for CR-ICC patients was 59% at 5 years versus 21% for the CR-TI patients (not significant). Freedom from DM for the CR-ICC patients was 41% at 5 years versus 8% for the CR-TI patients (P < .05)

  17. Noncoding RNAs in cancer and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianzhi Huang; Angel Alvarez; Bo Hu; Shi-Yuan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are of crucial importance for human cancer. The functional relevance of ncRNAs is particularly evident for microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). miRNAs are endogenously expressed small RNA sequences that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been extensively studied for their roles in cancers, whereas lncRNAs are emerging as important players in the cancer paradigm in recent years. These noncoding genes are often aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, the biological functions of most ncRNAs remain largely unknown. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing how ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells harboring self-renewal and differentiation capacities. These studies provide insight into the functional roles that ncRNAs play in tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapies, and they suggest ncRNAs as attractive therapeutic targets and potential y useful diagnostic tools.

  18. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the radiation dose was investigated. Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control. Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 32% and 19%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, WBI doses >30 Gy (p = 0.038), KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p = 0.007), no extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved survival. Local control rates at 6 and 12 months were 37% and 15%, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved local control. In RPA class 3 patients, survival rates at 6 months were 10% (35 of 39 patients) after 10 × 3 Gy and 9% (2 of 23 patients) after greater doses, respectively (p = 0.98). Improved outcomes were associated with WBI doses >30 Gy, better performance status, fewer brain metastases, lack of extracerebral metastases, and lower RPA class. Patients receiving WBI alone appear to benefit from WBI doses >30 Gy. However, such a benefit is limited to RPA class 1 or 2 patients

  19. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shijie Ding; Chunbao Li; Ninghui Cheng; Xiaojiang Cui; Xinglian Xu; Guanghong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of can...

  20. PIXE analysis of the serum of mice acquired radio-resistibility by low dose X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not only important for maintenance and improvement of health, but also indispensable for diagnosis and remedy of diseases to make inquiries into the biological defence mechanisms. Yonezawa et al. came across an induction of yet unknown defence mechanism(s) in mice which acquired radioresistance two weeks after low dose X-irradiation with 0.5 Gy. The 30-day survival rate after midlethal X-irradiation of the mice significantly increased by the pre-irradiation, but contrary to the common knowledge on radiation protection, recovery of the blood cell counts of thrombocytes, leukocytes and erythrocytes were not stimulated by the pre-irradiation. This study was planned to find some keys to elucidate the mechanism for the acquired radioresistance. Metal ions are well known to be important for enzyme activities as well as for metabolisms. Eleven elements, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, and Br were analysed in mice sera by PIXE. (author)

  1. CD133: A cancer stem cells marker, is used in colorectal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Ren; Wei-Qi Sheng; Xiang Du

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. A model of cancer development involving cancer stem cells has been put forward because it provides a possible explanation of tumor hierarchy. Cancer stem cells are characterized by their proliferation, tumorigenesis, differentiation, and self-renewal capacities, and chemoradiotherapy resistance. Due to the role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation and treatment failure, studies of cancer stem cell markers, such as CD1...

  2. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture...

  3. Markers of small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma SK

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; however, no specific serum biomarker is available till date for detection of early lung cancer. Despite good initial response to chemotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers that might influence survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. The review aims to summarize the current knowledge of serum biomarkers in SCLC to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of tumor progression in lung cancer. The current knowledge on the known serum cytokines and tumor biomarkers of SCLC is emphasized. Recent findings in the search for novel diagnostic and therapeutic molecular markers using the emerging genomic technology for detecting lung cancer are also described. It is believed that implementing these new research techniques will facilitate and improve early detection, prognostication and better treatment of SCLC.

  4. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  5. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  6. Germ cell cancer and disorders of spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakkebaek, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Jørgensen, N;

    1998-01-01

    Why is there a small peak of germ cell tumours in the postnatal period and a major peak in young age, starting at puberty? And, paradoxically, small risk in old age, although spermatogenesis is a lifelong process? Why is this type of cancer more common in individuals with maldeveloped gonads......, including undescended testis, gonadal dysgenesis and androgen insensitivity syndrome? Why has there, during the past 50 years, been a quite dramatic increase in testicular cancer in many developed countries? These are just a few of many questions concerning testicular cancer. However, the recent progress...... in research in the early stages of testicular cancer (carcinoma in situ testis (CIS)) allows us to begin to answer some of these questions. There is more and more evidence that the CIS cell is a gonocyte with stem cell potential, which explains why an adult man can develop a non-seminoma, which...

  7. Cancer stem cells and chemoradiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a disease of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which are emphasized as the central mechanisms of tumor progression in the multistepwise model. Discovery of rare subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has created a new focus in cancer research. The heterogeneity of tumors can be explained with the help of CSCs supported by antiapoptotic signaling. CSCs mimic normal adult stem cells by demonstrating resistance to toxic injuries and chemoradiation therapy. Moreover, they might be responsible for tumor relapse following apparent beneficial treatments. Compared with hematopoietic malignancies, conventional therapy regimes in solid tumors have improved the overall survival marginally, illustrating the profound impact of treatment resistance. This implies that the present therapies, which follow total elimination of rapidly dividing and differentiated tumor cells, need to be modified to target CSCs that repopulate the tumor. In this review article, we report on recent findings regarding the involvement of CSCs in chemoradiation resistance and provide new insights into their therapeutic implications in cancer. (author)

  8. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shin eHamada; Atsushi eMasamune; Tooru eShimosegawa

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and also...

  9. Alteration of pancreatic cancer cell functions by tumor-stromal cell interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a characteristic tissue structure called desmoplasia, which consists of dense fibrotic stroma surrounding cancer cells. Interactions between pancreatic cancer cells and stromal cells promote invasive growth of cancer cells and establish a specific microenvironment such as hypoxia which further aggravates the malignant behavior of cancer cells. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in the development of fibrosis within the pancreatic cancer tissue, and al...

  10. DNA From Dead Cancer Cells Induces TLR9-Mediated Invasion and Inflammation In Living Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Kaakinen, Mika; Patel, Ankita; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Chen, Dongquan; Harris, Kevin W.; Graves, David; Selander, Katri S.

    2014-01-01

    TLR9 is a cellular DNA-receptor, which is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. Although synthetic TLR9-ligands induce cancer cell invasion in vitro, the role of TLR9 in cancer pathophysiology has remained unclear. We show here that living cancer cells uptake DNA from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells. We discovered that such DNA induces TLR9- and cathepsin-mediated invasion in living cancer cells. To study whether this phenomenon contributes to treatment responses, triple negative, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells stably expressing control or TLR9 siRNA were inoculated orthotopically into nude mice. The mice were treated with vehicle or doxorubicin. The tumor groups exhibited equal decreases in size in response to doxorubicin. However, while the weights of vehicle-treated mice were similar, mice bearing control siRNA tumors became significantly more cachectic in response to doxorubicin, as compared with similarly treated mice bearing TLR9 siRNA tumors, suggesting a TLR9-mediated inflammation at the site of the tumor. In conclusion, our findings propose that DNA released from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells has significant influence on TLR9-mediated biological effects in living cancer cells. Through these mechanisms, tumor TLR9 expression may affect treatment responses to chemotherapy. PMID:24212717

  11. Stress associated gene expression in blood cells is related to outcome in radiotherapy treated head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously observed that a radiotherapy-induced biochemical response in plasma was associated with favourable outcome in head and neck squamous carcinoma cancer (HNSCC) patients. The aim of the present study was to compare stress associated blood cell gene expression between two sub-groups of HNSCC patients with different biochemical responses to radiotherapy. Out of 87 patients (histologically verified), 10 biochemical ‘responders’ having a high relative increase in plasma oxidative damage and a concomitant decrease in plasma antioxidants during radiotherapy and 10 ‘poor-responders’ were selected for gene-expression analysis and compared using gene set enrichment analysis. There was a significant induction of stress-relevant gene-sets in the responders following radiotherapy compared to the poor-responders. The relevance of the involvement of similar stress associated gene expression for HNSCC cancer and radioresistance was verified using two publicly available data sets of 42 HNSCC cases and 14 controls (GEO GSE6791), and radiation resistant and radiation sensitive HNSCC xenografts (E-GEOD-9716). Radiotherapy induces a systemic stress response, as revealed by induction of stress relevant gene expression in blood cells, which is associated to favourable outcome in a cohort of 87 HNSCC patients. Whether these changes in gene expression reflects a systemic effect or are biomarkers of the tumour micro-environmental status needs further study. Raw data are available at ArrayExpress under accession number E-MEXP-2460

  12. Stress associated gene expression in blood cells is related to outcome in radiotherapy treated head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bøhn Siv K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously observed that a radiotherapy-induced biochemical response in plasma was associated with favourable outcome in head and neck squamous carcinoma cancer (HNSCC patients. The aim of the present study was to compare stress associated blood cell gene expression between two sub-groups of HNSCC patients with different biochemical responses to radiotherapy. Methods Out of 87 patients (histologically verified, 10 biochemical ‘responders’ having a high relative increase in plasma oxidative damage and a concomitant decrease in plasma antioxidants during radiotherapy and 10 ‘poor-responders’ were selected for gene-expression analysis and compared using gene set enrichment analysis. Results There was a significant induction of stress-relevant gene-sets in the responders following radiotherapy compared to the poor-responders. The relevance of the involvement of similar stress associated gene expression for HNSCC cancer and radioresistance was verified using two publicly available data sets of 42 HNSCC cases and 14 controls (GEO GSE6791, and radiation resistant and radiation sensitive HNSCC xenografts (E-GEOD-9716. Conclusions Radiotherapy induces a systemic stress response, as revealed by induction of stress relevant gene expression in blood cells, which is associated to favourable outcome in a cohort of 87 HNSCC patients. Whether these changes in gene expression reflects a systemic effect or are biomarkers of the tumour micro-environmental status needs further study. Trial registration Raw data are available at ArrayExpress under accession number E-MEXP-2460.

  13. Gap Junctions: The Claymore for Cancerous Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gap junctions play an important role in the cell proliferation in mammalian cells as well as carcinogenesis. However, there are controversial issues about their role in cancer pathogenesis. This study was designed to evaluate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of Carbenoxolone (CBX as a prototype of inter-cellular gap junction blocker in MCF7 and BT20 human breast cancer cells. Methods: The MCF7and BT20 human breast cancer cell lines were cultivated, and treated at designated confluency with different doses of CBX. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay associated with cell viability tests. Gene expression evaluation was carried out using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: MCF7 and BT20 cells were significantly affected by CBX in a dose dependent manner in cell viability assays. Despite varying expression of genes, down regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes was observed in these cells. Conclusion: Based upon this investigation, it can be concluded that CBX could affect both low and high proliferative types of breast cancer cell lines and disproportionate down regulation of both pre- and anti-apoptotic genes may be related to interacting biomolecules, perhaps via gap junctions.

  14. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  15. Evaluating human cancer cell metastasis in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo metastasis assays have traditionally been performed in mice, but the process is inefficient and costly. However, since zebrafish do not develop an adaptive immune system until 14 days post-fertilization, human cancer cells can survive and metastasize when transplanted into zebrafish larvae. Despite isolated reports, there has been no systematic evaluation of the robustness of this system to date. Individual cell lines were stained with CM-Dil and injected into the perivitelline space of 2-day old zebrafish larvae. After 2-4 days fish were imaged using confocal microscopy and the number of metastatic cells was determined using Fiji software. To determine whether zebrafish can faithfully report metastatic potential in human cancer cells, we injected a series of cells with different metastatic potential into the perivitelline space of 2 day old embryos. Using cells from breast, prostate, colon and pancreas we demonstrated that the degree of cell metastasis in fish is proportional to their invasion potential in vitro. Highly metastatic cells such as MDA231, DU145, SW620 and ASPC-1 are seen in the vasculature and throughout the body of the fish after only 24–48 hours. Importantly, cells that are not invasive in vitro such as T47D, LNCaP and HT29 do not metastasize in fish. Inactivation of JAK1/2 in fibrosarcoma cells leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo, and in zebrafish these cells show limited spread throughout the zebrafish body compared with the highly metastatic parental cells. Further, knockdown of WASF3 in DU145 cells which leads to loss of invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo also results in suppression of metastasis in zebrafish. In a cancer progression model involving normal MCF10A breast epithelial cells, the degree of invasion/metastasis in vitro and in mice is mirrored in zebrafish. Using a modified version of Fiji software, it is possible to quantify individual metastatic cells in the transparent larvae to correlate with

  16. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  17. Squamous cell cancer of the rectum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tara Dyson; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is a rare malignancy. It appears to be associated with chronic inflammatory conditions and infections. The clear association seen between Human Papilloma Virus and various squamous cancers has not been firmly established for the squamous cell cancer of the rectum. The presentation is nonspecific and patients tend to present with advanced stage disease. Diagnosis relies on endoscopic examination with biopsy of the lesion. Distinction from squamous cell cancer of the anus can be difficult, but can be facilitated by immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratins. Staging of the cancer with endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography provides essential information on prognosis and can guide therapy. At present, surgery remains the main therapeutic option; however recent advances have made chemoradiation a valuable therapeutic addition. Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is a distinct entity and it is of crucial importance for the practicing Gastroenterologist to be thoroughly familiar with this disease. Compared to adenocarcinoma of the rectum and squamous cell cancer of the anal canal, squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum has different epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, and prognosis but, most importantly, requires a different therapeutic approach. This review will examine and summarize the available information regarding this disease from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist.

  18. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther; Sopper, Sieghart; Wolf, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems.

  19. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Holck, S.; Christensen, I. J.; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer specimens express syncytin, an endogenous retroviral envelope protein, previously implicated in fusions between placental trophoblast cells. Additionally, endothelial and cancer cells are shown to ex...

  20. Cancer Stem Cells: From Identification To Eradication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fundamental problem in cancer research is identification of the cells within a tumor that sustain the growth of the neoplastic clone. The concept that only a subpopulation of rare cancer stem cells (CSCs) is responsible for maintenance of the neoplasm emerged nearly 50 years ago: however, conclusive proof for the existence of a CSC was obtained only relatively recently. As definition, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of cancer cells (found within solid tumors or hematological malignancies) that possess characteristics normally associated with stem cells as high self-renewal potential. These cells are believed to be tumorige forming) in contrast to the bulk of cancer cells, which are thought to be non-tumorigenic. The first conclusive evidence for CSCs was published in 1997 in Nature Medicine by Bonnet and Dick who isolated a subpopulation of leukemic cells in AML that express a specific surface marker CD34 but lacks the CD38 marker. The authors established that the CD34+/CD38– subpopulation is capable of initiating leukemia in NOD/SCID mice that is histologically similar to the donor [1]. This subpopulation of cells is termed SCID Leukemia-initiating cells (SLIC). A theory suggests that such cells act as a reservoir for disease recurrence, are the origin of metastasis and exert resistance towards classical antitumor regimens. This resistance was attributed to a combination of several factors [2], suggesting that conventional antitumor regimens are targeting the bulk of the tumor not the dormant stubborn CSCs. Purpose Better understanding of the leukemogenic process and the biology of CSCS to define the most applicable procedures for their identification and isolation in order to design specific targeted therapies aiming at reducing disease burden to very low levels .. up to eradication of the tumor

  1. Electrodynamic activity of healthy and cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří

    Vol. 329. Bristol : IOP, 2011 - (Cifra, M.; Pokorny, J.; Kučera, O.), 012007 ISSN 1742-6588. [9th International Frohlich's Symposium on Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells - Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics. Praha (CZ), 01.07.2011-03.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Boundary elements * Cancer cells * Electric dipole Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  2. Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Rachel G.; Watanabe, Hideo; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenoc...

  3. Mechanisms of linear energy transfer-dependent radiation resistance in myeloid leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Kurtis John

    Ionizing radiations (IRs) of high linear energy transfer (LET), such as alpha particles, produce fundamentally different forms of DNA damage in cells than conventional low LET radiation, such as gamma rays. Alpha particle therapies have recently emerged as important potential treatments of cancer, particularly for relatively easily-accessible malignancies of the hematopoietic system. Therefore, we created stable radioresistant myeloid leukemia HL60 cell clones derived after irradiation from either gamma rays (RG) or alpha particles (RA) in order to understand whether resistance to high LET (IR) was possible and the potential differences in radioresistance that could arise from radiations of different LET. Repeated irradiations yielded radioresistant HL60 clones and, regardless of derivation, displayed similar levels of resistance to IR of either type of radiation. The resistant phenotype in each type of radioresistant clone was driven by similar, multifactorial changes that included significant reductions in apoptosis, a decreased late G2/M checkpoint accumulation that was indicative of increased genomic instability, as well as more robust repair of specific types of DNA lesions that included DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The relative changes in resistance to alpha particles, however, were substantially lower than the increase in resistance to gamma rays. The data suggest that these processes were interdependent, as inhibition of homology directed repair in the resistant clones sensitized them to gamma IR to a larger extent than naive HL60 cells. Finally, we identified the downregulation of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) in gamma-resistant cells but not in alpha-resistant cells. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated reductions in expression of IRP1 in radiation-naive HL60 cells led to significant radioresistance to gamma rays, but not alpha particles. The IRP1-mediated radioresistance was associated with changes in iron-mediated oxidative stress that led to significant

  4. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  5. Lambda bacteriophage gene products and x-ray sensitivity of Escherichia coli: comparison of red-dependent and gam-dependent radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When gene products of lambda bacteriophage are introduced into a cell by transient induction of a lysogen, increased resistance of the cells to x rays results. This phenomenon has been called phage-induced radioresistance. Genetic studies show at least two classes of induced radioresistance. The first type depends on the products of the lambda red genes and is observed in bacteria that are mutated in the recB gene. It is thought that the lambda red products compensate for the missing RecBC nuclease in the repair of x-ray damage. An optimal effect is obtained even when the lambda red products are supplied 1 h after irradiation. The lesions that are affected by the red-dependent process are probably not deoxyribonucleic acid strand breaks because the extent of deoxyribonucleic acid strand rejoining is not altered by the red products. The second type of phage-induced radioresistance requires the gam product of lambda and is observed in wild-type and polA strains. The lambda gam+ gene product must be present immediately after irradiation to exert its full effect. In its presence, DNA breakdown is decreased, and a greater fraction of DNA is converted back to high molecular weight. Strains carrying lex, recA, or certain other combinations of mutations do not show any detectable phage-induced radioresistance. (U.S.)

  6. Cancer Stem Cells, Tumor Dormancy, And Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi ePatel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells can persist undetectably for an extended period of time in primary tumors and in disseminated cancer cells. Very little is known about why and how these tumors persist for extended periods of time and then evolve to malignancy. The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs in human tumors challenges our current understanding of tumor recurrence, drug resistance, and metastasis, and opens up new research directions on how cancer cells are capable of switching from dormancy to malignancy. Although overlapping molecules and pathways have been reported to regulate the stem-like phenotype of CSCs and metastasis, accumulated evidence has suggested additional clonal diversity within the stem-like cancer cell subpopulation. This review will describe the current hypothesis linking CSCs and metastasis and summarize mechanisms important for metastatic CSCs to re-initiate tumors in the secondary sites. A better understanding of CSCs’ contribution to clinical tumor dormancy and metastasis will provide new therapeutic revenues to eradicate metastatic tumors and significantly reduce the mortality of cancer patients.

  7. Sunitinib for advanced renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Coppin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chris CoppinBC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CanadaAbstract: Renal cell cancer has been refractory to drug therapy in the large majority of patients. Targeted agents including sunitinib have been intensively evaluated in renal cell cancer over the past 5 years. Sunitinib is an oral small molecule inhibitor of several targets including multiple tyrosine kinase receptors of the angiogenesis pathway. This review surveys the rationale, development, validation, and clinical use of sunitinib that received conditional approval for use in North America and Europe in 2006. In patients with the clear-cell subtype of renal cell cancer and metastatic disease with good or moderate prognostic factors for survival, sunitinib 50 mg for 4 weeks of a 6-week cycle provides superior surrogate and patient-reported outcomes when compared with interferon-alfa, the previous commonly used first-line drug. Overall survival has not yet shown improvement over interferon and is problematic because of patient crossover from the control arm to sunitinib at disease progression. Toxicity is significant but manageable with experienced monitoring. Sunitinib therapy is an important step forward for this condition. High cost and limited efficacy support the ongoing search for further improved therapy.Keywords: renal cell cancer, targeted therapy, sunitinib

  8. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  9. High aldehyde dehydrogenase activity identifies cancer stem cells in human cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shu-Yan; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity characterizes a subpopulation of cells with cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in several malignancies. To clarify whether ALDH can be used as a marker of cervical cancer stem cells (CCSCs), ALDHhigh and ALDHlow cells were sorted from 4 cervical cancer cell lines and 5 primary tumor xenografts and examined for CSC characteristics. Here, we demonstrate that cervical cancer cells with high ALDH activity fulfill the functional criteria for CSCs: (1) ALD...

  10. New molecular analysis of differential gene expressions to evaluate new exposure markers and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular techniques, such as macro array and representation difference analysis (RDA) (1), allow to detect subtle variations into complex biological processes induced by exposure to ionising radiation. One of the most reliable method to investigate radioresistance in vitro is to select a clone with acquired or intrinsic resistant phenotype by delivering repeated fractions of low-dose X-irradiation to a parent cell line. The resulting isolated resistant clone is then suitable for molecular techniques to analyse differential genes which expressions are important in characterising response and resistance to radiation. The cDNA expression arrays allow to perform the analysis of hundreds of known genes while RDA permits the comparison of genomic cDNA also from higher eukaryotes. The aim of the present work was to verify the suitable of these new molecular approaches to recognize the expression of genes hypothetically useful as radioprotection markers. To this end, a relatively high dose of X-rays was used (2 Gy), differentially expressed genes were isolated, and new experiments based on high sensitive and reproducible RT-PCR are foreseen for lower doses. Human neuroblastoma cell lines IMR32 and its resistant clone (Clone F), previously isolated by repeated 2 Gy X-irradiation( 2), were irradiated with a single 2 Gy X-rays. Six hours later, cells were monitored for surviving fraction, index of apoptosis and RNAs were extracted, purified and analysed either by human macro array with 205 cDNA of apoptosis genes related spiked on and either by RDA methodology. Human apoptosis macro array confirmed higher expression of genes related both to apoptosis regulator (Bax) and apoptosis effectors (caspase-2) in IMR32 cell line. RDA showed several differentially expressed genes in the resistant clone. Among these genes, two unknown forms of a protein with a putative enzymatic activity are cloned and transfected in the sensitive cell line to understand their role in radioresistance

  11. Chemokine receptors in cancer metastasis and cancer cell-derived chemokines in host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Keiichi; Hojo, Shozo; Akashi, Takuya; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    The chemotactic cytokines called chemokines are a superfamily of small secreted cytokines that were initially characterized through their ability to prompt the migration of leukocytes. Attention has been focused on the chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells because cancer cell migration and metastasis show similarities to leukocyte trafficking. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) was first investigated as a chemokine receptor that is associated with lung metastasis of breast cancers. Recently, CXCR4 was reported to be a key molecule in the formation of peritoneal carcinomatosis in gastric cancer. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge about the role of CXCR4 in cancer metastases. In contrast to chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells, little is known about the roles of cancer cell-derived chemokines. Cancer tissue consists of both cancer cells and various stromal cells, and leukocytes that infiltrate into cancer are of particular importance in cancer progression. Although colorectal cancer invasion is regulated by the chemokine CCL9-induced infiltration of immature myeloid cells into cancer, high-level expression of cancer cell-derived chemokine CXCL16 increases infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells into cancer tissues, and correlates with a good prognosis. We discuss the conflicting biological effects of cancer cell-derived chemokines on cancer progression, using CCL9 and CXCL16 as examples. PMID:17894551

  12. Surgery for small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoyos, Alberto; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2014-11-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises approximately 14% of all lung cancer cases. Most patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are therefore treated nonoperatively with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or both. A small subset of patients with SCLC present with early-stage disease and will benefit from surgical resection plus chemotherapy. The rationale for radiotherapy in these patients remains controversial. PMID:25441133

  13. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    MISHRA, LOPA

    2014-01-01

    Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the fun...

  14. How Taxol/paclitaxel kills cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Beth A

    2014-01-01

    Taxol (generic name paclitaxel) is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. It is used off-label to treat gastroesophageal, endometrial, cervical, prostate, and head and neck cancers, in addition to sarcoma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Paclitaxel has long been recognized to induce mitotic arrest, which leads to cell death in a subset of the arrested population. However, r...

  15. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  16. Reversibility of apoptosis in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, H. L.; Yuen, K L; Tang, H M; Fung, M C

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell suicide programme characterised by unique cellular events such as mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction, nuclear condensation, cytoplasmic shrinkage and activation of apoptotic protease caspases, and these serve as the noticeable apoptotic markers for the commitment of cell demise. Here, we show that, however, the characterised apoptotic dying cancer cells can regain their normal morphology and proliferate after removal of apoptotic inducers. In addition, we demonstr...

  17. Lung cancer-initiating cells: a novel target for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Morris, John C.; Steel, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major public health problem causing more deaths than any other cancer. A better understanding of the biology of this disease and improvements in treatment are greatly needed. Increasing evidence supports the concept that a rare and specialized population of cancer cells, so-called cancer-initiating cells with stem cell-like characteristics, is responsible for tumor growth, maintenance, and recurrence. Cancer-initiating cells also exhibit characteristics that render them resis...

  18. miR-15a/16 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting the TLR1/NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Many miRNAs have been identified as essential issues and core determining factors in tumor radiation. Recent reports have demonstrated that miRNAs and Toll-like receptors could exert reciprocal effects to control cancer development in various ways. However, a novel role of miR-15a/16 in enhancing radiation sensitivity by directly targeting TLR1 has not been reported, to our knowledge. Methods and Materials: Bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, biochemical assays, and subcutaneous tumor establishment were used to characterize the signaling pathways of miRNA-15a/16 in response to radiation treatment. Results: First, an inverse correlation between the expression of miR-15a/16 and TLR1 protein was revealed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and normal lung tissues. Next, we corroborated that miR-15a/16 specifically bound to TLR1 3′UTR and inhibited the expression of TLR1 in H358 and A549 cells. Furthermore, miR-15a/16 downregulated the activity of the NF-κB signaling pathway through TLR1. In addition, overexpression of miR-15a/16 inhibited survival capability and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in H358 and A549 cells. Finally, subcutaneous tumor bearing NSCLC cells in a nude mice model was established, and the results showed that combined groups (miR-15a/16 + radiation) inhibited tumor growth more significantly than did radiation alone. Conclusions: We mainly elucidate that miRNA-15a/16 can enhance radiation sensitivity by regulating the TLR1/NF-κB signaling pathway and act as a potential therapeutic approach to overcome radioresistance for lung cancer treatment

  19. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  20. Chemotherapy in heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells with interconversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the interconversion between differentiated and stem-like cancer cells has been observed. Here, we model the in vitro growth of heterogeneous cell cultures in the presence of interconversion from differentiated cancer cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs), showing that, by targeting only CSC with cytotoxic agents, it is not always possible to eradicate cancer. We have determined the kinetic conditions under which cytotoxic agents in in vitro heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells eradicate cancer. In particular, we have shown that the chemotherapeutic elimination of in vitro cultures of heterogeneous cancer cells is effective only if it targets all cancer cell types, and if the induced death rates for the different subpopulations of cancer cell types are large enough. The quantitative results of the model are compared and validated with experimental data. (paper)

  1. Radioresistant DNA synthesis in fibroblasts of a patient with Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation effect on DNA replication on fibroblasts of a healthy donor and a patient with Down's syndrome either by direct 3H-thymidine inclusion into DNA, or by analysis of the sizes of daughter DNA moleculs at the state of stable distribution in acid saccharose, gradients was studied. Gamma-radiation doses (5-10 Gy) suppressing DNA synthesis in normal fibroblasts practically had no effect on DNA synthesisin fibroblasts of a patient with Down's syndrome. Radioresistant DNA synthesis in Down's syndrome is conditioned by a far less supression of replicon initiation as compared with the one in normal cells. So, it is stated that in Down's disease there is no delay in DNA synthesis by ionizing radiation that enables the normal cells to repair DNA damages before replication renewal

  2. Mapping proteolytic cancer cell-extracellular matrix interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, K.A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    For cancer progression and metastatic dissemination, cancer cells migrate and penetrate through extracellular tissues. Cancer invasion is frequently facilitated by proteolytic processing of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cellular regions mediating proteolysis are diverse and depen

  3. Sensitization of cancer cells to radiation by selenadiazole derivatives by regulation of ROS-mediated DNA damage and ERK and AKT pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Wu Jing Zong Dui Hospital of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou (China); Zhou, Yangliang; Lan, Guoqiang; Yang, Liye; Zheng, Wenjie; Liang, Yuanwei [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Chen, Tianfeng, E-mail: tchentf@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • Selenadiazole derivatives could be used as an effective and low toxic sensitizer for radiotherapy. • Selenadiazole derivatives enhances radiation-induced growth inhibition on A375 cells through induction of G2/M arrest. • ROS-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in radiosensitization of selenadiazole derivatives. - Abstract: X-ray-based radiotherapy represents one of the most effective ways in treating human cancers. However, radioresistance and side effect remain as the most challenging issue. This study describes the design and application of novel selenadiazole derivatives as radiotherapy sensitizers to enhance X-ray-induced inhibitory effects on A375 human melanoma and Hela human cervical carcinoma cells. The results showed that, pretreatment of the cells with selenadiazole derivatives dramatically enhance X-ray-induced growth inhibition and colony formation. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that the sensitization by selenadiazole derivatives was mainly caused by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Results of Western blotting demonstrated that the combined treatment-induced A375 cells growth inhibition was achieved by triggering reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA damage involving inactivation of AKT and MAPKs. Further investigation revealed that selenadiazole derivative in combination with X-ray could synergistically inhibit the activity of thioredoxin reductase-1 in A375 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that selenadiazole derivatives can act as novel radiosensitizer with potential application in combating human cancers.

  4. Sensitization of cancer cells to radiation by selenadiazole derivatives by regulation of ROS-mediated DNA damage and ERK and AKT pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Selenadiazole derivatives could be used as an effective and low toxic sensitizer for radiotherapy. • Selenadiazole derivatives enhances radiation-induced growth inhibition on A375 cells through induction of G2/M arrest. • ROS-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in radiosensitization of selenadiazole derivatives. - Abstract: X-ray-based radiotherapy represents one of the most effective ways in treating human cancers. However, radioresistance and side effect remain as the most challenging issue. This study describes the design and application of novel selenadiazole derivatives as radiotherapy sensitizers to enhance X-ray-induced inhibitory effects on A375 human melanoma and Hela human cervical carcinoma cells. The results showed that, pretreatment of the cells with selenadiazole derivatives dramatically enhance X-ray-induced growth inhibition and colony formation. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that the sensitization by selenadiazole derivatives was mainly caused by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Results of Western blotting demonstrated that the combined treatment-induced A375 cells growth inhibition was achieved by triggering reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA damage involving inactivation of AKT and MAPKs. Further investigation revealed that selenadiazole derivative in combination with X-ray could synergistically inhibit the activity of thioredoxin reductase-1 in A375 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that selenadiazole derivatives can act as novel radiosensitizer with potential application in combating human cancers

  5. The metabolic landscape of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Biondani, Giulia; Cordani, Marco; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of quiescent cells endowed with self-renewal properties that can sustain the malignant behavior of the tumor mass giving rise to more differentiated cancer cells. For this reason, the specific killing of CSCs represents one of the most important challenges of the modern molecular oncology. However, their particular resistance to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy imposes a thorough understanding of their biological and biochemical features. The metabolic peculiarities of CSCs may be a therapeutic and diagnostic opportunity in cancer research. In this review, we summarize the most significant discoveries on the metabolism of CSCs describing and critically analyzing the studies supporting either glycolysis or mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary source of energy for CSCs. PMID:26337609

  6. Stem cell technology and engineering for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sinh Truong Nguyen; Phuc Van Pham

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are not only widely used for regenerative medicine, but are also considered as a useful tool for cancer treatment. For a long time, stem cells have been utilized to renew the immune system for radiation or chemotherapy treated patients. Recently, stem cells are being engineered to carry therapeutic reagents to target tumor sites. Cancer vaccines based on the knowledge of cancer stem cells have been studied and applied for cancer treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells have been u...

  7. Cellular basis of the immunohematologic defects observed in short-term semiallogeneic B6C3F1→C3H chimeras: evidence for host-versus-graft reaction initiated by radioresistant T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethally irradiated C3Hf mice reconstituted with a relatively low dose (2 x 106) of B6C3F1 bone marrow cells (B6C3F1→C3Hf chimeras) frequently manifest immunohematologic deficiencies during the first month following injection of bone marrow cells. They show slow recovery of antibody-forming potential to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as compared to that observed in syngeneic (C3Hf→C3Hf or B6C3F1→B6C3F1) chimeras. They also show a deficiency of B-cell activity as assessed by antibody response to SRBC following further reconstitution with B6C3F1-derived thymus cells 1 week after injection of bone marrow cells. A significant fraction of B6C3F1→C3Hf chimeras was shown to manifest a sudden loss of cellularity of spleens during the second week following injection of bone marrow cells even though cellularity was restored to the normal level within 1 week. The splenic mononuclear cells recovered from such chimeras almost invariably showed strong cytotoxicity against target cells expressing donor-type specific H-2 antigens (H-2/sup b/) when assesed by 51Cr-release assay in vitro. The effector cells responsible for the observed anti-donor specific cytotoxicity were shown to be residual host-derived T cells. These results indicate strongly that residual host T cells could develop anti-donor specific cytotoxicity even after exposure to a supralethal dose (1050 R) of radiation and that the immunohematologic disturbances observed in shortterm F1 to parent bone marrow chimeras (B6C3F1→C3Hf) were due to host-versus-graft reaction (HVGR) initiated by residual host T cells. The implication of these findings on the radiobiological nature of the residual T cells and the persistence of potentially anti-donor reactive T-cell clones in long-surviving allogeneic bone marrow chimeras was discussed

  8. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong ZHANG; Ai-zhen CAI; Xue-ming WEI; Li DING; Feng-zhi LI; Ai-ming ZHENG; Da-jiang DAI

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer.Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells,including several gastric cancer cell lines.This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.Methods:We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells.Results:This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells.Five stemness-related gene expression profiles,including OCT-4,SOX-2,NANOG,CD44,and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2,were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells.Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells.When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice,SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells.Conclusions:These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and Pediatric Solid Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a subpopulation of cells, termed tumor-initiating cells or tumor stem cells (TSC), has been identified in many different types of solid tumors. These TSC, which are typically more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation compared to other tumor cells, have properties similar to normal stem cells including multipotency and the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone. Much of the research on TSC has focused on adult cancers. With considerable differences in tumor biology between adult and pediatric cancers, there may be significant differences in the presence, function and behavior of TSC in pediatric malignancies. We discuss what is currently known about pediatric solid TSC with specific focus on TSC markers, tumor microenvironment, signaling pathways, therapeutic resistance and potential future therapies to target pediatric TSC

  10. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based on the...

  11. Additional gene therapy with Ad5CMV-p53 enhanced the efficacy of radiotherapy in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of combination therapy of ionizing radiation (IR) and adenoviral p53 gene therapy and to evaluate its molecular mechanisms. Methods and Materials: Two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3 cells, containing different types of p53 gene mutations, were investigated. The recombinant adenovirus vector containing the wild-type p53 gene (Ad5CMV-p53) was used for this study. Cells were irradiated (in 0, 2, 4, and 6 Gy, 300 cGy/min) and after 12 h of irradiation, the cells were infected with various doses of Ad5CMV-p53 (0-40 multiplicity of infection [MOI]). Cytotoxicity was determined by clonogenic assay. The molecular mechanisms were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), apoptotic cell detection, and cell cycle analysis. Results: The cell growth inhibition in DU145 (p53-mutated) cells by IR was strongly enhanced by additional Ad5CMV-p53 infection in a viral dose-dependent manner. In DU145 cells, IR alone induced minimal p53 mRNA expression. However, IR combined with Ad5CMV-p53 infection stimulated significant increase in p53 mRNA expression supplemented with Bax and p21 mRNA expressions. In PC-3 (p53-null), IR induced Bax and p21 mRNA expression, while the combination effects were observed in p53, Bax, and p21 mRNA expression. Apoptotic cell deaths were rarely observed after IR alone (DU145: 3%, PC-3: 5%). However, after combination therapy, the proportion of apoptotic cells greatly increased (sevenfold in DU145 cells, and twice in PC-3 cells). G1 cell cycle arrest was observed after Ad5CMV-p53 infection and the combination in both cell lines. Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of IR and Ad5CMV-p53 gene therapy resulted in remarkable synergistic effects in human prostate cancer cells. This combination therapy could be one of the optimal treatment strategies for radioresistant prostate cancer

  12. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast: Current Opinion and Future Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Monville, Florence; Ginestier, Christophe; Dontu, Gabriela; Birnbaum, Daniel; Wicha, Max S.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis, which holds that cancers are driven by a cellular subcomponent that has stem cell properties, that is, self-renewal, tumorigenicity and multilineage differentiation capacity. The cancer stem cell hypothesis modifies our conceptual approach of oncogenesis and shall have implications in breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment, especially in metastatic breast cancer for which no curative treatment exists. Given the speci...

  13. Epirubicin-Adsorbed Nanodiamonds Kill Chemoresistant Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Low, Xinyi Casuarine; Hou, Weixin; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Toh, Tan Boon; Mohd Abdul Rashid, Masturah; Ho, Dean; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Ep...

  14. Understanding cancer stem cell heterogeneity and plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dean G Tang

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity is an omnipresent feature of mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo.It has been recently realized that even mouse and human embryonic stem cells under the best culture conditions are heterogeneous containing pluripotent as well as partially committed cells.Somatic stem cells in adult organs are also heterogeneous,containing many subpopulations of self-renewing cells with distinct regenerative capacity.The differentiated progeny of adult stem cells also retain significant developmental plasticity that can be induced by a wide variety of experimental approaches.Like normal stem cells,recent data suggest that cancer stem cells(CSCs)similarly display significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity,and that the CSC progeny can manifest diverse plasticity.Here,I discuss CSC heterogeneity and plasticity in the context of tumor development and progression,and by comparing with normal stem cell development.Appreciation of cancer cell plasticity entails a revision to the earlier concept that only the tumorigenic subset in the tumor needs to be targeted.By understanding the interrelationship between CSCs and their differentiated progeny,we can hope to develop better therapeutic regimens that can prevent the emergence of tumor cell variants that are able to found a new tumor and distant metastases.

  15. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-μmol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 μmol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  16. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  17. Molecular Pathways: Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostasis in Cancer Cells and Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Veronique; Hay, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in regulating normal cellular processes, but deregulated ROS contribute to the development of various human diseases including cancers. Cancer cells have increased ROS levels compared to normal cells, because of their accelerated metabolism. The high ROS levels in cancer cells, which distinguish them from normal cells, could be pro-tumorigenic, but are also their Achilles’ heel. The high ROS content in cancer cells renders them more susceptible to o...

  18. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  19. Foxp3 expression in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourgoulianis Konstantinos I

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3 specifically characterizes the thymically derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs. Limited evidence indicates that it is also expressed, albeit to a lesser extent, in tissues other than thymus and spleen, while, very recently, it was shown that Foxp3 is expressed by pancreatic carcinoma. This study was scheduled to investigate whether expression of Foxp3 transcripts and mature protein occurs constitutively in various tumor types. Materials and methods Twenty five tumor cell lines of different tissue origins (lung cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, erythroid leukemia, acute T-cell leukemia were studied. Detection of Foxp3 mRNA was performed using both conventional RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR while protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, using different antibody clones. Results Foxp3 mRNA as well as Foxp3 protein was detected in all tumor cell lines, albeit in variable levels, not related to the tissue of origin. This expression correlated with the expression levels of IL-10 and TGFb1. Conclusion We offer evidence that Foxp3 expression, characterizes tumor cells of various tissue origins. The biological significance of these findings warrants further investigation in the context of tumor immune escape, and especially under the light of current anti-cancer efforts interfering with Foxp3 expression.

  20. Inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuates radiosensitivity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by increasing hTERT expression and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Wang

    Full Text Available The known functions of telomerase in tumor cells include replenishing telomeric DNA and maintaining cell immortality. We have previously shown the existence of a negative correlation between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Here we set out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation by telomerase of radiosensitivity in MCF-7 cells. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of a human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma radioresistant (Hep2R cDNA library was first performed to search for potential hTERT interacting proteins. We identified ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D3 (UBE2D3 as a principle hTERT-interacting protein and validated this association biochemically. ShRNA-mediated inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuated MCF-7 radiosensitivity, and induced the accumulation of hTERT and cyclin D1 in these cells. Moreover, down-regulation of UBE2D3 increased hTERT activity and cell proliferation, accelerating G1 to S phase transition in MCF-7 cells. Collectively these findings suggest that UBE2D3 participates in the process of hTERT-mediated radiosensitivity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by regulating hTERT and cyclin D1.

  1. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  2. Comparison of protein patterns of xrs-5, a radiosensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and CHO-K1, its radioresistant parent, using two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.M. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA). Dept. of Zoology)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray sensitive strains of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines have been used to analyze radiation repair mechanisms. One cell line, xrs-5, has been shown to be very sensitive to ionizing radiation and radical forming chemical mutagens. This sensitivity is thought to be a result a mutation in the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanism, and its characterization has been a goal of several repair mechanism studies. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected a protein (MW approximately 55KD) in the DNA/Nuclear Matrix (nucleoid) cell fraction of CHO-Kl cells that is absent in the nucleoid fraction of xrs-5. This protein is present, however, in both CHO-Kl and xrs-5 whole cell protein maps. To determine whether the 55KD protein is responsible for the radiosensitive and defective DSB repair phenotype of xrs-5 cells, studies are now underway to analyze revertants of xrs-5 that are proficient in DSB repair. Furthermore, an effort to sequence the protein in question is planned. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Comparison of protein patterns of xrs-5, a radiosensitive Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and CHO-K1, its radioresistant parent, using two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray sensitive strains of Chinese hamster ovary cell lines have been used to analyze radiation repair mechanisms. One cell line, xrs-5, has been shown to be very sensitive to ionizing radiation and radical forming chemical mutagens. This sensitivity is thought to be a result a mutation in the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanism, and its characterization has been a goal of several repair mechanism studies. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we have detected a protein (MW approximately 55KD) in the DNA/Nuclear Matrix (nucleoid) cell fraction of CHO-Kl cells that is absent in the nucleoid fraction of xrs-5. This protein is present, however, in both CHO-Kl and xrs-5 whole cell protein maps. To determine whether the 55KD protein is responsible for the radiosensitive and defective DSB repair phenotype of xrs-5 cells, studies are now underway to analyze revertants of xrs-5 that are proficient in DSB repair. Furthermore, an effort to sequence the protein in question is planned. 23 refs., 2 figs

  4. Knockdown of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptosis of H1299 cells via ROS-dependent and p53-independent NF-κB activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hong Shik [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jeong-Hwa [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Ji-Hye [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Woo [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie-Young; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Park, In-Chul [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu, E-mail: sgh63@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in H1299 cells. • Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant H1299 cells. • Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. • ROS generation enhances NF-κB activity, which acts as an upstream signal in the c-Myc/Noxa apoptotic pathway. - Abstract: We previously identified hepatoma-derived growth fact