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Sample records for cancer cells delays

  1. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  2. CALCULUS FROM THE PAST: MULTIPLE DELAY SYSTEMS ARISING IN CANCER CELL MODELLING

    KAUST Repository

    WAKE, G. C.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlocal calculus is often overlooked in the mathematics curriculum. In this paper we present an interesting new class of nonlocal problems that arise from modelling the growth and division of cells, especially cancer cells, as they progress through the cell cycle. The cellular biomass is assumed to be unstructured in size or position, and its evolution governed by a time-dependent system of ordinary differential equations with multiple time delays. The system is linear and taken to be autonomous. As a result, it is possible to reduce its solution to that of a nonlinear matrix eigenvalue problem. This method is illustrated by considering case studies, including a model of the cell cycle developed recently by Simms, Bean and Koeber. The paper concludes by explaining how asymptotic expressions for the distribution of cells across the compartments can be determined and used to assess the impact of different chemotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Australian Mathematical Society.

  3. The microtubule cytoskeleton is required for a G2 cell cycle delay in cancer cells lacking stathmin and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Bruce K; Caruso Silva, Victoria; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2012-05-01

    In several cancer cell lines, depleting the microtubule (MT)-destabilizing protein stathmin/oncoprotein18 leads to a G2 cell cycle delay and apoptosis. These phenotypes are observed only in synergy with low levels of p53, but the pathway(s) activated by stathmin depletion to delay the cell cycle are unknown. We found that stathmin depletion caused greater MT stability in synergy with loss of p53, measured by the levels of acetylated α-tubulin and the rate of centrosomal MT nucleation. Nocodazole or vinblastine-induced MT depolymerization abrogated the stathmin-depletion induced G2 delay, measured by the percentage of cells staining positive for several markers (TPX2, CDK1 with inhibitory phosphorylation), indicating that MTs are required to lengthen G2. Live cell imaging showed that stathmin depletion increased time in G2 without an impact on the duration of mitosis, indicating that the longer interphase duration is not simply a consequence of a previous slowed mitosis. In contrast, stabilization of MTs with paclitaxel (8 nM) slowed mitosis without lengthening the duration of interphase, demonstrating that increased MT stability alone is not sufficient to delay cells in G2.

  4. The delayed luminescence spectroscopy as tool to investigate the cytotoxic effect on human cancer cells of drug-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, R.; Gulino, M.; Scordino, A.; Musumeci, F.; Campisi, A.; Bonfanti, R.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2016-05-01

    The first results concerning the possibility to use Delayed Luminescence spectroscopy to evaluate the in vitro induction of cytotoxic effects on human glioblastoma cells of nanostructured lipid carrier and drug-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier are showed in this contribution. We tested the effects of nanostructured lipid carrier, ferulic acid and ferulic acidloaded nanostructured lipid carrier on U-87MG cell line. The study seems to confirm the ability of Delayed Luminescence to be sensible indicator of alterations induced on functionality of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in U-87MG cancer cells when treated with nanostructured lipid carriers.

  5. Pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor obatoclax delays cell cycle progression and blocks migration of colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Christian Koehler

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that new treatment regimes have improved overall survival of patients challenged by colorectal cancer (CRC, prognosis in the metastatic situation is still restricted. The Bcl-2 family of proteins has been identified as promising anti cancer drug target. Even though small molecules targeting Bcl-2 proteins are in clinical trials, little is known regarding their effects on CRC. The aim of this study was to preclinically investigate the value of ABT-737 and Obatoclax as anticancer drugs for CRC treatment. The effects of the BH3-mimetics ABT-737 and Obatoclax on CRC cells were assessed using viability and apoptosis assays. Wound healing migration and boyden chamber invasion assays were applied. 3-dimensional cell cultures were used for long term assessment of invasion and proliferation. Clinically relevant concentrations of pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor Obatoclax did not induce cell death. In contrast, the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Obatoclax caused a cell line specific slowdown of CRC cell growth. Furthermore, Obatoclax, but not ABT-737, recovered E-Cadherin expression and led to impaired migration and invasion of CRC cells. The proliferative capacity and invasiveness of CRC cells was strikingly inhibited by low dose Obatoclax in long term 3-dimensional cell cultures. Obatoclax, but not ABT-737, caused a G1-phase arrest accompanied by a downregulation of Cyclin D1 and upregulation of p27 and p21. Overexpression of Mcl-1, Bcl-xL or Bcl-2 reversed the inhibitory effect of Obatoclax on migration but failed to restore the proliferative capacity of Obatoclax-treated CRC cells. The data presented indicate broad and multifaceted antitumor effects of the pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor Obatoclax on CRC cells. In contrast to ABT-737, Obatoclax inhibited migration, invasion and proliferation in sublethal doses. In summary, this study recommends pan-Bcl-2 inhibition as a promising approach for clinical trials in CRC.

  6. HDAC8 Inhibition Blocks SMC3 Deacetylation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression without Affecting Cohesin-dependent Transcription in MCF7 Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Tanushree; Antony, Jisha; Braithwaite, Antony W; Horsfield, Julia A

    2016-06-10

    Cohesin, a multi-subunit protein complex involved in chromosome organization, is frequently mutated or aberrantly expressed in cancer. Multiple functions of cohesin, including cell division and gene expression, highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target. The SMC3 subunit of cohesin is acetylated (ac) during S phase to establish cohesion between replicated chromosomes. Following anaphase, ac-SMC3 is deacetylated by HDAC8. Reversal of SMC3 acetylation is imperative for recycling cohesin so that it can be reloaded in interphase for both non-mitotic and mitotic functions. We blocked deacetylation of ac-SMC3 using an HDAC8-specific inhibitor PCI-34051 in MCF7 breast cancer cells, and examined the effects on transcription of cohesin-dependent genes that respond to estrogen. HDAC8 inhibition led to accumulation of ac-SMC3 as expected, but surprisingly, had no influence on the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes that are altered by siRNA targeting of RAD21 or SMC3. Knockdown of RAD21 altered estrogen receptor α (ER) recruitment at SOX4 and IL20, and affected transcription of these genes, while HDAC8 inhibition did not. Rather, inhibition of HDAC8 delayed cell cycle progression, suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that HDAC8 inhibition does not change the estrogen-specific transcriptional role of cohesin in MCF7 cells, but instead, compromises cell cycle progression and cell survival. Our results argue that candidate inhibitors of cohesin function may differ in their effects depending on the cellular genotype and should be thoroughly tested for predicted effects on cohesin's mechanistic roles.

  7. M867, a novel selective inhibitor of caspase-3 enhances cell death and extends tumor growth delay in irradiated lung cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Woon Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Radioresistance of lung cancer cells results in unacceptable rate of loco-regional failure. Although radiation is known to induce apoptosis, our recent study showed that knockdown of pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax resulted in an increase in autophagic cell death and lung cancer radiosensitivity in vitro. To further explore the potential of apoptosis inhibition as a way to sensitize lung cancer for therapy, we tested M867, a novel chemical and reversible caspase-3 inhibitor, in combination with ionizing radiation in vivo and in vitro. METHODS AND FINDINGS: M867 reduced clonogenic survival in H460 lung cancer cells (DER = 1.27, p = 0.007 compared to the vehicle-treated treated cells. We found that administration of M867 with ionizing radiation in an in vivo mouse hind limb lung cancer model was well tolerated, and produced a significant tumor growth delay compared to radiation alone. A dramatic decrease in tumor vasculature was observed with M867 and radiation using von Willebrand factor staining. In addition, Ki67 index showed >5-fold reduction of tumor proliferation in the combination therapy group, despite the reduced levels of apoptosis observed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining. Radiosensitizing effect of M867 through inhibiting caspases was validated using caspase-3/-7 double-knockout (DKO mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF cell model. Consistent with our previous study, autophagy contributed to the mechanism of increased cell death, following inhibition of apoptosis. In addition, matrigel assay showed a decrease in in vitro endothelial tubule formation during the M867/radiation combination treatment. CONCLUSIONS: M867 enhances the cytotoxic effects of radiation on lung cancer and its vasculature both in vitro and in vivo. M867 has the potential to prolong tumor growth delay by inhibiting tumor proliferation

  8. Immediate Versus Delayed Treatment with EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors after First-line Therapy in Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-jie Wang; Ping-ping Li; Hong Sun; Ping Yang; Jie Wang; Tong-tong An; Tony Mok; Lu Yang; Hua Bai; Jun Zhao; Jian-chun Duan; Mei-na Wu; Yu-yan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the outcomes of patients who received TKI immediately after the first-line without progression as maintenance treatment (immediate group) vs. those received delayed treatment upon disease progression as second-line therapy (delayed group). Methods: The study included 159 no-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who received gefitinib or erlotinib as maintenance treatment in the immediate group (85 patients) or as second-line therapy in the delayed group (74patients). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). EGFR mutation status was detected using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Results: PFS was 17.3 and 16.4 months in the immediate and delayed groups, respectively (hazard ratio [HR],0.99; 95% Confidence Interval [Cl]: 0.69-1.42; P=0.947). In a subgroup analysis that included only patients with EGFR mutation, however, PFS was significantly longer in the immediate group than in the delayed group (HR, 0.48; 95% Cl:0.27-0.85; P=0.012). In patients with wild type EGFR, the risk for disease progression was comparable between the two groups (HR, 1.23; 95% Cl: 0.61-2.51; P=0.564). No significant difference was demonstrated between the immediate and delayed group in terms of the overall survival (OS) (26.1 months vs. 21.6 months, respectively;HR=0.53; 95% Cl: 0.27 to 1.06; P=0.072). There was also no difference in the incidence of adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions: EGFR TKI maintenance improves PFS in patients with EGFR mutation. Prospectively designed clinical studies that compare TKI immediate vs. delayed treatment after first-line chemotherapy upon disease progression are needed.

  9. Expression of metastasis suppressor BRMS1 in breast cancer cells results in a marked delay in cellular adhesion to matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic dissemination is a multi-step process that depends on cancer cells’ ability to respond to microenvironmental cues by adapting adhesion abilities and undergoing cytoskeletal rearrangement. Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor 1 (BRMS1) affects several steps of the metastatic cascade: it dec...

  10. Growth of human gastric cancer cells in nude mice is delayed by a ketogenic diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voelker Hans

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the most prominent metabolic alterations in cancer cells are the increase in glucose consumption and the conversion of glucose to lactic acid via the reduction of pyruvate even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, may provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies that inhibit tumour growth by administration of a ketogenic diet with average protein but low in carbohydrates and high in fat enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT. Methods Twenty-four female NMRI nude mice were injected subcutaneously with tumour cells of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line 23132/87. The animals were then randomly split into two feeding groups and fed either a ketogenic diet (KD group; n = 12 or a standard diet (SD group; n = 12 ad libitum. Experiments were ended upon attainment of the target tumor volume of 600 mm3 to 700 mm3. The two diets were compared based on tumour growth and survival time (interval between tumour cell injection and attainment of target tumour volume. Results The ketogenic diet was well accepted by the KD mice. The tumour growth in the KD group was significantly delayed compared to that in the SD group. Tumours in the KD group reached the target tumour volume at 34.2 ± 8.5 days versus only 23.3 ± 3.9 days in the SD group. After day 20, tumours in the KD group grew faster although the differences in mean tumour growth continued significantly. Importantly, they revealed significantly larger necrotic areas than tumours of the SD group and the areas with vital tumour cells appear to have had fewer vessels than tumours of the SD group. Viable tumour cells in the border zone surrounding the necrotic areas of tumours of both groups exhibited a glycolytic phenotype with expression of glucose transporter-1 and transketolase-like 1 enzyme. Conclusion Application of an unrestricted ketogenic diet enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and MCT

  11. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing a single tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope delays tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Botto, Sara; Alexander, Richard B; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly immunogenic virus that results in a persistent, life-long infection in the host typically with no ill effects. Certain unique features of CMV, including its capacity to actively replicate in the presence of strong host CMV-specific immunity, may give CMV an advantage compared with other virus-based vaccine delivery platforms. In the present study, we tested the utility of mouse CMV (mCMV)-based vaccines expressing human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer immunotherapy in double-transgenic mice expressing PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2bxPSA F1 mice). We assessed the capacity of 2 mCMV-based vectors to induce PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses and affect the growth of PSA-expressing Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate tumors (TRAMP-PSA). In the absence of tumor challenge, immunization with mCMV vectors expressing either a H2-D(b)-restricted epitope PSA(65-73) (mCMV/PSA(65-73)) or the full-length gene for PSA (mCMV/PSA(FL)) induced comparable levels of CD8 T-cell responses that increased (inflated) with time. Upon challenge with TRAMP-PSA tumor cells, animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(65-73) had delay of tumor growth and increased PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses, whereas animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(FL) showed progressive tumor growth and no increase in number of splenic PSA(65-73)-specific T cells. The data show that a prototype CMV-based prostate cancer vaccine can induce an effective antitumor immune response in a "humanized" double-transgenic mouse model. The observation that mCMV/PSA(FL) is not effective against TRAMP-PSA is consistent with our previous findings that HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted immune responses to PSA are associated with suppression of effective CD8 T-cell responses to TRAMP-PSA tumors.

  12. Lactaptin induces p53-independent cell death associated with features of apoptosis and autophagy and delays growth of breast cancer cells in mouse xenografts.

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    Olga A Koval

    Full Text Available Lactaptin, the proteolytic fragment of human milk kappa-casein, induces the death of various cultured cancer cells. The mechanisms leading to cell death after lactaptin treatment have not been well characterized. In this study the in vivo and in vitro effects of a recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2 were examined. Following treatment with the recombinant analogue of lactaptin strong caspase -3, -7 activation was detected. As a consequence of caspase activation we observed the appearance of a sub-G1 population of cells with subdiploid DNA content. Dynamic changes in the mRNA and protein levels of apoptosis-related genes were estimated. No statistically reliable differences in p53 mRNA level or protein level were found between control and RL2-treated cells. We observed that RL2 constitutively suppressed bcl-2 mRNA expression and down regulated Bcl-2 protein expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. We demonstrated that RL2 penetrates cancer and non-transformed cells. Identification of the cellular targets of the lactaptin analogue revealed that α/β-tubulin and α-actinin-1 were RL2-bound proteins. As the alteration in cellular viability in response to protein stimulus can be realized not only by way of apoptosis but also by autophagy, we examined the implications of autophagy in RL2-dependent cell death. We also found that RL2 treatment induces LC3-processing, which is a hallmark of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine enhanced RL2 cytotoxicity to MDA-MB-231 cells, indicating the pro-survival effect of RL2-dependent autophagy. The antitumour potential of RL2 was investigated in vivo in mouse xenografts bearing MDA-MB-231 cells. We demonstrated that the recombinant analogue of lactaptin significantly suppressed the growth of solid tumours. Our results indicate that lactaptin could be a new molecule for the development of anticancer drugs.

  13. BOLD delay times using group delay in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloigner, Julie; Vu, Chau; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that effects red blood cells, which can lead to vasoocclusion, ischemia and infarct. This disease often results in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique for measuring and mapping the brain activity. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals contain also information about the neurovascular coupling, vascular reactivity, oxygenation and blood propagation. Temporal relationship between BOLD fluctuations in different parts of the brain provides also a mean to investigate the blood delay information. We used the induced desaturation as a label to profile transit times through different brain areas, reflecting oxygen utilization of tissue. In this study, we aimed to compare blood flow propagation delay times between these patients and healthy subjects in areas vascularized by anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In a group comparison analysis with control subjects, BOLD changes in these areas were found to be almost simultaneous and shorter in the SCD patients, because of their increased brain blood flow. Secondly, the analysis of a patient with a stenosis on the anterior cerebral artery indicated that signal of the area vascularized by this artery lagged the MCA signal. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes blood propagation modifications, and that these changes could be used as a biomarker of vascular damage.

  14. Delay estimation for CMOS functional cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis on arbitr......Presents a new RC tree network model for delay estimation of CMOS functional cells. The model is able to reflect topological changes within a cell, which is of particular interest when doing performance driven layout synthesis. Further, a set of algorithms to perform worst case analysis...... on arbitrary CMOS functional cells using the proposed delay model, is presented. Both model and algorithms have been implemented as a part of a cell compiler (CELLO) working in an experimental silicon compiler environment....

  15. A new method for analyzing diagnostic delay in gynecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandborg, Mai Partridge; Edwards, Kasper; Kragtrup, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to present a new methodology to illustrate, understand, and measure delay in health care. The method is inspired by process mapping tools as analytical framework and demonstrates its usefulness for studying diagnostic delay in gynecological cancer. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Six women with a diagnostic delay of 6 weeks or more before treatment of gynecological cancer at a specialized regional department (the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, Denmark) were included in the study. Maps of existing processes were performed for each...... to responsibilities and was shown to recurrently influence and contribute to the delay in the diagnostic process. Some important contributors to diagnostic delay in gynecological cancer, such as lack of cancer suspicion, competing diseases, negative test results, inexpedient referral patterns, and referrals without...

  16. A New Method for Analyzing Diagnostic Delay in Gynecological Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandborg, Mai Partridge; Edwards, Kasper; Kragstrup, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to present a new methodology to illustrate, understand, and measure delay in health care. The method is inspired by process mapping tools as analytical framework and demonstrates its usefulness for studying diagnostic delay in gynecological cancer. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Six women with a diagnostic delay of 6 weeks or more before treatment of gynecological cancer at a specialized regional department (the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, Denmark) were included in the study. Maps of existing processes were performed for each...... to responsibilities and was shown to recurrently influence and contribute to the delay in the diagnostic process. Some important contributors to diagnostic delay in gynecological cancer, such as lack of cancer suspicion, competing diseases, negative test results, inexpedient referral patterns, and referrals without...

  17. Targeted cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyl transferase suicide gene therapy induces small cell lung cancer-specific cytotoxicity and tumor growth delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Gjetting, Torben; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2010-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant cancer for which there is no curable treatment. Novel therapies are therefore in great demand. In the present study we investigated the therapeutic effect of transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy for SCLC based on the yeast cytosine de...

  18. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  19. PRIMA-1Met/APR-246 induces apoptosis and tumor growth delay in small cell lung cancer expressing mutant p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Selivanova, Galina; Christensen, Camilla Laulund;

    2011-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis, necessitating the need to develop new and efficient treatment modalities. PRIMA-1(Met) (p53-dependent reactivation of massive apoptosis), also known as APR-246, is a small molecule, which restores tumor suppressor...... function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Since p53 is mutated in more than 90% of SCLC, we investigated the ability of PRIMA-1(Met) to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in SCLC with different p53 mutations....

  20. Delay in diagnostic workup and treatment of esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. Grotenhuis (Brechtje); P. van Hagen (Pieter); B.P.L. Wijnhoven (Bas); V.M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); H.W. Tilanus (Hugo); J.J-B. van Lanschot (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Esophageal cancer should preferably be detected and treated at an early stage, but this may be prohibited by late onset of symptoms and delays in referral, diagnostic workup, and treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of these delays on outcome in pa

  1. Delayed cell cycle progression from SEPW1 depletion is p53- and p21-dependent in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential redox-active element with close connections to cancer. Most of Se’s biological functions have been attributed to the antioxidant properties of Se-containing proteins. The relative contribution of selenoproteins and small Se compounds in cancer protection is a matter of ...

  2. Delay of medical care for symptomatic breast cancer: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Karla Unger-Saldaña; Claudia Infante-Castañeda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to organize and summarize existing information on delayed medical attention for women with breast cancer and identify research needs in this area. This review is organized in six parts: origins and permanence of the message do not delay medical attention for potential cancer symptoms; definition and classification of breast cancer delay; impact of delay on breast cancer prognosis; factors related to breast cancer delay and the ways these have been studied; the s...

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  4. Targeted cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyl transferase suicide gene therapy induces small cell lung cancer-specific cytotoxicity and tumor growth delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Gjetting, Torben; Poulsen, Thomas Tuxen

    2010-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant cancer for which there is no curable treatment. Novel therapies are therefore in great demand. In the present study we investigated the therapeutic effect of transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy for SCLC based on the yeast cytosine...... deaminase (YCD) gene alone or fused with the yeast uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (YUPRT) gene followed by administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) prodrug. Experimental design: The YCD gene or the YCD-YUPRT gene was placed under regulation of the SCLC-specific promoter insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1...

  5. MAZ-binding G4-decoy with locked nucleic acid and twisted intercalating nucleic acid modifications suppresses KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells and delays tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, Susanna; Zorzet, Sonia; Rapozzi, Valentina;

    2013-01-01

    KRAS mutations are primary genetic lesions leading to pancreatic cancer. The promoter of human KRAS contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) that can fold in G4-DNA structures binding to nuclear proteins, including MAZ (myc-associated zinc-finger). Here, we report that MAZ activates KRAS...... transcription. To knockdown oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer cells, we designed oligonucleotides that mimic one of the G-quadruplexes formed by NHE (G4-decoys). To increase their nuclease resistance, two locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications were introduced at the 3'-end, whereas to enhance the folding...... the Kaplan-Meier median survival time by 70%. Together, our data show that MAZ-specific G4-decoys mimicking a KRAS quadruplex are promising for pancreatic cancer therapy....

  6. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti [Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, 26300 Gambang, Pahang (Malaysia); Bahar, Arifah [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor and UTM Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (UTM-CIAM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  7. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  8. Delay in the diagnosis of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Pilegaard

    reports that old age, patient symptom reactions in the form of active seeking of information and support, as well as the active supportive behaviour of partners were important predictors of short patient delays, while patient tendencies to respond to threatening stimuli with emotional control and avoidant....... It is concluded that the study design may, to some extent, have given rise to selection and information bias and a risk of confounding, which, however, was largely accounted for in the analyses. We found a wide generalizability, although differences in health care systems regarding financing, degree...

  9. EVI1 targets ΔNp63 and upregulates the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 independent of p53 to delay cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Kasturi Bala; Kuila, Nivedita; Das Mohapatra, Alok; Panda, Aditya K; Chakraborty, Soumen

    2013-08-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that specific transcriptional events are involved in cell cycle, proliferation and differentiation processes; however, their deregulation by proto-oncogenes are involved in the development of leukemia and tumors. One such proto-oncogene is ecotropic viral integration site I which can differentially effect cell cycle progression and proliferation, in cell types of different origin. Our data for the first time shows that ecotropic viral integration site I binds to ΔNp63 promoter element directly and down regulates its expression. Down regulation of ΔNp63 induces the expression of p21 in HT-29 cells and also in colon carcinoma cells that do not express p53 including patient samples expressing low level of p53, that eventually delay cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase. Concomitant silencing of ecotropic viral integration site I from the cells or introduction of ΔNp63 to the cells significantly rescued this phenotype, indicating the growth defect induced by ΔNp63 deficiency to be, at least in part, attributable to ecotropic viral integration site I function. The mutual regulation between ecotropic viral integration site I and ΔNp63 may constitute a novel axis which might affect the downstream pathways in cells that do not express functional p53.

  10. Diagnostic delay in oral squamous cell carcinoma: the role of cognitive and psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Vera; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Calvino, Francesco; Compilato, Domenico; Colella, Giuseppe; Campisi, Giuseppina

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study investigated, in two cohorts of subjects living in Southern Italy and awaiting treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the variables related to diagnostic delay ascribable to the patient, with particular reference to the cognitive and psychological ones. A total of 156 patients with OSCC (mean age: 62 years, M/F: 2.39∶1) were recruited at the Universities of Palermo and Naples. Risk factors related to patient delay included: sociodemographic, health-related, cognitive and psychological variables. The analysis was conducted by considering two different delay ranges: dichotomous (≤1 month vs. >1 month) and polytomous (3 months) delay. Data were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses and a P value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. For both delay measurements, the most relevant variables were: 'Personal experience of cancer' (dichotomous delay: P=0.05, odds ratio (OR)=0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.11-0.99; polytomous delay: P=0.006, Chi-square=10.224) and 'Unawareness' (dichotomous delay: Pdichotomous and for polytomous categorization of delay, respectively. The findings of this study indicated that, in the investigated cohorts, the knowledge about cancer issues is strongly linked to the patient delay. Educational interventions on the Mediterranean population are necessary in order to increase the patient awareness and to emphasize his/her key role in early diagnosis of OSCC.

  11. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  12. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  13. Delayed breast reconstruction with implants after invasive breast cancer does not impair prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Düring, Maria; Henriksen, Trine Foged;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women......We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women...

  14. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  15. Diagnostic delay, quality of life and patient satisfaction among women diagnosed with endometrial or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine M; Christensen, Karl Bang; Ottesen, Bent;

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the association between diagnostic delay (total delay), quality of life (QoL) and patient satisfaction, and the associations between QoL and patient satisfaction scores and survival for women diagnosed with ovarian or endometrial cancer.......This study investigates the association between diagnostic delay (total delay), quality of life (QoL) and patient satisfaction, and the associations between QoL and patient satisfaction scores and survival for women diagnosed with ovarian or endometrial cancer....

  16. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  17. Delay in Presentation, Diagnosis, and Treatment for Breast Cancer Patients in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Helalah, Ahmad Munir; Alshraideh, Ahmad Hussam; Al-Hanaqtah, Mo'tasem; Da'na, Moh'd; Al-Omari, Asim; Mubaidin, Rasmi

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer, and one of the leading causes of death for females in Jordan and many countries in the world. Studies have shown that delay in symptoms presentation, diagnosis or treatment would result in poor prognosis. There has been no published study from Jordan on delays in patient presentation, delays in diagnosis, or delays in treatment. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess these important quality indicators aiming to improve prognosis for breast cancer patients in Jordan. This project was a cross-sectional study on female breast cancer patients in Jordan. The total number of participants was 327. The proportion of patients with presentation delay, diagnosis delay, and treatment delay was 32.2%, 49.1%, or 32.4%, respectively. The main reported reasons for delay in presentation were ignorance of the nature of the problem (65.6%), limited/lack of knowledge that symptoms were suggestive of cancer diagnosis (16.7%), and misdiagnosis (16.7%). Predictors of delay and mean time for presentation, diagnosis, and treatment were identified. Our results reveal that breast cancer patients in Jordan are experiencing delays in presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. This could justify the advanced stages at diagnosis and poor outcomes for breast cancer patients in Jordan. We recommend revising the current early detection and down-staging programs in Jordan.

  18. Diagnostic delay experienced among gynecological cancer patients: a nationwide survey in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine Magtengaard; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Karl Bang;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine diagnostic delay among gynecological cancer patients. DESIGN: Nationwide study. SETTING: The cohort comprised all women receiving their first treatment for cervical, endometrial, or ovarian cancer between 1 October 2006 and 1 December 2007 in four of the five centers...... for gynecological cancer surgery in Denmark. SAMPLE: Of the 911 women alive, 648 participated, resulting in a response rate of 71.1%; of these, 30.1% were diagnosed with cervical cancer, 31.0% with endometrial cancer, and 38.9% with ovarian cancer. METHODS: Questionnaire survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnostic...... experiencing very long delays. Ovarian cancer patients experienced significantly shorter delays compared with other gynecological cancer patients in all parts of the health care system. CONCLUSIONS: Delays occur in all parts of the diagnostic process, suggesting that a multifaceted approach should be adopted...

  19. Delay in Breast Cancer: Implications for Stage at Diagnosis and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eCaplan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer continues to be a disease with tremendous public health significance. Primary prevention of breast cancer is still not available, so efforts to promote early detection continue to be the major focus in fighting breast cancer. Since early detection is associated with decreased mortality, one would think that it is important to minimize delays in detection and diagnosis. There are two major types of delay. Patient delay is delay in seeking medical attention after self-discovering a potential breast cancer symptom. System delay is delay within the health care system in getting appointments, scheduling diagnostic tests, receiving a definitive diagnosis, and initiating therapy. Earlier studies of the consequences of delay on prognosis tended to show that increased delay is associated with more advanced stage cancers at diagnosis, thus resulting in poorer chances for survival. More recent studies have had mixed results, with some studies showing increased survival with longer delays. One hypothesis is that diagnostic difficulties could perhaps account for this survival paradox. A rapidly growing lump may suggest cancer to both doctors and patients, while a slow growing lump or other symptom could be less obvious to them. If this is the case, then the shorter delays would be seen with the more aggressive tumors for which the prognosis is worse leading to reduced survival. It seems logical that a tumor that is more advanced at diagnosis would lead to shorter survival; but the several counter-intuitive studies in this review show that it is dangerous to make assumptions.

  20. Diagnostic delay in oral squamous cell carcinoma:the role of cognitive and psychological variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vera Panzarella; Giuseppe Pizzo; Francesco Calvino; Domenico Compilato; Giuseppe Colella; Giuseppina Campisi

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated, in two cohorts of subjects living in Southern Italy and awaiting treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the variables related to diagnostic delay ascribable to the patient, with particular reference to the cognitive and psychological ones. A total of 156 patients with OSCC (mean age:62 years, M/F:2.39:1) were recruited at the Universities of Palermo and Naples. Risk factors related to patient delay included:sociodemographic, health-related, cognitive and psychological variables. The analysis was conducted by considering two different delay ranges:dichotomous (f1 month vs. .1 month) and polytomous (,1 month, 1-3 months, .3 months) delay. Data were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses and a P value f0.05 was considered statistically significant. For both delay measurements, the most relevant variables were:‘Personal experience of cancer’ (dichotomous delay:P50.05, odds ratio (OR)50.33, 95%confidence interval (CI)50.11-0.99;polytomous delay:P50.006, Chi-square510.224) and‘Unawareness’ (dichotomous delay:P,0.01, OR54.96, 95%CI52.16-11.37;polytomous delay:P50.087, Chi-square54.77). Also‘Denial’ (P,0.01, OR56.84, 95%CI52.31-20.24) and‘Knowledge of cancer’ (P50.079, Chi-square58.359) were found to be statistically significant both for dichotomous and for polytomous categorization of delay, respectively. The findings of this study indicated that, in the investigated cohorts, the knowledge about cancer issues is strongly linked to the patient delay. Educational interventions on the Mediterranean population are necessary in order to increase the patient awareness and to emphasize his/her key role in early diagnosis of OSCC.

  1. Socioeconomic patient characteristics predict delay in cancer diagnosis: a Danish cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolowski Ineta

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delay in cancer diagnosis may be important for cancer prognosis. Large individual variations in the duration of delay have been observed. This study examines whether patients' socioeconomic characteristics are predictors of long patient-, doctor- and system-related delay in cancer diagnosis. Methods Danish population-based cohort study. From September 2004 to September 2005, newly diagnosed cancer patients were enrolled from administrative registries. A total of 467 general practitioners in the County of Aarhus, Denmark, completed questionnaires on 2,212 cancer patients' diagnostic pathways. A total of 1,252 cancer patients filled in questionnaires on their socioeconomic characteristics (e.g. marital status, education, occupation, household income and fortune. Delay was categorised as short or long based on quartiles. Predictors of long delay were assessed in a logistic regression model using odds ratios (ORs as a proxy of relative risks. Results In regard to patient delay, retired female patients experienced shorter delays (OR 0.35, 95% confidence interval (95%CI 0.13 to 0.98 than employed female patients, while female smokers experienced longer delays (OR 2.42, 95%CI 1.21 to 4.85 than female non-smokers. In regard to doctor delay, female patients with a large household fortune experienced shorter delays (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.45 than economically less privileged female patients. Well-educated men experienced shorter delays (OR 0.40, 95%CI 0.16 to 1.00 than men with short education. Male patients experienced longer doctor delays (OR 2.11, 95%CI 1.11 to 4.02 than women when gender-specific cancers were excluded. In regard to system delay, female patients with a large household fortune experienced shorter delays (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.21 to 0.99 than economically less privileged women, while female patients with a high alcohol intake experienced longer delays (OR 2.82, 95%CI 1.18 to 6.72 than women with an average intake

  2. Compact cascadable gm-C all-pass true time delay cell with reduced delay variation over frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garakoui, Seyed Kasra; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram; Vliet, van Frank E.

    2015-01-01

    At low-GHz frequencies, analog time-delay cells realized by LC delay lines or transmission lines are unpractical in CMOS, due to their large size. As an alternative, delays can be approximated by all-pass filters exploiting transconductors and capacitors (g m -C filters). This paper presents an easi

  3. Delays in diagnosis of childhood cancer in southeastern Turkey and the associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Nilgun Col; Guler, Elif

    2015-03-01

    In childhood cancer patients, early diagnosis may have an impact on survival that reduces the potential morbidity. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with delay in diagnosis in children with cancer in southeastern Turkey. The clinical records of 682 patients with childhood cancer were evaluated. Study variables were classified as factors related to the patient, their disease, and the health care system. The median parental delay, physician delay, and total delay were determined as 20, 23, and 60 days, respectively. There was a significant relationship between parental delay, physician delay, and total delay and age at diagnosis (P = .005, P = .008, and P = .004, respectively). Long parental delay was least frequent in children younger than 1 year (P = .001). Parental, physician, and total delay were longer in patients with solid tumors than in patients with leukemias (P = .007, P = .000, and P = .000, respectively). Patients with tumors of the genitalia had longer physician delay and total delay than patients with other solid tumors (P = .001 and P = .000, respectively). Patients with solid tumor and early-stage disease had longer physician delay and total delay (P = .016 and P = .013, respectively). According to the first physician contacted, long physician delay was less frequent among pediatricians (P = .003). Delayed diagnosis was associated with age, type/localization and stage of tumor, the first physician consulted, and area of residence. A sustained effort should be made to raise the level of awareness of childhood cancer among parents and to sensitize all physicians, especially those who treat pediatric patients infrequently, with regard to the warning signs of the disease.

  4. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  5. Early versus delayed endocrine therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Fritz H

    2007-03-01

    Endocrine treatment (ET) has in the past been shown to be beneficial in delaying clinical progression in all stages of prostate cancer, leading to an improvement of progression free survival in virtually all trials ever conducted. The first observations on this issue date back to the studies of the Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group in the 1960s. The period of time during which ET and the resulting side effects can be avoided is strongly dependent on the clinical stage of the disease. This treatment period is long in men who have minimal disease, such as a rising prostate-specific antigen after potentially curative management; however, it is considerably shorter in men who initially present with metastatic disease. In these situations, the potential benefit in quality of life, and avoidance of adverse events must be matched against the benefit in terms of gaining progression free time for the individual patient. This difficult task is supported by information supplied in this review. Locally advanced and regional (lymph node positive; stage T3N0-1M0Gx) disease is the domain of adjuvant ET. In this field, important progress has recently been made due to trials, which combine aggressive treatment of the primary tumor with adjuvant ET initiated at the same time. Therefore, in locally advanced and regional disease, radiotherapy or surgery combined with adjuvant ET must be considered state-of-the-art.

  6. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Patient Related Factors Associated with Delayed Reporting in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study provide guidance towards interventions to reduce patient delay. Interventions should target the rural, older age group and lower socioeconomic population for educating them and to change their psychosocial behavior for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  8. False negative fecal occult blood tests due to delayed sample return in colorectal cancer screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, L.G.M. van; Rijn, A.F. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van; Fockens, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Dekker, E.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed return of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) samples to a laboratory might cause false negatives because of hemoglobin degradation. Quantitative iFOBT's became increasingly more accepted in colorectal cancer screening. Therefore, we studied the effects of delay between sampling a

  9. Delayed menopause due to granulosa cell tumor of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Murkey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old patient presented with complaints of menorrhagia. Endometrial biopsy revealed simple hyperplasia of the endometrium. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy was carried out. The ovaries looked grossly normal, but histopathology reported granulosa cell tumor of the right ovary. Granulosa cell tumors belong to the sexcord stromal category and account for approximately 2% of all ovarian tumors. We review the features and treatment of granulosa cell tumors and the importance of screening for ovarian tumors in a case of endometrial hyperplasia and delayed menopause.

  10. Ki-67 is required for maintenance of cancer stem cells but not cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidado, Justin; Wong, Hong Yuen; Rosen, D. Marc; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Garay, Joseph P.; Fessler, Abigail G.; Rasheed, Zeshaan A.; Hicks, Jessica; Cochran, Rory L.; Croessmann, Sarah; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Mohseni, Morassa; Beaver, Julia A.; Chu, David; Cravero, Karen; Christenson, Eric S.; Medford, Arielle; Mattox, Austin; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Argani, Pedram; Chawla, Ajay; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-01-01

    Ki-67 expression is correlated with cell proliferation and is a prognostic marker for various cancers; however, its function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that genetic disruption of Ki-67 in human epithelial breast and colon cancer cells depletes the cancer stem cell niche. Ki-67 null cells had a proliferative disadvantage compared to wildtype controls in colony formation assays and displayed increased sensitivity to various chemotherapies. Ki-67 null cancer cells showed decreased and delayed tumor formation in xenograft assays, which was associated with a reduction in cancer stem cell markers. Immunohistochemical analyses of human breast cancers revealed that Ki-67 expression is maintained at equivalent or greater levels in metastatic sites of disease compared to matched primary tumors, suggesting that maintenance of Ki-67 expression is associated with metastatic/clonogenic potential. These results elucidate Ki-67's role in maintaining the cancer stem cell niche, which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for human malignancies. PMID:26823390

  11. On a cellular automaton with time delay for modelling cancer tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iarosz, K C; Martins, C C; Batista, A M [Departamento de Matematica e EstatIstica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R L; Lopes, S R [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Caldas, I L [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66316, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Penna, T J P, E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-340, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    In this work we considered cellular automaton model with time delay. Time delay included in this model reflects the delay between the time in which the site is affected and the time in which its variable is updated. We analyzed the effect of the rules on the dynamics through the cluster counting. According to this cluster counting, the dynamics behavior is investigated. We verified periodic oscillations same as delay differential equation. We also studied the relation between the time delay in the cell cycle and the time to start the metastasis, using suitable numerical diagnostics.

  12. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  13. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Taiwanese women: potential treatment delay and impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ling; Chan, K Arnold; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Chang, Li-Yun; Wang, Ming-Yang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of women diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) in Taiwan. PABC is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after obstetric delivery. Our sample of PABC patients (N = 26) included all patients diagnosed at a major medical center in northern Taiwan from 1984 through 2009. Among these patients, 15 were diagnosed during pregnancy and 11 were diagnosed within 1 year after delivery. The comparison group included 104 patients within the same age range as the PABC patients and diagnosed with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy from 2004 through 2009 at the same hospital. Patients' initiating treatment delayed, 5-year and 10-year overall survival were delineated by stratified Kaplan-Meier estimates. Patients' characteristics were associated with initiating treatment delayed was evaluated with multivariate proportional hazards modeling. Antepartum PABC patients were younger and had longer time between diagnosis and treatment initiation than postpartum PABC patients. The predictor of treatment delayed was including birth parity, cancer stage, and pregnancy. The PABC group had larger tumors, more advanced cancer stage, and tumors with less progesterone receptor than the comparison group. The antepartum PABC patients had higher mortality than postpartum PABC and comparison groups within 5 years after diagnosis. Based on these results, we confirmed that pregnant women with breast cancer were more likely to delay treatment. Therefore, we recommend that breast cancer screening should be integrated into the prenatal and postnatal routine visits for early detection of the women's breast problems.

  14. Misconceptions about breast lumps and delayed medical presentation in urban breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Garth H; Ferrans, Carol Estwing; Kaiser, Karen; Campbell, Richard; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Warnecke, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite current recommendations for women to be screened for breast cancer with mammography every one to two years, less than half of all newly diagnosed breast cancers are initially detected through screening mammography. Prompt medical attention to a new breast symptom can result in earlier stage at diagnosis, yet many patients delay seeking medical care after becoming aware of a breast symptom. METHODS In a population-based study of breast cancer we examined factors potentially associated with patient delay in seeking health care for a breast symptom among 436 symptomatic urban breast cancer patients (146 White, 197 Black and 95 Hispanic). Race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, health care access and utilization, and misconceptions about the meaning of breast lumps were the key independent variables. RESULTS Sixteen percent of patients reported delaying more than 3 months before seeking medical advice about breast symptoms. Misconceptions about breast lumps, and lacking a regular provider, health insurance and recent preventive care were all associated with prolonged patient delay (p<0.005 for all). Misconceptions were much more common among ethnic minorities and women of lower socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION Reducing patient delay and disparities in delay will require both educating women about the importance of getting breast lumps evaluated in a timely manner, and providing greater access to regular health care. PMID:20200436

  15. Laryngeal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the head and neck region with an increased incidence rate worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a group of cells with eternal life or infinite self-renewal ability, which have high migrating, infiltrative, and metastatic abilities. Though CSCs only account for a small proportion in tumors, the high resistance to traditional therapy exempts them from therapy killing and thus they can reconstruct tumors. Our current knowledge, about CSCs in the LSCC, largely depends on head and neck studies with a lack of systematic data about the evidences of CSCs in tumorigenesis of LSCC. Certainly, the combination of therapies aimed at debulking the tumour (e.g. surgery, conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy together with targeted therapies aimed at the elimination of the CSCs might have a positive impact on the long-term outcome of patients with laryngeal cancer (LC in the future and may cast a new light on the cancer treatment.

  16. The health seeking trajectories of Malaysian women and their husbands in delay cases of breast cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nasir; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ahmad, Aini

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess why women delay in getting treatment (i.e. surgery) for breast cancer, as well as to explore on what type of issues are involved in such delay cases. Basic interpretative of qualitative methodology was applied to construct the reality of delay phenomena, and its interaction with social worlds. Six themes were identified: new conception of breast cancer treatment, psychological defenses, health support system, symtomatology experience, model and barriers. The delay issue in breast cancer requires attention as a multidimensional problem as this will facilitate more comprehensive and effective intervention to reduce delay.

  17. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  18. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  19. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  1. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  2. The influence of fixation delay on mitotic activity and flow cytometric cell cycle variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergers, E; Jannink, I; van Diest, P I; Cuesta, M A; Meyer, S; van Mourik, J C; Baak, J P

    1997-01-01

    Proliferation variables such as mitotic activity and the percentage of S-phase cells have been shown to be of prognostic value in many tumors, especially in breast cancer. However, some studies reported a decrease in mitotic activity caused by delay in fixation of the tissue. In contrast, other studies showed that the identifiability of mitotic figures decreases after fixation delay, but the total number of mitotic figures and also the percentage of S-phase cells remain unchanged. Most studies have been done on small numbers of experimental tumors, thus introducing the risk of selection bias. The aim of this study was to reinvestigate the influence of fixation delay on mitotic activity and cell cycle variables assessed by flow cytometry in an adequate number of resected human tissues to reach firmer conclusions. Resection specimens of 19 and 21 cases, respectively, for the mitotic activity estimate and the flow cytometric percentage of S-phase calculation were collected directly from the operating theater using lung, breast, and intestinal cancers and normal intestinal mucosa. The tissues were cut in pieces, and from each specimen, pieces were fixed in 4% buffered formaldehyde (for mitosis counting) as well as snap frozen (for flow cytometry) immediately after excision, as well as after a fixation delay of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 18, and 24 hours. Moreover, during the fixation delay, one series from each specimen was kept in the refrigerator and the second at room temperature. Thus, a total of 304 (19 X 16) and 336 (21 X 16) specimens were investigated for the mitotic activity estimate and the percentage of S-phase cells calculation, respectively. With regard to the estimation of the mitotic activity, both clear and doubtful mitotic figures were registered separately, obtaining an "uncorrected" and "corrected" (for doubtful mitotic figures) mitotic activity estimate. The percentage of S-phase cells was obtained by cell cycle analysis of flow cytometric DNA-histograms. The

  3. Delay in referring and related factors in patients with advanced breast cancer - Emam Hospital (2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ghaem Maghami F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of study was to determine the frequency of delay referring and related factors in patients with advanced breast cancer, in Imam Khomeini Hospital in the 2000. Materials and Methods: Successively 200 patients were entered the study if they were consentient. A questionnaire was constructed and information was obtained through interviewing. Results: From the cases, 64 patients (32 percent referred without delay and 136 patients (68 percent referred tardily. The patients who were late in comparison with patients who didn’t late, had significantly higher mean age (P=0.004, lower education level (P=0.002, and lower economic status (P=0.001. The frequency rate of single were lower among them (P=0.001, fewer percent were residual of big cities (P=0.01 and they had less rate of available physician (P=0.004. 24.3 percent of delay referring patients and 53.1 percent of patients without delay has a positive family history of breast cancer (P=0.001. 62.5 percent of delay referring patients and 85 percent of patients without delay were aware about importance of Self Breast Examination (S.B.E (P=0.002 and respectively 84.4 percent and 98.4 percent were award about symptoms of breast cancer (P=0.01. 23.5 percent and 33 percent of patients with and without delay Knew the method of B.S.E respectively. It wasn’t a significant difference. Conclusion: Lack of awareness about necessity of medical consultation, fear, carelessly, unavailable physician and poverty were the major causes of delay in patients who referred late.

  4. Delayed damage after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki [Osaka Dental Univ., Hirakata (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    I investigated radiation damage, including osteoradionecrosis, arising from tooth extraction in fields that had received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and evaluated the effectiveness of pilocarpine for xerostomia. Between January 1990 and April 1996, I examined 30 patients for bone changes after tooth extraction in fields irradiated at the Department of Oral Radiology, Osaka Dental University Hospital. Nineteen of the patients had been treated for nasopharyngeal cancer and 11 for oropharyngeal cancer. Between January and April 1996, 4 additional patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (3-mg, 6-mg and 9-mg of KSS-694 orally three times a day) for 12 weeks and evaluated every 4 weeks as a base line. One had been treated for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, two for cancer of the cheek and one for an unknown carcinoma. Eighteen of the patients (11 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 7 with oropharyngeal carcinoma) had extractions. Use of preoperative and postoperative radiographs indicated that damage to the bone following tooth extraction after radiation exposure was related to whether antibiotics were administered the day before the extraction, whether forceps or elevators were used, and whether the tooth was in the field of radiation. Xerostomia improved in all 4 of the patients who received 6-mg or 9-mg of pilocarpine. It improved saliva production and relieved the symptoms of xerostomia after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, although there were minor side effects such as fever. This information can be used to improve the oral environment of patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, and to better understand their oral environment. (author)

  5. Reduced ultraviolet irradiation delays subsequent squamous cell carcinomas in hairless mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Lerche, Catharina M; Poulsen, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and UV prophylaxis is essential to prevent skin cancer. It is unclear whether patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) may benefit from reduced UV exposures in terms of delaying the development of new...... tumors. The objective was to evaluate the significance of discontinued or reduced UV exposure for the development of subsequent skin tumors. METHODS: Seven groups of mice (n = 175) were irradiated with UV doses of 2 and 4 standard erythema doses (SED) that were continued, reduced or discontinued.......0001) and 44 days (2 SED, P = 0.111). CONCLUSION: This suggests that patients with SCC may benefit from reduced UV exposure....

  6. Does Embarrassment Contribute to Delay in Seeking Medical Care for Breast Cancer? A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Neishaboury

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Embarrassment and shame of visiting a doctor for a breast disease are among psychosocial factors that potentially contribute to delay in seeking medical advice. The purpose of this study is to review the published literature to determine if embarrassment regarding breast examination, diagnosis and treatment is associated with patient delay.Methods: We searched PubMed with the following key terms: patient acceptance of health care (MeSH, breast neoplasms/psychology (MeSH, shame (MeSH, embarrassment, delayed diagnosis, to find relevant literature published before August 2015.Results: The studies that explicitly assessed the association between embarrassment and delay for seeking medical advice for breast cancer were very limited. Among these studies, only 2 were quantitative studies, 4 were based on qualitative research and 4 were reviews. Other studies assessed attitudes in population-based surveys or included patients (females and males suffering from different types of cancer.Conclusions: Women should be educated that diseases of the breast need to be cared for as health issues in other parts of the body. They should be informed that embarrassment in this regard is not related to grace and integrity but can be potentially life-threatening. Further research is necessary to quantify the association of embarrassment or shame with delay in seeking diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. More research can elucidate the ways that the negative impact of shame/embarrassment can be minimized in different ethnic groups.

  7. Therapeutic Delay and Survival After Surgery for Cancer of the Pancreatic Head With or Without Preoperative Biliary Drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Eshuis; N.A. van der Gaag; E.A.J. Rauws; C.H.J. van Eijck; M.J. Bruno; E.J. Kuipers; P.P. Coene; F.J.G.M. Kubben; J.J.G.M. Gerritsen; J.W. Greve; M.F. Gerhards; I.H.J.T. de Hingh; J.H. Klinkenbijl; C.Y. Nio; S.M.M. de Castro; O.R.C. Busch; T.M. van Gulik; P.M.M. Bossuyt; D.J. Gouma

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relation between delay in surgery because of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) and survival in patients scheduled for surgery for pancreatic head cancer. Background: Patients with obstructive jaundice due to pancreatic head cancer can undergo PBD. The associated delay of

  8. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  9. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer in Taiwanese women: potential treatment delay and impact on survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Yang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of women diagnosed with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC in Taiwan. PABC is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after obstetric delivery. Our sample of PABC patients (N = 26 included all patients diagnosed at a major medical center in northern Taiwan from 1984 through 2009. Among these patients, 15 were diagnosed during pregnancy and 11 were diagnosed within 1 year after delivery. The comparison group included 104 patients within the same age range as the PABC patients and diagnosed with breast cancer not associated with pregnancy from 2004 through 2009 at the same hospital. Patients' initiating treatment delayed, 5-year and 10-year overall survival were delineated by stratified Kaplan-Meier estimates. Patients' characteristics were associated with initiating treatment delayed was evaluated with multivariate proportional hazards modeling. Antepartum PABC patients were younger and had longer time between diagnosis and treatment initiation than postpartum PABC patients. The predictor of treatment delayed was including birth parity, cancer stage, and pregnancy. The PABC group had larger tumors, more advanced cancer stage, and tumors with less progesterone receptor than the comparison group. The antepartum PABC patients had higher mortality than postpartum PABC and comparison groups within 5 years after diagnosis. Based on these results, we confirmed that pregnant women with breast cancer were more likely to delay treatment. Therefore, we recommend that breast cancer screening should be integrated into the prenatal and postnatal routine visits for early detection of the women's breast problems.

  10. Delayed diagnosis of coeliac disease increases cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Benedetto Rita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between coeliac disease (CD and neoplasms has been long established, but few data are available about the risk factors. The aim of this paper is to estimate the risk of developing a neoplasm among non diagnosed coeliac patients and to evaluate if this risk correlates with the age of patients at diagnosis of coeliac disease. Methods The study population consists of patients (n = 1968 diagnosed with CD at 20 Italian gastroenterology referral Centers between 1st January 1982 and 31st March 2005. Results The SIR for all cancers resulted to be 1.3; 95% CI = 1.0–1.7 p Conclusion Coeliac patients have an increased risk of developing cancer in relation to the age of diagnosis of CD. This risk results higher for malignancies of the gastro-intestinal sites. An accurate screening for tumors should be performed in patients diagnosed with CD in adulthood and in advancing age.

  11. Factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal people in Australia: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaouli; Teng, Tiew-Hwa Katherine; Bessarab, Dawn; Aoun, Samar; Baxi, Siddhartha; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives Delayed presentation of symptomatic cancer is associated with poorer survival. Aboriginal patients with cancer have higher rates of distant metastases at diagnosis compared with non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper examined factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal Australians from patient and service providers' perspectives. Methods In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted in two stages (2006–2007 and 2011). Inductive thematic analysis was assisted by use of NVivo looking around delays in presentation, diagnosis and referral for cancer. Participants Aboriginal patients with cancer/family members (n=30) and health service providers (n=62) were recruited from metropolitan Perth and six rural/remote regions of Western Australia. Results Three broad themes of factors were identified: (1) Contextual factors such as intergenerational impact of colonisation and racism and socioeconomic deprivation have negatively impacted on Aboriginal Australians' trust of the healthcare professionals; (2) health service-related factors included low accessibility to health services, long waiting periods, inadequate numbers of Aboriginal professionals and high staff turnover; (3) patient appraisal of symptoms and decision-making, fear of cancer and denial of symptoms were key reasons patients procrastinated in seeking help. Elements of shame, embarrassment, shyness of seeing the doctor, psychological ‘fear of the whole health system’, attachment to the land and ‘fear of leaving home’ for cancer treatment in metropolitan cities were other deterrents for Aboriginal people. Manifestation of masculinity and the belief that ‘health is women's domain’ emerged as a reason why Aboriginal men were reluctant to receive health checks. Conclusions Solutions to improved Aboriginal cancer outcomes include focusing on the primary care sector encouraging general practitioners to be proactive to suspicion of symptoms with appropriate

  12. DNA replication defects delay cell division and disrupt cell polarity in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encalada, S E; Martin, P R; Phillips, J B; Lyczak, R; Hamill, D R; Swan, K A; Bowerman, B

    2000-12-15

    In early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, asymmetric cell divisions produce descendants with asynchronous cell cycle times. To investigate the relationship between cell cycle regulation and pattern formation, we have identified a collection of embryonic-lethal mutants in which cell divisions are delayed and cell fate patterns are abnormal. In div (for division delayed) mutant embryos, embryonic cell divisions are delayed but remain asynchronous. Some div mutants produce well-differentiated cell types, but they frequently lack the endodermal and mesodermal cell fates normally specified by a transcriptional activator called SKN-1. We show that mislocalization of PIE-1, a negative regulator of SKN-1, prevents the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in div-1 mutant embryos. In addition to defects in the normally asymmetric distribution of PIE-1, div mutants also exhibit other losses of asymmetry during early embryonic cleavages. The daughters of normally asymmetric divisions are nearly equal in size, and cytoplasmic P-granules are not properly localized to germline precursors in div mutant embryos. Thus the proper timing of cell division appears to be important for multiple aspects of asymmetric cell division. One div gene, div-1, encodes the B subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex. Reducing the function of other DNA replication genes also results in a delayed division phenotype and embryonic lethality. Thus the other div genes we have identified are likely to encode additional components of the DNA replication machinery in C. elegans.

  13. Socio-demographic factors, comorbidity and diagnostic delay among women diagnosed with cervical, endometrial or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine Magtengaard; Christensen, K B; Ottesen, B;

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the association between socio-demographic factors, comorbidity and diagnostic delay among gynaecological cancer patients. A questionnaire was sent to 1052 women diagnosed with cervical, endometrial or ovarian cancer between October 2006 and December 2007 in Denmark. Long...... diagnosed with cervical and endometrial cancer as opposed to ovarian cancer, and with working as opposed to being retired. In conclusion, this study found that socio-demographic factors and comorbidity play a role in the probability of experiencing long delays. If delays in diagnosis are to be reduced...

  14. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  15. Delays in diagnosis of young females with symptomatic cervical cancer in England: an interview-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Anita W; Ramirez, Amanda J; Hamilton, William; Sasieni, Peter; Patnick, Julietta; Forbes, Lindsay JL

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis may be delayed in young females with cervical cancer because of a failure to recognise symptoms. Aim To examine the extent and determinants of delays in diagnosis of young females with symptomatic cervical cancer. Design and setting A national descriptive study of time from symptoms to diagnosis of cervical cancer and risk factors for delay in diagnosis at all hospitals diagnosing cervical cancer in England. Method One-hundred and twenty-eight patients <30 years with a recent diagnosis of cervical cancer were interviewed. Patient delay was defined as ≥3 months from symptom onset to first presentation and provider delay as ≥ 3 months from first presentation to diagnosis. Results Forty (31%) patients had presented symptomatically: 11 (28%) delayed presentation. Patient delay was more common in patients <25 than patients aged 25–29 (40% versus 15%, P = 0.16). Vaginal discharge was more common among patients who delayed presentation than those who did not; many reported not recognising this as a possible cancer symptom. Provider delay was reported by 24/40 (60%); in some no report was found in primary care records of a visual inspection of the cervix and some did not re-attend after the first presentation for several months. Gynaecological symptoms were common (84%) among patients who presented via screening. Conclusions Young females with cervical cancer frequently delay presentation, and not recognising symptoms as serious may increase the risk of delay. Delay in diagnosis after first presentation is also common. There is some evidence that UK guidelines for managing young females with abnormal bleeding are not being followed. PMID:25267045

  16. Delayed Paclitaxel-Trastuzumab-Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omalkhair Abulkhair

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonitis is a rare but serious complication associated with paclitaxel and/or trastuzumab treatment. We report a 51-year-old female patient with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with shortness of breath, fever, dry cough and pulmonary infiltrates. She had been treated without complications for 10 weeks with paclitaxel (Taxol® and trastuzumab (Herceptin® as neoadjuvant therapy, with complete clinical and pathological response. Infections and cardiomyopathy were excluded as causes of her symptoms. Bronchoscopy and biopsy were performed and a diagnosis of drug-induced interstitial pneumonitis was made. After treatment with steroids, the patient showed a significant response in less than 24 h; she was discharged home without the need for oxygen less than 48 h after therapy initiation. Although no causative association could be found between either trastuzumab or paclitaxel and this patient’s pulmonary syndrome, the potential for such toxicity should be considered, especially as paclitaxel/trastuzumab is a vey common combination therapy for breast cancer.

  17. Impact of social and clinical factors on diagnostic delay of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianatinasab, Mostafa; Fararouei, Mohammad; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One of the reasons for high mortality of breast cancer is long delay in seeking medical care. This study was designed to measure the association of a wide range of socio-demographic and clinical factors with the diagnostic delay in breast cancer among Iranian patients. This study was conducted on 505 newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer from southern part of Iran. Medical files of the patients who were admitted to the hospital from November 2013 to May 2015 were examined and clinical and demographic information were extracted. According to the results, illiterate patients were diagnosed on average 87.42 days later compared with those with a college degree (95%CI: 29.68–145.16, P = 0.003) and those from rural area were diagnosed on average 72.48 days later (95%CI: 35.94–109.03, P = 0.001) compared with urban residences. Single women were diagnosed 65.99 days later (95%CI: 7.37–124.61, P = 0.02) compared with those married. Lobular or medullary types of cancer were diagnosed 65.19 days later (95%CI: 2.67–127.70, P = 0.04) compared with ductal type. On the other hand, those who were able to perform breast self-exam were diagnosed 49.07 days earlier compared with others (95%CI: 18.69–79.45, P = 0.002). Those felt lump as the initiating symptom were diagnosed 62.01 days earlier, (95%CI: 8.17–115.85, P = 0.02) compared with those with other initial symptoms. The only factor associated with doctors diagnosis delay was the place of residence as rural residences were diagnosed on average 87.42 days later compared with urban residences, (95%CI: 53.82–121.92, P = 0.001). Higher education, living in cities, ductal type of tumor, and noticing lump in breast were the most important demographic and clinical factors associated with shorter breast cancer diagnosis delay. Informing women and doctors, especially general physicians who are practicing in rural areas, of the common symptoms of breast cancer as well as training women to perform breast self

  18. Delayed Diagnosis: Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of Scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Didar Balcı,

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common form of skin cancer, the scalp lesions of BCC have been rarely reported. Giant BCC is defined as a tumor larger than 5 cm in diameter and only 0.5-1 % of all BCCs achieve this size. We report a case of giant BCC on the scalp that was treated with topical coticosteroids and antifungal shampoo for five years. BCC should be considered in the differential diagnosis in erythematous plaque type lesions resistant to therapy with long duration localized on the scalp.

  19. Qualitative Properties in a More General Delayed Hematopoietic Stem Cells Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz-Alaoui M. A.; Yafia R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a more general model describing the dynamics of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC) model with one delay. Its dynamics are studied in terms of local stability and Hopf bifurcation. We prove the existence of the possible steady state and their stability with respect to the time delay and without delay. We show that a sequence of Hopf bifurcations occur at the positive steady state as the delay crosses some critical values. We illustrate our results by some numerical ...

  20. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  2. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  3. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  4. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have the potential of accumulating more years of cell phone exposure than adults do. Thus far, the data from studies in children with cancer do not support this theory. The first published analysis came from a large ...

  5. Cancer Stem Cells in Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, D; Brown, H K; Tellez-Gabriel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and...

  6. A Noise and Mismatches of Delay Cells and Their Effects on DLLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gholami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Jitter is one of the most important parameters in design of delay locked loop (DLL based frequency synthesizer. In this paper noise and mismatches of conventional delay cells which are mainly used in the DLLs architecture are introduced completely. First, time domain equations related to noise and mismatches of conventional delay cells are reported. Then, these equations are used to calculate jitter of DLL due to mismatch and noise of delay cells. At last closed form equations are obtained which can be used in the designing of low jitter DLLs. To validate these equations, a conventional DLL is designed in TSMC 0.18um CMOS Technology.

  7. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  8. Impact of cell cycle delay on micronucleus frequency in TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Zhanna; Spellman, Richard A; Thiffeault, Catherine; Dobo, Krista L; Schuler, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies with TK6 cells have shown that extending the recovery period after pulse treatment allows for greater micronucleus expression for some compounds. This study explores the role of cell cycle delay in micronucleus expression after pulse treatment with three model genotoxins [mitomycin C, etoposide (ETOP), vinblastine]. Cells were treated for 4 hr and allowed to recover for 36 hr with samples removed at various time points during the recovery period and analyzed for cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and micronucleus frequency. Our results show that mitomycin C causes cell cycle delay for 20 hr after pulse treatment and cell cycle perturbation is no longer evident after 36 hr of recovery. The micronucleus frequency of cells sampled at 36 hr is doubled when compared with cells sampled at 20 hr after mitomycin C removal. When cells were treated with indirect acting genotoxins (ETOP, vinblastine), cell cycle perturbation was not observed at the 20 hr time point. Micronucleus frequency after treatment with either ETOP or vinblastine did not differ between the 20 hr and the 36 hr time point. All three compounds induced similar levels of apoptosis ranging from 4.5 to 5.6% with maximum induction occurring at the 36-hr time point. We conclude that TK6 cells exhibit extended cell cycle arrest after exposure to MMC and can go on to express micronuclei, after overcoming cell cycle arrest.

  9. Ring VCO Design with Variable Capacitance XNOR Delay Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Arya, Sandeep; Pandey, Sujata

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the new designs of voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) with three transistors XNOR gate as variable capacitive load. Design of three, five and seven stage VCO have been reported using single ended ring topology. CMOS inverter based delay cell is modified with addition of XNOR capacitive load. Output frequency has been controlled by applied voltage to variable capacitive load. Control voltage of VCO has been varied from 1.3 to 2.1 V. Three stage VCO provides output frequency variation in the range of 3.52-3.34 GHz with power consumption variation from 0.81 to 1.76 mW. Five stage VCO shows frequency variation from 2.06 to 1.98 GHz with power consumption varying from 1.35 to 2.94 mW. Moreover, frequency of seven stage VCO varies from 1.47 to 1.41 GHz with varying power from 1.89 to 4.12 mW. Power consumption and output frequency of proposed VCO circuits have been compared with earlier reported circuits and present approach shows considerable improvements.

  10. Oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaini, Giancarlo; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial metabolism may play a key role in controlling cancer cells life and proliferation. Recent evidence also indicates how the altered contribution of these organelles to metabolism and the resistance of cancer mitochondria against apoptosis-associated permeabilization are closely related. The hallmarks of cancer growth, increased glycolysis and lactate production in tumours, have raised attention due to recent observations suggesting a wide spectrum of oxidative phosphorylation deficit and decreased availability of ATP associated with malignancies and tumour cell expansion. More specifically, alteration in signal transduction pathways directly affects mitochondrial proteins playing critical roles in controlling the membrane potential as UCP2 and components of both MPTP and oxphos complexes, or in controlling cells life and death as the Bcl-2 proteins family. Moreover, since mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics, are also involved in processes of cells life and death, proper regulation of these mitochondrial functions is crucial for tumours to grow. Therefore a better understanding of the key pathophysiological differences between mitochondria in cancer cells and in their non-cancer surrounding tissue is crucial to the finding of tools interfering with these peculiar tumour mitochondrial functions and will disclose novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. Here, we review the peculiarity of tumour mitochondrial bioenergetics and the mode it is linked to the cell metabolism, providing a short overview of the evidence accumulated so far, but highlighting the more recent advances.

  11. Time delay and noise explaining the behaviour of the cell growth in fermentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayuobi, Tawfiqullah; Rosli, Norhayati [Faculty of Industrial Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, 26300 Gambang, Pahang (Malaysia); Bahar, Arifah [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Salleh, Madihah Md [Department of Biotechnology Industry, Faculty of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-02-03

    This paper proposes to investigate the interplay between time delay and external noise in explaining the behaviour of the microbial growth in batch fermentation process. Time delay and noise are modelled jointly via stochastic delay differential equations (SDDEs). The typical behaviour of cell concentration in batch fermentation process under this model is investigated. Milstein scheme is applied for solving this model numerically. Simulation results illustrate the effects of time delay and external noise in explaining the lag and stationary phases, respectively for the cell growth of fermentation process.

  12. Time delay and noise explaining the behaviour of the cell growth in fermentation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuobi, Tawfiqullah; Rosli, Norhayati; Bahar, Arifah; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the interplay between time delay and external noise in explaining the behaviour of the microbial growth in batch fermentation process. Time delay and noise are modelled jointly via stochastic delay differential equations (SDDEs). The typical behaviour of cell concentration in batch fermentation process under this model is investigated. Milstein scheme is applied for solving this model numerically. Simulation results illustrate the effects of time delay and external noise in explaining the lag and stationary phases, respectively for the cell growth of fermentation process.

  13. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27446378

  14. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples.

  15. Diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma with delayed computed tomography; Differentiation from metastatic liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koda, Shojiro; Machida, Keiichi; Ishihara, Manabu; Taniguchi, Yuko; Yamakawa, Fumiko; Kai, Shunkichi; Otsuka, Yukio (Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the capability of delayed contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) to differentiate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic liver cancer (MLC). Plain and contrast-enhanced CT scans were available for review in a total of 25 patients with histologically proven and untreated either HCC (14 patients) or MLC (the other 11). Plain CT failed to reveal significant difference in CT values for tumor and liver parenchyma between the HCC group (23.44{plus minus}14.98 HU) and MLC group (23.40{plus minus}13.82 HU); however, the values were significantly lower in the HCC group (16.84{plus minus}10.45 HU) than the MLC group (31.71{plus minus}7.34 HU) on delayed CT 4 hr after injection of contrast medium. Tumor density index, as obtained from (tumor density-liver density)/(liver density), was not significantly different on plain CT in the two groups (-0.36{plus minus}0.17 for HCC vs -0.45{plus minus}0.17 for MLC). On delayed CT, however, the subjects in the HCC group had significant decrease in tumor density index (-0.25{plus minus}0.14), as compared with the MLC group (-0.44{plus minus}0.12), p<0.01. Clear inside structure and margin of the tumor, as shown on plain CT, became obscure on delayed CT in cases of HCC, which is in contrast with MLC of which margin became clear on delayed CT. These findings suggest the potential of delayed CT for differentiating HCC from MLC. (N.K.).

  16. Selective depletion of a minor subpopulation of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is followed by a delayed but progressive loss of bulk tumor cells and disease regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodell Margaret A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer precursor/progenitor cells may initiate and sustain the growth of tumors, but evidence for their existence in human disease is indirect, relying on their in vitro properties and animal models. More directly, specific elimination of these rare cells from cancer patients should produce a delayed but progressive disappearance of differentiated malignant progeny. Here, we describe selective eradication of a putative precursor population in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, followed 6 months later by a progressive loss of mature tumor cells without further treatment. This outcome supports the presence of a rare population of precursor/progenitor cells in human malignancies, and suggests benefit from their removal.

  17. Nuclear and non-nuclear targets for G{sub 2} delay in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lear, B.; Sedita, B.A.; Grdina, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The role of DNA double-strand breaks in producing mitotic (G{sub 2}) delay was examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Restriction enzymes, which produce only DNA double-stranded breaks, were introduced by electroporation into CHO-K1 and its radiation-sensitive derivativexrs-5; at several time points after treatment, the fraction of cells in G{sub 2} was determined. Electroporation of Alu I or Sau 3A1 into CHO-K1 resulted in a G{sub 2} delay that peaked with 40% of the population in G{sub 2} at 12 h after treatment. The delay lasted about 8 h. This is equivalent to a 5 Gy {gamma} ray exposure. In xrs-5 cells, the same treatment resulted in a G{sub 2} delay that peaked at 50% of the population 20 h after treatment and the delay lasted about 12 h. Much of delay induced in CHO-K1 cells was due to the electroporation treatment itself. The electroporation, which on its own was not toxic or mutagenic in either CHO-K1 or xrs-5 cells, resulted in a G{sub 2} delay in that peaked at 30% 12 h after treatment in CHO-K1 cells and 8 h after treatment in xrs-5 cells. In both cell lines, the delay was about 6 h long. These results indicate that DNA double-strand breaks are one signal for G{sub 2} delay, but that there may be other, nonuclear targets for delay as well.

  18. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  19. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  20. Factors influencing delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segura Josep M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most frequent tumor in developed countries. Since survival from CRC depends mostly on disease stage at the time of diagnosis, individuals with symptoms or signs suspicious of CRC should be examined without delay. Many factors, however, intervene between symptom onset and diagnosis. This study was designed to: 1 Describe the diagnostic process of CRC from the onset of first symptoms to diagnosis and treatment. 2 Establish the time interval from initial symptoms to diagnosis and treatment, globally and considering patient's and doctors' delay, with the latter due to family physician and/or hospital services. 3 Identify the factors related to defined types of delay. 4 Assess the concordance between information included in primary health care and hospital clinical records regarding onset of first symptoms. Methods/Design Descriptive study, coordinated, with 5 participant groups of 5 different Spanish regions (Balearic Islands, Galicia, Catalunya, Aragón and Valencia Health Districts, with a total of 8 acute public hospitals and 140 primary care centers. Incident cases of CRC during the study period, as identified from pathology services at the involved hospitals. A sample size of 896 subjects has been estimated, 150 subjects for each participant group. Information will be collected through patient interviews and primary health care and hospital clinical records. Patient variables will include sociodemographic variables, family history of cancer, symptom perception, and confidence in the family physician; tumor variables will include tumor site, histological type, grade and stage; symptom variables will include date of onset, type and number of symptoms; health system variables will include number of patient contacts with family physician, type and content of the referral, hospital services attending the patient, diagnostic modalities and results; and delay intervals, including global delays

  1. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  2. Delay of medical care for symptomatic breast cancer: a literature review El retraso en la atención médica del cáncer de mama: una revisión de la literatura

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to organize and summarize existing information on delayed medical attention for women with breast cancer and identify research needs in this area. This review is organized in six parts: origins and permanence of the message "do not delay" medical attention for potential cancer symptoms; definition and classification of breast cancer delay; impact of delay on breast cancer prognosis; factors related to breast cancer delay and the ways these have been studied; the s...

  3. Cancer stem cells: therapeutic implications and perspectives in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Han

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory is gaining increasing attention from researchers and has become an important focus of cancer research. According to the theory, a minority population of cancer cells is capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding the properties and characteristics of CSCs is key to future study on cancer research, such as the isolation and identification of CSCs, the cancer diagnosis, and the cancer therapy. Standard oncology treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection, can only shrink the bulk tumor and the tumor tends to relapse. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting CSCs and their microenvironmental niche address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies to eradicate the CSCs that otherwise result in therapy resistance. The combined use of traditional therapies with targeted CSC-specific agents may target the whole cancer and offer a promising strategy for lasting treatment and even cure.

  4. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  5. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  6. The relationship of cancer stem cells in urological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pokrywczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies are ongoing to identify and isolate cancer stem cells from cancers of genito-urinary tracts. Better understanding of their role in prostate, urothelial and kidney cancer origin, growth and progression opens new pathways in development of more effective treatment methods. However there are still many issues before advances in this field can be introduced for clinical application. This review addresses current achievements in cancer stem cells research in uro-oncology.

  7. Non-practice of breast self examination and marital status are associated with delayed presentation with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Sumarni Mohd; Othman, Zabedah; Cheong, Kee Chee; Hock, Lim Kuang; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Yusoff, Ahmad Faudzi; Mustafa, Amal Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Delay in seeking treatment for breast cancer is a barrier to the early diagnosis and management of the disease, resulting in a poorer prognosis. We here estimated the prevalence of delayed presentation for breast cancer and identified possible influential sociodemographic factors in a cross-sectional study of 250 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer at the Radiotherapy and Oncology Clinic in Kuala Lumpur Hospital. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire and from medical records. We examined associations between delayed presentation (presenting to a physician more than 3 months after self-discovery of a symptom) and sociodemographic characteristics, practice of breast self examination (BSE), history of benign breast disease, family history of breast cancer and type of symptom, symptom disclosure and advice from others to seek treatment using multiple logistic regression. Time from self-discovery of symptom to presentation ranged from tghe same day to 5 years. Prevalence of delayed presentation was 33.1% (95%CI: 27.4, 39.3). A significantly higher proportion of delayers presented with late stages (stage III/IV) (58.3% vs. 26.9%, ppresentation than married women and women who never performed breast self examination were more likely to delay presentation compared to those who regularly performed BSE (OR: 2.74, 95% CI: 1.33, 5.64). Our findings indicate that delayed presentation for breast cancer symptoms among Malaysian women is high and that marital status and breast self examination play major roles in treatment-seeking for breast cancer symptoms.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  9. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  10. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  11. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  12. Importance of cell damage causing growth delay for high pressure inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanba, Masaru; Nomura, Kazuki; Nasuhara, Yusuke; Hayashi, Manabu; Kido, Miyuki; Hayashi, Mayumi; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru; Hirayama, Masao; Ueno, Shigeaki; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-06-01

    A high pressure (HP) tolerant (barotolerant) mutant a2568D8 and a variably barotolerant mutant a1210H12 were generated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using ultra-violet mutagenesis. The two mutants, a barosensitive mutant a924E1 and the wild-type strain, were pressurized (225 MPa), and pressure inactivation behavior was analyzed. In the wild-type strain, a proportion of the growth-delayed cells were detected after exposure to HP. In a924E1, the proportion of growth-delayed cells significantly decreased compared with the wild-type. In a2568D8, the proportion of growth-delayed cells increased and the proportion of inactivated cells decreased compared with the wild-type. In a1210H12, the growth-delayed cells could not be detected within 120 s of exposure to HP. The proportion of growth-delayed cells, which incurred the damage, would affect the survival ratio by HP. These results suggested that cellular changes in barotolerance caused by mutations are remarkably affected by the ability to recover from cellular damage, which results in a growth delay.

  13. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  14. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  15. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H., E-mail: grahamc@queensu.ca

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  16. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser Norbert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Stem-like tumor cells are regarded as highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR. Previous studies have focused on apoptosis early after irradiation, and the apoptosis resistance observed has been attributed to reduced DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair compared to non-stem tumor cells. Here, early and late radioresponse of patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs and differentiated cells directly derived from them were examined for cell death mode and the influence of stem cell-specific growth factors. Materials and methods Primary SLGCs were propagated in serum-free medium with the stem-cell mitogens epidermal growth factor (EGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2. Differentiation was induced by serum-containing medium without EGF and FGF. Radiation sensitivity was evaluated by assessing proliferation, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and mitotic catastrophe. DNA damage-associated γH2AX as well as p53 and p21 expression were determined by Western blots. Results SLGCs failed to apoptose in the first 4 days after irradiation even at high single doses up to 10 Gy, but we observed substantial cell death later than 4 days postirradiation in 3 of 6 SLGC lines treated with 5 or 10 Gy. This delayed cell death was observed in 3 of the 4 SLGC lines with nonfunctional p53, was associated with mitotic catastrophe and occurred via apoptosis. The early apoptosis resistance of the SLGCs was associated with lower γH2AX compared to differentiated cells, but we found that the stem-cell culture cytokines EGF plus FGF-2 strongly reduce γH2AX levels. Nonetheless, in two p53-deficient SLGC lines examined γIR-induced apoptosis even correlated with EGF/FGF-induced proliferation and mitotic catastrophe. In a line containing CD133-positive and -negative stem-like cells, the CD133-positive cells proliferated faster and underwent more γIR-induced mitotic catastrophe. Conclusions Our results suggest the importance of delayed

  17. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  18. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  19. Role of Ku80-dependent end-joining in delayed genomic instability in mammalian cells surviving ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji, E-mail: kzsuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-machi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2010-01-05

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed destabilization of the genome in the progenies of surviving cells. This phenomenon, which is called radiation-induced genomic instability, is manifested by delayed induction of radiation effects, such as cell death, chromosome aberration, and mutation in the progeny of cells surviving radiation exposure. Previously, there was a report showing that delayed cell death was absent in Ku80-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, however, the mechanism of their defect has not been determined. We found that delayed induction of DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal breaks were intact in Ku80-deficient cells surviving X-irradiation, whereas there was no sign for the production of chromosome bridges between divided daughter cells. Moreover, delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes was significantly compromised in those cells compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Reintroduction of the human Ku86 gene complimented the defective DNA repair and recovered delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes and delayed cell death, indicating that defective Ku80-dependent dicentric induction was the cause of the absence of delayed cell death. Since DNA-PKcs-defective cells showed delayed phenotypes, Ku80-dependent illegitimate rejoining is involved in delayed impairment of the integrity of the genome in radiation-survived cells.

  20. Predictors of delayed failure of structural kyphoplasty for pathological compression fractures in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah, Gary; Altshuler, David; Sadiq, Omar; Nyame, V Kwasi; Eltahawy, Hazem; Szerlip, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Pathological compression fractures in cancer patients cause significant pain and disability. Spinal metastases affect quality of life near the end of life and may require multiple procedures, including medical palliative care and open surgical decompression and fixation. An increasingly popular minimally invasive technique to treat metastatic instabilities is kyphoplasty. Even though it may alleviate pain due to pathological fractures, it may fail. However, delayed kyphoplasty failures with retropulsed cement and neural element compression have not been well reported. Such failures necessitate open surgical decompression and stabilization, and cement inserted during the kyphoplasty complicates salvage surgeries in patients with a disease-burdened spine. The authors sought to examine the incidence of delayed failure of structural kyphoplasty in a series of cement augmentations for pathological compression fractures. The goal was to identify risk predictors by analyzing patient and disease characteristics to reduce kyphoplasty failure and to prevent excessive surgical procedures at the end of life. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients with metastatic cancer from 2010 to 2013 who had undergone a procedure involving cement augmentation for a pathological compression fracture at their institution. The authors examined the characteristics of the patients, diseases, and radiographic fractures. RESULTS In total, 37 patients underwent cement augmentation in 75 spinal levels during 45 surgeries. Four patients had delayed structural kyphoplasty failure necessitating surgical decompression and fusion. The mean time to kyphoplasty failure was 2.88 ± 1.24 months. The mean loss of vertebral body height was 16% in the patients in whom kyphoplasty failed and 32% in patients in whom kyphoplasty did not fail. No posterior intraoperative cement extravasation was observed in the patients in whom kyphoplasty had failed. The mean spinal

  1. Does delay in diagnosing colorectal cancer in symptomatic patients affect tumor stage and survival? A population-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Otto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosing colorectal cancer (CRC at an early stage improves survival. To what extent any delay affects outcome once patients are symptomatic is still unclear. Our objectives were to evaluate the association between diagnostic delay and survival in symptomatic patients with early stage CRC and late stage CRC. Methods Prospective population-based observational study evaluating daily clinical practice in Northern Holland. Diagnostic delay was determined through questionnaire-interviews. Dukes' stage was classified into two groups: early stage (Dukes A or B and late stage (Dukes C or D cancer. Patients were followed up for 3.5 years after diagnosis. Results In total, 272 patients were available for analysis. Early stage CRC was present in 136 patients while 136 patients had late stage CRC. The mean total diagnostic delay (SE was 31 (1.5 weeks in all CRC patients. No significant difference was observed in the mean total diagnostic delay in early versus late stage CRC (p = 0.27. In early stage CRC, no difference in survival was observed between patients with total diagnostic delay shorter and longer than the median (Kaplan-Meier, log-rank p = 0.93. In late stage CRC, patients with a diagnostic delay shorter than the median had a shorter survival than patients with a diagnostic delay longer than the median (log-rank p = 0.01. In the multivariate Cox regression model with survival as dependent variable and median delay, age, open access endoscopy, number and type of symptoms as independent variables, the odd's ratio for survival in patients with long delay (>median versus short delay (≤median was 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.1 to 3.0; p = 0.01. Tumor-site was not associated with patient survival. When separating late stage CRC in Dukes C and Dukes D tumors, a shorter delay was associated with a shorter survival in Dukes D tumors only and not in Dukes C tumors. Conclusion In symptomatic CRC patients, a longer diagnostic and

  2. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  3. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  4. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for kidney (renal cell) cancer. The list ...

  5. Implications of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells for Understanding Fomation and Therapy of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Li; Donglin Wang

    2005-01-01

    Most cancers are heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There is increasing evidence suggesting that only a minority of cancer cells, tumorigenic or tumor initiating cells, possess the capacity to proliferate extensively and form new hematopoietic cancer or solid tumors. Tumor initiating cells share characteristics required for normal stem cells. The dysregulation of self-renewal and proliferation of stem cells is a likely requirement for cancer development. This review formulates a model for the origin of cancer stem cells and regulating self-renewal which influences the way we study and treat cancer.

  6. A low-power DCO using inverter interlaced cascaded delay cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qiang; Fan Tao; Dai Xiangming; Yuan Guoshun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-power small-area digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) using an inverters interlaced cascaded delay cell (ⅡCDC).It uses a coarse-fine architecture with binary-weighted delay stages for the delay range and resolution.The coarse-tuning stage of the DCO uses ⅡCDC,which is power and area efficient with low phase noise,as compared with conventional delay cells.The ADPLL with a DCO is fabricated in the UMC 180-nm CMOS process with an active area of 0.071 mm2.The output frequency range is 140-600 MHz at the power supply of 1.8 V.The power consumption is 2.34 mW@a 200 MHz output.

  7. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  8. Preclinical evaluation of 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate on liver cancer and cancer stem cells with different p53 status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Lamy

    Full Text Available Isothiocyanates from plants of the order Brassicales are considered promising cancer chemotherapeutic phytochemicals. However, their selective cytotoxicity on liver cancer has been barely researched. Therefore, in the present study, we systematically studied the chemotherapeutic potency of 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC. Selective toxicity was investigated by comparing its effect on liver cancer cells and their chemoresistant subpopulations to normal primary hepatocytes and liver tissue slices. Additionally, in a first assessment, the in vivo tolerability of MTBITC was investigated in mice. Growth arrest at G2/M and apoptosis induction was evident in all in vitro cancer models treated with MTBITC, including populations with cancer initiating characteristics. This was found independent from TP53; however cell death was delayed in p53 compromised cells as compared to wt-p53 cells which was probably due to differential BH3 only gene regulation i. e. Noxa and its antagonist A1. In normal hepatocytes, no apoptosis or necrosis could be detected after repeated administration of up to 50 µM MTBITC. In mice, orally applied MTBITC was well tolerated over 18 days of treatment for up to 50 mg/kg/day, the highest dose tested. In conclusion, we could show here that the killing effect of MTBITC has a definite selectivity for cancer cells over normal liver cells and its cytotoxicity even applies for chemoresistant cancer initiating cells. Our study could serve for a better understanding of the chemotherapeutic properties of isothiocyanates on human liver-derived cancer cells.

  9. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design.

  10. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  11. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  12. Global dynamics of cell mediated immunity in viral infection models with distributed delays

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate global dynamics for a system of delay differential equations which describes a virus-immune interaction in \\textit{vivo}. The model has two distributed time delays describing time needed for infection of cell and virus replication. Our model admits three possible equilibria, an uninfected equilibrium and infected equilibrium with or without immune response depending on the basic reproduction number for viral infection $R_{0}$ and for CTL response $R_{1}$ such that $R_{1}1$. The immune activation has a positive role in the reduction of the infection cells and the increasing of the uninfected cells if $R_{1}>1$.

  13. Combined effects of lapatinib and bortezomib in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and activity of bortezomib against lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuandong; Niu, Xiuqing; Luo, Jianmin; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Kunwei

    2010-10-01

    Lapatinib and bortezomib are highly active against breast cancer cells. Breast cancer patients who initially respond to lapatinib may eventually manifest acquired resistance to this treatment. Thus, the identification of novel agents that may prevent or delay the development of acquired resistance to lapatinib is critical. In the current study, we show that the combination of lapatinib and bortezomib results in a synergistic growth inhibition in human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and that the combination enhances apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells. Importantly, we found that the combination of lapatinib plus bortezomib more effectively blocked activation of the HER2 pathway in SK-BR-3 cells, compared with monotherapy. In addition, we established a model of acquired resistance to lapatinib by chronically challenging SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells with increasing concentrations of lapatinib. Here, we showed that bortezomib notably induced apoptosis of lapatinib-resistant SK-BR-3 pools and further inhibited HER2 signaling in the resistant cells. Taken together, the current data indicate a synergistic interaction between lapatinib and bortezomib in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of these two noncross-resistant targeted therapies. The combination of lapatinib and bortezomib may be a potentially novel approach to prevent or delay the onset of acquired resistance to lapatinib in HER2-overxpressing/estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers.

  14. Delayed perforation occurring after endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezawa, Kenji; Michida, Tomoki; Iwahashi, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Kosaku; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi; Katayama, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Delayed perforation occurring after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a rare but serious complication which sometimes requires emergent surgery. However, reports of its characteristics, including endoscopic imaging and management, are not fully detailed. A 70-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the treatment of early gastric cancer. On the day of the ESD, hematemesis was observed because of a Mallory-Weiss tear, and a visible vessel in the post-ESD ulcer was additionally treated endoscopically by coagulation. Second-look endoscopic examination on the next day revealed a perforation 3 mm in diameter at the treated vessel in the ulcer. The shape of the perforation was round and the color of the surrounding muscle layer had become whitish. The perforation was closed with endoclips, and decompression of the pneumoperitoneum was performed. The patient was conservatively managed and was discharged 13 days after the ESD. We show endoscopic images of delayed perforation and discuss the mechanism and management of this complication.

  15. Delayed transition to new cell fates during cellular reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xianrui; Lyons, Deirdre C; Socolar, Joshua E S; McClay, David R

    2014-07-15

    In many embryos specification toward one cell fate can be diverted to a different cell fate through a reprogramming process. Understanding how that process works will reveal insights into the developmental regulatory logic that emerged from evolution. In the sea urchin embryo, cells at gastrulation were found to reprogram and replace missing cell types after surgical dissections of the embryo. Non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells reprogrammed to replace missing skeletogenic mesoderm cells and animal caps reprogrammed to replace all endomesoderm. In both cases evidence of reprogramming onset was first observed at the early gastrula stage, even if the cells to be replaced were removed earlier in development. Once started however, the reprogramming occurred with compressed gene expression dynamics. The NSM did not require early contact with the skeletogenic cells to reprogram, but the animal cap cells gained the ability to reprogram early in gastrulation only after extended contact with the vegetal halves prior to that time. If the entire vegetal half was removed at early gastrula, the animal caps reprogrammed and replaced the vegetal half endomesoderm. If the animal caps carried morpholinos to either hox11/13b or foxA (endomesoderm specification genes), the isolated animal caps failed to reprogram. Together these data reveal that the emergence of a reprogramming capability occurs at early gastrulation in the sea urchin embryo and requires activation of early specification components of the target tissues.

  16. S-phase delay in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells induced by overexpression of integrin β1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Long Liang; Ting-Wen Lei; Heng Wu; Jian-Min Sn; Li-Ying Wang; Qun-Ying Lei; Xi-Liang Zha

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the mechanisms of integrin overexpression in negatively regulating the cell cycle control of hepatocellular carcinoma cells SMMC-7721.METHODS: The cell cycle pattern was determined by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression levels were assayed by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Stable transfection was performed by Lipofectamine 2000 reagent,and cells were screened by G418.RESULTS: Overexpression of α5β1 or β1 integrin induced S-phase delay in SMMC-7721 cells, and this delay was possibly due to the accumulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs) p21cip1 and p27kip1. The decrease of protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation was present in this signaling pathway, but focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was not involved.When phosphorylation of PKB was solely blocked by wortmannin, p27kip1 protein level was increased. Moreover,S-phase delay was recurred when attachment of the parental SMMC-7721 cells was inhibited by the preparation of polyHEME, and this cell cycle pattern was similar to that of β1-7721 or α5β1-7721 cells.CONCLUSION: S-phase delay induced by overexpression of integrin β1 subunit is attributed to the decrease of PKB phosphorylation and subsequent increases of p21cip1 and p27kip1 proteins, and may be involved in the unoccupied α5β1because of lack of its ligands.

  17. Delayed animal aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence by platelet rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hen-Yu; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Tsai, Ching-Yu; Tina Chen, Szu-Yu; Liu, Alice; Chen, Wei-Hong; Wei, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ming-Fu; Williams, David F; Deng, Win-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Aging is related to loss of functional stem cell accompanying loss of tissue and organ regeneration potentials. Previously, we demonstrated that the life span of ovariectomy-senescence accelerated mice (OVX-SAMP8) was significantly prolonged and similar to that of the congenic senescence-resistant strain of mice after platelet rich plasma (PRP)/embryonic fibroblast transplantation. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of PRP for recovering cellular potential from senescence and then delaying animal aging. We first examined whether stem cells would be senescent in aged mice compared to young mice. Primary adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow derived stem cells (BMSCs) were harvested from young and aged mice, and found that cell senescence was strongly correlated to animal aging. Subsequently, we demonstrated that PRP could recover cell potential from senescence, such as promote cell growth (cell proliferation and colony formation), increase osteogenesis, decrease adipogenesis, restore cell senescence related markers and resist the oxidative stress in stem cells from aged mice. The results also showed that PRP treatment in aged mice could delay mice aging as indicated by survival, body weight and aging phenotypes (behavior and gross morphology) in term of recovering the cellular potential of their stem cells compared to the results on aged control mice. In conclusion these findings showed that PRP has potential to delay aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence and could be used as an alternative medicine for tissue regeneration and future rejuvenation.

  18. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  19. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  20. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  1. Disrupting Na+,HCO3--cotransporter NBCn1 (Slc4a7) delays murine breast cancer development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, S.; Axelsen, T. V.; Andersen, Anne Poder

    2016-01-01

    Increased metabolism and insufficient blood supply cause acidic waste product accumulation in solid cancers. During carcinogenesis, cellular acid extrusion is upregulated but the underlying molecular mechanisms and their consequences for cancer growth and progression have not been established....... Genome-wide association studies have indicated a possible link between the Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7) and breast cancer. We tested the functional consequences of NBCn1 knockout (KO) for breast cancer development. NBCn1 protein expression increased 2.5-fold during breast carcinogenesis...... and was responsible for the increased net acid extrusion and alkaline intracellular pH of breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. Genetic disruption of NBCn1 delayed breast cancer development: tumor latency was ~50% increased while tumor growth rate was ~65% reduced in NBCn1 KO compared with wild-type (WT...

  2. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  3. A Comparison of Postoperative Early Enteral Nutrition with Delayed Enteral Nutrition in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongchao Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined esophageal cancer patients who received enteral nutrition (EN to evaluate the validity of early EN compared to delayed EN, and to determine the appropriate time to start EN. A total of 208 esophagectomy patients who received EN postoperatively were divided into three groups (Group 1, 2 and 3 based on whether they received EN within 48 h, 48 h–72 h or more than 72 h, respectively. The postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOH, days for first fecal passage, cost of hospitalization, and the difference in serum albumin values between pre-operation and post-operation were all recorded. The statistical analyses were performed using the t-test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi square test. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Group 1 had the lowest thoracic drainage volume, the earliest first fecal passage, and the lowest LOH and hospitalization expenses of the three groups. The incidence of pneumonia was by far the highest in Group 3 (p = 0.019. Finally, all the postoperative outcomes of nutritional conditions were the worst by a significant margin in Group 3. It is therefore safe and valid to start early enteral nutrition within 48 h for postoperative esophageal cancer patients.

  4. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  5. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  6. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-xiang Yuan; Jingxin Mo; Guixian Zhao; Gang Shu; Hua-lin Fu; Wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  7. Socio-demographic factors, comorbidity and diagnostic delay among women diagnosed with cervical, endometrial or ovarian cancer: a nationwide survey in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine Magtengaard; Christensen, Karl Bang; Ottesen, Bent Smedegaard;

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the association between socio-demographic factors, comorbidity and diagnostic delay among gynaecological cancer patients. A questionnaire was sent to 1052 women diagnosed with cervical, endometrial or ovarian cancer between October 2006 and December 2007 in Denmark. Long...... diagnosed with cervical and endometrial cancer as opposed to ovarian cancer, and with working as opposed to being retired. In conclusion, this study found that socio-demographic factors and comorbidity play a role in the probability of experiencing long delays. If delays in diagnosis are to be reduced...

  8. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  9. Dynamics of an HBV/HCV infection model with intracellular delay and cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengqin; Li, Jianquan; Zheng, Chongwu; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A new mathematical model of hepatitis B/C virus (HBV/HCV) infection which incorporates the proliferation of healthy hepatocyte cells and the latent period of infected hepatocyte cells is proposed and studied. The dynamics is analyzed via Pontryagin's method and a newly proposed alternative geometric stability switch criterion. Sharp conditions ensuring stability of the infection persistent equilibrium are derived by applying Pontryagin's method. Using the intracellular delay as the bifurcation parameter and applying an alternative geometric stability switch criterion, we show that the HBV/HCV infection model undergoes stability switches. Furthermore, numerical simulations illustrate that the intracellular delay can induce complex dynamics such as persistence bubbles and chaos.

  10. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  11. Delay in diagnosis of cancer as a patient safety issue - a root cause analysis based on a representative case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known in the literature that imaging has almost no value for diagnosis of superficial bladder cancer. However, wide gap exists between knowledge on diagnosis of bladder cancer and actual clinical practice. Case presentation Delay in diagnosis of bladder cancer in a male person with tetraplegia occurred because of reliance on negative flexible cystoscopy and single biopsy, negative ultrasound examination of urinary bladder, and computerised tomography of pelvis. Difficulties in scheduling cystoscopy also contributed to a delay of nearly ten months between the onset of haematuria and establishing a histological diagnosis of vesical malignancy in this patient. The time interval between transurethral resection and cystectomy was 42 days. This delay was mainly due to scheduling of surgery. Conclusion We learn from this case that doctors should be aware of the limitations of negative flexible cystoscopy and single biopsy, cytology of urine, ultrasound examination of urinary bladder, and computed tomography of pelvis for diagnosis of bladder cancer in spinal cord injury patients. Random bladder biopsies must be considered under general anaesthesia when there is high suspicion of bladder cancer. Spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 may develop autonomic dysreflexia; therefore, one should be extremely well prepared to prevent or manage autonomic dysreflexia when performing cystoscopy and bladder biopsy. Spinal cord injury patients, who pass blood in urine, should be accorded top priority in scheduling of investigations and surgical procedures.

  12. The Consequence of Delayed Fixation on Subsequent Preservation of Urine Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain G. Ahmed,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Degenerative changes caused by delays in urine preservation contribute to false-negative and false-positive interpretation of urothelial disease in cytology. The aim of this study is to assess whether the delay of fixation of urine samples makes any significant difference to urine cytology and morphology, and the limit of acceptability of delay for routine use in the hospital laboratory.Methods: Three cell collection fluids were evaluated by analyzing the preservation and degeneration of cells in urine samples. In this study, 50 voided urine specimens were taken at random from females complaining of vaginal discharge. Each specimen was divided into three sterile containers. The first was immediately centrifugated and the deposit was smeared onto a cleaned micro slide and immediately fixed into 95�0ethyl alcohol for 15 minutes. The remaining two were prepared in the same manner, however, the second after two hours of collection and the third after four hours of collection. The degree of degeneration and thus the preservation were assessed by a table of chosen criteria, then ranked and analyzed using Friedman's nonparametric test, atp=0.05.Results: The results showed a significant difference between the preservation and the delay in urine fixation, p<0.0001.Conclusion: Any delay in fixation of urine specimen for cytology affects the preservation of cells, which may result in miss diagnosis. It is recommended that urine samples for cytology should be fixed immediately after collection.

  13. Deficiency in the 15 kDa Selenoprotein Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, and is thought to provide protection against some forms of cancer. These protective effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, through selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Recent studies in a mouse colon cancer cell line have shown that the 15 kDa selenoprotein (Sep15 may also play a role in promoting colon cancer. The current study investigated whether the effects of reversing the cancer phenotype observed when Sep15 was removed in mouse colon cancer cells, were recapitulated in HCT116 and HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Targeted down-regulation of Sep15 using RNAi technology in these human colon cancer cell lines resulted in similarly decreased growth under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions. However, the magnitude of reduction in cell growth was much less than in the mouse colon cancer cell line investigated previously. Furthermore, changes in cell cycle distribution were observed, indicating a delayed release of Sep15 deficient cells from the G0/G1 phase after synchronization. The potential mechanism by which human colon cancer cells lacking Sep15 revert their cancer phenotype will need to be explored further.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Lpl Lipoproteins Delay G2/M Phase Transition in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Deplanche, Martine; Nega, Mulugeta; Le Loir, Yves; Peisl, Loulou; Götz, Friedrich; Berkova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is an ordered set of events, leading to cell growth and division into two daughter cells. The eukaryotic cell cycle consists of interphase (G1, S, and G2 phases), followed by the mitotic phase and G0 phase. Many bacterial pathogens secrete cyclomodulins that interfere with the host cell cycle. In Staphylococcus aureus four cyclomodulins have been described so far that all represent toxins and are secreted into the culture supernatant. Here we show that the membrane-anchored lipoprotein-like proteins (Lpl), encoded on a genomic island called νSaα, interact with the cell cycle of HeLa cells. By comparing wild type and lpl deletion mutant it turned out that the lpl cluster is causative for the G2/M phase transition delay and also contributes to increased invasion frequency. The lipoprotein Lpl1, a representative of the lpl cluster, also caused G2/M phase transition delay. Interestingly, the lipid modification, which is essential for TLR2 signaling and activation of the immune system, is not necessary for cyclomodulin activity. Unlike the other staphylococcal cyclomodulins Lpl1 shows no cytotoxicity even at high concentrations. As all Lpl proteins are highly conserved there might be a common function that is accentuated by their multiplicity in a tandem gene cluster. The cell surface localized Lpls' suggests a correlation between G2/M phase transition delay and host cell invasion. PMID:28083519

  15. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  16. Stem cell characteristics in prostate cancer cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, M.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate the presence of a small, stem-like cell population in several human cancers that is crucial for the tumour (re)population. OBJECTIVE: Six established prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines-DU145, DuCaP, LAPC-4, 22Rv1, LNCaP, and PC-3-were examined for their stem cell pr

  17. High Mortality Rate of Stomach Cancer Caused Not by High Incidence but Delays in Diagnosis in Aomori Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaka, Masashi; Tanaka, Rina; Sasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    Background: There are substantial differences in the mortality rates of stomach cancer among the 47 prefectures in Japan, and Aomori prefecture is one of the most severely impacted. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence and mortality rates of stomach cancer in Aomori prefecture in comparison with Japan as a whole and cast light on reasons underlying variation. Methods: Data on stomach cancer cases were extracted from the Aomori Cancer Registry Database. Incidence rates for specific stages at the time of diagnosis were cited from Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan, and mortality rates for stomach cancer in Aomori prefecture and the whole of Japan were obtained from Vital Statistics. Age-standardised incidence and mortality rates were calculated using the direct method. Results: The age-standardised incidence rate of stomach cancer in Aomori prefecture was higher than in the whole of Japan for males but lower for females. However, the age-standardised mortality rates were higher in Aomori prefecture in both sexes. The proportion of localised cancers was lower in Aomori prefecture than in the whole of Japan for most age groups. Conclusions: The lower rate for localised cancer suggests that higher age-standardised mortality rates are due to delays in diagnosis, despite an attendance rate for stomach cancer screening was higher in Aomori prefecture than in the whole of Japan. One plausible explanation for the failure of successful early detection might be poor quality control during screening implementation that impedes early detection.

  18. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  19. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  20. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  1. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  2. Toward a stem cell gene therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ZongYi; Liu, Ying; Tuve, Sebastian; Xun, Ye; Fan, Xiaolong; Min, Liang; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Disis, Mary Leonora; Lieber, André

    2009-05-28

    Current approaches for treatment of late-stage breast cancer rarely result in a long-term cure. In part this is due to tumor stroma that prevents access of systemically or intratumorally applied therapeutics. We propose a stem cell gene therapy approach for controlled tumor stroma degradation that uses the pathophysiologic process of recruitment of inflammatory cells into the tumor. This approach involves genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their subsequent transplantation into tumor-bearing mice. We show that inducible, intratumoral expression of relaxin (Rlx) either by transplanting tumor cells that contained the Rlx gene or by transplantation of mouse HSCs transduced with an Rlx-expressing lentivirus vector delays tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer. The antitumor effect of Rlx was mediated through degradation of tumor stroma, which provided increased access of infiltrating antitumor immune cells to their target tumor cells. Furthermore, we have shown in a human/mouse chimeric model that genetically modified HSCs expressing a transgene can access the tumor site. Our findings are relevant for cancer gene therapy and immunotherapy.

  3. Single-cell analysis in cancer genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatpour, Assieh; Lai, Shujing; Guo, Guoji; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Genetic changes and environmental differences result in cellular heterogeneity among cancer cells within the same tumor, thereby complicating treatment outcomes. Recent advances in single-cell technologies have opened new avenues to characterize the intra-tumor cellular heterogeneity, identify rare cell types, measure mutation rates, and, ultimately, guide diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review the recent single-cell technological and computational advances at the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, and discuss their applications in cancer research. PMID:26450340

  4. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. Immunohistological comparison of granulated cell proteins in induced immediate urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, M T; Peterson, E A; Kobza-Black, A; English, J S; Dover, J S; Murphy, G M; Bhogal, B; Greaves, M W; Winkelmann, R K; Leiferman, K M

    1995-12-01

    Urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria are two forms of physical urticaria which are well defined clinically and histologically. Previous studies have shown eosinophil granule protein deposition in urticarial reactions, including chronic urticaria, solar urticaria and delayed pressure urticaria. To evaluate and compare the involvement of granulated inflammatory cells in urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria, we studied sequential biopsies of induced lesions of urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria by indirect immunofluorescence, to detect eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) and neutrophil granule elastase. Biopsies from dermographic lesions at time 0, 5 min, 15 min, 2 h and 24 h, showed few infiltrating eosinophils, with minimal extracellular MBP deposition, and a few infiltrating neutrophils, with minimal neutrophil elastase deposition, throughout the evolution of the lesions. Sequential biopsies of delayed pressure urticaria at time 0, 20 min, 6, 12 and 24 h, showed eosinophil infiltration with extensive MBP deposition beginning at 20 min, and neutrophil infiltration with variable elastase deposition beginning at 20 min. Control tissue specimens from normal volunteers showed neutrophil infiltration and slight degranulation, but no eosinophil infiltration or degranulation. Comparison of urticarial dermographism with delayed pressure urticaria showed marked differences in the patterns of infiltration. Delayed pressure urticaria, with eosinophil and neutrophil degranulation, was strikingly similar to the IgE-mediated late phase reaction. In contrast, eosinophil and neutrophil involvement in urticarial dermographism was minimal. Considering the extent of eosinophil granule protein deposition and the biological activities of the eosinophil granule proteins, the findings in delayed pressure urticaria point to an important pathophysiological role of eosinophils in the disease.

  6. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Yumi [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Masaya [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Takakura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ntakaku@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound affects RUNX2 immunopositive osteogenic cells in delayed clinical fracture healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, S.; Nolte, P.A.; Korstjens, C.M.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Osteogenic cell proliferation and differentiation play an important role in adequate fracture healing, and is target for osteoinductive therapies in delayed fracture healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances fracture healing at t

  8. Decrease in spermidine content during logarithmic phase of cell growth delays spore formation of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, I; Takada, H; Terao, K; Kakegawa, T; Igarashi, K; Hirose, S

    1994-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis 168M contained a large amount of spermidine during the logarithmic phase of growth, but the amount decreased drastically during the stationary phase. The extracts, prepared from B. subtilis cells harvested in the logarithmic phase, contained activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) rather than the activity of ornithine decarboxylase. In the presence of alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific and irreversible inhibitor of ADC, the amount of spermidine in B. subtilis during the logarithmic phase decreased to about 25% of the control cells. Under these conditions, spore formation of B. subtilis 168M delayed greatly without significant inhibition of cell growth. The decrease in spermidine content in the logarithmic phase rather than in the stationary phase was involved in the delay of sporulation. Electron microscopy of cells at 24 hrs. of culture confirmed the delay of spore formation by the decrease of spermidine content. Furthermore, the delay of sporulation was negated by the addition of spermidine. These data suggest that a large amount of spermidine existing during the logarithmic phase plays an important role in the sporulation of B. subtilis.

  9. Small interfering RNA targeted to IGF-IR delays tumor growth and induces proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphanie Durfort

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and its type I receptor (IGF-IR play significant roles in tumorigenesis and in immune response. Here, we wanted to know whether an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be used for specific antitumor immunostimulation in a breast cancer model. For that, we evaluated short interfering RNA (siRNAs for inhibition of in vivo tumor growth and immunological stimulation in immunocompetent mice. We designed 2'-O-methyl-modified siRNAs to inhibit expression of IGF-IR in two murine breast cancer cell lines (EMT6, C4HD. Cell transfection of IGF-IR siRNAs decreased proliferation, diminished phosphorylation of downstream signaling pathway proteins, AKT and ERK, and caused a G0/G1 cell cycle block. The IGF-IR silencing also induced secretion of two proinflammatory cytokines, TNF- α and IFN-γ. When we transfected C4HD cells with siRNAs targeting IGF-IR, mammary tumor growth was strongly delayed in syngenic mice. Histology of developing tumors in mice grafted with IGF-IR siRNA treated C4HD cells revealed a low mitotic index, and infiltration of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, suggesting activation of an antitumor immune response. When we used C4HD cells treated with siRNA as an immunogen, we observed an increase in delayed-type hypersensitivity and the presence of cytotoxic splenocytes against wild-type C4HD cells, indicative of evolving immune response. Our findings show that silencing IGF-IR using synthetic siRNA bearing 2'-O-methyl nucleotides may offer a new clinical approach for treatment of mammary tumors expressing IGF-IR. Interestingly, our work also suggests that crosstalk between IGF-I axis and antitumor immune response can mobilize proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  11. Nucleolar re-activation is delayed in mouse embryos cloned from two different cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarcova, Olga; Dinnyes, A.; Polgar, Z.

    2009-01-01

    displayed early NPBs transformation. In conclusion, despite normal onset of EGA in cloned embryos, activation of functional nucleoli was one cell cycle delayed in NT embryos. NT-MEF embryos displayed normal targeting but delayed activation of nucleolar proteins. Contrary, in NT-HM1 embryos, both......Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare embryonic genome activation (EGA) in mouse embryos of different origin using nucleolus as a marker. Early and late 2-cell and late 4-cell stage embryos, prepared by in vitro fertilization (IVF), parthenogenetic activation (PG), and nuclear transfer...... ofmouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and mouse HM1 emryonic stem cells (HM1), were processed for autoradiography following 3H-uridine incubation (transcriptional activity), transmission electron microscopy (ultrastructure) and immunofluorescence (nucleolar proteins; upstream binding factor, UBF...

  12. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  13. Mast cells and cancer: enemies or allies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyduch, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells are a component of cancer microenvironment the role of which is complex and poorly understood. Mast cells promote cancer growth by stimulation of neoangiogenesis, tissue remodeling and by modulation of the host immune response. The mediators of cancer promotion include protease-activated receptors, mitogen activated protein kinases, prostaglandins and histamine. Histamine may induce tumor proliferation and immunosuppression through H1 and H2 receptors, respectively. The mast cell-derived modulators of immune response include also interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and CD30L. Possibly stimulation of angiogenesis is the most important. Mast cells release potent proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), TNF- α and IL-8, and mast cells' enzymes, like metaloproteinases (MMPs), tryptase and chymase participate in vessels' formation. The anti-cancer actions of mast cells include direct growth inhibition, immunologic stimulation, inhibition of apoptosis and decreased cell mobility; the mediators of these processes include chymase, tryptase, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. The very same mediators may exert both pro- or anti-cancer effects depending on concentration, presence of cofactors or location of secreting cells. In fact, peri- and intra-tumoral mast cells may have dissimilar effects. Understanding of the role of mast cells in cancer could lead to improved prognostication and development of therapeutic methods targeting the mast cells.

  14. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  15. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  16. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  17. Delayed massive immune hemolysis mediated by minor ABO incompatibility after allogeneic peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Salmon, Jean; Michaux, S.; Hermanne, J. P.; Baudoux, Etienne; Gerard, Christiane; Sondag, Danièle; Fillet, Georges; Beguin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow transplantation with minor ABO incompatibility may be followed by moderate delayed hemolysis of the recipient's red cells by donor-derived ABO antibodies. This reaction may be more severe after transplantation of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs). CASE REPORT: A 16-year-old boy underwent an allogeneic PBPC transplant from his HLA-mismatched mother as treatment for acute myeloblastic leukemia that had proved resistant to induction chemotherapy. Transfusion of th...

  18. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  20. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heravi, Mitra [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Kumala, Slawomir [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J. [Cancer Drug Research Laboratory, McGill University Health Center, Montreal (Canada); Radzioch, Danuta [Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Muanza, Thierry M., E-mail: tmuanza@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  1. Anastomotic salvage after rectal cancer resection using the Turnbull–Cutait delayed anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallet, Julie; Bouchard, Alexandre; Drolet, Sébastien; Milot, Hélène; Desrosiers, Emilie; Lebrun, Aude; Grégoire, Roger Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Turnbull–Cutait abdominoperineal pull-through followed by delayed coloanal anastomosis (DCA) was first described in 1961. Studies have described its use for challenging colorectal conditions. We reviewed our experience with Turnbull–Cutait DCA as a salvage procedure for complex failure of colorectal anastomosis. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study from October 2010 to September 2011, with analysis of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Results Seven DCAs were performed for anastomotic complications (3 chronic leaks, 2 rectovaginal fistulas, 1 colovesical fistula, 1 colonic ischemia) following surgery for rectal cancer. Six patients had a diverting ileostomy constructed as part of previous treatment for anastomotic complications before the salvage procedure. No anastomotic leaks were observed. All procedures but 1 were completed successfully. One patient who underwent DCA subsequently required an abdominoperineal resection and a permanent colostomy for postoperative extensive colonic ischemia. No 30-day mortality occurred. Conclusion Salvage Turnbull–Cutait DCA appears to be a safe procedure and could be offered to patients with complex anastomotic complications. This procedure could be added to the surgeon’s armamentarium as an alternative to the creation of a permanent stoma. PMID:25421083

  2. Imposition of a delay prior to beginning radiotherapy: impact on mood states for cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merker, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Waiting lists for radiotherapy are a recent phenomenon in highly populated areas and, coupled with the public's awareness of the nature of cancer and the need for immediate treatment, a psychological dilemma has emerged. Since virtually all patients are now assigned to the radiotherapy waiting list, a random sample of patients who would begin radiotherapy immediately following their initial consultation was created. Quality of life, in terms of self-reported mood indices, was assessed at five points in time for each patient using the Profile of Mood States. Approximately 25% of the delayed patients chose to leave the waiting list and seek treatment elsewhere. The most striking finding was that patients who began radiotherapy immediately experienced improved quality of life during the course of treatment as per Forester, et al., (1985). In contrast, the patients who spent time (1-8 weeks) on a treatment waiting list experienced a decrease in quality of life over their course of radiotherapy and even more so at a month following the end of treatment.

  3. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  4. Double red cell concentrates -in vitro quality after delayed refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S; Bekoe, Y; Uddin, S; Beard, M; Cardigan, R

    2010-10-01

    Automated collection of red cell concentrates (RCC) presents a number of potential advantages to donors, blood services and recipients, and allows the collection of finished components from sites that are remote from a blood centre. However, data are lacking on how long the collected RCC may be stored at ambient temperature prior to their final storage at 4 °C. In this study, the Haemonetics Cymbal device was used to collect RCC using citrate, phosphate and dextrose (CPD-50) anticoagulant. A total of 10 procedures each yielded two leucodepleted RCC in saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol (SAGM) additive solution. One of each pair of RCC was kept warm in an insulated transport bag for 8 h and the other for 6 h. In vitro assessments of the quality of the RCC were made during subsequent 42-day storage of the RCC at 2-6 °C, and compared with reference data. All collected RCC were within UK and European limits for volume, haematocrit and haemoglobin content. Haemolysis was within specification at Day 42 and was no different in RCC held warm for 6 or 8 hours, but tended to be higher than reference data from whole blood derived RCC. ATP, 2,3 DPG and supernatant potassium levels were all similar in RCC held warm for 6 or 8 hours and reference data. We conclude that the Cymbal device may be used to collect two RCC in SAGM, and the in vitro assessment indicates that RCC may be stored without refrigeration for up to 8 h following collection, prior to final storage at 4 °C.

  5. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  6. Delayed cell death in the contralateral hippocampus following kainate injection into the CA3 subfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglóczky, Z; Freund, T F

    1995-06-01

    A model of epileptic cell death has been developed employing unilateral injections of kainic acid, a glutamate agonist, into the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. The contralateral hippocampus, where neuronal damage is induced by hyperactivity in afferent pathways, served as the model structure. The pattern of cell death in this model was shown earlier to correspond to the vulnerable regions in human temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present time-course study we demonstrated that the different subpopulations of vulnerable cells in the contralateral hippocampus of the rat degenerate at different times following kainate injection. Spiny calretinin-containing cells in the hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum disappear at 12-24 h, other types of hilar neurons and CA3c pyramidal cells show shrinkage and argyrophilia at two days, whereas CA1 pyramidal cells degenerate at three days postinjection. The majority of cells destined to die showed a transient expression of the heatshock protein 72, approximately one day (for hilar-CA3c) or two days (for CA1) before degeneration. Parvalbumin-immunoreactivity transiently disappeared from the soma and dendrites of interneurons between the first and the fourth day. The results suggest that seizure-induced cell death is delayed, therefore acute oedema, even if it occurs, is insufficient to kill neurons. The only exception is the population of calretinin-containing interneurons degenerating at 12-24 h. The further one day delay between hilar-CA3c and CA1 cell death is likely to be due to differences in the relative density of glutamate receptor types (kainate versus NMDA) and the source of afferent input of these subfields. Thus, simple pharmacotherapy targeting only one of the excitotoxic mechanisms (i.e. acute oedema of calretinin cells versus delayed death of hilar-CA3c and CA1 cells at different time points) is likely to fail.

  7. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  8. Internal Mammary Recipient Site Breast Cancer Recurrence Following Delayed Microvascular Breast Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosich-Medina, Anais; Wang, Susan; Erel, Ertan; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The internal mammary vessels are a popular recipient site for microsurgical anastomoses of free flap breast reconstructions. We, however, observed 3 patients undergoing internal mammary vessel delayed free flap breast reconstruction that subsequently developed tumor recurrence at this site. We reviewed their characteristics to determine whether there was a correlation between delayed microsurgical reconstruction and local recurrence. Methods: A retrospective review of a single surgeon's delayed free flap breast reconstructions using the internal mammary vessels was conducted over a 7-year period to identify the time intervals between mastectomy and delayed breast reconstruction and between delayed breast reconstruction and recurrence. Results: Three patients developed local recurrence at the site of the microvascular anastomoses following delayed breast reconstruction. All patients had been disease-free following mastectomy. The median time interval between mastectomy and delayed breast reconstruction was 28 months (range = 20-120 months) while that between delayed breast reconstruction and local recurrence was 7 months (range = 4-10 months). Two patients died from metastatic disease, 36 and 72 months following their local recurrence. One patient remains alive 44 months after reconstruction. Conclusions: Local tumor recurrence at the internal mammary vessel dissection site following delayed breast reconstruction raises the question whether these 2 events may be related. Specifically, could internal mammary vessel dissection undertaken for delayed microsurgical reconstruction predispose to recurrence in the internal mammary lymph nodes? Further research is needed to ascertain whether delayed breast reconstruction increases the risk of local recurrence in this patient group. PMID:23383360

  9. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  10. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  11. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and preven

  12. TCRP1 contributes to cisplatin resistance by preventing Pol β degradation in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaorong; Wang, Chengkun; Gu, Yixue; Zhang, Zhijie; Zheng, Guopei; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) is the first-line chemotherapy drug widely used for the treatment of lung cancer patients, whereas the majority of cancer patients will eventually show resistance to DDP. The mechanisms responsible for DDP resistance are not fully understood. Tongue cancer resistance-associated protein 1 (TCRP1) gene was recently cloned and reported to specially mediate DDP resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. However, the mechanisms of TCRP1-mediated DDP resistance are far from clear, and whether TCRP1 participates in DDP resistance in lung cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we show that TCRP1 contributes to DDP resistance in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of TCRP1 sensitizes the cells to DDP and increases the DDP-induced DNA damage. We have identified that Pol β is associated with DDP resistance, and Pol β knockdown delays the repair of DDP-induced DNA damage in A549/DDP cells. We find TCRP1 interacts with Pol β in lung cancer cells. Moreover, TCRP1 knockdown decreases the level of Pol β and increases the level of its ubiquitination. These results suggest that TCRP1 contributes to DDP resistance through the prevention of Pol β degradation in lung cancer cells. These findings provide new insights into chemoresistance and may contribute to prevention and reversal of DDP resistance in treatment of lung cancer in the future.

  13. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  14. The Haiti Breast Cancer Initiative: Initial Findings and Analysis of Barriers-to-Care Delaying Patient Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Haiti, breast cancer patients present at such advanced stages that even modern therapies offer modest survival benefit. Identifying the personal, sociocultural, and economic barriers-to-care delaying patient presentation is crucial to controlling disease. Methods. Patients presenting to the Hôpital Bon Sauveur in Cange were prospectively accrued. Delay was defined as 12 weeks or longer from initial sign/symptom discovery to presentation, as durations greater than this cutoff correlate with reduced survival. A matched case-control analysis with multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting delay. Results. Of N=123 patients accrued, 90 (73% reported symptom-presentation duration and formed the basis of this study: 52 patients presented within 12 weeks of symptoms, while 38 patients waited longer than 12 weeks. On logistic regression, lower education status (OR = 5.6, P=0.03, failure to initially recognize mass as important (OR = 13.0, P<0.01, and fear of treatment cost (OR = 8.3, P=0.03 were shown to independently predict delayed patient presentation. Conclusion. To reduce stage at presentation, future interventions must educate patients on the recognition of initial breast cancer signs and symptoms and address cost concerns by providing care free of charge and/or advertising that existing care is already free.

  15. Role of founder cell deficit and delayed neuronogenesis in microencephaly of the trisomy 16 mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydar, T. F.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Yarowsky, P. J.; Krueger, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    Development of the neocortex of the trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), is characterized by a transient delay in the radial expansion of the cortical wall and a persistent reduction in cortical volume. Here we show that at each cell cycle during neuronogenesis, a smaller proportion of Ts16 progenitors exit the cell cycle than do control, euploid progenitors. In addition, the cell cycle duration was found to be longer in Ts16 than in euploid progenitors, the Ts16 growth fraction was reduced, and an increase in apoptosis was observed in both proliferative and postmitotic zones of the developing Ts16 neocortical wall. Incorporation of these changes into a model of neuronogenesis indicates that they are sufficient to account for the observed delay in radial expansion. In addition, the number of neocortical founder cells, i.e., precursors present just before neuronogenesis begins, is reduced by 26% in Ts16 mice, leading to a reduction in overall cortical size at the end of Ts16 neuronogenesis. Thus, altered proliferative characteristics during Ts16 neuronogenesis result in a delay in the generation of neocortical neurons, whereas the founder cell deficit leads to a proportional reduction in the overall number of neurons. Such prenatal perturbations in either the timing of neuron generation or the final number of neurons produced may lead to significant neocortical abnormalities such as those found in DS.

  16. A delay in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle that is induced by a dicentric chromosome and dependent upon mitotic checkpoints.

    OpenAIRE

    Neff, M. W.; Burke, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are genetically unstable and depress the rate of cell division in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have characterized the effects of a conditionally dicentric chromosome on the cell division cycle by using microscopy, flow cytometry, and an assay for histone H1 kinase activity. Activating the dicentric chromosome induced a delay in the cell cycle after DNA replication and before anaphase. The delay occurred in the absence of RAD9, a gene required to arrest cell division in r...

  17. The role of health system factors in delaying final diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in Mexico City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Kristin; Barghash, Maya; Donach, Martin; de la Barrera, Marcos Gutiérrez; Schneider, Robert J; Formenti, Silvia C

    2011-04-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer is the leading cancer-related death among women and most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages (50-60%). We hypothesized health system factors could be partly responsible for this delay and performed a prospective review of 166 new breast cases at a major public hospital in Mexico City. Our analysis confirmed the prevalence of locally advanced and metastatic disease (47% of patients). A subset analysis of 32 women with confirmed stage I-IIIC breast cancer found an average time interval of 1.8 months from symptom onset to first primary care consultation (PCC), with an additional 6.6 months from first PCC to confirmed diagnosis, and 0.6 months from diagnosis to treatment initiation. Patients underwent an average of 7.9 clinic visits before confirmed diagnosis. Findings suggest that protracted referral time from primary to specialty care accounts for the bulk of delay, with earlier stage patients experiencing longer delays. These findings reveal a critical need for further study and exploration of interventions.

  18. Stem cell concepts renew cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, John E

    2008-12-15

    Although uncontrolled proliferation is a distinguishing property of a tumor as a whole, the individual cells that make up the tumor exhibit considerable variation in many properties, including morphology, proliferation kinetics, and the ability to initiate tumor growth in transplant assays. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in the design of therapeutic strategies. The mechanistic basis of tumor heterogeneity has been uncertain; however, there is now strong evidence that cancer is a cellular hierarchy with cancer stem cells at the apex. This review provides a historical overview of the influence of hematology on the development of stem cell concepts and their linkage to cancer.

  19. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  20. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  1. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  3. Stem Cells and Cancer; Celulas madre y cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrelles, C.; Paraminio, J. M.; Lorz, C.

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  4. Induction of cancer cell stemness by chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingwang; Ghisolfi, Laura; Keates, Andrew C; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Lee, Dong-ki; Li, Chiang J

    2012-07-15

    Recent studies indicate that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in most hematological and solid tumors. CSCs are characterized by their ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into the multitude of cells that comprise the tumor mass. Moreover, these cells have been shown to be intrinsically resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Despite their fundamental role in cancer pathogenesis, the cellular origin of CSCs remains highly controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether heterogeneous cancer cells can acquire stem cell-like properties in response to chemotherapy. We demonstrate that carboplatin can induce the self-renewal (spherogenesis) and pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct3/4 expression) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells grown under stem cell culture conditions. Moreover, we show that non-CSC cells, obtained by side population flow cytometric sorting using Hoechst 33342, can acquire stem-like properties after exposure to carboplatin. Finally, we show that knockdown of Sox2 and Oct3/4 gene expression in HCC cells can reduce carboplatin-mediated increases in sphere formation and increase cellular sensitivity to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data indicate that bulk cancer cells may be an important source of CSCs during tumor development, and that targeting Sox2 and/or Oct3/4 may be a promising approach for targeting CSCs in clinical cancer treatment.

  5. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Delayed presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency due to prolonged maternal T cell engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Muhsen, Saleh Z.

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder with heterogenous genetic etiologies. We describe a typical case in a 9-year-old boy that was masked by a clinically functional maternal T cell engraftment leading to late presentation with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and cytomegalovirus infection, probably following exhaustion of maternally engrafted cells. Based on immunological findings, he had a T- B+SCID phenotype. This report suggests that in rare cases, engrafted maternal T cell might persist for long time leading to partial constitution of immune function and delayed clinical presentation of SCID. PMID:20427943

  7. Transplanted adipose-derived stem cells delay D-galactose-induced aging in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Yang; Ou Sha; Jingxing Dai; Lin Yuan; Dongfei Li; Zhongqiu Wen; Huiying Yang; Meichun Yu; Hui Tao; Rongmei Qu; Yikuan Du; Yong Huang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of allogeneically transplanted, adipose-derived stem cells in aging rats, in the present study, we established a rat model of subacute aging using continuous subcutaneous injections of D-galactose. Two weeks after the adipose-derived stem cells transplantations, serum superoxide dismutase activity was significantly increased, malondialdehyde content was significantly reduced, hippocampal neuronal degeneration was ameliorated, the apoptotic index of hippocampal neurons was decreased, and learning and memory function was significantly improved in the aging rats. These results indicate that allogeneic transplantation of adipose-derived stem cells may effectively delay D-galactose-induced aging.

  8. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundqvist, Helene; Augsten, Martin; Strömberg, Anna; Rullman, Eric; Mijwel, Sara; Kharaziha, Pedram; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Gustafsson, Thomas; Östman, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum) and after completed exercise (exercise serum). The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  9. Effect of acute exercise on prostate cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Rundqvist

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of several cancers, including aggressive prostate cancer. The mechanisms mediating the effects are not yet understood; among the candidates are modifications of endogenous hormone levels. Long-term exercise is known to reduce serum levels of growth stimulating hormones. In contrast, the endocrine effects of acute endurance exercise include increased levels of mitogenic factors such as GH and IGF-1. It can be speculated that the elevation of serum growth factors may be detrimental to prostate cancer progression into malignancy. The incentive of the current study is to evaluate the effect of acute exercise serum on prostate cancer cell growth. We designed an exercise intervention where 10 male individuals performed 60 minutes of bicycle exercise at increasing intensity. Serum samples were obtained before (rest serum and after completed exercise (exercise serum. The established prostate cancer cell line LNCaP was exposed to exercise or rest serum. Exercise serum from 9 out of 10 individuals had a growth inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Incubation with pooled exercise serum resulted in a 31% inhibition of LNCaP growth and pre-incubation before subcutaneous injection into SCID mice caused a delay in tumor formation. Serum analyses indicated two possible candidates for the effect; increased levels of IGFBP-1 and reduced levels of EGF. In conclusion, despite the fear of possible detrimental effects of acute exercise serum on tumor cell growth, we show that even the short-term effects seem to add to the overall beneficial influence of exercise on neoplasia.

  10. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell ...

  11. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  12. Enhancing endogenous stem cells in the newbornvia delayed umbilical cord clamping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher Lawton; Sandra Acosta; Nate Watson; Chiara Gonzales-Portillo; hTeo Diamandis; Naoki Tajiri; Yuji Kaneko; Paul R. Sanberg; Cesar V. Borlongan

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no consensus among clinicians and scientists over the appropriate or optimal timing for umbilical cord clamping. However, many clinical studies have suggested that delayed cord clamping is associated with various neonatal beneifts including increased blood volume, reduced need for blood transfusion, increased cerebral oxygenation in pre-term infants, and decreased frequency of iron deifciency anemia in term infants. Human umbilical cord blood con-tains signiifcant amounts of stem and progenitor cells and is currently used in the treatment of several life-threatening diseases. We propose that delayed cord clamping be encouraged as it en-hances blood lfow from the placenta to the neonate, which is accompanied by an increase supply of valuable stem and progenitor cells, as well as may improve blood oxygenation and increase blood volume, altogether reducing the infant’s susceptibility to both neonatal and age-related diseases.

  13. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000675.htm Low white blood cell count and cancer To use ... high blood pressure, or seizures Continue Reading How Low is too Low? When your blood is tested, ...

  14. Noncoding RNAs in cancer and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianzhi Huang; Angel Alvarez; Bo Hu; Shi-Yuan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are of crucial importance for human cancer. The functional relevance of ncRNAs is particularly evident for microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). miRNAs are endogenously expressed small RNA sequences that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been extensively studied for their roles in cancers, whereas lncRNAs are emerging as important players in the cancer paradigm in recent years. These noncoding genes are often aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, the biological functions of most ncRNAs remain largely unknown. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing how ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells harboring self-renewal and differentiation capacities. These studies provide insight into the functional roles that ncRNAs play in tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapies, and they suggest ncRNAs as attractive therapeutic targets and potential y useful diagnostic tools.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jing Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer (HNC is the sixth most common malignancy world-wide, however the survival rate has not improved for the past 20 years. In recent years, the cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis has gained ground in several malignancies and there is mounting evidence suggesting CSCs mediate tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. However, the CSC theory is also challenged at least in certain types of cancer. Here we review the progress of CSC studies in HNC, which suggest that HNC conforms to the CSC model. The identified CSC markers and their tumor initiation properties provide a framework for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for HNC.

  16. PTEN, Stem Cells, and Cancer Stem Cells*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Reginald; Wu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Like normal stem cells, “cancer stem cells” have the capacity for indefinite proliferation and generation of new cancerous tissues through self-renewal and differentiation. Among the major intracellular signaling pathways, WNT, SHH, and NOTCH are known to be important in regulating normal stem cell activities, and their alterations are associated with tumorigenesis. It has become clear recently that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) is also critical for stem cell...

  17. The depletion of interleukin-8 causes cell cycle arrest and increases the efficacy of docetaxel in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Nan; Chen, Liu-Hua; Ye, Run-Yi; Lin, Ying; Wang, Shen-Ming

    2013-02-15

    IL-8 is a multi-functional pro-inflammatory chemokine, which is highly expressed in cancers, such as ER-negative breast cancer. The present study demonstrates the pervasive role of IL-8 in the malignant progression of ER-negative breast cancer. IL-8 siRNA inhibited proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle progression in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. IL-8 silencing resulted in the upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p27, the downregulation of cyclin D1, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Akt and NF-κB activities. IL-8 depletion also increased the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. These results indicate a role for IL-8 in promoting tumor cell survival and resistance to docetaxel and highlight the potential therapeutic significance of IL-8 depletion in ER-negative breast cancer patients.

  18. Haem oxygenase delays programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by modulation of hydrogen peroxide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhu; Huang, Jingjing; Xu, Sheng; Ling, Tengfang; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    Haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers protection against a variety of oxidant-induced cell and tissue injury in animals and plants. In this report, it is confirmed that programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers is stimulated by GA and prevented by ABA. Meanwhile, HO activity and HO-1 protein expression exhibited lower levels in GA-treated layers, whereas the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content was apparently increased. The pharmacology approach illustrated that scavenging or accumulating H(2)O(2) either delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, pretreatment with the HO-1 specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), before exposure to GA, not only decreased HO activity but also accelerated GA-induced PCD significantly. The application of the HO-1 inducer, haematin, and the enzymatic reaction product of HO, carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution, both of which brought about a noticeable induction of HO expression, substantially prevented GA-induced PCD. These effects were reversed when ZnPPIX was added, suggesting that HO in vivo played a role in delaying PCD. Meanwhile, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities or transcripts were enhanced by haematin, CO, or bilirubin (BR), the catalytic by-product of HO. This enhancement resulted in a decrease in H(2)O(2) production and a delay in PCD. In addition, the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), dithiothreitol (DTT), and ascorbic acid (AsA) were able not only to delay PCD but also to mimic the effects of haematin and CO on HO up-regulation. Overall, the above results suggested that up-regulation of HO expression delays PCD through the down-regulation of H(2)O(2) production.

  19. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Koido; Eiichi Hara; Sadamu Homma; Yoshihisa Namiki; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Jianlin Gong; Hisao Tajiri

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived...

  20. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  1. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    progenitor cells (NPCs) by expressing an activated form of Notch1 (N1ICD) or oncogenic PIK3CA (PIK3CA*) in the developing mouse cerebellum, using cell...resistance, pediatric cancer, brain tumor, Notch1, PIK3CA, cell of origin, molecular subtypes, neural stem cells, neural progenitor cells, tumor initiation...neural progenitor cells, tumor initiation. 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Major goals of the project: The stated goals of this project are to: 1) test the

  2. Delayed Diagnosis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ Associated with Bevacizumab Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients: Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Erovigni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Medication-induced Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (MRONJ has been reported not only after use of antiresorptive agents (bisphosphonates and denosumab, but also in cancer patients receiving antiangiogenic agents, alone or combined with antiresorptive drugs. We report two cases of MRONJ observed in colorectal cancer patients after bevacizumab therapy only. MRONJ was diagnosed, respectively, two and seven months after a tooth extraction; both the patients had received two courses of bevacizumab infusions (for a total of 29 and 10 administrations, respectively. We discuss if tooth extraction during or after antiangiogenic therapy could be a potential trigger of MRONJ, but also if an underlying bone disease not evident before oral surgery might be a possible cause. A careful drug history has to be registered by dental specialists in cancer patients before oral surgery and adequate imaging might be obtained to avoid a delayed diagnosis.

  3. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  4. Cancer and deregulation of stem cells pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Correia Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells may have an important etiological role in cancer. Their classic regulatory pathways are deregulated in tumors, strengthening the stem cell theory of cancer. In this manuscript, we review Wnt, Notch and Hedhehog pathways, describing which of their factors may be responsible for the neoplastic development. Furthermore, we classify these elements as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, demonstrating their mutation implications in cancer. The activation of these pathways is associated with the expression of certain genes which maintain proliferation and apoptosis inhibition. Further work should be carried out in the future in order to control tumor development by controlling these signaling cascades.

  5. Patient delay among Colombian women with breast cancer Demora en pacientes colombianas con cáncer de mama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Piñeros

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Characterize diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in Bogota, Colombia and examine the extent and determinants of patient delay. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a census approach we identified 1 106 women with breast cancer. Information was gathered through personal interviews and the review of medical records. Patient delay was defined as the time elapsed from first symptoms to initial consultation. RESULTS: More than 80% of the women (902 consulted due to symptoms; the majority had advanced-stage disease. Patient delay was established in 20.3% and the main related factors were older age, lack of social security and advanced clinical stage. Higher education in patients was associated with reduced delays. DISCUSSION: Women do not recognize breast cancer symptoms. Patient delay and related factors are similar to those found in other studies. There is an urgent need to develop communication and education strategies regarding breast cancer symptoms and early detection.OBJETIVO: Caracterizar el diagnóstico y tratamiento de mujeres con cáncer de mama en Bogotá, Colombia; establecer la demora de pacientes en la asistencia a consulta y los factores relacionados. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: A través de una aproximación censal se identificaron 1 106 mujeres con cáncer de mama. La recolección de información se hizo mediante entrevistas y revisión de historias clínicas. Se consideró demora de la paciente el tiempo entre la percepción del síntoma y la primera consulta. RESULTADOS: Más de 80% de las mujeres consultaron por síntomas; la mayoría eran estados avanzados. Los factores que se relacionaron con la demora fueron una mayor edad, no tener afiliación al sistema de salud y la enfermedad avanzada. Una mayor educación se relacionó con menor demora. DISCUSIÓN: Las mujeres no reconocen los síntomas del cáncer de mama; es necesario diseñar estrategias de comunicación y educación para estimular el reconocimiento de los síntomas y

  6. During Drosophila disc regeneration, JAK/STAT coordinates cell proliferation with Dilp8-mediated developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Tomonori; Comoglio, Federico; Seimiya, Makiko; Cabuy, Erik; Paro, Renato

    2015-05-05

    Regeneration of fragmented Drosophila imaginal discs occurs in an epimorphic manner involving local cell proliferation at the wound site. After disc fragmentation, cells at the wound site activate a restoration program through wound healing, regenerative cell proliferation, and repatterning of the tissue. However, the interplay of signaling cascades driving these early reprogramming steps is not well-understood. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of regenerating cells in the early phase within 24 h after wounding. We found that JAK/STAT signaling becomes activated at the wound site and promotes regenerative cell proliferation in cooperation with Wingless (Wg) signaling. In addition, we showed that the expression of Drosophila insulin-like peptide 8 (dilp8), which encodes a paracrine peptide to delay the onset of pupariation, is controlled by JAK/STAT signaling in early regenerating discs. Our findings suggest that JAK/STAT signaling plays a pivotal role in coordinating regenerative disc growth with organismal developmental timing.

  7. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  8. Neurotrophin signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Valérie; Lagadec, Chann; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Le Bourhis, Xuefen

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), are thought to be at the origin of tumor development and resistance to therapies. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of CSC stemness is essential to the design of more effective therapies for cancer patients. Cancer cell stemness and the subsequent expansion of CSCs are regulated by micro-environmental signals including neurotrophins. Over the years, the roles of neurotrophins in tumor development have been well established and regularly reviewed. Especially, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reported to stimulate tumor cell proliferation, survival, migration and/or invasion, and favors tumor angiogenesis. More recently, neurotrophins have been reported to regulate CSCs. This review briefly presents neurotrophins and their receptors, summarizes their roles in different cancers, and discusses the emerging evidence of neurotrophins-induced enrichment of CSCs as well as the involved signaling pathways.

  9. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-06

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  10. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  11. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-03-07

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  12. An MMP13-selective inhibitor delays primary tumor growth and the onset of tumor-associated osteolytic lesions in experimental models of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Shah

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy-5-(2-methoxyethyl pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H-trione (Cmpd-1, on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis.

  13. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  14. New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent or Delay Beta-Cell Failure in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Floriana Elvira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The most recent estimates of International Diabetes Federation indicate that 382 million people have diabetes, and the incidence of this disease is increasing. While in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM beta-cell death is autoimmunemediated, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors that impair beta-cell function and insulin action. Many people with T2DM remain unaware of their illness for a long time because symptoms may take years to appear or be recognized, while the body is affected by excess blood glucose. These patients are often diagnosed only when diabetes complications have already developed. The aim of this article was to perform a review based on literature data on therapeutic modalities to prevent/delay beta cell function decline. Material and Methods: We searched MEDLINE from 2000 to the present to identify the therapeutic approaches to prevent or delay beta-cell failure in patients with T2DM. Results and conclusions: Several common polymorphisms in genes linked to monogenic forms of diabetes appear to influence the response to T2DM pharmacotherapy. Recent studies report the role of the G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40, also known as Free Fatty Acids Receptor 1 (FFAR1 in the regulation of beta-cell function- CNX-011-67 (a GPR40 agonist has the potential to provide good and durable glycemic control in T2DM patients.

  15. Cancer Cells Hijack Gluconeogenic Enzymes to Fuel Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa-Martinez, Eduardo; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-11-19

    In this issue and the October 15th issue of Molecular Cell, studies by Montal et al. (2015) and Vincent et al. (2015) report that certain types of cancer cells utilize the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 2 (PCK2) to reprogram anabolic metabolism and support cell growth.

  16. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-03

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  17. Delay of ZGA initiation occurred in 2-cell blocked mouse embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA JING QIU; WU WEN ZHANG; ZHI LI WU; YI HONG WANG; MIN QIAN; YI PING LI

    2003-01-01

    One-cell mouse embryos from KM strain and B6C3F1 strain were cultured in M16 medium, in which2-cell block generally occurs. Embryos of KM strain exhibited 2-cell block, whereas B6C3F1 embryos,which are regarded as a nonblocking strain, proceeded to the 4-cell stage in our culture condition. It is oftenassumed that the block of early development is due to the failure of zygotic gene activation (ZGA) in culturedembryos. In this study we examined protein synthesis patterns by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of[35S] methionine radiolabeled 2-cell embryos. Embryos from the blocking strain and the nonblocking strainwere compared in their development both in vitro and in vivo. The detection of TRC expression, a markerof ZGA, at 42 h post hCG in KM embryos developed in vitro suggested that ZGA was also initiated even inthe 2-cell arrested embryos. Nevertheless, a significant delay of ZGA was observed in KM strain as comparedwith normally developed B6C3F1 embryos. At the very beginning of major ZGA as early as 36 h post hCG,TRC has already been expressed in B6C3F1 embryos developed in vitro and KM embryos developed in vivo.But for 2-cell blocked KM embryos, TRC was still not detectable even at 38 h post hCG. These evidencessuggest that 2-cell-blocked embryos do initiate ZGA, and that 2-cell block phenomenon is due not to thedisability in initiating ZGA, but to a delay of ZGA.

  18. Cancer cells with irons in the fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrom, Laura M; Rivella, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and proliferation of cells, as well as for many biological processes that are important for the maintenance and survival of the human body. However, excess iron is associated with the development of cancer and other pathological conditions, due in part to the pro-oxidative nature of iron and its damaging effects on DNA. Current studies suggest that iron depletion may be beneficial for patients that have diseases associated with iron overload or other iron metabolism disorders that may increase the risk for cancer. On the other hand, studies suggest that cancer cells are more vulnerable to the effects of iron depletion and oxidative stress in comparison to normal cells. Therefore, cancer patients might benefit from treatments that alter both iron metabolism and oxidative stress. This review highlights the pro-oxidant effects of iron, the relationship between iron and cancer development, the vulnerabilities of the iron-dependent cancer phenotype, and how these characteristics may be exploited to prevent or treat cancer.

  19. Induction of Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Colon Cancer Cells by Defined Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Oshima, Nobu

    2014-01-01

    Oshima N, Yamada Y, Nagayama S, Kawada K, Hasegawa S, et al. (2014) Induction of Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Colon Cancer Cells by Defined Factors. PLoS ONE 9(7): e101735. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0101735

  20. Application Delay Modelling for Variable Length Packets in Single Cell IEEE 802.11 WLANs

    CERN Document Server

    Sunny, Albert; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of modelling the average delay experienced by an application packets of variable length in a single cell IEEE 802.11 DCF wireless local area network. The packet arrival process at each node i is assumed to be a stationary and independent increment random process with mean ai and second moment a(2) i . The packet lengths at node i are assumed to be i.i.d random variables Pi with finite mean and second moment. A closed form expression has been derived for the same. We assume the input arrival process across queues to be uncorrelated Poison processes. As the nodes share a single channel, they have to contend with one another for a successful transmission. The mean delay for a packet has been approximated by modelling the system as a 1-limited Random Polling system with zero switchover times. Extensive simulations are conducted to verify the analytical results.

  1. A differential equation with state-dependent delay from cell population biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, Philipp; Waurick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a differential equation, describing the maturation of a stem cell population, with a state-dependent delay, which is implicitly defined via the solution of an ODE. We elaborate smoothness conditions for the model ingredients, in particular vital rates, that guarantee the existence of a local semiflow and allow to specify the linear variational equation. The proofs are based on theoretical results of Hartung et al. combined with implicit function arguments in infinite dimensions. Moreover we elaborate a criterion for global existence for differential equations with state-dependent delay. To prove the result we adapt a theorem by Hale and Lunel to the C1-topology and use a result on metric spaces from Diekmann et al.

  2. A NOVEL DESIGN OF MULTIPLEXER BASED FULL-ADDER CELL FOR POWER AND PROPAGATION DELAY OPTIMIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. RAMANA MURTHY

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel high-speed and high-performance multiplexer based full adder cell for low-power applications. The proposed full adder is composed of two separate modules with identical hardware configurations that generate Sum and Carry signals in a parallel manner. The proposed adder circuit has an advantage in terms of short critical path when compared with various existing previous designs. Comprehensive experiments were performed in various situations to evaluate the performance of the proposed design. Simulations were performed by Microwind 2 VLSI CAD tool for LVS and BSIM 4 for parametric analysis of various feature sizes. The simulation results demonstrate clearly the improvement of the proposed design in terms of lower power dissipation, less propagation delay, less occupying area and low power delay product (PDP compared to other widely used existing full adder circuits.

  3. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  4. Squamous cell cancer of the rectum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tara Dyson; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is a rare malignancy. It appears to be associated with chronic inflammatory conditions and infections. The clear association seen between Human Papilloma Virus and various squamous cancers has not been firmly established for the squamous cell cancer of the rectum. The presentation is nonspecific and patients tend to present with advanced stage disease. Diagnosis relies on endoscopic examination with biopsy of the lesion. Distinction from squamous cell cancer of the anus can be difficult, but can be facilitated by immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratins. Staging of the cancer with endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography provides essential information on prognosis and can guide therapy. At present, surgery remains the main therapeutic option; however recent advances have made chemoradiation a valuable therapeutic addition. Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum is a distinct entity and it is of crucial importance for the practicing Gastroenterologist to be thoroughly familiar with this disease. Compared to adenocarcinoma of the rectum and squamous cell cancer of the anal canal, squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum has different epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, and prognosis but, most importantly, requires a different therapeutic approach. This review will examine and summarize the available information regarding this disease from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist.

  5. NSAIDs and Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Ettarh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is common worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in patients. Fortunately, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that continuous therapy with NSAIDs offers real promise of chemoprevention and adjunct therapy for colon cancer patients. Tumour growth is the result of complex regulation that determines the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. How NSAIDs affect this balance is important for understanding and improving treatment strategies and drug effectiveness. NSAIDs inhibit proliferation and impair the growth of colon cancer cell lines when tested in culture in vitro and many NSAIDs also prevent tumorigenesis and reduce tumour growth in animal models and in patients, but the relationship to inhibition of tumour cell proliferation is less convincing, principally due to gaps in the available data. High concentrations of NSAIDs are required in vitro to achieve cancer cell inhibition and growth retardation at varying time-points following treatment. However, the results from studies with colon cancer cell xenografts are promising and, together with better comparative data on anti-proliferative NSAID concentrations and doses (for in vitro and in vivo administration, could provide more information to improve our understanding of the relationships between these agents, dose and dosing regimen, and cellular environment.

  6. Germ cell cancer and disorders of spermatogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakkebaek, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Jørgensen, N;

    1998-01-01

    in research in the early stages of testicular cancer (carcinoma in situ testis (CIS)) allows us to begin to answer some of these questions. There is more and more evidence that the CIS cell is a gonocyte with stem cell potential, which explains why an adult man can develop a non-seminoma, which...... is a neoplastic caricature of embryonic growth. We consider the possibility that CIS cells may loose their stem cell potential with ageing. Along these lines, a seminoma is regarded a gonocytoma where the single gonocytes have little or no stem cell potential. The Sertoli and Leydig cells, which are activated......Why is there a small peak of germ cell tumours in the postnatal period and a major peak in young age, starting at puberty? And, paradoxically, small risk in old age, although spermatogenesis is a lifelong process? Why is this type of cancer more common in individuals with maldeveloped gonads...

  7. Cell-of-Origin of Cancer versus Cancer Stem Cells: Assays and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Tang, Dean G

    2015-10-01

    A tumor originates from a normal cell that has undergone tumorigenic transformation as a result of genetic mutations. This transformed cell is the cell-of-origin for the tumor. In contrast, an established clinical tumor is sustained by subpopulations of self-renewing cancer cells operationally called cancer stem cells (CSC) that can generate, intraclonally, both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells. Identifying and characterizing tumor cell-of-origin and CSCs should help elucidate tumor cell heterogeneity, which, in turn, should help understand tumor cell responses to clinical treatments, drug resistance, tumor relapse, and metastatic spread. Both tumor transplantation and lineage-tracing assays have been helpful in characterizing these cancer cell populations, although each system has its strengths and caveats. In this article, we briefly review and summarize advantages and limitations of both assays in support of a combinatorial approach to accurately define the roles of both cancer-initiating and cancer-propagating cells. As an aside, we also wish to clarify the definitions of cancer cell-of-origin and CSCs, which are often interchangeably used by mistake.

  8. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  9. Enteric Bacteria and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacteria can contribute to cell proliferation and cancer development, particularly in chronic infectious diseases in which bacteria and/or bacterial components might interfere with cell function. The number of microbial cells within the gut lumen is estimated to be 100 trillion, which is about 10-times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells in the human body. Because of the complexity of the gut flora, identifying the specific microbial agents related to human diseases remains challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that the stemness of colon cancer cells is, in part, orchestrated by the microenvironment and is defined by high Wnt activity. In this review article, we will discuss recent progress with respect to intestinal stem cells, cancer stem cells, and the molecular mechanisms of enteric bacteria in the activation of the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the roles of other pathways, including JAK-STAT, JNK, and Notch, in regulating stem cell niches during bacterial infections using Drosophila models. Insights gained from understanding how host-bacterial interaction during inflammation and cancer may serve as a paradigm for understanding the nature of self-renewal signals.

  10. Internal Mammary Recipient Site Breast Cancer Recurrence Following Delayed Microvascular Breast Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Rosich-Medina, Anais; Wang, Susan; Erel, Ertan; Malata, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The internal mammary vessels are a popular recipient site for microsurgical anastomoses of free flap breast reconstructions. We, however, observed 3 patients undergoing internal mammary vessel delayed free flap breast reconstruction that subsequently developed tumor recurrence at this site. We reviewed their characteristics to determine whether there was a correlation between delayed microsurgical reconstruction and local recurrence. Methods: A retrospective review of a single surg...

  11. Telomerase inhibition effectively targets mouse and human AML stem cells and delays relapse following chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Bagger, Frederik O; Heidel, Florian H;

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and lethal blood cancer maintained by rare populations of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Selective targeting of LSCs is a promising approach for treating AML and preventing relapse following chemotherapy, and developing such therapeutic modalities is a key...

  12. Changes from 1992 to 2002 in the pretreatment delay for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of larynx or pharynx: a Danish nationwide survey from DAHANCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; Nielsen, Anni Linnet; Larsen, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark, a general impression of prolonged pretreatment delay for patients with head and neck cancer led to a nationwide study of time spans from symptom debut over first health care contact to start of treatment. Charts of consecutive new patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx...... and larynx, seen at the five Danish oncology centers in January-April 1992 and 2002, respectively, were reviewed. Of the 288 patients identified, definitive treatment was radiotherapy in 264 cases, surgery in one case. Twenty-three patients had neither surgery nor radiotherapy. Total time from first health...

  13. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  14. Delaying Renal Transplant after Radical Prostatectomy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Karakayalı, Feza; Moray, Gökhan; Demirağ, Alp

    2015-11-01

    To minimize the recurrence of a previously treated neoplasm in organ recipients, a period of 2 to 5 years without recurrence is advocated for most malignancies. However, prostate cancer is different because of its biological properties, diagnosis, and treatment. Most prostate cancers are detected at a low stage and demonstrate slow growth after detection. Definitive treatment with radical prostatectomy affords excellent results. Renal transplant candidates with early-stage prostate cancer have a higher risk of dying on dialysis than dying from prostate cancer; therefore, renal transplant candidates with organ-confined prostate cancer should be immediately considered for transplant.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells: A Moving Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Chandler, Julie; Lagasse, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Even though the number of anti-cancer drugs entering clinical trials and approved by the FDA has increased in recent years, many cancer patients still experience poor survival outcome. The main explanation for such a dismal prognosis is that current therapies might leave behind a population of cancer cells with the capacity for long-term self-renewal, so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), from which most tumors are believed to be derived and fueled. CSCs might favor local and distant recurrence even many years after initial treatment, thus representing a potential target for therapies aimed at improving clinical outcome. In this review, we will address the CSC hypothesis with a particular emphasis on its current paradigms and debates, and discuss several mechanisms of CSC resistance to conventional therapies.

  16. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  17. Getting to the heart of the matter in cancer: Novel approaches to targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh; Mori, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. While cancers may initially show good response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it is not uncommon for them to recur at a later date. This phenomenon may be explained by the existence of a small population of cancer stem cells, which are inherently resistant to anti-cancer treatment as well as being capable of self-renewal. Therefore, while most of the tumour bulk consisting of cells that are not cancer stem cells respond to treatment, the cancer stem cells remain, leading to disease recurrence. Following this logic, the effective targeting of cancer stem cells holds promise for providing long-term cure in individuals with cancer. Cancer stem cells, like normal stem cells are endowed with mechanisms to protect themselves against a wide range of insults including anti-cancer treatments, such as the enhancement of the DNA damage response and the ability to extrude drugs. It is therefore important to develop new strategies if cancer stem cells are to be eradicated. In this review, we describe the strategies that we have developed to target cancer stem cells. These strategies include the targeting of the histone demethylase jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B), which we found to be functionally significant in the maintenance of cancer stem cells. Other strategies being pursued include reprogramming of cancer stem cells and the targeting of a functional cell surface marker of liver cancer stem cells, the aminopeptidase CD13.

  18. FREQUENCY CATASTROPHE AND CO-EXISTING ATTRACTORS IN A CELL Ca2+ NONLINEAR OSCILLATION MODEL WITH TIME DELAY*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应阳君; 黄祖洽

    2001-01-01

    Frequency catastrophe is found in a cell Ca2+ nonlinear oscillation model with time delay. The relation of the frequency transition to the time delay is studied by numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. There is a range of parameters in which two kinds of attractors with great frequency differences co-exist in the system. Along with parameter changes, a critical phenomenon occurs and the oscillation frequency changes greatly. This mechanism helps us to deepen the understanding of the complex dynamics of delay systems, and might be of some meaning in cell signalling.

  19. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  20. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  1. From cell signaling to cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin DING; Yun FENG; Hong-yang WANG

    2007-01-01

    Cancer has been seriously threatening the health and life of humans for a long period. Despite the intensive effort put into revealing the underlying mechanisms of cancer, the detailled machinery of carcinogenesis is still far from fully understood.Numerous studies have illustrated that cell signaling is extensively involved in tumor initiation, promotion and progression. Therefore, targeting the key mol-ecules in the oncogenic signaling pathway might be one of the most promising ways to conquer cancer. Some targeted drugs, such as imatinib mesylate (Gleevec),herceptin, gefitinib (Iressa), sorafenib (Nexavar) and sunitinib (Sutent), which evolve from monotarget drug into multitarget ones, have been developed with encouraging effects.

  2. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy.

  3. Delayed olfactory ensheathing cell transplants reduce nociception after dorsal root injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ann; Lauschke, Jenny L; Gorrie, Catherine A; Cameron, Nicholas; Hayward, Ian; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Waite, Phil M E

    2011-05-01

    Injury to cervical dorsal roots mimics the deafferentation component of brachial plexus injury in humans, with intractable neuropathic pain in the deafferented limb being a common consequence. Such lesions are generally not amenable to surgical repair. The use of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) for dorsal root repair, via acute transplantation, has been successful in several studies. From a clinical point of view, delayed transplantation of OECs would provide a more realistic timeframe for repair. In this study we investigated the effect of delayed OEC transplantation on functional recovery of skilled forepaw movements and amelioration of neuropathic pain, using a C7 and C8 dorsal root injury rat model previously established in our lab. We found that OEC transplantation to the dorsal horn 1 week after root injury effectively attenuated neuropathic disturbances associated with dorsal root injury, including spontaneous pain behavior, tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The sensory controls of complex, goal-oriented skilled reaching and ladder walking, however, were not improved by delayed OEC transplantation. We did not detect any significant influence of transplanted OECs on injury-induced central reorganisation and afferent sprouting. The anti-nociceptive effect mediated by OEC transplants may therefore be explained by alternative mechanisms such as modification of inflammation and astrogliosis. The significant effect of OEC transplants in mitigating neuropathic pain may be clinically useful in intractable pain syndromes arising from deafferentation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair.

  4. Significant Delay of Lethal Outcome in Cancer Patients Due to Peroral Administration of Bacillus oligonitrophilus KU-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Malkov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of cancer patients remains a serious medical problem and the development of alternative treatment strategies is therefore of great importance. In this connection, we developed a new bacterial-based, anticancer method. Ten cancer patients (three males, seven females were involved in this study. Bacterial suspension of stationary phase Bacillus oligonitrophilus KU-1 was used as a remedy for peroral administration. In five patients, side effects (sicchasia, slight blood, and intracranial pressure gain were detected, but all patients showed significant delay of lethal outcome without serious side effects. In conclusion, the suggested method was, in our opinion, a good alternative to conventional chemo- and radiotherapy techniques. In order to evaluate its efficiency for various tumors, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study is needed.

  5. The cancer stem cell theory: is it correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2008-11-30

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis posits that tumor growth is driven by a rare subpopulation of cells, designated cancer stem cells (CSC). Studies supporting this theory are based in large part on xenotransplantation experiments wherein human cancer cells are grown in immunocompromised mice and only CSC, often constituting less than 1% of the malignancy, generate tumors. Herein, we show that all colonies derived from randomly chosen single cells in mouse lung and breast cancer cell lines form tumors following allografting histocompatible mice. Our study suggests that the majority of malignant cells rather than CSC can sustain tumors and that the cancer stem cell theory must be reevaluated.

  6. Diminished Memory T-Cell Expansion Due to Delayed Kinetics of Antigen Expression by Lentivectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Furmanov

    Full Text Available Memory CD8(+ T lymphocytes play a central role in protective immunity. In attempt to increase the frequencies of memory CD8(+ T cells, repeated immunizations with viral vectors are regularly explored. Lentivectors have emerged as a powerful vaccine modality with relatively low pre-existing and anti-vector immunity, thus, thought to be ideal for boosting memory T cells. Nevertheless, we found that lentivectors elicited diminished secondary T-cell responses that did not exceed those obtained by priming. This was not due to the presence of anti-vector immunity, as limited secondary responses were also observed following heterologous prime-boost immunizations. By dissecting the mechanisms involved in this process, we demonstrate that lentivectors trigger exceptionally slow kinetics of antigen expression, while optimal activation of lentivector-induced T cells relays on durable expression of the antigen. These qualities hamper secondary responses, since lentivector-encoded antigen is rapidly cleared by primary cytotoxic T cells that limit its presentation by dendritic cells. Indeed, blocking antigen clearance by cytotoxic T cells via FTY720 treatment, fully restored antigen presentation. Taken together, while low antigen expression is expected during secondary immunization with any vaccine vector, our results reveal that the intrinsic delayed expression kinetics of lentiviral-encoded antigen, further dampens secondary CD8(+ T-cell expansion.

  7. Comparison of the protective action of glutathione and cysteamine on radiation-induced mitotic delay in cultured S-5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, S; Kobayashi, M; Hashimoto, H; Nakanishi, T

    1979-06-01

    The protective effect of glutathione (GSH) and cysteamine (MEA) on radiation-induced mitotic delay in cultured mammalian L-5 cells was studied. Cells treated with 20 mM of GSH during irradiation with 2 Gy (200 rad) showed faster recovery of the mitotic index than control cells irradiated without chemical treatment; however, GSH had no effect on mitotic delay time. Inhibition of mitosis was observed with 80, 100, and 120 mM of GSH. Cells treated with 5 mM of MEA during irradiation also showed faster recovery of the mitotic index than the controls, but in addition the delay time was shortened. Progression of G2-phase cells treated with 5-fluorouracil to mitosis after irradiation was protected by MEA but not by GSH. Progression of S-phase cells labeled with 3H-thymidine to mitosis was accelerated by both agents during irradiation.

  8. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  9. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Cancer: Lessons from Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kid Törnquist

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomyelin is found in the cell membrane of all eukaryotic cells, and was for a long time considered merely as a structural component. However, during the last two decades, metabolites of sphingomyelin, especially sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, have proven to be physiologically significant regulators of cell function. Through its five different G protein-coupled receptors, S1P regulates a wide array of cellular processes, ranging from stimulating cellular proliferation and migration, to the inhibition of apoptosis and induction of angiogenesis and modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis. Many of the processes regulated by S1P are important for normal cell physiology, but may also induce severe pathological conditions, especially in malignancies like cancer. Thus, understanding S1P signaling mechanisms has been the aim of a multitude of investigations. Great interest has also been shown in understanding the action of sphingosine kinase (SphK, i.e., the kinase phosphorylating sphingosine to S1P, and the interactions between S1P and growth factor signaling. In the present review, we will discuss recent findings regarding the possible importance of S1P and SphK in the etiology of thyroid cancer. Although clinical data is still scarce, our in vitro findings suggest that S1P may function as a “double-edged sword”, as the receptor profile of thyroid cancer cells largely determines whether S1P stimulates or blocks cellular migration. We will also discuss the interactions between S1P- and VEGF-evoked signaling, and the importance of a S1P1-VEGF receptor 2 complex in thyroid cancer cells.

  10. The metabolic landscape of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Biondani, Giulia; Cordani, Marco; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of quiescent cells endowed with self-renewal properties that can sustain the malignant behavior of the tumor mass giving rise to more differentiated cancer cells. For this reason, the specific killing of CSCs represents one of the most important challenges of the modern molecular oncology. However, their particular resistance to traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy imposes a thorough understanding of their biological and biochemical features. The metabolic peculiarities of CSCs may be a therapeutic and diagnostic opportunity in cancer research. In this review, we summarize the most significant discoveries on the metabolism of CSCs describing and critically analyzing the studies supporting either glycolysis or mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation as a primary source of energy for CSCs.

  11. GLUL Promotes Cell Proliferation in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Shaohua; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zifeng; Wu, Dongmei; Wu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Yuanlin

    2016-10-28

    Glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) belongs to the glutamine synthetase family. It catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia in an ATP-dependent reaction. Here, we found higher expression of GLUL in the breast cancer patients was associated with larger tumor size and higher level of HER2 expression. In addition, GLUL was heterogeneously expressed in various breast cancer cells. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GLUL in SK-BR-3 cells were obviously higher than that in the other types of breast cancer cells. Results showed GLUL knockdown in SK-BR-3 cells could significantly decrease the proliferation ability. Furthermore, GLUL knockdown markedly inhibited the p38 MAPK and ERK1/ERK2 signaling pathways in SK-BR-3 cells. Thus, GLUL may represent a novel target for selectively inhibiting p38 MAPK and ERK1/ERK2 signaling pathways and the proliferation potential of breast cancer cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  13. Cell death, chromosome damage and mitotic delay in normal human, ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma fibroblasts after x-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F; Scott, D

    1981-05-01

    We recently showed (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler 1980) that X-ray sensitive mouse lymphoma cells sustain more chromosome damage, mitotic delay and spindle defects than X-ray resistant cells. We proposed that (a) chromosome aberrations contribute much more to lethality than spindle defects, and (b) that DNA lesions are less effectively repaired in the sensitive cells and give rise to more G2 mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations. Our present results on human fibroblasts with reported differential sensitivity to ionizing radiation (i.e. normal donors and patients with ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma) support the first hypothesis since we observed a positive correlation between chromosome aberration frequencies and cell killing and no induced spindle defects. Our second hypothesis is however not substantiated since X-ray sensitive fibroblasts from the ataxia patient suffered less mitotic delay than cells from normal donors. A common lesion for mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations can still be assumed by adopting the hypothesis of Painter and Young (1981) that the defect in ataxia cells is not in repair but in a failure of DNA damage to initiate mitotic delay. In contrast to other reports, we found the retinoblastoma cells to be of normal radiation sensitivity (cell killing and aberration).

  14. An update on the biology of cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bueno, José María; Ocaña, Alberto; Castro-García, Paola; Gil Gas, Carmen; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Poblet, Enrique; Serrano, Rosario; Calero, Raúl; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer stem cells are defined as cancer cells with self-renewal capacity. These cells represent a small subpopulation endowed with the ability to form new tumours when injected in nude mice. Markers of differentiation have been used to identify these cancer cells. In the case of breast cancer, CD44+/CD24- select a population with stem cell properties. The fact that these cells have self-renewal ability has suggested that this population could be responsible for new tumour formation and cancer relapse. These cells have been shown to be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than normal cancer cells. The identification of the molecular druggable alterations responsible for the initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells is an important goal. In this article we will review all these points with special emphasis on the possible role of new drugs designed to interact with molecular pathways of cancer stem cells.

  15. Cancer stem cells and field cancerization of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple, M; Suresh, Amritha; Das, Debashish; Kuriakose, Moni A

    2015-07-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a high propensity for local failure, which is attributed to recurrence at the primary site or the development of second primary tumors (SPT). Field cancerization that refers to the existence of transformed cells in areas adjacent to the primary tumor, has been attributed to be one of the probable reasons underlying disease relapse. The carcinogenic process necessitates multiple molecular events for the transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. This implies that only the long-time residents of the epithelium, such as the stem cells, might be the candidates capable of accumulating these genetic hits. These transformed stem cells- the 'Cancer stem cells' (CSCs), are further known to be equipped with the properties of tumor initiation and migration, both of which are essential for orchestrating field cancerization. The concept that the CSCs might be responsible for field cancerization in OSCC has not been explored extensively. If the role of CSCs as the primary units of field cancerization process is established, their presence in the mucosa adjacent to the tumor may be an indicator for local recurrence and/or development of second primary tumors. In this review, we examine the available evidence in literature exploring the possibilities of CSCs driving the process of field cancerization and thereby being the underlying mechanism for disease recurrence and development of SPT.

  16. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer What Is Kidney Cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  17. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  18. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination.

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K. Friedman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a subpopulation of cells, termed tumor-initiating cells or tumor stem cells (TSC, has been identified in many different types of solid tumors. These TSC, which are typically more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation compared to other tumor cells, have properties similar to normal stem cells including multipotency and the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone. Much of the research on TSC has focused on adult cancers. With considerable differences in tumor biology between adult and pediatric cancers, there may be significant differences in the presence, function and behavior of TSC in pediatric malignancies. We discuss what is currently known about pediatric solid TSC with specific focus on TSC markers, tumor microenvironment, signaling pathways, therapeutic resistance and potential future therapies to target pediatric TSC.

  20. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells in the side population cells of human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong ZHANG; Ai-zhen CAI; Xue-ming WEI; Li DING; Feng-zhi LI; Ai-ming ZHENG; Da-jiang DAI

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Side population (SP) cells may play a crucial role in tumorigenesis and the recurrence of cancer.Many kinds of cell lines and tissues have demonstrated the presence of SP cells,including several gastric cancer cell lines.This study is aimed to identify the cancer stem-like cells in the SP of gastric cancer cell line MKN-45.Methods:We used fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to sort SP cells in the human gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 (cells labeled with Hoechst 33342) and then characterized the cancer stem-like properties of SP cells.Results:This study found that the SP cells had higher clone formation efficiency than major population (MP) cells.Five stemness-related gene expression profiles,including OCT-4,SOX-2,NANOG,CD44,and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters gene ABCG2,were tested in SP and MP cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Western blot was used to show the difference of protein expression between SP and MP cells.Both results show that there was significantly higher protein expression in SP cells than in MP cells.When inoculated into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice,SP cells show higher tumorigenesis tendency than MP cells.Conclusions:These results indicate that SP cells possess cancer stem cell properties and prove that SP cells from MKN-45 are gastric cancer stem-like cells.

  1. Projected impact of the trend toward delayed childbearing on breast cancer incidence in the Saarland/FRG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, H; Stegmaier, C

    1990-01-01

    The potential impact of the trend toward delayed childbearing or nulliparity on future breast cancer incidence is quantitatively assessed for the Saarland/FRG. Distribution of age at first birth is estimated from vital statistics for seven five-year birth cohorts from 1936-40 to 1966-70. Estimates of the relative risks associated with age at first birth or nulliparity are based on median results of 23 controlled epidemiologic studies conducted in Europe and North America. Compared to the birth cohorts around 1940, a steady increase in incidence up to about +15% is projected for the younger cohorts indicating a substantial public health impact. Using data of the population based cancer registry of the Saarland, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer up to age 50 is calculated as 1.52% for the 1936-40 birth cohort and is projected to rise to 1.75% in the 1966-70 cohort. Similar changes in fertility patterns have been observed in other parts of the FRG. Given the continuing rise in mortality from breast cancer in the FRG this stresses the need for more effective screening procedures.

  2. Time delay control for fuel cells with bidirectional DC/DC converter and battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.B. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea); Kang, S.J. [Mechatronics Engineering Department, Korea Polytechnic College V, Gwangju (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Transient behavior is a key property in the vehicular application of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. A better control technology is constructed to increase the transient performance of PEM fuel cells. A steady-state isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze mass transfer and water transport in the membrane. To prevent the starvation of air in the PEM fuel cell, time delay control is used to regulate the optimum stoichiometric amount of oxygen, although dynamic fluctuations exist in the PEM fuel cell power. A bidirectional DC/DC converter connects the battery to the DC link to manage the power distribution between the fuel cell and the battery. Dynamic evolution control (DEC) allows for adequate pulse-width modulation (PWM) control of the bidirectional DC/DC converter with fast response. Matlab/Simulink/Simpower simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology, increase the transient performance of the PEM fuel cell system and satisfy the requirement of energy management. (author)

  3. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  4. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Bae [Mechanical Engineering Department, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea)

    2010-10-01

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system. (author)

  5. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based...

  6. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  7. Molecular Pathways: Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostasis in Cancer Cells and Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Veronique; Hay, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in regulating normal cellular processes, but deregulated ROS contribute to the development of various human diseases including cancers. Cancer cells have increased ROS levels compared to normal cells, because of their accelerated metabolism. The high ROS levels in cancer cells, which distinguish them from normal cells, could be pro-tumorigenic, but are also their Achilles’ heel. The high ROS content in cancer cells renders them more susceptible to o...

  8. Inhibitory effect of Polo-like kinase 1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hua Chen; Bin Lan; Ying Qu; Xiao-Qing Zhang; Qu Cai; Bing-Ya Liu; Zheng-Gang Zhu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) serine/threonine kinase plays a vital role in multiple phases of mitosis in gastric cancer cells. To investigate the effect of PLK1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: PLK1 expression was blocked by small RNA interference(siRNA). The expression levels of PLK1, cdc2, cyclin B and caspase 3 were detected by Western blotting. Then, PLK1 depletion, cdc2 activity,cell proliferation, cell cycle phase distribution, mitotic spindle structure, and the rate of apoptosis of the PLK1knockdown cells were observed.RESULTS: PLK1 gene knockdown was associated with increased cyclin B expression, increased cdc2 activity (but not with the expression levels), accumulation of gastric cancer cells at G2/M, improper mitotic spindle formation,delayed chromosome separation and delayed or arrested cytokinesis. Moreover, PLK1 depletion in gastric cancer cells was associated with decreased proliferation,attenuated pro-caspase 3 levels and increased apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Blockage of PLK1 expression may lead to decreased mitosis or even apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, indicating that PLK1 may be a valuable therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  9. Delayed cutaneous wound healing and aberrant expression of hair follicle stem cell markers in mice selectively lacking Ctip2 in epidermis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: COUP-TF interacting protein 2 [(Ctip2, also known as Bcl11b] is an important regulator of skin homeostasis, and is overexpressed in head and neck cancer. Ctip2(ep-/- mice, selectively ablated for Ctip2 in epidermal keratinocytes, exhibited impaired terminal differentiation and delayed epidermal permeability barrier (EPB establishment during development, similar to what was observed in Ctip2 null (Ctip2(-/- mice. Considering that as an important role of Ctip2, and the fact that molecular networks which underlie cancer progression partially overlap with those responsible for tissue remodeling, we sought to determine the role of Ctip2 during cutaneous wound healing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full thickness excisional wound healing experiments were performed on Ctip2(L2/L2 and Ctip2(ep-/- animals per time point and used for harvesting samples for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblotting. Results demonstrated inherent defects in proliferation and migration of Ctip2 lacking keratinocytes during re-epithelialization. Mutant mice exhibited reduced epidermal proliferation, delayed keratinocyte activation, altered cell-cell adhesion and impaired ECM development. Post wounding, Ctip2(ep-/- mice wounds displayed lack of E-Cadherin suppression in the migratory tongue, insufficient expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha SMA in the dermis, and robust induction of K8. Importantly, dysregulated expression of several hair follicle (HF stem cell markers such as K15, NFATc1, CD133, CD34 and Lrig1 was observed in mutant skin during wound repair. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results confirm a cell autonomous role of keratinocytic Ctip2 to modulate cell migration, proliferation and/or differentiation, and to maintain HF stem cells during cutaneous wounding. Furthermore, Ctip2 in a non-cell autonomous manner regulated granulation tissue formation and tissue contraction during wound closure.

  10. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell transplantation for delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong D

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dianrong Gong,1 Haiyan Yu,1 Weihua Wang,2 Haixin Yang,1 Fabin Han1,21Department of Neurology, 2Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng People's Hospital, The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Stem cell transplantation is one of the potential treatments for neurological disorders. Since human umbilical cord stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection and promote neural regeneration, we have attempted to transplant the human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (hUCB-MNCs to treat patients with delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication (DEACOI. The hUCB-MNCs were isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood and were given to patients subarachnoidally. Physical examinations, mini-mental state examination scores, and computed tomography scans were used to evaluate the improvement of symptoms, signs, and pathological changes of the patient's brain before and after hUCB-MNC transplantation. A total of 12 patients with DEACOI were treated with hUCB-MNCs in this study. We found that most of the patients have shown significant improvements in movement, behavior, and cognitive function, and improved brain images in 1–4 months from the first transplantation of hUCB-MNCs. None of these patients have been observed to have any severe adverse effects. Our study suggests that the hUCB-MNC transplantation may be a safe and effective treatment for DEACOI. Further studies and clinical trials with more cases, using more systematic scoring methods, are needed to evaluate brain structural and functional improvements in patients with DEACOI after hUCB-MNC therapy.Keywords: human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells, transplantation, delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication, MMSE

  11. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casina Kan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow.

  12. Understanding cancer stem cell heterogeneity and plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dean G Tang

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity is an omnipresent feature of mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo.It has been recently realized that even mouse and human embryonic stem cells under the best culture conditions are heterogeneous containing pluripotent as well as partially committed cells.Somatic stem cells in adult organs are also heterogeneous,containing many subpopulations of self-renewing cells with distinct regenerative capacity.The differentiated progeny of adult stem cells also retain significant developmental plasticity that can be induced by a wide variety of experimental approaches.Like normal stem cells,recent data suggest that cancer stem cells(CSCs)similarly display significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity,and that the CSC progeny can manifest diverse plasticity.Here,I discuss CSC heterogeneity and plasticity in the context of tumor development and progression,and by comparing with normal stem cell development.Appreciation of cancer cell plasticity entails a revision to the earlier concept that only the tumorigenic subset in the tumor needs to be targeted.By understanding the interrelationship between CSCs and their differentiated progeny,we can hope to develop better therapeutic regimens that can prevent the emergence of tumor cell variants that are able to found a new tumor and distant metastases.

  13. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Casina; Vargas, Geoffrey; Le Pape, François; Clézardin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow. PMID:27782035

  14. Targeting cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiwu Ruth He,1 Daniel C Smith,1 Lopa Mishra2 1Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The poor outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is attributed to recurrence of the disease after curative treatment and the resistance of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy, which may be explained partly by the function of liver cancer stem cells (CSCs. Liver CSCs have emerged as an important therapeutic target against HCC. Numerous surface markers for liver CSCs have been identified, and include CD133, CD90, CD44, CD13, and epithelial cell adhesion molecules. These surface markers serve not only as tools for identifying and isolating liver CSCs but also as therapeutic targets for eradicating these cells. In studies of animal models and large-scale genomic analyses of human HCC samples, many signaling pathways observed in normal stem cells have been found to be altered in liver CSCs, which accounts for the stemness and aggressive behavior of these cells. Antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the signaling pathways have been evaluated at different levels of preclinical and clinical development. Another strategy is to promote the differentiation of liver CSCs to less aggressive HCC that is sensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Disruption of the tumor niche essential for liver CSC homeostasis has become a novel strategy in cancer treatment. To overcome the challenges in developing treatment for liver CSCs, more research into the genetic makeup of patient tumors that respond to treatment may lead to more effective therapy. Standardization of HCC CSC tumor markers would be helpful for measuring the CSC response to these agents. Herein, we review the current strategies for developing treatment to eradicate liver CSCs and to improve the outcome for patients with

  15. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  16. The influence of spirituality and religiosity on breast cancer screening delay in African American women: application of the Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior (TRA/TPB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullate, Mary

    2006-01-01

    African American women (AAW) are 25% more likely to present with late stage breast cancer and 20% more likely to die from their disease than Caucasian women. Researchers report that a treatment delay of 3 months is a significant factor in breast cancer mortality. Socioeconomic factors, lack of access and knowledge, spiritual and religious beliefs, fear and fatalism are reported as contributing factors to screening delays. Studies have primarily applied the Health Belief Model (HBM) and modified versions like the Champion HBM to preventive health practices. Neither have significant inclusion of spirituality or religiosity. The TRA/TPB focus on beliefs, intent and attitude as individual determinants of the likelihood of performing a specific behavior; but have not had wide utility in studies related to screening delays among AAW. This paper explores the utility of applying the TRA/TPB as the theoretical framework for determining cultural relevance of spirituality and religiosity to screening delays among AAW.

  17. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  18. Drug treatment of cancer cell lines: a way to select for cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  19. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Chiodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  20. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara, E-mail: mondello@igm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  1. The response of normal and ataxia-telangiectasia cells to bleomycin: relationships between chromosome damage, cell cycle delay and cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F; Scott, D

    1985-08-01

    In agreement with our earlier observation (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler, 1982) on X-irradiated normal and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) fibroblasts, we now report that after bleomycin or neocarzinostatin treatment also, A-T cells exhibit less G2 delay than normal cells. We confirm that A-T cells sustain more chromosome damage and lethality than normal cells after bleomycin. These observations support the hypothesis (Painter and Young, 1980) that A-T cells are defective in the recognition of certain lesions which normally lead to delays in progression through the cell cycle, during which they are repaired, and which, if unrepaired, lead to cell-lethal chromosome damage. However, we find that after bleomycin, as opposed to X-rays, the contribution of this type of lesion to cell death is minimal. The predominant lesions leading to cell death after bleomycin are not manifested at chromosome aberrations and do not lead to G2 delay or DNA-synthesis inhibition. A-T cells are defective in the recognition and/or repair of both types of lesion.

  2. Activated RET/PTC oncogene elicits immediate early and delayed response genes in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, D; Monaco, C; de Vita, G; D'Alessio, A; Dathan, N A; Possenti, R; Vecchio, G; Fusco, A; Santoro, M; de Franciscis, V

    1995-07-06

    The expression of the receptor-like tyrosine kinase RET is associated with tumors, tissues or cell lines of neural crest origin. In addition RET products (Ret) are involved in determining cell fate during the differentiation of the enteric nervous system and during renal organogenesis. However, as yet, no direct evidence exists to indicate that the Ret kinase activity might interfere in a specific way with cellular differentiation, or proliferation, of a neural crest derived cell line. By using two constitutively activated forms of RET (RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3) in transient transfection experiments, we have obtained evidence that active RET could reprogramme the gene expression pattern in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. Transcription driven by gene promoters, such as NGFI-A and vgf, which belong, respectively, to primary and delayed response genes to nerve growth factor (NGF), and by the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter, is rapidly induced by the expression of activated RET oncogenes. This induction is not elicited in other non neural derived cell types tested. We also demonstrate that endogenous ras activity is required for RET induction of these neural markers. Finally, in the RET/PTC transfected PC12 cells, NGF is unable to induce further their transcription. This suggests that RET/PTC could share an intracellular signalling pathway with the NGF-receptor.

  3. Ectopic expression of Capsicum-specific cell wall protein Capsicum annuum senescence-delaying 1 (CaSD1) delays senescence and induces trichome formation in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunyoung; Yeom, Seon-In; Jo, Sunghwan; Jeong, Heejin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Choi, Doil

    2012-04-01

    Secreted proteins are known to have multiple roles in plant development, metabolism, and stress response. In a previous study to understand the roles of secreted proteins, Capsicum annuum secreted proteins (CaS) were isolated by yeast secretion trap. Among the secreted proteins, we further characterized Capsicum annuum senescence-delaying 1 (CaSD1), a gene encoding a novel secreted protein that is present only in the genus Capsicum. The deduced CaSD1 contains multiple repeats of the amino acid sequence KPPIHNHKPTDYDRS. Interestingly, the number of repeats varied among cultivars and species in the Capsicum genus. CaSD1 is constitutively expressed in roots, and Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaSD1 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves resulted in delayed senescence with a dramatically increased number of trichomes and enlarged epidermal cells. Furthermore, senescence- and cell division-related genes were differentially regulated by CaSD1-overexpressing plants. These observations imply that the pepper-specific cell wall protein CaSD1 plays roles in plant growth and development by regulating cell division and differentiation.

  4. A paradox of cadmium: a carcinogen that impairs the capability of human breast cancer cells to induce angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Punzi, Tiziana; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium, a highly persistent heavy metal, has been categorized as a human carcinogen. Even though it is known that cadmium acts as estrogens in breast cancer cells, several studies failed to demonstrate whether cadmium is a causal factor for breast cancer. The lack of a strong association between cadmium and breast cancer could be found in the antiangiogenic properties of this heavy metal, which might counteract its carcinogenic properties in the progression of breast cancer. In this study, we exposed estrogen-responsive breast cancer cells to subtoxic levels of cadmium, and we evaluated their angiogenic potential using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay. Exposure of breast cancer cells to subtoxic levels of cadmium significantly inhibited the angiogenic potential of the breast cancer cell line, suggesting the possibility that cadmium might negatively regulate the production of proangiogenic factors in breast cancer cells. Our results suggest that cadmium might exert a paradoxical effect in breast cancer: on the one hand, it could promote carcinogenesis, and, on the other hand, it could delay the onset of tumors by inhibiting breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis.

  5. Chronic mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition: preventing cancer to delay aging, or vice versa?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Zelton Dave; Curiel, Tyler Jay; Livi, Carolina Becker

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and aging appear to be inexorably linked, yet approaches to ameliorate them in concert are lacking. Although not (easily) feasible in humans, years of preclinical research show that diet and growth factor restriction each successfully address cancer and aging together. Chronic treatment of genetically heterogeneous mice with an enteric formulation of rapamycin (eRapa) extended maximum lifespan of both genders when started in mid or late life. In part, cancer amelioration in treated mice suggested that long-term eRapa, like diet restriction, could be a pharmacological approach feasible for use in the clinic. We review the current understanding of the role of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in cancer and aging. We also discuss the tumor immune surveillance system, and the need for a better understanding of its responses to mTOR inhibitors. We also address the issue of the misperception that rapamycin is a potent immunosuppressant. Finally, we review the current state of mTOR inhibitors in the cancer clinic. Because of the burgeoning elderly population most at risk for cancer, there is a great need for our eRapa findings to be a proof of concept for the development of new and more comprehensive approaches to cancer prevention that are safe and also mitigate other deleterious effects of aging.

  6. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Stuart C; Metcalf, Robert L; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P E; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Richard E B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Rothwell, Dominic G; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2016-11-09

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form 'endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (Pcisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in ovarian cancer cell lines,RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry were used to detect the expression of COX-2 in 5 ovarian cancer cell lines. The expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein was detected in all 5 cell lines. It is suggested that COX-2 is expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, which provides a basis for the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Brian [Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 7416, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Rochefort, Holly [Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, HCT 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Goldkorn, Amir, E-mail: agoldkor@usc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 3440, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  9. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Hu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  10. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  11. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  12. Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    comprised of fibroblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes, which collectively form the mammary fat pad . Breast cancer originates from subversions of...luminal epithelial cells embedded in a complex stromal matrix (‘mammary fat pad ’) comprised predominantly of fibroblasts, adipocytes and macrophages (Fig. 1...report, we showed that limited exposure (i.e., in utero and lactational only) of female rat offspring to a maternal diet containing soy protein isolate

  13. Current therapy of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the most important recent clinical trials on the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Two randomized studies addressing the timing of thoracic radiotherapy in limited stage SCLC are discussed. In the smaller of the two studies (n = 103), a survival benefit was associated...

  14. Forcing Cancer Cells to Commit Suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Mees, Gilles; Peeters, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis plays a crucial role in the normal development, homeostasis of multicellular organisms, carcinogenic process, and response of cancer cells to anticancer drugs. It is a genetically strictly regulated process, controlled by the balance between pro-and antiapoptotic proteins. Resistance to st

  15. Low concentrations of nitric oxide delay the differentiation of embryonic stem cells and promote their survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedo, J R; Tapia-Limonchi, R; Mora-Castilla, S; Cahuana, G M; Hmadcha, A; Martin, F; Bedoya, F J; Soria, B

    2010-10-07

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intracellular messenger in several cell systems, but its contribution to embryonic stem cell (ESC) biology has not been characterized. Exposure of ESCs to low concentrations (2-20 μM) of the NO donor diethylenetriamine NO adduct confers protection from apoptosis elicited by leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) withdrawal. NO blocked caspase 3 activation, PARP degradation, downregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes Casp7, Casp9, Bax and Bak1 and upregulation of the anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 111, Bcl-2 and Birc6. These effects were also observed in cells overexpressing eNOS. Exposure of LIF-deprived mESCs to low NO prevented the loss of expression of self-renewal genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) and the SSEA marker. Moreover, NO blocked the differentiation process promoted by the absence of LIF and bFGF in mouse and human ESCs. NO treatment decreased the expression of differentiation markers, such as Brachyury, Gata6 and Gata4. Constitutive overexpression of eNOS in cells exposed to LIF deprivation maintained the expression of self-renewal markers, whereas the differentiation genes were repressed. These effects were reversed by addition of the NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Altogether, the data suggest that low NO has a role in the regulation of ESC differentiation by delaying the entry into differentiation, arresting the loss of self-renewal markers and promoting cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis.

  16. Low concentrations of nitric oxide delay the differentiation of embryonic stem cells and promote their survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedo, J R; Tapia-Limonchi, R; Mora-Castilla, S; Cahuana, G M; Hmadcha, A; Martin, F; Bedoya, F J; Soria, B

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intracellular messenger in several cell systems, but its contribution to embryonic stem cell (ESC) biology has not been characterized. Exposure of ESCs to low concentrations (2–20 μM) of the NO donor diethylenetriamine NO adduct confers protection from apoptosis elicited by leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) withdrawal. NO blocked caspase 3 activation, PARP degradation, downregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes Casp7, Casp9, Bax and Bak1 and upregulation of the anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2 111, Bcl-2 and Birc6. These effects were also observed in cells overexpressing eNOS. Exposure of LIF-deprived mESCs to low NO prevented the loss of expression of self-renewal genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) and the SSEA marker. Moreover, NO blocked the differentiation process promoted by the absence of LIF and bFGF in mouse and human ESCs. NO treatment decreased the expression of differentiation markers, such as Brachyury, Gata6 and Gata4. Constitutive overexpression of eNOS in cells exposed to LIF deprivation maintained the expression of self-renewal markers, whereas the differentiation genes were repressed. These effects were reversed by addition of the NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Altogether, the data suggest that low NO has a role in the regulation of ESC differentiation by delaying the entry into differentiation, arresting the loss of self-renewal markers and promoting cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:21368853

  17. Stemness is derived from thyroid cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng eMa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs. Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre. This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells which do not express TPO.Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15 and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6 week old BRAFV600E mice. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a derived cancer thyroid cell line in which overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of vimentin expression and up regulation of stemness markers Oct4, Rex1, CD15 with enhanced migration ability of the cells. Conclusions: Our findings support our earlier hypothesis that stemness in thyroid cancer is derived via EMT rather than from resident thyroid stem cells. In mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre the neoplastic changes were dependent on thyroid cell differentiation and the onset of stemness must have been derived from differentiated thyroid epithelial cells.

  18. Spontaneous cancer-stromal cell fusion as a mechanism of prostate cancer androgen-independent progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxiang Wang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human prostate cancer cells are capable of acquiring malignant attributes through interaction with stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment, while the interacting stromal cells can also become affected with both phenotypic and genotypic alterations. This study used a co-culture model to investigate the mechanism underlying the co-evolution of cancer and stromal cells. Red fluorescent androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells were cultured with a matched pair of normal and cancer-associated prostate myofibroblast cells to simulate cancer-stromal interaction, and cellular changes in the co-culture were documented by tracking the red fluorescence. We found frequent spontaneous fusions between cancer and stromal cells throughout the co-culture. In colony formation assays assessing the fate of the hybrid cells, most of the cancer-stromal fusion hybrids remained growth-arrested and eventually perished. However, some of the hybrids survived to form colonies from the co-culture with cancer-associated stromal cells. These derivative clones showed genomic alterations together with androgen-independent phenotype. The results from this study reveal that prostate cancer cells are fusogenic, and cancer-stromal interaction can lead to spontaneous fusion between the two cell types. While a cancer-stromal fusion strategy may allow the stromal compartment to annihilate invading cancer cells, certain cancer-stromal hybrids with increased survival capability may escape annihilation to form a derivative cancer cell population with an altered genotype and increased malignancy. Cancer-stromal fusion thus lays a foundation for an incessant co-evolution between cancer and the cancer-associated stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  19. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinthalapally V Rao; Altaf Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of allcancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressivetreatment. Recently, there have been important advancesin the molecular, pathological and biological understandingof pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recentnew targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeuticcombinations, no treatment option is viable in patients withadvanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to targetprogression of PC is of intense interest. A small populationof pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been foundto be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation,progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recentlyachieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors,including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads tofocus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. Thefocus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention andtreatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salientdevelopments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here,we provide a review of current updates and new insightson the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression withspecial emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathwaysaltered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention andtreatment of PC.

  20. Enrichment and Function Research of Large Cell Lung Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke YUE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There are no universal method to recognize and screen for lung cancer stem cell markers and indicators. Commonly used methods are flow Cytometry and learning from other cancer stem cell sorting tags to sort lung cancer stem cells. But this method has low specificity screening, the workload is huge. In this study, Serum-free suspension culture was used to enrich lung cancer stem cells, and explore method for lung cancer stem cell screening. Methods Human large lung cancer cell line-L9981 was cultured in serum-free and growth factors added medium, and spheres were obtained. Then the morphological differences of sphere cells and adherent L9981 cells cultured in serum-containing mediums are observed. Cell proliferation was analyzed by Vi-cell viability analyzer; invasion ability was tested by transwell assay; and in vivo tumorigenicity of the two groups of cells was studied in nude mouse. Results Compared with adherent L9981 cells cultured in serum-containing mediums, cells cultured in serum-free medium display sphere appearance. Doubling time of adherent cells and sphere cells are (56.05±1.95 h and (33.00±1.44 h respectively; Spheroid cells had higher invasion and tumorigenicity ability, 5 times and 20 times respectively, than adherent cells. Conclusion Suspension cultured L9981 in Serum-free medium could form spheroid populations. Cells in spheres had higher ability of invasion and Tumorigenicity than adherent L9981 cells. These results indicated spheroid L9981 cells contained enriched lung cancer stem cells, and Serum-free suspension culture can be a candidate method for enriching lung cancer stem cell.

  1. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by the delay between Toll-like receptor agonist injection and transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayeb, Rahma; Tamagne, Marie; Bierling, Philippe; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Vingert, Benoît

    2016-02-01

    Murine models of red blood cell transfusion show that inflammation associated with viruses or methylated DNA promotes red blood cell alloimmunization. In vaccination studies, the intensity of antigen-specific responses depends on the delay between antigen and adjuvant administration, with a short delay limiting immune responses. In mouse models of alloimmunization, the delay between the injection of Toll-like receptor agonists and transfusion is usually short. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of Toll-like receptor 3 agonist administration affects red blood cell alloimmunization. Poly(I:C), a Toll-like receptor 3 agonist, was administered to B10BR mice at various time points before the transfusion of HEL-expressing red blood cells. For each time point, we measured the activation of splenic HEL-presenting dendritic cells, HEL-specific CD4(+) T cells and anti-HEL antibodies in serum. The phenotype of activated immune cells depended on the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-dependent inflammation. The production of anti-HEL antibodies was highest when transfusion occurred 7 days after agonist injection. The proportion of HEL-presenting CD8α(+) dendritic cells producing interleukin-12 was highest in mice injected with poly(I:C) 3 days before transfusion. Although the number of early-induced HEL-specific CD4(+) T cells was similar between groups, a high proportion of these cells expressed CD134, CD40 and CD44 in mice injected with poly(I:C) 7 days before transfusion. This study clearly shows that the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-induced inflammation influences the immune response to transfused red blood cells.

  2. The depletion of Interleukin-8 causes cell cycle arrest and increases the efficacy of docetaxel in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Nan [Breast Disease Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Liu-Hua [Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Ye, Run-Yi [Breast Disease Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Ying, E-mail: frostlin@hotmail.com [Breast Disease Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Shen-Ming, E-mail: shenmingwang@hotmail.com [Breast Disease Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► IL-8 depletion affects cell cycle distribution. ► Intrinsic IL-8 mediates breast cancer cell migration and invasion. ► IL-8 siRNA down regulates key factors that control survival and metastatic pathway. ► IL-8 depletion reduces integrin β3 expression. ► IL-8 depletion increases the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. -- Abstract: IL-8 is a multi-functional pro-inflammatory chemokine, which is highly expressed in cancers, such as ER-negative breast cancer. The present study demonstrates the pervasive role of IL-8 in the malignant progression of ER-negative breast cancer. IL-8 siRNA inhibited proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle progression in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. IL-8 silencing resulted in the upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p27, the downregulation of cyclin D1, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Akt and NF-κB activities. IL-8 depletion also increased the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. These results indicate a role for IL-8 in promoting tumor cell survival and resistance to docetaxel and highlight the potential therapeutic significance of IL-8 depletion in ER-negative breast cancer patients.

  3. Differential Cytotoxic Potential of Silver Nanoparticles in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells and Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jung Choi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis postulates that cancer cells are composed of hierarchically-organized subpopulations of cells with distinct phenotypes and tumorigenic capacities. As a result, CSCs have been suggested as a source of disease recurrence. Recently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been used as antimicrobial, disinfectant, and antitumor agents. However, there is no study reporting the effects of AgNPs on ovarian cancer stem cells (OvCSCs. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of AgNPs and their mechanism of causing cell death in A2780 (human ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs derived from A2780. In order to examine these effects, OvCSCs were isolated and characterized using positive CSC markers including aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and CD133 by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. The anticancer properties of the AgNPs were evaluated by assessing cell viability, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and mitochondrial membrane potential (mt-MP. The inhibitory effect of AgNPs on the growth of ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs was evaluated using a clonogenic assay. Following 1–2 weeks of incubation with the AgNPs, the numbers of A2780 (bulk cells and ALDH+/CD133+ colonies were significantly reduced. The expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes was measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Our observations showed that treatment with AgNPs resulted in severe cytotoxicity in both ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs. In particular, AgNPs showed significant cytotoxic potential in ALDH+/CD133+ subpopulations of cells compared with other subpopulation of cells and also human ovarian cancer cells (bulk cells. These findings suggest that AgNPs can be utilized in the development of novel nanotherapeutic molecules for the treatment of ovarian cancers by specific targeting of the ALDH+/CD133+ subpopulation of cells.

  4. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  5. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  6. Implications of cancer stem cell theory for cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S; Schwartz, Steven J; Sun, Duxin

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anticancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anticancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine and vitamin D(3), are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor-initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival.

  7. Verrucous Squamous Cell Cancer in the Esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeland, Charlotte; Achiam, Michael P; Federspiel, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma is a rare, slow-growing type of squamous cell cancer. Fewer than 50 patients with verrucous carcinoma in the esophagus have been described worldwide. In 2014, two male patients were diagnosed with verrucous carcinoma in the distal part of the esophagus. The endoscopic...... examinations showed a similar wart-like, white, irregular mucosa in both cases. The diagnosis was difficult to make since all biopsies taken from the affected area showed no malignancy. This cancer type has a relatively good prognosis when the diagnosis is finally obtained. Both our patients presented...

  8. Tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells possess cancer stem-like cell properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui; ZHANG Heng-wei; SUN Xian-fu; GUO Xu-hui; HE Ya-ning; CUI Shu-de; FAN Qing-xia

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cause of cancer recurrence because they are resistant to conventional therapy and contribute to cancer growth and metastasis.Endocrinotherapy is the most common breast cancer therapy and acquired tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is the main reason for endocrinotherapy failure during such therapy.Although acquired resistance to endocrine treatment has been extensively studied,the underlying mechanisms are unclear.We hypothesized that breast CSCs played an important role in TAM-induced resistance during breast cancer therapy.Therefore,we investigated the biological characteristics of TAM-resistant (TAM-R) breast cancer cells.Methods Mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity of wild-type (WT) and TAM-R MCF7 cells were tested by a mammosphere assay and mouse tumor xenografts respectively.Stem-cell markers (SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were tested by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR.Morphological observation was performed to characterize EMT.Results After induction of TAM resistance,TAM-R MCF7 cells exhibited increased proliferation in the presence of TAM compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05),indicating enhanced TAM resistance of TAM-R MCF7 cells compared to that of WT MCF7 cells.TAM-R MCF7 cells showed enhanced mammosphere formation and tumorigenicity in nude mice compared to that of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.01),demonstrating the elevated CSC properties of TAM-R MCF7 cells.Consistently,qRT-PCR revealed that TAM-R MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of stem cell markers including SOX-2,OCT-4,and CD133,compared to those of WT MCF7 cells (P <0.05).Morphologically,TAM-R MCF7 cells showed a fibroblastic phenotype,but WT MCF7 cells were epithelial-like.After induction of TAM resistance,qRT-PCR indicated that MCF7 cells expressed increased mRNA levels of Snail,vimentin,and N-cadherin and decreased levels of E-cadherin,which are considered as EMT characteristics (P <0

  9. Metformin Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Cycle Arrest by Upregulating MicroRNA34a in Renal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Halei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Le; Yang, Fan; Tang, Dahai; Zhang, Kebin

    2017-01-01

    Background Metformin is a widely used biguanide drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been revaluated as a potential anti-cancer drug with promising activity in various tumors. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the suppression of cancer cells by metformin remain not well understood. Material/Methods In this study, human renal cell carcinoma cell line ACHN was used to investigate the anti-proliferation effect of metformin. A cell counting kit-8 assay was used to detect the cell viability. The cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclin D1 and p27KIP1 was detected by Western blot. The underlying mechanism involving miRNA34a was further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and transfection with miRNA inhibitor specific for miRNA34a in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. Results Metformin could significantly inhibit the proliferation of ACHN cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the results showed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest and delayed entry into S phase in ACHN cells. It was shown that metformin downregulates the expression of cyclin D1 and increases the p27KIP1 level. Furthermore, metformin increased ACHN cell death. Lastly, miRNA34a was found to be upregulated by metformin in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that inhibition of miRNA34a could partially attenuate the suppressive effect of metformin on renal cancer cell proliferation. Conclusions The study data revealed that metformin induced cell growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest partially by upregulating miRNA34a in renal cancer cells. PMID:28045889

  10. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; E; Norton; Kirsten; A; Ward-Hartstonge; Edward; S; Taylor; Roslyn; A; Kemp

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, par-ticularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship betweencancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  11. Dendritic cell-based vaccine for pancreatic cancer in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masato Okamoto; Masanori Kobayashi; Yoshikazu Yonemitsu; Shigeo Koido; Sadamu Homma

    2016-01-01

    "Vaccell" is a dendritic cell(DC)-based cancer vaccine which has been established in Japan. The DCs play central roles in deciding the direction of host immune reactions as well as antigen presentation. We have demonstrated that DCs treated with a streptococcal immune adjuvant OK-432, produce interleukin-12, induce Th1-dominant state, and elicit anti-tumor effects, more powerful than those treated with the known DCmaturating factors. We therefore decided to mature DCs by the OK-432 for making an effective DC vaccine, Vaccell. The 255 patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer who received standard chemotherapy combined with DC vaccines, were analyzed retrospectively. Survival time of the patients with positive delayed type hypersensitivity(DTH) skin reaction was significantly prolonged as compared with that of the patients with negative DTH. The findings strongly suggest that there may be "Responders" for the DC vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. We next conducted a smallscale prospective clinical study. In this trial, we pulsed HLA class Ⅱ-restricted WT1 peptide(WT1-Ⅱ) in addition to HLA class Ⅰ-restricted peptide(WT1-Ⅰ) into the DCs. Survival of the patients received WT1-Ⅰ and-Ⅱ pulsed DC vaccine was significantly extended as compared to that of the patients received DCs pulsed with WT1-Ⅰ or WT1-Ⅱ alone. Furthermore, WT1-specific DTH positive patients showed significantly improved the overall survival as well as progressionfree survival as compared to the DTH negative patients. The activation of antigen-specific immune responses by DC vaccine in combination with standard chemotherapy may be associated with a good clinical outcome in advanced pancreatic cancer. We are now planning a pivotal study of the Vaccell in appropriate protocols in Japan.

  12. Younger women's experiences of deciding against delayed breast reconstruction post-mastectomy following breast cancer: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Fiona; Archer, Stephanie; Montague, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Most women do not reconstruct their breast(s) post-mastectomy. The experiences of younger women who maintain this decision, although important to understand, are largely absent in the research literature. This interview-based study uses interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the experiences of six women, diagnosed with primary breast cancer in their 30s/40s, who decided against delayed reconstruction. Findings reported here focus on one superordinate theme (decision-making) from a larger analysis, illustrating that the women's drive to survive clearly influenced their initial decision-making process. Their tenacity in maintaining their decision is highlighted, despite non-reconstruction sometimes being presented negatively by medical teams. Patient-centred support recommendations are made.

  13. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  14. A Stochastic Model for Cancer Stem Cell Origin in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Christine; Fohrer, Helene; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Lewis, Dale W.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Gamblin, T. Clark; Geller, David A.; Lagasse, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Human cancers have been found to include transformed stem cells that may drive cancer progression to metastasis. Here we report that metastatic colon cancer contains clonally derived tumor cells with all of the critical properties expected of stem cells, including self-renewal and to the ability to differentiate into mature colon cells. Additionally, when injected into mice, these cells initiated tumors that closely resemble human cancer. Karyotype analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells expressed many consistent (clonal), along with unique chromosomal aberrations, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in the cancer stem cells. Thus, this new model for cancer origin and metastatic progression includes features of both the hierarchical model for cancerous stem cells and the stochastic model, driven by the observation of chromosomal instability. PMID:18757407

  15. Stiffness of cancer cells measured with an AFM indentation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Iwata, Mayumi

    2015-09-01

    The stiffness of cancer cells and its changes during metastasis are very important for understanding the pathophysiology of cancer cells and the mechanisms of metastasis of cancer. As the first step of the studies on the mechanics of cancer cells during metastasis, we determined the elasticity and stiffness of cancer cells with an indentation method using an atomic force microscope (AFM), and compared with those of normal cells. In most of the past AFM studies, Young׳s elastic moduli of cells have been calculated from force-indentation data using Hertzian model. As this model is based on several important assumptions including infinitesimal strain and Hooke׳s linear stress-strain law, in the exact sense it cannot be applied to cells that deform very largely and nonlinearly. To overcome this problem, we previously proposed an equation F=a[exp(bδ)-1] to describe relations between force (F) and indentation (δ), where a and b are parameters relating with cellular stiffness. In the present study, we applied this method to cancer cells instead of Young׳s elastic modulus. The conclusions obtained are: 1) AFM indentation test data of cancer cells can be very well described by the above equation, 2) cancer cells are softer than normal cells, and 3) there are no significant locational differences in the stiffness of cancer cells between the central and the peripheral regions. These methods and results are useful for studying the mechanics of cancer cells and the mechanisms of metastasis.

  16. Primary cultures of human colon cancer as a model to study cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, Sergey; Danilova, Anna; Raskin, Grigory; Petrov, Nikolai; Bajenova, Olga; O'Brien, Stephen J; Tomilin, Alexey; Tolkunova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The principal cause of death in cancer involves tumor progression and metastasis. Since only a small proportion of the primary tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are the most aggressive, have the capacity to metastasize and display properties of stem cells, it is imperative to characterize the gene expression of diagnostic markers and to evaluate the drug sensitivity in the CSCs themselves. Here, we have examined the key genes that are involved in the progression of colorectal cancer and are expressed in cancer stem cells. Primary cultures of colorectal cancer cells from a patient's tumors were studied using the flow cytometry and cytological methods. We have evaluated the clinical and stem cell marker expression in these cells, their resistance to 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan, and the ability of cells to form tumors in mice. The data shows the role of stem cell marker Oct4 in the resistance of primary colorectal cancer tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil.

  17. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  18. Synergistic effect between amoxicillin and TLR ligands on dendritic cells from amoxicillin-delayed allergic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Sanchez-Quintero

    Full Text Available Amoxicillin, a low-molecular-weight compound, is able to interact with dendritic cells inducing semi-maturation in vitro. Specific antigens and TLR ligands can synergistically interact with dendritic cells (DC, leading to complete maturation and more efficient T-cell stimulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the synergistic effect of amoxicillin and the TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively in TLR expression, DC maturation and specific T-cell response in patients with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH reactions to amoxicillin. Monocyte-derived DC from 15 patients with DTH to amoxicillin and 15 controls were cultured with amoxicillin in the presence or absence of TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively. We studied TLR1-9 gene expression by RT-qPCR, and DC maturation, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. DC from both patients and controls expressed all TLRs except TLR9. The amoxicillin plus TLR2/4 or TLR7/8 ligands showed significant differences, mainly in patients: AX+PAM+LPS induced a decrease in TLR2 and AX+R848 in TLR2, 4, 7 and 8 mRNA levels. AX+PAM+LPS significantly increased the percentage of maturation in patients (75% vs. controls (40% (p=0.036 and T-cell proliferation (80.7% vs. 27.3% of cases; p=0.001. Moreover, the combinations AX+PAM+LPS and AX+R848 produced a significant increase in IL-12p70 during both DC maturation and T-cell proliferation. These results indicate that in amoxicillin-induced maculopapular exanthema, the presence of different TLR agonists could be critical for the induction of the innate and adaptive immune responses and this should be taken into account when evaluating allergic reactions to these drugs.

  19. Guidelines on renal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickisch, G; Carballido, J; Hellsten, S; Schuize, H; Mensink, H

    2001-01-01

    Objectives., On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), Guidelines for Diagnosis, Therapy and. Follow Up of Renal. Cell Carcinoma Patients were established. Criteria for recommendations were evidence based and included aspects of cost-effectiveness and clinical feasibility. Method: A sy

  20. Microchimeric Cells, Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Deniz Taştemir; Demirhan, Osman; Abat, Deniz; Demirberk, Bülent; Tunç, Erdal; Kuleci, Sedat

    2015-09-01

    The phenomenon of feta-maternal microchimerisms inspires numerous questions. Many questions remain to be answered regarding this new avenue of genetics. The X and Y chromosomes have been associated with malignancy in different types of human tumors. We aimed to investigate the numerical aberrations of chromosomes X and Y in lung cancer (LC) and bladder cancer (BC) and review recent evidence for possible roles of microchimeric cells (McCs) in these cancers. We carried out cytogenetic analysis of the tumor and blood sampling in 52 cases of people with BC and LC, and also with 30 healthy people. A total of 48 (92.3 %) of the patients revealed sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). A total SCAs was found in 9.8 % of 2282 cells that were analyzed as one or more cells in each case. The 68 and 95 SCAs were found in the 1952 (8.4 %) cells in peripheral blood, and 41 and 19 SCAs in the 330 (18.2 %) cells in the tumoral tissues respectively. There was a significant difference in the frequencies of SCAs between the patients and the control groups determined by the Fischer's Exact Test (p chromosome monosomies. Largely a Y chromosome loss was present in 77.8 % of the men, and the 47, XXY karyotype was found in 33.3 % of them. The second most common SCA was monosomy X, and was found in 71.4 % of the women. McCs were observed in 26.9 % of the 52 patients, and the frequencies of McCs were higher in the blood than in the tissues (p aneuploidies of X and Y chromosomes play a role in the pathogenesis of cancers.

  1. American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) extract affects human prostate cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest by modulating expression of cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déziel, Bob; MacPhee, James; Patel, Kunal; Catalli, Adriana; Kulka, Marianna; Neto, Catherine; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Hurta, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, and its prevalence is expected to increase appreciably in the coming decades. As such, more research is necessary to understand the etiology, progression and possible preventative measures to delay or to stop the development of this disease. Recently, there has been interest in examining the effects of whole extracts from commonly harvested crops on the behaviour and progression of cancer. Here, we describe the effects of whole cranberry extract (WCE) on the behaviour of DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Following treatment of DU145 human prostate cancer cells with 10, 25 and 50 μg ml⁻¹ of WCE, respectively for 6 h, WCE significantly decreased the cellular viability of DU145 cells. WCE also decreased the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle following treatment of cells with 25 and 50 μg ml⁻¹ treatment of WCE for 6 h. These alterations in cell cycle were associated with changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins and other cell cycle associated proteins. WCE decreased the expression of CDK4, cyclin A, cyclin B1, cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and increased the expression of p27. Changes in p16(INK4a) and pRBp107 protein expression levels also were evident, however, the changes noted in p16(INK4a) and pRBp107 protein expression levels were not statistically significant. These findings demonstrate that phytochemical extracts from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) can affect the behaviour of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and further support the potential health benefits associated with cranberries.

  2. Tumoral stem cell reprogramming as a driver of cancer: Theory, biological models, implications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Hauer, Julia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Ingenhag, Deborah; Rodríguez-Meira, Alba; Auer, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a clonal malignant disease originated in a single cell and characterized by the accumulation of partially differentiated cells that are phenotypically reminiscent of normal stages of differentiation. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumor cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that cancer stem cells could arise through a tumor stem cell reprogramming mechanism, suggesting that genetic lesions that initiate the cancer process might be dispensable for tumor progression and maintenance. This review addresses the impact of these results toward a better understanding of cancer development and proposes new approaches to treat cancer in the future.

  3. Induced mutations in tomato SlExp1 alter cell wall metabolism and delay fruit softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoia, Silvia; Boualem, Adnane; Marcel, Fabien; Troadec, Christelle; Quemener, Bernard; Cellini, Francesco; Petrozza, Angelo; Vigouroux, Jacqueline; Lahaye, Marc; Carriero, Filomena; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening and softening are key traits for many fleshy fruit. Since cell walls play a key role in the softening process, expansins have been investigated to control fruit over ripening and deterioration. In tomato, expression of Expansin 1 gene, SlExp1, during fruit ripening was associated with fruit softening. To engineer tomato plants with long shelf life, we screened for mutant plants impaired in SlExp1 function. Characterization of two induced mutations, Slexp1-6_W211S, and Slexp1-7_Q213Stop, showed that SlExp1 loss of function leads to enhanced fruit firmness and delayed fruit ripening. Analysis of cell wall polysaccharide composition of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant pointed out significant differences for uronic acid, neutral sugar and total sugar contents. Hemicelluloses chemistry analysis by endo-β-1,4-d-glucanase hydrolysis and MALDI-TOF spectrometry revealed that xyloglucan structures were affected in the fruit pericarp of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant. Altogether, these results demonstrated that SlExp1 loss of function mutants yield firmer and late ripening fruits through modification of hemicellulose structure. These SlExp1 mutants represent good tools for breeding long shelf life tomato lines with contrasted fruit texture as well as for the understanding of the cell wall polysaccharide assembly dynamics in fleshy fruits.

  4. Therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jeong Kim; Elizabeth L Siegler; Natnaree Siriwon; Pin Wang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic limitations of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs present a challenge for cancer therapy; these shortcomings are largely attributed to the ability of cancer cells to repopulate and metastasize after initial therapies. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have a crucial impact in current shortcomings of cancer therapy because they are largely responsible for tumor initiation, relapse, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the properties and mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatments is necessary to improve patient outcomes and survival rates. In this review, the authors characterize and compare different CSC-speciifc biomarkers that are present in various types of tumors. We further discuss multiple targeting approaches currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show great potential for targeting CSCs. This review discusses numerous strategies to eliminate CSCs by targeting surface biomarkers, regulating CSC-associated oncogenes and signaling pathways, inhibiting drug-eflfux pumps involved in drug resistance, modulating the tumor microenvironment and immune system, and applying drug combination therapy using nanomedicine.

  5. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Bin, E-mail: yanbin@mercyhealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Mercy Cancer Center, Mercy Medical Center-North Iowa, Mason City, IA 50401 (United States); Ouyang, Ruoyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China); Huang, Chenghui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Department of Oncology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Xinagya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Liu, Franklin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Neill, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39213 (United States); Li, Chuanyuan [Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  6. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  7. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  8. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-01

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer.

  9. Raman spectra of single cell from gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-Ling Yan; Rui-Xin Dong; Lei Zhang; Xue-Jun Zhang; Zong-Wang Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the difference between cancer cells and normal cells, we investigated the Raman spectra of singlecells from gastrointestinal cancer patients. METHODS: All samples were obtained from 30 diagnosed as gastrointestinal cancer patients. The flesh tumor specimen is located in the center of tumor tissue, while the normal ones were 5 cm away from the outside tumor section. The imprint was put under the microscope and a single cell was chosen for Raman measurement. All spectra were collected at confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy (British Renishaw) with NIR 780 nm laser.RESULTS: We measured the Raman spectra of several cells from gastrointestinal cancer patients. The result shows that there exists the strong line at 1 002/cm with less half-width assigned to the phenylalanine in several cells. The Raman lines of white cell were lower and less, while those of red cell were not only higher in intensity and more abundant, but also had a parti cular C-N breathing stretching band of pyrrole ring at 1 620-1 540/cm. The line at 1 084/cm assigned to phosphate backbone of DNA became obviously weaker in cancer cell. The Raman spectra of stomach cancer cells were similar to those of normal cells, but the Raman intensity of cancer cells was much lower than that of normal cells, and even some lines disappear. The lines of enteric cancer cells became weaker than spectra above and many lines disappeared, and the cancer cells in different position had different fluorescence intensity.CONCLUSION: The Raman spectra of several cells from cancer patients show that the structural changes of cancer cells happen and many bonds rupture so that the biological function of cells are lost. The results indicate that Raman spectra can offer the experiment basis for the cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Induction of iPS cells and of cancer stem cells: the stem cell or reprogramming hypothesis of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2014-01-01

    This article as designed to examine whether the "stoichiometric" or "elite models" of the origin of the "induced pluripotent stem" (iPS) cells fits some experiment facts from the developmental biology of adult stem cells and from the field of cancer research. In brief, since the evidence presented to support the stoichiometric model failed to recognize the factual existence of adult organ specific stem cells, the model has not been rigorously tested. In addition, the demonstration of a subset of cells (MUSE cells) in normal primary in vitro cultures of human fibroblasts (the usual source of iPS cells) seems to be the origin of the iPS cells. Moreover, from the field of carcinogenesis, the "stem cell" versus "de-differentiation" or "reprogramming" hypotheses were examined. Again, using the role of glycolysis, known to be associated with the Warburg effect in cancer cells, a list of experiments showing that (a) normal stem cells, which have few mitochondria, metabolize via glycolysis; (b) the stem cells are targets for "initiation" or "immortalization" or the blockage of differentiation and apoptosis of the stem cells by "immortalizing viruses"; (c) Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), when expressed, is associated with glycolysis and therefore, must be expressed in normal adult stem cells, as well as in cancer cells; and (d) p53, depleted or rendered dysfunctional by SV40 Large T antigen, is associated with the reduction of mitochondrial function and mass and is associated with the Warburg effect. Together, these observations from the iPS and "cancer stem cell" fields support the idea that both iPS cells and cancer stem cell are derived from adult organ-specific stem cells that do not restore or switch their metabolism of glucose from oxidative metabolism to glycolysis but, rather, in both cases, the adult stem cell, which metabolizes by glycolysis, is prevented from differentiation or from metabolizing by oxidative phosphorylation.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, Ludmila; Rault, Lucie; Almeida, Sintia; Legembre, Patrick; Edmond, Valérie; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Even, Sergine; Taieb, Frédéric; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Le Loir, Yves; Berkova, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Alekseeva

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  13. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggestin...

  14. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  15. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  16. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  17. IL-33 facilitates endocrine resistance of breast cancer by inducing cancer stem cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyan; Sun, Jiaxing; Wang, Chunhong; Bu, Xiangmao; Liu, Xiangping; Mao, Yan; Wang, Haibo

    2017-02-16

    Breast cancers with estrogen receptor (ER) expressions account for the majority of all clinical cases. Due to hormone therapy with tamoxifen, prognoses of patients with ER-positive breast cancer are significantly improved. However, endocrine resistance to tamoxifen is common and inevitable, leading to compromised efficacy of hormone therapy. Herein, we identify a crucial role of IL-33 in inducing endocrine resistance of breast cancer. IL-33 overexpression in breast cancer cells results in resistance to tamoxifen-induced tumor growth inhibition, while IL-33 knockdown corrects this problem. Mechanistically, IL-33 induces breast cancer stem cell properties evidenced by mammosphere formation and xenograft tumorigenesis, as well as expression of cancer stem cell genes including ALDH1A3, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2. In breast cancer patients, higher serum IL-33 levels portend advanced clinical stages, poorly differentiated cancer cells and tumor recurrence. IL-33 expression levels in patients' freshly isolated breast cancer cells predicts tamoxifen resistance and cancer stem cell features in individual patient. Collectively, IL-33 induces endocrine resistance of breast cancer by promoting cancer stem cell properties. These findings provide novel mechanisms connecting IL-33 with cancer pathogenesis and pinpoint IL-33 as a promising target for optimizing hormone therapy in clinical practice.

  18. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kiyoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Ii, Masaaki, E-mail: masaii@art.osaka-med.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Asahi, Michio [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Azuma, Haruhito [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  19. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we...... a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors....

  20. Can a Cancer Cell Turn into a Normal Cell?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranan Gülhan Aktas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HepG2 cells, a human liver cancer cell line (hepatocellular carcinoma, are being considered as a future model for bioartificial liver studies. They have the ability to differentiate and demonstrate some features of normal liver cells. Our previous studies focused on examination of the morphological and functional properties of these cells under different extracellular environmental conditions. We have created a culture model that these cells demonstrate remarkable changes after 30 days. These changes include an increase in the cytoplasmic organelles, formation of bile canaliculi, occurrence of junctional complexes between the adjacent cells, existence of microvilli on the apical surfaces, accumulation of glycogen particles in the cytoplasm, an increase at the density of albumin labeled areas and a rise at the Na-K ATPase level on cellular membranes.

  1. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  2. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT for assessment of prostate cancer: evaluation of image quality after forced diuresis and delayed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Merseburger, Axel S. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Urology, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Urinary radiotracer excretion of {sup 68}Ga-Labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands may complicate the assessment of the prostate region and differentiation of lymph nodes from ureteral activity. The aim of this study was to assess the value of delayed imaging after forced diuresis. Sixty-six patients underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT for evaluation of prostate cancer at 60 min post-injection. In subgroups of patients, this was amended by delayed imaging after 180 min post-injection, preceded by furosemide and oral hydration early, at the time of tracer injection, or delayed, at 100 min post-injection. Urinary tracer activity within the bladder and focal ureteral activity was analyzed. After forced diuresis, linear and focal visualization of ureters was significantly reduced. After delayed furosemide, mean and peak bladder activity decreased (p < 0.001), and image quality of the prostate region improved on delayed images (p < 0.001). Early furosemide co-injection with tracer resulted in increased mean and peak bladder activity (p < 0.001) and in deteriorated image quality of the prostate region on delayed images (p = 0.008). Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT delayed imaging after forced diuresis can improve the assessment of prostate region and pelvic lymph nodes by removing excreted tracer from the lower urinary tract. (orig.)

  3. Cancer stem cell plasticity and tumor hierarchy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marina Carla Cabrera; Robert E Hollingsworth; Elaine M Hurt

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the complex process of intratumoralheterogeneity have been highly debated and differentcellular mechanisms have been hypothesized to accountfor the diversity within a tumor. The clonal evolution andcancer stem cell (CSC) models have been proposed asdrivers of this heterogeneity. However, the concept ofcancer stem cell plasticity and bidirectional conversionbetween stem and non-stem cells has added additionalcomplexity to these highly studied paradigms and may helpexplain the tumor heterogeneity observed in solid tumors.The process of cancer stem cell plasticity in which cancercells harbor the dynamic ability of shifting from a non-CSCstate to a CSC state and vice versa may be modulated byspecific microenvironmental signals and cellular interactionsarising in the tumor niche. In addition to promoting CSCplasticity, these interactions may contribute to the cellulartransformation of tumor cells and affect response tochemotherapeutic and radiation treatments by providingCSCs protection from these agents. Herein, we review theliterature in support of this dynamic CSC state, discussthe effectors of plasticity, and examine their role in thedevelopment and treatment of cancer.

  4. Cavitary Lung Cancer Lined with Normal Bronchial Epithelium and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Reports of cavitary lung cancer are not uncommon, and the cavity generally contains either dilated bronchi or cancer cells. Recently, we encountered a surgical case of cavitary lung cancer whose cavity tended to enlarge during long-term follow-up, and was found to be lined with normal bronchial epithelium and adenocarcinoma cells.

  5. Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162415.html Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain: ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When breast cancer spreads to the brain, important molecular changes may ...

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  7. Nonequilibrium population dynamics of phenotype conversion of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Xu Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a dynamic biological process that involves distinct cancer cell subpopulations proliferating at different rates and interconverting between them. In this paper we proposed a mathematical framework of population dynamics that considers both distinctive growth rates and intercellular transitions between cancer cell populations. Our mathematical framework showed that both growth and transition influence the ratio of cancer cell subpopulations but the latter is more significant. We derived the condition that different cancer cell types can maintain distinctive subpopulations and we also explain why there always exists a stable fixed ratio after cell sorting based on putative surface markers. The cell fraction ratio can be shifted by changing either the growth rates of the subpopulations (Darwinism selection or by environment-instructed transitions (Lamarckism induction. This insight can help us to understand the dynamics of the heterogeneity of cancer cells and lead us to new strategies to overcome cancer drug resistance.

  8. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates.

  9. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  10. A delay prior to mitotic entry triggers caspase 8-dependent cell death in p53-deficient Hela and HCT-116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Victoria C; Plooster, Melissa; Leung, Jessica C; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Stathmin/Oncoprotein 18, a microtubule destabilizing protein, is required for survival of p53-deficient cells. Stathmin-depleted cells are slower to enter mitosis, but whether delayed mitotic entry triggers cell death or whether stathmin has a separate pro-survival function was unknown. To test these possibilities, we abrogated the cell cycle delay by inhibiting Wee1 in synchronized, stathmin-depleted cells and found that apoptosis was reduced to control levels. Synchronized cells treated with a 4 hour pulse of inhibitors to CDK1 or both Aurora A and PLK1 delayed mitotic entry and apoptosis was triggered only in p53-deficient cells. We did not detect mitotic defects downstream of the delayed mitotic entry, indicating that cell death is activated by a mechanism distinct from those activated by prolonged mitotic arrest. Cell death is triggered by initiator caspase 8, based on its cleavage to the active form and by rescue of viability after caspase 8 depletion or treatment with a caspase 8 inhibitor. In contrast, initiator caspase 9, activated by prolonged mitotic arrest, is not activated and is not required for apoptosis under our experimental conditions. P53 upregulates expression of cFLIPL, a protein that blocks caspase 8 activation. cFLIPL levels are lower in cells lacking p53 and these levels are reduced to a greater extent after stathmin depletion. Expression of FLAG-tagged cFLIPL in p53-deficient cells rescues them from apoptosis triggered by stathmin depletion or CDK1 inhibition during G2. These data indicate that a cell cycle delay in G2 activates caspase 8 to initiate apoptosis specifically in p53-deficient cells.

  11. Metabolic alterations in cancer cells and therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naima Hammoudi; Kausar Begam Riaz Ahmed; Celia Garcia-Prieto; Peng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an important area of research in recent years. Elucidation of the metabolic differences between cancer and normal cells and the underlying mechanisms will not only advance our understanding of fundamental cancer cell biology but also provide an important basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and novel compounds to selectively eliminate cancer cells by targeting their unique metabolism. This article reviews several important metabolic alterations in cancer cells, with an emphasis on increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and glutamine addiction, and discusses the mechanisms that may contribute to such metabolic changes. In addition, metabolic alterations in cancer stem cells, mitochondrial metabolism and its influence on drug sensitivity, and potential therapeutic strategies and agents that target cancer metabolism are also discussed.

  12. Expression of tumor antigens on primary ovarian cancer cells compared to established ovarian cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloudová, Kamila; Hromádková, Hana; Partlová, Simona; Brtnický, Tomáš; Rob, Lukáš; Bartůňková, Jiřina; Hensler, Michal; Halaška, Michael J.; Špíšek, Radek; Fialová, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In order to select a suitable combination of cancer cell lines as an appropriate source of antigens for dendritic cell-based immunotherapy of ovarian cancer, we analyzed the expression level of 21 tumor associated antigens (BIRC5, CA125, CEA, DDX43, EPCAM, FOLR1, Her-2/neu, MAGE-A1, MAGE-A2, MAGE-A3, MAGE-A4, MAGE-A6, MAGE-A10, MAGE-A12, MUC-1, NY-ESO-1, PRAME, p53, TPBG, TRT, WT1) in 4 established ovarian cancer cell lines and in primary tumor cells isolated from the high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. More than 90% of tumor samples expressed very high levels of CA125, FOLR1, EPCAM and MUC-1 and elevated levels of Her-2/neu, similarly to OVCAR-3 cell line. The combination of OV-90 and OVCAR-3 cell lines showed the highest overlap with patients' samples in the TAA expression profile. PMID:27323861

  13. Overexpression of cyclin Y in non-small cell lung cancer is associated with cancer cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY) is a key cell cycle regulator that acts as a growth factor sensor to integrate extracellular signals with the cell cycle machinery. The expression status of CCNY in lung cancer and its clinical significance remain unknown. The data indicates that CCNY may be deregulated in non-small cell lung cancer, where it may act to promote cell proliferation. These studies suggest that CCNY may be a candidate biomarker of NSCLC and a possible therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment.

  14. Increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delays caspase activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eSun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefin B (cystatin B is an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases localized in the nucleus and the cytosol. Loss-of-function mutations in the stefin B gene (CSTB gene were reported in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1. Our previous results showed that thymocytes isolated from stefin B-deficient mice are more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin (STS than the wild-type control cells. We have also shown that the increased expression of stefin B in the nucleus of T98G astrocytoma cells delayed cell cycle progression through the S phase. In the present study we examined if the nuclear or cytosolic functions of stefin B are responsible for the accelerated induction of apoptosis observed in the cells from stefin B-deficient mice. We have shown that the overexpression of stefin B in the nucleus, but not in the cytosol of astrocytoma T98G cells, delayed caspase-3 and-7 activation. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone completely inhibited caspase activation, while treatment with the inhibitor of calpains- and papain-like cathepsins (2S,3S-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester did not prevent caspase activation. We concluded that the delay of caspase activation in T98G cells overexpressing stefin B in the nucleus is independent of cathepsin inhibition.

  15. Reduced PAK1 activity sensitizes FA/BRCA-proficient breast cancer cells to PARP inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamar Cruz, Olga; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Perez-Plasencia, Carlos; Johnson, Neil; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Slifker, Michael; Renner, Catherine; Chernoff, Jonathan; Arias-Romero, Luis E

    2016-11-22

    Cells that are deficient in homologous recombination, such as those that have mutations in any of the Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA genes, are hypersensitive to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). However, FA/BRCA-deficient tumors represent a small fraction of breast cancers, which might restrict the therapeutic utility of PARP inhibitor monotherapy. The gene encoding the serine-threonine protein kinase p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) is amplified and/or overexpressed in several human cancer types including 25-30% of breast tumors. This enzyme controls many cellular processes by phosphorylating both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates. Here, we show that depletion or pharmacological inhibition of PAK1 down-regulated the expression of genes involved in the FA/BRCA pathway and compromised the ability of cells to repair DNA by Homologous Recombination (HR), promoting apoptosis and reducing colony formation. Combined inhibition of PAK1 and PARP in PAK1 overexpressing breast cancer cells had a synergistic effect, enhancing apoptosis, suppressing colony formation, and delaying tumor growth in a xenograft setting. Because reduced PAK1 activity impaired FA/BRCA function, inhibition of this kinase in PAK1 amplified and/or overexpressing breast cancer cells represents a plausible strategy for expanding the utility of PARP inhibitors to FA/BRCA-proficient cancers.

  16. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shirong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-03-20

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation.

  17. Delayed contraction of the CD8+ T cell response toward lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in mice lacking serglycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Christensen, Jan P; Sørensen, Maria R

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that the lack of serglycin proteoglycan affects secretory granule morphology and granzyme B (GrB) storage in in vitro generated CTLs. In this study, the role of serglycin during viral infection was studied by infecting wild-type (wt) mice and serglycin-deficient (SG...... response was also seen after infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. BrdU labeling of cells in vivo revealed that the delayed contraction was associated with sustained proliferation of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells in SG(-/-) mice. Moreover, wt LCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells from TCR318 transgenic mice...... expanded much more extensively in virus-infected SG(-/-) mice than in matched wt mice, indicating that the delayed contraction represents a T cell extrinsic phenomenon. In summary, the present report points to a novel, previously unrecognized role for serglycin proteoglycan in regulating the kinetics...

  18. DUAL ROLES OF CANCER CELL-EXPRESSED IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN CANCER IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the expression of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors on cancer cells has been well-established for decades, the potential roles and mechanisms of action of these cancerous antigen receptors have not been fully elucidated. A monoclonal antibody designated as RP215, which reacts specifically with the carbohydrate-associated epitope located on the heavy chain region of cancerous immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, was used as a unique probe to study the roles of antigen receptors in the immunology of cancer cells. Through extensive cell-based biological and immunological studies, it was found that both anti-antigen receptors and RP215 demonstrated similar actions on the gene regulations involved in the growth/proliferation of cancer cells, as well as on toll-like receptors involved in innate immunity. In addition, RP215-specific cancerous immunoglobulins are believed to capture or neutralize circulating antigen/antibodies which may be harmful to cancer cells within the human body. In contrast to normal B and T cells and their respective receptors in the conventional immune system, cancer cells co-express both immunoglobulins and T cell receptors and immune protection is exercised by unique mechanisms. For example, these cancer cell-expressed antigen receptors display a lack of class switching, limited hyper-mutation, aberrant glycosylations and a strong influence on the toll-like receptors of cancer cells. Therefore, it is hypothesized that both normal and cancerous immune systems may co-exist and operate simultaneously within the human body. The balance of these two immune factors for respective surveillance and protection may be relevant to the outcome of cancer immunotherapy in humans. A potential therapeutic strategy is being developed by using RP215 as a drug candidate to target cancer cells based on these observations.

  19. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Cell model of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia reveals early and delayed afterdepolarizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Kujala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC provide means to study the pathophysiology of genetic disorders. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is a malignant inherited ion channel disorder predominantly caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2. In this study the cellular characteristics of CPVT are investigated and whether the electrophysiological features of this mutation can be mimicked using iPSC -derived cardiomyocytes (CM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Spontaneously beating CMs were differentiated from iPSCs derived from a CPVT patient carrying a P2328S mutation in RyR2 and from two healthy controls. Calcium (Ca(2+ cycling and electrophysiological properties were studied by Ca(2+ imaging and patch-clamp techniques. Monophasic action potential (MAP recordings and 24h-ECGs of CPVT-P2328S patients were analyzed for the presence of afterdepolarizations. We found defects in Ca(2+ cycling and electrophysiology in CPVT CMs, reflecting the cardiac phenotype observed in the patients. Catecholaminergic stress led to abnormal Ca(2+ signaling and induced arrhythmias in CPVT CMs. CPVT CMs also displayed reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ content, indicating leakage of Ca(2+ from the SR. Patch-clamp recordings of CPVT CMs revealed both delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs during spontaneous beating and in response to adrenaline and also early afterdepolarizations (EADs during spontaneous beating, recapitulating the changes seen in MAP and 24h-ECG recordings of patients carrying the same mutation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This cell model shows aberrant Ca(2+ cycling characteristic of CPVT and in addition to DADs it displays EADs. This cell model for CPVT provides a platform to study basic pathology, to screen drugs, and to optimize drug therapy.

  1. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types.

  2. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  3. Cancer Stem Cell Biomarker Discovery Using Antibody Array Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rob; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving hundreds of pathways and numerous levels of disease progression. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence that the origins and growth rates of specific types of cancer may involve "cancer stem cells," which are defined as "cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the development of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor.(1)" Many types of cancer are now thought to harbor cancer stem cells. These cells themselves are thought to be unique in comparison to other cells types present within the tumor and to exhibit characteristics that allow for the promotion of tumorigenesis and in some cases metastasis. In addition, it is speculated that each type of cancer stem cell exhibits a unique set of molecular and biochemical markers. These markers, alone or in combination, may act as a signature for defining not only the type of cancer but also the progressive state. These biomarkers may also double as signaling entities which act autonomously or upon neighboring cancer stem cells or other cells within the local microenvironment to promote tumorigenesis. This review describes the heterogeneic properties of cancer stem cells and outlines the identification and application of biomarkers and signaling molecules defining these cells as they relate to different forms of cancer. Other examples of biomarkers and signaling molecules expressed by neighboring cells in the local tumor microenvironment are also discussed. In addition, biochemical signatures for cancer stem cell autocrine/paracrine signaling, local site recruitment, tumorigenic potential, and conversion to a stem-like phenotype are described.

  4. Transformation from non-small-cell lung cancer to small-cell lung cancer: molecular drivers and cells of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Matthew G; Niederst, Matthew J; Sequist, Lecia V; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The two broad histological subtypes of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the cause of 15% of cases, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 85% of cases and includes adenocarcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma. Although NSCLC and SCLC are commonly thought to be different diseases owing to their distinct biology and genomic abnormalities, the idea that these malignant disorders might share common cells of origin has been gaining support. This idea has been supported by the unexpected findings that a subset of NSCLCs with mutated EGFR return as SCLC when resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors develops. Additionally, other case reports have described the coexistence of NSCLC and SCLC, further challenging the commonly accepted view of their distinct lineages. Here, we summarise the published clinical observations and biology underlying tumours with combined SCLC and NSCLC histology and cancers that transform from adenocarcinoma to SCLC. We also discuss pre-clinical studies pointing to common potential cells of origin, and speculate how the distinct paths of differentiation are determined by the genomics of each disease.

  5. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  6. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  7. Mitochondria as therapeutic targets for cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Sung Song; Jeong Yu Jeong; Seung Hun Jeong; Hyoung Kyu Kim; Kyung Soo Ko; Byoung Doo Rhee; Nari Kim; Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by theirsomatic stem cells and are responsible for tumorinitiation, chemoresistance, and metastasis. Evidencefor the CSCs existence has been reported for a numberof human cancers. The CSC mitochondria have beenshown recently to be an important target for cancertreatment, but clinical significance of CSCs and theirmitochondria properties remain unclear. Mitochondriatargetedagents are considerably more effectivecompared to other agents in triggering apoptosis ofCSCs, as well as general cancer cells, via mitochondrialdysfunction. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered incancer cells because of their reliance on glycolyticintermediates, which are normally destined for oxidativephosphorylation. Therefore, inhibiting cancer-specificmodifications in mitochondrial metabolism, increasingreactive oxygen species production, or stimulatingmitochondrial permeabilization transition could bepromising new therapeutic strategies to activate celldeath in CSCs as well, as in general cancer cells. Thisreview analyzed mitochondrial function and its potentialas a therapeutic target to induce cell death in CSCs.Furthermore, combined treatment with mitochondriatargeteddrugs will be a promising strategy for thetreatment of relapsed and refractory cancer.

  8. Advanced Merkel cell cancer and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bird, B R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Merkel cell cancer (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine skin cancer occurring predominantly in elderly Caucasians. It tends to metastasize to regional lymph nodes and viscera and is sensitive to chemotherapy but recurs rapidly. AIM: To report one such case, its response to chemotherapy and briefly review the literature. METHODS: A 73-year-old male with a fungating primary lesion on his left knee and ulcerated inguinal lymph nodes was diagnosed with MCC and treated with chemotherapy. The two largest case series and reviews of case reports were summarised. RESULTS: His ulcer healed after two cycles of carboplatin and etoposide with improvement in quality of life. Overall response rates of nearly 60% to chemotherapy are reported but median survival is only nine months with metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy should be considered for fit elderly patients with MCC who have recurrent or advanced disease.

  9. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  10. How Taxol/paclitaxel kills cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Beth A

    2014-09-15

    Taxol (generic name paclitaxel) is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. It is used off-label to treat gastroesophageal, endometrial, cervical, prostate, and head and neck cancers, in addition to sarcoma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Paclitaxel has long been recognized to induce mitotic arrest, which leads to cell death in a subset of the arrested population. However, recent evidence demonstrates that intratumoral concentrations of paclitaxel are too low to cause mitotic arrest and result in multipolar divisions instead. It is hoped that this insight can now be used to develop a biomarker to identify the ∼50% of patients that will benefit from paclitaxel therapy. Here I discuss the history of paclitaxel and our recently evolved understanding of its mechanism of action.

  11. NK cell phenotypic modulation in lung cancer environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jin

    Full Text Available Nature killer (NK cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunotherapy. But it indicated that tumor cells impacted possibly on NK cell normal functions through some molecules mechanisms in tumor microenvironment.Our study analyzed the change about NK cells surface markers (NK cells receptors through immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real-time PCR, the killed function from mouse spleen NK cell and human high/low lung cancer cell line by co-culture. Furthermore we certificated the above result on the lung cancer model of SCID mouse.We showed that the infiltration of NK cells in tumor periphery was related with lung cancer patients' prognosis. And the number of NK cell infiltrating in lung cancer tissue is closely related to the pathological types, size of the primary cancer, smoking history and prognosis of the patients with lung cancer. The expression of NK cells inhibitor receptors increased remarkably in tumor micro-environment, in opposite, the expression of NK cells activated receptors decrease magnificently.The survival time of lung cancer patient was positively related to NK cell infiltration degree in lung cancer. Thus, the down-regulation of NKG2D, Ly49I and the up-regulation of NKG2A may indicate immune tolerance mechanism and facilitate metastasis in tumor environment. Our research will offer more theory for clinical strategy about tumor immunotherapy.

  12. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  13. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth G; Wailes, Elizabeth M; Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole H

    2016-02-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the US. Cancerous cells may have inadequate adhesions to the extracellular matrix and adjacent cells. Previous work has suggested that restoring these contacts may negate the cancer phenotype. This work aims to restore those contacts using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Varying concentrations of carboxylated MWNTs in water, with or without type I collagen, were dried to create a thin film upon which one of three breast cell lines were seeded: cancerous and metastatic MDA- MB-231 cells, cancerous but non-metastatic MCF7 cells, or non-cancerous MCF10A cells. Proliferation, adhesion, scratch and autophagy assays, western blots, and immunochemical staining were used to assess adhesion and E-cadherin expression. Breast cancer cells grown on a MWNT-collagen coated surface displayed increased adhesion and decreased migration which correlated with an increase in E-cadherin. This work suggests an alternative approach to cancer treatment by physically mediating the cells' microenvironment.

  14. Changes from 1992 to 2002 in the pretreatment delay for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of larynx or pharynx: a Danish nationwide survey from DAHANCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; Nielsen, Anni Linnet; Larsen, Susanne;

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark, a general impression of prolonged pretreatment delay for patients with head and neck cancer led to a nationwide study of time spans from symptom debut over first health care contact to start of treatment. Charts of consecutive new patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx...... and larynx, seen at the five Danish oncology centers in January-April 1992 and 2002, respectively, were reviewed. Of the 288 patients identified, definitive treatment was radiotherapy in 264 cases, surgery in one case. Twenty-three patients had neither surgery nor radiotherapy. Total time from first health...... care contact to start of definitive treatment was significantly longer in 2002 than in 1992 (median 70 versus 50 days, p...

  15. Selected Activities of Citrus Maxima Merr. Fruits on Human Endothelial Cells: Enhancing Cell Migration and Delaying Cellular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiwan Buachan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC. Short-term (48 h co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL. CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  16. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ (Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Innovative reporter gene systems are designed to mark quiescent or proliferating lung cancer cells (Aim 1) and then used to track and trace the dynamics of

  17. Estrogen-mediated upregulation of Noxa is associated with cell cycle progression in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wensheng; Swetzig, Wendy M; Medisetty, Rajesh; Das, Gokul M

    2011-01-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2-homology domain (BH3)-only protein reported to be a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Estrogen has been well documented to stimulate cell growth and inhibit apoptosis in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. Intriguingly, recent reports have shown that 17β-estradiol (E2) induces Noxa expression, although the mechanisms underlying E2-mediated induction of Noxa and its functional significance are unknown. Using MCF7 human breast cancer cells as an experimental model, we show that Noxa is upregulated by E2 via p53-independent processes that involve c-Myc and ERα. Experiments using small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNA) to specifically knock down p53, c-Myc, and ERα demonstrated that c-Myc and ERα, but not p53, are involved in the transcriptional upregulation of Noxa following E2 treatment. Furthermore, while E2 promoted the recruitment of c-Myc and ERα to the NOXA promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, E2 did not induce p53 recruitment. Interestingly, E2-mediated upregulation of Noxa was not associated with apoptosis. However, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Noxa resulted in cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1)-phase and significantly delayed the G(1)-to-S-phase transition following E2 treatment, indicating that Noxa expression is required for cell cycle progression in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

  18. Estrogen-mediated upregulation of Noxa is associated with cell cycle progression in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Liu

    Full Text Available Noxa is a Bcl-2-homology domain (BH3-only protein reported to be a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family. Estrogen has been well documented to stimulate cell growth and inhibit apoptosis in estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer cells. Intriguingly, recent reports have shown that 17β-estradiol (E2 induces Noxa expression, although the mechanisms underlying E2-mediated induction of Noxa and its functional significance are unknown. Using MCF7 human breast cancer cells as an experimental model, we show that Noxa is upregulated by E2 via p53-independent processes that involve c-Myc and ERα. Experiments using small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNA to specifically knock down p53, c-Myc, and ERα demonstrated that c-Myc and ERα, but not p53, are involved in the transcriptional upregulation of Noxa following E2 treatment. Furthermore, while E2 promoted the recruitment of c-Myc and ERα to the NOXA promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays, E2 did not induce p53 recruitment. Interestingly, E2-mediated upregulation of Noxa was not associated with apoptosis. However, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Noxa resulted in cell cycle arrest in G(0/G(1-phase and significantly delayed the G(1-to-S-phase transition following E2 treatment, indicating that Noxa expression is required for cell cycle progression in ER-positive breast cancer cells.

  19. Pattern of hair cell loss and delayed peripheral neuron degeneration in inner ear by a high-dose intratympanic gentamicin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintao Yu; Dalian Ding; Fengjun Wang; Haiyan Jiang; Hong Sun; Richard Salvi

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics (AmAn) and delayed peripheral ganglion neuron death in the inner ear, experimental animal models were widely used with several different approaches including AmAn systemic injections, combination treat-ment of AmAn and diuretics, or local application of AmAn. In these approaches, systemic AmAn treatment alone usually causes incomplete damage to hair cells in the inner ear. Co-administration of diuretic and AmAn can completely destroy the cochlear hair cells, but it is impossible to damage the vestibular system. Only the approach of AmAn local application can selectively eliminate most sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Therefore, AmAn local application is more suitable for studies for complete hair cell destructions in cochlear and vestibular system and the following delayed peripheral ganglion neuron death. In current studies, guinea pigs were unilaterally treated with a high concentration of gentamicin (GM, 40 mg/ml) through the tympanic membrane into the middle ear cavity. Auditory functions and vestibular functions were measured before and after GM treatment. The loss of hair cells and delayed degeneration of ganglion neurons in both cochlear and vestibular system were quantified 30 days or 60 days after treatment. The results showed that both auditory and vestibular functions were completely abolished after GM treatment. The sensory hair cells were totally missing in the cochlea, and severely destroyed in vestibular end-organs. The delayed spiral ganglion neuron death 60 days after the deafening procedure was over 50%. However, no obvious pathological changes were observed in vestibular ganglion neurons 60 days post-treatment. These results indicated that a high concentration of gentamycin delivered to the middle ear cavity can destroy most sensory hair cells in the inner ear that subsequently causes the delayed spiral ganglion neuron degeneration. This model might be useful for studies

  20. RhoC and ROCKs regulate cancer cell interactions with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Nicolas; Im, Jae Hong; Garg, Ritu; Cox, Susan; Soyer, Magali; Riou, Philippe; Colomba, Audrey; Muschel, Ruth J; Ridley, Anne J

    2015-06-01

    RhoC is a member of the Rho GTPase family that is implicated in cancer progression by stimulating cancer cell invasiveness. Here we report that RhoC regulates the interaction of cancer cells with vascular endothelial cells (ECs), a crucial step in the metastatic process. RhoC depletion by RNAi reduces PC3 prostate cancer cell adhesion to ECs, intercalation between ECs as well as transendothelial migration in vitro. Depletion of the kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2, two known RhoC downstream effectors, similarly decreases cancer interaction with ECs. RhoC also regulates the extension of protrusions made by cancer cells on vascular ECs in vivo. Transient RhoC depletion is sufficient to reduce both early PC3 cell retention in the lungs and experimental metastasis formation in vivo. Our results indicate RhoC plays a central role in cancer cell interaction with vascular ECs, which is a critical event for cancer progression.

  1. Cell migration towards CXCL12 in leukemic cells compared to breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shirley C; Goh, Poh Hui; Kudatsih, Jossie; Ncube, Sithembile; Gurung, Renu; Maxwell, Will; Mueller, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Chemotaxis or directed cell migration is mediated by signalling events initiated by binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors and the activation of a complex signalling cascade. The molecular signalling pathways involved in cell migration are important to understand cancer cell metastasis. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of CXCL12 induced cell migration and the importance of different signalling cascades that become activated by CXCR4 in leukemic cells versus breast cancer cells. We identified Src kinase as being essential for cell migration in both cancer types, with strong involvement of the Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway. We did not detect any involvement of Ras or JAK2/STAT3 in CXCL12 induced migration in Jurkat cells. Preventing PKC activation with inhibitors does not affect migration in Jurkat cells at all, unlike in the adherent breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cells. However, in both cell lines, knock down of PKCα prevents migration towards CXCL12, whereas the expression of PKCζ is less crucial for migration. PI3K activation is essential in both cell types, however LY294002 usage in MCF-7 cells does not block migration significantly. These results highlight the importance of verifying specific signalling pathways in different cell settings and with different approaches.

  2. HS-4, a highly potent inhibitor of cell proliferation of human cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Lan Xing; Shu-Hong Tian; Xue-Li Xie; Jian Fu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antitumor activity of the compound HS-4 and the action mechanism.Methods:MTT method was used to testin vitroantitumor activity of the compound HS-4. Orthotopic xenotransplantation tumor model of liver cancer was established in nude mice, and,in vivoantitumor activity of compound HS-4 was tested with a small animal in-vivo imaging system. Sequencing of small RNA library and RNA library was performed in HS-4 treated tumor cell group and control group to investigate the anti-cancer mechanism of HS-4 at level of functional genomics, using high-throughput sequencing technology. Results:HS-4 was found to have relatively highin-vitro antitumor activity against liver cancer cells, gastric cancer cells, renal cancer cells, lung cancer cells, breast cancer cells and colon cancer cells. The IC50 values against SMMC-7721 and Bel-7402 of liver cancer cells were 0.14 and 0.13 nmol/L respectively, while the IC50 values against MGC-803 and SGC-7901 of gastric cancer cells were 0.19 and 0.21 nmol/L, respectively. It was demonstrated that HS- 4 possessed a better therapeutic effect in liver cancer.Conclusions: A new reliable orthotopic xenotransplantation tumor model of liver cancer in nude mice is established. The new compounds HS-4 was found to possess relatively highin vivo andin vitroantitumor activity against liver cancer cells.

  3. Delayed fertilization of anuran amphibian (Xenopus) eggs leads to reduced numbers of primordial germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakahara, M.; Neff, A. W.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Several media were tested for the extent to which they promoted high fertilization efficiencies in ovulated, stripped Xenopus eggs. One medium was selected for maintaining eggs in a 'delayed fertilization' (DelF) condition. DelF eggs displayed several unusual characteristics, including shift of the center of gravity, prominent sperm entrance site, and occasional polyspermy. The frequency of normal pattern formation varied according to the length of time eggs were maintained in the DelF condition. Various developmental abnormalities were observed during gastrulation, neurulation, and organogenesis. Most abnormalities appeared, however, to be related to morphogenesis of the endoderm. Primordial germ cell (PGC) development was examined in DelF eggs which displayed normal external morphological features at the swimming tadpole stage. PGC counts were usually normal in short-duration (eg, 5 hr) DelF eggs, but frequently substantially reduced or completely diminished in longer-duration (eg, 25h) tadpoles. Six spawnings were compared and shown to exhibit considerable variability in fertility, morphogenesis, and PGC development. Yolk platelet shifts and developmental parameters were examined in two additional spawnings. The subcortical cytoplasm in which the germ plasm is normally localized appeared to be disrupted in longer duration DelF eggs. That observation may account for low PGC counts in DelF tadpoles.

  4. EFFECT OF SOMATOSTATIN ON THE CELL CYCLE OF HUMAN GALLBLADDER CANCER CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李济宇; 全志伟; 张强; 刘建文

    2005-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of somatostatin on the cell cycle of human gallbladder cancer cell. Methods Growth curve of gallbladder cancer cell was measured after somatostatin treated on gradient concentration. Simultaneously, the change of gallbladder cancer cell cycle was detected using flow cytometry.Results Concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition caused by somatostatin was detected in gallbladder cancer cell(P<0.05). Cell growth was arrested in S phase since 12h after somatostatin treated, which reached its peak at 24h, then fell down. The changes in apoptosis index of gallbladder cancer cell caused by somatostatin correlated with that's in cell cycle. Conclusion Somatostatin could inhibit the cell growth of human gallbladder cancer cell in vitro on higher concentration. It might result from inducing growth arrest in S phase in early stage and inducing apoptosis in the late stage.

  5. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Top Notch cancer stem cells by paracrine NF-κB signaling in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhou; Grivennikov, Sergei I

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are likely to play critical roles in metastasis, therapy resistance, and recurrence of hematological and solid malignancies. It is well known that the stem cell niche plays a key role for asymmetric division and homeostasis of normal stem cells, whereas cancer stem cells seem to use these niches. Among many pathways involved in self-renewal of cancer stem cells, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling has been documented to promote their expansion in a cell-autonomous fashion. A recent study, however, suggests that paracrine NF-κB activation promotes the expansion of cancer stem cells through the activation of Notch in basal-type breast cancer cells.

  7. Prevalence of epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells correlates with recurrence in early-stage ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Alvero, Ayesha B; Yang, Yingkui

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells (EOC stem cells) have been associated with recurrence and chemoresistance. CD44 and CK18 are highly expressed in cancer stem cells and function as tools for their identification and characterization. We investigated the association between the number of CD44+ ...

  8. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  9. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fabron Junior

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA are frequently transfused with red blood cells (RBC. Recently, we reported that the calculated risk of RBC alloimmunization per transfused unit in Brazilian patients with SCA is 1.15%. We describe a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with SCA. CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old Brazilian female with homozygous SCA was admitted for a program of partial exchange transfusion prior to cholecystectomy. Her blood group was O RhD positive and no atypical RBC alloantibody was detected using the indirect antiglobulin technique. Pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb was 8.7 g/dL and isovolumic partial exchange transfusion was performed using 4 units of ABO compatible packed RBC. Five days after the last transfusion she developed generalized joint pain and fever of 39°C. Her Hb level dropped from 12.0 g/dL to 9.3 g/dL and the unconjugated bilirrubin level rose to 27 mmol/L. She was jaundiced and had hemoglobinuria. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 48.7% HbS, 46.6% HbA1, 2.7% HbA2, and 2.0% HbF. The patient’s extended RBC phenotype was CDe, K-k+, Kp(a-b+, Fy(a-b-, M+N+s+, Le(a+b-, Di(a-. An RBC alloantibody with specificity to the Rh system (anti-c, titer 1:16.384 was identified by the indirect antiglobulin test. The Rh phenotype of the RBC used in the last packed RBC transfusion was CcDEe. The patient was discharged, asymptomatic, 7 days after admission.

  10. Resveratrol-induced augmentation of telomerase activity delays senescence of endothelial progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-bin; ZHU Li; HUANG Jun; YIN Yi-gang; KONG Xiang-qing; RONG Qi-fei; SHI Ai-wu; CAO Ke-jiang

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that resveratrol increases endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) numbers and functional activity.Increased EPC numbers and activity are associated with the inhibition of EPC senescence.In this study,we investigated the effect of resveratrol on the senescence of EPCs,leading to potentiation of cellular function.Methods EPCs were isolated from human peripheral blood and identified immunocytochemically.EPCs were incubated with resveratrol (1,10,and 50 μmol/L) or control for specified times.After in vitro cultivation,acidic β-galactosidase staining revealed the extent of senescence in the cells.To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism of the effect of resveratrol,we measured telomerase activity using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique.Furthermore,we measured the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and the phosphorylation of Akt by immunoblotting.Results Resveratrol dose-dependently inhibited the onset of EPC senescence in culture.Resveratrol also significantly increased telomerase activity.Interestingly,quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that resveratrol dose-dependently increased the expression of the catalytic subunit,hTERT,an effect that was significantly inhibited by pharmacological phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) blockers (wortmannin).The expression of hTERT is regulated by the PI3-K/Akt pathway; therefore,we examined the effect of resveratrol on Akt activity in EPCs.Immunoblotting analysis revealed that resveratrol led to dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of Akt in EPCs.Conclusion Resveratrol delayed EPCs senescence in vitro,which may be dependent on telomerase activation.

  11. Human prostate cancer stem cells: new features unveiled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuting Sun; Wei-Qiang Gao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a rare sub-population of phenotypically distinct cancer cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics.They are tumourigenic, meanwhile capable of self-renewal and forming differentiated progenies.CSCs are believed to be resistant to the standard therapeutics, and provide the cell reservoir for tumour initiation.1 Understanding CSCs or in another word, tumour-initiating cells, is of critical therapeutic importance.

  12. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  13. Role of microRNAs in maintaining cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence sustains that the establishment and maintenance of many, if not all, human cancers are due to cancer stem cells (CSCs), tumor cells with stem cell properties, such as the capacity to self-renew or generate progenitor and differentiated cells. CSCs seem to play a major role in tumor metastasis and drug resistance, but albeit the potential clinical importance, their regulation at the molecular level is not clear. Recent studies have highlighted several miRNAs to be differentially expressed in normal and cancer stem cells and established their role in targeting genes and pathways supporting cancer stemness properties. This review focuses on the last advances on the role of microRNAs in the regulation of stem cell properties and cancer stem cells in different tumors.

  14. Complete androgen blockade safely allows for delay of cytotoxic chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Kaliks

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Complete androgen blockade (CAB does not prolong overall survival (OS in patients with castration refractory prostate cancer (CRPC. Although there is variable clinical benefit with second-line hormone manipulation, we do not know which patients might benefit the most. OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical predictors of benefit of complete androgen blockade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records for 54 patients who received treatment with CAB in the setting of disease progression despite castration. We evaluated progression-free survival (PFS and OS according to PSA at diagnosis, Gleason scores, age, testosterone level, and duration of prior disease control during castration in first line treatment. RESULTS: Among 54 patients who received CAB, the median PFS was 9 months (CI 4.3-13.7 and OS was 36 months (CI 24-48. We did not find an effect of PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.32, Gleason score (p = 0.91, age (p = 0.69 or disease control during castration (p = 0.87 on PFS or OS. Thirty-four patients subsequently received chemotherapy, with a mean OS of 21 months (CI 16.4-25.5, median not reached. CONCLUSION: Age, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis and length of disease control with castration did not affect PFS or OS. In the absence of predictors of benefit, CAB should still be considered in CRPC.

  15. Pharmacological targeting of the transcription factor SOX18 delays breast cancer in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Jeroen; Fontaine, Frank; Moustaqil, Mehdi; Mittal, Deepak; Sierecki, Emma; Sacilotto, Natalia; Zuegg, Johannes; Robertson, Avril AB; Holmes, Kelly; Salim, Angela A; Mamidyala, Sreeman; Butler, Mark S; Robinson, Ashley S; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Johnston, Wayne; Alexandrov, Kirill; Black, Brian L; Hogan, Benjamin M; Val, Sarah De; Capon, Robert J; Carroll, Jason S; Bailey, Timothy L; Koopman, Peter; Jauch, Ralf; Smyth, Mark J; Cooper, Matthew A; Gambin, Yann; Francois, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacological targeting of transcription factors holds great promise for the development of new therapeutics, but strategies based on blockade of DNA binding, nuclear shuttling, or individual protein partner recruitment have yielded limited success to date. Transcription factors typically engage in complex interaction networks, likely masking the effects of specifically inhibiting single protein-protein interactions. Here, we used a combination of genomic, proteomic and biophysical methods to discover a suite of protein-protein interactions involving the SOX18 transcription factor, a known regulator of vascular development and disease. We describe a small-molecule that is able to disrupt a discrete subset of SOX18-dependent interactions. This compound selectively suppressed SOX18 transcriptional outputs in vitro and interfered with vascular development in zebrafish larvae. In a mouse pre-clinical model of breast cancer, treatment with this inhibitor significantly improved survival by reducing tumour vascular density and metastatic spread. Our studies validate an interactome-based molecular strategy to interfere with transcription factor activity, for the development of novel disease therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21221.001 PMID:28137359

  16. MEMBRANE LEc EXPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. A. Udalova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Affine chromatography was used to isolate Lec antibodies from the sera of a healthy female donor with the high titers of these anti- bodies, which were labeled with biotin. The study enrolled 51 patients with primary breast cancer (BC. Antigen expression was found by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. With these two techniques being used, the detection rate of Lec expression in BC cells was 65% (33/51; the antigen was most frequently found by flow cytometry as compared with immunohistochemistry: 72 and 58% of cases, respectively.

  17. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

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    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  18. Cells of Origin of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0280 TITLE: Cells of Origin of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zhe Li, PhD CONTRACTING...Xie, Zhe Li 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: zli4@rics.bwh.harvard.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...Lined Inclusion Cysts or Teratomas. PLoS ONE 8, e65067. Sherman-Baust, C.A., Kuhn, E., Valle, B.L., Shih Ie, M., Kurman, R.J., Wang , T.L., Amano, T

  19. Implication of expression of Nanog in prostate cancer cells and their stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Liao, Hui; Guo, Fengjin; Qin, Liang; Qi, Jun

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the prostate cancer may arise from prostate cancer stem cells that share some same characteristics with normal stem cells. The purpose of this study was to detect the differences of Nanog expression between PC3 prostate cancer cell line and its tumor stem cells, and the relationship was preliminarily examined between Nanog and prostate cancer and its tumor stem cells. By using magnetic active cell sorting (MACS), we isolated a population of CD44(+)/CD133(+) prostate cancer cells that display stem cell characteristics from PC3 cell line. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive expressions of CD44, CD133 and α(2)β(1)-integin in the isolated cells. CCK-8 analysis showed that isolated cells had a strong proliferative ability. The formation of the cell spheres in serum-free medium and holoclones in serum-supplied medium showed that the cells were capable of self-renewing, indicating that the isolated cells were a population of cancer stem-like cells derived from PC3 cell line. Western blotting exhibited that the isolated cells had higher experession of Nanog, an embryonic stem marker, as compared with PC3 cells. Our study showed that Nanog might be helpful in sustaining the self-renewal and the undifferentiation of prostate cancer stem cells, and may serve as a marker for prostate cancer stem cells for isolation and identification.

  20. Negative Selection and Chromosome Instability Induced by Mad2 Overexpression Delay Breast Cancer but Facilitate Oncogene-Independent Outgrowth

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    Konstantina Rowald

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability (CIN is associated with poor survival and therapeutic outcome in a number of malignancies. Despite this correlation, CIN can also lead to growth disadvantages. Here, we show that simultaneous overexpression of the mitotic checkpoint protein Mad2 with KrasG12D or Her2 in mammary glands of adult mice results in mitotic checkpoint overactivation and a delay in tumor onset. Time-lapse imaging of organotypic cultures and pathologic analysis prior to tumor establishment reveals error-prone mitosis, mitotic arrest, and cell death. Nonetheless, Mad2 expression persists and increases karyotype complexity in Kras tumors. Faced with the selective pressure of oncogene withdrawal, Mad2-positive tumors have a higher frequency of developing persistent subclones that avoid remission and continue to grow.

  1. Negative Selection and Chromosome Instability Induced by Mad2 Overexpression Delay Breast Cancer but Facilitate Oncogene-Independent Outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowald, Konstantina; Mantovan, Martina; Passos, Joana; Buccitelli, Christopher; Mardin, Balca R; Korbel, Jan O; Jechlinger, Martin; Sotillo, Rocio

    2016-06-21

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is associated with poor survival and therapeutic outcome in a number of malignancies. Despite this correlation, CIN can also lead to growth disadvantages. Here, we show that simultaneous overexpression of the mitotic checkpoint protein Mad2 with Kras(G12D) or Her2 in mammary glands of adult mice results in mitotic checkpoint overactivation and a delay in tumor onset. Time-lapse imaging of organotypic cultures and pathologic analysis prior to tumor establishment reveals error-prone mitosis, mitotic arrest, and cell death. Nonetheless, Mad2 expression persists and increases karyotype complexity in Kras tumors. Faced with the selective pressure of oncogene withdrawal, Mad2-positive tumors have a higher frequency of developing persistent subclones that avoid remission and continue to grow.

  2. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth and Expression of Key Molecules in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and least understood form of advanced breast cancer. Its lethality originates from its nature of invading the lymphatic system and absence of a palpable tumor mass. Different from other metastatic breast cancer cells, IBC cells invade by forming tumor spheroids that retain E-cadherin-based cell–cell adhesions. Herein we describe the potential of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) as an attractive candidate for anti-IBC therapy...

  3. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  4. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  5. Regulation of apoptosis pathways in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-09-10

    Cancer stem cell are considered to represent a population within the bulk tumor that share many similarities to normal stem cells as far as their capacities to self-renew, differentiate, proliferate and to reconstitute the entire tumor upon serial transplantation are concerned. Since cancer stem cells have been shown to be critical for maintaining tumor growth and have been implicated in treatment resistance and tumor progression, they constitute relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, it has been postulated that eradication of cancer stem cells will be pivotal in order to achieve long-term relapse-free survival. However, one of the hallmarks of cancer stem cells is their high resistance to undergo cell death including apoptosis in response to environmental cues or cytotoxic stimuli. Since activation of apoptosis programs in tumor cells underlies the antitumor activity of most currently used cancer therapeutics, it will be critical to develop strategies to overcome the intrinsic resistance to apoptosis of cancer stem cells. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the ability of cancer stem cells to evade apoptosis will likely open new avenues to target this critical pool of cells within the tumor in order to develop more efficient treatment options for patients suffering from cancer.

  6. A multi-phenotypic cancer model with cell plasticity.

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    Zhou, Da; Wang, Yue; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    The conventional cancer stem cell (CSC) theory indicates a hierarchy of CSCs and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), that is, CSCs can differentiate into NSCCs but not vice versa. However, an alternative paradigm of CSC theory with reversible cell plasticity among cancer cells has received much attention very recently. Here we present a generalized multi-phenotypic cancer model by integrating cell plasticity with the conventional hierarchical structure of cancer cells. We prove that under very weak assumption, the nonlinear dynamics of multi-phenotypic proportions in our model has only one stable steady state and no stable limit cycle. This result theoretically explains the phenotypic equilibrium phenomena reported in various cancer cell lines. Furthermore, according to the transient analysis of our model, it is found that cancer cell plasticity plays an essential role in maintaining the phenotypic diversity in cancer especially during the transient dynamics. Two biological examples with experimental data show that the phenotypic conversions from NCSSs to CSCs greatly contribute to the transient growth of CSCs proportion shortly after the drastic reduction of it. In particular, an interesting overshooting phenomenon of CSCs proportion arises in three-phenotypic example. Our work may pave the way for modeling and analyzing the multi-phenotypic cell population dynamics with cell plasticity.

  7. Effects of ciglitazone and troglitazone on the proliferation of human stomach cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chan Woo Cheon; Dae Hwan Kim; Dong Heon Kim; Yong Hoon Cho; Jae Hun Kim

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the cytological and molecular effects of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and PPAR-γ agonists on stomach cancer cells.METHODS: To determine the proliferation-suppressive effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone, SNU-216 and SNU-668 stomach cancer cells were plated in media containing 40 μmol/L troglitazone and ciglitazone at a density of 1 × 104 cells/well. After 3, 5 and 7 d, the cells were counted with a hemocytometer. To assess the appearance of PPAR-γ, a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed.On day 7, Western blotting was used to determine the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the expression of p21 and phosphorylated-ERK ( pERK) genes. Flow cytometry analysis was used to determine which portion of the cell cycle was delayed when troglitazone was used to suppress cell proliferation. In order to clarify the mechanism underlying the activity of troglitazone, microarray analysis was conducted.RESULTS: PPAR-γ was manifested in both SNU-216and SNU-668 cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone suppressed cell growth, and troglitazone was a stronger suppressor of stomach cancer cells than ciglitazone, an inducer of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. SNU-668 cells were also determined to be more sensitive to ciglitazone and troglitazone than SNU-216 cells. When troglitazone and ciglitazone were administered to stomach cancer cells, levels of p21 expression were increased, but ERK phosphorylation levels were reduced. When GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, was applied in conjunction with ciglitazone and troglitazone, the cell growth suppression effect was unaffected. The gene transcription program revealed a variety of alterations as the consequence of troglitazone treatment, and multiple troglitazoneassociated pathways were detected. The genes whose expression was increased by troglitazone treatment were associated with cell development, differentiation,signal transmission between cells, and

  8. Breast cancer stem cell-like cells are more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-stem cells: role of ATM.

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    Seog-Young Kim

    Full Text Available There are contradictory observations about the different radiosensitivities of cancer stem cells and cancer non-stem cells. To resolve these contradictory observations, we studied radiosensitivities by employing breast cancer stem cell (CSC-like MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB453 cells as well as their corresponding non-stem cells. CSC-like cells proliferate without differentiating and have characteristics of tumor-initiating cells [1]. These cells were exposed to γ-rays (1.25-8.75 Gy and survival curves were determined by colony formation. A final slope, D(0, of the survival curve for each cell line was determined to measure radiosensitivity. The D(0 of CSC-like and non-stem MDA-MB-453 cells were 1.16 Gy and 1.55 Gy, respectively. Similar results were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells (0.94 Gy vs. 1.56 Gy. After determination of radiosensitivity, we investigated intrinsic cellular determinants which influence radiosensitivity including cell cycle distribution, free-radical scavengers and DNA repair. We observed that even though cell cycle status and antioxidant content may contribute to differential radiosensitivity, differential DNA repair capacity may be a greater determinant of radiosensitivity. Unlike non-stem cells, CSC-like cells have little/no sublethal damage repair, a low intracellular level of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and delay of γ-H2AX foci removal (DNA strand break repair. These results suggest that low DNA repair capacity is responsible for the high radiosensitivity of these CSC-like cells.

  9. Metabolic profiling of breast cancer: Differences in central metabolism between subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Halbach, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Although the concept of aerobic glycolysis in cancer was already reported in the 1930s by Otto Warburg, the understanding of metabolic pathways remains challenging especially due to the heterogeneity of cancer. In consideration of four different time points (1, 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation), GC-MS profiling of metabolites was performed on cell extracts and supernatants of breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, -453, BT-474) with different sub classification and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. To the exclusion of trypsinization, direct methanolic extraction, cell scraping and cell disruption was executed to obtain central metabolites. Major differences in biochemical pathways have been observed in the breast cancer cell lines compared to the breast epithelial cell line, as well as between the breast cancer cell lines themselves. Characteristics of breast cancer subtypes could be correlated to their individual metabolic profiles. PLS-DA revealed the discrimination of breast cancer cell lines from MCF-10A based on elevated amino acid levels. The observed metabolic signatures have great potential as biomarker for breast cancer as well as an improved understanding of subtype specific phenomenons of breast cancer.

  10. Experimental studies on ultralow frequency pulsed gradient magnetic field inducing apoptosis of cancer cell and inhibiting growth of cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾繁清; 郑从义; 张新晨; 李宗山; 李朝阳; 王川婴; 张新松; 黄晓玲; 张沪生

    2002-01-01

    The morphology characteristics of cell apoptosis of the malignant tumour cells in magnetic field-treated mouse was observed for the first time. The apoptotic cancer cell contracted, became rounder and divorced from adjacent cells; the heterochromatin condensed and coagulated together along the inner side of the nuclear membrane; the endoplasmic reticulums(ER) expanded and fused with the cellular membrane; many apoptotic bodies which were packed by the cellular membrane appeared and were devoured by some lymphocytes and plasma. Apoptosis of cancer cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated in situ nick end labeling(TUNEL). It was found that the number of apoptosis cancer cells of the sample treated by the magnetic field is more than that of the control sample. The growth of malignant tumour in mice was inhibited and the ability of immune cell to dissolve cancer cells was improved by ultralow frequency(ULF) pulsed gradient magnetic field; the nuclei DNA contents decreased, indicating that magnetic field can block DNA replication and inhibit mitosis of cancer cells. It was suggested that magnetic field could inhibit the metabolism of cancer cell, lower its malignancy, and restrain its rapid and heteromorphic growth. Since ULF pulsed gradient magnetic field can induce apoptosis of cancer cells and inhibit the growth of malignant tumour, it could be used as a new method to treat cancer.

  11. Segmentation and Analysis of Cancer Cells in Blood Samples

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    Arjun Nelikanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood cancer is an umbrella term for cancers that affect the blood, bone marrow and lymphatic system. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is one of the kinds of blood cancer which can be affected at any age in the humans. The analysis of peripheral blood samples is an important test in the procedures for the diagnosis of leukemia. In this paper the blood sample images are used and implementing a clustering algorithm for detection of the cancer cells. This paper also implements morphological operations and feature extraction techniques using MATLAB for the analysis of cancer cells in the images.

  12. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  13. Chronic treatment with N-acetyl-cystein delays cellular senescence in endothelial cells isolated from a subgroup of atherosclerotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voghel, Guillaume; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Farhat, Nada; Mamarbachi, Aida M; Villeneuve, Louis; Fortier, Annik; Perrault, Louis P; Carrier, Michel; Thorin, Eric

    2008-05-01

    Endothelial senescence may contribute to the pathogenesis of age-related vascular disorders. Furthermore, chronic exposure to risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) accelerates the effects of chronological aging by generating stress-dependent damages, including oxidative stress, therefore promoting stress-induced premature senescence. Our objective was to determine whether a chronic treatment with an antioxidant (N-acetyl-cystein, NAC) could delay senescence of endothelial cells (EC) isolated and cultured from arterial segments of patients with severe coronary artery disease. If EC were considered as one population (n=26), chronic NAC treatment slightly shortened telomere attrition rate associated with senescence but did not significantly delay the onset of endothelial senescence. However, in a subgroup of NAC-treated EC (n=15) cellular senescence was significantly delayed, NAC decreased lipid peroxidation (HNE), activated the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) and inhibited telomere attrition. In contrast, in another subgroup of EC (n=11) characterized by initial short telomeres, no effect of NAC on HNE and high levels of DNA damages, the antioxidant was not beneficial on senescence, suggesting an irreversible stress-dependent damage. In conclusion, chronic exposure to NAC can delay senescence of diseased EC via hTERT activation and transient telomere stabilization, unless oxidative stress-associated cell damage has become irreversible.

  14. Stem cells and cancer: Evidence for bone marrow stem cells in epithelial cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Chen Li; Calin Stoicov; Arlin B Rogers; JeanMarie Houghton

    2006-01-01

    Cancer commonly arises at the sites of chronic inflammation and infection. Although this association has long been recognized, the reason has remained unclear. Within the gastrointestinal tract, there are many examples of inflammatory conditions associated with cancer, and these include reflux disease and Barrett's adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, Helicobacter infection and gastric cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer and viral hepatitis leading to hepatocellular carcinoma.There are several mechanisms by which chronic inflammation has been postulated to lead to cancer which includes enhanced proliferation in an endless attempt to heal damage, the presence of a persistent inflammatory environment creating a pro-carcinogenic environment and more recently a role for engraftment of circulating marrow-derived stem cells which may contribute to the stromal components of the tumor as well as the tumor mass itself. Here we review the recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of circulating bone marrow-derived stem cells to the formation of tumors in animal models as well as in human beings.

  15. Human lung cancer cell line SPC-A1 contains cells with characteristics of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C H; Yang, S F; Li, P Q

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play important roles in occurrence, development, recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Isolation and identification of CSCs have been performed from some cancer tissues or cells. In this paper, human lung adenocarcinoma stem cells were induced and isolated from SPC-A1 cells and their characteristics were determined. SPC-A1 cells were cultured in serum-free medium and epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor were added into the medium to induce the formation of multicellular tumor spheroids. The results showed that floating multicellular tumor spheroids (named pulmospheres) were formed 5-10 d after the induction of SPC-A1 cells. Real-time PCR analysis showed that in the pulmospheres, the marker of bronchioalveolar stem cells, Clara cell secretary protein and the marker of AT2 cells, alveolar surfactant protein C were highly expressed. Furthermore, such embryonic stem cell markers as octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4), Bmi-1, and thyroid transcription factor -1 (TTF-1) were also highly expressed. Some miRNAs as hsa-miR-126, hsa-miR-145, hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7d, hsa-let-7c, hsa-let-7e and hsa-miR-98, which were lowly expressed in SPC-A1 cells, were not expressed in the pulmospheres. Cell cycle analysis showed that 94.29 % of the pulmosphere cells were in G1 stages. Further study showed that these cells possessed higher proliferation and invasion activity than SPC-A1 cells. Tumorigenicity activity experiments on BALB/c nude mice showed that 1 × 103 of the pulmosphere cells could form tumors with similar pathological features with lung adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, lung adenocarcinoma stem cells were enriched in the pulmosphere cells and were with high tumorigenicity.

  16. The Interconnectedness of Cancer Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The elegance of fundamental and applied research activities have begun to reveal a myriad of spatial and temporal alterations in downstream signaling networks affected by cell surface receptor stimulation including G protein– coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Interconnected biochemical pathways serve to integrate and distribute the signaling information throughout the cell by orchestration of complex biochemical circuits consisting of protein interactions and covalent modification processes. It is clear that scientific literature summarizing results from both fundamental and applied scientific research activities has served to provide a broad foundational biologic data-base that has been instrumental in advancing our continued understanding of underlying cancer biology. This article reflects on historical advances and the role of innovation in the competitive world of grant-sponsored research.

  17. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  18. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurier Jean-Fabien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC, a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. Methods We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. Results TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to

  19. Genetic Risk Can Be Decreased: Quitting Smoking Decreases and Delays Lung Cancer for Smokers With High and Low CHRNA5 Risk Genotypes — A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Shiun Chen

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: We demonstrate that quitting smoking is highly beneficial in reducing lung cancer risks for smokers regardless of their CHRNA5 rs16969968 genetic risk status. Smokers with high-risk CHRNA5 genotypes, on average, can largely eliminate their elevated genetic risk for lung cancer by quitting smoking- cutting their risk of lung cancer in half and delaying its onset by 7 years for those who develop it. These results: 1 underscore the potential value of smoking cessation for all smokers, 2 suggest that CHRNA5 rs16969968 genotype affects lung cancer diagnosis through its effects on smoking, and 3 have potential value for framing preventive interventions for those who smoke.

  20. Gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Thompson, T C

    2008-05-01

    There is a critical need to develop new and effective cancer therapies that target bone, the primary metastatic site for prostate cancer and other malignancies. Among the various therapeutic approaches being considered for this application, gene-modified cell-based therapies may have specific advantages. Gene-modified cell therapy uses gene transfer and cell-based technologies in a complementary fashion to chaperone appropriate gene expression cassettes to active sites of tumor growth. In this paper, we briefly review potential cell vehicles for this approach and discuss relevant gene therapy strategies for prostate cancer. We further discuss selected studies that led to the conceptual development and preclinical testing of IL-12 gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss future directions in the development of gene-modified cell therapy for metastatic prostate cancer, including the need to identify and test novel therapeutic genes such as GLIPR1.

  1. Impact of Annexin A3 expression in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S Y; Li, Y; Fan, L Q; Zhao, Q; Tan, B B; Liu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Annexin A3 participates in various biological processes, including tumorigenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Annexin A3 in gastric cancer and its relationship with cell differentiation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Annexin A3 expression in gastric cancer tissues was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. The proliferation of gastric cancer cells was measured by the MTT assay. Cell migration and invasion were determined via wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. Knock down of endogenous Annexin A3 in gastric cancer BGC823 cells was performed using siRNA technology. The expression of Annexin A3 was significantly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues, and negatively correlated with the differentiation degree. Silencing of endogenous Annexin A3 suppressed the proliferation, migration, and invasion of BGC823 cells. Additionally, the expression of p21, p27, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 was upregulated, and the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1, MMP-1, and MMP-2 decreased in cells treated with Annexin A3-siRNA. Annexin A3 was upregulated in gastric cancer cells. Deletion of endogenous Annexin A3 significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  2. Apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells induced by Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xiong Zhou; Xiao-Ling Ding; Jie-Fei Huang; Hong Zhang; Sheng-Bao Wu; Jian-Ping Cheng; Qun Wei

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer ceils induced by Triptolide (TL),and the relationship between this apoptosis and expression of caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.METHODS:Human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was cultured in DIEM media for this study.MTT assay was used to determine the cell growth inhibitory rate in vitro.Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to detect the apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells before and after TL treatment.RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of apoptosis-associated gene caspase-3' bcl-2 and bax.RESULTS:TL inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner.TL induced human pancreatic cancer cells to undergo apoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics.TUNEL assay showed that after the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells with 40 ng/mL TL for 12 h and 24 h,the apoptotic rates of human pancreatic cancer cells increased significantly.RT-PCR demonstrated that caspase-3 and bax were significantly up-regulated in SW1990 cells treated with TL while bcl-2 mRNA was not.CONCLUSION:TL is able to induce the apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.This apoptosis may be mediated by up-regulating the expression of apoptosisassociated caspase-3 and bax gene.

  3. Definition of molecular determinants of prostate cancer cell bone extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Steven R; Hays, Danielle L; Yazawa, Erika M; Opperman, Matthew; Walley, Kempland C; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Burdick, Monica M; Gillard, Bryan M; Moser, Michael T; Pantel, Klaus; Foster, Barbara A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2013-01-15

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, but transit of malignant cells across the bone marrow endothelium (BMEC) remains a poorly understood step in metastasis. Prostate cancer cells roll on E-selectin(+) BMEC through E-selectin ligand-binding interactions under shear flow, and prostate cancer cells exhibit firm adhesion to BMEC via β1, β4, and αVβ3 integrins in static assays. However, whether these discrete prostate cancer cell-BMEC adhesive contacts culminate in cooperative, step-wise transendothelial migration into bone is not known. Here, we describe how metastatic prostate cancer cells breach BMEC monolayers in a step-wise fashion under physiologic hemodynamic flow. Prostate cancer cells tethered and rolled on BMEC and then firmly adhered to and traversed BMEC via sequential dependence on E-selectin ligands and β1 and αVβ3 integrins. Expression analysis in human metastatic prostate cancer tissue revealed that β1 was markedly upregulated compared with expression of other β subunits. Prostate cancer cell breaching was regulated by Rac1 and Rap1 GTPases and, notably, did not require exogenous chemokines as β1, αVβ3, Rac1, and Rap1 were constitutively active. In homing studies, prostate cancer cell trafficking to murine femurs was dependent on E-selectin ligand, β1 integrin, and Rac1. Moreover, eliminating E-selectin ligand-synthesizing α1,3 fucosyltransferases in transgenic adenoma of mouse prostate mice dramatically reduced prostate cancer incidence. These results unify the requirement for E-selectin ligands, α1,3 fucosyltransferases, β1 and αVβ3 integrins, and Rac/Rap1 GTPases in mediating prostate cancer cell homing and entry into bone and offer new insight into the role of α1,3 fucosylation in prostate cancer development.

  4. Severe neurologic complication after delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in 2 children with sickle cell anemia: significant diagnosis and therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenga, Narcisse; Mialou, Valérie; Kebaïli, Kamila; Galambrun, Claire; Bertrand, Yves; Pondarre, Corinne

    2008-12-01

    Although delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) has been widely recognized as a serious complication of red blood cell transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), there is no consensus on its optimal management. Discontinuation of transfusion is recommended, whereas corticosteroids and immunoglobulins are considered to be beneficial. We report 2 children with sickle cell anemia who were diagnosed with DHTR and experienced a subsequent neurologic event in the course of treatment with corticosteroids. The role of corticosteroids as possible precipitating factors of neurologic complications is discussed. Pending a better understanding of the chain of events of DHTR, SCD children with DHTR should receive steroids with great caution.

  5. FACT prevents the accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin and a subsequent cell cycle delay in G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Morillo-Huesca

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3 in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA-damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication.

  6. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cekanova, Maria, E-mail: mcekanov@utk.edu [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fernando, Romaine I. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Siriwardhana, Nalin [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sukhthankar, Mugdha [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Parra, Columba de la [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR (United States); Woraratphoka, Jirayus [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, Medical Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Malone, Christine [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ström, Anders [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Baek, Seung J. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wade, Paul A. [Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Saxton, Arnold M. [Department of Animal Science, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Donnell, Robert M. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostics Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pestell, Richard G. [Department of Cancer Biology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  7. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside TL

    2015-01-01

    Theresa L Whiteside University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, US Abstract: Regulatory T cells (Treg) are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well und...

  8. Dihydroartemisinin is an inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang JIAO; Chun-min GE; Qing-hui MENG; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anticancer activity of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a deriva-tive of antimalaria drug artemisinin in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods: Cell growth was determined by the MTT viability assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle progression were evaluated by a DNA fragmentation gel electro-phoresis, flow cytometry assay, and TUNEL assay; protein and mRNA expression were analyzed by Western blotting and RT-PCR assay. Results: Artemisinin and its derivatives, including artesunate, arteether, artemether, arteannuin, and DHA, exhibit anticancer growth activities in human ovarian cancer cells. Among them, DHA is the most effective in inhibiting cell growth. Ovarian cancer cell lines are more sensitive (5-10-fold) to DHA treatment compared to normal ovarian cell lines. DHA at micromolar dose levels exhibits a dose- and time-dependent cyto-toxicity in ovarian cancer cell lines. Furthermore, DHA induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest, accompanied by a decrease of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 and an increase of Bax and Bad. Conclusion: The promising results show for the first time that DHA inhibits the growth of human ovarian cancer cells. The selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth, apoptosis induction, and G2 arrest provide in vitro evidence for further studies of DHA as a possible anticancer drug in the clinical treatment of ovarian cancer.

  9. Exometabolom analysis of breast cancer cell lines: Metabolic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Erbes, Thalia; Halbach, Sebastian; Brummer, Tilman; Jäger, Markus; Hirschfeld, Marc; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-08-21

    Cancer cells show characteristic effects on cellular turnover and DNA/RNA modifications leading to elevated levels of excreted modified nucleosides. We investigated the molecular signature of different subtypes of breast cancer cell lines and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Prepurification of cell culture supernatants was performed by cis-diol specific affinity chromatography using boronate-derivatized polyacrylamide gel. Samples were analyzed by application of reversed phase chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Collectively, we determined 23 compounds from RNA metabolism, two from purine metabolism, five from polyamine/methionine cycle, one from histidine metabolism and two from nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. We observed major differences of metabolite excretion pattern between the breast cancer cell lines and MCF-10A, just as well as between the different breast cancer cell lines themselves. Differences in metabolite excretion resulting from cancerous metabolism can be integrated into altered processes on the cellular level. Modified nucleosides have great potential as biomarkers in due consideration of the heterogeneity of breast cancer that is reflected by the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Our data suggests that the metabolic signature of breast cancer cell lines might be a more subtype-specific tool to predict breast cancer, rather than a universal approach.

  10. Damaged DNA binding protein 2 plays a role in breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilal Kattan

    Full Text Available The Damaged DNA binding protein 2 (DDB2, is involved in nucleotide excision repair as well as in other biological processes in normal cells, including transcription and cell cycle regulation. Loss of DDB2 function may be related to tumor susceptibility. However, hypothesis of this study was that DDB2 could play a role in breast cancer cell growth, resulting in its well known interaction with the proliferative marker E2F1 in breast neoplasia. DDB2 gene was overexpressed in estrogen receptor (ER-positive (MCF-7 and T47D, but not in ER-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 or normal mammary epithelial cell lines. In addition, DDB2 expression was significantly (3.0-fold higher in ER-positive than in ER-negative tumor samples (P = 0.0208 from 16 patients with breast carcinoma. Knockdown of DDB2 by small interfering RNA in MCF-7 cells caused a decrease in cancer cell growth and colony formation. Inversely, introduction of the DDB2 gene into MDA-MB231 cells stimulated growth and colony formation. Cell cycle distribution and 5 Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by flow cytometry analysis showed that the growth-inhibiting effect of DDB2 knockdown was the consequence of a delayed G1/S transition and a slowed progression through the S phase of MCF-7 cells. These results were supported by a strong decrease in the expression of S phase markers (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen, cyclin E and dihydrofolate reductase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that DDB2 can play a role as oncogene and may become a promising candidate as a predictive marker in breast cancer.

  11. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  12. Mathematical models in cell biology and cancer chemotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to show how mathematics can be applied to improve cancer chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most drugs used in treating cancer kill both normal and abnormal cells. However, more cancer cells than normal cells can be destroyed by the drug because tumor cells usually exhibit different growth kinetics than normal cells. To capitalize on this last fact, cell kinetics must be studied by formulating mathematical models of normal and abnormal cell growth. These models allow the therapeutic and harmful effects of cancer drugs to be simulated quantitatively. The combined cell and drug models can be used to study the effects of different methods of administering drugs. The least harmful method of drug administration, according to a given criterion, can be found by applying optimal control theory. The prerequisites for reading this book are an elementary knowledge of ordinary differential equations, probability, statistics, and linear algebra. In order to make this book self-contained, a chapter on...

  13. Tumor metabolism: cancer cells give and take lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Gregg L

    2008-12-01

    Tumors contain well-oxygenated (aerobic) and poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) regions, which were thought to utilize glucose for oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, respectively. In this issue of the JCI, Sonveaux et al. show that human cancer cells cultured under hypoxic conditions convert glucose to lactate and extrude it, whereas aerobic cancer cells take up lactate via monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and utilize it for oxidative phosphorylation (see the related article beginning on page 3930). When MCT1 is inhibited, aerobic cancer cells take up glucose rather than lactate, and hypoxic cancer cells die due to glucose deprivation. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with an inhibitor of MCT1 retarded tumor growth. MCT1 expression was detected exclusively in nonhypoxic regions of human cancer biopsy samples, and in combination, these data suggest that MCT1 inhibition holds potential as a novel cancer therapy.

  14. A mathematical model of cancer cells with phenotypic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells is recently becoming a cutting-edge research area in cancer, which challenges the cellular hierarchy proposed by the conventional cancer stem cell theory. In this study, we establish a mathematical model for describing the phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells, based on which we try to find some salient features that can characterize the dynamic behavior of the phenotypic plasticity especially in comparison to the hierarchical model of cancer cells. Methods: We model cancer as population dynamics composed of different phenotypes of cancer cells. In this model, not only can cancer cells divide (symmetrically and asymmetrically and die, but they can also convert into other cellular phenotypes. According to the Law of Mass Action, the cellular processes can be captured by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs. On one hand, we can analyze the long-term stability of the model by applying qualitative method of ODEs. On the other hand, we are also concerned about the short-term behavior of the model by studying its transient dynamics. Meanwhile, we validate our model to the cell-state dynamics in published experimental data.Results: Our results show that the phenotypic plasticity plays important roles in both stabilizing the distribution of different phenotypic mixture and maintaining the cancer stem cells proportion. In particular, the phenotypic plasticity model shows decided advantages over the hierarchical model in predicting the phenotypic equilibrium and cancer stem cells’ overshoot reported in previous biological experiments in cancer cell lines.Conclusion: Since the validity of the phenotypic plasticity paradigm and the conventional cancer stem cell theory is still debated in experimental biology, it is worthy of theoretically searching for good indicators to distinguish the two models through quantitative methods. According to our study, the phenotypic equilibrium and overshoot

  15. Chemoresistance of CD133+ cancer stem cells in laryngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-pu; LIU Yan; ZHONG Wei; YU Dan; WEN Lian-ji; JIN Chun-shun

    2011-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence suggests that tumors are histologically heterogeneous and are maintained by a small population of tumor cells termed cancer stem cells. CD133 has been identified as a candidate marker of cancer stem cells in laryngeal carcinoma. This study aimed to analyze the chemoresistance of CD133+ cancer stem cells.Methods The response of Hep-2 cells to different chemotherapeutic agents was investigated and the expression of CD133 was studied. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was used to identify CD133,and the CD133+ subset of cells was separated and analyzed in colony formation assays,cell invasion assays,chemotherapy resistance studies,and analyzed for the expression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2.Results About 1%-2% of Hep-2 cells were CD133+ cells,and the CD133+ proportion was enriched by chemotherapy.CD133+ cancer stem cells exhibited higher potential for clonogenicity and invasion,and were more resistant to chemotherapy. This resistance was correlated with higher expression of ABCG2.Conclusions This study suggested that CD133+ cancer stem cells are more resistant to chemotherapy. The expression of ABCG2 could be partially responsible for this. Targeting this small population of CD133+ cancer stem cells could be a strategy to develop more effective treatments for laryngeal carcinoma.

  16. Depletion of Aurora-A in zebrafish causes growth retardation due to mitotic delay and p53-dependent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Hyunsook

    2013-03-01

    Aurora-A is a serine/threonine mitotic kinase that is required for centrosome maturation. Many cancer cells over-express Aurora-A, and several reports have suggested that Aurora-A has prognostic value in the clinical treatment of cancer. Therefore, inhibitors for Aurora-A kinase have been developed. However, studies on Aurora-A are largely performed in cancer cell lines and are sometimes controversial. For effective evaluation of Aurora-A inhibitors in cancer treatment, it is essential to understand its function at the organism level. Here, we report the crucial functions of Aurora-A in homeostasis of spindle organization in mitosis using zebrafish embryogenesis as a model system. Using morpholino technology, we show that depletion of Aurora-A in zebrafish embryogenesis results in short bent trunks, accompanied by growth retardation and eventual cell death. Live-imaging and immunofluorescence analyses of the embryos revealed that the developmental defects are due to problems in mitosis, manifested through monopolar and disorganized spindle formation. Aurora-A-depleted cells exhibited mitotic arrest with congression failure, leading to activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Cell death in the absence of Aurora-A was partially rescued by co-injection of the p53 morpholino, suggesting that apoptosis after Aurora-A depletion is p53-dependent. The clinical implications of these results relate to the indication that Aurora-A inhibitors may be effective towards cancers with intact p53.

  17. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Isothiocyanate, Induces G2/M Arrest in Cervical Cancer Cells through CyclinB1 Downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ya-Min; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Globally, cervical cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The main treatment methods for this type of cancer include conization or hysterectomy procedures. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural, compound-based drug derived from dietary isothiocyanates which has previously been shown to possess potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive effects against several types of cancer. The present study investigated the effects of SFN on anti-proliferation and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cell lines (Cx, CxWJ, and HeLa). We found that cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phases of the cell-cycle. Treatment with SFN led to cell cycle arrest as well as the down-regulation of Cyclin B1 expression, but not of CDC2 expression. In addition, the effects of GADD45β gene activation in cell cycle arrest increase proportionally with the dose of SFN; however, mitotic delay and the inhibition of proliferation both depend on the dosage of SFN used to treat cancer cells. These results indicate that SFN may delay the development of cancer by arresting cell growth in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cyclin B1 gene expression, dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex, and up-regulation of GADD45β proteins. PMID:27626412

  18. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Isothiocyanate, Induces G2/M Arrest in Cervical Cancer Cells through CyclinB1 Downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Min Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, cervical cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The main treatment methods for this type of cancer include conization or hysterectomy procedures. Sulforaphane (SFN is a natural, compound-based drug derived from dietary isothiocyanates which has previously been shown to possess potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive effects against several types of cancer. The present study investigated the effects of SFN on anti-proliferation and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cell lines (Cx, CxWJ, and HeLa. We found that cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phases of the cell-cycle. Treatment with SFN led to cell cycle arrest as well as the down-regulation of Cyclin B1 expression, but not of CDC2 expression. In addition, the effects of GADD45β gene activation in cell cycle arrest increase proportionally with the dose of SFN; however, mitotic delay and the inhibition of proliferation both depend on the dosage of SFN used to treat cancer cells. These results indicate that SFN may delay the development of cancer by arresting cell growth in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cyclin B1 gene expression, dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex, and up-regulation of GADD45β proteins.

  19. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    In: Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology . DeVita Jr VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.), JB Lippincott Co., Philadelphia, p. 293, 1993. 2...Alteration of signal transduction in T cells from cancer patients. In: Important Advances in Oncology 1995. DeVita Jr VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.), JB...Rosenberg SA: Cell transfer therapy: Clinical applications. In: Biologic Therapy of Cancer. DeVita Jr VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.), JB Lippincott

  20. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerman, Peter S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Voet, Douglas; Jing, Rui; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Stojanov, Petar; McKenna, Aaron; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Imielinski, Marcin; Helman, Elena; Hernandez, Bryan; Pho, Nam H.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chu, Andy; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Stoll, Dominik; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Chuah, Eric; Coope, Robin J. N.; Corbett, Richard; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Anhe Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Karen; Nip, Ka Ming; Olshen, Adam; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Slobodan, Jared R.; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Saksena, Gordon; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Schumacher, Stephen E.; Tabak, Barbara; Carter, Scott L.; Pho, Nam H.; Nguyen, Huy; Onofrio, Robert C.; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Hammerman, Peter S.; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Protopopov, Alexei; Zhang, Jianhua; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Lee, Semin; Xi, Ruibin; Yang, Lixing; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Hailei; Shukla, Sachet; Chen, Peng-Chieh; Haseley, Psalm; Lee, Eunjung; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Socci, Nicholas D.; Liang, Yupu; Schultz, Nikolaus; Borsu, Laetitia; Lash, Alex E.; Viale, Agnes; Sander, Chris; Ladanyi, Marc; Auman, J. Todd; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Shi, Yan; Liquori, Christina; Meng, Shaowu; Li, Ling; Turman, Yidi J.; Topal, Michael D.; Tan, Donghui; Waring, Scot; Buda, Elizabeth; Walsh, Jesse; Jones, Corbin D.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Singh, Darshan; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Dolina, Peter; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; O'Connor, Brian D.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze; Chiang, Derek Y.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Pan, Fei; Van den Berg, David J.; Triche, Timothy; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sinha, Rileen; Ciriello, Giovanni; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Gao, Jianjiong; Aksoy, B. Arman; Weinhold, Nils; Ramirez, Ricardo; Taylor, Barry S.; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Mo, Qianxing; Seshan, Venkatraman; Paik, Paul K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod; Unruh, Anna; Wakefield, Chris; Cason, R. Craig; Baggerly, Keith A.; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Ted; Waltman, Peter; Sokolov, Artem; Ellrott, Kyle; Collisson, Eric A.; Zerbino, Daniel; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Auman, J. Todd; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Du, Ying; Cabanski, Christopher; Walter, Vonn; Singh, Darshan; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Marron, J. S.; Liu, Yufeng; Wang, Kai; Liu, Jinze; Prins, Jan F.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Zhang, Yiqun; Travis, William D.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Yi, Joanne; Aubry, Marie C.; Cheney, Richard; Dacic, Sanja; Flieder, Douglas; Funkhouser, William; Illei, Peter; Myers, Jerome; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Shelton, Troy; Hatfield, Martha; Morris, Scott; Yena, Peggy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Paulauskis, Joseph; Meyerson, Matthew; Baylin, Stephen B.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Akbani, Rehan; Azodo, Ijeoma; Beer, David; Bose, Ron; Byers, Lauren A.; Carbone, David; Chang, Li-Wei; Chiang, Derek; Chu, Andy; Chun, Elizabeth; Collisson, Eric; Cope, Leslie; Creighton, Chad J.; Danilova, Ludmila; Ding, Li; Getz, Gad; Hammerman, Peter S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hernandez, Bryan; Herman, James G.; Heymach, John; Ida, Cristiane; Imielinski, Marcin; Johnson, Bruce; Jurisica, Igor; Kaufman, Jacob; Kosari, Farhad; Kucherlapati, Raju; Kwiatkowski, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Lawrence, Michael S.; Maher, Christopher A.; Mungall, Andy; Ng, Sam; Pao, William; Peifer, Martin; Penny, Robert; Robertson, Gordon; Rusch, Valerie; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Siegfried, Jill; Sinha, Rileen; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sougnez, Carrie; Stoll, Dominik; Stuart, Joshua; Thomas, Roman K.; Tomaszek, Sandra; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Travis, William D.; Vaske, Charles; Weinstein, John N.; Weisenberger, Daniel; Wheeler, David; Wigle, Dennis A.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wilks, Christopher; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Jianjua John; Jensen, Mark A.; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari B.; Chu, Anna L.; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric E.; Pontius, Joan; Pihl, Todd D.; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique L.; Nicholls, Matthew C.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter A.; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi N.; Barletta, Sean P.; Greene, John M.; Pot, David A.; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Bandarchi-Chamkhaleh, Bizhan; Boyd, Jeff; Weaver, JoEllen; Wigle, Dennis A.; Azodo, Ijeoma A.; Tomaszek, Sandra C.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ida, Christiane M.; Yang, Ping; Kosari, Farhad; Brock, Malcolm V.; Rogers, Kristen; Rutledge, Marian; Brown, Travis; Lee, Beverly; Shin, James; Trusty, Dante; Dhir, Rajiv; Siegfried, Jill M.; Potapova, Olga; Fedosenko, Konstantin V.; Nemirovich-Danchenko, Elena; Rusch, Valerie; Zakowski, Maureen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Fan, Zhen; Todaro, Nicole; Eckman, John; Myers, Jerome; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh B.; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bartlett, Johnm. S.; Kodeeswaran, Sugy; Zanke, Brent; Sekhon, Harman; David, Kerstin; Juhl, Hartmut; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Thorp, Richard; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Phu, Bui Duc; Hajek, Richard; PhiHung, Nguyen; Khan, Khurram Z.; Muley, Thomas; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Sheth, Margi; Yang, Liming; Buetow, Ken; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Schaefer, Carl; Guyer, Mark S.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.; Peterson, Jane; Sofia, Heidi J.; Thomson, Elizabeth; Meyerson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment.

  1. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  2. Pitavastatin suppressed liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, He-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Pitavastatin classically functions as a blood cholesterol-lowering drug. Previously, it was discovered with antiglioma stem cell properties through drug screening. However, whether it can be used for liver cancer cell therapy has never been reported. In this study, the cell viability and colony formation assay were utilized to analyze the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin on liver cancer cells. The cell cycle alteration was checked after pitavastatin treatment. Apoptosis-related protein expression and the effect of caspase inhibitor were also checked. The in vivo inhibitory effect of pitavastatin on the growth of liver tumor was also tested. It was found that pitavastatin inhibited growth and colony formation of liver cancer Huh-7 cells and SMMC7721 cells. It induced arrest of liver cancer cells at the G1 phase. Increased proportion of sub-G1 cells was observed after pitavastatin treatment. Pitavastatin promoted caspase-9 cleavage and caspase-3 cleavage in liver cancer cells. Caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reversed the cleavage of cytotoxic effect of pitavastatin. Moreover, pitavastatin decreased the tumor growth and improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study suggested the antiliver cancer effect of the old drug pitavastatin. It may be developed as a drug for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27621652

  3. The cancer-germline antigen SSX2 causes cell cycle arrest and DNA damage in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2011-01-01

    The SSX family of cancer and germline antigens is mainly expressed in the germ cells of healthy individuals as well as wide range of cancers and is therefore potential targets for immunotherapy. However, little is known about the role of SSX proteins in tumorigenesis and normal cell function. Here......, we show that SSX2 is involved in regulation of cancer cell growth. We found that ectopic expression of SSX2 in melanoma and colon cancer cells strongly reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis in vitro. Importantly, in a xenograft mouse model, the growth of tumors derived from SSX2 overexpressing...... an increase in the number of gamma-H2AX ‘DNA damage foci’, indicating replicative stress, which may lead to genomic instability. As the p53 tumor suppressor is an inducer of G1 arrest after DNA damage and often deregulated in cancer cells, we investigated if the growth reduction due to SSX2 expression was p53...

  4. Cerebral Rhizomucor Infection Treated by Posaconazole Delayed-Release Tablets in an Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego O. Andrey

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis (zygomycosis is an emerging fungal disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT recipients. A 30-year-old woman diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia and needing allo-HSCT presented pulmonary and cerebral infection due to Rhizomucor pusillus. This fungal infection was treated with surgical treatment and posaconazole delayed-release tablets. This strategy allowed reaching high drug levels that could not be obtained with the posaconazole solution.

  5. Unlocking Pandora's box: personalising cancer cell death in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Dean A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and a recognised cause of multidrug resistance. Over the last decade, insights into how apoptosis might be exploited in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and how cancer therapeutics might be used to engage apoptotic signalling in a personalised manner have changed markedly. We are now in the wake of a paradigm shift in stratified therapeutic approaches related to NSCLC. At the heart of this shift in thinking is the emerging knowledge that even the most drug-resistant cancers exhibit a functional death pathway and, critically, that this pathway can be efficiently engaged, leading to clinical benefit. This review will summarise current knowledge of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway dysfunction in NSCLC and how the next generation of targeted therapeutics might be used to exploit deficiencies in apoptotic signalling in a personalised manner to improve clinical outcome and predict therapeutic benefit.

  6. Combination Effect of Nimotuzumab with Radiation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Radiologicaland Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor nimotuzumab in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT-8, LoVo, WiDr, and HCT-116 were treated with nimotuzumab and/or radiation. The effects on cell proliferation, viability, and cell cycle progression were measured by MTT, clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. An immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in colorectal cancer cell lines. Under these experimental conditions, pre-treatment with nimotuzumab increased radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cell lines, except for cell line HCT-116. However, cell proliferation or cell cycle progression was not affected by the addition of nimotuzumab, irrespective of irradiation. Nimotuzumab enhanced the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting EGFR-mediated cell survival signaling. This study provided a rationale for the clinical application of the selective EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in combination with radiation in colorectal cancer cells.

  7. Hymenolepis nana: adoptive transfer of protective immunity and delayed type hypersensitivity response with mesenteric lymph node cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Okamoto, K

    1991-01-01

    A marked degree of footpad swelling was observed in BALB/c mice infected with Hymenolepis nana eggs, when soluble egg antigen was injected into their footpads 4 to 21 days after the egg infection, indicating delayed type hypersensitivity responses in infected mice. Adoptive transfer with mesenteric lymph node cells from donor mice (BALB/c strain; +/+) infected with eggs 4 days before cell collection could confer this hypersensitivity to recipient nude mice (BALB/c strain; nu/nu). These mesenteric lymph node cells were then divided into two fractions, blast-enriched and blast-depleted cells, by density gradient centrifugation with Percoll. The recipients intravenously injected with the blast-depleted cell fraction showed a marked increase in footpad thickness, whereas the intravenous transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction resulted in an insignificant increase in footpad thickness. The transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction, but not of the blast-depleted cell fraction, conferred a strong adoptive immunity on syngeneic recipient nude mice, when the immunity transferred was assessed by examining cysticercoids developed in the intestinal villi on Day 4 of challenge infection. The lack of delayed type hypersensitivity response in mice that received the blast-enriched cell population was not due to a lack of the capacity of the cells to induce the response, because the cells were capable of inducing a significant increase in thickness of footpads of normal mice when these cells were locally injected into the footpad together with soluble egg antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Dietary Ziziphus jujuba Fruit Influence on Aberrant Crypt Formation and Blood Cells in Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Chung-Teng; Wu, Wang-Hung; Chien, Se-Ping; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-01-01

    Ziziphus jujuba (ZJ) fruit is rich in bioactive functional components such as polysaccharides, triterpenoid acid, flavonoids and oleamide. It has been commonly used in the treatment of various diseases including diabetes, digestive disorders, diarrhea, skin infections, liver and urinary complaints. However, dietary effects with regard to chemoprevention of colon cancer have not been studied. The present study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of dietary ZJ against colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane (AOM)-dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-treated mice. AOM was injected (10 mg/kg b.wt., i.p.) and three cycles of 2% DSS in drinking water for 7 days with 14 days of normal drinking water in-between were administered to induce colitis-associated colon cancer. ZJ fruit was supplemented into feed at levels of 5 and 10%. Dietary ZJ significantly attenuated aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and also decreased the progression of hyperplasia to dysplasia. In addition, it significantly reduced circulating white blood cells, lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and platelets compared to colon cancer mice. We conclude that ZJ supplementation may delay the progression of colon cancer from hyperplasia to dysplasia and ultimately adenocarcinoma and cancer. In addition, it decreased circulating tumor-related leukocytes, main regulators of cancer inflammation. Dietary consumption of ZJ fruit attenuated the formation of ACF and delayed the progression of colon cancer.

  9. Early and Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Result in Comparable Reductions in CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion Marker Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Rachel; Hartogensis, Wendy; Deguit, Christian D; Krone, Melissa; Hoh, Rebecca; Hecht, Rick; Pilcher, Christopher D; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter W; McCune, Joseph M

    2017-03-23

    In untreated HIV infection, CD8+ T cell exhaustion (i.e., decreased proliferative and effector capacity) is associated with high levels of expression of co-inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, TIGIT, CD160, and 2B4. This is evident for both HIV-specific and non-HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated during chronic infection decreases but may not completely normalize the expression of such "exhaustion markers." Compared to initiation of ART later in the course of disease, initiation soon after infection reduces some parameters of chronic inflammation and adaptive immune dysfunction. However, it is not known if Early ART (e.g., initiated within the first six months after HIV infection) versus Delayed ART (e.g., initiated during chronic infection) preferentially reduces expression of exhaustion markers. We evaluated exhaustion marker expression on subsets of circulating effector and memory CD8+ T cells at longitudinal pre- and post-ART (two and five years on ART) time points from n=19 (Early ART) and n=23 (Delayed ART) individuals. Prior to ART, TIGIT and CD160 were expressed on a statistically significantly higher proportion of effector and transitional memory cells from individuals in the Delayed ART group: the timing of ART initiation, however, did not consistently affect the expression of the exhaustion markers once viral suppression was achieved. Understanding which factors do and do not regulate aspects of CD8+ T cell exhaustion, including the expression of exhaustion markers, is critical to inform the rational design of CD8+ T cell-based therapies to treat HIV, for which CD8+ T cell exhaustion remains an important barrier to efficacy.

  10. a Simple Evolutionary Model for Cancer Cell Population and its Implications on Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wen, Shutang; Li, Baoshun; Li, Yuxiao

    We established a simple evolutionary model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis. By taking cellular interactions into consideration, we introduced the evolutionary games theory into the quasispecies model. The fitness values are determined by both genotypes and cellular interactions. In the evolutionary model, a cancer cell population can evolve in different patterns. For single peak intrinsic fitness landscape, the evolution pattern can transit with increasing differentiation probability from malignant cells to benign cells in four different modes. For a large enough value of differentiation probability, the evolution is always the case that the malignant cells extinct ultimately, which might give some implications on cancer therapy.

  11. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... expression of ion transporters and channels is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, it is timely to consider this especially for epithelia. Epithelial cells are highly proliferative and epithelial cancers, carcinomas, account for about 90% of all cancers. In this review we will focus on ion...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed....

  12. Quasi-Periodicity, Chaos and Coexistence in the Time Delay Controlled Two-Cell DC-DC Buck Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubaâ, Karama; Feki, Moez

    In addition to border collision bifurcation, the time delay controlled two-cell DC/DC buck converter is shown to exhibit a chaotic behavior as well. The time delay controller adds new design parameters to the system and therefore the variation of a parameter may lead to different types of bifurcation. In this work, we present a thorough analysis of different scenarios leading to bifurcation and chaos. We show that the time delay controlled two-cell DC/DC buck converter may also exhibit a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation which for some parameter set may lead to a 2D torus that may then break yielding a chaotic behavior. Besides, the saturation of the controller can also lead to the coexistence of a stable focus and a chaotic attractor. The results are presented using numerical simulation of a discrete map of the two-cell DC/DC buck converter obtained by expressing successive crossings of Poincaré section in terms of each other.

  13. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab administered at approved doses may delay development of trastuzumab resistance by additively enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gábor; Szöőr, Árpád; Simon, László; Yarden, Yosef; Szöllősi, János; Vereb, György

    2016-10-01

    Although the recently concluded CLEOPATRA trial showed clinical benefits of combining trastuzumab and pertuzumab for treating HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab monotherapy is still the mainstay in adjuvant settings. Since trastuzumab resistance occurs in over half of these cancers, we examined the mechanisms by which treatment of intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant and -sensitive tumors can benefit from the combination of these antibodies. F(ab')2 of both trastuzumab and pertuzumab were generated and validated in order to separately analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-based and direct biological effects of the antibodies. Compared to monotherapy, combination of the two antibodies at clinically permitted doses enhanced the recruitment of natural killer cells responsible for ADCC, and significantly delayed the outgrowth of xenografts from intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells. Antibody dose-response curves of in vitro ADCC showed that antibody-mediated killing can be saturated, and the two antibodies exert an additive effect at sub-saturation doses. Thus, the additive effect in vivo indicates that therapeutic tissue levels likely do not saturate ADCC. Additionally, isobole studies with the in vitro trastuzumab-sensitive BT-474 cells showed that the direct biological effect of combined treatment is additive, and surpasses the maximum effect of either monotherapy. Our results suggest the combined therapy is expected to give results that are superior to monotherapy, whatever the type of HER2-positive tumor may be. The combination of both antibodies at maximum clinically approved doses should thus be administered to patients to recruit maximum ADCC and cause maximum direct biological growth inhibition.

  14. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Lincan [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Shen, Hongmei [Cancer Center of Integrative Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhao, Guangqiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Yang, Runxiang [Cancer Chemotherapy Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Cai, Xinyi [Colorectal Cancer Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Jin, Congguo [Cancer Institute, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Huang, Yunchao, E-mail: daliduanlincan@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  15. Shared signaling pathways in normal and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam K Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology have led to the identification of a subpopulation of cells within tumors that appear to be responsible for initiating and propagating the cancer. These tumor initiating cells are not only unique in their ability to generate tumors, but also share many similarities with elements of normal adult tissue stem cells, and have therefore been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. These CSCs often inappropriately use many of the same signaling pathways utilized by their normal stem cell counterparts which may present a challenge to the development of CSC specific therapies. Here, we discuss three major stem cell signaling pathways (Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog; with a focus on their function in normal mammary gland development and their misuse in breast cancer stem cell fate determination.