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Sample records for cancer cells based

  1. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  2. A Cell-Based Approach to Early Pancreatic Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0457 TITLE: A Cell-Based Approach to Early Pancreatic Cancer Detection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Ben Stanger...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Cell-Based Approach to Early Pancreatic Cancer Detection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0457 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...pancreatic cancer patients. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Pancreatic cancer , metastasis, circulating tumor cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION

  3. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanka Jähnisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs, which display an extraordinary capacity to induce, sustain, and regulate T-cell responses providing the opportunity of DC-based cancer vaccination strategies. Thus, clinical trials enrolling prostate cancer patients were conducted, which were based on the administration of DCs loaded with tumor-associated antigens. These clinical trials revealed that DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in prostate cancer patients. In this context, the administration of the vaccine sipuleucel-T consisting of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells including APCs, which were pre-exposed in vitro to the fusion protein PA2024, resulted in a prolonged overall survival among patients with metastatic castration-resistent prostate cancer. In April 2010, sipuleucel-T was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for prostate cancer therapy.

  4. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger; Rao, Jian Yu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is ~33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  5. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Sarah E; Gimzewski, James K [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jin Yusheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rao Jianyu [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: jrao@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: gim@chem.ucla.edu

    2008-09-24

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is {approx}33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  6. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Immune modulation by dendritic-cell-based cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHAITANYA KUMAR; SAKSHI KOHLI; POONAMALLE PARTHASARATHY BAPSY; ASHOK KUMAR VAID; MINISH JAIN; VENKATA SATHYA SURESH ATTILI; BANDANA SHARAN

    2017-03-01

    The interplay between host immunity and tumour cells has opened the possibility of targeting tumour cells bymodulation of the human immune system. Cancer immunotherapy involves the treatment of a tumour by utilizing therecombinant human immune system components to target the pro-tumour microenvironment or by revitalizing theimmune system with the ability to kill tumour cells by priming the immune cells with tumour antigens. In this review,current immunotherapy approaches to cancer with special focus on dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines arediscussed. Some of the DC-based vaccines under clinical trials for various cancer types are highlighted. Establishingtumour immunity involves a plethora of immune components and pathways; hence, combining chemotherapy,radiation therapy and various arms of immunotherapy, after analysing the benefits of individual therapeutic agents,might be beneficial to the patient.

  8. On dendritic cell-based therapy for cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morikazu Onji; Sk. Md. Fazle Akbar

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most prevalent antigen-presenting cell in vivo, had been widely characterized in the last three decades. DCs are present in almost all tissues of the body and play cardinal roles in recognition of microbial agents,autoantigens, allergens and alloantigen. DCs process the microbial agents or their antigens and migrate to lymphoid tissues to present the antigenic peptide to lymphocytes. This leads to activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. Initially, it was assumed that DCs are principally involved in the induction and maintenance of adaptive immune responses, but now it is evident that DCs also have important roles in innate immunity. These features make DCs very good candidates for therapy against various pathological conditions including malignancies. Initially, DC-based therapy was used in animal models of cancers. Data from these studies inspired considerable optimism and DC-based therapies was started in human cancers 8 years ago. In general,DC-based therapy has been found to be safe in patients with cancers, although few controlled trials have been conducted in this regard. Because the fundamentals principles of human cancers and animal models of cancers are different, the therapeutic efficacy of the ongoing regime of DC-based therapy in cancer patients is not satisfactory. In this review, we covered the various aspects that should be considered for developing better regime of DC-based therapy for human cancers.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Prostate: From Birth to Death and Potential Applications in Between. Prostate Cancer Foundation Tumor Microenvironment/ Immunology Working Group...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0304 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs CONTRACTING...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions

  10. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, G.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs; Jeffrey Karp ...clinical trials for CRPC. The team is composed of Drs. Jeffrey Karp Co-Director of Regenerative Therapeutics at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital...encapsulating a PSA-activated thapsigargin-based prodrug (G115, Fig. 5) were generated by the Karp lab with the properties outlined in Table 7. These

  12. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  13. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    In: Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology . DeVita Jr VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.), JB Lippincott Co., Philadelphia, p. 293, 1993. 2...Alteration of signal transduction in T cells from cancer patients. In: Important Advances in Oncology 1995. DeVita Jr VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.), JB...Rosenberg SA: Cell transfer therapy: Clinical applications. In: Biologic Therapy of Cancer. DeVita Jr VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds.), JB Lippincott

  14. Liquid-based cytology in oral cavity squamous cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navone, Roberto; Pentenero, Monica; Gandolfo, Sergio

    2011-04-01

    Oral exfoliative cytology is a practical tool for early diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and potentially malignant lesion (OPML), but is not yet extensively used. A literature review evaluated conventional and liquid-based oral diagnostic cytology efficacy and efficiency. 'Special' techniques like liquid-based cytology, computer-assisted cytology, Oral CDx, DNA ploidy, immunocytochemistry, molecular analyses and microhistology were reviewed. Cytology was useful when diagnosing OSCC and OPML. Oral CDx may assess dysplastic changes in clinically suspicious (class I) lesions, with doubtful efficacy in apparently innocuous (class II) lesions. Flow and/or image cytometry and immunocytochemistry can identify markers for the prediction of evolution of the OPML to OSCC. Molecular biology can detect the minimal residual clonal population of cancer cells in field cancerization and oral mucosa surgical margins. Microhistology is a reliable first level test in class II lesions for selected cases requiring surgical biopsy. Conventional cytology helps in OSCC and OPML screening; liquid-based cytology gives better results, enhancing both sensitivity and specificity, and provides material for further investigation. Sampling with the 'curette technique' permits collection of 'accidental' tissue fragments used as microbiopsies and proved a useful first-level test for the management of class II OPML.

  15. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations.

  16. A MULTISCALE, CELL-BASED FRAMEWORK FOR MODELING CANCER DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JIANG, YI [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Cancer remains to be one of the leading causes of death due to diseases. We use a systems approach that combines mathematical modeling, numerical simulation, in vivo and in vitro experiments, to develop a predictive model that medical researchers can use to study and treat cancerous tumors. The multiscale, cell-based model includes intracellular regulations, cellular level dynamics and intercellular interactions, and extracellular level chemical dynamics. The intracellular level protein regulations and signaling pathways are described by Boolean networks. The cellular level growth and division dynamics, cellular adhesion and interaction with the extracellular matrix is described by a lattice Monte Carlo model (the Cellular Potts Model). The extracellular dynamics of the signaling molecules and metabolites are described by a system of reaction-diffusion equations. All three levels of the model are integrated through a hybrid parallel scheme into a high-performance simulation tool. The simulation results reproduce experimental data in both avasular tumors and tumor angiogenesis. By combining the model with experimental data to construct biologically accurate simulations of tumors and their vascular systems, this model will enable medical researchers to gain a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular interactions associated with cancer progression and treatment.

  17. Dendritic cell-based nanovaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulis, L.E.M.; Mandal, S.; Kreutz, M.; Figdor, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy critically relies on the efficient presentation of tumor antigens to T-cells to elicit a potent anti-tumor immune response aimed at life-long protection against cancer recurrence. Recent advances in the nanovaccine field have now resulted in formulations that trigger strong anti

  18. Dendritic cell-based vaccine for pancreatic cancer in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masato Okamoto; Masanori Kobayashi; Yoshikazu Yonemitsu; Shigeo Koido; Sadamu Homma

    2016-01-01

    "Vaccell" is a dendritic cell(DC)-based cancer vaccine which has been established in Japan. The DCs play central roles in deciding the direction of host immune reactions as well as antigen presentation. We have demonstrated that DCs treated with a streptococcal immune adjuvant OK-432, produce interleukin-12, induce Th1-dominant state, and elicit anti-tumor effects, more powerful than those treated with the known DCmaturating factors. We therefore decided to mature DCs by the OK-432 for making an effective DC vaccine, Vaccell. The 255 patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer who received standard chemotherapy combined with DC vaccines, were analyzed retrospectively. Survival time of the patients with positive delayed type hypersensitivity(DTH) skin reaction was significantly prolonged as compared with that of the patients with negative DTH. The findings strongly suggest that there may be "Responders" for the DC vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. We next conducted a smallscale prospective clinical study. In this trial, we pulsed HLA class Ⅱ-restricted WT1 peptide(WT1-Ⅱ) in addition to HLA class Ⅰ-restricted peptide(WT1-Ⅰ) into the DCs. Survival of the patients received WT1-Ⅰ and-Ⅱ pulsed DC vaccine was significantly extended as compared to that of the patients received DCs pulsed with WT1-Ⅰ or WT1-Ⅱ alone. Furthermore, WT1-specific DTH positive patients showed significantly improved the overall survival as well as progressionfree survival as compared to the DTH negative patients. The activation of antigen-specific immune responses by DC vaccine in combination with standard chemotherapy may be associated with a good clinical outcome in advanced pancreatic cancer. We are now planning a pivotal study of the Vaccell in appropriate protocols in Japan.

  19. The evolving paradigm of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of immunity by cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, M; Rodvold, J J; Mahadevan, N R

    2016-01-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) has been thought to influence tumorigenesis mainly through cell-intrinsic, pro-survival effects. In recent years, however, new evidence has emerged showing that the UPR is also the source of cell-extrinsic effects, particularly directed at those immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Here we will review and discuss this new body of information with focus on the role of cell-extrinsic effects on innate and adaptive immunity, suggesting that the transmission of ER stress from cancer cells to myeloid cells in particular is an expedient used by cancer cells to control the immune microenvironment, which acquires pro-inflammatory as well as immune-suppressive characteristics. These new findings can now be seen in the broader context of similar phenomena described in Caenorhabditis elegans, and an analogy with quorum sensing and 'community effects' in prokaryotes and eukaryotes can be drawn, arguing that a cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of heterologous cells may be phylogenetically conserved. Finally, we will discuss the role of aneuploidy as an inducer of proteotoxic stress and potential initiator of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation. In presenting these new views, we wish to bring attention to the cell-extrinsic regulation of tumor growth, including tumor UPR-based cell-nonautonomous signaling as a mechanism of maintaining tumor heterogeneity and resistance to therapy, and suggest therapeutically targeting such mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  1. Cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma: Therapeutic implications based on stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite advances in its diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of patients with advanced HCC remains unfavorable. Recent advances in stem cell biology and associated technologies have enabled the identification of minor components of tumorigenic cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells, in cancers such as HCC. Furthermore, because CSC play a central role in tumor development, metastasis and recurrence, they are considered to be a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Hepatic CSC have been successfully identified using functional and cell surface markers. The analysis of purified hepatic CSC has revealed the molecular machinery and signaling pathways involved in their maintenance. In addition, epigenetic transcriptional regulation has been shown to be important in the development and maintenance of CSC. Although inhibitors of CSC show promise as CSC-targeting drugs, novel therapeutic approaches for the eradication of CSC are yet to be established. In this review, we describe recent progress in hepatic CSC research and provide a perspective on the available therapeutic approaches based on stem cell biology. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  2. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  3. [Mechanism research on the lupeol treatment on MCF-7 breast cancer cells based on cell metabonomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongdong; Kuang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Guiming; Peng, Zhangxiao; Wang, Yan; Yan, Chao

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the suppressive effects of lupeol on MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and explore its mechanism on inhibiting the proliferation of MCF-7 cells based on cell metabonomics and cell cycle. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used in the cell metabonomics assay to identify metabolites of MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 cells treated with lupeol. Then, orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to process the metabolic data and model parameters of OPLS-DA were as follows: R2Ycum = 0.988, Q2Ycum = 0.964, which indicated that these two groups could be distinguished clearly. The metabolites (VIP (variable importance in the projection) > 1) were analyzed by t-test, and finally, metabolites (t < 0.05) were identified to be biomarkers. Eleven metabolites such as butanedioic acid, phosphoric acid, L-leucine and isoleucine which had a significant contribution to classification were selected and preliminarily identified due to the accurate mass. Cell cycle assay was analyzed by FACSCalibur. Since the cells in the phase of G1 were increased significantly after the treatment of lupeol, we speculated that lupeol has a blocking effect on the generation of succinyl-CoA and the reaction of substrate phosphorylation of tricarboxylic acid cycle of MCF-7 cells. This study provided a novel approach to the mechanism research on the lupeol treatment on MCF-7 breast cancer cells based on cell metabonomics.

  4. Cell-SELEX-based selection of aptamers that recognize distinct targets on metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Ming; Bing, Tao; Wei, Jia-Yi; Chen, Zhe-Zhou; Shangguan, Di-Hua; Fang, Jin

    2014-08-01

    The development of diagnostic/therapeutic strategies against metastasis-related molecular targets is critical for improving the survival rate of cancer patients. Subtractive Cell-SELEX was performed using highly metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) LoVo cells and non-metastatic HCT-8 cells as the target and negative cells, respectively, for the selection of metastatic-specific aptamers. This process generated seven aptamers that displayed highly specific binding to the target cells with Kds in the nanomolar range. Based on the distinct chemical/biological properties of their individual cell surface targets, the aptamers were separately functionalized: the receptor-targeting aptamer W14 was used as a carrier for doxorubicin, resulting in the specific delivery of the drug to the target cells and a significant reduction of its cytotoxicity to non-target cells, and the non-receptor-binding aptamer W3 was used as a molecular probe conjugated to quantum dots for the targeted imaging of metastatic cancer cell lines, spontaneous lung metastasis murine tissue, and metastatic CRC patient tissues. In addition, these aptamers can be used in combination due to their lack of detectable mutual-binding interference. The study demonstrates that a panel of aptamers that recognize distinct features of target molecules can be obtained through single Cell-SELEX selection, and the selected aptamers may be individually functionalized for specific applications and/or utilized in combination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  6. Cell-based selection provides novel molecular probes for cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefah, Kwame; Bae, Kyung-Mi; Phillips, Joseph A; Siemann, Dietmar W; Su, Zhen; McClellan, Steve; Vieweg, Johannes; Tan, Weihong

    2013-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a malignant subpopulation of cells in hierarchically organized tumors. They constitute a subpopulation of malignant cells within a tumor mass and possess the ability to self-renew giving rise to heterogeneous tumor cell populations with a complex set of differentiated tumor cells. CSC may be the cause of metastasis and therapeutic refractory disease. Because few markers exist to identify and isolate pure CSC, we used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to create DNA aptamers that can identify novel molecular targets on the surfaces of live CSC. Out of 22 putative DNA sequences, 3 bound to ~90% and 5 bound to ~15% of DU145 prostate cancer cells. The 15% of cells that were positive for the second panel of aptamers expressed high levels of E-cadherin and CD44, had high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 activity, grew as spheroids under nonadherent culture conditions, and initiated tumors in immune-compromised mice. The discovery of the molecular targets of these aptamers could reveal novel CSC biomarkers.

  7. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  8. Selection of metastatic breast cancer cells based on adaptability of their metabolic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis

  9. Classifying cancers based on T cell infiltration and PD-L1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Michele W. L.; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Ribas, Antoni; Smyth, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy may become a major treatment backbone in many cancers over the next decade. There are numerous immune cell types found in cancers and many components of an immune reaction to cancer. Thus the tumor has many strategies to evade an immune response. It has been proposed that four different types of tumor microenvironment exist based on the presence or absence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression. We review this stratification and the latest in a series of results that shed light on new approaches for rationally designing ideal combination cancer therapies based on tumor immunology. PMID:25977340

  10. The Basics of Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells in T Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Lillian R; Bailey, Stefanie R; Wyatt, Megan M; Bowers, Jacob S; Majchrzak, Kinga; Nelson, Michelle H; Haupt, Carl; Paulos, Chrystal M; Varela, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) can mediate objective responses in patients with advanced malignancies. There have been major advances in this field, including the optimization of the ex vivo generation of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to ample numbers for effective ACT therapy via the use of natural and artificial antigen presenting cells (APCs). Herein we review the basic properties of APCs and how they have been manufactured through the years to augment vaccine and T cell-based cancer therapies. We then discuss how these novel APCs impact the function and memory properties of T cells. Finally, we propose new ways to synthesize aAPCs to augment the therapeutic effectiveness of antitumor T cells for ACT therapy.

  11. Generation of dendritic cell-based vaccine using high hydrostatic pressure for non-small cell lung cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hradilova, Nada; Sadilkova, Lenka; Palata, Ondrej; Mysikova, Dagmar; Mrazkova, Hana; Lischke, Robert; Spisek, Radek; Adkins, Irena

    2017-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) induces immunogenic death of tumor cells which confer protective anti-tumor immunity in vivo. Moreover, DC pulsed with HHP-treated tumor cells induced therapeutic effect in mouse cancer model. In this study, we tested the immunogenicity, stability and T cell stimulatory activity of human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC)-based HHP lung cancer vaccine generated in GMP compliant serum free medium using HHP 250 MPa. DC pulsed with HHP-killed lung cancer cells and poly(I:C) enhanced DC maturation, chemotactic migration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after 24h. Moreover, DC-based HHP lung cancer vaccine showed functional plasticity after transfer into serum-containing media and stimulation with LPS or CD40L after additional 24h. LPS and CD40L stimulation further differentially enhanced the expression of costimulatory molecules and production of IL-12p70. DC-based HHP lung cancer vaccine decreased the number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells and stimulated IFN-γ-producing tumor antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Tumor antigen specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses were detected in NSCLC patient’s against a selected tumor antigens expressed by lung cancer cell lines used for the vaccine generation. We also showed for the first time that protein antigen from HHP-killed lung cancer cells is processed and presented by DC to CD8+ T cells. Our results represent important preclinical data for ongoing NSCLC Phase I/II clinical trial using DC-based active cellular immunotherapy (DCVAC/LuCa) in combination with chemotherapy and immune enhancers. PMID:28187172

  12. A unique perylene-based DNA intercalator: localization in cell nuclei and inhibition of cancer cells and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zejun; Guo, Kunru; Yu, Jieshi; Sun, Haili; Tang, Jun; Shen, Jie; Müllen, Klaus; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2014-10-29

    To date, perylene derivatives have not been explored as DNA intercalator to inhibit cancer cells by intercalating into the base pairs of DNA. Herein, a water-soluble perylene bisimide (PBDI) that efficiently intercalates into the base pairs of DNA is synthesized. Excitingly, PBDI is superior to the commercial DNA intercalator, amonafide, for specific nuclear accumulation and effective suppression of cancer cells and tumors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Increased frequency of single base substitutions in a population of transcripts expressed in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchetti Laurent

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Base Substitutions (SBS that alter transcripts expressed in cancer originate from somatic mutations. However, recent studies report SBS in transcripts that are not supported by the genomic DNA of tumor cells. Methods We used sequence based whole genome expression profiling, namely Long-SAGE (L-SAGE and Tag-seq (a combination of L-SAGE and deep sequencing, and computational methods to identify transcripts with greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Millions of tags produced by 40 healthy and 47 cancer L-SAGE experiments were compared to 1,959 Reference Tags (RT, i.e. tags matching the human genome exactly once. Similarly, tens of millions of tags produced by 7 healthy and 8 cancer Tag-seq experiments were compared to 8,572 RT. For each transcript, SBS frequencies in healthy and cancer cells were statistically tested for equality. Results In the L-SAGE and Tag-seq experiments, 372 and 4,289 transcripts respectively, showed greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Increased SBS frequencies could not be attributed to known Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP, catalogued somatic mutations or RNA-editing enzymes. Hypothesizing that Single Tags (ST, i.e. tags sequenced only once, were indicators of SBS, we observed that ST proportions were heterogeneously distributed across Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC, healthy differentiated and cancer cells. ESC had the lowest ST proportions, whereas cancer cells had the greatest. Finally, in a series of experiments carried out on a single patient at 1 healthy and 3 consecutive tumor stages, we could show that SBS frequencies increased during cancer progression. Conclusion If the mechanisms generating the base substitutions could be known, increased SBS frequency in transcripts would be a new useful biomarker of cancer. With the reduction of sequencing cost, sequence based whole genome expression profiling could be used to characterize increased SBS frequency in patient’s tumor and aid diagnostic.

  14. Lineage relationship of prostate cancer cell types based on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ware Carol B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumor heterogeneity is a major factor in disease management. Heterogeneity could be due to multiple cancer cell types with distinct gene expression. Of clinical importance is the so-called cancer stem cell type. Cell type-specific transcriptomes are used to examine lineage relationship among cancer cell types and their expression similarity to normal cell types including stem/progenitor cells. Methods Transcriptomes were determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis for the following cell types. Putative prostate progenitor cell populations were characterized and isolated by expression of the membrane transporter ABCG2. Stem cells were represented by embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cells. The cancer cell types were Gleason pattern 3 (glandular histomorphology and pattern 4 (aglandular sorted from primary tumors, cultured prostate cancer cell lines originally established from metastatic lesions, xenografts LuCaP 35 (adenocarcinoma phenotype and LuCaP 49 (neuroendocrine/small cell carcinoma grown in mice. No detectable gene expression differences were detected among serial passages of the LuCaP xenografts. Results Based on transcriptomes, the different cancer cell types could be clustered into a luminal-like grouping and a non-luminal-like (also not basal-like grouping. The non-luminal-like types showed expression more similar to that of stem/progenitor cells than the luminal-like types. However, none showed expression of stem cell genes known to maintain stemness. Conclusions Non-luminal-like types are all representatives of aggressive disease, and this could be attributed to the similarity in overall gene expression to stem and progenitor cell types.

  15. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  16. Cell-Based Memory of DNA Damage in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    yeast [Ajo-Franklin et al., 2007]. A set of transcriptional activators was constructed and stably transformed into U2OS cells. In the resting state...factors for functionality and the use of insulator sequences to prevent heterochromatin formation (i.e. loss of gene function). As previously mentioned...locus that has been previously determined to remain euchromatic. Furthermore, we are using “ insulator sequences” (based on the insulator sequences

  17. A balanced review of the status T cell-based therapy against cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent commentary stirred intense controversy over the status of anti-cancer immunotherapy. The commentary suggested moving beyond current anti-cancer vaccines since active-specific immunization failed to match expectations toward a more aggressive approach involving the adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded tumor antigen-specific T cells. Although the same authors clarified their position in response to others' rebuttal more discussion needs to be devoted to the current status of T cell-based anti-cancer therapy. The accompanying publications review the status of adoptive transfer of cancer vaccines on one hand and active-specific immunization on the other. Hopefully, reading these articles will offer a balanced view of the current status of antigen-specific ant-cancer therapies and suggest future strategies to foster unified efforts to complement either approach with the other according to specific biological principles.

  18. Agent-Based Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell Driven Solid Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Macklin, Paul; Enderling, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tumor growth has become an invaluable tool to simulate complex cell-cell interactions and emerging population-level dynamics. Agent-based models are commonly used to describe the behavior and interaction of individual cells in different environments. Behavioral rules can be informed and calibrated by in vitro assays, and emerging population-level dynamics may be validated with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we describe the design and implementation of a lattice-based agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth.

  19. Highly sensitive detection of cancer cells with an electrochemical cytosensor based on boronic acid functional polythiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervisevic, Muamer; Senel, Mehmet; Sagir, Tugba; Isik, Sevim

    2017-04-15

    The detection of cancer cells through important molecular recognition target such as sialic acid is significant for the clinical diagnosis and treatment. There are many electrochemical cytosensors developed for cancer cells detection but most of them have complicated fabrication processes which results in poor reproducibility and reliability. In this study, a simple, low-cost, and highly sensitive electrochemical cytosensor was designed based on boronic acid-functionalized polythiophene. In cytosensors fabrication simple single-step procedure was used which includes coating pencil graphite electrode (PGE) by means of electro-polymerization of 3-Thienyl boronic acid and Thiophen. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used as an analytical methods to optimize and measure analytical performances of PGE/P(TBA0.5Th0.5) based electrode. Cytosensor showed extremely good analytical performances in detection of cancer cells with linear rage of 1×10(1) to 1×10(6) cellsmL(-1) exhibiting low detection limit of 10 cellsmL(-1) and incubation time of 10min. Next to excellent analytical performances, it showed high selectivity towards AGS cancer cells when compared to HEK 293 normal cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs). This method is promising for future applications in early stage cancer diagnosis.

  20. NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy: from basic biology to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yin, Jie; Li, Ting; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Leavenworth, JianMei; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which recognize and kill target cells independent of antigen specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching, play pivotal roles in immune defence against tumors. However, tumor cells often acquire the ability to escape NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Thus, understanding mechanisms underlying regulation of NK cell phenotype and function within the tumor environment is instrumental for designing new approaches to improve the current cell-based immunotherapy. In this review, we elaborate the main biological features and molecular mechanisms of NK cells that pertain to regulation of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor activity. We further overview current clinical approaches regarding NK cell-based cancer therapy, including cytokine infusion, adoptive transfer of autologous or allogeneic NK cells, applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing NK cells and adoptive transfer of memory-like NK cells. With these promising clinical outcomes and fuller understanding the basic questions raised in this review, we foresee that NK cell-based approaches may hold great potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  1. In vitro cultured lung cancer cells are not suitable for animal-based breath biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallschmidt, Kristin; Becker, Roland; Zwaka, Hanna; Menzel, Randolf; Johnen, Dorothea; Fischer-Tenhagen, Carola; Rolff, Jana; Nehls, Irene

    2015-02-10

    In vitro cultured lung cancer cell lines were investigated regarding the possible identification of volatile organic compounds as potential biomarkers. Gas samples from the headspace of pure culture medium and from the cultures of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 and Lu7466 were exposed to polypropylene fleece in order to absorb odour components. Sniffer dogs were trained with loaded fleeces of both cell lines, and honey bees were trained with fleeces exposed to A549. Afterwards, their ability to distinguish between cell-free culture medium odour and lung cancer cell odour was tested. Neither bees nor dogs were able to discriminate between odours from the cancer cell cultures and the pure culture medium. Solid phase micro extraction followed by gas chromatography with mass selective detection produced profiles of volatiles from the headspace offered to the animals. The profiles from the cell lines were largely similar; distinct differences were based on the decrease of volatile culture medium components due to the cells' metabolic activity. In summary, cultured lung cancer cell lines do not produce any biomarkers recognizable by animals or gas chromatographic analysis.

  2. Lymphatic Reprogramming of Adult Endothelial Stem Cells for a Cell-Based Therapy for Lymphedema in Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Therapy for Lymphedema inBreast Cancer Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Young Kwon Hong, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lymphatic Reprogramming of Adult Endothelial Stem Cells for a Cell-Based Therapy for Lymphedema in... lymphedema patients. The key significance of our proposal is to utilize the elusive circulating adult stem cells to avoid the ethical and immunological

  3. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  4. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  5. Optimization of interdigitated electrode (IDE) arrays for impedance based evaluation of Hs 578T cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Frank, Jr.; Price, Dorielle T.; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2010-04-01

    This paper examines the effect of electrode width and spacing of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) for impedance-based cancer detection and characterization. IDEs are desired for bioimpedance measurements because their fabrication process is simple and inexpensive, and the geometry presents a potential for improved sensitivity over other microelectrode designs. Optimizing the geometry will eliminate this problem and increase the sensitivity of these devices for bioimpedance measurement applications. This paper evaluates the effect of IDE geometry on the sensitivity of breast cancer cell impedance measurements. Equivalent circuit data analysis was conducted to quantify and characterize the cells.

  6. Base excision repair activities differ in human lung cancer cells and corresponding normal controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahalil, Bensu; Bohr, Vilhelm A; De Souza-Pinto, Nadja C

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is thought to play a role in carcinogenesis by causing mutations, and indeed accumulation of oxidized DNA bases has been observed in samples obtained from tumors but not from surrounding tissue within the same patient. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway...... for the repair of oxidized modifications both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. In order to ascertain whether diminished BER capacity might account for increased levels of oxidative DNA damage in cancer cells, the activities of BER enzymes in three different lung cancer cell lines and their non......-cancerous counterparts were measured using oligonucleotide substrates with single DNA lesions to assess specific BER enzymes. The activities of four BER enzymes, OGG1, NTH1, UDG and APE1, were compared in mitochondrial and nuclear extracts. For each specific lesion, the repair activities were similar among the three...

  7. Optical tweezers based measurement of PLGA-NP interaction with prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesener, Thea; Mondal, Argha; Menon, Jyothi U.; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-02-01

    In order to quantify the binding capacities of polymeric, biodegradable and biocompatible poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), conjugated with either R11 peptides or Folic Acid, the strength by detach from prostate cancer cells (PCCs) was measured via optical tweezers based measurements. Specific nanoparticle drug delivery eliminates the previously used diffuse, full-body application of potent cancer drugs by localizing drug delivery to malignant cells. Precise monitoring of NP position in the trap near the PCC membrane using a fluorescence imaging based method enabled calibration of the trap stiffness and subsequent force measurements. By defining the force with which the many diverse conjugates and coatings of different types of NPs bind the vast array of cancer cell types, chemotherapeutic drugs can be delivered in a specific manner with the optimal particle and corresponding conjugates. Further, and most significantly, the rupture force measurements will reveal whether or not targeted nanoparticles can overcome the force of blood attempting to pull the particle from designated cells. Our preliminary study revealed that the binding between PLGA-NPs and prostate cancer cells is enhanced by coating with folic acid or R11 peptides. These conjugates increase the force required to detach the particle thus allowing particles to overcome drag force of the blood in prostate capillary systems.

  8. Prediction of cancer cell sensitivity to natural products based on genomic and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhenyu; Zhang, Wenna; Lu, Yongming; Yang, Qiaoyue; Ding, Qiuying; Xia, Junfeng; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural products play a significant role in cancer chemotherapy. They are likely to provide many lead structures, which can be used as templates for the construction of novel drugs with enhanced antitumor activity. Traditional research approaches studied structure-activity relationship of natural products and obtained key structural properties, such as chemical bond or group, with the purpose of ascertaining their effect on a single cell line or a single tissue type. Here, for the first time, we develop a machine learning method to comprehensively predict natural products responses against a panel of cancer cell lines based on both the gene expression and the chemical properties of natural products. The results on two datasets, training set and independent test set, show that this proposed method yields significantly better prediction accuracy. In addition, we also demonstrate the predictive power of our proposed method by modeling the cancer cell sensitivity to two natural products, Curcumin and Resveratrol, which indicate that our method can effectively predict the response of cancer cell lines to these two natural products. Taken together, the method will facilitate the identification of natural products as cancer therapies and the development of precision medicine by linking the features of patient genomes to natural product sensitivity.

  9. Prediction of cancer cell sensitivity to natural products based on genomic and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Yue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural products play a significant role in cancer chemotherapy. They are likely to provide many lead structures, which can be used as templates for the construction of novel drugs with enhanced antitumor activity. Traditional research approaches studied structure-activity relationship of natural products and obtained key structural properties, such as chemical bond or group, with the purpose of ascertaining their effect on a single cell line or a single tissue type. Here, for the first time, we develop a machine learning method to comprehensively predict natural products responses against a panel of cancer cell lines based on both the gene expression and the chemical properties of natural products. The results on two datasets, training set and independent test set, show that this proposed method yields significantly better prediction accuracy. In addition, we also demonstrate the predictive power of our proposed method by modeling the cancer cell sensitivity to two natural products, Curcumin and Resveratrol, which indicate that our method can effectively predict the response of cancer cell lines to these two natural products. Taken together, the method will facilitate the identification of natural products as cancer therapies and the development of precision medicine by linking the features of patient genomes to natural product sensitivity.

  10. Droplet-based microtumor model to assess cell-ECM interactions and drug resistance of gastric cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Minjeong; Koh, Ilkyoo; Lee, Seok Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Pilnam

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a common aggressive malignant tumor with high incidence and mortality worldwide. GC is classified into intestinal and diffuse types according to the histo-morphological features. Because of distinctly different clinico-pathological features, new cancer therapy strategies and in vitro preclinical models for the two pathological variants of GC is necessary. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) influence the biological behavior of tumor cells, we hypothesized that GC might be more similarly modeled in 3D with matrix rather than in 2D. Herein, we developed a microfluidic-based a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro gastric cancer model, with subsequent drug resistance assay. AGS (intestinal type) and Hs746T (diffuse type) gastric cancer cell lines were encapsulated in collagen beads with high cellular viability. AGS exhibited an aggregation pattern with expansive growth, whereas Hs746T showed single-cell-level infiltration. Importantly, in microtumor models, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastatic genes were upregulated, whereas E-cadherin was downregulated. Expression of ß-catenin was decreased in drug-resistant cells, and chemosensitivity toward the anticancer drug (5-FU) was observed in microtumors. These results suggest that in vitro microtumor models may represent a biologically relevant platform for studying gastric cancer cell biology and tumorigenesis, and for accelerating the development of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:28128310

  11. Natural killer cell-based adoptive immunotherapy eradicates and drives differentiation of chemoresistant bladder cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Teixeira, Margarida; Paiva-Oliveira, Daniela; Parada, Belmiro; Alves, Vera; Sousa, Vitor; Chijioke, Obinna; Münz, Christian; Reis, Flávio; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Gomes, Célia

    2016-10-21

    High-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a high risk of recurrence and progression to muscle-invasive forms, which seems to be largely related to the presence of tumorigenic stem-like cell populations that are refractory to conventional therapies. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Natural Killer (NK) cell-based adoptive immunotherapy against chemoresistant bladder cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in a pre-clinical relevant model, using NK cells from healthy donors and NMIBC patients. Cytokine-activated NK cells from healthy donors and from high-grade NMIBC patients were phenotypically characterized and assayed in vitro against stem-like and bulk differentiated bladder cancer cells. Stem-like cells were isolated from two bladder cancer cell lines using the sphere-forming assay. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in mice bearing a CSC-induced orthotopic bladder cancer. Animals were treated by intravesical instillation of interleukin-activated NK cells. Tumor response was evaluated longitudinally by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. NK cells from healthy donors upon activation with IL-2 and IL-15 kills indiscriminately both stem-like and differentiated tumor cells via stress ligand recognition. In addition to cell killing, NK cells shifted CSCs towards a more differentiated phenotype, rendering them more susceptible to cisplatin, highlighting the benefits of a possible combined therapy. On the contrary, NK cells from NMIBC patients displayed a low density on NK cytotoxicity receptors, adhesion molecules and a more immature phenotype, losing their ability to kill and drive differentiation of CSCs. The local administration, via the transurethral route, of activated NK cells from healthy donors provides an efficient tumor infiltration and a subsequent robust tumoricidal activity against bladder cancer with high selective cytolytic activity against CSCs, leading to a dramatic reduction in tumor burden from 80 % to complete

  12. Raman-based identification of circulating tumor cells for cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Beleites, Claudia; Schie, Iwan W.; Clement, Joachim H.; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that can be extracted from body fluids offer new prospects in cancer diagnostics. An overview about our recent achievements is presented to use Raman-based methodologies to distinguish cancer cells from normal blood cells. In a first approach, a microfluidic chip was developed to collect Raman spectra from optically trapped cells. Whereas sensitivities and specificities were promising, the throughput was not compatible with the expected low number of CTCs per million white blood cells. A second strategy immobilized up to 200,000 cells onto a microhole array made of silicon nitride. Rapid microscopic screening can be applied to pre-select a subset of cells from which Raman spectra are collected for specific CTC identification. As this approach is compatible with living cells and Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation is non-destructive, a robotic arm can select positively identified CTCs for in-depth biochemical assessment. Finally, an in vivo approach directly collects CTCs from the blood stream. This way reduces the cell number to a manageable size that is subjected to Raman spectroscopy for cell typing and enumeration. An integrated acquisition mode was introduced to further increase the throughput and robustness of single cell classification.

  13. Co-culture of apoptotic breast cancer cells with immature dendritic cells: a novel approach for DC-based vaccination in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jin [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Liu, Qiang [Department of Hematology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Jiandong [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Ren, Qinyou [Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Cao, Wei [Department of Interventional Radiology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yang, Jingyue; Yu, Zhaocai [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Yu, Fang [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Wu, Yanlan [Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Shi, Hengjun [Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Liu, Wenchao [Department of Oncology, State Key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xijing Hospital, the Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2012-04-27

    A dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategy could reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of breast cancer patients. However, while therapy-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells can enhance maturation and antigen presentation of DCs, whether this effect occurs in breast cancer is currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of doxorubicin (ADM)-induced apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the activation of DCs. ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells could effectively induce immature DC (iDC) maturation. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of DC maturity marker CD83 was 23.3 in the ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cell group compared with 8.5 in the MCF-7 cell group. The MFI of DC co-stimulatory marker CD86 and HLA-DR were also increased after iDCs were treated with ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the proliferating autologous T-lymphocytes increased from 14.2 to 40.3% after incubated with DCs induced by apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The secretion of interferon-γ by these T-lymphocytes was also increased. In addition, cell-cell interaction between apoptotic MCF-7 cells and iDCs, but not soluble factors released by apoptotic MCF-7 cells, was crucial for the maturation of iDCs. These findings constitute a novel in vitro DC-based vaccine strategy for the treatment of breast cancer by ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells.

  14. Co-culture of apoptotic breast cancer cells with immature dendritic cells: a novel approach for DC-based vaccination in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A dendritic cell (DC-based vaccine strategy could reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of breast cancer patients. However, while therapy-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells can enhance maturation and antigen presentation of DCs, whether this effect occurs in breast cancer is currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effect of doxorubicin (ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the activation of DCs. ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells could effectively induce immature DC (iDC maturation. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of DC maturity marker CD83 was 23.3 in the ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cell group compared with 8.5 in the MCF-7 cell group. The MFI of DC co-stimulatory marker CD86 and HLA-DR were also increased after iDCs were treated with ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the proliferating autologous T-lymphocytes increased from 14.2 to 40.3% after incubated with DCs induced by apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The secretion of interferon-γ by these T-lymphocytes was also increased. In addition, cell-cell interaction between apoptotic MCF-7 cells and iDCs, but not soluble factors released by apoptotic MCF-7 cells, was crucial for the maturation of iDCs. These findings constitute a novel in vitro DC-based vaccine strategy for the treatment of breast cancer by ADM-induced apoptotic MCF-7 cells.

  15. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  16. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Nielsen, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    of responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior...

  17. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  18. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  19. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo.

  20. The butterfly effect in cancer: a single base mutation can remodel the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jonathan R; Zhang, Yaoyang; Liao, Lujian; Ueno, Lynn; Du, Lisa; Jonkers, Marloes; Yates, John R; Vogt, Peter K

    2015-01-27

    We have compared the proteome, transcriptome, and metabolome of two cell lines: the human breast epithelial line MCF-10A and its mutant descendant MCF-10A-H1047R. These cell lines are derived from the same parental stock and differ by a single amino acid substitution (H1047R) caused by a single nucleotide change in one allele of the PIK3CA gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit p110α of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). They are considered isogenic. The H1047R mutation of PIK3CA is one of the most frequently encountered somatic cancer-specific mutations. In MCF-10A, this mutation induces an extensive cellular reorganization that far exceeds the known signaling activities of PI3K. The changes are highly diverse, with examples in structural protein levels, the DNA repair machinery, and sterol synthesis. Gene set enrichment analysis reveals a highly significant concordance of the genes differentially expressed in MCF-10A-H1047R cells and the established protein and RNA signatures of basal breast cancer. No such concordance was found with the specific gene signatures of other histological types of breast cancer. Our data document the power of a single base mutation, inducing an extensive remodeling of the cell toward the phenotype of a specific cancer.

  1. One Step Quick Detection of Cancer Cell Surface Marker by Integrated NiFe-based Magnetic Biosensing Cell Cultural Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenchen Bao; Lei Chen; Tao Wang; Chong Lei; Furong Tian; Daxiang Cui; Yong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    RGD peptides has been used to detect cell surface integrin and direct clinical effective therapeutic drug selection. Herein we report that a quick one step detection of cell surface marker that was realized by a specially designed NiFe-based magnetic biosensing cell chip combined with functionalized magnetic nanoparti-cles. Magnetic nanoparticles with 20-30 nm in diameter were prepared by coprecipitation and modified with RGD-4C, and the resultant RGD-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were used for targeting cancer cells cul-tured on the NiFe-based magnetic biosensing chip and distinguish the amount of cell surface receptor-integrin. Cell lines such as Calu3, Hela, A549, CaFbr, HEK293 and HUVEC exhibiting different integrin expression were chosen as test samples. Calu3, Hela, HEK293 and HUVEC cells were successfully identified. This approach has advantages in the qualitative screening test. Compared with traditional method, it is fast, sensitive, low cost, easy-operative, and needs very little human intervention. The novel method has great potential in applications such as fast clinical cell surface marker detection, and diagnosis of early cancer, and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  2. Platinum-Based Drugs Differentially Affect the Ultrastructure of Breast Cancer Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adawi, Kawther; Al-Nabhani, Abdurahman; Al-Kindi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although platinum-based drugs (PBDs) are effective anticancer agents, responsive patients eventually become resistant. While resistance of some cancers to PBDs has been explored, the cellular responses of BC cells are not studied yet. Therefore, we aim to assess the differential effects of PBDs on BC ultrastructure. Three representative cells were treated with different concentrations and timing of Cisplatin, Carboplatin, and Oxaliplatin. Changes on cell surface and ultrastructure were detected by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In SEM, control cells were semiflattened containing microvilli with extending lamellipodia while treated ones were round with irregular surface and several pores, indicating drug entry. Prolonged treatment resembled distinct apoptotic features such as shrinkage, membrane blebs, and narrowing of lamellipodia with blunt microvilli. TEM detected PBDs' deposits that scattered among cellular organelles inducing structural distortion, lumen swelling, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. Deposits were attracted to fat droplets, explained by drug hydrophobic properties, while later they were located close to cell membrane, suggesting drug efflux. Phagosomes with destructed organelles and deposits were detected as defending mechanism. Understanding BC cells response to PBDs might provide new insight for an effective treatment.

  3. Quantum dots-based multiplexed immunohistochemistry of protein expression in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Shi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs are bright fluorescent nanoparticles that have been successfully used for the detection of biomarker expression in cells. The objective of the present study is to use this technology in a multiplexing manner to determine at a single cell level the expression of a cell-specific bio-marker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA expressed by human prostate cancer LNCaP and ARCaP cell lines. Here we compared the sensitivity of immunohistochemistry (IHC and QD-based detection of AR and PSA expression in these cell lines. Further, we conducted multiplexing QD-based detection of PSA and androgen receptor (AR expression in LNCaP cells subjecting to androgen (R1881 stimulation. The involvement of AR in PSA regulation in LNCaP cells, at a single cell level, was confirmed by the co-incubation of LNCaP cells in the presence of both R1881 and its receptor antagonist, bicalutamide (Casodex. We showed here the superior quality of QDs, in comparison to IHC, for the detection of AR and PSA in cultured LNCaP and ARCaP cells. Multiplexing QDs technique can be used to detect simultaneously AR and PSA expression induced by R1881 which promoted AR translocation from its cytosolic to the nuclear compartment.We observed AR antagonist, bicalutamide, inhibited AR nuclear translocation and PSA, but not AR expression in LNCaP cells.

  4. Rationale for a multimodality strategy to enhance the efficacy of dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashodeep eDatta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC, master antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate interactions between the adaptive and innate immune arms, are increasingly utilized in cancer immunotherapy. Despite remarkable progress in our understanding of DC immunobiology, as well as several encouraging clinical applications — such as DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer — clinically effective DC-based immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. The complex interplay between diverse molecular and immune processes that govern resistance to DC-based vaccination compels a multimodality approach, encompassing a growing arsenal of antitumor agents which target these distinct processes and synergistically enhance DC function. These include antibody-based targeted molecular therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, therapies that inhibit immunosuppressive cellular elements, conventional cytotoxic modalities, and immune potentiating adjuvants. It is likely that in the emerging era of precision cancer therapeutics, tangible clinical benefits will only be realized with a multifaceted—and personalized—approach combining DC-based vaccination with adjunctive strategies.

  5. RNA-Based TWIST1 Inhibition via Dendrimer Complex to Reduce Breast Cancer Cell Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Finlay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in the United States, and survival rates are lower for patients with metastases and/or triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC; ER, PR, and Her2 negative. Understanding the mechanisms of cancer metastasis is therefore crucial to identify new therapeutic targets and develop novel treatments to improve patient outcomes. A potential target is the TWIST1 transcription factor, which is often overexpressed in aggressive breast cancers and is a master regulator of cellular migration through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Here, we demonstrate an siRNA-based TWIST1 silencing approach with delivery using a modified poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer. Our results demonstrate that SUM1315 TNBC cells efficiently take up PAMAM-siRNA complexes, leading to significant knockdown of TWIST1 and EMT-related target genes. Knockdown lasts up to one week after transfection and leads to a reduction in migration and invasion, as determined by wound healing and transwell assays. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PAMAM dendrimers can deliver siRNA to xenograft orthotopic tumors and siRNA remains in the tumor for at least four hours after treatment. These results suggest that further development of dendrimer-based delivery of siRNA for TWIST1 silencing may lead to a valuable adjunctive therapy for patients with TNBC.

  6. Dendritic cell based tumor vaccination in prostate and renal cell cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Draube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than 200 clinical trials have been performed using dendritic cells (DC as cellular adjuvants in cancer. Yet the key question whether there is a link between immune and clinical response remains unanswered. Prostate and renal cell cancer (RCC have been extensively studied for DC-based immunotherapeutic interventions and were therefore chosen to address the above question by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data was obtained after a systematic literature search from clinical trials that enrolled at least 6 patients. Individual patient data meta-analysis was performed by means of conditional logistic regression grouped by study. Twenty nine trials involving a total of 906 patients were identified in prostate cancer (17 and RCC (12. Objective response rates were 7.7% in prostate cancer and 12.7% in RCC. The combined percentages of objective responses and stable diseases (SD amounted to a clinical benefit rate (CBR of 54% in prostate cancer and 48% in RCC. Meta-analysis of individual patient data (n = 403 revealed the cellular immune response to have a significant influence on CBR, both in prostate cancer (OR 10.6, 95% CI 2.5-44.1 and in RCC (OR 8.4, 95% CI 1.3-53.0. Furthermore, DC dose was found to have a significant influence on CBR in both entities. Finally, for the larger cohort of prostate cancer patients, an influence of DC maturity and DC subtype (density enriched versus monocyte derived DC as well as access to draining lymph nodes on clinical outcome could be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As a 'proof of principle' a statistically significant effect of DC-mediated cellular immune response and of DC dose on CBR could be demonstrated. Further findings concerning vaccine composition, quality control, and the effect of DC maturation status are relevant for the immunological development of DC-based vaccines.

  7. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  8. Cell type classifiers for breast cancer microscopic images based on fractal dimension texture analysis of image color layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitaree, Sirinapa; Phinyomark, Angkoon; Boonyaphiphat, Pleumjit; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    Having a classifier of cell types in a breast cancer microscopic image (BCMI), obtained with immunohistochemical staining, is required as part of a computer-aided system that counts the cancer cells in such BCMI. Such quantitation by cell counting is very useful in supporting decisions and planning of the medical treatment of breast cancer. This study proposes and evaluates features based on texture analysis by fractal dimension (FD), for the classification of histological structures in a BCMI into either cancer cells or non-cancer cells. The cancer cells include positive cells (PC) and negative cells (NC), while the normal cells comprise stromal cells (SC) and lymphocyte cells (LC). The FD feature values were calculated with the box-counting method from binarized images, obtained by automatic thresholding with Otsu's method of the grayscale images for various color channels. A total of 12 color channels from four color spaces (RGB, CIE-L*a*b*, HSV, and YCbCr) were investigated, and the FD feature values from them were used with decision tree classifiers. The BCMI data consisted of 1,400, 1,200, and 800 images with pixel resolutions 128 × 128, 192 × 192, and 256 × 256, respectively. The best cross-validated classification accuracy was 93.87%, for distinguishing between cancer and non-cancer cells, obtained using the Cr color channel with window size 256. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm, based on fractal dimension features extracted from a color channel, performs well in the automatic classification of the histology in a BCMI. This might support accurate automatic cell counting in a computer-assisted system for breast cancer diagnosis.

  9. Fluorescence-based co-culture of normal and cancerous cells as an indicator of therapeutic effects in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro

    2014-10-15

    Comprehensive evaluation of the effects of cancer therapies in vitro is difficult because of the need to distinguish the main effects from the side effects within the data. This problem cannot be overcome by methods involving monoculture, because the effects of anti-cancer drugs in a monoculture can only be measured on either normal or cancerous cells in isolation. In order to promote therapeutic development, therefore, we need a novel drug evaluation method which can simultaneously determine both therapeutic activity and toxicity under a co-culture of normal and cancerous cells. Co-culture creates a more biomimetic condition in comparison to monoculture. The novel method proposed in this study uses an easy experiment for estimating the effects of treatments with various kinds of drugs as a solution to the abovementioned problems. We have previously established two cell lines: a rat gastric mucosal cell line (RGM) and its corresponding cancerous mutant cell line (RGK). In this study, we have developed a new evaluation procedure using a co-culture of green fluorescent protein-expressing RGM cells (RGM-GFP) and kusabira orange-expressing RGK cells (RGK-KO). These cell lines emit green and red fluorescence, respectively. We demonstrated the capability of the method in evaluations of the cancer-selective effects of anti-cancer drugs and X-ray treatment. These results clearly distinguished the cancer-selective toxicity of the applied therapies.

  10. Diagnostic approach for cancer cells in urine sediments by 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic detection in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Makito; Nakai, Yasushi; Anai, Satoshi; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Kuwada, Masaomi; Onishi, Sayuri; Chihara, Yoshitomo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-05-01

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma is diagnosed and followed up after transurethral resection using a combination of cystoscopy, urine cytology and urine biomarkers at regular intervals. However, cystoscopy can overlook flat lesions like carcinoma in situ, and the sensitivity of urinary tests is poor in low-grade tumors. There is an emergent need for an objective and easy urinary diagnostic test for the management of bladder cancer. In this study, three different modalities for 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-based photodynamic diagnostic tests were used. We developed a compact-size, desktop-type device quantifying red fluorescence in cell suspensions, named "Cellular Fluorescence Analysis Unit" (CFAU). Urine samples from 58 patients with bladder cancer were centrifuged, and urine sediments were then treated with ALA. ALA-treated sediments were subjected to three fluorescence detection assays, including the CFAU assay. The overall sensitivities of conventional cytology, BTA, NMP22, fluorescence cytology, fluorescent spectrophotometric assay and CFAU assay were 48%, 33%, 40%, 86%, 86% and 87%, respectively. Three different ALA-based assays showed high sensitivity and specificity. The ALA-based assay detected low-grade and low-stage bladder urothelial cells at shigher rate (68-80% sensitivity) than conventional urine cytology, BTA and NMP22 (8-20% sensitivity). Our findings demonstrate that the ALA-based fluorescence detection assay is promising tool for the management of bladder cancer. Development of a rapid and automated device for ALA-based photodynamic assay is necessary to avoid the variability induced by troublesome steps and low stability of specimens.

  11. Loss of cadherin-based cell adhesion and the progression of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlug, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Lobular breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that is histologically characterized by a noncohesive growth pattern of small regular cells, where single cells infiltrate as one-layered strands of cells. This noncohesive growth pattern is due to inactivation of the E-cadherin complex and a subseque

  12. Treatment Analysis in a Cancer Stem Cell Context Using a Tumor Growth Model Based on Cellular Automata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Monteagudo

    Full Text Available Cancer can be viewed as an emergent behavior in terms of complex system theory and artificial life, Cellular Automata (CA being the tool most used for studying and characterizing the emergent behavior. Different approaches with CA models were used to model cancer growth. The use of the abstract model of acquired cancer hallmarks permits the direct modeling at cellular level, where a cellular automaton defines the mitotic and apoptotic behavior of cells, and allows for an analysis of different dynamics of the cellular system depending on the presence of the different hallmarks. A CA model based on the presence of hallmarks in the cells, which includes a simulation of the behavior of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC and their implications for the resultant growth behavior of the multicellular system, was employed. This modeling of cancer growth, in the avascular phase, was employed to analyze the effect of cancer treatments in a cancer stem cell context. The model clearly explains why, after treatment against non-stem cancer cells, the regrowth capability of CSCs generates a faster regrowth of tumor behavior, and also shows that a continuous low-intensity treatment does not favor CSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby allowing an unproblematic control of future tumor regrowth. The analysis performed indicates that, contrary to the current attempts at CSC control, trying to make CSC proliferation more difficult is an important point to consider, especially in the immediate period after a standard treatment for controlling non-stem cancer cell proliferation.

  13. Discrimination of healthy and cancer cells of the bladder by metabolic state, based on autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, S.; Litvinova, Karina; Rafailov, E. U.; Nabi, G.

    2015-02-01

    Bladder cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide (4th in men). It is responsible for high patient morbidity and displays rapid recurrence and progression. Lack of sensitivity of gold standard techniques (white light cystoscopy, voided urine cytology) means many early treatable cases are missed. The result is a large number of advanced cases of bladder cancer which require extensive treatment and monitoring. For this reason, bladder cancer is the single most expensive cancer to treat on a per patient basis. In recent years, autofluorescence spectroscopy has begun to shed light into disease research. Of particular interest in cancer research are the fluorescent metabolic cofactors NADH and FAD. Early in tumour development, cancer cells often undergo a metabolic shift (the Warburg effect) resulting in increased NADH. The ratio of NADH to FAD ("redox ratio") can therefore be used as an indicator of the metabolic status of cells. Redox ratio measurements have been used to differentiate between healthy and cancer breast cells and to monitor cellular responses to therapies. Here, we have demonstrated, using healthy and bladder cancer cell lines, a statistically significant difference in the redox ratio of bladder cancer cells, indicative of a metabolic shift. To do this we customised a standard flow cytometer to excite and record fluorescence specifically from NADH and FAD, along with a method for automatically calculating the redox ratio of individual cells within large populations. These results could inform the design of novel probes and screening systems for the early detection of bladder cancer.

  14. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  15. Label-free detection of liver cancer cells by aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejuan; Pan, Yangang; Liu, Huiqing; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Bailin

    2016-05-15

    Liver cancer is one of the most common and highly malignant cancers in the world. There are no effective therapeutic options if an early liver cancer diagnosis is not achieved. In this work, detection of HepG2 cells by label-free microcantilever array aptasensor was developed. The sensing microcantilevers were functionalized by HepG2 cells-specific aptamers. Meanwhile, to eliminate the interferences induced by the environment, the reference microcantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol self-assembled monolayers. The aptasensor exhibits high specificity over not only human liver normal cells, but also other cancer cells of breast, bladder, and cervix tumors. The linear relation ranges from 1×10(3) to 1×10(5)cells/mL, with a detection limit of 300 cells/mL (S/N=3). Our work provides a simple method for detection of liver cancer cells with advantages in terms of simplicity and stability.

  16. Cancer Therapeutic Based on T Cell Receptors Designed to Regiospecifically Release Interleukin-12 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a potential cancer therapeutic based on T cells genetically engineered to express the human interleukin 12 (IL-12) cytokine only in the tumor environment.

  17. Mechanism of eliciting host immunity against cancer cells treated with silica-phthalocyanine-based near infrared photoimmunotherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a new type of molecularly-targeted cancer photo-therapy based on conjugating a near infrared silica-phthalocyanine dye, IR700, to a monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting cancer-specific cell-surface molecules. When exposed to NIR light, the conjugate induces a highly-selective necrotic/ immunogenic cell death (ICD) only in receptor-positive, MAb-IR700-bound cancer cells. This cell death occurs as early as 1 minute after exposure to NIR light. Meanwhile, immediately adjacent receptor-negative cells including immune cells are unharmed. Therefore, we hypothesized that NIR-PIT could efficiently elicit host immunity against treated cancer cells. Three-dimensional dynamic quantitative phase contrast microscopy and selective plane illumination microscopy of tumor cells undergoing PIT showed rapid swelling in treated cells immediately after light exposure suggesting rapid water influx into cells, followed by irreversible morphologic changes such as bleb formation, and rupture of vesicles. Furthermore, biological markers of ICD including relocation of HSP70/90 and calreticulin, and release of ATP and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), were clearly detected immediately after NIR-PIT. When NIR-PIT was performed in a mixture of cancer cells and immature dendritic cells, maturation of immature dendritic cells was strongly induced rapidly after NIR-PIT. In summary, NIR-PIT can induce necrotic/ immunogenic cell death that promotes rapid maturation of immature dendritic cells adjacent to dying cancer cells. Therefore, NIR-PIT could efficiently initiate host immune response against NIR-PIT treated cancer cells growing in patients.

  18. Graphene oxide selectively targets cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: implications for non-toxic cancer treatment, via "differentiation-based nano-therapy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorillo, Marco; Verre, Andrea F; Iliut, Maria; Peiris-Pagés, Maria; Ozsvari, Bela; Gandara, Ricardo; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-02-28

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a.k.a. cancer stem cells (CSCs), are difficult to eradicate with conventional approaches to cancer treatment, such as chemo-therapy and radiation. As a consequence, the survival of residual CSCs is thought to drive the onset of tumor recurrence, distant metastasis, and drug-resistance, which is a significant clinical problem for the effective treatment of cancer. Thus, novel approaches to cancer therapy are needed urgently, to address this clinical need. Towards this end, here we have investigated the therapeutic potential of graphene oxide to target cancer stem cells. Graphene and its derivatives are well-known, relatively inert and potentially non-toxic nano-materials that form stable dispersions in a variety of solvents. Here, we show that graphene oxide (of both big and small flake sizes) can be used to selectively inhibit the proliferative expansion of cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types. For this purpose, we employed the tumor-sphere assay, which functionally measures the clonal expansion of single cancer stem cells under anchorage-independent conditions. More specifically, we show that graphene oxide effectively inhibits tumor-sphere formation in multiple cell lines, across 6 different cancer types, including breast, ovarian, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancers, as well as glioblastoma (brain). In striking contrast, graphene oxide is non-toxic for "bulk" cancer cells (non-stem) and normal fibroblasts. Mechanistically, we present evidence that GO exerts its striking effects on CSCs by inhibiting several key signal transduction pathways (WNT, Notch and STAT-signaling) and thereby inducing CSC differentiation. Thus, graphene oxide may be an effective non-toxic therapeutic strategy for the eradication of cancer stem cells, via differentiation-based nano-therapy.

  19. Immobilization free electrochemical biosensor for folate receptor in cancer cells based on terminal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jiancong; Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Weiqiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2016-12-15

    The determination of folate receptor (FR) that over expressed in vast quantity of cancerous cells frequently is significant for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Many DNA-based electrochemical biosensors have been developed for FR detection with high selectivity and sensitivity, but most of them need complicated immobilization of DNA on the electrode surface firstly, which is tedious and therefore results in the poor reproducibility. In this study, a simple, sensitive, and selective electrochemical FR biosensor in cancer cells has been proposed, which combines the advantages of the convenient immobilization-free homogeneous indium tin oxide (ITO)-based electrochemical detection strategy and the high selectivity of the terminal protection of small molecule linked DNA. The small molecule of folic acid (FA) and an electroactive molecule of ferrocence (Fc) were tethered to 3'- and 5'-end of an arbitrary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), respectively, forming the FA-ssDNA-Fc complex. In the absence of the target FR, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was degraded by exonuclease I (Exo I) from 3'-end and produced a free Fc, diffusing freely to the ITO electrode surface and resulting in strong electrochemical signal. When the target FR was present, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was bound to FR through specific interaction with FA anchored at the 3'-end, effectively protecting the ssDNA strand from hydrolysis by Exo I. The FR-FA-ssDNA-Fc could not diffuse easily to the negatively charged ITO electrode surface due to the electrostatic repulsion between the DNA strand and the negatively charged ITO electrode, so electrochemical signal reduced. The decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of FR concentration in range of 10fM to 10nM with a detection limit of 3.8fM (S/N=3). The proposed biosensor has been applied to detect FR in HeLa cancer cells, and the decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of cell concentration ranging

  20. Phase-based x-ray scattering—A possible method to detect cancer cells in a very early stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feye-Treimer, U., E-mail: feye-treimer@helmholtz-berlin.de; Treimer, W. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, University of Applied Sciences, D-13353 Berlin, Germany and Joint Department G-GTOMO, Helmholtz Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie Berlin, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: This theoretical work contains a detailed investigation of the potential and sensitivity of phase-based x-ray scattering for cancer detection in biopsies if cancer is in a very early stage of development. Methods: Cancer cells in their early stage of development differ from healthy ones mainly due to their faster growing cell nuclei and the enlargement of their densities. This growth is accompanied by an altered nucleus–plasma relation for the benefit of the cell nuclei, that changes the physical properties especially the index of refraction of the cell and the one of the cell nuclei. Interaction of radiation with matter is known to be highly sensitive to small changes of the index of refraction of matter; therefore a detection of such changes of volume and density of cell nuclei by means of high angular resolved phase-based scattering of x rays might provide a technique to distinguish malignant cells from healthy ones ifthe cell–cell nucleus system is considered as a coherent phase shifting object. Then one can observe from a thin biopsy which represents a monolayer of cells (no multiple scattering) that phase-based x-ray scattering curves from healthy cells differ from those of cancer cells in their early stage of development. Results: Detailed calculations of x-ray scattering patterns from healthy and cancer cell nuclei yield graphs and numbers with which one can distinguish healthy cells from cancer ones, taking into account that both kinds of cells occur in a tissue within a range of size and density. One important result is the role and the influence of the (lateral) coherence width of the radiation on the scattering curves and the sensitivity of phase-based scattering for cancer detection. A major result is that a larger coherence width yields a larger sensitivity for cancer detection. Further import results are calculated limits for critical sizes and densities of cell nuclei in order to attribute the investigated tissue to be healthy or

  1. Alterations of the exo- and endometabolite profiles in breast cancer cell lines: A mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Hirschfeld, Marc; Erbes, Thalia; Neubauer, Hans; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2016-06-21

    In recent years, knowledge about metabolite changes which are characteristic for the physiologic state of cancer cells has been acquired by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Distinct molecularly characterized breast cancer cell lines provide an unbiased and standardized in vitro tumor model reflecting the heterogeneity of the disease. Tandem mass spectrometry is a widely applied analytical platform and highly sensitive technique for analysis of complex biological samples. Endo- and exometabolite analysis of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, -453 and BT-474 as well as the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A has been performed using two different analytical platforms: UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF based on a scheduled precursor list has been applied for highlighting of significant differences between cell lines and HPLC-ESI-QqQ using multiple reaction monitoring has been utilized for a targeted approach focusing on RNA metabolism and interconnected pathways, respectively. Statistical analysis enabled a clear discrimination of the breast epithelial from the breast cancer cell lines. As an effect of oxidative stress, a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio has been detected in breast cancer cell lines. The triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 showed an elevation in nicotinamide, 1-ribosyl-nicotinamide and NAD+ reflecting the increased energy demand in triple negative breast cancer, which has a more aggressive clinical course than other forms of breast cancer. Obtained distinct metabolite pattern could be correlated with distinct molecular characteristics of breast cancer cells. Results and methodology of this preliminary in vitro study could be transferred to in vivo studies with breast cancer patients.

  2. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M;

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  3. Evaluation of a nanotechnology-based carrier for delivery of curcumin in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Puri, Anu; Tele, Shrikant; Blumenthal, Robert; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2008-05-01

    We have initiated studies to enhance targeted delivery of an anticancer agent, curcumin, for prostate cancer treatment by incorporating this agent into the liposomes (nanodelivery vehicles primarily composed of phospholipids) coated with prostate membrane specific antigen specific antibodies. We prepared curcumin-loaded liposomes of various lipid compositions by sonication at an average size of 100-150 nm. Un-entrapped curcumin was removed by size exclusion chromatography. Data show that curcumin preferentially partitioned into liposomes prepared from dimyristoyl phosphatidyl choline (DMPC) and cholesterol among the various compositions tested. The anti-proliferative activity of liposomal curcumin was studied using two human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and C4-2B) by a tetrazolium dye-based (MTT) assay. Treatment of cells with liposomal curcumin (5-10 microM) for 24-48 h at 37 degrees C resulted in at least 70-80% inhibition of cellular proliferation without affecting their viability. On the other hand, free curcumin exhibited similar inhibition only at 10-fold higher doses (>50 microM). We also observed that LNCaP cells were relatively more sensitive to liposomal curcumin mediated block of cellular proliferation than C4-2B cells. We are currently developing liposome formulations with targeting ability to further improve the efficacy of curcumin in vivo.

  4. QCL-based TDLAS sensor for detection of NO toward emission measurements from ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhring, M.; Huang, S.; Jahjah, M.; Jiang, W.; Ren, W.; Willer, U.; Caneba, C.; Yang, L.; Nagrath, D.; Schade, W.; Tittel, F. K.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a sensitive sensor for detecting nitric oxide (NO) emissions from biological samples is reported. The sensor is based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled quantum cascade laser (QCL) and a 100-m astigmatic Herriot cell. A 2 f-wavelength modulation spectroscopy technique was used to obtain QCL-based TDLAS NO emission measurements with an optimum signal-to-noise ratio. An absorption line at 1,900.076 cm-1 was targeted to measure NO with a minimum detection limit of 124 ppt. Positive control measurements with the NO donor DETA NONOate were performed to determine and optimize the sensor performance for measurements of biological samples. Our measurements with NO donor show the potential suitability of the sensor for monitoring NO emission from cancer cells for biological investigations.

  5. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer.The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach.I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging,stem cells,and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling.The high expression of aging-or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging,stem cells,and cancer.These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation,metabolic process,DNA damage response,apoptosis,p53 signaling pathway,immune/inflammatory response,and other processes,suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging.Moreover,these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation,proliferation,and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells.These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer.Certainly,the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation.This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  6. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer. The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach. I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling. The high expression of aging- or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging, stem cells, and cancer. These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation, metabolic process, DNA damage response, apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, immune/inflammatory response, and other processes, suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging. Moreover, these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells. These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer. Certainly, the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation. This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  7. Gene expression-based biomarkers for discriminating early and late stage of clear cell renal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Sherry; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Sehgal, Manika; Kaur, Harpreet; Sharma, Suresh; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to identify expression-based gene biomarkers that can discriminate early and late stage of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. We have analyzed the gene expression of 523 samples to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the early and late stage of ccRCC. First, a threshold-based method has been developed, which attained a maximum accuracy of 71.12% with ROC 0.67 using single gene NR3C2. To improve the performance of threshold-based method, we combined two or more genes and achieved maximum accuracy of 70.19% with ROC of 0.74 using eight genes on the validation dataset. These eight genes include four underexpressed (NR3C2, ENAM, DNASE1L3, FRMPD2) and four overexpressed (PLEKHA9, MAP6D1, SMPD4, C11orf73) genes in the late stage of ccRCC. Second, models were developed using state-of-art techniques and achieved maximum accuracy of 72.64% and 0.81 ROC using 64 genes on validation dataset. Similar accuracy was obtained on 38 genes selected from subset of genes, involved in cancer hallmark biological processes. Our analysis further implied a need to develop gender-specific models for stage classification. A web server, CancerCSP, has been developed to predict stage of ccRCC using gene expression data derived from RNAseq experiments. PMID:28349958

  8. Inorganic nanoparticle-based drug codelivery nanosystems to overcome the multidrug resistance of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-08-04

    Biocompatible inorganic material-based nanosystems provide a novel choice to effectively circumvent the intrinsic drawbacks of traditional organic materials in biomedical applications, especially in overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells due to their unique structural and compositional characteristics, for example, high stability, large surface area, tunable compositions, abundant physicochemical multifunctionalities, and specific biological behaviors. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in the construction of inorganic nanoparticles-based drug codelivery nanosystems (mesoporous SiO2, Fe3O4, Au, Ag, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, LDH, etc.) to efficiently circumvent the MDR of cancer cells, including the well-known codelivery of small molecular anticancer drug/macromolecular therapeutic gene and codelivery of small molecular chemosensitizer/anticancer drug, and very recently explored codelivery of targeting ligands/anticancer drug, codelivery of energy/anticancer drug, and codelivery of contrast agent for diagnostic imaging and anticancer drug. The unsolved issues, future developments, and potential clinical translations of these codelivery nanosystems are also discussed. These elaborately designed biocompatible inorganic materials-based nanosystems offer an unprecedented opportunity and show the encouraging bright future for overcoming the MDR of tumors in clinic personalized medicine and the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Development of cell-based quantitative evaluation method for cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs for apoptosis by high precision surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona, Toshihiro; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Kosaihira, Atsushi; Shibata, Junko

    2008-04-01

    In vitro rapid and quantitative cell-based assay is demanded to verify the efficacy prediction of cancer drugs since a cancer patient may have unconventional aspects of tumor development. Here, we show the rapid and non-label quantitative verifying method and instrumentation of apoptosis for cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs (Roscovitine and D-allose) by reaction analysis of living liver cancer cells cultured on a sensor chip with a newly developed high precision (50 ndeg s -1 average fluctuation) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. The time-course cell reaction as the SPR angle change rate for 10 min from 30 min cell culture with a drug was significantly related to cell viability. By the simultaneous detection of differential SPR angle change and fluorescence by specific probes using the new instrument, the SPR angle was related to the nano-order potential decrease in inner mitochondrial membrane potential. The results obtained are universally valid for the cell cycle-arrest type cancer drugs, which mediate apoptosis through different cell-signaling pathways, by a liver cancer cell line of Hep G2 (P<0.001). This system towards the application to evaluate personal therapeutic potentials of drugs using cancer cells from patients in clinical use.

  10. Synthesis of kaempferide Mannich base derivatives and their antiproliferative activity on three human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Son; Shi, Ling; Luan, Fang-Qian; Wang, Qiu-An

    2015-01-01

    Kaempferide (3,5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone, 1), a naturally occurring flavonoid with potent anticancer activity in a number of human tumour cell lines, was first semisynthesized from naringin. Based on Mannich reaction of kaempferide with various secondary amines and formaldehyde, nine novel kaempferide Mannich base derivatives 2-10 were synthesized. The aminomethylation occurred preferentially in the position at C-6 and C-8 of the A-ring of kaempferide. All the synthetic compounds were tested for antiproliferative activity against three human cancer cell lines (Hela, HCC1954, SK-OV-3) by the standard MTT method. The results showed that compounds 1, 2 and 5-10 were more potent against Hela cells with IC50 values of 12.47-28.24 μM than the positive control cis-platin (IC50 41.25 μM), compounds 5, 6, 8 and 10 were more potent against HCC1954 cells with IC50 values of 8.82-14.97 μM than the positive control cis-platin (IC50 29.68 μM), and compounds 2, 3, 5, 6 and 10 were more potent against SK-OV-3 cells with IC50 values of 7.67-18.50 μM than the positive control cis-platin (IC50 21.27 μM).

  11. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction...... of responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....

  12. Chroman-4-one- and chromone-based sirtuin 2 inhibitors with antiproliferative properties in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tina; Malo, Marcus; Kokkola, Tarja; Engen, Karin; Fridén-Saxin, Maria; Wallén, Erik A A; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija; Jarho, Elina M; Luthman, Kristina

    2014-12-11

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) catalyze the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation of N(ε)-acetyl lysines on various protein substrates. SIRTs are interesting drug targets as they are considered to be related to important pathologies such as inflammation and aging-associated diseases. We have previously shown that chroman-4-ones act as potent and selective inhibitors of SIRT2. Herein we report novel chroman-4-one and chromone-based SIRT2 inhibitors containing various heterofunctionalities to improve pharmacokinetic properties. The compounds retained both high SIRT2 selectivity and potent inhibitory activity. Two compounds were tested for their antiproliferative effects in breast cancer (MCF-7) and lung carcinoma (A549) cell lines. Both compounds showed antiproliferative effects correlating with their SIRT2 inhibition potency. They also increased the acetylation level of α-tubulin, indicating that SIRT2 is likely to be the target in cancer cells. A binding mode of the inhibitors that is consistent with the SAR data was proposed based on a homology model of SIRT2.

  13. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the tolerance of patients with small cell lung cancer undergoing chemoradiation with tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT.Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the toxicity profile for nine patients with small cell lung cancer of the limited stage who underwent chemoradiation delivered with helical tomotherapy (HT has been conducted.Results: Acute grade 3-4 hematologic and esophagitis toxicities developed in two and three patients respectively. One patient developed a pulmonary embolism during radiotherapy. Seven patients had weight loss ranging from 0 to 30 pounds (median: 4 pounds. Three patients had treatment breaks ranging from 2 to 12 days. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range: 2-24 months, no patients developed any radiation related toxicities such as grade 3-4 pneumonitis or other long-term complications. The median survival was estimated to be 15 months. There were 2 local recurrences, 3 mediastinal recurrences, and six distant metastases.Conclusion: Grade 3-4 toxicities remained significant during chemoradiation when radiation was delivered with tomotherapy-based IGRT. However, the absence of grade 3-4 pneumonitis is promising and the use of HT needs to be investigated in future prospective studies.

  14. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  15. Proteasome-based mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, Leonie H. A. M.; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Cloos, Jacqueline; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Chan, Elena T.; Kirk, Christopher J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, registered for Multiple Myeloma treatment, is currently explored for activity in solid tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we studied the proteasome-based mechanisms underlying intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in NSCLC cells. Var

  16. Proteasome-based mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, Leonie H. A. M.; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Cloos, Jacqueline; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Chan, Elena T.; Kirk, Christopher J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, registered for Multiple Myeloma treatment, is currently explored for activity in solid tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we studied the proteasome-based mechanisms underlying intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in NSCLC cells.

  17. Biochip-Based Detection of KRAS Mutation in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ziegler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at evaluating the potential of a biochip assay to sensitively detect KRAS mutation in DNA from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC tissue samples. The assay covers 10 mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the KRAS gene, and is based on mutant-enriched PCR followed by reverse-hybridization of biotinylated amplification products to an array of sequence-specific probes immobilized on the tip of a rectangular plastic stick (biochip. Biochip hybridization identified 17 (21% samples to carry a KRAS mutation of which 16 (33% were adenocarcinomas and 1 (3% was a squamous cell carcinoma. All mutations were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Using 10 ng of starting DNA, the biochip assay demonstrated a detection limit of 1% mutant sequence in a background of wild-type DNA. Our results suggest that the biochip assay is a sensitive alternative to protocols currently in use for KRAS mutation testing on limited quantity samples.

  18. Functional Assay of Cancer Cell Invasion Potential Based on Mechanotransduction of Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Weitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells undergo a number of biophysical changes as they transform from an indolent to an aggressive state. These changes, which include altered mechanical and electrical properties, can reveal important diagnostic information about disease status. Here, we introduce a high-throughput, functional technique for assessing cancer cell invasion potential, which works by probing for the mechanically excitable phenotype exhibited by invasive cancer cells. Cells are labeled with fluorescent calcium dye and imaged during stimulation with low-intensity focused ultrasound, a non-contact mechanical stimulus. We show that cells located at the focus of the stimulus exhibit calcium elevation for invasive prostate (PC-3 and DU-145 and bladder (T24/83 cancer cell lines, but not for non-invasive cell lines (BPH-1, PNT1A, and RT112/84. In invasive cells, ultrasound stimulation initiates a calcium wave that propagates from the cells at the transducer focus to other cells, over distances greater than 1 mm. We demonstrate that this wave is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules and can be abolished through inhibition of transient receptor potential channels and inositol trisphosphate receptors, implicating these proteins in the mechanotransduction process. If validated clinically, our technology could provide a means to assess tumor invasion potential in cytology specimens, which is not currently possible. It may therefore have applications in diseases such as bladder cancer, where cytologic diagnosis of tumor invasion could improve clinical decision-making.

  19. Ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor based on sandwich architecture for selective label-free detection of colorectal cancer (CT26) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashkavayi, Ayemeh Bagheri; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza; Kavoosian, Saeid

    2017-06-15

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and has no effective treatment. Therefore, development of new methods for early diagnosis is instantly required. Biological recognition probes such as synthetic receptor and aptamer is one of the candidate recognition layers to detect important biomolecules. In this work, an electrochemical aptasensor was developed by fabricating an aptamer-cell-aptamer sandwich architecture on an SBA-15-3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (SBA-15-pr-NH2) and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified graphite screen printed electrode (GSPE) surface for the selective, label-free detection of CT26 cancer cells. Based on the incubation of the thiolated aptamer with CT26 cells, the electron-transfer resistance of Fe (CN)6(3-/4-) redox couple increased considerably on the aptasensor surface. The results obtained from cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies showed that the fabricated aptasensor can specifically identify CT26 cells in the concentration ranges of 10-1.0×10(5)cells/mL and 1.0×10(5)-6.0×10(6) cells/mL, respectively, with a detection limit of 2cells/mL. Applying the thiol terminated aptamer (5TR1) as a recognition layer led to a sensor with high affinity for CT26 cancer cells, compared to control cancer cells of AGS cells, VERO Cells, PC3 cells and SKOV-3 cells. Therefore a simple, rapid, label free, inexpensive, excellent, sensitive and selective electrochemical aptasensor based on sandwich architecture was developed for detection of CT26 Cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Therapeutic dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines: the state of art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strioga, M.M.; Felzmann, T.; Powell, D.J.; Ostapenko, V.; Dobrovolskiene, N.T.; Matuskova, M.; Michalek, J.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, capable of initiating proper adaptive immune responses. Although tumor-infiltrating DCs are able to recognize cancer cells and uptake tumor antigens, they often have impaired functions because of the immunosuppressive t

  1. Microarray-based analysis of microRNA expression in breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhi-xin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to determine the miRNA profile in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs and to explore the functions of characteristic BCSC miRNAs. Methods We isolated ESA+CD44+CD24-/low BCSCs from MCF-7 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. A human breast cancer xenograft assay was performed to validate the stem cell properties of the isolated cells, and microarray analysis was performed to screen for BCSC-related miRNAs. These BCSC-related miRNAs were selected for bioinformatic analysis and target prediction using online software programs. Results The ESA+CD44+CD24-/low cells had up to 100- to 1000-fold greater tumor-initiating capability than the MCF-7 cells. Tumors initiated from the ESA+CD44+CD24-/low cells were included of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells, indicating stem cell properties. We also obtained miRNA profiles of ESA+CD44+CD24-/low BCSCs. Most of the possible targets of potential tumorigenesis-related miRNAs were oncogenes, anti-oncogenes or regulatory genes. Conclusions We identified a subset of miRNAs that were differentially expressed in BCSCs, providing a starting point to explore the functions of these miRNAs. Evaluating characteristic BCSC miRNAs represents a new method for studying breast cancer-initiating cells and developing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating the tumorigenic subpopulation of cells in breast cancer.

  2. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  3. iTRAQ-based proteomic profiling of breast cancer cell response to doxorubicin and TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sharon; Nunez, Andrea C; Lin, Mike Z; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I; Baxter, Robert C

    2012-07-06

    Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and predicting response to chemotherapy remains a major clinical challenge. To minimize adverse side-effects or cumulative toxicity in patients unlikely to benefit from treatment, biomarkers indicating treatment efficacy are critically needed. iTRAQ labeling coupled with multidimensional LC-MS/MS of the enriched mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum fraction, key organelles regulating apoptosis, has led to the discovery of several differentially abundant proteins in breast cancer cells treated with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin followed by the death receptor ligand, TRAIL, among 571 and 801 unique proteins identified in ZR-75-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, respectively. The differentially abundant proteins represent diverse biological processes associated with cellular assembly and organization, molecular transport, oxidative stress, cell motility, cell death, and cancer. Despite many differences in molecular phenotype between the two breast cancer cell lines, a comparison of their subproteomes following drug treatment revealed three proteins displaying common regulation: PPIB, AHNAK, and SLC1A5. Changes in these proteins, detected by iTRAQ, were confirmed by immunofluorescence, visualized by confocal microscopy. These novel potential biomarkers may have clinical utility for assessing response to cancer treatment and may provide insight into new therapeutic targets for breast cancer.

  4. Perspectives in Engineered Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Based Anti- Cancer Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackova, Darinka Gjorgieva; Kanjevac, Tatjana; Rimondini, Lia; Bosnakovski, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and apprehension of the characteristics and circumstances in which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) affect and make alterations (enhance or reduce) to the growth of tumors and metastasis spread is pivotal, not only for reaching the possibility to employ MSCs as drug delivery systems, but also for making forward movement in the existing knowledge of involvement of major factors (tumor microenvironment, soluble signaling molecules, etc.) in the process of carcinogenesis. This capability is reliable because MSCs present a great basis for engineering and constructions of new systems to target cancers, intended to secrete therapeutic proteins in the tumor region, or for delivering of oncolytic viruses' directly at the tumor site (targeted chemotherapy with enzyme prodrug conversion or induction of tumor cell apoptosis). MSCs as a crucial segment of the tumor surroundings and their confirmed tumor tropism, are assumed to be an open gateway for the design of promising drug delivery systems. The presented paper reviews current publications in this fieldwork, searches out the most recent patents that were published after 2012 (WO2014066122, US20140017787, WO2015100268, US20150086515), and tries to present the current progress and future prospective on the design and development in anti-cancer drug delivery systems based on MSCs.

  5. Postoperative follow-up strategy based on recurrence dynamics for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Katsuya; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Nishii, Teppei; Yamamoto, Taketsugu; Nagashima, Takuya; Ando, Kohei; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Woo, Tekkan; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Kumakiri, Yutaka; Maehara, Takamitsu; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-06-01

    Our study was designed to visually represent recurrence patterns after surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the use of event dynamics and to clarify postoperative follow-up methods based on the times of recurrence. A total of 829 patients with NSCLC who underwent complete pulmonary resection from 2005 to 2007 in 9 hospitals affiliated with the Yokohama Consortium of Thoracic Surgeons were studied. Event dynamics, based on the hazard rate, were evaluated. Only first events involving the development of distant metastases, local recurrence or both were considered. The effects of sex, histological type, pathological stage and age were studied. The hazard rate curve displayed an initial surge that peaked about 6-8 months after surgery. The next distinct peak was noted at the end of the second year of follow-up. On non-parametric kernel smoothing, the maximum peak was found 6-8 months after surgery in men. In women, the highest peak occurred 22-24 months after surgery, which was about 16 months later than the peak in men. The peak timing of the hazard curve was not affected by histological type, pathological stage or age in either sex. Our results suggest that the timing of recurrence after surgery for lung cancer is characterized by a bimodal pattern, and the times with the highest risk of recurrence were suggested to differ between men and women. Postoperative follow-up strategies should be based on currently recommended follow-up programmes, take into account the recurrence patterns of lung cancer, and be modified as required to meet the needs of individual patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Natural Killer Cell-Based Therapies Targeting Cancer: Possible Strategies to Gain and Sustain Anti-Tumor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Sarhan, Dhifaf; Chrobok, Michael; Duru, Adil D.; Alici, Evren

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were discovered 40 years ago, by their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure. Since then, NK cells have been seen as promising agents for cell-based cancer therapies. However, NK cells represent only a minor fraction of the human lymphocyte population. Their skewed phenotype and impaired functionality during cancer progression necessitates the development of clinical protocols to activate and expand to high numbers ex vivo to be able to infuse sufficient numbers of functional NK cells to the cancer patients. Initial NK cell-based clinical trials suggested that NK cell-infusion is safe and feasible with almost no NK cell-related toxicity, including graft-versus-host disease. Complete remission and increased disease-free survival is shown in a small number of patients with hematological malignances. Furthermore, successful adoptive NK cell-based therapies from haploidentical donors have been demonstrated. Disappointingly, only limited anti-tumor effects have been demonstrated following NK cell infusion in patients with solid tumors. While NK cells have great potential in targeting tumor cells, the efficiency of NK cell functions in the tumor microenvironment is yet unclear. The failure of immune surveillance may in part be due to sustained immunological pressure on tumor cells resulting in the development of tumor escape variants that are invisible to the immune system. Alternatively, this could be due to the complex network of immune-suppressive compartments in the tumor microenvironment, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and regulatory T cells. Although the negative effect of the tumor microenvironment on NK cells can be transiently reverted by ex vivo expansion and long-term activation, the aforementioned NK cell/tumor microenvironment interactions upon reinfusion are not fully elucidated. Within this context, genetic modification of NK cells

  7. Radiomics-based Prognosis Analysis for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yucheng; Oikonomou, Anastasia; Wong, Alexander; Haider, Masoom A.; Khalvati, Farzad

    2017-04-01

    Radiomics characterizes tumor phenotypes by extracting large numbers of quantitative features from radiological images. Radiomic features have been shown to provide prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes in several studies. However, several challenges including feature redundancy, unbalanced data, and small sample sizes have led to relatively low predictive accuracy. In this study, we explore different strategies for overcoming these challenges and improving predictive performance of radiomics-based prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). CT images of 112 patients (mean age 75 years) with NSCLC who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy were used to predict recurrence, death, and recurrence-free survival using a comprehensive radiomics analysis. Different feature selection and predictive modeling techniques were used to determine the optimal configuration of prognosis analysis. To address feature redundancy, comprehensive analysis indicated that Random Forest models and Principal Component Analysis were optimum predictive modeling and feature selection methods, respectively, for achieving high prognosis performance. To address unbalanced data, Synthetic Minority Over-sampling technique was found to significantly increase predictive accuracy. A full analysis of variance showed that data endpoints, feature selection techniques, and classifiers were significant factors in affecting predictive accuracy, suggesting that these factors must be investigated when building radiomics-based predictive models for cancer prognosis.

  8. Magneto-impedance based detection of magnetically labeled cancer cells and bio-proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, J.; Howell, M.; Mohapatra, S.; Nhung, T. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    A magnetic biosensor with enhanced sensitivity and immobilized magnetic markers is essential for a reliable analysis of the presence of a biological entity in a fluid. Based on conventional approaches, however, it is quite challenging to create such a sensor. We report on a novel magnetic biosensor using the magneto-impedance (MI) effect of a Co-based amorphous ribbon with a microhole-patterned surface that fulfils these requirements. The sensor probe was fabricated by patterning four microholes, each of diameter 2 μm and depth 2 μm, on the ribbon surface using FIB lithography. The magnetically labeled Luis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cancer cells and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins were drop-casted on the ribbon surface, and MI was measured over 0.1 - 10 MHz frequency range. As the analytes were trapped into the microholes, their physical motion was minimized and interaction among the magnetic fields was strengthened, thus yielding a more reliable and sensitive detection of the biological entities. The presence of magnetically labeled LLC cells (8.25x105 cells/ml, 10 μl) and BSA proteins (2x1011 particles/ml, 10 μl) were found to result in a ~ 2% change in MI with respect to the reference signal.

  9. Cancer-associated fibroblast-targeted strategy enhances antitumor immune responses in dendritic cell-based vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshio, Yasuhiko; Teramoto, Koji; Hanaoka, Jun; Tezuka, Noriaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Asai, Tohru; Daigo, Yataro; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Given the close interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), TME-targeted strategies would be promising for developing integrated cancer immunotherapy. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the dominant stromal component, playing critical roles in generation of the pro-tumorigenic TME. We focused on the immunosuppressive trait of CAFs, and systematically explored the alteration of tumor-associated immune responses by CAF-targeted therapy. C57BL/6 mice s.c. bearing syngeneic E.G7 lymphoma, LLC1 Lewis lung cancer, or B16F1 melanoma were treated with an anti-fibrotic agent, tranilast, to inhibit CAF function. The infiltration of immune suppressor cell types, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, in the TME was effectively decreased through reduction of stromal cell-derived factor-1, prostaglandin E2, and transforming growth factor-β. In tumor-draining lymph nodes, these immune suppressor cell types were significantly decreased, leading to activation of tumor-associated antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In addition, CAF-targeted therapy synergistically enhanced multiple types of systemic antitumor immune responses such as the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, natural killer activity, and antitumor humoral immunity in combination with dendritic cell-based vaccines; however, the suppressive effect on tumor growth was not observed in tumor-bearing SCID mice. These data indicate that systemic antitumor immune responses by various immunologic cell types are required to bring out the efficacy of CAF-targeted therapy, and these effects are enhanced when combined with effector-stimulatory immunotherapy such as dendritic cell-based vaccines. Our mouse model provides a novel rationale with TME-targeted strategy for the development of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25483888

  10. Fluorescence assay for glycan expression on living cancer cells based on competitive strategy coupled with dual-functionalized nanobiocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Lu, Danqin; Lin, Bin; Sun, Qianqian; Liu, Kai; Xu, Lili; Zhang, Shengping; Hu, Chen; Wang, Chuangui; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2013-11-21

    Cell surface glycans are a class of sophisticated biomolecules related to cancer development and progression, and their analysis is of great significance for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we proposed a fluorescence assay to evaluate glycan expression on living cancer cells based on a competitive strategy coupled with dual-functionalized nanobiocomposites. The competitive assay was conducted between living cancer cells and thiomannosyl derivatives using concanavalin A (Con A)-modified electrode as the interaction platform. To impart fluorescence signaling ability to competitive derivatives, quantum dots (QDs) were anchored on BSA-protected Au nanoparticles, and thiomannosyl derivatives were further immobilized on the nanoparticle surface through Au-S binding. Due to the spacing between QDs and Au nanoparticles by BSA, the {QDs-Au-BSA-mannose} nanobiocomposites maintained the fluorescence of QDs and showed binding ability with the Con A-modified electrode. Au nanorods (AuNRs)-modified electrode was used as an effective substrate to immobilize Con A. This assay was successfully applied to the analysis of two cancer cells lines (A549 and QGY-7701). The method is simple and shows promise for the study of glycan expression on living cancer cells.

  11. Induction of apoptosis through tubulin inhibition in human cancer cells by new chromene-based chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryapour, Hassan; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Foroumadi, Alireza; Mahdavi, Majid; Emami, Saeed

    2012-12-01

    As microtubules are highly involved in cellular growth, it appears to be a preferential target for cancer treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been performed to discover drugs that affect on microtubule function. Several microtubule inhibitors are in various stages of laboratory evaluations and clinical trials. A series of chromene-based chalcones with chlorine, methoxy, fluorine, tetrahydropyranyloxy and cyanide substituents were prepared and evaluated for cytotoxic effects against K562 and SK-N-MC cell lines, and the inhibitory effect on tubulin polymerization was studied as well. MTT, tubulin polymerization assays and binding measurements were evaluated by using related spectroscopy. Immunocytochemical study, morphological observations and apoptosis assay were examined using a fluorescence microscope and a flow cytometer. (E)-3-(6-Chloro-2H-chromen-3-yl)-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl) prop-2-en-1-one (compound 14) proved to be the most active in this series as an inhibitor of tubulin assembly [IC₅₀, 19.6 µM] and cytotoxic agent on K562 cells [IC₅₀, 38.7 µM]. Furthermore, these compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on tubulin polymerization and reduced the in vitro assembly and bundling of proto-filaments. Also, compound 14 bound to the tubulin with a dissociation constant of 9.4 ± 0.7 µM and induced conformational changes in this protein. This study suggests that the compound 14 could be a good antitumor agent because of its biological functions. Compound 14 appears to bind directly to tubulin and thereby perturbs microtubule stability and the function of the spindle apparatus, which causes cancer cells to arrest and undergo apoptosis.

  12. LC-MS Based Sphingolipidomic Study on A2780 Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line and its Taxol-resistant Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Tong, Tian-Tian; Yau, Lee-Fong; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance elicited by cancer cells continue to cause huge problems world-wide, for example, tens of thousands of patients are suffering from taxol-resistant human ovarian cancer. However, its biochemical mechanisms remain unclear. Sphingolipid metabolic dysregulation has been increasingly regarded as one of the drug-resistant mechanisms for various cancers, which in turn provides potential targets for overcoming the resistance. In the current study, a well-established LC-MS based sphingolipidomic approach was applied to investigate the sphingolipid metabolism of A2780 and taxol-resistant A2780 (A2780T) human ovarian cancer cell lines. 102 sphingolipids (SPLs) were identified based on accurate mass and characteristic fragment ions, among which 12 species have not been reported previously. 89 were further quantitatively analyzed by using multiple reaction monitoring technique. Multivariate analysis revealed that the levels of 52 sphingolipids significantly altered in A2780T cells comparing to those of A2780 cells. These alterations revealed an overall increase of sphingomyelin levels and significant decrease of ceramides, hexosylceramides and lactosylceramides, which concomitantly indicated a deviated SPL metabolism in A2780T. This is the most comprehensive sphingolipidomic analysis of A2780 and A2780T, which investigated significantly changed sphingolipid profile in taxol-resistant cancer cells. The aberrant sphingolipid metabolism in A2780T could be one of the mechanisms of taxol-resistance. PMID:27703266

  13. Bacterial exopolysaccharide based magnetic nanoparticles: a versatile nanotool for cancer cell imaging, targeted drug delivery and synergistic effect of drug and hyperthermia mediated cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Balasubramanian; Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Sreejith, Raveendran; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Iwai, Seiki; Suzuki, Masashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthikumar, Dasappan Nair

    2014-06-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are highly heterogeneous polymers produced by fungi and bacteria that have garnered considerable attention and have remarkable potential in various fields, including biomedical research. The necessity of biocompatible materials to coat and stabilize nanoparticles is highly recommended for successful application of the same in biomedical regime. In our study we have coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with two bacterial EPS-mauran (MR) and gellan gum (GG). The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs was enhanced and we have made it multifunctional by attaching targeting moiety, folate and with encapsulation of a potent anticancerous drug, 5FU. We have conjugated an imaging moiety along with nanocomposite to study the effective uptake of nanoparticles. It was also observed that the dye labeled folate targeted nanoparticles could effectively enter into cancer cells and the fate of nanoparticles was tracked with Lysotracker. The biocompatibility of EPS coated MNPs and synergistic effect of magnetic hyperthermia and drug for enhanced antiproliferation of cancer cells was also evaluated. More than 80% of cancer cells was killed within a period of 60 min when magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) was applied along with drug loaded EPS coated MNPs, thus signifying the combined effect of drug loaded MNPs and MHT. Our results suggests that MR and GG coated MNPs exhibited excellent biocompatibility with low cell cytotoxicity, high therapeutic potential, and superparamagnetic behavior that can be employed as prospective candidates for bacterial EPS based targeted drug delivery, cancer cell imaging and for MHT for killing cancer cells within short period of time.

  14. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Jill Williams

    Full Text Available Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells. To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ. Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Briana Jill; Bhatia, Shilpa; Adams, Lisa K; Boling, Susan; Carroll, Jennifer L; Li, Xiao-Lin; Rogers, Donna L; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre; Pereboev, Alexander V; Curiel, David T; Mathis, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs) with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells). To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ). Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Hand-Ground Nanoscale Zn(II) -Based Coordination Polymers Derived from NSAIDs: Cell Migration Inhibition of Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mithun; Sarkar, Koushik; Deb, Jolly; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2017-04-27

    Increased levels of intracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) have been linked with the unregulated cancer cell migration that often leads to metastasis. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are responsible for the increased PGE2 concentration in inflamed as well as cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that NSAID-derived Zn(II) -based coordination polymers are able to inhibit cell migration of human breast cancer cells. Various NSAIDs were anchored to a series of 1D Zn(II) coordination polymers through carboxylate-Zn coordination, and these structures were fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Hand grinding in a pestle and mortar resulted in the first reported example of nanoscale coordination polymers that were suitable for biological studies. Two such hand-ground nanoscale coordination polymers NCP1 a and NCP2 a, which contained naproxen (a well-studied NSAID), were successfully internalized by the human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231, as was evident from cellular imaging by using a fluorescence microscope. They were able to kill the cancer cells (MTT assay) more efficiently than the corresponding mother drug naproxen, and most importantly, they significantly inhibited cancer cell migration thereby displaying anticancer activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Near-infrared emitting fluorescent nanocrystals-labeled natural killer cells as a platform technology for the optical imaging of immunotherapeutic cells-based cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taik Lim, Yong; Cho, Mi Young; Noh, Young-Woock; Chung, Jin Woong; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2009-11-01

    This study describes the development of near-infrared optical imaging technology for the monitoring of immunotherapeutic cell-based cancer therapy using natural killer (NK) cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals. Although NK cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies have drawn interest as potent preclinical or clinical methods of cancer therapy, there are few reports documenting the molecular imaging of NK cell-based cancer therapy, primarily due to the difficulty of labeling of NK cells with imaging probes. Human natural killer cells (NK92MI) were labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated quantum dots (QD705) for fluorescence imaging. FACS analysis showed that the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 have no effect on the cell viability. The effect of anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 labeling on the NK92MI cell function was investigated by measuring interferon gamma (IFN- γ) production and cytolytic activity. Finally, the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 showed a therapeutic effect similar to that of unlabeled NK92MI cells. Images of intratumorally injected NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated could be acquired using near-infrared optical imaging both in vivo and in vitro. This result demonstrates that the immunotherapeutic cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals can be a versatile platform for the effective tracking of injected therapeutic cells using optical imaging technology, which is very important in cell-based cancer therapies.

  18. [Metabonomics study of lung cancer cells based on liquid l chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinwei; Wu, Qian; Lu, Wang; Wang, Yan; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Chen, Zhe; Yan, Chao

    2013-07-01

    The metabolic profiles of the polar metabolites and the non-polar metabolites in lung tumor cell lines H358, A549, HCC827, H1299, Calu-3, Calu-l, PC-9 and normal cell line MRC-5 were analyzed separately using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Partial least square discriminant analysis ( PLS-DA) was used to process the metabolic data. The results showed that the metabolites of the lung cancer cell lines and normal cell line have significant differences. Further, 10 polar metabolites and 21 non-polar metabolites which had a significant contribution to classification were selected and preliminarily identified due to the accurate mass. Comparing with the normal cell line, the lung tumor cell lines present an abnormal metabolism in protein, fatty acid, and phospholipids. These results may provide important information for the early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  19. Simulating non-small cell lung cancer with a multiscale agent-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Deisboeck Thomas S; Sagotsky Jonathan; Zhang Le; Wang Zhihui

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In silico modeling is considered to be an increasingly promising tool to add useful insights into the dynamics of the EGFR signal transduction pathway. However, most of the previous modeling work focused on the molecular or the cellular level only, neglecting the crucial feedback between these scales as well as the interaction with the hete...

  20. Six versus fewer planned cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Antonio; Chiodini, Paolo; Sun, Jong-Mu;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. However, the optimum number of treatment cycles remains controversial. Therefore, we did a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data to compare ...

  1. Discovery of Small Molecules That Induce Lysosomal Cell Death in Cancer Cell Lines Using an Image-Based Screening Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliero, Romina J; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Lelieveld, Daphne; Pratiwi, Riyona D; Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja; Martin, Nathaniel I; Klumperman, Judith; Egan, David A

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway is a caspase 3-independent cell death pathway that has been suggested as a possible target for cancer therapy, making the development of sensitive and specific high-throughput (HT) assays to identify LCD inducers highly desirable. In this study, we report a two

  2. Array-based identification of triple-negative breast cancer cells using fluorescent nanodot-graphene oxide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yu; Auguste, Debra T

    2016-07-15

    Early and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer holds great promise to improve treatability and curability. Here, we report the usage of six luminescent nanodot-graphene oxide complexes as novel fluorescent nanoprobes in a sensing array capable of effectively identifying healthy, cancerous, and metastatic human breast cells. The sensory system is based on the utilization of nanoprobe-graphene oxide sensor elements that can be disrupted in the presence of breast cells to give fluorescent readouts. Using this multichannel sensor, we have successfully identified breast cancer cells and distinguished between estrogen receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive, and triple negative phenotypes. This approach also allows cell identification at high sensitivity (200 cells) with high reproducibility. The unknown cell sample analysis indicates that the sensor is able to identify 49 out of 50 breast cell samples correctly, with a detection accuracy of 98%. Taken together, this array-based luminescent nanoprobe-graphene oxide sensing platform presents a useful cell screening tool with potential applications in biomedical diagnostics.

  3. Molecular size, shape, and electric charges: essential for perylene bisimide-based DNA intercalator to localize in cell nuclei and inhibit cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zejun; Cheng, Wenyu; Guo, Kunru; Yu, Jieshi; Shen, Jie; Tang, Jun; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-05-13

    The molecular properties concerning size, shape, and electric charges of the planar aromatic DNA intercalators are still poorly understood. Herein, a series of water-soluble perylene bisimide (PBI) derivatives containing a rigid and planar aromatic nanoscaffold with different size, shape, and electric charges were synthesized. Using histochemistry and cell viability assays on animal tissues and cancer cells, we revealed the molecular properties required for successful DNA intercalators to localize in cell nuclei and inhibit cancer cells. Small molecular size and the strong polarity of hydrophilic substituents are prerequisites for PBI-based DNA intercalators. A large number of charges facilitate the nucleic accumulation of these DNA intercalators, while fewer charges and planar aromatic nanoscaffold more efficiently inhibit cancer cell growth.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance ovarian cancer cell infiltration through IL6 secretion in an amniochorionic membrane based 3D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touboul Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early peritoneal invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC by tumoral aggregates presents in ascites is a major concern. The role of the microenvironment seems to be important in this process but the lack of adequate models to study cellular interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells does not allow to uncover the molecular pathways involved. Our goal was to study the interactions between ovarian cancer cells (OCC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC using a 3D model. Methods We used millimetric pieces of amniochorionic membrane - referred to as amniotic membrane scaffold (AMS - to create 3D peritoneal nodules mimicking EOC early invasion. We were able to measure the distribution and the depth of infiltration using confocal microsopy. We extracted MSC from the amniochorionic membrane using the markers CD34-, CD45-, CD73+, CD90+, CD105+ and CD29+ at the Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS analysis. We used transwell and wound healing tests to test OCC migration and invasion in vitro. Results Here we show that OCC tumors were located in regions rich in MSC (70%. The tumors infiltrated deeper within AMS in regions rich in MSC (p Conclusions The use of tridimensional models using AMS could be a useful tool to decipher early molecular events in ovarian cancer metastasis. Cytokine inhibitors interrupting the cross-talk between OCCs and MSCs such as IL6 should be investigated as a new therapeutic approach in ovarian cancer.

  5. Chemosensitizing effects of carbon-based nanomaterials in cancer cells: enhanced apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation as underlying mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Kati; Ringel, Jessica; Hampel, Silke; Rieger, Christiane; Huebner, Doreen; Wirth, Manfred P.; Fuessel, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can exert antitumor activities themselves and sensitize cancer cells to conventional chemotherapeutics such as carboplatin and cisplatin. In the present study, the chemosensitizing effect of CNFs and CNTs on cancer cells of urological origin was investigated regarding the underlying mechanisms. Prostate cancer (DU-145, PC-3) and bladder cancer (EJ28) cells were treated with carbon nanomaterials (CNFs, CNTs) and chemotherapeutics (carboplatin, cisplatin) alone as well as in combination for 24 h. Forty-eight (EJ28) or 72 h (DU-145, PC-3) after the end of treatment the effects on cellular proliferation, clonogenic survival, cell death rate and cell cycle distribution were evaluated. Depending on the cell line, simultaneous administration of chemotherapeutics and carbon nanomaterials produced an additional inhibition of cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival of up to 77% and 98%, respectively, compared to the inhibitory effects of the chemotherapeutics alone. These strongly enhanced antiproliferative effects were accompanied by an elevated cell death rate, which was predominantly mediated via apoptosis and not by necrosis. The antitumor effects of combinations with CNTs were less pronounced than those with CNFs. The enhanced effects of the combinatory treatments on cellular function were mostly of additive to partly synergistic nature. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis demonstrated an arrest at the G2/M phase mediated by a monotreatment with chemotherapeutics. Following combinatory treatments, mostly less than or nearly additive increases of cell fractions in the G2/M phase could be observed. In conclusion, the pronounced chemosensitizing effects of CNFs and CNTs were mediated by an enhanced apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. The combination of carbon-based nanomaterials and conventional chemotherapeutics represents a novel

  6. Novel Drug Delivery System Based on Docetaxel-Loaded Nanocapsules as a Therapeutic Strategy Against Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Aránega

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of cancer therapy, lipid nanocapsules based on a core-shell structure are promising vehicles for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs such as docetaxel. The main aim of this work was to evaluate whether docetaxel-loaded lipid nanocapsules improved the anti-tumor effect of free docetaxel in breast cancer cells. Three docetaxel-loaded lipid nanocapsules were synthesized by solvent displacement method. Cytotoxic assays were evaluated in breast carcinoma (MCF-7 cells treated by the sulforhodamine B colorimetric method. Cell cycle was studied by flow cytometry and Annexin V-FITC, and apoptosis was evaluated by using propidium iodide assays. The anti-proliferative effect of docetaxel appeared much earlier when the drug was encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles than when it was free. Docetaxel-loaded lipid nanocapsules significantly enhanced the decrease in IC50 rate, and the treated cells evidenced apoptosis and a premature progression of the cell cycle from G(1 to G(2-M phase. The chemotherapeutic effect of free docetaxel on breast cancer cells is improved by its encapsulation in lipid nanocapsules. This approach has the potential to overcome some major limitations of conventional chemotherapy and may be a promising strategy for future applications in breast cancer therapy.

  7. small Cell Lung Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment response in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methodology: A single-center ..... groupings in the forthcoming (7th) edition of the TNM. Classification of ... overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. J Clin Oncol ...

  8. Impact of Introducing Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer : A Population-Based Time-Trend Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palma, David; Visser, Otto; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Belderbos, Jose; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with high local control rates. The impact of introducing SBRT in patients 75 years of age or older was studied using a population-based cancer registry. Methods The Amsterdam Cancer Registry wa

  9. A FISH-based method for assessment of HER-2 amplification status in breast cancer circulating tumor cells following CellSearch isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frithiof H

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Frithiof,1 Kristina Aaltonen,1 Lisa Rydén2,3 1Division of Oncology and Pathology, 2Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, 3Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Introduction: Amplification of the HER-2/neu (HER-2 proto-oncogene occurs in 10%–15% of primary breast cancer, leading to an activated HER-2 receptor, augmenting growth of cancer cells. Tumor classification is determined in primary tumor tissue and metastatic biopsies. However, malignant cells tend to alter their phenotype during disease progression. Circulating tumor cell (CTC analysis may serve as an alternative to repeated biopsies. The Food and Drug Administration-approved CellSearch system allows determination of the HER-2 protein, but not of the HER-2 gene. The aim of this study was to optimize a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based method to quantitatively determine HER-2 amplification in breast cancer CTCs following CellSearch-based isolation and verify the method in patient samples. Methods: Using healthy donor blood spiked with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2-positive breast cancer cell lines, SKBr-3 and BT-474, and a corresponding negative control (the HER-2-negative MCF-7 cell line, an in vitro CTC model system was designed. Following isolation in the CellSearch system, CTC samples were further enriched and fixed on microscope slides. Immunocytochemical staining with cytokeratin and 4',6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole dihydrochloride identified CTCs under a fluorescence microscope. A FISH-based procedure was optimized by applying the HER2 IQFISH pharmDx assay for assessment of HER-2 amplification status in breast cancer CTCs. Results: A method for defining the presence of HER-2 amplification in single breast cancer CTCs after CellSearch isolation was established using cell lines as positive and negative controls. The method was validated in blood from breast cancer patients

  10. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putty-Reddy Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein–protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG and polyhistidine (His and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples.

  11. Specific microtubule-depolymerizing agents augment efficacy of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Wei-Ting

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs are associated with immunogenic cell death and have the ability to enhance maturation and antigen presentation of dendritic cells (DCs. Specific microtubule-depolymerizing agents (MDAs such as colchicine have been shown to confer anti-cancer activity and also trigger activation of DCs. Methods In this study, we evaluated the ability of three MDAs (colchicine and two 2-phenyl-4-quinolone analogues to induce immunogenic cell death in test tumor cells, activate DCs, and augment T-cell proliferation activity. These MDAs were further evaluated for use as an adjuvant in a tumor cell lysate-pulsed DC vaccine. Results The three test phytochemicals considerably increased the expression of DAMPs including HSP70, HSP90 and HMGB1, but had no effect on expression of calreticulin (CRT. DC vaccines pulsed with MDA-treated tumor cell lysates had a significant effect on tumor growth, showed cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity against tumors, and increased the survival rate of test mice. In vivo antibody depletion experiments suggested that CD8+ and NK cells, but not CD4+ cells, were the main effector cells responsible for the observed anti-tumor activity. In addition, culture of DCs with GM-CSF and IL-4 during the pulsing and stimulation period significantly increased the production of IL-12 and decreased production of IL-10. MDAs also induced phenotypic maturation of DCs and augmented CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation when co-cultured with DCs. Conclusions Specific MDAs including the clinical drug, colchicine, can induce immunogenic cell death in tumor cells, and DCs pulsed with MDA-treated tumor cell lysates (TCLs can generate potent anti-tumor immunity in mice. This approach may warrant future clinical evaluation as a cancer vaccine.

  12. Detection of Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Using Quantum-Dot-Based Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Larré; Yuan Ruan; Weimin Yu; Fan Cheng; Xiaobin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a new class of fluorescent labeling for biological and biomedical applications. In this study, we detected prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) expression correlated with tumor grade and stage in human prostate cancer by QDs-based immunolabeling and conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC), and evaluated the sensitivity and stability of QDs-based immunolabeling in comparison with IHC. Our data revealed that increasing levels of PSCA expression accompanied advanced tumor gra...

  13. Potential use of [gammadelta] T cell-based vaccines in cancer immunotherapy

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    Mohd Wajid A. Khan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is a fast advancing methodology involving one of two approaches: 1 compounds targeting immune checkpoints, and 2 cellular immunomodulators. The latter approach is still largely experimental and features in vitro generated, live immune effector cells or antigen-presenting cells (APC. [gammadelta] T cells are known for their efficient in vitro tumor killing activities. Consequently, many laboratories worldwide are currently testing the tumor killing function of [gammadelta] T cells in clinical trials. Reported benefits are modest; however, these studies have demonstrated that large [gammadelta] T cell infusions were well tolerated. Here, we discuss the potential of using human [gammadelta] T cells not as effector cells but as a novel cellular vaccine for treatment of cancer patients. Antigen-presenting [gammadelta] T cells do not require to home to tumor tissues but, instead, need to interact with endogenous, tumor-specific [alphabeta] T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Newly mobilised effector [alphabeta] T cells are then thought to overcome the immune blockade by creating proinflammatory conditions fit for effector T cell homing to and killing of tumor cells. Immunotherapy may include tumor antigen-loaded [gammadelta] T cells alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  14. PD-L1 peptide co-stimulation increases immunogenicity of a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Martinenaite, Evelina; Hansen, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    We recently described naturally occurring PD-L1-specific T cells that recognize PD-L1-expressing immune cells as well as malignant cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the immunogenicity of a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine could be influenced by co-stimulation with a known PD-L1......-derived epitope. We incubated a PD-L1-derived peptide epitope (19 amino acids long) or a control peptide (an irrelevant HIV epitope) with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with malignant melanoma who had received a DC-based vaccine. We observed a significantly higher number of T cells...... and attractive option to augment the effectiveness of cancer vaccines and other immunotherapeutic agents....

  15. A paper-based detection method of cancer cells using the photo-thermal effect of nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianhua; Zheng, Yanping; Liu, Jingjing; Bing, Xin; Hua, Jingjun; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    A novel paper-based dot immune-graphene-gold filtration assay (DIGGFA) for the detection of breast cancer cells was developed based on the photo-thermal effect of graphene oxide (GO)-Au nanocomposite. Anti-EpCAM antibody which specific to the MCF-7 cell surface antigen, was immobilized on the nitrocellulose paper. The GO-Au-anti-EpCAM composite would interact with the MCF-7 cells captured on the nitrocellulose paper. After the test zone was irradiated by a laser, GO-Au nanocomposite could generate heat, temperature contrast was recorded and positive correlated with the cell number. Standard curve was prepared according to the temperature contrast and the cell number. Under optimal conditions, this method could detect a minimum of 600 MCF-7 cells with a near infrared laser and an infrared temperature gun within 15 min. This simple and rapid method could be applied to the clinical diagnosis in hospitals.

  16. Effects of a novel porphyrin-based photosensitizer on sensitive and multidrug-resistant human gastric cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Mao, Lina; Liu, Shuping; Liang, Yanling; Wang, Sicheng; Wang, Yeyu; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Che, Yanjun; Gao, Lijing; Liu, Tianjun

    2015-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been considered to be a possible candidate approach in combating multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon during the treatment of cancer. To investigate the photocytotoxicity of a novel porphyrin-based photosensitizer, meso-5-[ρ-DTPA-aminophenyl]-10, 15, 20-triphenyl-porhyrin (DTP) (Fig. 1A), on MDR cells, the intracellular DTP uptake, phototoxicity and subcellular DTP localization were studied by using a human gastric cancer MGC803 cell line and its paclitaxel selected subline MGC803/PA expressing MDR phenotype. No significant difference was observed in intracellular DTP accumulation between sensitive and resistant cell lines after exposure to 1.56 μM concentration for 6h. DTP-PDT induced significant photocytotoxicity on both MGC803 and MGC803/PA cell lines and the photokilling was greater in MGC803 cell line in comparison to MGC803/PA. The fluence that caused 50% cell death was 4.42 and 6.29 J/cm(2) in MGC803 and MGC803/PA cell lines, respectively. The presence of Pgp inhibitors verapamil and cyclosporin A could not modify the intracellular DTP level in MGC803/PA cell line and the phototoxic effects. DTP was localized at lysosomes of MGC803 cell line but at lysosomes and mitochondria of MGC803/PA. Our results indicated that DTP-mediated PDT could eradicate gastric cancer cells whether or not they express MDR although the efficacy is slightly reduced in the MDR cells. The photokilling in MDR cells could not be altered by MDR inhibitor verapamil. The slightly different photocytotoxicity between sensitive and resistant cell lines could not explained by classical Pgp MDR and might be attributed to the differential intracellular DTP localization sites.

  17. Mortality in cancer patients with a history of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma - a nationwide population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannesdottir Sigrun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is associated with underlying immunosuppression, so it may be a prognostic marker in patients with subsequent cancer. We therefore conducted a nationwide population-based Danish cohort study to evaluate whether a history of cutaneuos SCC has prognostic impact in patients with one of the following index cancers: non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, or cancer of the lung, colon, rectum, breast, or prostate. Methods We used Danish medical databases, which cover the entire Danish population of 5.6 million inhabitants and linked them using the unique personal identification number assigned to all Danish residents. From 1982 through 2003, we identified 745 index cancer patients with and 79,143 without previous cutaneous SCC. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we calculated adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Overall, previous SCC was associated with an increased mortality of cancer (MRR 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04-1.23. When examining index cancers separately, increased MRRs were found for cancer of the lung (MRR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05-1.43, colon (MRR 1.13, 95% CI: 0.92-1.40, rectum (MRR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00-1.67, breast (MRR 1.09, 95% CI: 0.82-1.43, and NHL (MRR 1.09, 95% CI: 0.81-1.47, but not for prostate cancer (MRR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83-1.18. Conclusions Our results suggest that previous cutaneous SCC is associated with poor prognosis of some cancers. This finding stresses the importance of adherence to the existing recommendations of screening, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer in patients with a history of SCC.

  18. DNA methylation-based biomarkers for early detection of non-small cell lung cancer: an update

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    Laird-Offringa Ite A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the United States. This disease is clinically divided into two sub-types, small cell lung cancer, (10–15% of lung cancer cases, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 85–90% of cases. Early detection of NSCLC, which is the more common and less aggressive of the two sub-types, has the highest potential for saving lives. As yet, no routine screening method that enables early detection exists, and this is a key factor in the high mortality rate of this disease. Imaging and cytology-based screening strategies have been employed for early detection, and while some are sensitive, none have been demonstrated to reduce lung cancer mortality. However, mortality might be reduced by developing specific molecular markers that can complement imaging techniques. DNA methylation has emerged as a highly promising biomarker and is being actively studied in multiple cancers. The analysis of DNA methylation-based biomarkers is rapidly advancing, and a large number of potential biomarkers have been identified. Here we present a detailed review of the literature, focusing on DNA methylation-based markers developed using primary NSCLC tissue. Viable markers for clinical diagnosis must be detectable in 'remote media' such as blood, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, or even exhaled breath condensate. We discuss progress on their detection in such media and the sensitivity and specificity of the molecular marker panels identified to date. Lastly, we look to future advancements that will be made possible with the interrogation of the epigenome.

  19. Targeting dendritic cells in lymph node with an antigen peptide-based nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuan; Jin, Honglin; Qiao, Sha; Dai, Yanfeng; Huang, Chuan; Lu, Lisen; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-08-01

    The design of peptide-based subunit vaccine formulations for the direct delivery of tumor antigen peptides (Aps) to dendritic cells (DCs) localized within draining lymph nodes (DLNs) is challenging. Mature DCs (mDCs) are abundantly distributed within DLNs but have dramatically reduced endocytic uptake and antigen-processing abilities, so their role as potential vaccine targets has been largely overlooked. Here we report an ultra-small biocompatible nanovaccine (α-Ap-FNP) functionalized by avidly targeting delivery of Ap via the scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) pathway to mDCs. The self-assembly, small size (∼30 nm), SR-B1-targeting and optical properties of α-Ap-FNP resulted in its efficient Ap loading, substantial LN accumulation, targeting of mDCs and enhanced Ap presentation, and fluorescence trafficking, respectively. We also demonstrate that the α-Ap-FNP can be either used alone or encapsulated with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide as a prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine. Thus, the excellent properties of α-Ap-FNP provide it potential for clinical applications as a potent nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Simulating non-small cell lung cancer with a multiscale agent-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deisboeck Thomas S

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is frequently overexpressed in many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. In silico modeling is considered to be an increasingly promising tool to add useful insights into the dynamics of the EGFR signal transduction pathway. However, most of the previous modeling work focused on the molecular or the cellular level only, neglecting the crucial feedback between these scales as well as the interaction with the heterogeneous biochemical microenvironment. Results We developed a multiscale model for investigating expansion dynamics of NSCLC within a two-dimensional in silico microenvironment. At the molecular level, a specific EGFR-ERK intracellular signal transduction pathway was implemented. Dynamical alterations of these molecules were used to trigger phenotypic changes at the cellular level. Examining the relationship between extrinsic ligand concentrations, intrinsic molecular profiles and microscopic patterns, the results confirmed that increasing the amount of available growth factor leads to a spatially more aggressive cancer system. Moreover, for the cell closest to nutrient abundance, a phase-transition emerges where a minimal increase in extrinsic ligand abolishes the proliferative phenotype altogether. Conclusion Our in silico results indicate that in NSCLC, in the presence of a strong extrinsic chemotactic stimulus (and depending on the cell's location downstream EGFR-ERK signaling may be processed more efficiently, thereby yielding a migration-dominant cell phenotype and overall, an accelerated spatio-temporal expansion rate.

  1. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  2. The application progress in cell-SELEX-based aptamers in cancer%Cell-SELEX技术在肿瘤诊治中的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕彬

    2013-01-01

    Aptamers, selected by an in vitro process known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides with high selectivity, affinity and stability. Aptamers that can bind whole cells, especially cancer cells, are generated by a method called cell-SELEX. Compared with antibodies, aptamers possess many advantages,including wide range of targets, quick and reproducible synthesis, nontoxicity and lack of immunogenicity,easy and controllable modification to fulfill the recognition of cancer cells. Aptamers conjugated nanomaterials gain more flexibility as cancer cell targeting tools. In this review, we discuss the application of cell-SELEX-based aptamers in novel cancer biomarkers identification,cancer imaging, cancer therapy and enhanced targeting when conjugated with nanomaterials.%核酸适配体是运用指数富集的配体系统进化(systematic evolution of ligand by exponential enrichment,SELEX)技术从人工体外合成的随机寡核苷酸序列库中,经过多轮筛选后得到的单链DNA或单链RNA,具有靶标广泛、制备方便、稳定性好、无免疫原性等优点.细胞SELEX(cell-SELEX)是指将整个细胞作为靶标筛选特异性DNA适配体的技术,尤其适用于肿瘤细胞的核酸适配体筛选.本文简要介绍cell-SELEX技术获得的核酸适配体在肿瘤标记发现、肿瘤成像、肿瘤治疗及与纳米材料结合后用于肿瘤靶向研究的应用进展.

  3. Novel coumarin- and quinolinone-based polycycles as cell division cycle 25-A and -C phosphatases inhibitors induce proliferation arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwergel, Clemens; Czepukojc, Brigitte; Evain-Bana, Emilie; Xu, Zhanjie; Stazi, Giulia; Mori, Mattia; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Mai, Antonello; Botta, Bruno; Ragno, Rino; Bagrel, Denise; Kirsch, Gilbert; Meiser, Peter; Jacob, Claus; Montenarh, Mathias; Valente, Sergio

    2017-07-07

    Cell division cycle phosphatases CDC25 A, B and C are involved in modulating cell cycle processes and are found overexpressed in a large panel of cancer typology. Here, we describe the development of two novel quinone-polycycle series of CDC25A and C inhibitors on the one hand 1a-k, coumarin-based, and on the other 2a-g, quinolinone-based, which inhibit either enzymes up to a sub-micro molar level and at single-digit micro molar concentrations, respectively. When tested in six different cancer cell lines, compound 2c displayed the highest efficacy to arrest cell viability, showing in almost all cell lines sub-micro molar IC50 values, a profile even better than the reference compound NCS95397. To investigate the putative binding mode of the inhibitors and to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships, molecular docking and 3-D QSAR studies were also carried out. Four selected inhibitors, 1a, 1d, 2a and 2c have been also tested in A431 cancer cells; among them, compound 2c was the most potent one leading to cell proliferation arrest and decreased CDC25C protein levels together with its splicing variant. Compound 2c displayed increased phosphorylation levels of histone H3, induction of PARP and caspase 3 cleavage, highlighting its contribution to cell death through pro-apoptotic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonlinear quantitative radiation sensitivity prediction model based on NCI-60 cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunying; Girard, Luc; Das, Amit; Chen, Sun; Zheng, Guangqiang; Song, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a nonlinear model to perform a novel quantitative radiation sensitivity prediction. We used the NCI-60 panel, which consists of nine different cancer types, as the platform to train our model. Important radiation therapy (RT) related genes were selected by significance analysis of microarrays (SAM). Orthogonal latent variables (LVs) were then extracted by the partial least squares (PLS) method as the new compressive input variables. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) regression model was trained with these LVs to predict the SF2 (the surviving fraction of cells after a radiation dose of 2 Gy γ-ray) values of the cell lines. Comparison with the published results showed significant improvement of the new method in various ways: (a) reducing the root mean square error (RMSE) of the radiation sensitivity prediction model from 0.20 to 0.011; and (b) improving prediction accuracy from 62% to 91%. To test the predictive performance of the gene signature, three different types of cancer patient datasets were used. Survival analysis across these different types of cancer patients strongly confirmed the clinical potential utility of the signature genes as a general prognosis platform. The gene regulatory network analysis identified six hub genes that are involved in canonical cancer pathways.

  5. Nonlinear Quantitative Radiation Sensitivity Prediction Model Based on NCI-60 Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunying Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a nonlinear model to perform a novel quantitative radiation sensitivity prediction. We used the NCI-60 panel, which consists of nine different cancer types, as the platform to train our model. Important radiation therapy (RT related genes were selected by significance analysis of microarrays (SAM. Orthogonal latent variables (LVs were then extracted by the partial least squares (PLS method as the new compressive input variables. Finally, support vector machine (SVM regression model was trained with these LVs to predict the SF2 (the surviving fraction of cells after a radiation dose of 2 Gy γ-ray values of the cell lines. Comparison with the published results showed significant improvement of the new method in various ways: (a reducing the root mean square error (RMSE of the radiation sensitivity prediction model from 0.20 to 0.011; and (b improving prediction accuracy from 62% to 91%. To test the predictive performance of the gene signature, three different types of cancer patient datasets were used. Survival analysis across these different types of cancer patients strongly confirmed the clinical potential utility of the signature genes as a general prognosis platform. The gene regulatory network analysis identified six hub genes that are involved in canonical cancer pathways.

  6. Identification of immune cell infiltration in hematoxylin-eosin stained breast cancer samples: texture-based classification of tissue morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkki, Riku; Linder, Nina; Kovanen, Panu E.; Pellinen, Teijo; Lundin, Johan

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment of breast cancer capture clinically important information. Despite the heterogeneity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, it has been shown that the degree of infiltration assessed by visual evaluation of hematoxylin-eosin (H and E) stained samples has prognostic and possibly predictive value. However, quantification of the infiltration in H and E-stained tissue samples is currently dependent on visual scoring by an expert. Computer vision enables automated characterization of the components of the tumor microenvironment, and texture-based methods have successfully been used to discriminate between different tissue morphologies and cell phenotypes. In this study, we evaluate whether local binary pattern texture features with superpixel segmentation and classification with support vector machine can be utilized to identify immune cell infiltration in H and E-stained breast cancer samples. Guided with the pan-leukocyte CD45 marker, we annotated training and test sets from 20 primary breast cancer samples. In the training set of arbitrary sized image regions (n=1,116) a 3-fold cross-validation resulted in 98% accuracy and an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.98 to discriminate between immune cell -rich and - poor areas. In the test set (n=204), we achieved an accuracy of 96% and AUC of 0.99 to label cropped tissue regions correctly into immune cell -rich and -poor categories. The obtained results demonstrate strong discrimination between immune cell -rich and -poor tissue morphologies. The proposed method can provide a quantitative measurement of the degree of immune cell infiltration and applied to digitally scanned H and E-stained breast cancer samples for diagnostic purposes.

  7. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  8. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Silicon nanowire based biosensing platform for electrochemical sensing of Mebendazole drug activity on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashaani, Hani; Faramarzpour, Mahsa; Hassanpour, Morteza; Namdar, Nasser; Alikhani, Alireza; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2016-11-15

    Electrochemical approaches have played crucial roles in bio sensing because of their Potential in achieving sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and other bio evidences. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with nanomaterials tends to new generations of label-free biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitive area and response signals. Here we applied Silicon Nanowire (SiNW) array electrodes (in an integrated architecture of working, counter and reference electrodes) grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system with VLS procedure to electrochemically diagnose the presence of breast cancer cells as well as their response to anticancer drugs. Mebendazole (MBZ), has been used as antitubulin drug. It perturbs the anodic/cathodic response of the cell covered biosensor by releasing Cytochrome C in cytoplasm. Reduction of cytochrome C would change the ionic state of the cells monitored by SiNW biosensor. By applying well direct bioelectrical contacts with cancer cells, SiNWs can detect minor signal transduction and bio recognition events, resulting in precise biosensing. Our device detected the trace of MBZ drugs (with the concentration of 2nM) on electrochemical activity MCF-7 cells. Also, experimented biological analysis such as confocal and Flowcytometry assays confirmed the electrochemical results.

  10. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  11. Comparative evaluation of techniques for the manufacturing of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, Alexander Michael; Graffi, Sebastian; Witt, Volker; Eichstill, Christina; Wagner, Dagmar; Ul-Haq, Sidrah; Wimmer, Doris; Felzmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturing procedures for cellular therapies are continuously improved with particular emphasis on product safety. We previously developed a dendritic cell (DC) cancer vaccine technology platform that uses clinical grade lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-y for the maturation of monocyte derived DCs. DCs are frozen after 6 hrs exposure at a semi-mature stage (smDCs) retaining the capacity to secret interleukin (IL)-12 and thus support cytolytic T-cell responses, which is lost at full maturation. We compared closed systems for monocyte enrichment from leucocyte apheresis products from healthy individuals using plastic adherence, CD14 selection, or CD2/19 depletion with magnetic beads, or counter flow centrifugation (elutriation) using a clinical grade in comparison to a research grade culture medium for the following DC generation. We found that elutriation was superior compared to the other methods showing 36 +/- 4% recovery, which was approximately 5-fold higher as the most frequently used adherence protocol (8 +/- 1%), and a very good purity (92 +/- 5%) of smDCs. Immune phenotype and IL-12 secretion (adherence: 1.4 +/- 0.4; selection: 20 +/- 0.6; depletion: 1 +/-0.5; elutriation: 3.6 +/- 1.5 ng/ml) as well as the potency of all DCs to stimulate T cells in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction did not show statistically significant differences. Research grade and clinical grade DC culture media were equally potent and freezing did not impair the functions of smDCs. Finally, we assessed the functional capacity of DC cancer vaccines manufactured for three patients using this optimized procedure thereby demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing DC cancer vaccines that secret IL-12 (9.4 +/- 6.4 ng/ml). We conclude that significant steps were taken here towards clinical grade DC cancer vaccine manufacturing.

  12. On the cells of origin of radiogenic thyroid cancer: New studies based on an old idea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.; Domann, F.E.; Groch, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    We have presented evidence that the functional thyroid follicles (follicular units, FU) which are formed in grafts of monodispersed rat thyroid cells, and hence the thyroid tumors which later develop in such grafts, are clonal in origin. Recent studies have been designed to investigate: whether cell number-dependent inhibition of promotion-progression is mediated by remote hormonal feed-back, local cell-cell interactions, or both; the cell population kinetics of the clonogen subpopulation during goitrogenesis and goiter involution; and the effect of prolonged exposure to high levels of TSH (thyrotropin) on the capacity of the clonogens to give rise to functional FU. The results indicate that local cell-cell interactions play an important role in the cell number-dependent suppression of neoplastic promotion-progression. They also show that if sufficient thyroid cells are grafted, the thyroid-pituitary axis can be reestablished in thyroidectomized rats fed normal diets. In such animals given iodine deficient diets, the FU that develop in the thyroid grafts shift their secretory pattern to increase the ratio of T3 (triiodothyronine) to T4 (thyroxine), and thus conserve the available iodine. Finally, the clonogenic subpopulation is conserved during both goitrogenesis and goiter involution. When they are transplanted to thyroidectomized recipients, clonogens from two types of goiters form FU that are morphologically indistinguishable from those that develop in grafts of normal thyroid clonogens. Furthermore, the secretion of T3 and T4 by such grafts is dependent on the grafted clonogen number, and hence FU formation, and not on the total number of thyroid cells transplanted. We conclude that the thyroid clonogens, the presumptive cancer progenitor cells, have many of the characteristics of stem cells.

  13. On the cells of origin of radiogenic thyroid cancer: New studies based on an old idea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.; Domann, F.E.; Groch, K.M.

    1990-12-31

    We have presented evidence that the functional thyroid follicles (follicular units, FU) which are formed in grafts of monodispersed rat thyroid cells, and hence the thyroid tumors which later develop in such grafts, are clonal in origin. Recent studies have been designed to investigate: whether cell number-dependent inhibition of promotion-progression is mediated by remote hormonal feed-back, local cell-cell interactions, or both; the cell population kinetics of the clonogen subpopulation during goitrogenesis and goiter involution; and the effect of prolonged exposure to high levels of TSH (thyrotropin) on the capacity of the clonogens to give rise to functional FU. The results indicate that local cell-cell interactions play an important role in the cell number-dependent suppression of neoplastic promotion-progression. They also show that if sufficient thyroid cells are grafted, the thyroid-pituitary axis can be reestablished in thyroidectomized rats fed normal diets. In such animals given iodine deficient diets, the FU that develop in the thyroid grafts shift their secretory pattern to increase the ratio of T3 (triiodothyronine) to T4 (thyroxine), and thus conserve the available iodine. Finally, the clonogenic subpopulation is conserved during both goitrogenesis and goiter involution. When they are transplanted to thyroidectomized recipients, clonogens from two types of goiters form FU that are morphologically indistinguishable from those that develop in grafts of normal thyroid clonogens. Furthermore, the secretion of T3 and T4 by such grafts is dependent on the grafted clonogen number, and hence FU formation, and not on the total number of thyroid cells transplanted. We conclude that the thyroid clonogens, the presumptive cancer progenitor cells, have many of the characteristics of stem cells.

  14. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  15. Plasmonic Nanoparticle-based Hybrid Photosensitizers with Broadened Excitation Profile for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy combining nanotechnology has shown great potential with improved therapeutic efficacy and fewer side effects. Ideal photosensitizers for cancer treatment should both have good singlet oxygen production capability and be excitable by light illuminations with deep tissue penetration. Here we report a type of hybrid photosensitizers consisting of plasmonic silver nanoparticles and photosensitizing molecules, where strong resonance coupling between the two leads to a broadened excitation profile and exceptionally high singlet oxygen production under both visible light and infrared light excitations. Our results indicate that the hybrid photosensitizers display low cytotoxicity without light illumination yet highly enhanced photodynamic inhibition efficacy against Hela cells under a broad spectrum of light illuminations including the near-infrared light, which has great implication in photodynamic therapy of deep-tissue cancers.

  16. Rhodanine-based PRL-3 inhibitors blocked the migration and invasion of metastatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Garam; Lee, Su-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Nan; Han, Young-Min; Lee, Rhan-Hee; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2013-07-01

    PRL-3, phosphatase of regenerating liver-3, plays a role in cancer progression through its involvement in invasion, migration, metastasis, and angiogenesis. We synthesized rhodanine derivatives, CG-707 and BR-1, which inhibited PRL-3 enzymatic activity with IC50 values of 0.8 μM and 1.1 μM, respectively. CG-707 and BR-1 strongly inhibited the migration and invasion of PRL-3 overexpressing colon cancer cells without exhibiting cytotoxicity. The specificity of the inhibitors on PRL-3 phosphatase activity was confirmed by the phosphorylation recovery of known PRL-3 substrates such as ezrin and cytokeratin 8. The compounds selectively inhibited PRL-3 in comparison with other phosphatases, and CG-707 regulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins. The results of the present study reveal that rhodanine is a specific PRL-3 inhibitor and a good lead molecule for obtaining a selective PRL-3 inhibitor.

  17. Multifunctional oval-shaped gold-nanoparticle-based selective detection of breast cancer cells using simple colorimetric and highly sensitive two-photon scattering assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wentong; Arumugam, Sri Ranjini; Senapati, Dulal; Singh, Anant K; Arbneshi, Tahir; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2010-03-23

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and it is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women today. The key to the effective and ultimately successful treatment of diseases such as cancer is early and accurate diagnosis. Driven by the need, in this article, we report for the first time a simple colorimetric and highly sensitive two-photon scattering assay for highly selective and sensitive detection of breast cancer SK-BR-3 cell lines at a 100 cells/mL level using a multifunctional (monoclonal anti-HER2/c-erb-2 antibody and S6 RNA aptamer-conjugated) oval-shaped gold-nanoparticle-based nanoconjugate. When multifunctional oval-shaped gold nanoparticles are mixed with the breast cancer SK-BR-3 cell line, a distinct color change occurs and two-photon scattering intensity increases by about 13 times. Experimental data with the HaCaT noncancerous cell line, as well as with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line, clearly demonstrated that our assay was highly sensitive to SK-BR-3 and it was able to distinguish from other breast cancer cell lines that express low levels of HER2. The mechanism of selectivity and the assay's response change have been discussed. Our experimental results reported here open up a new possibility of rapid, easy, and reliable diagnosis of cancer cell lines by monitoring the colorimetric change and measuring TPS intensity from multifunctional gold nanosystems.

  18. RNAi-based therapeutic nanostrategy: IL-8 gene silencing in pancreatic cancer cells using gold nanorods delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Nishtha; Yang, Chengbin; Yin, Feng; Yoon, Ho Sup; Chuan, Tjin Swee; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2015-09-11

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing possesses great ability for therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. Among various oncogene mutations, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene mutations are found to be overexpressed in many pancreatic cell lines. In this work, we demonstrate IL-8 gene silencing by employing an RNAi-based gene therapy approach and this is achieved by using gold nanorods (AuNRs) for efficient delivery of IL-8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the pancreatic cell lines of MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1. Upon comparing to Panc-1 cells, we found that the dominant expression of the IL-8 gene in MiaPaCa-2 cells resulted in an aggressive behavior towards the processes of cell invasion and metastasis. We have hence investigated the suitability of using AuNRs as novel non-viral nanocarriers for the efficient uptake and delivery of IL-8 siRNA in realizing gene knockdown of both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescence imaging techniques have been applied to confirm transfection and release of IL-8 siRNA. The ratio of AuNRs and siRNA has been optimized and transfection efficiencies as high as 88.40 ± 2.14% have been achieved. Upon successful delivery of IL-8 siRNA into cancer cells, the effects of IL-8 gene knockdown are quantified in terms of gene expression, cell invasion, cell migration and cell apoptosis assays. Statistical comparative studies for both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells are presented in this work. IL-8 gene silencing has been demonstrated with knockdown efficiencies of 81.02 ± 10.14% and 75.73 ± 6.41% in MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, respectively. Our results are then compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Oligofectamine, serving as positive control. The gene knockdown results illustrate the potential role of AuNRs as non-viral gene delivery vehicles for RNAi-based targeted cancer therapy applications.

  19. Human cancer cells express Slug-based epithelial-mesenchymal transition gene expression signature obtained in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassiou Dimitris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological mechanisms underlying cancer cell motility and invasiveness remain unclear, although it has been hypothesized that they involve some type of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods We used xenograft models of human cancer cells in immunocompromised mice, profiling the harvested tumors separately with species-specific probes and computationally analyzing the results. Results Here we show that human cancer cells express in vivo a precise multi-cancer invasion-associated gene expression signature that prominently includes many EMT markers, among them the transcription factor Slug, fibronectin, and α-SMA. We found that human, but not mouse, cells express the signature and Slug is the only upregulated EMT-inducing transcription factor. The signature is also present in samples from many publicly available cancer gene expression datasets, suggesting that it is produced by the cancer cells themselves in multiple cancer types, including nonepithelial cancers such as neuroblastoma. Furthermore, we found that the presence of the signature in human xenografted cells was associated with a downregulation of adipocyte markers in the mouse tissue adjacent to the invasive tumor, suggesting that the signature is triggered by contextual microenvironmental interactions when the cancer cells encounter adipocytes, as previously reported. Conclusions The known, precise and consistent gene composition of this cancer mesenchymal transition signature, particularly when combined with simultaneous analysis of the adjacent microenvironment, provides unique opportunities for shedding light on the underlying mechanisms of cancer invasiveness as well as identifying potential diagnostic markers and targets for metastasis-inhibiting therapeutics.

  20. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  1. A cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for imaging Cu2 + in living cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Dong, Baoli; Kong, Xiuqi; Song, Xuezhen; Zhang, Nan; Lin, Weiying

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring copper level in cancer cells is important for the further understanding of its roles in the cell proliferation, and also could afford novel copper-based strategy for the cancer therapy. Herein, we have developed a novel cancer cell-specific fluorescent probe for the detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. The probe employed biotin as the cancer cell-specific group. Before the treatment of Cu2 +, the probe showed nearly no fluorescence. However, the probe can display strong fluorescence at 581 nm in response to Cu2 +. The probe exhibited excellent sensitivity and high selectivity for Cu2 + over the other relative species. Under the guidance of biotin group, could be successfully used for detecting Cu2 + in living cancer cells. We expect that this design strategy could be further applied for detection of the other important biomolecules in living cancer cells.

  2. PD-L1 peptide co-stimulation increases immunogenicity of a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Martinenaite, Evelina; Hansen, Morten; Junker, Niels; Borch, Troels Holz; Met, Özcan; Donia, Marco; Svane, Inge Marie; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2016-08-01

    We recently described naturally occurring PD-L1-specific T cells that recognize PD-L1-expressing immune cells as well as malignant cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the immunogenicity of a dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine could be influenced by co-stimulation with a known PD-L1-derived epitope. We incubated a PD-L1-derived peptide epitope (19 amino acids long) or a control peptide (an irrelevant HIV epitope) with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with malignant melanoma who had received a DC-based vaccine. We observed a significantly higher number of T cells that reacted to the vaccine in cultures that had been co-stimulated with the PD-L1 peptide epitope compared to cultures incubated with control peptide. Next, we characterized a novel PD-L1-derived epitope (23 amino acids long) and found that co-stimulation with both PD-L1 epitopes boosted the immune response elicited by the DC vaccine even further. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the number of vaccine-reacting T cells in vitro. In conclusion, activation of PD-L1-specific T cells may directly modulate immunogenicity of DC vaccines. Addition of PD-L1 epitopes may thus be an easily applicable and attractive option to augment the effectiveness of cancer vaccines and other immunotherapeutic agents.

  3. RGD-Functionalization of Poly(2-oxazoline-Based Networks for Enhanced Adhesion to Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Schenk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(2-oxazoline networks with varying swelling degrees and varying hydrophilicity can be synthesized from 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline, 2-nonyl-2-oxazoline, 2-9’-decenyl-2-oxazoline and 2,2’-tetramethylene-bis-2-oxazoline in one-pot/one-step strategies. These gels can be loaded with organic molecules, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate, either during the polymerization (covalent attachment of the dye or according to post-synthetic swelling/deswelling strategies (physical inclusion of the dye. Surface functionalization of ground gels by thiol-ene reactions with cysteine-bearing peptides exhibiting the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD motif yields microparticles with enhanced recognition of human cancer cells compared to healthy endothelial cells.

  4. Multifunctional quantum dots-based cancer diagnostics and stem cell therapeutics for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoshima, Daisuke; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-12-01

    A field of recent diagnostics and therapeutics has been advanced with quantum dots (QDs). QDs have developed into new formats of biomolecular sensing to push the limits of detection in biology and medicine. QDs can be also utilized as bio-probes or labels for biological imaging of living cells and tissues. More recently, QDs has been demonstrated to construct a multifunctional nanoplatform, where the QDs serve not only as an imaging agent, but also a nanoscaffold for diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. This review highlights the promising applications of multi-functionalized QDs as advanced nanosensors for diagnosing cancer and as innovative fluorescence probes for in vitro or in vivo stem cell imaging in regenerative medicine.

  5. Redox-Responsive Porphyrin-Based Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Vega

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of stimulus-responsive photosensitizer delivery systems that carry a high payload of photosensitizers is of great importance in photodynamic therapy. In this study, redox-responsive polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles (PSilQNPs built by a reverse microemulsion approach using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl porphyrin (TCPP silane derivatives as building blocks, were successfully fabricated. The structural properties of TCPP-PSilQNPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS/ζ-potential, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The photophysical properties were determined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The quantity of singlet oxygen generated in solution was measured using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran. The redox-responsive release of TCPP molecules was successfully demonstrated in solution in the presence of a reducing agent. The internalization of TCPP-PSilQNPs in cancer cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Phototoxicity experiments in vitro showed that the redox-responsive TCPP-PSilQNPs exhibited an improved phototherapeutic effect on cervical cancer cells compared to a non-responsive TCPP-PSilQNP control material.

  6. Redox-Responsive Porphyrin-Based Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Daniel L.; Lodge, Patrick; Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of stimulus-responsive photosensitizer delivery systems that carry a high payload of photosensitizers is of great importance in photodynamic therapy. In this study, redox-responsive polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles (PSilQNPs) built by a reverse microemulsion approach using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (TCPP) silane derivatives as building blocks, were successfully fabricated. The structural properties of TCPP-PSilQNPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS)/ζ-potential, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The photophysical properties were determined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The quantity of singlet oxygen generated in solution was measured using 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran. The redox-responsive release of TCPP molecules was successfully demonstrated in solution in the presence of a reducing agent. The internalization of TCPP-PSilQNPs in cancer cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Phototoxicity experiments in vitro showed that the redox-responsive TCPP-PSilQNPs exhibited an improved phototherapeutic effect on cervical cancer cells compared to a non-responsive TCPP-PSilQNP control material. PMID:26729110

  7. Association between different EGFR mutation status and survival in pemetrexed-based chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郏博

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between different epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)mutation status and survival in pemetrexed-based chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed to assess146 patients with advanced NSCLC at Cancer

  8. Comparison of protein- and polysaccharide-based nanoparticles for cancer therapy: synthesis, characterization, drug release, and interaction with a breast cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, Öznur; Erdal, Ebru; Vural, Tayfun; Kavaz, Doğa; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2017-03-01

    In this study, human serum albumin (HSA) was used as a protein-based material and poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCh) as a polysaccharide-based material for the production of nanoparticles to be used as nanocarriers in cancer therapy. HSA and PHB-CMCh nanoparticles were prepared and characterized with a Zeta Sizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. The effects of the pH value of the suspending medium and the amounts of crosslinker and polymer concentration on nanoparticle size and size distribution were investigated. The anticancer-agent etoposide was used as a model drug and encapsulated in nanoparticles to obtain drug release profiles. The entrapment efficiency of HSA nanoparticles was found to be greater than that of PHB-CMCh nanoparticles. To achieve "active" targeting of cancer cells, the nanoparticles were modified with concanavalin A. In the final step of the study, the interaction of nanoparticles with cancer cells was investigated in cytotoxicity and cellular uptake studies.

  9. Reversal of multidrug resistance in human lung cancer cells by delivery of 3-octadecylcarbamoylacrylic acid–cisplatin-based liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Ren, Weifang; Xu, Tingting; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Hongyu; Zhu, Shanshan; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Liposome-based drug delivery system would be an innovative and promising candidate to circumvent multidrug resistance (MDR) of cisplatin (CDDP). However, the reversal efficacy of liposomal CDDP was severely impaired by weak cellular uptake and insufficient intracellular drug release. In this study, 3-octadecylcarbamoylacrylic acid–CDDP nanocomplex (OMI–CDDP–N)-based liposomes (OCP-L) with high cellular uptake and sufficient intracellular drug release were designed to circumvent MDR of lung cancer. OMI–CDDP–N was synthesized through a pH-sensitive monocarboxylato and an O→Pt coordinate bond, which is more efficient than CDDP. Also, OCP-L incorporated with OMI–CDDP–N could induce effective cellular uptake, enhanced nuclear distribution, and optimal cellular uptake kinetics. In particular, OCP-L presented superior effects on enhancing cell apoptosis and in vitro cytotoxicity in CDDP-resistant human lung cancer (A549/CDDP) cells. The mechanisms of MDR reversal in A549/CDDP cells by OCP-L could attribute to organic cation transporter 2 restoration, ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide suppression, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α-subunit depletion, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway inhibition. These results demonstrated that OCP-L may provide an effective delivery of CDDP to resistant cells to circumvent MDR and enhance the therapeutic index of the chemotherapy. PMID:28255230

  10. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition stimulates human cancer cells to extend microtubule-based invasive protrusions and suppresses cell growth in collagen gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Oyanagi

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a crucial event in tumor invasion and metastasis. However, most of past EMT studies have been conducted in the conventional two-dimensional (2D monolayer culture. Therefore, it remains unclear what invasive phenotypes are acquired by EMT-induced cancer cells. To address this point, we attempted to characterize EMT cells in more physiological, three-dimensional (3D collagen gel culture. EMT was induced by treating three human carcinoma cell lines (A549, Panc-1 and MKN-1 with TGF-ß. The TGF-ß treatment stimulated these cells to overexpress the invasion markers laminin γ2 and MT1-MMP in 2D culture, in addition to the induction of well-known morphological change and EMT marker expression. EMT induction enhanced cell motility and adhesiveness to fibronectin and collagen in 2D culture. Although EMT cells showed comparable cell growth to control cells in 2D culture, their growth rates were extremely suppressed in soft agar and collagen gel cultures. Most characteristically, EMT-induced cancer cells commonly and markedly extended invasive protrusions in collagen gel. These protrusions were mainly supported by microtubules rather than actin cytoskeleton. Snail-introduced, stable EMT cells showed similar protrusions in 3D conditions without TGF-ß. Moreover, these protrusions were suppressed by colchicine or inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (HSP-90 and protein phosphatase 2A. However, MMP inhibitors did not suppress the protrusion formation. These data suggest that EMT enhances tumor cell infiltration into interstitial stroma by extending microtubule-based protrusions and suppressing cell growth. The elevated cell adhesion to fibronectin and collagen and high cell motility also seem important for the tumor invasion.

  11. [The effect of the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) based perioperative chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Masayuki; Yamada, T; Moriyama, S; Suzuki, E; Niwa, H

    2008-01-01

    In this study we analyze the usefulness of the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA) based perioperative chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. From 2001 to 2006, we examined the chemosensitivity of 70 lung cancer tissues to cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin (CBDCA), paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine and irinotecan. In 16 patients with stage III lung cancer who treated induction therapy, the response rate was 100% of 5 patients treated chemotherapy using 2 HDRA-positive drugs, 50% of 8 patient treeated using 1 positive drugs and 0% of 3 patients treated using negative drugs, respectively. The 3-year survival rate of the 5 patients treated using 2 positive drugs was better than that of 11 patient treated using 1 or non positive drugs (p = 0.07). In 39 patients with stage III lung cancer who treated adjuvant chemotherapy, the survival rate of the 14 patients treated chemotherapy using 2 positive drugs was significantly better than that of 25 patients treated using 1 or non positive drugs (p = 0.03). Therefore, HDRA may useful to the improvement of the response to chemotherapy and survival.

  12. The level of telomere dysfunction determines the efficacy of telomerase-based therapeutics in a lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Milena; Zimmermann, Stefan; Waller, Cornelius F; Martens, Uwe M

    2005-05-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that maintains telomeres of eukaryotic chromosomes. Activation of telomerase is a common feature of the majority of human cancers, and inhibition of this enzyme has been proposed as a novel target for cancer therapeutics. Here, we investigated the effects of telomerase inhibition in the non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H460, using a genetic approach by ectopic expression of dominant-negative (DN)-hTERT. Five clones were selected in which telomerase activity was completely abolished. As a result, telomere erosion was observed leading to proliferation arrest after a lag period of 20-28 population doublings. Although overall telomere length was similar between the different clones as measured by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH), striking differences were found in telomere length of individual chromosomes. In particular, lack of individual telomeres and formation of end-to-end fusions were variable. Interestingly, this level of individual telomere dysfunction was positively correlated with the remaining life span of the different clones in vitro. In addition, the amount of telomere dysfunction induced by DN-hTERT was twice as high compared to the small molecule telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532, which induced growth arrest after >100 population doublings. Thus, pharmacological strategies that aim at inhibition of telomerase in cancer cells should take into account that not only overall telomere shortening, but rapid induction of a high level telomere dysfunction appears to be the crucial surrogate parameter for the development of future telomerase-based therapeutics.

  13. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  14. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  15. Laryngeal cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Greco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the head and neck region with an increased incidence rate worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a group of cells with eternal life or infinite self-renewal ability, which have high migrating, infiltrative, and metastatic abilities. Though CSCs only account for a small proportion in tumors, the high resistance to traditional therapy exempts them from therapy killing and thus they can reconstruct tumors. Our current knowledge, about CSCs in the LSCC, largely depends on head and neck studies with a lack of systematic data about the evidences of CSCs in tumorigenesis of LSCC. Certainly, the combination of therapies aimed at debulking the tumour (e.g. surgery, conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy together with targeted therapies aimed at the elimination of the CSCs might have a positive impact on the long-term outcome of patients with laryngeal cancer (LC in the future and may cast a new light on the cancer treatment.

  16. Automated selection of regions of interest for intensity-based FRET analysis of transferrin endocytic trafficking in normal vs. cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ronak; Vanderpoel, Andrew; Eladdadi, Amina; Anderson, Kate; Abe, Ken; Barroso, Margarida

    2014-03-15

    The overexpression of certain membrane-bound receptors is a hallmark of cancer progression and it has been suggested to affect the organization, activation, recycling and down-regulation of receptor-ligand complexes in human cancer cells. Thus, comparing receptor trafficking pathways in normal vs. cancer cells requires the ability to image cells expressing dramatically different receptor expression levels. Here, we have presented a significant technical advance to the analysis and processing of images collected using intensity based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) confocal microscopy. An automated Image J macro was developed to select region of interests (ROI) based on intensity and statistical-based thresholds within cellular images with reduced FRET signal. Furthermore, SSMD (strictly standardized mean differences), a statistical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) evaluation parameter, was used to validate the quality of FRET analysis, in particular of ROI database selection. The Image J ROI selection macro together with SSMD as an evaluation parameter of SNR levels, were used to investigate the endocytic recycling of Tfn-TFR complexes at nanometer range resolution in human normal vs. breast cancer cells expressing significantly different levels of endogenous TFR. Here, the FRET-based assay demonstrates that Tfn-TFR complexes in normal epithelial vs. breast cancer cells show a significantly different E% behavior during their endocytic recycling pathway. Since E% is a relative measure of distance, we propose that these changes in E% levels represent conformational changes in Tfn-TFR complexes during endocytic pathway. Thus, our results indicate that Tfn-TFR complexes undergo different conformational changes in normal vs. cancer cells, indicating that the organization of Tfn-TFR complexes at the nanometer range is significantly altered during the endocytic recycling pathway in cancer cells. In summary, improvements in the automated selection of FRET ROI datasets

  17. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  18. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine the cytoskeletal dynamics they chose magnetic twisting cytometry, where the spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads was measured, which is a measure for the cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. The group of Katarina Wolf measured the stiffness of the cell nucleus because it is the largest and stiffest organelle, which may hinder the migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue [2]. They combined atomic force confocal microscopy for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness (the inverse of the compressibility) with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact as well as monitoring of the cell's fate. The dynamics of tissue topology such as the mixing of compartments during cancer invasion and metastasis were theoretically analyzed by Lance L Munn [3]. In particular, he presented a mathematical model of tissue repair and tumor growth based on collective cell migration that simulates a wide range of tumor behaviors using correct tissue compartmentalization and connectivity. In the future, the topological analysis could be helpful for tumor diagnosis or monitoring tumor therapy. The group of Cynthia A Reinhart-King analyzed how the topological guidance of a 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities affects cell motility [4]. In particular, they mimicked the heterogeneities in density of the tumor stroma by preparing gels with an interface of high and low density collagen gels and investigated how this affects cell motility. The author's review paper details the effect of focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on cell motility and how this effect is driven by mechanical alterations of cells expressing FAK compared to cells with FAK knock-out [5]. In particular, it focused on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. This article highlights that both focal adhesion proteins

  19. EMT-like circulating tumor cells in ovarian cancer patients are enriched by platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebouti, Issam; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Buderath, Paul; Wimberger, Pauline; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik

    2017-07-25

    Assuming that tumor cell dissemination requires a shift to a mesenchymal phenotype, we analyzed the incidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT)-like circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in ovarian cancer patients and inquired, how their molecular phenotypes respond to platinum-based chemotherapy and influence outcome. Before surgery, overall detection rate for epithelial CTCs was 18%. EMT-like CTCs were more frequently observed (30%) and were mutually exclusive to epithelial CTCs in the majority of patients (82%). After chemotherapy, EMT-like CTCs increased up to 52%, accompanied by the "de novo" emergence of PI3Kα+/Twist+ EMT-like CTCs. Before surgery, PI3K+ EMT-like CTCs in combination with epithelial CTCs indicated decreased OS (p = 0.02) and FIGO I-III patients with residual tumor burden after surgery were more likely to be positive for EMT-like CTCs after chemotherapy (p = 0.02). In the latter group, epithelial CTCs alone significantly correlated with decreased PFS and OS (p = 0.02, p = 0.002), supported by an additional inclusion of PI3K+ CTCs (OS, p = 0.001). Blood samples of 91 ovarian cancer patients before surgery and 31 matched samples after adjuvant chemotherapy were evaluated for CTCs with the AdnaTest ovarian cancer and EMT-1, analyzing the epithelial-associated transcripts EpCAM, Muc-1 and CA125 and the EMT-associated transcripts PI3Kα, Akt-2 and Twist. Platinum-based chemotherapy seems to select for EMT-like CTCs in ovarian cancer patients and provokes a shift towards PI3Kα and Twist expressing CTCs, which may reflect clonal tumor evolution towards therapy resistance. It has to be determined, whether this CTC subgroup may serve as a biomarker to identify patients at high risk.

  20. Metabolic profiling-based data-mining for an effective chemical combination to induce apoptosis of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazoe, Motofumi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Hidaka, Shiori; Kim, Yoonhee; Murayama, Kanako; Takai, Mika; Huang, Yuhui; Yamashita, Shuya; Murata, Motoki; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2015-03-31

    Green tea extract (GTE) induces apoptosis of cancer cells without adversely affecting normal cells. Several clinical trials reported that GTE was well tolerated and had potential anti-cancer efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) is the primary compound responsible for the anti-cancer effect of GTE; however, the effect of EGCG alone is limited. To identify GTE compounds capable of potentiating EGCG bioactivity, we performed metabolic profiling of 43 green tea cultivar panels by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Here, we revealed the polyphenol eriodictyol significantly potentiated apoptosis induction by EGCG in vitro and in a mouse tumour model by amplifying EGCG-induced activation of the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR)/protein kinase B/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/protein kinase C delta/acid sphingomyelinase signalling pathway. Our results show that metabolic profiling is an effective chemical-mining approach for identifying botanical drugs with therapeutic potential against multiple myeloma. Metabolic profiling-based data mining could be an efficient strategy for screening additional bioactive compounds and identifying effective chemical combinations.

  1. Identification of Distinct Breast Cancer Stem Cell Populations Based on Single-Cell Analyses of Functionally Enriched Stem and Progenitor Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Akrap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of breast cancer cell subpopulations featuring truly malignant stem cell qualities is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease and lack of general markers. By combining extensive single-cell gene expression profiling with three functional strategies for cancer stem cell enrichment including anchorage-independent culture, hypoxia, and analyses of low-proliferative, label-retaining cells derived from mammospheres, we identified distinct stem cell clusters in breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ERα+ tumors featured a clear hierarchical organization with switch-like and gradual transitions between different clusters, illustrating how breast cancer cells transfer between discrete differentiation states in a sequential manner. ERα− breast cancer showed less prominent clustering but shared a quiescent cancer stem cell pool with ERα+ cancer. The cellular organization model was supported by single-cell data from primary tumors. The findings allow us to understand the organization of breast cancers at the single-cell level, thereby permitting better identification and targeting of cancer stem cells.

  2. Quantum dot nanoprobe-based high-content monitoring of notch pathway inhibition of breast cancer stem cell by capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer death for women worldwide. Breast cancer patients are treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although chemotherapy and radiotherapy are applied, some cancer cells still survive. These cells, called cancer stem cell (CSC), exhibit special capabilities, such as drug and radio resistance. The remaining CSC can trigger cancer recurrence. Thus, it is critical to find an effective way to target CSC. Capsaicin has been reported to affect anticancer activity in many cancers. It also has been shown that capsaicin induces apoptosis in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In this study, we demonstrate that capsaicin causes dose-dependent growth disruption in breast CSC and inhibits translocation of notch intracellular membrane domain (NICD) into the nucleus. MCF-7 cells were treated with capsaicin at various concentrations (5 μM, 10 μM, and 20 μM) for 24 h. After capsaicin treatment, it was found that the number of breast CSC (%) decreased as the treatment concentration of capsaicin increased. This result was also confirmed with FACS. NICD translocation to the nucleus and apoptotic cell death of breast CSC were concurrently observed at the single breast CSC level using highly sensitive quantum dot (Qdot)-antibody nanoprobes. The control breast CSCs without the capsaicin treatment were able to translocate NICD into the nucleus. On the other hand, translocation of NICD into the nucleus was not observed in capsaicin-treated cells. In addition, apoptotic cell death was caused when the breast CSC were treated with capsaicin at more than 10 μM. Although many studies have shown that capsaicin produces anticancer activity in cancer cell lines, the present result is the first report to demonstrate that capsaicin is capable of causing breast CSC apoptotic cell death via inhibiting its notch signaling pathway.

  3. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  4. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  6. Genome-based identification of cancer genes by proviral tagging in mouse retrovirus-induced T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Rachel; Trubetskoy, Alla; Suzuki, Takeshi; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Lenz, Jack

    2003-02-01

    The identification of tumor-inducing genes is a driving force for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer. Many retroviruses induce tumors by insertion of viral DNA adjacent to cellular oncogenes, resulting in altered expression and/or structure of the encoded proteins. The availability of the mouse genome sequence now allows analysis of retroviral common integration sites in murine tumors to be used as a genetic screen for identification of large numbers of candidate cancer genes. By positioning the sequences of inverse PCR-amplified, virus-host junction fragments within the mouse genome, 19 target genes were identified in T-cell lymphomas induced by the retrovirus SL3-3. The candidate cancer genes included transcription factors (Fos, Gfi1, Lef1, Myb, Myc, Runx3, and Sox3), all three D cyclins, Ras signaling pathway components (Rras2/TC21 and Rasgrp1), and Cmkbr7/CCR7. The most frequent target was Rras2. Insertions as far as 57 kb away from the transcribed portion were associated with substantially increased transcription of Rras2, and no coding sequence mutations, including those typically involved in Ras activation, were detected. These studies demonstrate the power of genome-based analysis of retroviral insertion sites for cancer gene discovery, identify several new genes worth examining for a role in human cancer, and implicate the pathways in which those genes act in lymphomagenesis. They also provide strong genetic evidence that overexpression of unmutated Rras2 contributes to tumorigenesis, thus suggesting that it may also do so if it is inappropriately expressed in human tumors.

  7. Internalization pathways into cancer cells of gadolinium-based radiosensitizing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Wael; Sancey, Lucie; Aloy, Marie-Thérèse; Armandy, Emma; Alcantara, Gustavo B; Epicier, Thierry; Malchère, Annie; Joly-Pottuz, Lucile; Mowat, Pierre; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Burdin, Béatrice; Rivoire, Annie; Boulé, Christelle; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Pourchez, Jérémie; Cottier, Michèle; Roux, Stéphane; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Perriat, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, nanoparticles have been studied in theranostic field with the objective of exhibiting a long circulation time through the body coupled to major accumulation in tumor tissues, rapid elimination, therapeutic potential and contrast properties. In this context, we developed sub-5 nm gadolinium-based nanoparticles that possess in vitro efficient radiosensitizing effects at moderate concentration when incubated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (SQ20B). Two main cellular internalization mechanisms were evidenced and quantified: passive diffusion and macropinocytosis. Whereas the amount of particles internalized by passive diffusion is not sufficient to induce in vitro a significant radiosensitizing effect, the cellular uptake by macropinocytosis leads to a successful radiotherapy in a limited range of particles incubation concentration. Macropinocytosis processes in two steps: formation of agglomerates at vicinity of the cell followed by their collect via the lamellipodia (i.e. the "arms") of the cell. The first step is strongly dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the particles, especially their zeta potential that determines the size of the agglomerates and their distance from the cell. These results should permit to control the quantity of particles internalized in the cell cytoplasm, promising ambitious opportunities towards a particle-assisted radiotherapy using lower radiation doses.

  8. The cancer stem cell theory: is it correct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Min-Hyuk; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2008-11-30

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis posits that tumor growth is driven by a rare subpopulation of cells, designated cancer stem cells (CSC). Studies supporting this theory are based in large part on xenotransplantation experiments wherein human cancer cells are grown in immunocompromised mice and only CSC, often constituting less than 1% of the malignancy, generate tumors. Herein, we show that all colonies derived from randomly chosen single cells in mouse lung and breast cancer cell lines form tumors following allografting histocompatible mice. Our study suggests that the majority of malignant cells rather than CSC can sustain tumors and that the cancer stem cell theory must be reevaluated.

  9. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Sha Chen; An-Xin Wang; Bing Dong; Ke-Feng Pu; Li-Hua Yuan; Yi-Min Zhu

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory,cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells.This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention.Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer.In this review,we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells,and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells,a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  10. Mn-doped ZnSe d-dots-based α-methylacyl-CoA racemase probe for human prostate cancer cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yang; Su, Xingguang

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we report the successful use of non-cadmium-based Mn-doped ZnSe d-dots (Mn/ZnSe) as highly efficient and nontoxic optical probes for human prostate cancer cells imaging. Mn/ZnSe d-dots are directly prepared in aqueous solution. The α-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) is overexpressed in prostate cancers; the presence of antibodies specific for AMACR is more sensitive and specific than serum prostate specific antigen levels in distinguishing patients with prostate cancers. Mn/ZnSe d-dots were linked to anti-AMACR to form Mn/ZnSe d-dots-anti-AMACR bioconjugates for the direct prostate cancer cell imaging. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2 and 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay demonstrated that Mn/ZnSe d-dots exhibited favorable cytocompatibility to LNCaP cells with high concentration (1 mM) and long-time incubation (24 h). Furthermore, cellular imaging results demonstrated that Mn/ZnSe d-dots were remarkably efficacious for high-specificity cell imaging. The antibody-mediated delivery of the bioconjugates was further confirmed by the observation of no fluorescence signals in vitro targeting in nonprostate-cancer-based cell lines which are negative for AMACR. Mn/ZnSe d-dots as non-cadmium-based safe and efficient optical imaging nanoprobes could therefore be used for targeting imaging and treatment of cancers in the early stage.

  11. Evaluation of circulating cellular DCLK1 protein, as the most promising colorectal cancer stem cell marker, using immunoassay based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Alireza; Madjd, Zahra; Kadijani, Azade Amini; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Modarresi, Mohammad Hossein; Verdi, Javad; Akbari, Abolfazl; Tavoosidana, Gholamreza

    2016-09-26

    DCLK1, as the most potential colorectal cancer stem cell (CSC) marker has been the core of many recent investigations. However, no study has been performed to evaluate the circulating cellular DCLK1 protein (CCDP) that might reflect the presences of colorectal CSC in circulation. We aimed to evaluate CCDP in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients applying immunoassay based methods including PLA, IPCR and ELISA in order to introduce the method of choice for clinical detection of CCDP. PBMCs were extracted from blood samples of 58 CRC patients along with 58 blood samples of tumor free controls. Total protein of PBMC was extracted and the CCDP level was evaluated. The results of three applied immunoassay tests were compared and the best approach for clinical application was introduced, accordingly. In addition, the correlation of CCD Plevel with clincopathologic findings of CRC patients was assessed. The results of three immuneassay methods confirmed each other. Based on our finding, ELISA could be the most judicious method for clinical evaluation of CCDP considering its simplicity for clinical implications. Our results also showed a significant higher amount of CCDP in peripheral blood of CRC patients compared to control group which was also correlated with patients' clinicopathologic finding such as stage, grade and neoadjuvant history. CCDP could be applied for monitoring purposes in CRC patients. However, its application needs to be more elucidated in future investigations implementing larger samples.

  12. Array-based genome-wide RNAi screening to identify shRNAs that enhance p53-related apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sugisaka, Jun; Sasaki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Tokino, Takashi

    2014-09-15

    p53 transduction is a potentially effective cancer therapy but does not result in a good therapeutic response in all human cancers due to resistance to apoptosis. To discover factors that overcome resistance to p53-induced apoptosis, we attempted to identify RNAi sequences that enhance p53-induced apoptosis. We screened a genome-wide lentiviral shRNA library in liver cancer Huh-7 and pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells, both of which resist p53-induced apoptosis. After the infection of adenovirus expressing p53 or LacZ as a control, shRNA-treated populations were analyzed by microarray. We identified shRNAs that were significantly decreased in p53-infected cells compared with control cells. Among these shRNAs, shRNA-58335 was markedly decreased in both cancer cell lines tested. shRNA-58335 enhanced p53-related apoptosis in vitro and augmented the inhibitory effect of adenoviral p53 transduction on tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, the enhanced apoptotic response by shRNA-58335 was also confirmed by treatment with PRIMA-1, which reactivates mutant p53, instead of adenoviral p53 transduction. We found that shRNA-58335 evokes the apoptotic response following p53 transduction or functional restoration of p53 with a small molecule drug in cancer cells resistant to p53-induced apoptosis. The combination of p53 restoration and RNAi-based drugs is expected to be a promising novel cancer therapy.

  13. Cytoreductive partial nephrectomy does not undermine cancer control in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Umberto; Zini, Laurent; Perrotte, Paul; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Jeldres, Claudio; Arjane, Philippe; Pharand, Daniel; Widmer, Hugues; Péloquin, François; Montorsi, Francesco; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2008-11-01

    We examined the population-based rates of cancer-specific survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC) treated with either partial (PN) or radical cytoreductive nephrectomy (RN). Patients diagnosed with MRCC and treated with either PN or RN were identified within nine SEER cancer registries. Matched and unmatched Kaplan-Meier survival analyses, as well as multivariable Cox regression models compared the effect of RN (n = 1997, 97.8%) vs. PN (n = 46, 2.2%) on cancer-specific survival (CSS). Covariates consisted of age, gender, community type (rural vs urban), race, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry, tumor size and year of diagnosis. In multivariable unmatched Cox regression analyses, no statistically significantly difference was found in CSS between the two groups (hazard ratio [HR] 1.40, P = .16). Similarly, no difference in CSS was found in the matched analyses (HR 1.35, log rank P = .34). Cytoreductive PN does not appear to undermine survival in patients with MRCC.

  14. Silica nanoparticle-based dual imaging colloidal hybrids: cancer cell imaging and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Haisung Lee,1 Dongkyung Sung,2 Jinhoon Kim,3 Byung-Tae Kim,3 Tuntun Wang,4 Seong Soo A An,5 Soo-Won Seo,6 Dong Kee Yi4 1Molecular Diagnostics, In Vitro Diagnostics Unit, New Business Division, SK Telecom, 2Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Korea University, 3Interdisciplinary Graduate Program of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Samsung Medical Center, 4Department of Chemistry, Myongji University, Seoul, 5Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Seongnam, 6Medical Device Development Center, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation, Daegu, Republic of Korea Abstract: In this study, fluorescent dye-conjugated magnetic resonance (MR imaging agents were investigated in T mode. Gadolinium-conjugated silica nanoparticles were successfully synthesized for both MR imaging and fluorescence diagnostics. Polyamine and polycarboxyl functional groups were modified chemically on the surface of the silica nanoparticles for efficient conjugation of gadolinium ions. The derived gadolinium-conjugated silica nanoparticles were investigated by zeta potential analysis, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. MR equipment was used to investigate their use as contrast-enhancing agents in T1 mode under a 9.4 T magnetic field. In addition, we tracked the distribution of the gadolinium-conjugated nanoparticles in both lung cancer cells and organs in mice. Keywords: dual bioimaging, MR imaging, silica colloid, T1 contrast imaging, nanohybrid

  15. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  16. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  17. Mixed effects modeling of proliferation rates in cell-based models: consequence for pharmacogenomics and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Im

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The International HapMap project has made publicly available extensive genotypic data on a number of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Building on this resource, many research groups have generated a large amount of phenotypic data on these cell lines to facilitate genetic studies of disease risk or drug response. However, one problem that may reduce the usefulness of these resources is the biological noise inherent to cellular phenotypes. We developed a novel method, termed Mixed Effects Model Averaging (MEM, which pools data from multiple sources and generates an intrinsic cellular growth rate phenotype. This intrinsic growth rate was estimated for each of over 500 HapMap cell lines. We then examined the association of this intrinsic growth rate with gene expression levels and found that almost 30% (2,967 out of 10,748 of the genes tested were significant with FDR less than 10%. We probed further to demonstrate evidence of a genetic effect on intrinsic growth rate by determining a significant enrichment in growth-associated genes among genes targeted by top growth-associated SNPs (as eQTLs. The estimated intrinsic growth rate as well as the strength of the association with genetic variants and gene expression traits are made publicly available through a cell-based pharmacogenomics database, PACdb. This resource should enable researchers to explore the mediating effects of proliferation rate on other phenotypes.

  18. HPLC-based metabolomics to identify cytotoxic compounds from Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against human breast cancer MCF-7Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Wahid; Andarwulan, Nuri; Giriwono, Puspo Edi; Pamungkas, Joko

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to identify the active compounds in Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng which play a role to inhibit viability of breast cancer MCF-7 cells using HPLC-based metabolomics approach. Five fractions of the plant extract were observed including ethanol, hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and water fraction. There were 45 HPLC chromatograms resulted from 5 fractions with 3 replications and 3 wavelengths detection. The chromatograms were compared to the data of IC50 from MTT assay of each fraction against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using metabolomics. The OPLS analysis result promptly pointed towards a chloroform fraction at retention time of 40.16-41.28min that has the greatest contribution to the cytotoxic activity. The data of mass spectra indicated that an abietane diterpene namely 7-acetoxy-6-hydroxyroyleanone was the main compound that contributed to the cytotoxic activity. This metabolomics application method can be used as a quick preliminary guideline to uncover the most dominant compound related to the bioactivity.

  19. The Interactions between L-Tyrosine Based Nanoparticles Decorated with Folic Acid and Cervical Cancer Cells Under Physiological Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Andrew J.; Shah, Kush N.; Robishaw, Nikki K.; Panzner, Matthew J.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Yun, Yang H.

    2012-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs have been established clinically, but their efficacy can be compromised by nonspecific toxicity and an inability to reach the desired cancerous intracellular spaces. In order to address these issues, researchers have explored the use of folic acid as a targeted moiety to increase specificity of chemotherapeutic drugs. To expand upon such research, we have conjugated folic acid to functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) and subsequently decorated the surface of L-tyrosine polyphosphate (LTP) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles possess the appropriate size (100–500 nm) for internalization as shown by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Under simulated physiological flow, LTP nanoparticles decorated with folic acid (targeted nanoparticles) show a 10-fold greater attachment to HeLa, a cervical cancer cell line, compared to control nanoparticles and to human dermal fibroblasts. The attachment of these targeted nanoparticles progresses at a linear rate, and the strength of this nanoparticle attachment is shown to withstand shear stresses of 3.0 dynes/cm2. These interactions of the targeted nanoparticles to HeLa are likely a result of a receptor-ligand binding, as a competition study with free folic acid inhibits the nanoparticle attachment. Finally, the targeted nanoparticles encapsulated with a silver based drug show increased efficacy in comparison to non-decorated (plain) nanoparticles and drug alone against HeLa cells. Thus, targeted nanoparticles are a promising delivery platform for developing anticancer therapies that over-express the folate receptors (FRs). PMID:22957928

  20. A Conjugate Based on Anti-HER2 Diaffibody and Auristatin E Targets HER2-Positive Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwotka-Suszczak, Anna M.; Sochaj-Gregorczyk, Alicja M.; Pieczykolan, Jerzy; Krowarsch, Daniel; Jelen, Filip; Otlewski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have recently emerged as efficient and selective cancer treatment therapeutics. Currently, alternative forms of drug carriers that can replace monoclonal antibodies are under intensive investigation. Here, a cytotoxic conjugate of an anti-HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) diaffibody with monomethyl-auristatin E (MMAE) is proposed as a potential anticancer therapeutic. The anti-HER2 diaffibody was based on the ZHER2:4 affibody amino acid sequence. The anti-HER2 diaffibody has been expressed as a His-tagged protein in E. coli and purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetyl (Ni-NTA) agarose chromatography. The molecule was properly folded, and the high affinity and specificity of its interaction with HER2 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and flow cytometry, respectively. The (ZHER2:4)2DCS-MMAE conjugate was obtained by coupling the maleimide group linked with MMAE to cysteines, which were introduced in a drug conjugation sequence (DCS). Cytotoxicity of the conjugate was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide MTT assay and the xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analyzer. Our experiments demonstrated that the conjugate delivered auristatin E specifically to HER2-positive tumor cells, which finally led to their death. These results indicate that the cytotoxic diaffibody conjugate is a highly potent molecule for the treatment of various types of cancer overexpressing HER2 receptors. PMID:28216573

  1. Echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omersa, Daniel; Cufer, Tanja; Marcun, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer and remains an important cause of cancer death worldwide. Platinum-based chemotherapy (PBC) for NSCLC can modify outcome while the risk of cardiotoxicity remains poorly researched. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and severity of cardiac injury during PBC in patients with NSCLC and to identify patients at risk. Methods This was a single-centre, prospective, observational study of patients with early and advanced stage NSCLC referred for PBC. In addition to standard care, patients were examined and evaluated for cardiotoxicity before the first dose (visit 1), at the last dose (visit 2) and 6 months after the last dose of PBC (visit 3). Cardiotoxicity (at visit 2 and 3) was defined as increase in the ultrasensitive troponin T, N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide or decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Results Overall, 41 patients (mean age 61 ± 9; 54% men; 68% advanced lung cancer) were included. The median number of PBC cycles was 4. During the study period, there were no incidents of heart failure, and 3 deaths caused by tumour progression were recorded. The mean values of biomarkers and LVEF did not change significantly (p > 0.20). However, 10 (25%) had cardiotoxicity which was independently associated with a history of ischemic heart disease (p = 0.026). Conclusions In NSCLC, cardiac assessment and lifestyle modifications may be pursued in patients with a history of cardiac disease and in patients with longer life expectancy.

  2. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  3. AlgiMatrix™-Based 3D Cell Culture System as an In Vitro Tumor Model: An Important Tool in Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godugu, Chandraiah; Singh, Mandip

    2016-01-01

    Routinely used two-dimensional cell culture-based models often fail while translating the observations into in vivo models. This setback is more common in cancer research, due to several reasons. The extracellular matrix and cell-to-cell interactions are not present in two-dimensional (2D) cell culture models. Diffusion of drug molecules into cancer cells is hindered by barriers of extracellular components in in vivo conditions, these barriers are absent in 2D cell culture models. To better mimic or simulate the in vivo conditions present in tumors, the current study used the alginate based three-dimensional cell culture (AlgiMatrix™) model, which resembles close to the in vivo tumor models. The current study explains the detailed protocols involved in AlgiMatrix™ based in vitro non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) models. The suitability of this model was studied by evaluating, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and penetration of nanoparticles into the in vitro tumor spheroids. This study also demonstrated the effect of EphA2 receptor targeted docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles on MDA-MB-468 TNBC cell lines. The methods section is subdivided into three subsections such as (1) preparation of AlgiMatrix™-based 3D in vitro tumor models and cytotoxicity assays, (2) free drug and nanoparticle uptake into spheroid studies, and (3) western blot, IHC, and RT-PCR studies.

  4. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  5. Overexpression of MAC30 is Resistant to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruhua; Fen, Yan; Lin, Xubo; Ma, Tieliang; Cai, Hourong; Ding, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy has developed its stability as the first-line treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of meningioma-associated protein (MAC30) on adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapeutic response and survival in patients with NSCLC. A total of 174 retrospective stage III B to IV Chinese patients with NSCLC were enrolled in the study. Among all cases, 85 patients were given platinum-based chemotherapy and another 89 patients received molecularly targeted therapy. The expression of MAC30 in tumor samples was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining to correlate with the therapeutic response and survival of patients. Patients having NSCLC with MAC30 overexpression showed a poorer response to platinum-based chemotherapy, while there was no prognostic value of MAC30 expression on molecularly targeted therapy. Further, patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy with enhanced MAC30 expression exhibited shorter survival. A multivariate analysis exhibited that increased MAC30 expression was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients having NSCLC with platinum-based chemotherapy. In conclusion, patients having NSCLC with higher MAC30 expression resisted to platinum-based chemotherapy and exhibited worse survival. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Size-based enrichment of exfoliated tumor cells in urine increases the sensitivity for DNA-based detection of bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Andersson

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is diagnosed by cystoscopy, a costly and invasive procedure that is associated with patient discomfort. Analysis of tumor-specific markers in DNA from sediments of voided urine has the potential for non-invasive detection of bladder cancer; however, the sensitivity is limited by low fractions and small numbers of tumor cells exfoliated into the urine from low-grade tumors. The purpose of this study was to improve the sensitivity for non-invasive detection of bladder cancer by size-based capture and enrichment of tumor cells in urine. In a split-sample set-up, urine from a consecutive series of patients with primary or recurrent bladder tumors (N = 189 was processed by microfiltration using a membrane filter with a defined pore-size, and sedimentation by centrifugation, respectively. DNA from the samples was analyzed for seven bladder tumor-associated methylation markers using MethyLight and pyrosequencing assays. The fraction of tumor-derived DNA was higher in the filter samples than in the corresponding sediments for all markers (p<0.000001. Across all tumor stages, the number of cases positive for one or more markers was 87% in filter samples compared to 80% in the corresponding sediments. The largest increase in sensitivity was achieved in low-grade Ta tumors, with 82 out of 98 cases positive in the filter samples (84% versus 74 out of 98 in the sediments (75%. Our results show that pre-analytic processing of voided urine by size-based filtration can increase the sensitivity for DNA-based detection of bladder cancer.

  7. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-18

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  9. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  10. Chip Based Magnetic Imager for Molecular Profiling of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    and trafficking vesicles used to identify cancer. Both lectures will include a discussion of the role of improved materials science for advancing...MVs from pRBCs; supporting notes for analytical equations and movie. This material is available free of charge via the Internet at http:// pubs.acs.org...prevalent cancer in women worldwide, with 80% of cases occurring in resource-limited countries (16). Cellular analyses using the D3 assay reliably

  11. Insights into the field carcinogenesis of ovarian cancer based on the nanocytology of endocervical and endometrial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K.; Kunte, Dhananja; Hurteau, Jean A.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Krosnjar, Nela; Shah, Maitri; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer fatalities among American women. Although curable at early stages with surgery, most women are diagnosed with symptoms of late-stage metastatic disease. Moreover, none of the current diagnostic techniques are clinically recommended for at-risk women as they preferentially target low-grade tumors (which do not affect longevity) and fail to capture early signatures of more lethal serous tumors which originate in the fimbrae region of the fallopian tubes. Hence, the early detection of ovarian cancer is challenging given the current strategy. Recently, our group has developed a novel optical imaging technique, partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, that can quantify the nanoscale macromolecular density fluctuations within biological cells via a biomarker, disorder strength (Ld). Using the concept of field carcinogenesis, we propose a method of detecting ovarian cancer by PWS assessment of endometrial and endocervical columnar cells. The study includes 26 patients (controls = 15, cancer = 11) for endometrium and 23 (controls = 13, cancer = 10) for endocervix. Our results highlight a significant increase in Ld (% fold-increase > 50%, P-value < 0.05) for columnar epithelial cells obtained from cancer patients compared to controls for both endocervix and endometrium. Overall, the quantification of field carcinogenic events in the endometrium and the novel observation of its extension to the cervix are unique findings in the understanding of ovarian field carcinogenesis. We further show independent validation of the presence of cervical field carcinogenesis with mico-RNA expression data. PMID:23436651

  12. Induction of cancer stem cell properties in colon cancer cells by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobu Oshima

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered to be responsible for the dismal prognosis of cancer patients. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition and maintenance of CSC properties in cancer cells because of their rarity in clinical samples. We herein induced CSC properties in cancer cells using defined factors. We retrovirally introduced a set of defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2 and KLF4 into human colon cancer cells, followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium, not human embryonic stem cell medium. We then evaluated the CSC properties in the cells. The colon cancer cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of the marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. We designated the cells with CSC properties induced by the factors, a subset of the transduced cells, as induced CSCs (iCSCs. Moreover, we established a novel technology to isolate and collect the iCSCs based on the differences in the degree of the dye-effluxing activity enhancement. The xenografts derived from our iCSCs were not teratomas. Notably, in contrast to the tumors from the parental cancer cells, the iCSC-based tumors mimicked actual human colon cancer tissues in terms of their immunohistological findings, which showed colonic lineage differentiation. In addition, we confirmed that the phenotypes of our iCSCs were reproducible in serial transplantation experiments. By introducing defined factors, we generated iCSCs with lineage specificity directly from cancer cells, not via an induced pluripotent stem cell state. The novel method enables us to obtain abundant materials of CSCs that not only have enhanced tumorigenicity, but also the ability to differentiate to recapitulate a specific type of cancer tissues. Our method can be of great value to fully understand CSCs and develop new therapies targeting CSCs.

  13. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  14. Anti-cancer activity and mutagenic potential of novel copper(II) quinolinone Schiff base complexes in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Brian; Thangella, Venkat Reddy; Creaven, Bernadette S; Walsh, Maureen; Egan, Denise A

    2012-08-15

    This study determined the cytotoxic, cyto-selective and mutagenic potential of novel quinolinone Schiff base ligands and their corresponding copper(II) complexes in human-derived hepatic carcinoma cells (Hep-G2) and non-malignant human-derived hepatic cells (Chang). Results indicated that complexation of quinolinone Schiff bases with copper served to significantly enhance cytotoxicity. Here, the complex of (7E)-7-(3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzylideamino)-4-methylquinolin-2(1H)-one (TV117-FM) exhibited the lowest IC(50) value (17.9 μM) following 96 h continuous exposure, which was comparable to cisplatin (15.0 μM). However, results revealed that TV117-FM lacked cytoselectivity over non-malignant cells. Additionally, the complex was minimally effluxed from cells via Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and was shown to be non-mutagenic in the Standard Ames test. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation assays showed that it was capable of inhibiting DNA synthesis in a concentrationand time-dependent manner. However, inhibition was not as a consequence of DNA intercalation, as illustrated in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Interestingly, it was shown that the ligand was capable of inhibiting the action of topoisomerase II, but this was lost following complexation. This indicated that the mechanism of action of the novel copper(II) complex was different from that of the parent ligand and suggests that TV117-FM may have a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Studies are currently underway to elucidate the exact in vitro mechanism of action of this novel, metal-based anti-cancer agent.

  15. Daucus carota pentane-based fractions arrest the cell cycle and increase apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebaby, Wassim N; Mroueh, Mohammad; Bodman-Smith, Kikki; Mansour, Anthony; Taleb, Robin I; Daher, Costantine F; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2014-10-10

    Daucus carota L.ssp.carota (wild carrot), an herb used in folk medicine worldwide, was recently demonstrated to exhibit anticancer activity. In this study we examined the anticancer effect of Daucus carota oil extract (DCOE) fractions on the human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 and clarified the mechanism of action. Using the WST assay, the pentane fraction (F1) and 1:1 pentane:diethyl ether fraction (F2) were shown to possess the highest cytotoxicity against both cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both fractions induced the accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase, increase in apoptotic cell death and chromatin condensation. The increase in apoptosis in response to treatment was also apparent in the increase in BAX and the decrease in Bcl-2 levels as well as the proteolytic cleavage of both caspase-3 and PARP as revealed by Western blot. Furthermore, treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with either fraction significantly reduced the level of phosphorylated Erk but did not show any effect on phosphorylated Akt. The combined treatment with a potent PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) and F1 or F2 fraction had a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell survival which shows that these two drugs work on different pathways. These results suggest that the pentane-based fractions of DCOE possess potential anti-cancer activity that is mainly mediated through the Erk pathway.

  16. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  17. Multi-target siRNA based on DNMT3A/B homologous conserved region influences cell cycle and apoptosis of human prostate cancer cell line TSU-PR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-feng Du

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal genome hypermethylation participates in the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells highly express DNA methyltransferase 3 (DMNT3 family genes, essential for maintaining genome methylation. In the present study, multi-target siRNA, based on the homologous region of the DNMT3 family, was designed for the in vitro investigation of its effects on the proliferation, migration, and invasion of TSU-PR1 prostate cancer cells. The consequential cell-cycle derangement, through DNMT3A/B or only DNMT3B silencing, was partially efficient, without affecting apoptosis. DNMT3A silencing had absolutely no effect on changing TSU-PR1 cell biological behavior. Hence, DNMT3B alone apparently plays a key role in maintaining the unfavorable behavior of prostate-cancer cells, thereby implying its potential significance as a promising therapeutic target, with DNMT3A simply in the role of helper.

  18. TMX1 determines cancer cell metabolism as a thiol-based modulator of ER-mitochondria Ca2+ flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raturi, Arun; Gutiérrez, Tomás; Ortiz-Sandoval, Carolina; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Herrera-Cruz, Maria Sol; Rockley, Jeremy P; Gesson, Kevin; Ourdev, Dimitar; Lou, Phing-How; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Tahbaz, Nasser; Zaugg, Michael; Baksh, Shairaz; Ballanyi, Klaus; Simmen, Thomas

    2016-08-15

    The flux of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria regulates mitochondria metabolism. Within tumor tissue, mitochondria metabolism is frequently repressed, leading to chemotherapy resistance and increased growth of the tumor mass. Therefore, altered ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux could be a cancer hallmark, but only a few regulatory proteins of this mechanism are currently known. One candidate is the redox-sensitive oxidoreductase TMX1 that is enriched on the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), the site of ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux. Our findings demonstrate that cancer cells with low TMX1 exhibit increased ER Ca(2+), accelerated cytosolic Ca(2+) clearance, and reduced Ca(2+) transfer to mitochondria. Thus, low levels of TMX1 reduce ER-mitochondria contacts, shift bioenergetics away from mitochondria, and accelerate tumor growth. For its role in intracellular ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux, TMX1 requires its thioredoxin motif and palmitoylation to target to the MAM. As a thiol-based tumor suppressor, TMX1 increases mitochondrial ATP production and apoptosis progression. Copyright © 2016 Raturi et al.

  19. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  20. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in drug‑resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) development leads to resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Microarray methods can provide information regarding new candidate genes that can play a role in resistance to cytostatic drugs. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into cancer tissue as well as increased apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we report changes in the ECM and related gene expression pattern in methotrexate-, cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, vincristine-, topotecan- and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the W1 ovarian cancer cell line. The resistant variants of the W1 cell line were generated by stepwise selection of cells with an increasing concentration of the indicated drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Genome U219 Array Strips were used for hybridizations. Independent t-tests were used to determinate the statistical significance of results. Genes whose expression levels were higher than the assumed threshold (upregulated, >5-fold and downregulated, 20-fold. These genes were: ITGB1BP3, COL3A1, COL5A2, COL15A1, TGFBI, DCN, LUM, MATN2, POSTN and EGFL6. The expression of seven genes decreased very significantly: ITGA1, COL1A2, LAMA2, GPC3, KRT23, VIT and HMCN1. The expression pattern of ECM and related genes provided the preliminary view into the role of ECM components in cytostatic drug resistance of cancer cells. The exact role of the investigated genes in drug resistance requires further investigation.

  1. The effects of 3D channel geometry on CTC passing pressure--towards deformability-based cancer cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Xu, Jie; Hong, Bin; Chen, Xiaolin

    2014-07-21

    Various lab on a chip devices have been developed recently to detect and separate circulating tumour cells (CTCs) for early stage cancer detection. Because CTCs are extremely rare in the blood, next generation CTC microfilters aim at significant improvement in both efficiency and throughput. CTC microfilters based on cell deformability seem to be a promising direction. In the present research, we study a CTC passing event through a micro-filtering channel with various 3D geometries. The pressure signatures for different types of cells passing through different channels are characterized numerically. Specifically, five kinds of cross-sections, circular, square, triangular and two kinds of rectangular channels with aspect ratios of 2 and 5, are studied in this work. The total pressures for cells passing through the channels are calculated and reveal different behaviour from what is predicted by the static surface tension model. Among all five cross-sections studied, the circular cross-section features the highest critical pressure and thus is most suitable for high efficiency CTC separation. The square filtering channel provides the second largest critical pressure, and the triangular cross-section provides the least critical pressure among these three cross-sections. All these three cross-sections are better than the rectangular channels with aspect ratios of 2 and 5. For the rectangular channel, a high aspect ratio channel may lead to cell splitting at high speed, which will result in a periodic pressure signature. Our findings will provide valuable information for the design of next generation CTC microfilters.

  2. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor overexpressi

  3. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor

  4. L-Ornithine Schiff base-copper and -cadmium complexes as new proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyu; Bi, Caifeng; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Nan; Deshmukh, Rahul; Yan, Xingchen; Lv, Xiuwen; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Xia; Dou, Q Ping

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a crucial role in many cellular processes such as cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis. Aberrant activation of UPS may result in cellular transformation or other altered pathological conditions. Previous studies have shown that metal-based complexes could inhibit proteasome activity and induce apoptosis in certain human cancer cells. In the current study, we report that the cadmium and copper complexes with heterocycle-ornithine Schiff base are potent inhibitors of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like (CT-like) activity, leading to induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. Two novel copper-containing complexes and two novel cadmium-containing complexes with different heterocycle-ornithine Schiff base structures as ligands were synthesized and characterized. We found that complexes Cu1, Cd1 and Cd2 show proteasome-inhibitory activities in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and human prostate cancer LNCaP cells, resulting in the accumulation of p27, a natural proteasome substrate and other ubiquitinated proteins, followed by the induction of apoptosis. Our results suggest that metal complexes with heterocycle-ornithine Schiff base have proteasome-inhibitory capabilities and have the potential to be developed into novel anticancer drugs.

  5. In vitro study of cell death with 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy to improve the efficiency of cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.; Ikram, M.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a kind of photochemo therapeutic treatment that exerts its effect mainly through the induction of cell death. Distinct types of cell death may be elicited by different PDT regimes. In this study, efforts are underway to optimize PDT protocols for improved efficacy and combination of all three PDT mechanisms involved in the different human carcinomas cell narcosis. Our in vitro cell culture experiments with 5-aminolevulanic acid (ALA) a clinically approved photiosensitizer (PS) and 635 nm laser light have yielded promising results, as follow: (1) (human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line incubated, for 18 h, with 30 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 50 J/cm2 can produce 85% of cell killing (2) human larynx carcinoma (Hep2c) cell line incubated, for 7 h, with 55 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 85 J/cm2 can produce 75% of cell killing (3) human liver cancer (HepG2) cell line incubated, for 22-48 h, with 262 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 120 J/cm2 can produce 95% of cell killing (4) human muscle cancer (RD) cell line incubated, for 47 h, with 250 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 80 J/cm2 can produce 76% of cell killing (5) Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line incu-bated, for 18 h, with 400 μg/ml of 5-ALA, treated with laser light dose of 40 J/cm2 can produce 82% of cell killing confirming the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

  6. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  8. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  9. Therapeutic implications of colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eros; Fabrizi; Simona; di; Martino; Federica; Pelacchi; Lucia; Ricci-Vitiani

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in many industrialized countries and is characterized by a heterogenic pool of cells with distinct differentiation patterns. Recently, the concept that cancer might arise from a rare population of cells with stem cell-like properties has received support with regard to several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, cancer can be considered a disease in which mutations either convert no...

  10. Single cancer cell analysis on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yoon Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells in blood may represent “a real time liquid biopsy” through the interrogation of single cancer cells thereby determining the outspread of their heterogeneity and guiding therapy. In this thesis, we focused on single cancer cell analysis downstream of the isolation of cancer cells from

  11. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  12. Customized Treatment in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on EGFR Mutations and BRCA1 mRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Rafael; Perez-Roca, Laia; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Cobo, Manuel; Moran, Teresa; Chaib, Imane; Provencio, Mariano; Domine, Manuel; Sala, Maria Angeles; Jimenez, Ulpiano; Diz, Pilar; Barneto, Isidoro; Macias, Jose Antonio; de las Peñas, Ramon; Catot, Silvia; Isla, Dolores; Sanchez, Jose Miguel; Ibeas, Rafael; Lopez-Vivanco, Guillermo; Oramas, Juana; Mendez, Pedro; Reguart, Noemi; Blanco, Remei; Taron, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    Background Median survival is 10 months and 2-year survival is 20% in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. A small fraction of non-squamous cell lung cancers harbor EGFR mutations, with improved outcome to gefitinib and erlotinib. Experimental evidence suggests that BRCA1 overexpression enhances sensitivity to docetaxel and resistance to cisplatin. RAP80 and Abraxas are interacting proteins that form complexes with BRCA1 and could modulate the effect of BRCA1. In order to further examine the effect of EGFR mutations and BRCA1 mRNA levels on outcome in advanced NSCLC, we performed a prospective non-randomized phase II clinical trial, testing the hypothesis that customized therapy would confer improved outcome over non-customized therapy. In an exploratory analysis, we also examined the effect of RAP80 and Abraxas mRNA levels. Methodology/Principal Findings We treated 123 metastatic non-squamous cell lung carcinoma patients using a customized approach. RNA and DNA were isolated from microdissected specimens from paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Patients with EGFR mutations received erlotinib, and those without EGFR mutations received chemotherapy with or without cisplatin based on their BRCA1 mRNA levels: low, cisplatin plus gemcitabine; intermediate, cisplatin plus docetaxel; high, docetaxel alone. An exploratory analysis examined RAP80 and Abraxas expression. Median survival exceeded 28 months for 12 patients with EGFR mutations, and was 11 months for 38 patients with low BRCA1, 9 months for 40 patients with intermediate BRCA1, and 11 months for 33 patients with high BRCA1. Two-year survival was 73.3%, 41.2%, 15.6% and 0%, respectively. Median survival was influenced by RAP80 expression in the three BRCA1 groups. For example, for patients with both low BRCA1 and low RAP80, median survival exceeded 26 months. RAP80 was a significant factor for survival in patients treated according to BRCA1 levels (hazard ratio, 1

  13. Cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah K; Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Heymann, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and in some cases metastasis. Recent published work demonstrates evidence of cancer stem cell phenotypes in osteosarcoma with links to drug resistance and tumorigenesis. In this review we will discuss the commonly used isolation techniques for cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma as well as the identified biochemical and molecular markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enantioselective Effects of Metalaxyl Enantiomers on Breast Cancer Cells Metabolic Profiling Using HPLC-QTOF-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrative high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF based metabolomics approach was performed to evaluate the enantioselective metabolic perturbations in MCF-7 cells after treatment with R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl, respectively. Untargeted metabolomics profile, multivariate pattern recognition, metabolites identification, and pathway analysis were determined after metalaxyl enantiomer exposure. Principal component analysis (PCA and partitial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA directly reflected the enantioselective metabolic perturbations induced by metalaxyl enantiomers. On the basis of multivariate statistical results, a total of 49 metabolites including carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, organic acids, phospholipids, indoles, derivatives, etc. were found to be the most significantly changed metabolites and metabolic fluctuations caused by the same concentration of R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl were enantioselective. Pathway analysis indicated that R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl mainly affected the 7 and 10 pathways in MCF-7 cells, respectively, implying the perturbed pathways induced by metalaxyl enantiomers were also enantioselective. Furthermore, the significantly perturbed metabolic pathways were highly related to energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. Such results provide more specific insights into the enantioselective metabolic effects of chiral pesticides in breast cancer progression, reveal the underlying mechanisms, and provide available data for the health risk assessments of chiral environmental pollutants at the molecular level.

  15. Enantioselective Effects of Metalaxyl Enantiomers on Breast Cancer Cells Metabolic Profiling Using HPLC-QTOF-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Wentao; Wang, Dezhen; Yan, Jin; Wang, Yao; He, Lin

    2017-01-12

    In this study, an integrative high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF) based metabolomics approach was performed to evaluate the enantioselective metabolic perturbations in MCF-7 cells after treatment with R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl, respectively. Untargeted metabolomics profile, multivariate pattern recognition, metabolites identification, and pathway analysis were determined after metalaxyl enantiomer exposure. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partitial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) directly reflected the enantioselective metabolic perturbations induced by metalaxyl enantiomers. On the basis of multivariate statistical results, a total of 49 metabolites including carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, organic acids, phospholipids, indoles, derivatives, etc. were found to be the most significantly changed metabolites and metabolic fluctuations caused by the same concentration of R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl were enantioselective. Pathway analysis indicated that R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl mainly affected the 7 and 10 pathways in MCF-7 cells, respectively, implying the perturbed pathways induced by metalaxyl enantiomers were also enantioselective. Furthermore, the significantly perturbed metabolic pathways were highly related to energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. Such results provide more specific insights into the enantioselective metabolic effects of chiral pesticides in breast cancer progression, reveal the underlying mechanisms, and provide available data for the health risk assessments of chiral environmental pollutants at the molecular level.

  16. A Biofunctional Molecular Beacon for Detecting Single Base Mutations in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a convenient and sensitive biosensing system to detect specific DNA sequences is an important issue in the field of genetic disease therapy. As a classic DNA detection technique, molecular beacon (MB is often used in the biosensing system. However, it has intrinsic drawbacks, including high assay cost, complicated chemical modification, and operational complexity. In this study, we developed a simple and cost-effective label-free multifunctional MB (LMMB by integrating elements of polymerization primer, template, target recognition, and G-quadruplex into one entity to detect target DNA. The core technique was accomplished by introducing a G-hairpin that features fragments of both G-quadruplex and target DNA recognition in the G-hairpin stem. Hybridization between LMMB and target DNA triggered conformational change between the G-hairpin and the common C-hairpin, resulting in significant SYBR-green signal amplification. The hybridization continues to the isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization and accumulation of the double-stranded fragments, causing the uninterrupted extension of the LMMB without a need of chemical modification and other assistant DNA sequences. The novel and programmable LMMB could detect target DNA with sensitivity at 250 pmol/l with a linear range from 2 to 100 nmol/l and the relative standard deviation of 7.98%. The LMMB could sense a single base mutation from the normal DNA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplicons of the mutant-type cell line from the wild-type one. The total time required for preparation and assaying was only 25 minutes. Apparently, the LMMB shows great potential for detecting DNA and its mutations in biosamples, and therefore it opens up a new prospect for genetic disease therapy.

  17. A Biofunctional Molecular Beacon for Detecting Single Base Mutations in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haiyan; Ma, Ji; Wang, Jie; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Sinko, Patrick J; Jia, Lee

    2016-04-05

    The development of a convenient and sensitive biosensing system to detect specific DNA sequences is an important issue in the field of genetic disease therapy. As a classic DNA detection technique, molecular beacon (MB) is often used in the biosensing system. However, it has intrinsic drawbacks, including high assay cost, complicated chemical modification, and operational complexity. In this study, we developed a simple and cost-effective label-free multifunctional MB (LMMB) by integrating elements of polymerization primer, template, target recognition, and G-quadruplex into one entity to detect target DNA. The core technique was accomplished by introducing a G-hairpin that features fragments of both G-quadruplex and target DNA recognition in the G-hairpin stem. Hybridization between LMMB and target DNA triggered conformational change between the G-hairpin and the common C-hairpin, resulting in significant SYBR-green signal amplification. The hybridization continues to the isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization and accumulation of the double-stranded fragments, causing the uninterrupted extension of the LMMB without a need of chemical modification and other assistant DNA sequences. The novel and programmable LMMB could detect target DNA with sensitivity at 250 pmol/l with a linear range from 2 to 100 nmol/l and the relative standard deviation of 7.98%. The LMMB could sense a single base mutation from the normal DNA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons of the mutant-type cell line from the wild-type one. The total time required for preparation and assaying was only 25 minutes. Apparently, the LMMB shows great potential for detecting DNA and its mutations in biosamples, and therefore it opens up a new prospect for genetic disease therapy.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells in Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, D; Brown, H K; Tellez-Gabriel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents and advanced osteosarcoma patients with evidence of metastasis share a poor prognosis. Osteosarcoma frequently gains resistance to standard therapies highlighting the need for improved treatment regimens and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a sub-type of tumour cells attributed to critical steps in cancer including tumour propagation, therapy resistance, recurrence and...

  19. A Schiff base-derived copper (II) complex is a potent inducer of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by activating the intrinsic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajrezaie, Maryam; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Zahedifard, Maryam; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Looi, Chung Yeng; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Metal-based drugs with extensive clinical applications hold great promise for the development of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. In the last few decades, Schiff bases and their complexes have become well known for their extensive biological potential. In the present study, we examined the antiproliferative effect of a copper (II) complex on HT-29 colon cancer cells. The Cu(BrHAP)2 Schiff base compound demonstrated a potent antiproliferative effect in HT-29 cells, with an IC50 value of 2.87  μg/ml after 72 h of treatment. HT-29 cells treated with Cu (II) complexes underwent apoptosis death, as exhibited by a progressive elevation in the proportion of the G1 cell population. At a concentration of 6.25  μg/ml, the Cu(BrHAP)2 compound caused significant elevation in ROS production following perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, as assessed by the measurement of fluorescence intensity in stained cells. Furthermore, the activation of caspases 3/7 and 9 was part of the Cu (II) complex-induced apoptosis, which confirmed the involvement of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Meanwhile, there was no significant activation of caspase-8. Taken together, these results imply that the Cu(BrHAP)2 compound is a potential candidate for further in vivo and clinical colon cancer studies to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from metal-based agents.

  20. A Schiff Base-Derived Copper (II Complex Is a Potent Inducer of Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells by Activating the Intrinsic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hajrezaie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-based drugs with extensive clinical applications hold great promise for the development of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. In the last few decades, Schiff bases and their complexes have become well known for their extensive biological potential. In the present study, we examined the antiproliferative effect of a copper (II complex on HT-29 colon cancer cells. The Cu(BrHAP2 Schiff base compound demonstrated a potent antiproliferative effect in HT-29 cells, with an IC50 value of 2.87 μg/ml after 72 h of treatment. HT-29 cells treated with Cu (II complexes underwent apoptosis death, as exhibited by a progressive elevation in the proportion of the G1 cell population. At a concentration of 6.25 μg/ml, the Cu(BrHAP2 compound caused significant elevation in ROS production following perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, as assessed by the measurement of fluorescence intensity in stained cells. Furthermore, the activation of caspases 3/7 and 9 was part of the Cu (II complex-induced apoptosis, which confirmed the involvement of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Meanwhile, there was no significant activation of caspase-8. Taken together, these results imply that the Cu(BrHAP2 compound is a potential candidate for further in vivo and clinical colon cancer studies to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from metal-based agents.

  1. Prognostic Factors and Treatment Results After Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin in Germ Cell Cancer: A Population-based Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, Maria G; Lauritsen, Jakob; Mortensen, Mette S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: First-line treatment for patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) is bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). A prognostic classification of patients receiving chemotherapy was published by the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) in 1997, but only...... classification were higher age and lactate dehydrogenase ≥1.5 times the upper limit of normal. For NSGCC patients, higher age and pulmonary metastases were additional adverse prognostic factors. Treatment in earlier years was associated with higher mortality. Limitations include the small number of patients...... of testicular cancer patients, we evaluated prognostic factors for outcome and calculated survival after standard chemotherapy. We find that survival has improved over the years and we propose new prognostic factors for outcome for validation in larger patient cohorts....

  2. Intelligent CAD System for Automatic Detection of Mitotic Cells from Breast Cancer Histology Slide Images Based on Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Nateghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD system for automatic mitosis detection from breast cancer histopathology slide images. In this system, a new approach for reducing the number of false positives is proposed based on Teaching-Learning-Based optimization (TLBO. The proposed CAD system is implemented on the histopathology slide images acquired by Aperio XT scanner (scanner A. In TLBO algorithm, the number of false positives (falsely detected nonmitosis candidates as mitosis ones is defined as a cost function and, by minimizing it, many of nonmitosis candidates will be removed. Then some color and texture (textural features such as those derived from cooccurrence and run-length matrices are extracted from the remaining candidates and finally mitotic cells are classified using a specific support vector machine (SVM classifier. The simulation results have proven the claims about the high performance and efficiency of the proposed CAD system.

  3. NMR-based evaluation of the metabolic profile and response to dichloroacetate of human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailavasan, Mithun; Rehman, Ishtiaq; Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Tozer, Gillian; Paley, Martyn

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic profile of human prostate cancer cells that have different metastatic potential and to determine their response to dichloroacetate (DCA) using NMR technology. Two isogenic human prostate cancer cell lines, differing in their metastatic potential [LNCaP (poorly metastatic) and LNCaP-LN3 (highly metastatic)], were studied. Metabolite ratios from NMR spectral integrals acquired at a field strength of 9.4 T using a 5-mm broadband probe with an NMR-compatible bioreactor were compared in the presence and absence of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor DCA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes were assessed by zymography. Following the treatment of cells with 50 mm DCA, there was a significant reduction in the lactate/choline, lactate/creatine, lactate/alanine and the combined lactate/(choline + creatine + alanine) ratios in LNCaP-LN3 cells relative to LNCaP cells. No significant changes in metabolite ratios were found in LNCaP cells following DCA treatment. As expected, LDH zymography assays showed an absence of the LDH-B subunit in LNCaP-LN3 cells, whereas both LDH-A and LDH-B subunits were present in LNCaP cells. DCA was shown to significantly modify the metabolite ratios in highly metastatic LNCaP-LN3 cells, but not in poorly metastatic LNCaP cells. This effect was probably related to the absence of the LDH-B subunit in LNCaP-LN3 cells, and could have a bearing on cancer treatment with DCA and related compounds.

  4. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  5. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  6. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luis [CNRS UMR 7598, LJLL, & INRIA MAMBA team, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, luis@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Chisholm, Rebecca [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, rebecca.chisholm@gmail.com (Australia); Clairambault, Jean [INRIA MAMBA team & LJLL, UMR 7598, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, jean.clairambault@inria.fr, Corresponding author (France); Escargueil, Alexandre [INSERM “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 938, CDR St Antoine, Hôpital St Antoine, 184 Fbg. St Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France, alexandre.escargueil@upmc.fr (France); Lorenzi, Tommaso [CMLA, ENS Cachan, 61, Av. du Président Wilson, 94230 Cachan cedex & INRIA MAMBA team, & LJLL, UMR 7598, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, tommaso.lorenzi@gmail.com (France); Lorz, Alexander [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598 & INRIA Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, alex.lorz@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Trélat, Emmanuel [Institut Universitaire de France, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598, Boîte courrier 187, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, emmanuel.trelat@upmc.fr (France)

    2016-06-08

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as “bet hedging” of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  7. Combined magnetic nanoparticle-based microRNA and hyperthermia therapy to enhance apoptosis in brain cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Birju P; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2014-10-29

    A novel therapy is demonstrated utilizing magnetic nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering microRNA and inducing magnetic hyperthermia. In particular, the combination of lethal-7a microRNA (let-7a), which targets a number of the survival pathways that typically limit the effectiveness of hyperthermia, with magnetic hyperthermia greatly enhances apoptosis in brain cancer cells.

  8. Detection of Prostate Stem Cell Antigen Expression in Human Prostate Cancer Using Quantum-Dot-Based Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Larré

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are a new class of fluorescent labeling for biological and biomedical applications. In this study, we detected prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA expression correlated with tumor grade and stage in human prostate cancer by QDs-based immunolabeling and conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC, and evaluated the sensitivity and stability of QDs-based immunolabeling in comparison with IHC. Our data revealed that increasing levels of PSCA expression accompanied advanced tumor grade (QDs labeling, r = 0.732, p < 0.001; IHC, r = 0.683, p < 0.001 and stage (QDs labeling, r = 0.514, p = 0.001; IHC, r = 0.432, p = 0.005, and the similar tendency was detected by the two methods. In addition, by comparison between the two methods, QDs labeling was consistent with IHC in detecting the expression of PSCA in human prostate tissue correlated with different pathological types (K = 0.845, p < 0.001. During the observation time, QDs exhibited superior stability. The intensity of QDs fluorescence remained stable for two weeks (p = 0.083 after conjugation to the PSCA protein, and nearly 93% of positive expression with their fluorescence still could be seen after four weeks.

  9. In vitro and in vivo imaging of initial B-T-cell interactions in the setting of B-cell based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nela Klein; Wennhold, Kerstin; Balkow, Sandra; Kondo, Eisei; Bölck, Birgit; Weber, Tanja; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Grabbe, Stephan; Bloch, Wilhelm; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of B cells for cancer vaccines, since they have yielded promising results in preclinical animal models. Contrary to dendritic cells (DCs), we know little about the migration behavior of B cells in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between CD40-activated B (CD40B) cells and cytotoxic T cells in vitro and the migration behavior of CD40B cells in vivo. Dynamic interactions of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells were observed by time-lapse video microscopy. The migratory and chemoattractant potential of CD40B cells was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using flow cytometry, standard transwell migration assays, and imaging of fluorescently labeled murine CD40B cells. Murine CD40B cells show migratory features similar to human CD40B cells. They express important lymph node homing receptors which were functional and induced chemotaxis of T cells in vitro. Striking differences were observed with regard to interactions of human APCs with T cells. CD40B cells differ from DCs by displaying a rapid migratory pattern undergoing highly dynamic, short-lived and sequential interactions with T cells. In vivo, CD40B cells are home to the secondary lymphoid organs where they accumulate in the B cell zone before traveling to the B/T cell boundary. Moreover, intravenous (i.v.) administration of murine CD40B cells induced an antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell response. Taken together, this data show that CD40B cells home secondary lymphoid organs where they physically interact with T cells to induce antigen-specific T cell responses, thus underscoring their potential as cellular adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26405608

  10. Gap Junctions: The Claymore for Cancerous Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gap junctions play an important role in the cell proliferation in mammalian cells as well as carcinogenesis. However, there are controversial issues about their role in cancer pathogenesis. This study was designed to evaluate genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of Carbenoxolone (CBX as a prototype of inter-cellular gap junction blocker in MCF7 and BT20 human breast cancer cells. Methods: The MCF7and BT20 human breast cancer cell lines were cultivated, and treated at designated confluency with different doses of CBX. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay associated with cell viability tests. Gene expression evaluation was carried out using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: MCF7 and BT20 cells were significantly affected by CBX in a dose dependent manner in cell viability assays. Despite varying expression of genes, down regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes was observed in these cells. Conclusion: Based upon this investigation, it can be concluded that CBX could affect both low and high proliferative types of breast cancer cell lines and disproportionate down regulation of both pre- and anti-apoptotic genes may be related to interacting biomolecules, perhaps via gap junctions.

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jing; Huang Dong-Yan; Muhammad Zubair Yousaf; Hou Yang-Long; Gao Song

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with easily modified surfaces have been playing an important role in biomedicine.As cancer is one of the major causes of death,tremendous efforts have been devoted to advance the methods of cancer diagnosis and therapy.Recently,magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that are responsive to a magnetic field have shown great promise in cancer therapy.Compared with traditional cancer therapy,magnetic field triggered therapeutic approaches can treat cancer in an unconventional but more effective and safer way.In this review,we will discuss the recent progress in cancer therapies based on MNPs,mainly including magnetic hyperthermia,magnetic specific targeting,magnetically controlled drug delivery,magnetofection,and magnetic switches for controlling cell fate.Some recently developed strategies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitoring cancer therapy and magnetic tissue engineering are also addressed.

  12. Stiffness of cancer cells measured with an AFM indentation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Iwata, Mayumi

    2015-09-01

    The stiffness of cancer cells and its changes during metastasis are very important for understanding the pathophysiology of cancer cells and the mechanisms of metastasis of cancer. As the first step of the studies on the mechanics of cancer cells during metastasis, we determined the elasticity and stiffness of cancer cells with an indentation method using an atomic force microscope (AFM), and compared with those of normal cells. In most of the past AFM studies, Young׳s elastic moduli of cells have been calculated from force-indentation data using Hertzian model. As this model is based on several important assumptions including infinitesimal strain and Hooke׳s linear stress-strain law, in the exact sense it cannot be applied to cells that deform very largely and nonlinearly. To overcome this problem, we previously proposed an equation F=a[exp(bδ)-1] to describe relations between force (F) and indentation (δ), where a and b are parameters relating with cellular stiffness. In the present study, we applied this method to cancer cells instead of Young׳s elastic modulus. The conclusions obtained are: 1) AFM indentation test data of cancer cells can be very well described by the above equation, 2) cancer cells are softer than normal cells, and 3) there are no significant locational differences in the stiffness of cancer cells between the central and the peripheral regions. These methods and results are useful for studying the mechanics of cancer cells and the mechanisms of metastasis.

  13. Circulating tumour cells: the evolving concept and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based methodology for basic and clinical cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, P K; Cummins, A G; Price, T J; Roberts-Thomson, I C; Hardingham, J E

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastatic relapse and this has fuelled interest in their detection and quantification. Although numerous methods have been developed for the enrichment and detection of CTCs, none has yet reached the 'gold' standard. Since epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-based enrichment of CTCs offers several advantages, it is one of the most commonly used and has been adapted for high-throughput technology. However, emerging evidence suggests that CTCs are highly heterogeneous: they consist of epithelial tumour cells, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cells, hybrid (epithelial/EMT(+)) tumour cells, irreversible EMT(+) tumour cells, and circulating tumour stem cells (CTSCs). The EpCAM-based approach does not detect CTCs expressing low levels of EpCAM and non-epithelial phenotypes such as CTSCs and those that have undergone EMT and no longer express EpCAM. Thus, the approach may lead to underestimation of the significance of CTCs, in general, and CTSCs and EMT(+) tumour cells, in particular, in cancer dissemination. Here, we provide a critical review of research literature on the evolving concept of CTCs and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based technology for basic and clinical cancer research. The review also outlines future perspectives in the field.

  14. Application of bifurcation theory and siRNA-based control signal to restore the proper response of cancer cells to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Emilia; Puszynski, Krzysztof

    2016-11-07

    Many diseases with a genetic background such as some types of cancer are caused by damage in the p53 signaling pathway. The damage changes the system dynamics providing cancer cells with resistance to therapy such as radiation therapy. The change can be observed as the difference in bifurcation diagrams and equilibria type and location between normal and damaged cells, and summarized as the changes of the mathematical model parameters and following changes of the eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Therefore a change in other model parameters, such as mRNA degradation rates, may restore the proper eigenvalues and by that proper system dynamics. From the biological point of view, the change of mRNA degradation rate can be achieved by application of the small interfering RNA (siRNA). Here, we propose a general mathematical framework based on the bifurcation theory and siRNA-based control signal in order to study how to restore the proper response of cells with damaged p53 signaling pathway to therapy by using ionizing radiation (IR) therapy as an example. We show the difference between the cells with normal p53 signaling pathway and cells with abnormalities in the negative (as observed in SJSA-1 cell line) or positive (as observed in MCF-7 or PNT1a cell lines) feedback loop. Then we show how the dynamics of these cells can be restored to normal cell dynamics by using selected siRNA.

  15. Immunology of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yang

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of pluri-potent stem cells to repair the tissues in which stem cells reside holds great promise in development of novel cell replacement therapeutics for treating chronic and degenerative diseases. However,numerous reports show that stem cell therapy, even in an autologous setting, triggers lymphocyte infiltration and inflammation. Therefore, an important question to be answered is how the host immune system responds to engrafted autologous stem cells or allogeneous stem cells. In this brief review, we summarize the progress in several related areas in this field, including some of our data, in four sections: (1) immunogenicity of stem cells; (2)strategies to inhibit immune rejection to allograft stem cells; (3) immune responses to cancer stem cells; and (4)mesenchymal stem cells in immune regulation. Improvement of our understanding on these and other aspects of immune system-stem cell interplay would greatly facilitate the development of stem cell-based therapeutics for regenerative purposes.

  16. Comparative assessment of lipid based nano-carrier systems for dendritic cell based targeting of tumor re-initiating cells in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Arpit; Mishra, Dinesh K; Jain, Subodh K; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Lohiya, Nirmal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to identify an optimum nano-carrier system to deliver tumor antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) for efficient targeting of tumor reinitiating cells (TRICs) in gynecological malignancies. Different lipid based nano-carrier systems i.e. liposomes, ethosomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNPs) were examined for their ability to activate DCs in allogeneic settings. Out of these three, the most optimized formulation was subjected for cationic and mannosylated surface modification and pulsed with DCs for specific targeting of tumor cells. In both allogeneic and autologous trials, SLNPs showed a strong ability to activate DCs and orchestrate specific immune responses for targeting TRICs in gynecological malignancies. Our findings suggest that the mannosylated form of SLNPs is a suitable molecular vector for DC based therapeutics. DCs pulsed with mannosylated SLNPs may be utilized as adjuvant therapy for specific removal of TRICs to benefit patients from tumor recurrence.

  17. Quantum dot-based quantification revealed differences in subcellular localization of EGFR and E-cadherin between EGFR-TKI sensitive and insensitive cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Donghai; Su Ling; Peng Xianghong; Zhang Hongzheng; Khuri, Fadlo R; Shin, Dong M; Chen Zhuo [Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)], E-mail: gzchen@emory.edu

    2009-06-03

    Nanoparticle quantum dots (QDs) provide sharper and more photostable fluorescent signals than organic dyes, allowing quantification of multiple biomarkers simultaneously. In this study, we quantified the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin (E-cad) in the same cells simultaneously by using secondary antibody-conjugated QDs with two different emission wavelengths (QD605 and QD565) and compared the cellular distribution of EGFR and E-cad between EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-insensitive and -sensitive lung and head and neck cancer cell lines. Relocalization of EGFR and E-cad upon treatment with the EGFR-TKI erlotinib in the presence of EGF was visualized and analyzed quantitatively. Our results showed that QD-immunocytochemistry (ICC)-based technology can not only quantify basal levels of multiple biomarkers but also track the localization of the biomarkers upon biostimulation. With this new technology we found that in EGFR-TKI-insensitive cells, EGFR and E-cad were located mainly in the cytoplasm; while in sensitive cells, they were found mainly on the cell membrane. After induction with EGF, both EGFR and E-cad internalized to the cytoplasm, but the internalization capability in sensitive cells was greater than that in insensitive cells. Quantification also showed that inhibition of EGF-induced EGFR and E-cad internalization by erlotinib in the sensitive cells was stronger than that in the insensitive cells. These studies demonstrate substantial differences between EGFR-TKI-insensitive and -sensitive cancer cells in EGFR and E-cad expression and localization both at the basal level and in response to EGF and erlotinib. QD-based analysis facilitates the understanding of the features of EGFR-TKI-insensitive versus -sensitive cancer cells and may be used in the prediction of patient response to EGFR-targeted therapy.

  18. Smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, and risk of renal cell cancer: a population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Tariq

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidney and renal pelvis cancers account for 4% of all new cancer cases in the United States, among which 85% are renal cell carcinomas (RCC. While cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for RCC, little is known about the contribution of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to RCC incidence. This study assesses the role of smoking and ETS on RCC incidence using a population-based case-control design in Florida and Georgia. Methods Incident cases (n = 335 were identified from hospital records and the Florida cancer registry, and population controls (n = 337 frequency-matched by age (+/- 5 years, gender, and race were identified through random-digit dialing. In-person interviews assessed smoking history and lifetime exposure to ETS at home, work, and public spaces. Home ETS was measured in both years and hours of exposure. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression, controlled for age, gender, race, and BMI. Results Cases were more likely to have smoked 20 or more pack-years, compared with never-smokers (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 0.93 – 1.95. A protective effect was found for smoking cessation, beginning with 11–20 years of cessation (OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.18–0.85 and ending with 51 or more years of cessation (OR: 0.11, 95% CI: 0.03–0.39 in comparison with those having quit for 1–10 years. Among never-smokers, cases were more likely to report home ETS exposure of greater than 20 years, compared with those never exposed to home ETS (OR: 2.18; 95% CI: 1.14–4.18. Home ETS associations were comparable when measured in lifetime hours of exposure, with cases more likely to report 30,000 or more hours of home ETS exposure (OR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.20–4.69. Highest quartiles of combined home/work ETS exposure among never-smokers, especially with public ETS exposure, increased RCC risk by 2 to 4 times. Conclusion These findings confirm known associations between smoking and RCC and establish a

  19. Oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaini, Giancarlo; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial metabolism may play a key role in controlling cancer cells life and proliferation. Recent evidence also indicates how the altered contribution of these organelles to metabolism and the resistance of cancer mitochondria against apoptosis-associated permeabilization are closely related. The hallmarks of cancer growth, increased glycolysis and lactate production in tumours, have raised attention due to recent observations suggesting a wide spectrum of oxidative phosphorylation deficit and decreased availability of ATP associated with malignancies and tumour cell expansion. More specifically, alteration in signal transduction pathways directly affects mitochondrial proteins playing critical roles in controlling the membrane potential as UCP2 and components of both MPTP and oxphos complexes, or in controlling cells life and death as the Bcl-2 proteins family. Moreover, since mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics, are also involved in processes of cells life and death, proper regulation of these mitochondrial functions is crucial for tumours to grow. Therefore a better understanding of the key pathophysiological differences between mitochondria in cancer cells and in their non-cancer surrounding tissue is crucial to the finding of tools interfering with these peculiar tumour mitochondrial functions and will disclose novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. Here, we review the peculiarity of tumour mitochondrial bioenergetics and the mode it is linked to the cell metabolism, providing a short overview of the evidence accumulated so far, but highlighting the more recent advances.

  20. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  1. HSP90 inhibition downregulates thymidylate synthase and sensitizes colorectal cancer cell lines to the effect of 5FU-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Alese, Olatunji B; Landry, Jerome; Diaz, Roberto; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2014-10-30

    Cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis are essential steps in cancer cell growth. Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a therapeutic target for 5FU. We tested the hypothesis that HSP90 transcriptional and functional inhibition can inhibit cell cycle progression, downregulate TS levels and sensitize colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to the effects of 5FU. Treatment with ganetespib (50 nM) for 24 hours inhibited cyclin D1 and pRb at the transcriptional and translational levels and induced p21, leading to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in both CRC cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29). This was associated with downregulation of E2F1 and its target gene TS. In addition, ganetespib inhibited PI3K/Akt and ERK signalling pathways. Similar effects were observed with HSP90 knockdown in both cell lines. Ganetespib sensitized CRC cell lines to the effects of oxaliplatin and 5FU. Similar effects were also observed in tumors from animals treated with ganetespib, oxaliplatin and 5FU. In this study, we present in vitro and animal data supporting that the targeting of HSP90 decreases CRC cell survival and proliferation. Ganetespib sensitizes CRC cell lines to the effects of 5FU-based chemotherapy. Combining HSP90 inhibitors with chemotherapy is a rational approach for future drug development in CRC.

  2. Adjuvants for peptide-based cancer vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Khong, Hiep; Overwijk, Willem W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapies based on T cells have shown impressive clinical benefit. In particular, immune checkpoint blockade therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 are causing dramatic tumor shrinkage and prolonged patient survival in a variety of cancers. However, many patients do not benefit, possibly due to insufficient spontaneous T cell reactivity against their tumors and/or lacking immune cell infiltration to tumor site. Such tumor-specific T cell responses could be induced through anti-...

  3. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  4. Two novel Co(II complexes with two different Schiff bases: inhibiting growth of human skin cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-J. Xiao

    Full Text Available Using two flexible Schiff bases, H2L1 and H2L2, two new cobalt II (Co(II-coordination compounds, namely, Py3CoL1 (1 and Py3CoL2 (2 (Py=pyridine, L1=3,5-ClC6H2(OC=NC6H3(O-4-NO2, L2=3,5-BrC6H2(OC=NC6H3(O-4-NO2 have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 2 are both six-coordinate in a distorted octahedral geometry, and the 1D chain structure was formed by the π…π and C-H…O interactions or C-H…Cl interaction. The in vitro antitumor activities of 1, 2 and their corresponding organic ligands Py, L1, and L2 were studied and evaluated, in which three human skin cancer cell lines (A-431, HT-144 and SK-MEL-30 were used in the screening tests.

  5. Rhipsalis (Cactaceae)-like Hierarchical Structure Based Microfluidic Chip for Highly Efficient Isolation of Rare Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuangqian; Zhang, Xian; Dai, Xiaofang; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-12-14

    The circulating tumor cells (CTCs), originating from the primary tumor, play a vital role in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, disease monitoring, and precise therapy. However, the CTCs are extremely rare in the peripheral bloodstream and hard to be isolated. To overcome current limitations associated with CTC capture and analysis, the strategy incorporating nanostructures with microfluidic devices receives wide attention. Here, we demonstrated a three-dimensional microfluidic device (Rm-chip) for capturing cancer cells with high efficiency by integrating a novel hierarchical structure, the "Rhipsalis (Cactaceae)"-like micropillar array, into the Rm-chip. The PDMS micropillar array was fabricated by soft-lithography and rapid prototyping method, which was then conformally plated with a thin gold layer through electroless plating. EpCAM antibody was modified onto the surface of the micropillars through the thiol-oligonucleotide linkers in order to release captured cancer cells by DNase I treatment. The antibody-functionalized device achieved an average capture efficiency of 88% in PBS and 83.7% in whole blood samples. We believe the Rm-chip provided a convenient, economical, and versatile approach for cell analysis with wide potential applications.

  6. Breast cancer cell targeted MR molecular imaging probe: Anti-MUC1 antibody-based magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Khaniabadi, P.; S. A Majid, A. M.; Asif, M.; Moradi Khaniabadi, B.; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, D.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2017-05-01

    Effective and specific diagnostic imaging techniques are important in early-stage breast cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to develop a specific breast cancer contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In so doing, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were conjugated to C595 monoclonal antibody using EDC chemistry to produce nanoprobe with high relaxivity and narrow size (87.4±0.7 nm). To test the developed nanoprobe in vitro, assessments including Cell toxicity, targeting efficacy, cellular binding, and MR imaging were carried out. The results indicated that after 6 hrs incubation with MCF-7 cells at 200 to 25 µg Fe/ml doses, 76% to 16% T2 reduction was obtained. The presence of iron localised in MCF-7 cells measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was about 9.95±0.09 ppm iron/cell at higher doses of nanoprobe. Moreover, a linear relationship between iron concentration of nontoxic SPION-C595 and T2 relaxation times was observed. This study also revealed that developed nanoprobe might be used as a specific negative contrast agent for detecting breast cancer.

  7. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples.

  8. Single cell sequencing reveals heterogeneity within ovarian cancer epithelium and cancer associated stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Boris J; Maile, Makayla; Mitra, Amit Kumar; Sebe, Attila; Bazzaro, Martina; Geller, Melissa A; Abrahante, Juan E; Klein, Molly; Hellweg, Raffaele; Mullany, Sally A; Beckman, Kenneth; Daniel, Jerry; Starr, Timothy K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of heterogeneity in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) by analyzing RNA expression in single epithelial and cancer associated stromal cells. In addition, we explored the possibility of identifying subgroups based on pathway activation and pre-defined signatures from cancer stem cells and chemo-resistant cells. A fresh, HGSOC tumor specimen derived from ovary was enzymatically digested and depleted of immune infiltrating cells. RNA sequencing was performed on 92 single cells and 66 of these single cell datasets passed quality control checks. Sequences were analyzed using multiple bioinformatics tools, including clustering, principle components analysis, and geneset enrichment analysis to identify subgroups and activated pathways. Immunohistochemistry for ovarian cancer, stem cell and stromal markers was performed on adjacent tumor sections. Analysis of the gene expression patterns identified two major subsets of cells characterized by epithelial and stromal gene expression patterns. The epithelial group was characterized by proliferative genes including genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation and MYC activity, while the stromal group was characterized by increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes and genes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Neither group expressed a signature correlating with published chemo-resistant gene signatures, but many cells, predominantly in the stromal subgroup, expressed markers associated with cancer stem cells. Single cell sequencing provides a means of identifying subpopulations of cancer cells within a single patient. Single cell sequence analysis may prove to be critical for understanding the etiology, progression and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Eradicating cancer cells: struggle with a chameleon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di, J.; Duiveman-de Boer, T.; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of cancer stem cells to abrogate tumor growth is a new treatment modality. However, like normal cells cancer cells show plasticity. Differentiated tumor stem cells can acquire stem cell properties when they gain access to the stem cell niche. This indicates that eradicating of stem cells

  10. Insights into the field carcinogenesis of ovarian cancer based on the nanocytology of endocervical and endometrial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K; Kunte, Dhananja; Hurteau, Jean A; Subramanian, Hariharan; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Krosnjar, Nela; Shah, Maitri; Backman, Vadim

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer fatalities among American women. Although curable at early stages with surgery, most women are diagnosed with symptoms of late-stage metastatic disease. Moreover, none of the current diagnostic techniques are clinically recommended for at-risk women as they preferentially target low-grade tumors (which do not affect longevity) and fail to capture early signatures of more lethal serous tumors which originate in the fimbrae region of the fallopian tubes. Hence, the early detection of ovarian cancer is challenging given the current strategy. Recently, our group has developed a novel optical imaging technique, partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, that can quantify the nanoscale macromolecular density fluctuations within biological cells via a biomarker, disorder strength (Ld ). Using the concept of field carcinogenesis, we propose a method of detecting ovarian cancer by PWS assessment of endometrial and endocervical columnar cells. The study includes 26 patients (controls = 15, cancer = 11) for endometrium and 23 (controls = 13, cancer = 10) for endocervix. Our results highlight a significant increase in Ld (% fold-increase > 50%, p-value < 0.05) for columnar epithelial cells obtained from cancer patients compared to controls for both endocervix and endometrium. Overall, the quantification of field carcinogenic events in the endometrium and the novel observation of its extension to the cervix are unique findings in the understanding of ovarian field carcinogenesis. We further show independent validation of the presence of cervical field carcinogenesis with micro-RNA expression data.

  11. Delivery of carboplatin by carbon-based nanocontainers mediates increased cancer cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlt, M; Fuessel, S; Kraemer, K; Wirth, M P [Department for Urology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Haase, D; Hampel, S; Oswald, S; Bachmatiuk, A; Klingeler, R; Ritschel, M; Leonhardt, A; Buechner, B [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Schulze, R, E-mail: kai.kraemer@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Bioanalytical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Bergstrasse 66, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-08-20

    Since the activity of several conventional anticancer drugs is restricted by resistance mechanisms and dose-limiting side-effects, the design of nanocarriers seems to be an efficient and promising approach for drug delivery. Their chemical and mechanical stability and their possible multifunctionality render tubular nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), promising delivery agents for anticancer drugs. The goal of the present study was to investigate CNTs and CNFs in order to deliver carboplatin in vitro. No significant intrinsic toxicity of unloaded materials was found, confirming their biocompatibility. Carboplatin was loaded onto CNTs and CNFs, revealing a loading yield of 0.20 mg (CNT-CP) and 0.13 mg (CNF-CP) platinum per milligram of material. The platinum release depended on the carrier material. Whereas CNF-CP marginally released the drug, CNT-CP functioned as a drug depot, constantly releasing up to 68% within 14 days. The cytotoxicity of CNT-CP and CNF-CP in urological tumour cell lines was dependent on the drug release. CNT-CP was identified to be more effective than CNF-CP concerning the impairment of proliferation and clonogenic survival of tumour cells. Moreover, carboplatin, which was delivered by CNT-CP, exhibited a higher anticancer activity than free carboplatin.

  12. Reprogramming of human cancer cells to pluripotency for models of cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsun; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2015-01-01

    The ability to study live cells as they progress through the stages of cancer provides the opportunity to discover dynamic networks underlying pathology, markers of early stages, and ways to assess therapeutics. Genetically engineered animal models of cancer, where it is possible to study the consequences of temporal-specific induction of oncogenes or deletion of tumor suppressors, have yielded major insights into cancer progression. Yet differences exist between animal and human cancers, such as in markers of progression and response to therapeutics. Thus, there is a need for human cell models of cancer progression. Most human cell models of cancer are based on tumor cell lines and xenografts of primary tumor cells that resemble the advanced tumor state, from which the cells were derived, and thus do not recapitulate disease progression. Yet a subset of cancer types have been reprogrammed to pluripotency or near-pluripotency by blastocyst injection, by somatic cell nuclear transfer and by induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology. The reprogrammed cancer cells show that pluripotency can transiently dominate over the cancer phenotype. Diverse studies show that reprogrammed cancer cells can, in some cases, exhibit early-stage phenotypes reflective of only partial expression of the cancer genome. In one case, reprogrammed human pancreatic cancer cells have been shown to recapitulate stages of cancer progression, from early to late stages, thus providing a model for studying pancreatic cancer development in human cells where previously such could only be discerned from mouse models. We discuss these findings, the challenges in developing such models and their current limitations, and ways that iPS reprogramming may be enhanced to develop human cell models of cancer progression. PMID:25712212

  13. Lupeol triterpene, a novel diet-based microtubule targeting agent: disrupts survivin/cFLIP activation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Murtaza, Imtiyaz; Witkowsky, Olya; Kohl, Amanda Marie; Maddodi, Nityanand

    2009-10-23

    Recently we showed Lupeol, a triterpene, found in fruits and vegetables inhibits the growth of tumors originated from human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (CaP) cells and decreases the serum-PSA levels in a mouse model. Here, we provide evidence that Lupeol inhibits the growth of androgen-sensitive as well as androgen-insensitive CaP cells by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest without exhibiting any toxicity to normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) at the doses at which it kills cancer cells. We observed that Lupeol treatment to LNCaP and DU145 cells resulted in a dose-dependent (i) decrease in the protein levels of Cyclins-A, -B1, -D1, -D2, -E2, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-2 and (ii) increase in the protein level of CDK-inhibitor p21. Since G2/M cell cycle phase is regulated by microtubule assembly, we investigated effect of Lupeol on microtubule assembly, its regulation and down-stream targets in CaP cells. Lupeol treatment significantly modulated the level of (i) microtubule components alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin, (ii) microtubule-regulatory protein stathmin, and (iii) microtubule-regulatory down-stream target/pro-survival protein survivin. Lupeol treatment also decreased the level of anti-apoptotic protein cFLIP. Finally, Lupeol was observed to significantly decrease the transcriptional activation of survivin and cFLIP genes in CaP cells. We conclude that the Lupeol-induced growth inhibition of CaP cells is a net outcome of simultaneous effects on stathmin, cFLIP, and survivin which results in the disruption of microtubule assembly. We suggest that Lupeol alone or as an adjuvant to other microtubule agents could be developed as a potential agent for the treatment of human CaP.

  14. Nonequilibrium population dynamics of phenotype conversion of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Xu Zhou

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a dynamic biological process that involves distinct cancer cell subpopulations proliferating at different rates and interconverting between them. In this paper we proposed a mathematical framework of population dynamics that considers both distinctive growth rates and intercellular transitions between cancer cell populations. Our mathematical framework showed that both growth and transition influence the ratio of cancer cell subpopulations but the latter is more significant. We derived the condition that different cancer cell types can maintain distinctive subpopulations and we also explain why there always exists a stable fixed ratio after cell sorting based on putative surface markers. The cell fraction ratio can be shifted by changing either the growth rates of the subpopulations (Darwinism selection or by environment-instructed transitions (Lamarckism induction. This insight can help us to understand the dynamics of the heterogeneity of cancer cells and lead us to new strategies to overcome cancer drug resistance.

  15. Filtration Device for On-Site Collection, Storage and Shipment of Cells from Urine and Its Application to DNA-Based Detection of Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Andersson

    Full Text Available Molecular analysis of cells from urine provides a convenient approach to non-invasive detection of bladder cancer. The practical use of urinary cell-based tests is often hampered by difficulties in handling and analyzing large sample volumes, the need for rapid sample processing to avoid degradation of cellular content, and low sensitivity due to a high background of normal cells. We present a filtration device, designed for home or point-of-care use, which enables collection, storage and shipment of urinary cells. A special feature of this device is a removable cartridge housing a membrane filter, which after filtration of urine can be transferred to a storage unit containing an appropriate preserving solution. In spiking experiments, the use of this device provided efficient recovery of bladder cancer cells with elimination of >99% of excess smaller-sized cells. The performance of the device was further evaluated by DNA-based analysis of urinary cells collected from 57 patients subjected to transurethral resection following flexible cystoscopy indicating the presence of a tumor. All samples were tested for FGFR3 mutations and seven DNA methylation markers (BCL2, CCNA1, EOMES, HOXA9, POU4F2, SALL3 and VIM. In the group of patients where a transitional cell tumor was confirmed at histopathological evaluation, urine DNA was positive for one or more markers in 29 out of 31 cases (94%, including 19 with FGFR3 mutation (61%. In the group of patients with benign histopathology, urine DNA was positive for methylation markers in 13 out of 26 cases (50%. Only one patient in this group was positive for a FGFR3 mutation. This patient had a stage Ta tumor resected 6 months later. The ability to easily collect, store and ship diagnostic cells from urine using the presented device may facilitate non-invasive testing for bladder cancer.

  16. Treatment and survival outcomes of small cell carcinoma of the esophagus: an analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew T; Shao, Meng; Rineer, Justin; Osborn, Virginia; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2016-11-09

    Given the paucity of esophageal small cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, there are few large studies evaluating this disease. In this study, the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was utilized to analyze the clinical features, treatment, and survival of patients with esophageal SCC in a large, population-based dataset. We selected patients diagnosed with esophageal SCC from 1998 to 2011. Patients were identified as having no treatment, chemotherapy alone, radiation ± sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation, and esophagectomy ± chemotherapy and/or radiation. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with OS. A total of 583 patients were identified. Most patients had stage IV disease (41.7%). Regarding treatment selection, chemoradiation was the most commonly utilized for patients with nonmetasatic disease, whereas chemotherapy alone was most common for metastatic patients. Esophagectomy (median survival 44.9 months with 3 year OS 50.5%) was associated with the best OS for patients with localized (node-negative) disease compared with chemotherapy alone (p < 0.001) or chemoradiation (p = 0.01). For locoregional (node-positive) disease, treatment with chemoradiation resulted in a median survival of 17.8 months and a 3 year OS 31.6%. On multivariate analysis, treatment with chemotherapy alone (p = 0.003) was associated with worse OS while esophagectomy (p = 0.04) was associated with improved OS compared to chemoradiation. Esophageal SCC is an aggressive malignancy with most patients presenting with metastatic disease. Either esophagectomy or chemoradiation as part of multimodality treatment appear to improve OS for selected patients with nonmetastatic disease.

  17. Stealth monoolein-based nanocarriers for delivery of siRNA to cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Ana Cristina Norberto Gonçalves; Raemdonck, Koen; Martens, Thomas; Rombouts, Koen; Simón-Vázquez, Rosana; Botelho, C.M.; Lopes, Ivo Edgar Araújo; Lúcio, M.; González-Fernández, África; Real Oliveira, M. Elisabete C.D.; Gomes, Andreia; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    While the delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is an attractive strategy to treat several clinical con- ditions, siRNA-nanocarriers stability after intravenous administration is still a major obstacle for the development of RNA-interference based therapies. But, although the need for stability is well recognized, the notion that strong stabilization can decrease nanocarriers efficiency is sometimes neglected. In this work we evaluated two stealth functionalization strategies to stabili...

  18. Triazole-dithiocarbamate based selective lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) inactivators inhibit gastric cancer cell growth, invasion, and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi-Chao; Duan, Ying-Chao; Ma, Jin-Lian; Xu, Rui-Min; Zi, Xiaolin; Lv, Wen-Lei; Wang, Meng-Meng; Ye, Xian-Wei; Zhu, Shun; Mobley, David; Zhu, Yan-Yan; Wang, Jun-Wei; Li, Jin-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ru; Zhao, Wen; Liu, Hong-Min

    2013-11-14

    Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, plays an important role in epigenetic regulation of gene activation and repression. The up-regulated LSD1's expression has been reported in several malignant tumors. In the current study, we designed and synthesized five series of 1,2,3-triazole-dithiocarbamate hybrids and screened their inhibitory activity toward LSD1. We found that some of these compounds, especially compound 26, exhibited the most specific and robust inhibition of LSD1. Interestingly, compound 26 also showed potent and selective cytotoxicity against LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803 and HGC-27, as well as marked inhibition of cell migration and invasion, compared to 2-PCPA. Furthermore, compound 26 effectively reduced the tumor growth bared by human gastric cancer cells in vivo with no signs of adverse side effects. These findings suggested that compound 26 deserves further investigation as a lead compound in the treatment of LSD1 overexpressing gastric cancer.

  19. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a central role in attenuated Listeria monocytogenes-based immunotherapy against metastatic breast cancer in young and old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, D; Jahangir, A; Quispe-Tintaya, W; Einstein, M H; Gravekamp, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are present in large numbers in blood of mice and humans with cancer, and they strongly inhibit T-cell and natural killer (NK) cell responses, at young and old age. We found that a highly attenuated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Listeriaat)-infected MDSC and altered the immune-suppressing function of MDSC. Methods: Young (3 months) and old (18 months) BALB/cByJ mice with metastatic breast cancer (4T1 model) were immunised with Listeriaat semi-therapeutically (once before and twice after tumour development), and analysed for growth of metastases and primary tumour, in relation to MDSC-, CD8 T-cell and NK cell responses. Results: We found that Listeriaat-infected MDSC, which delivered Listeriaat predominantly to the microenvironment of metastases and primary tumours, where they spread from MDSC into tumour cells (infected tumour cells will ultimately become a target for Listeria-activated immune cells). Immunotherapy with Listeriaat significantly reduced the population of MDSC in blood and primary tumours, and converted a remaining subpopulation of MDSC into an immune-stimulating phenotype producing IL-12, in correlation with significantly improved T-cell and NK cell responses to Listeriaat at both ages. This was accompanied with a dramatic reduction in the number of metastases and tumour growth at young and old age. Conclusions: Although preclinical studies show that immunotherapy is less effective at old than at young age, our study demonstrates that Listeriaat-based immunotherapy can be equally effective against metastatic breast cancer at both young and old age by targeting MDSC. PMID:23640395

  1. Novel indole-based tambjamine-analogues induce apoptotic lung cancer cell death through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Villanueva, Alberto; Martínez-García, David; Rodilla, Ananda M; Ramos, Ricard; Fardilha, Margarida; Moya, Juan; Quesada, Roberto; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Perez-Tomas, Ricardo

    2017-04-10

    Lung cancer has become the leading killer cancer worldwide, due to late diagnosis and lack of efficient anticancer drugs. We have recently described novel natural-derived tambjamine analogues that are potent anion transporters capable of disrupting cellular ion balance, inducing acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of cellular plasma membranes. Although these tambjamine analogues were able to compromise cell survival, their molecular mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Herein we characterize the molecular cell responses induced by highly active indole-based tambjamine analogues treatment in lung cancer cells. Expression changes produced after compounds treatment comprised genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle, growth factors and its receptors, protein kinases and topoisomerases, among others. Dysregulation of BCL2 and BIRC5/survivin genes suggested the apoptotic pathway as the induced molecular cell death mechanism. In fact, activation of several pro-apoptotic markers (caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP) and reversion of the cytotoxic effect upon treatment with an apoptosis inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) were observed. Moreover, members of the Bcl-2 protein family suffered changes after tambjamine analogues treatment, with a concomitant protein decrease towards the pro-survival members. Besides this, it was observed cellular accumulation of ROS upon compound treatment and an activation of the stress-kinase p38 MAPK route that, when inhibited, reverted the cytotoxic effect of the tambjamine analogues. Finally, a significant therapeutic effect of these compounds was observed in subcutaneous and orthotopic lung cancer mice models. Taken together, these results shed light on the mechanism of action of novel cytotoxic anionophores and demonstrate the therapeutic effects against lung cancer.

  2. A grid matrix-based Raman spectroscopic method to characterize different cell milieu in biopsied axillary sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Dipasree; Tak, Megha; Setia, Mohit; Patil, Asawari; Sengupta, Amit; Chilakapati, C Murali Krishna; Srivastava, Anurag; Parmar, Vani; Nair, Nita; Sarin, Rajiv; Badwe, R

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy which is based upon inelastic scattering of photons has a potential to emerge as a noninvasive bedside in vivo or ex vivo molecular diagnostic tool. There is a need to improve the sensitivity and predictability of Raman spectroscopy. We developed a grid matrix-based tissue mapping protocol to acquire cellular-specific spectra that also involved digital microscopy for localizing malignant and lymphocytic cells in sentinel lymph node biopsy sample. Biosignals acquired from specific cellular milieu were subjected to an advanced supervised analytical method, i.e., cross-correlation and peak-to-peak ratio in addition to PCA and PC-LDA. We observed decreased spectral intensity as well as shift in the spectral peaks of amides and lipid bands in the completely metastatic (cancer cells) lymph nodes with high cellular density. Spectral library of normal lymphocytes and metastatic cancer cells created using the cellular specific mapping technique can be utilized to create an automated smart diagnostic tool for bench side screening of sampled lymph nodes. Spectral library of normal lymphocytes and metastatic cancer cells created using the cellular specific mapping technique can be utilized to develop an automated smart diagnostic tool for bench side screening of sampled lymph nodes supported by ongoing global research in developing better technology and signal and big data processing algorithms.

  3. DUAL ROLES OF CANCER CELL-EXPRESSED IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN CANCER IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While the expression of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors on cancer cells has been well-established for decades, the potential roles and mechanisms of action of these cancerous antigen receptors have not been fully elucidated. A monoclonal antibody designated as RP215, which reacts specifically with the carbohydrate-associated epitope located on the heavy chain region of cancerous immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, was used as a unique probe to study the roles of antigen receptors in the immunology of cancer cells. Through extensive cell-based biological and immunological studies, it was found that both anti-antigen receptors and RP215 demonstrated similar actions on the gene regulations involved in the growth/proliferation of cancer cells, as well as on toll-like receptors involved in innate immunity. In addition, RP215-specific cancerous immunoglobulins are believed to capture or neutralize circulating antigen/antibodies which may be harmful to cancer cells within the human body. In contrast to normal B and T cells and their respective receptors in the conventional immune system, cancer cells co-express both immunoglobulins and T cell receptors and immune protection is exercised by unique mechanisms. For example, these cancer cell-expressed antigen receptors display a lack of class switching, limited hyper-mutation, aberrant glycosylations and a strong influence on the toll-like receptors of cancer cells. Therefore, it is hypothesized that both normal and cancerous immune systems may co-exist and operate simultaneously within the human body. The balance of these two immune factors for respective surveillance and protection may be relevant to the outcome of cancer immunotherapy in humans. A potential therapeutic strategy is being developed by using RP215 as a drug candidate to target cancer cells based on these observations.

  4. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth and Expression of Key Molecules in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and least understood form of advanced breast cancer. Its lethality originates from its nature of invading the lymphatic system and absence of a palpable tumor mass. Different from other metastatic breast cancer cells, IBC cells invade by forming tumor spheroids that retain E-cadherin-based cell–cell adhesions. Herein we describe the potential of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) as an attractive candidate for anti-IBC therapy...

  5. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  6. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction of CT histogram based feature space for predicting recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohmatsu, H.; Aokage, K.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2015-03-01

    Advantages of CT scanners with high resolution have allowed the improved detection of lung cancers. In the recent release of positive results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) in the US showing that CT screening does in fact have a positive impact on the reduction of lung cancer related mortality. While this study does show the efficacy of CT based screening, physicians often face the problems of deciding appropriate management strategies for maximizing patient survival and for preserving lung function. Several key manifold-learning approaches efficiently reveal intrinsic low-dimensional structures latent in high-dimensional data spaces. This study was performed to investigate whether the dimensionality reduction can identify embedded structures from the CT histogram feature of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) space to improve the performance in predicting the likelihood of RFS for patients with NSCLC.

  7. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  8. Validation of a quantitative flow cytometer assay for monitoring HER-2/neu expression level in cell-based cancer immunotherapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randlev, Britta; Huang, Li-chun; Watatsu, Mitsuko; Marcus, Matthew; Lin, Andy; Shih, Shian-Jiun

    2010-03-01

    GVAX immunotherapy for prostate cancer is comprised of two genetically modified prostate cancer cell lines, CG1940 and CG8711, engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor. As part of the matrix of potency assays, CG1940 and CG8711 are tested for the expression level of cell surface HER-2/neu using a quantitative flow cytometer assay. This assay reports the antibody binding capacity value of the cells as a measure of HER-2/neu expression using cells immediately after thawing from cryogenic storage. With optimized cell handling and staining procedure and appropriate system suitability controls, the assay was validated as a quantitative assay. The validation results showed that assay accuracy, specificity, precision, linearity, and range were suitable for the intended use of ensuring lot-to-lot consistency of HER-2/neu expression. Assay robustness was demonstrated using design of experiments that evaluated critical assay parameters. Finally, the assay was successfully transferred to a current good manufacturing practice Quality Control laboratory in a separate facility. Since the overall precision of this assay is better than that of ELISA methods and it can be performed with ease and high throughput, quantitative flow cytometer-based assays may be an appropriate immunological assay platform for Quality Control laboratories for characterization and release of cell-based therapies.

  9. Developing Anticancer Copper(II) Pro-drugs Based on the Nature of Cancer Cells and the Human Serum Albumin Carrier IIA Subdomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Qi, Jinxu; Ajayi, Joshua-Paul; Zhang, Yao; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    To synergistically enhance the selectivity and efficiency of anticancer copper drugs, we proposed and built a model to develop anticancer copper pro-drugs based on the nature of human serum albumin (HSA) IIA subdomain and cancer cells. Three copper(II) compounds of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone Schiff-base ligand in the presence pyridine, imidazole, or indazole ligands were synthesized (C1-C3). The structures of three HSA complexes revealed that the Cu compounds bind to the hydrophobic cavity in the HSA IIA subdomain. Among them, the pyridine and imidazole ligands of C1 and C2 are replaced by Lys199, and His242 directly coordinates with Cu(II). The indazole and Br ligands of C3 are replaced by Lys199 and His242, respectively. Compared with the Cu(II) compounds alone, the HSA complexes enhance cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells approximately 3-5-fold, but do not raise cytotoxicity levels in normal cells in vitro through selectively accumulating in cancer cells to some extent. We find that the HSA complex has a stronger capacity for cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of MCF-7 by targeting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and down-regulating the expression of CDK1 and cyclin B1. Moreover, the HSA complex promotes MCF-7 cell apoptosis possibly through the intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated mitochondrial pathway, accompanied by the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  10. POST-OPERATIVE STAGING AND SURVIVAL BASED ON THE REVISED TNM STAGING SYSTEM FOR NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the factors affecting post-operative staging and survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients based on the revised TNM staging system adopted by the UICC in 1977. Methods: Data were collected from 1757 consecutively operated NSCLC patients, including those receiving complete tumor excision, tumor debulking and exploratory thoractomy from April 1969 through Dec. 1993. the end point of follow-up was Nov. 30, 1998. Cumulative survival and its influencing factors were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox model of SPSS software. Results: In this series, 30 patients (1.7%) were lost from follow-up. The 5-year cumulative survival was 88.0% for patients in stage I A, and 53.9% in stage IB, 33.5% in stage II, 14.7% in stage IIIA, 5.5% in stage IIIB and 7.0% in stage IV. The overall 5-year survival rate was 28.2%. The 5-year survivals were 39.8%, 14.4% and 4.2% in patients treated with completely tumor resection, tumor debulking and explorative thoractomy, respectively. The 10-year survival rate was 31.4%, 9.5% and 0, respectively. Factors affecting long-term cumulative survival, in the order of decreasing significance, were the type of operation, lymph node status, staging, size and pathological type of the primary tumor. Conclusion: the revised staging system for NSCLC is superior to that used since 1986 as far as the end results of treatment in patients in different stage and the staging specificity are concerned. The T3N1M0 classification and the definition of M1 need to be further studied.

  11. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages.

  12. Receptor-Mediated Surface Charge Inversion Platform Based on Porous Silicon Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Cell Recognition and Combination Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Correia, Alexandra; Mäkilä, Ermei; Li, Wei; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni J; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-03-22

    Negatively charged surface-modified drug delivery systems are promising for in vivo applications as they have more tendency to accumulate in tumor tissues. However, the inefficient cell uptake of these systems restricts their final therapeutic performance. Here, we have fabricated a receptor-mediated surface charge inversion nanoparticle made of undecylenic acid modified, thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (UnTHCPSi) nanoparticles core and sequentially modified with polyethylenimine (PEI), methotrexate (MTX), and DNA aptamer AS1411 (herein termed as UnTHCPSi-PEI-MTX@AS1411) for enhancing the cell uptake of nucleolin-positive cells. The efficient interaction of AS1411 and the relevant receptor nucleolin caused the disintegration of the negative-charged AS1411 surface. The subsequent surface charge inversion and exposure of the active targeting ligand, MTX, enhanced the cell uptake of the nanoparticles. On the basis of this synergistic effect, the UnTHCPSi-PEI-MTX@AS1411 (hydrodynamic diameter is 242 nm) were efficiently internalized by nucleolin-positive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, with an efficiency around 5.8 times higher than that of nucleolin-negative cells (NIH 3T3 fibroblasts). The receptor competition assay demonstrated that the major mechanism (more than one-half) of the internalized nanoparticles in MDA-MB-231 cells was due to the receptor-mediated surface charge inversion process. Finally, after loading of sorafenib, the nanosystem showed efficient performance for combination therapy with an inhibition ratio of 35.6%.

  13. Water-soluble nanoconjugates of quantum dot-chitosan-antibody for in vitro detection of cancer cells based on “enzyme-free” fluoroimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: hmansur@demet.ufmg.br [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Mansur, Alexandra A.P. [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Soriano-Araújo, Amanda [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary School, UFMG (Brazil); Lobato, Zélia I.P. [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary School, UFMG (Brazil); Carvalho, Sandhra M. de [Center of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Innovation-CeNano" 2I, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG 31.270-901 (Brazil); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, ICB, UFMG (Brazil); Leite, Maria de Fatima [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, ICB, UFMG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Cancer remains one of the world's most devastating diseases with millions of fatalities and new cases every year. In this work, we attempted to develop a facile “enzyme-free” fluoroimmunoassay based on the novel nanoconjugates composed of CdS quantum dots (QDs) as the fluorescent inorganic core and an antibody-modified polysaccharide as the organic shell, modeling their possible application for the in vitro diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancer. Chitosan was conjugated with an anti-CD20 polyclonal antibody (pAbCD20) by the formation of covalent amide bonds. In the sequence, these chitosan-antibody conjugates were utilized as direct ligands for the surface biofunctionalization of CdS QDs (CdS/chitosan-pAbCD20) using a single-step colloidal process in aqueous medium at room temperature. The most relevant physico-chemical properties of these nanoconjugates were assessed by morphological and spectroscopic techniques. The results indicated that CdS nanocrystals were produced with an average diameter of 2.5 nm and with cubic zinc blende crystalline nanostructure. The CdS-immunoconjugates (CdS/chitosan-pAbCD20) presented colloidal hydrodynamic diameter (H{sub D}) of 15.0 ± 1.2 nm. In addition, the results evidenced that the “enzyme-free” QD-linked immunosorbent assay (QLISA) was effective for the in vitro detection against the antigen CD20 (aCD20) based on fluorescent behavior of the CdS nanoconjugates. Moreover, the CdS-immunoconjugates were successfully used for fluorescence bioimaging of NHL cancer cells. Finally, the cell viability results using different cell cultures based on LDH, MTT and Resazurin bio-assays have demonstrated no cytotoxicity of the new CdS-chitosan bioconjugates relative to the standard controls. Thus, CdS conjugates may offer a promising platform for the future development of in vitro and in vivo applications for the detection and diagnosis of NHL cancer cells. - Highlights: • CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared using

  14. The treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer in the elderly: an evidence-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Dawe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing proportion of patients with advanced NSCLC are over 70 years old, raising unique challenges for treatment decision-making. While these patients are underrepresented in clinical trials, there is an emerging body of evidence associated with this group. The lesson of comprehensive geriatric assessment is that chronological age does not always correlate with physiological age and a variety of important comorbidities and geriatric syndromes can go undetected in a typical history and physical. These comorbidities and expected physiologic changes due to aging complicate decision-making around appropriate treatment. This review discusses geriatric assessment in elderly cancer patients and evaluates the current evidence for chemotherapy and targeted therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer aged ≥70 years.

  15. Gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Thompson, T C

    2008-05-01

    There is a critical need to develop new and effective cancer therapies that target bone, the primary metastatic site for prostate cancer and other malignancies. Among the various therapeutic approaches being considered for this application, gene-modified cell-based therapies may have specific advantages. Gene-modified cell therapy uses gene transfer and cell-based technologies in a complementary fashion to chaperone appropriate gene expression cassettes to active sites of tumor growth. In this paper, we briefly review potential cell vehicles for this approach and discuss relevant gene therapy strategies for prostate cancer. We further discuss selected studies that led to the conceptual development and preclinical testing of IL-12 gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy for prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss future directions in the development of gene-modified cell therapy for metastatic prostate cancer, including the need to identify and test novel therapeutic genes such as GLIPR1.

  16. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  17. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  18. Cancer stem cells: therapeutic implications and perspectives in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Han

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory is gaining increasing attention from researchers and has become an important focus of cancer research. According to the theory, a minority population of cancer cells is capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding the properties and characteristics of CSCs is key to future study on cancer research, such as the isolation and identification of CSCs, the cancer diagnosis, and the cancer therapy. Standard oncology treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection, can only shrink the bulk tumor and the tumor tends to relapse. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting CSCs and their microenvironmental niche address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies to eradicate the CSCs that otherwise result in therapy resistance. The combined use of traditional therapies with targeted CSC-specific agents may target the whole cancer and offer a promising strategy for lasting treatment and even cure.

  19. RNAi-based glyconanoparticles trigger apoptotic pathways for in vitro and in vivo enhanced cancer-cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, João; Tian, Furong; Hernandez, Yulan; Bao, Chenchen; Baptista, Pedro V.; Cui, Daxiang; Stoeger, Tobias; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2015-05-01

    Gold glyconanoparticles (GlycoNPs) are full of promise in areas like biomedicine, biotechnology and materials science due to their amazing physical, chemical and biological properties. Here, siRNA GlycoNPs (AuNP@PEG@Glucose@siRNA) in comparison with PEGylated GlycoNPs (AuNP@PEG@Glucose) were applied in vitro to a luciferase-CMT/167 adenocarcinoma cancer cell line and in vivo via intratracheal instillation directly into the lungs of B6 albino mice grafted with luciferase-CMT/167 adenocarcinoma cells. siRNA GlycoNPs but not PEGylated GlycoNPs induced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Fas/CD95 and caspases 3 and 9 in CMT/167 adenocarcinoma cells in a dose dependent manner, independent of the inflammatory response, evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage cell counting. Moreover, in vivo pulmonary delivered siRNA GlycoNPs were capable of targeting c-Myc gene expression (a crucial regulator of cell proliferation and apoptosis) via in vivo RNAi in tumour tissue, leading to an ~80% reduction in tumour size without associated inflammation.Gold glyconanoparticles (GlycoNPs) are full of promise in areas like biomedicine, biotechnology and materials science due to their amazing physical, chemical and biological properties. Here, siRNA GlycoNPs (AuNP@PEG@Glucose@siRNA) in comparison with PEGylated GlycoNPs (AuNP@PEG@Glucose) were applied in vitro to a luciferase-CMT/167 adenocarcinoma cancer cell line and in vivo via intratracheal instillation directly into the lungs of B6 albino mice grafted with luciferase-CMT/167 adenocarcinoma cells. siRNA GlycoNPs but not PEGylated GlycoNPs induced the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Fas/CD95 and caspases 3 and 9 in CMT/167 adenocarcinoma cells in a dose dependent manner, independent of the inflammatory response, evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage cell counting. Moreover, in vivo pulmonary delivered siRNA GlycoNPs were capable of targeting c-Myc gene expression (a crucial regulator of cell proliferation and

  20. Selective collection and detection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells using aptamer-functionalized magnetic beads and quantum dots based nano-bio-probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xin; Zhou, Zhenxian; Yuan, Liang; Liu, Songqin

    2013-07-25

    A novel strategy for selective collection and detection of breast cancer cells (MCF-7) based on aptamer-cell interaction was developed. Mucin 1 protein (MUC1) aptamer (Apt1) was covalently conjugated to magnetic beads to capture MCF-7 cell through affinity interaction between Apt1 and MUC1 protein that overexpressed on the surface of MCF-7 cells. Meanwhile, a nano-bio-probe was constructed by coupling of nucleolin aptamer AS1411 (Apt2) to CdTe quantum dots (QDs) which were homogeneously coated on the surfaces of monodispersed silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs). The nano-bio-probe displayed similar optical and electrochemical performances to free CdTe QDs, and remained high affinity to nucleolin overexpressed cells through the interaction between AS1411 and nucleolin protein. Photoluminescence (PL) and square-wave voltammetric (SWV) assays were used to quantitatively detect MCF-7 cells. Improved selectivity was obtained by using these two aptamers together as recognition elements simultaneously, compared to using any single aptamer. Based on the signal amplification of QDs coated silica nanoparticles (QDs/SiO2), the detection sensitivity was enhanced and a detection limit of 201 and 85 cells mL(-1) by PL and SWV method were achieved, respectively. The proposed strategy could be extended to detect other cells, and showed potential applications in cell imaging and drug delivery.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  2. Towards increased selectivity of drug delivery to cancer cells: development of a LDL-based nanodelivery system for hydrophobic photosensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzova, Diana; Huntosova, Veronika; Kasak, Peter; Petrovajova, Dana; Joniova, Jaroslava; Dzurova, Lenka; Nadova, Zuzana; Sureau, Franck; Midkovsky, Pavol; Jancura, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL), a natural in vivo carrier of cholesterol in the vascular system, play a key role in the delivery of hydrophobic photosensitizers (pts) to tumor cells in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. To make this delivery system even more efficient, we have constructed a nano-delivery system by coating of LDL surface by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging were used to characterize redistribution of hypericin (Hyp), a natural potent pts, loaded in LDL/PEG and LDL/dextran complexes to free LDL molecules as well as to monitor cellular uptake of Hyp by U87-MG cells. It was shown than the redistribution process of Hyp between LDL molecules is significantly suppressed by dextran coating of LDL surface. On the other hand, PEG does not significantly influence this process. The modification of LDL molecules by the polymers does not inhibit their recognition by cellular LDL receptors. U-87 MG cellular uptake of Hyp loaded in LDL/PEG and LDL/dextran complexes appears to be similar to that one observed for Hyp transported by unmodified LDL particles. It is proposed that by polymers modified LDL molecules could be used as a basis for construction of a drug transport system for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs to cancer cells expressing high level of LDL receptors.

  3. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  4. A cationic cholesterol based nanocarrier for the delivery of p53-EGFP-C3 plasmid to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K; Naz, Sarwat; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    The p53 protein mediated anti-tumor strategy is limited due to the lack of suitable delivery agent with insignificant immunogenic response, serum compatibility, and early and easy detection of the transfected cell population. To overcome these problems, we generated a p53-EGFP-C3 fusion construct which expressed easily detectable green fluorescence protein (GFP) and allowed an estimation of p53 mediated anti-tumor activity. A mixture of cationic cholesterol gemini (Chol-5L) with natural lipid, DOPE (molar ratio 1:4), acronymed as Chol-5LD, formed a nano-liposome as characterized by various physical methods. The prepared clone was evaluated for the expression of GFP and functional p53 in HeLa and two additional cell lines with varied p53 status namely, H1299 (p53(-/-)) and HEK293T (p53(+/+)). Transfected cells were screened using RT-PCR, Western blotting, FACS analysis, MTT, Trypan blue assay and visualized under a fluorescence microscope. The p53-EGFP-C3 fusion protein induced apoptosis in cancer cells as evident from DNA fragmentation, cell cycle analysis, Annexin-V staining and PARP cleavage assays. The transfection and apoptosis induction efficiency of Chol-5LD was significantly higher than commercial reagents Lipofectamine2000 and Effectene irrespective of the cell lines examined. Further it significantly decreases the xenograft tumor volume in nude mice tumors via apoptosis as observed in H&E staining. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Amygdalin-mediated inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Liyu; Xie, Bo; Wang, Yaguo; Qian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor claiming the highest fatality worldwide for a long period of time. Unfortunately, most of the current treatment methods are still based on the characteristics of cancer cells in the primary lesion and the prognosis is often much poorer in patients with metastatic cancers. Amygdalin, a natural product of glycosides and lots of evidence shows that amygdalin can inhibit the proliferation of some kinds of cancer cells. In this study, we first obtained the h...

  6. Amygdalin-mediated inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Liyu; Xie, Bo; Wang, Yaguo; Qian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor claiming the highest fatality worldwide for a long period of time. Unfortunately, most of the current treatment methods are still based on the characteristics of cancer cells in the primary lesion and the prognosis is often much poorer in patients with metastatic cancers. Amygdalin, a natural product of glycosides and lots of evidence shows that amygdalin can inhibit the proliferation of some kinds of cancer cells. In this study, we first obtained the h...

  7. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image

  8. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image regis

  9. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Koido

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination.

  10. Exploring a new SPION-based MRI contrast agent with excellent water-dispersibility, high specificity to cancer cells and strong MR imaging efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuehua; Gong, An; Chen, Bin; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Tianxiang; Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-02-01

    Advances in contrast agents have greatly enhanced the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for early diagnosis of cancer. However, the commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-based contrast agents synthesized by co-precipitation method are not monodisperse with irregular morphologies and ununiform sizes. Other reported SPION-based contrast agents synthesized by solvothermal method or thermal decomposition method are limited by the bad water-dispersibility and low specificity to cancer cells. Herein, we propose a new strategy for exploring SPION-based MRI contrast agents with excellent water-dispersibility and high specificity to cancer cells. The SPION was synthesized by a polyol method and then entrapped into albumin nanospheres (AN). After that, a ligand folic acid (FA) was conjugated onto the surface of the AN to construct a SPION-AN-FA composite. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results indicate that the SPION-AN-FA has a spherical shape, a uniform size and an excellent water-dispersibility (polydispersity index (PDI) contrast agent.

  11. In Vitro Growth of Human Keratinocytes and Oral Cancer Cells into Microtissues: An Aerosol-Based Microencapsulation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Yean Leong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells encapsulation is a micro-technology widely applied in cell and tissue research, tissue transplantation, and regenerative medicine. In this paper, we proposed a growth of microtissue model for the human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line and an oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC cell line (ORL-48 based on a simple aerosol microencapsulation technique. At an extrusion rate of 20 μL/min and air flow rate of 0.3 L/min programmed in the aerosol system, HaCaT and ORL-48 cells in alginate microcapsules were encapsulated in microcapsules with a diameter ranging from 200 to 300 μm. Both cell lines were successfully grown into microtissues in the microcapsules of alginate within 16 days of culture. The microtissues were characterized by using a live/dead cell viability assay, field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, fluorescence staining, and cell re-plating experiments. The microtissues of both cell types were viable after being extracted from the alginate membrane using alginate lyase. However, the microtissues of HaCaT and ORL-48 demonstrated differences in both nucleus size and morphology. The microtissues with re-associated cells in spheroids are potentially useful as a cell model for pharmacological studies.

  12. Automatic cell cloning assay for determining the clonogenic capacity of cancer and cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedr, Radek; Pernicová, Zuzana; Slabáková, Eva; Straková, Nicol; Bouchal, Jan; Grepl, Michal; Kozubík, Alois; Souček, Karel

    2013-05-01

    The clonogenic assay is a well-established in vitro method for testing the survival and proliferative capability of cells. It can be used to determine the cytotoxic effects of various treatments including chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation. However, this approach can also characterize cells with different phenotypes and biological properties, such as stem cells or cancer stem cells. In this study, we implemented a faster and more precise method for assessing the cloning efficiency of cancer stem-like cells that were characterized and separated using a high-speed cell sorter. Cell plating onto a microplate using an automatic cell deposition unit was performed in a single-cell or dilution rank mode by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting method. We tested the new automatic cell-cloning assay (ACCA) on selected cancer cell lines and compared it with the manual approach. The obtained results were also compared with the results of the limiting dilution assay for different cell lines. We applied the ACCA to analyze the cloning capacity of different subpopulations of prostate and colon cancer cells based on the expression of the characteristic markers of stem (CD44 and CD133) and cancer stem cells (TROP-2, CD49f, and CD44). Our results revealed that the novel ACCA is a straightforward approach for determining the clonogenic capacity of cancer stem-like cells identified in both cell lines and patient samples. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. Association of GWAS-identified lung cancer susceptibility loci with survival length in patients with small-cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Genetic variants have been shown to affect length of survival in cancer patients. This study explored the association between lung cancer susceptibility loci tagged by single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified in the genome-wide association studies and length of survival in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC. Eighteen SNPs were genotyped among 874 SCLC patients and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the effects of genotype on survival length under an additive model with age, sex, smoking status and clinical stage as covariates. We identified 3 loci, 20q13.2 (rs4809957G >A, 22q12.2 (rs36600C >T and 5p15.33 (rs401681C >T, significantly associated with the survival time of SCLC patients. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR for patients with the rs4809957 GA or AA genotype was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P = 0.0187 and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.55-0.96; P = 0.0263 compared with the GG genotype. Using the dominant model, the adjusted HR for patients carrying at least one T allele at rs36600 or rs401681 was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.63-0.96; P = 0.0199 and 1.29 (95% CI, 1.08-1.55; P = 0.0047, respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Stratification analyses showed that the significant associations of these 3 loci were only seen in smokers and male patients. The rs4809957 SNP was only significantly associated with length of survival of patients with extensive-stage but not limited-stage tumor. These results suggest that some of the lung cancer susceptibility loci might also affect the prognosis of SCLC.

  14. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  15. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species Modulator 1 (Romo1) Predicts Poor Outcomes in Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated with Platinum-Based Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyeun; Choi, Sue In; Lee, Ji Sung; Kim, Chul Hwan; Jung, Won Jai; Lee, Eun Joo; Min, Kyung Hoon; Hur, Gyu Young; Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Sung Yong; Kim, Je Hyeong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Shin, Chol; Shim, Jae Jeong; Kang, Kyung Ho; In, Kwang Ho

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) is a key mediator of intracellular reactive oxygen species production. However, examination of the clinical usefulness of Romo1 in cancers has been limited. We evaluated the association of Romo1 expression with clinical outcomes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Romo1 expression in tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry and evaluated by histological score. Survival analyses were performed according to Romo1 expression and the association between Romo1 expression and clinical parameters was evaluated. A total of 88 tumor specimens were analyzed. Significantly shorter median progression-free survival (PFS) was observed in the high Romo1 group compared with the low Romo1 group (4.5 months vs. 9.8 months, p in advanced NSCLC patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Romo1 could be a potential adverse predictive marker in this setting.

  17. TLR2 ligation protects effector T cells from regulatory T-cell mediated suppression and repolarizes T helper responses following MVA-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiset, Laurent; Fend, Laetitia; Gatard-Scheikl, Tania; Rittner, Karola; Duong, Vanessa; Rooke, Ronald; Muller, Sylviane; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Préville, Xavier; Haegel, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is hampered by the immunosuppression maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-bearing hosts. Stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by Pam3Cys is known to affect Treg-mediated suppression. We found that Pam3Cys increases the proliferation of both CD4(+) effector T cells (Teffs) and Tregs co-cultured in vitro, but did not induce the proliferation of Tregs alone upon CD3 and CD28 stimulation. In a mouse model of RMA-MUC1 tumors, Pam3Cys was administered either alone or in combination with a modified vaccinia ankara (MVA)-based mucin 1 (MUC1) therapeutic vaccine. The combination of Pam3Cys with MVA-MUC1 (1) diminished splenic Treg/CD4(+) T-cell ratios to those found in tumor-free mice, (2) stimulated a specific anti-MUC1 interferon γ (IFNγ) response and (3) had a significant therapeutic effect on tumor growth and mouse survival. When CD4(+) Teffs and Tregs were isolated from Pam3Cys-treated mice, Teffs had become resistant to Treg-mediated suppression while upregulating the expression of BclL-x(L). Tregs from Pam3Cys-treated mice were fully suppressive for Teffs from naïve mice. Bcl-x(L) was induced by Pam3Cys with different kinetics in Tregs and Teffs. Teff from Pam3Cys-treated mice produced increased levels of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines and an interleukin (IL)-6-dependent secretion of IL-17 was observed in Teff:Treg co-cultures, suggesting that TLR2 stimulation had skewed the immune response toward a Th17 profile. Our results show for the first time that in a tumor-bearing host, TLR2 stimulation with Pam3Cys affects both Tregs and Teffs, protects Teff from Treg-mediated suppression and has strong therapeutic effects when combined with an MVA-based antitumor vaccine.

  18. Proteomic data analysis of glioma cancer stem-cell lines based on novel nonlinear dimensional data reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespinats, Sylvain; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Wengert, Georg; Houben, Ivo; Lobbes, Marc; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Glioma-derived cancer stem cells (GSCs) are tumor-initiating cells and may be refractory to radiation and chemotherapy and thus have important implications for tumor biology and therapeutics. The analysis and interpretation of large proteomic data sets requires the development of new data mining and visualization approaches. Traditional techniques are insufficient to interpret and visualize these resulting experimental data. The emphasis of this paper lies in the application of novel approaches for the visualization, clustering and projection representation to unveil hidden data structures relevant for the accurate interpretation of biological experiments. These qualitative and quantitative methods are applied to the proteomic analysis of data sets derived from the GSCs. The achieved clustering and visualization results provide a more detailed insight into the protein-level fold changes and putative upstream regulators for the GSCs. However the extracted molecular information is insufficient in classifying GSCs and paving the pathway to an improved therapeutics of the heterogeneous glioma.

  19. A New Drug Combinatory Effect Prediction Algorithm on the Cancer Cell Based on Gene Expression and Dose-Response Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, C Pankaj; Cheng, L; Alexander, P S; Singal, A; Li, L

    2015-02-01

    Gene expression data before and after treatment with an individual drug and the IC20 of dose-response data were utilized to predict two drugs' interaction effects on a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cancer cell. A novel drug interaction scoring algorithm was developed to account for either synergistic or antagonistic effects between drug combinations. Different core gene selection schemes were investigated, which included the whole gene set, the drug-sensitive gene set, the drug-sensitive minus drug-resistant gene set, and the known drug target gene set. The prediction scores were compared with the observed drug interaction data at 6, 12, and 24 hours with a probability concordance (PC) index. The test result shows the concordance between observed and predicted drug interaction ranking reaches a PC index of 0.605. The scoring reliability and efficiency was further confirmed in five drug interaction studies published in the GEO database.

  20. Nano metal-organic framework (NMOF)-based strategies for multiplexed microRNA detection in solution and living cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yafeng; Han, Jianyu; Xue, Peng; Xu, Rong; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-01-01

    MiRNAs are an emerging type of biomarker for diagnostics and prognostics. A reliable sensing strategy that can monitor miRNA expression in living cancer cells would be critical in view of its extensive advantages for fundamental research related to miRNA-associated bioprocesses and biomedical applications. Conventional miRNA sensing methods include northern blot, microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR. However, none of them is able to monitor miRNA levels expressed in living cancer cells in a real-time fashion. Some fluorescennt biosensors developed recently from carbon nanomaterials, such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphene oxide (GO), and carbon nanoparticles, have been successfully used for assaying miRNA in vitro; however the preparation processes are often expensive, complicated and time-consuming, which have motivated the research on other substitute and novel materials. Herein we present a novel sensing strategy based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes labeled with fluorophores and conjugated with an NMOF vehicle to monitor multiplexed miRNAs in living cancer cells. The NMOF works as a fluorescence quencher of the labelled PNA that is firmly bound with the metal center. In the presence of a target miRNA, PNA is hybridized and released from the NMOF leading to the recovery of fluorescence. This miRNA sensor not only enables the quantitative and highly specific detection of multiplexed miRNAs in living cancer cells, but it also allows the precise and in situ monitoring of the spatiotemporal changes of miRNA expression.MiRNAs are an emerging type of biomarker for diagnostics and prognostics. A reliable sensing strategy that can monitor miRNA expression in living cancer cells would be critical in view of its extensive advantages for fundamental research related to miRNA-associated bioprocesses and biomedical applications. Conventional miRNA sensing methods include northern blot, microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR. However, none of

  1. Reprogramming cancer cells: overview & current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian Lam; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with genetic and epigenetic origins, and the possible effects of reprogramming cancer cells using the defined sets of transcription factors remain largely uninvestigated. In the handful of publications available so far, findings have shown that reprogramming cancer cells changed the characteristics of the cells to differ from the parental cancer cells. These findings indicated the possibility of utilizing reprogramming technology to create a disease model in the laboratory to be used in studying the molecular pathogenesis or for drug screening of a particular cancer model. Despite numerous methods employed in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from cancer cells only a few studies have successfully reprogrammed malignant human cells. In this review we will provide an overview on i) methods to reprogram cancer cells, ii) characterization of the reprogrammed cancer cells, and iii) the differential effects of reprogramming on malignancy, epigenetics and response of the cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Continued technical progress in cancer cell reprogramming technology will be instrumental for more refined in vitro disease models and ultimately for the development of directed and personalized therapy for cancer patients in the future.

  2. GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer cells and patient breast cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gowrishankar

    Full Text Available F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues.

  3. Sensitive electrochemical aptamer cytosensor for highly specific detection of cancer cells based on the hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts and enzyme for signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Duanping; Lu, Jing; Zhong, Yuwen; Yu, Yanyan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Beibei; Chen, Zuanguang

    2016-01-15

    Human cancer is becoming a leading cause of death in the world and the development of a straightforward strategy for early detection of cancer is urgently required. Herein, a sandwich-type electrochemical aptamer cytosensor was developed for detection of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) based on the hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts and enzyme for signal amplification. The thiolated TLS11a aptamers were used as a selective bio-recognition element, attached to the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Meanwhile, the electrochemical nanoprobes were fabricated through the G-quadruplex/hemin/aptamer complexes and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized on the surfaces of Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticle-modified magnetic Fe3O4/MnO2 beads (Fe3O4/MnO2/Au@Pd). After the target cells were captured, the hybrid nanoprobes were further assembled to form an aptamer-cell-nanoprobes sandwich-like system on the electrode surface. Then, hybrid Fe3O4/MnO2/Au@Pd nanoelectrocatalysts, G-quadruplex/hemin HRP-mimicking DNAzymes and the natural HRP enzyme efficiently catalyzed the oxidation of hydroquinone (HQ) with H2O2, amplifying the electrochemical signals and improving the detection sensitivity. This electrochemical cytosensor delivered a wide detection range of 1×10(2)-1×10(7)cellsmL(-1), high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 15cellsmL(-1), good selectivity and repeatability. Finally, an electrochemical reductive desorption method was performed to break gold-thiol bond and desorb the components on the AuNPs/GCE for regenerating the cytosensor. These results have demonstrated that the electrochemical cytosensor has the potential to be a feasible tool for cost-effective cancer cell detection in early cancer diagnosis.

  4. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  5. Metabolic profiling of breast cancer: Differences in central metabolism between subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Halbach, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Although the concept of aerobic glycolysis in cancer was already reported in the 1930s by Otto Warburg, the understanding of metabolic pathways remains challenging especially due to the heterogeneity of cancer. In consideration of four different time points (1, 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation), GC-MS profiling of metabolites was performed on cell extracts and supernatants of breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, -453, BT-474) with different sub classification and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. To the exclusion of trypsinization, direct methanolic extraction, cell scraping and cell disruption was executed to obtain central metabolites. Major differences in biochemical pathways have been observed in the breast cancer cell lines compared to the breast epithelial cell line, as well as between the breast cancer cell lines themselves. Characteristics of breast cancer subtypes could be correlated to their individual metabolic profiles. PLS-DA revealed the discrimination of breast cancer cell lines from MCF-10A based on elevated amino acid levels. The observed metabolic signatures have great potential as biomarker for breast cancer as well as an improved understanding of subtype specific phenomenons of breast cancer.

  6. Ultrasensitive detection of cancer cells and glycan expression profiling based on a multivalent recognition and alkaline phosphatase-responsive electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojiao; He, Yao; Zhang, Youyu; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2014-09-01

    A multivalent recognition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-responsive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for cancer cell detection and in situ evaluation of cell surface glycan expression was developed on a poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-conjugated, chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) electrode interface. In this strategy, the multivalency and high affinity of the cell-targeted aptamers on rGO provided a highly efficient cell recognition platform on the electrode. The ALP and concanavalin A (Con A) coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) nanoprobes allowed the ALP enzyme-catalyzed production of phenols that inhibited the ECL reaction of Ru(bpy)32+ on the rGO electrode interface, affording fast and highly sensitive ECL cytosensing and cell surface glycan evaluation. Combining the multivalent aptamer interface and ALP nanoprobes, the ECL cytosensor showed a detection limit of 38 CCRF-CEM cells per mL in human serum samples, broad dynamic range and excellent selectivity. In addition, the proposed biosensor provided a valuable insight into dynamic profiling of the expression of different glycans on cell surfaces, based on the carbohydrates recognized by lectins applied to the nanoprobes. This biosensor exhibits great promise in clinical diagnosis and drug screening.A multivalent recognition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-responsive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for cancer cell detection and in situ evaluation of cell surface glycan expression was developed on a poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-conjugated, chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) electrode interface. In this strategy, the multivalency and high affinity of the cell-targeted aptamers on rGO provided a highly efficient cell recognition platform on the electrode. The ALP and concanavalin A (Con A) coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) nanoprobes allowed the ALP enzyme-catalyzed production of phenols that inhibited the ECL reaction of Ru(bpy)32+ on the rGO electrode

  7. Single-cell-precision microplasma-induced cancer cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Tan

    Full Text Available The issue of single-cell control has recently attracted enormous interest. However, in spite of the presently achievable intracellular-level physiological probing through bio-photonics, nano-probe-based, and some other techniques, the issue of inducing selective, single-cell-precision apoptosis, without affecting neighbouring cells remains essentially open. Here we resolve this issue and report on the effective single-cell-precision cancer cell treatment using the reactive chemistry of the localized corona-type plasma discharge around a needle-like electrode with the spot size ∼1 µm. When the electrode is positioned with the micrometer precision against a selected cell, a focused and highly-localized micro-plasma discharge induces apoptosis in the selected individual HepG2 and HeLa cancer cells only, without affecting any surrounding cells, even in small cell clusters. This is confirmed by the real-time monitoring of the morphological and structural changes at the cellular and cell nucleus levels after the plasma exposure.

  8. a Simple Evolutionary Model for Cancer Cell Population and its Implications on Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wen, Shutang; Li, Baoshun; Li, Yuxiao

    We established a simple evolutionary model based on the cancer stem cell hypothesis. By taking cellular interactions into consideration, we introduced the evolutionary games theory into the quasispecies model. The fitness values are determined by both genotypes and cellular interactions. In the evolutionary model, a cancer cell population can evolve in different patterns. For single peak intrinsic fitness landscape, the evolution pattern can transit with increasing differentiation probability from malignant cells to benign cells in four different modes. For a large enough value of differentiation probability, the evolution is always the case that the malignant cells extinct ultimately, which might give some implications on cancer therapy.

  9. Recombinant MUC1 probe authentically reflects cell-specific O-glycosylation profiles of endogenous breast cancer mucin. High density and prevalent core 2-based glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stefan; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2002-07-19

    Knowledge about the O-linked glycan chains of tumor-associated MUC1 is primarily based on enzymatic and immunochemical evidence. To obtain structural information and to overcome limitations by the scarcity of endogenous mucin, we expressed a recombinant glycosylation probe corresponding to six MUC1 tandem repeats in four breast cancer cell lines. Comparative analyses of the O-glycan profiles were performed after hydrazinolysis and normal phase chromatography of 2-aminobenzamide-labeled glycans. Except for a general reduction in the O-glycan chain lengths and a high density glycosylation, no common structural pattern was revealed. T47D fusion protein exhibits an almost complete shift from core 2 to core 1 expression with a preponderance of sialylated glycans. By contrast, MCF-7, MDA-MB231, and ZR75-1 cells glycosylate the MUC1 repeat peptide preferentially with core 2-based glycans terminating mostly with alpha 3-linked sialic acid (MDA-MB231, ZR75-1) or alpha 2/3-linked fucose (MCF-7). Endogenous MUC1 from T47D and MCF-7 cell supernatants revealed almost identical O-glycosylation profiles compared with the respective recombinant probes, indicating that the fusion proteins reflected the authentic O-glycan profiles of the cells. The structural patterns in the majority of cells under study are in conflict with biosynthetic models of MUC1 O-glycosylation in breast cancer, which claim that the truncation of normal core 2-based polylactosamine structures to short sialylated core 1-based glycans is due to the reduced activity of core 2-forming beta 6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases and/or to overexpression of competitive alpha 3- sialyltransferase.

  10. Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    components [53]. A role for Wnt signaling in stem cell self-renewal of mammary stem cells was suggested by recent studies of Alexander and colleagues...autocrine mechanism for constitutive Wnt pathway activation in human cancer cells. Cancer Cell 2004, 6:497-506. 54. Liu BY, McDermott SP, Khwaja SS, Alexander ...helping with the Western blotting, the University of Michigan Cancer Center Flow Cytometry and Vector Core Facilities, and Dr. Graham W. Neill for

  11. PET imaging-based phenotyping as a predictive biomarker of response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: Are we there yet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Kim, Chun K. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Dept. of Radiology,Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The increased understanding of the molecular pathology of different malignancies, especially lung cancer, has directed investigational efforts to center on the identification of different molecular targets and on the development of targeted therapies against these targets. A good representative is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); a major driver of non-small cell lung cancer tumorigenesis. Today, tumor growth inhibition is possible after treating lung tumors expressing somatic mutations of the EGFR gene with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). This opened the doors to biomarker-directed precision or personalized treatments for lung cancer patients. The success of these targeted anticancer therapies depends in part on being able to identify biomarkers and their patho-molecular make-up in order to select patients that could respond to specific therapeutic agents. While the identification of reliable biomarkers is crucial to predict response to treatment before it begins, it is also essential to be able to monitor treatment early during therapy to avoid the toxicity and morbidity of futile treatment in non-responding patients. In this context, we share our perspective on the role of PET imaging-based phenotyping in the personalized care of lung cancer patients to non-invasively direct and monitor the treatment efficacy of TKIs in clinical practice.

  12. Implications of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells for Understanding Fomation and Therapy of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Li; Donglin Wang

    2005-01-01

    Most cancers are heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There is increasing evidence suggesting that only a minority of cancer cells, tumorigenic or tumor initiating cells, possess the capacity to proliferate extensively and form new hematopoietic cancer or solid tumors. Tumor initiating cells share characteristics required for normal stem cells. The dysregulation of self-renewal and proliferation of stem cells is a likely requirement for cancer development. This review formulates a model for the origin of cancer stem cells and regulating self-renewal which influences the way we study and treat cancer.

  13. Evidence-Based Cancer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    With the advances in the field of oncology, imaging is increasingly used in the follow-up of cancer patients, leading to concerns about over-utilization. Therefore, it has become imperative to make imaging more evidence-based, efficient, cost-effective and equitable. This review explores the strategies and tools to make diagnostic imaging more evidence-based, mainly in the context of follow-up of cancer patients.

  14. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for kidney (renal cell) cancer. The list ...

  15. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  16. Probing the Behaviors of Gold Nanorods in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Based on UV-vis-NIR Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Ji, Yinglu; Meng, Jie; Wu, Xiaochun; Xu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, behaviors of positively-charged AuNRs in a highly metastatic tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 are examined based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dark-field microscopic observation. It is found that characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of AuNRs can be detected using spectroscopic method within living cells that have taken up AuNRs. The peak area of transverse SPR band is shown to be proportionally related to the amount of AuNRs in the cells determined with ICP-MS, which suggests a facile and real time quantification method for AuNRs in living cells. The shape of longitudinal SPR band in UV-vis-NIR spectrum reflects the aggregation state of AuNRs in the cells during the incubation period, which is proved by TEM and microscopic observations. Experimental results reveal that AuNRs are internalized by the cells rapidly; the accumulation, distribution and aggregation of AuNRs in the cells compartments are time and dose dependent. The established spectroscopic analysis method can not only monitor the behaviors of AuNRs in living cells but may also be helpful in choosing the optimum laser stimulation wavelength for anti-tumor thermotherapy. PMID:22384113

  17. Probing the behaviors of gold nanorods in metastatic breast cancer cells based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Ji, Yinglu; Meng, Jie; Wu, Xiaochun; Xu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, behaviors of positively-charged AuNRs in a highly metastatic tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 are examined based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dark-field microscopic observation. It is found that characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of AuNRs can be detected using spectroscopic method within living cells that have taken up AuNRs. The peak area of transverse SPR band is shown to be proportionally related to the amount of AuNRs in the cells determined with ICP-MS, which suggests a facile and real time quantification method for AuNRs in living cells. The shape of longitudinal SPR band in UV-vis-NIR spectrum reflects the aggregation state of AuNRs in the cells during the incubation period, which is proved by TEM and microscopic observations. Experimental results reveal that AuNRs are internalized by the cells rapidly; the accumulation, distribution and aggregation of AuNRs in the cells compartments are time and dose dependent. The established spectroscopic analysis method can not only monitor the behaviors of AuNRs in living cells but may also be helpful in choosing the optimum laser stimulation wavelength for anti-tumor thermotherapy.

  18. Probing the behaviors of gold nanorods in metastatic breast cancer cells based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqi Zhang

    Full Text Available In this work, behaviors of positively-charged AuNRs in a highly metastatic tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 are examined based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dark-field microscopic observation. It is found that characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR peaks of AuNRs can be detected using spectroscopic method within living cells that have taken up AuNRs. The peak area of transverse SPR band is shown to be proportionally related to the amount of AuNRs in the cells determined with ICP-MS, which suggests a facile and real time quantification method for AuNRs in living cells. The shape of longitudinal SPR band in UV-vis-NIR spectrum reflects the aggregation state of AuNRs in the cells during the incubation period, which is proved by TEM and microscopic observations. Experimental results reveal that AuNRs are internalized by the cells rapidly; the accumulation, distribution and aggregation of AuNRs in the cells compartments are time and dose dependent. The established spectroscopic analysis method can not only monitor the behaviors of AuNRs in living cells but may also be helpful in choosing the optimum laser stimulation wavelength for anti-tumor thermotherapy.

  19. Colon Cancer Cell Separation by Dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Xiaoming; Jiang, H.; Wood, P.; Hrushesky, W.; Wang, Guiren

    2009-11-01

    Separation of cancer cells from the other biological cells can be useful for clinical cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment. In this presentation, conventional dielectrophoresis (c-DEP) is used in a microfluidic chip to manipulate and collect colorectal cancer HCT116 cell, which is doped with Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293). It is noticed that, the HCT116 cell are deflected to a side channel from a main channel clearly by apply electric field at particular AC frequency band. This motion caused by negative DEP can be used to separate the cancer cell from others. In this manuscript, chip design, flow condition, the DEP spectrum of the cancer cell are reported respectively, and the separation and collection efficiency are investigated as well. The sorter is microfabricated using plastic laminate technology. -/abstract- This work has been financially supported by the NSF RII funding (EP

  20. Graphene oxide-encoded Ag nanoshells with single-particle detection sensitivity towards cancer cell imaging based on SERRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, DaBin; Kang, Homan; Jeon, Su-Ji; Kim, Hye-In; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Sangyeop; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-05-21

    Developing ultrasensitive Raman nanoprobes is one of the emerging interests in the field of biosensing and bioimaging. Herein, we constructed a new type of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering nanoprobe composed of an Ag nanoshell as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active nanostructure, which was encapsulated with 4,7,10-trioxa-1,13-tridecanediamine-functionalized graphene oxide as an ultrasensitive Raman reporter exhibiting strong resonance Raman scattering including distinct D and G modes. The designed nanoprobe was able to produce much more intense and simpler Raman signals even at a single particle level than the Ag nanoshell bearing a well-known Raman reporter, which is beneficial for the sensitive detection of a target in a complex biological system. Finally, this ultrasensitive nanoprobe successfully demonstrated its potential for bioimaging of cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  2. Thiazole-based nitrogen mustards: Design, synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculation, molecular docking, and antiproliferative activity against selected human cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Świtalska, Marta; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Plech, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Misiura, Konrad; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Czaplińska, Barbara; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Malarz, Katarzyna; Musioł, Robert; Grela, Izabela

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis, characterization and investigation of antiproliferative activity of ten thiazole-based nitrogen mustard against human cancer cells lines (MV4-11, A549, MCF-7 and HCT116) and normal mouse fibroblast (BALB/3T3) is presented. The structures of novel compounds were determined using 1H and 13C NMR, FAB(+)-MS, and elemental analyses. Among the derivatives, 5b, 5c, 5e, 5f and 5i were found to exhibit high activity against human leukaemia MV4-11 cells with IC50 values of 2.17-4.26 μg/ml. The cytotoxic activity of compound 5c and 5f against BALB/3T3 cells is up to 20 times lower than against cancer cell lines. Our results also show that compounds 5e and 5i have very strong activity against MCF-7 and HCT116 with IC50 values of 3.02-4.13 μg/ml. Moreover, spectroscopic characterization and cellular localization for selected compound were performed. In order to identify potential drug targets we perform computer simulations with DNA-binding site of hTopoI and hTopoII and quantum chemical calculation of interaction and binding energies in complexes of the five most active compounds with guanine.

  3. Cellular spectroscopy: applications to cancer stem cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, G.; Xin, H.; Anderson, A.; Mullinax, J.; Jaiswal, K.; Wiegand, A.; Avital, Itzhak

    2011-02-01

    Spectroscopic and light scattering methods were used to gain insight into the existence and characterization of the cancer stem cell. Fundamental technical description of devices used have been reported elsewhere. We included alterations and implementation of these biophotonic instruments as applied to our objectives. We disassociated human tumor and submitted the cells to optical characterization to support our working hypothesis of stem cell origins to cancer and mechanisms. Single cell combined with population based analysis within the Pancreatic cancer system led us to information regarding the polarization state of cells possessing anchor proteins and drug influx pumps. Multispectral imaging combined with flow cytometry enabled us to target rare cells that appear to retain template DNA. rendering them resistant to anti-cancer drug therapy. In this study we describe an optical method that combines high-throughput population pattern and correlates each cell with an individual fluorescent and bright-field image.

  4. Differential diagnosis of follicular cancer and follicular adenoma using an expert system based on a set of qualitative signs of cell atypia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Vladimir; Emeliyanova, Olga

    2011-10-01

    To determine the efficiency of the developed expert system based on a set of qualitative signs of cell atypia and their weighting coefficients in the differential diagnosis of follicular cancer and follicular adenoma of the thyroid gland. Sixty cytologic preparations of patients with histologic diagnosis of a follicular cancer and follicular adenoma were investigated. Weighting coefficients for each sign of atypia for both forms of pathology have been calculated with the help of the deduced equation. This allowed creating an expert system by which the function of transforming qualitative signs of cell atypia to a quantitative form was realized. "Strength reserve" according to the diagnostic index value, coincidence of the verified diagnosis with the histologic conclusion, and its invariability for all 12 iterations testified to the reliability of an expert system. Preliminary trials showed the efficiency of an expert system for differentiating the nature of a thyroid follicular tumor to be 97.5%. The developed expert system allows high efficiency in making a differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular cancer and follicular adenoma.

  5. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  6. Selective collection and detection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells using aptamer-functionalized magnetic beads and quantum dots based nano-bio-probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhou, Zhenxian [Nanjing Second Hospital, Nanjing 210083 (China); Yuan, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Liu, Songqin, E-mail: liusq@seu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Aptamer–cell affinity interaction was employed for selective collection and detection of MCF-7. •CdTe QDs and aptamer were coated on SiO{sub 2} NPs for bio-labeling. •Good sensitivity was achieved due to the signal amplification of SiO{sub 2} NPs. -- Abstract: A novel strategy for selective collection and detection of breast cancer cells (MCF-7) based on aptamer–cell interaction was developed. Mucin 1 protein (MUC1) aptamer (Apt1) was covalently conjugated to magnetic beads to capture MCF-7 cell through affinity interaction between Apt1 and MUC1 protein that overexpressed on the surface of MCF-7 cells. Meanwhile, a nano-bio-probe was constructed by coupling of nucleolin aptamer AS1411 (Apt2) to CdTe quantum dots (QDs) which were homogeneously coated on the surfaces of monodispersed silica nanoparticles (SiO{sub 2} NPs). The nano-bio-probe displayed similar optical and electrochemical performances to free CdTe QDs, and remained high affinity to nucleolin overexpressed cells through the interaction between AS1411 and nucleolin protein. Photoluminescence (PL) and square-wave voltammetric (SWV) assays were used to quantitatively detect MCF-7 cells. Improved selectivity was obtained by using these two aptamers together as recognition elements simultaneously, compared to using any single aptamer. Based on the signal amplification of QDs coated silica nanoparticles (QDs/SiO{sub 2}), the detection sensitivity was enhanced and a detection limit of 201 and 85 cells mL{sup −1} by PL and SWV method were achieved, respectively. The proposed strategy could be extended to detect other cells, and showed potential applications in cell imaging and drug delivery.

  7. Dynamics of Cancer Cell near Collagen Fiber Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    Cell migration is an integrated process that is important in life. Migration is essential for embryonic development as well as homeostatic processes such as wound healing and immune responses. When cell migrates through connective extracellular matrix (ECM), it applies cellular traction force to ECM and senses the rigidity of their local environment. We used human breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231) which is highly invasive and applies strong traction force to ECM. As cancer cell applies traction force to type I collage-based ECM, it deforms collagen fibers near the surface. Patterns of deforming collagen fibers are significantly different with pairs of cancer cells compared to a single cancer cell. While a pair of cancer cells within 60 um creates aligned collagen fiber chains between them permanently, a single cancer cell does not form any fiber chains. In this experiment we measured a cellular response and an interaction between a pair of cells through the chain. Finally, we analyzed correlation of directions between cancer cell migration and the collagen chain alignment.

  8. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design.

  9. Graphene-based platforms for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunny C; Lee, Stephen; Lalwani, Gaurav; Suhrland, Cassandra; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a multifunctional carbon nanomaterial and could be utilized to develop platform technologies for cancer therapies. Its surface can be covalently and noncovalently functionalized with anticancer drugs and functional groups that target cancer cells and tissue to improve treatment efficacies. Furthermore, its physicochemical properties can be harnessed to facilitate stimulus responsive therapeutics and drug delivery. This review article summarizes the recent literature specifically focused on development of graphene technologies to treat cancer. We will focus on advances at the interface of graphene based drug/gene delivery, photothermal/photodynamic therapy and combinations of these techniques. We also discuss the current understanding in cytocompatibility and biocompatibility issues related to graphene formulations and their implications pertinent to clinical cancer management.

  10. Expression of tumor antigens on primary ovarian cancer cells compared to established ovarian cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloudová, Kamila; Hromádková, Hana; Partlová, Simona; Brtnický, Tomáš; Rob, Lukáš; Bartůňková, Jiřina; Hensler, Michal; Halaška, Michael J.; Špíšek, Radek; Fialová, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In order to select a suitable combination of cancer cell lines as an appropriate source of antigens for dendritic cell-based immunotherapy of ovarian cancer, we analyzed the expression level of 21 tumor associated antigens (BIRC5, CA125, CEA, DDX43, EPCAM, FOLR1, Her-2/neu, MAGE-A1, MAGE-A2, MAGE-A3, MAGE-A4, MAGE-A6, MAGE-A10, MAGE-A12, MUC-1, NY-ESO-1, PRAME, p53, TPBG, TRT, WT1) in 4 established ovarian cancer cell lines and in primary tumor cells isolated from the high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. More than 90% of tumor samples expressed very high levels of CA125, FOLR1, EPCAM and MUC-1 and elevated levels of Her-2/neu, similarly to OVCAR-3 cell line. The combination of OV-90 and OVCAR-3 cell lines showed the highest overlap with patients' samples in the TAA expression profile. PMID:27323861

  11. Characterizing cancer cells with cancer stem cell-like features in 293T human embryonic kidney cells

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz Thomas A; Lacerda Lara; Xu Wei; Robertson Fredika; Ueno Naoto T; Lucci Anthony; Landis Melissa D; Rodriguez Angel A; Li Li; Cohen Evan; Gao Hui; Krishnamurthy Savitri; Zhang Xiaomei; Debeb Bisrat G; Cristofanilli Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the first suggestion of prospectively identifiable cancer stem cells in solid tumors, efforts have been made to characterize reported cancer stem cell surrogates in existing cancer cell lines, and cell lines rich with these surrogates have been used to screen for cancer stem cell targeted agents. Although 293T cells were derived from human embryonic kidney, transplantation of these cells into the mammary fat pad yields aggressive tumors that self-renew as evidenced b...

  12. A mathematical model of cancer cells with phenotypic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells is recently becoming a cutting-edge research area in cancer, which challenges the cellular hierarchy proposed by the conventional cancer stem cell theory. In this study, we establish a mathematical model for describing the phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells, based on which we try to find some salient features that can characterize the dynamic behavior of the phenotypic plasticity especially in comparison to the hierarchical model of cancer cells. Methods: We model cancer as population dynamics composed of different phenotypes of cancer cells. In this model, not only can cancer cells divide (symmetrically and asymmetrically and die, but they can also convert into other cellular phenotypes. According to the Law of Mass Action, the cellular processes can be captured by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs. On one hand, we can analyze the long-term stability of the model by applying qualitative method of ODEs. On the other hand, we are also concerned about the short-term behavior of the model by studying its transient dynamics. Meanwhile, we validate our model to the cell-state dynamics in published experimental data.Results: Our results show that the phenotypic plasticity plays important roles in both stabilizing the distribution of different phenotypic mixture and maintaining the cancer stem cells proportion. In particular, the phenotypic plasticity model shows decided advantages over the hierarchical model in predicting the phenotypic equilibrium and cancer stem cells’ overshoot reported in previous biological experiments in cancer cell lines.Conclusion: Since the validity of the phenotypic plasticity paradigm and the conventional cancer stem cell theory is still debated in experimental biology, it is worthy of theoretically searching for good indicators to distinguish the two models through quantitative methods. According to our study, the phenotypic equilibrium and overshoot

  13. Survival by histologic subtype in stage IV nonsmall cell lung cancer based on data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei Y

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Karynsa Cetin1, David S Ettinger2, Yong-jiang Hei3, Cynthia D O'Malley11Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 2Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Global Development, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USABackground: The role of histology in the targeted management of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC has garnered renewed attention in recent years. We provide contemporary population-based estimates of survival and an assessment of important prognostic factors in stage IV NSCLC by major histologic subtype.Methods: Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER Program, we stratified 51,749 incident stage IV NSCLC patients (1988–2003 with follow-up through 2006 by major histologic subtype. We used Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods to describe overall survival and the prognostic influence of select patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics for each histologic subgroup.Results: Survival was highest in patients with bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma (1-year survival: 29.1% and lowest in those with large cell tumors (1-year survival: 12.8%. Diagnosis in later years, female gender, younger age, either Asian/Pacific Islander or Hispanic race/ethnicity, lower tumor grade, and surgery or beam radiation as part of first-line treatment were generally independently associated with a decreased risk of death, but the prognostic significance of some of these factors (age, ethnicity, tumor grade varied according to histologic subtype.Conclusion: Findings demonstrate a poor prognosis across histologic subtypes in stage IV NSCLC patients but highlight differences in both absolute survival and the relative importance of select prognostic factors by histologic subclassification. More research using other sources of population-based data could help clarify the role of histology in the presentation, management, and prognosis of late

  14. The Role of Proteasome Inhibition in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Escobar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer therapy with current available chemotherapeutic agents is mainly palliative. For these and other reasons there is now a great interest to find targeted therapies that can be effective not only palliating lung cancer or decreasing treatment-related toxicity, but also giving hope to cure these patients. It is already well known that the ubiquitin-proteasome system like other cellular pathways is critical for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells; thus, proteosome inhibition has become a very attractive anticancer therapy. There are several phase I and phase II clinical trials now in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer using this potential target. Most of the trials use bortezomib in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. This paper tends to make a state-of-the-art review based on the available literature regarding the use of bortezomib as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

  15. Cancer Cell Fusion: Mechanisms Slowly Unravel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicite K. Noubissi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways driving invasion and metastasis have been studied for many years, the origin of the population of metastatic cells within the primary tumor is still not well understood. About a century ago, Aichel proposed that cancer cell fusion was a mechanism of cancer metastasis. This hypothesis gained some support over the years, and recently became the focus of many studies that revealed increasing evidence pointing to the possibility that cancer cell fusion probably gives rise to the metastatic phenotype by generating widespread genetic and epigenetic diversity, leading to the emergence of critical populations needed to evolve resistance to the treatment and development of metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the clinical relevance of cancer cell fusion, describe emerging mechanisms of cancer cell fusion, address why inhibiting cancer cell fusion could represent a critical line of attack to limit drug resistance and to prevent metastasis, and suggest one new modality for doing so.

  16. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  17. The biology of cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Neethan A; Shimono, Yohei; Qian, Dalong; Clarke, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Cancers originally develop from normal cells that gain the ability to proliferate aberrantly and eventually turn malignant. These cancerous cells then grow clonally into tumors and eventually have the potential to metastasize. A central question in cancer biology is, which cells can be transformed to form tumors? Recent studies elucidated the presence of cancer stem cells that have the exclusive ability to regenerate tumors. These cancer stem cells share many characteristics with normal stem cells, including self-renewal and differentiation. With the growing evidence that cancer stem cells exist in a wide array of tumors, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and differentiation because corruption of genes involved in these pathways likely participates in tumor growth. This new paradigm of oncogenesis has been validated in a growing list of tumors. Studies of normal and cancer stem cells from the same tissue have shed light on the ontogeny of tumors. That signaling pathways such as Bmi1 and Wnt have similar effects in normal and cancer stem cell self-renewal suggests that common molecular pathways regulate both populations. Understanding the biology of cancer stem cells will contribute to the identification of molecular targets important for future therapies.

  18. Dual Functional Nanocarrier for Cellular Imaging and Drug Delivery in Cancer Cells Based on π-Conjugated Core and Biodegradable Polymer Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Bhagyashree; Surnar, Bapurao; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2016-03-14

    Multipurpose polymer nanoscaffolds for cellular imaging and delivery of anticancer drug are urgently required for the cancer therapy. The present investigation reports a new polymer drug delivery concept based on biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) and highly luminescent π-conjugated fluorophore as dual functional nanocarrier for cellular imaging and delivery vehicles for anticancer drug to cancer cells. To accomplish this goal, a new substituted caprolactone monomer was designed, and it was subjected to ring opening polymerization using a blue luminescent bishydroxyloligo-phenylenevinylene (OPV) fluorophore as an initiator. A series of A-B-A triblock copolymer building blocks with a fixed OPV π-core and variable chain biodegradable PCL arm length were tailor-made. These triblocks self-assembled in organic solvents to produce well-defined helical nanofibers, whereas in water they produced spherical nanoparticles (size ∼150 nm) with blue luminescence. The hydrophobic pocket of the polymer nanoparticle was found to be an efficient host for loading water insoluble anticancer drug such as doxorubicin (DOX). The photophysical studies revealed that there was no cross-talking between the OPV and DOX chromophores, and their optical purity was retained in the nanoparticle assembly for cellular imaging. In vitro studies revealed that the biodegradable PCL arm was susceptible to enzymatic cleavage at the intracellular lysosomal esterase under physiological conditions to release the loaded drugs. The nascent nanoparticles were found to be nontoxic to cancer cells, whereas the DOX-loaded nanoparticles accomplished more than 80% killing in HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic analysis confirmed the cell penetrating ability of the blue luminescent polymer nanoparticles and their accumulation preferably in the cytoplasm. The DOX loaded red luminescent polymer nanoparticles were also taken up by the cells, and the drug was found to be accumulated at the perinuclear environment

  19. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  20. Trends in sinonasal cancer in The Netherlands: more squamous cell cancer, less adenocarcinoma. A population-based study 1973-2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpens, J.H.; Louwman, M.W.; Peters, R.; Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Burdorf, A.L.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer of the nasal cavity or the paranasal sinuses (sinonasal cancer) is rare. Sinonasal cancer has been associated with various occupational risk factors such as exposure to dust of hard wood and leather. Also, a relationship with smoking habits has been suggested. We studied the long

  1. Stem cells and cancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ullah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are the small units of multicellular creature. Regeneration and self-renewal are the ability of the stem cells. Each tissue is having particular stem cells, specific to it. These normal stem cells are converted into cancer stem cells through mutations in it. Although the expression of oncogenes is enhanced a lot, the tumor-supressing gene is lessened. Cancer stem cells are isolated and visualized through different techniques like immunocytochemical staining, spectral karyotyping, immunohistochemistry, induction method and dissection measures, then are performed histological procedures which include fascination, immunohistochemistry, dispensation, in situ hybridization and also quantitative examination of tissue flow cytometric analysis. For the analysis of quantization, statistical tests are also performed as two-sample t-test, Chi-square test, SD and arithmetic mean. Tumor cells generate glioma spheres. These are used in cancer study. Axin 1 is the gene suppressing cancer. Its removal causes the generation of liver cancer. Curcumin is the most effective for suppressing cancer as it increases the normal stem cell function and decreases the cancer stem cell function. Brahma-related gene 1 is crucial for the safeguarding of the stem cell residents in tissue-specific comportment. Different types of cancers originate through genetic mutation, tissue disorganization and cell proliferation. Tumor configuration is produced by the alteration in original cell culture having stem cells and progenitor cell populations. The developmental facets about cancer cells and cancer stem cells as well as their personal natal functions sustain an intricate steadiness to settle on their personal donations to the efficacy or harmfulness of the biological organization.

  2. Combined high-intensity local treatment and systemic therapy in metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: An analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Luu, Michael; Yoshida, Emi J; Kim, Sungjin; Tighiouart, Mourad; David, John M; Shiao, Stephen L; Mita, Alain C; Scher, Kevin S; Sherman, Eric J; Lee, Nancy Y; Ho, Allen S

    2017-08-17

    There is increasing evidence that primary tumor ablation can improve survival for some cancer patients with distant metastases. This may be particularly applicable to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) because of its tropism for locoregional progression. This study included patients with metastatic HNSCC undergoing systemic therapy identified in the National Cancer Data Base. High-intensity local treatment was defined as radiation doses ≥ 60 Gy or oncologic resection of the primary tumor. Multivariate Cox regression, propensity score matching, landmark analysis, and subgroup analysis were performed to account for imbalances in covariates, including adjustments for the number and location of metastatic sites in the subset of patients with this information available. In all, 3269 patients were included (median follow-up, 51.5 months). Patients undergoing systemic therapy with local treatment had improved survival in comparison with patients receiving systemic therapy alone in propensity score-matched cohorts (2-year overall survival, 34.2% vs 20.6%; P < .001). Improved survival was associated only with patients receiving high-intensity local treatment, whereas those receiving lower-intensity local treatment had survival similar to that of patients receiving systemic therapy without local treatment. The impact of high-intensity local therapy was time-dependent, with a stronger impact within the first 6 months after the diagnosis (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.255; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.210-0.309; P < .001) in comparison with more than 6 months after the diagnosis (AHR, 0.622; 95% CI, 0.561-0.689; P < .001) in the multivariate analysis. A benefit was seen in all subgroups, in landmark analyses of 1-, 2-, and 3-year survivors, and when adjusting for the number and location of metastatic sites. Aggressive local treatment warrants prospective evaluation for select patients with metastatic HNSCC. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017

  3. Probing the Behaviors of Gold Nanorods in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Based on UV-vis-NIR Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Weiqi Zhang; Yinglu Ji; Jie Meng; Xiaochun Wu; Haiyan Xu

    2012-01-01

    In this work, behaviors of positively-charged AuNRs in a highly metastatic tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 are examined based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dark-field microscopic observation. It is found that characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of AuNRs can be detected using spectroscopic method within living cells that have taken up AuNRs. The peak area of...

  4. Smart dendrimer-based nanogel for enhancing 5-fluorouracil loading efficiency against MCF7 cancer cell growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PHUNG NGAN LE; NGOC HOA NGUYEN; CUU KHOA NGUYEN; NGOC QUYEN TRAN

    2016-10-01

    Nano-carriers are not only evaluated as a novel kind of drug delivery, but also expected to bypass the critical bottleneck of conventional cancer chemotherapeutics. Among them, thermo-sensitive nanogel draws muchattention due to its efficacy in the loading and release of hydrophobic drugs. In the study, we developed a promising thermosensitive polymer-grafted dendrimer to enhance drug-loading efficiency, which was prepared from conjugationof thermo-sensitive carboxylic-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) polymer (PNIPAM) with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer (G3.0). The obtained copolymer structure and molecular weight were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (${}^!$H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC), respectively. Morphology of the nanocarrier was observed around 120–150 nm by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 200 nm by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The nanocarrier exhibited the higher drug loading (DL = 7.79%) and entrapment efficiency (EE = 42.25%) of 5-FU compared to PAMAM dendrimer G3.0 (DL = 2.25% and EE = 11.52%). In-vitro test, the 5-FU-loaded in PAMAM G3.0–PNIPAM could release approximately 40% of the encapsulated drug at pH = 7.4 after 5 days tracking, while the cumulative anticancer drugs achieved nearly two-fold increase (around 75%)at pH 5.5 during the same time.Moreover, the cytotoxicity assay results also indicated that the drug-loaded nanocarrier exhibited a significant growth inhibition of the MCF-7 cancer cell. The obtained resulted possibly offered agreat potential of the nanocarrier which may be utilized in delivering other anticancer drugs or dual drugs for chemotherapy in future.

  5. A cell-permeable fusion protein based on Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin for delivery of p53 tumorsuppressor into cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Fahrer

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered bacterial protein toxins are attractive systems for delivery of exogenous proteins into the cytosol of mammalian cells. The binary C2 toxin from C. botulinum has emerged as powerful delivery vehicle, which rests on its binding/translocation component C2IIa and the genetically modified adaptor domain C2IN that act in concert to trigger cell uptake. The p53 tumor suppressor protein has a crucial function in suppressing carcinogenesis and is frequently inactivated by diverse mechanisms in human tumor cells. Therefore, we constructed a C2IN-p53 fusion protein, which is internalized into cancer cells by C2IIa. To this end, the C2IN-p53 fusion construct was overexpressed in E. coli with good solubility, purified by heparin affinity chromatography and protein identity was confirmed by immunoblotting. We demonstrated that the fusion protein is capable of binding to the p53 consensus-DNA with high affinity in a p53-specific manner in vitro. Next, the internalization of C2IN-p53 was monitored in HeLa cells by cell fractionation and immunoblot analysis, which revealed a C2IIa-mediated translocation of the fusion protein into the cytosol. The uptake was also shown in A549 and Saos-2 cells with similar efficiency. These findings were further corroborated by confocal immunofluorescence analyses of C2IN-p53/C2IIa-treated HeLa and A549 cells, displaying predominantly cytoplasmic localization of the fusion construct.

  6. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) inhibits cancer cell growth and expression of key molecules in inflammatory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Acevedo, Raysa Rosario; Otero-Franqui, Elisa; Cubano, Luis A; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and least understood form of advanced breast cancer. Its lethality originates from its nature of invading the lymphatic system and absence of a palpable tumor mass. Different from other metastatic breast cancer cells, IBC cells invade by forming tumor spheroids that retain E-cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions. Herein we describe the potential of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) as an attractive candidate for anti-IBC therapy. Reishi contains biological compounds that are cytotoxic against cancer cells. We report the effects of Reishi on viability, apoptosis, invasion, and its mechanism of action in IBC cells (SUM-149). Results show that Reishi selectively inhibits cancer cell viability although it does not affect the viability of noncancerous mammary epithelial cells. Apoptosis induction is consistent with decreased cell viability. Reishi inhibits cell invasion and disrupts the cell spheroids that are characteristic of the IBC invasive pathology. Reishi decreases the expression of genes involved in cancer cell survival and proliferation (BCL-2, TERT, PDGFB), and invasion and metastasis (MMP-9), whereas it increases the expression of IL8. Reishi reduces BCL-2, BCL-XL, E-cadherin, eIF4G, p120-catenin, and c-Myc protein expression and gelatinase activity. These findings suggest that Reishi is an effective anti-IBC therapeutic.

  7. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may not be effective against the cancer stem cells that are responsible for recurrence. In recent years great progress has been made in identifying markers of both normal and malignant colon stem cells. Proteins proposed as colon cancer stem cell markers include CD133, CD44, CD166, ALDH1A1, Lgr5, and several others. In this review we consider the evidence for these proteins as colon cancer stem cell markers and as prognostic indicators of colon cancer survival. Additionally, we discuss potential functions of these proteins and the implications this may have for development of therapies that target colon cancer stem cells. PMID:21196254

  8. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  9. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-xiang Yuan; Jingxin Mo; Guixian Zhao; Gang Shu; Hua-lin Fu; Wei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rati...

  10. Prognostic impact of 18F-FDG uptake on PET in non-small cell lung cancer patients with postoperative recurrence following platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaira, Kyoichi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Murakami, Haruyasu; Ono, Akira; Naito, Tateaki; Endo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2014-03-01

    Whether fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake within tumor cells differs between primary and recurrent lung cancers is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of (18)F-FDG uptake by comparing that measured preoperatively at the primary site to that measured postoperatively at sites of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) recurrence. Only patients with postoperative recurrences who received platinum-based chemotherapy as the initial treatment after recurrence were included in the study. Fifty-two patients underwent (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) examinations before thoracotomy and at the time of recurrence after curative surgery. All recurrences were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. (18)F-FDG uptake in the preoperative primary tumors was significantly higher than that in the recurrent tumors (p=0.028), demonstrating a statistically significant correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient γ=0.482, precurrence. In NSCLC patients treated by chemotherapy for recurrence, preoperative measurements of (18)F-FDG uptake may be a more powerful surrogate marker for predicting outcome when measured preoperatively at the primary tumor site rather than postoperatively at sites of recurrence. © 2013 Published by The Japanese Respiratory Society on behalf of The Japanese Respiratory Society.

  11. Breast cancer stem-like cells and breast cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niansong Qian; Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita; Masakazu Toi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Until the early 1990s, human cancers were considered a morphologically heterogeneous population of cells. In 1997, Bonnet et al[1] demonstrated that a small population of leukemia cells was able to differentiate in vivo into leukemic blasts, indicating that the leukemic clone was organized as a hierarchy; this was subsequently denoted as cancer stem like cells (CSCs). CSCs are cancer cells that possess characteristics associated with normal stem cells and have the specific ability to give rise to all cell types found in a particular cancer. One reason for the failure of traditional anti tumor therapies might be their inability to eradicate CSCs. Therefore, therapies must identify and destroy CSCs in both primary and metastatic tumors.

  12. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  13. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image registration algorithm for VOI and voxel-wise assessment of longitudinal variations in FDG tumor uptake in NSCLC patients. Methods: Evaluation of the elastix toolbox was performed using F-18-FDG PET/CT ...

  14. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal 18F-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, Gerald SMA; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel JB; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry JM

    2015-01-01

    Background Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image registration algorithm for VOI and voxel-wise assessment of longitudinal variations in FDG tumor uptake in NSCLC patients. Methods Evaluation of the elastix toolbox was performed using 18F-FDG PET/CT at ...

  15. Targeted delivery of in situ PCR-amplified Sleeping Beauty transposon genes to cancer cells with lipid-based nanoparticle-like protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Fu, Duo; Yu, Dongli; Cui, Changhao; Wang, Li; Guo, Zhaoming; Mao, Chuanbin

    2017-03-01

    A Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is made of a transposon plasmid (containing gene encoding a desired functional or therapeutic protein) and a transposase plasmid (encoding an enzyme capable of cutting and pasting the gene into the host cell genome). It is a kind of natural, nonviral gene delivery vehicle, which can achieve efficient genomic insertion, providing long-term transgenic expression. However, before the SB transposon system could play a role in promoting gene expression, it has to be delivered efficiently first across cell membrane and then into cell nuclei. Towards this end, we used a nanoparticle-like lipid-based protocell, a closed bilayer of the neutral lipids with the DNA encapsulated inside, to deliver the SB transposon system to cancer cells. The SB transposon system was amplified in situ inside the protocells by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process, realizing more efficient loading and delivery of the target gene. To reach a high transfection efficiency, we introduced two targeting moieties, folic acid (FA) as a cancer cell-targeting motif and Dexamethasone (DEX) as a nuclear localization signaling molecule, into the protocells. As a result, the FA enabled the modified targeting protocells to deliver the DNA into the cancer cells with an increased efficiency and the DEX promoted the DNA to translocate to cell nuclei, eventually leading to the increased chromosome insertion efficiency of the SB transposon. In vivo study strongly suggested that the transfection efficiency of FA-modified protocells in the tumor tissue was much higher than that in other tissues, which was consistent with the in vitro results. Our studies implied that with the targeting ligand modification, the protocells could be utilized as an efficient targeting gene carrier. Since the protocells were made of neutral lipids without cationic charges, the cytotoxicity of protocells was significantly lower than that of traditional cationic gene carriers such as cationic

  16. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  17. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  18. Breathless cancer cells get fat on glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Anastasiou; Lewis C Cantley

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer cells depend on glutamine as a fuel for proliferation,yet the mechanisms by which glutamine supports cancer metabolism are not fully understood.Two recent studies highlight an important role for glutamine in the synthesis of lipids and provide novel insights into how glutamine metabolism could be targeted for cancer therapy.

  19. B Cell Epitope-Based Vaccination Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Kametani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many peptide vaccines are undergoing clinical studies. Most of these vaccines were developed to activate cytotoxic T cells; however, the response is not robust. Unlike vaccines, anti-cancer antibodies based on passive immunity have been approved as a standard treatment. Since passive immunity is more effective in tumor treatment, the evidence suggests that limited B cell epitope-based peptide vaccines may have similar activity. Nevertheless, such peptide vaccines have not been intensively developed primarily because humoral immunity is thought to be preferable to cancer progression. B cells secrete cytokines, which suppress immune functions. This review discusses the possibility of therapeutic antibody induction by a peptide vaccine and the role of active and passive B cell immunity in cancer patients. We also discuss the use of humanized mice as a pre-clinical model. The necessity of a better understanding of the activity of B cells in cancer is also discussed.

  20. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  1. Stochastic model for computer simulation of the number of cancer cells and lymphocytes in homogeneous sections of cancer tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Castellanos-Moreno, Arnulfo; Corella-Madueño, Adalberto; Gutiérrez-López, Sergio; Rosas-Burgos, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    We deal with a small enough tumor section to consider it homogeneous, such that populations of lymphocytes and cancer cells are independent of spatial coordinates. A stochastic model based in one step processes is developed to take into account natural birth and death rates. Other rates are also introduced to consider medical treatment: natural birth rate of lymphocytes and cancer cells; induced death rate of cancer cells due to self-competition, and other ones caused by the activated lymphocytes acting on cancer cells. Additionally, a death rate of cancer cells due to induced apoptosis is considered. Weakness due to the advance of sickness is considered by introducing a lymphocytes death rate proportional to proliferation of cancer cells. Simulation is developed considering different combinations of the parameters and its values, so that several strategies are taken into account to study the effect of anti-angiogenic drugs as well the self-competition between cancer cells. Immune response, with the presence ...

  2. Stem cell characteristics in prostate cancer cell lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, M.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate the presence of a small, stem-like cell population in several human cancers that is crucial for the tumour (re)population. OBJECTIVE: Six established prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines-DU145, DuCaP, LAPC-4, 22Rv1, LNCaP, and PC-3-were examined for their stem cell pr

  3. High-throughput RNA sequencing-based virome analysis of 50 lymphoma cell lines from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Subing; Strong, Michael J; Wang, Xia; Moss, Walter N; Concha, Monica; Lin, Zhen; O'Grady, Tina; Baddoo, Melody; Fewell, Claire; Renne, Rolf; Flemington, Erik K

    2015-01-01

    Using high-throughput RNA sequencing data from 50 common lymphoma cell culture models from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project, we performed an unbiased global interrogation for the presence of a panel of 740 viruses and strains known to infect human and other mammalian cells. This led to the findings of previously identified infections by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). In addition, we also found a previously unreported infection of one cell line (DEL) with a murine leukemia virus. High expression of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) transcripts was observed in DEL cells, and we identified four transcriptionally active integration sites, one being in the TNFRSF6B gene. We also found low levels of MuLV reads in a number of other cell lines and provided evidence suggesting cross-contamination during sequencing. Analysis of HTLV-1 integrations in two cell lines, HuT 102 and MJ, identified 14 and 66 transcriptionally active integration sites with potentially activating integrations in immune regulatory genes, including interleukin-15 (IL-15), IL-6ST, STAT5B, HIVEP1, and IL-9R. Although KSHV and EBV do not typically integrate into the genome, we investigated a previously identified integration of EBV into the BACH2 locus in Raji cells. This analysis identified a BACH2 disruption mechanism involving splice donor sequestration. Through viral gene expression analysis, we detected expression of stable intronic RNAs from the EBV BamHI W repeats that may be part of long transcripts spanning the repeat region. We also observed transcripts at the EBV vIL-10 locus exclusively in the Hodgkin's lymphoma cell line, Hs 611.T, the expression of which were uncoupled from other lytic genes. Assessment of the KSHV viral transcriptome in BCP-1 cells showed expression of the viral immune regulators, K2/vIL-6, K4/vIL-8-like vCCL1, and K5/E2-ubiquitin ligase 1 that was significantly higher than expression of

  4. Combined radio- and chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: systematic review of landmark studies based on acquired citations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten eNieder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The important role of combined chemoradiation for several groups of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is reflected by the large number of scientific articles published during the last 30 years. Different measures of impact and clinical relevance of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this review, article citation rate was chosen. Highly cited articles were identified through systematic search of the citation database Scopus. Among the 100 most often cited articles, meta-analyses (n=5 achieved a median of 203 citations, guidelines (n=7 97, phase III trials (n=29 168, phase II trials (n=21 135, phase I trials (n=7 88, and others combined 115.5 (p=0.001. Numerous national and international cooperative groups and several single institutions were actively involved in performing often cited, high-impact trials, reflecting the fact that NSCLC is a world-wide challenge that requires research collaboration. Platinum-containing combinations have evolved into a standard of care, typically administered concurrently. The issue of radiotherapy fractionation and total dose has also been studied extensively, yet with less conclusive results. Differences in target volume definition have been addressed. However, it was not possible to test all theoretically possible combinations of radiotherapy regimens, drugs and drug doses (lower radiosensitizing doses compared to higher systemically active doses. That is why current guidelines offer physicians a choice of different, presumably equivalent treatment alternatives. This review identifies open questions and strategies for further research.

  5. Elevated serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor predict a poor prognosis of platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zang JL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jialan Zang,1–3,* Yong Hu,1,2,* Xiaoyue Xu,1,2 Jie Ni,1,2 Dali Yan,1,2 Siwen Liu,4 Jieyu He,5 Jing Xue,4 Jianzhong Wu,4 Jifeng Feng2 1The Fourth Clinical School of Nanjing Medical University, 2Department of Chemotherapy, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Nanjing, 3Department of Oncology, The First Hospital of Harbin City, Harbin, 4Center of Clinical Laboratory, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, 5Department of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: This study was designed to investigate the predictive and prognostic values of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF level in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods: Patients’ peripheral blood samples were collected prior to chemotherapy and after 1 week of the third cycle of combination chemotherapy. Serum VEGF levels were evaluated through Luminex multiplex technique. Between September 2011 and August 2015, a total of 135 consecutive advanced or recurrent histologically verified NSCLC patients were enrolled in the study. Moreover, all the patients received platinum-based combination chemotherapy as a first-line treatment. Results: No significant associations were found between pretreatment serum VEGF levels and clinical characteristics, such as sex (P=0.0975, age (P=0.2522, stage (P=0.1407, lymph node metastasis (P=0.6409, tumor location (P=0.3520, differentiated degree (P=0.5608, pathological (histological type (P=0.4885, and response to treatment (P=0.9859. The VEGF load per platelet (VEGFPLT levels were not correlated with sex, age, primary tumor site, and pathological type in NSCLC patients (all P>0.05. The median survival time of progression-free survival (PFS was 6.407 and 5.29 months in the low and high groups, respectively, when using 280 pg/mL VEGF level as the cutoff point (P=0.024. Conclusion

  6. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing a single tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope delays tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Botto, Sara; Alexander, Richard B; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly immunogenic virus that results in a persistent, life-long infection in the host typically with no ill effects. Certain unique features of CMV, including its capacity to actively replicate in the presence of strong host CMV-specific immunity, may give CMV an advantage compared with other virus-based vaccine delivery platforms. In the present study, we tested the utility of mouse CMV (mCMV)-based vaccines expressing human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer immunotherapy in double-transgenic mice expressing PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2bxPSA F1 mice). We assessed the capacity of 2 mCMV-based vectors to induce PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses and affect the growth of PSA-expressing Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate tumors (TRAMP-PSA). In the absence of tumor challenge, immunization with mCMV vectors expressing either a H2-D(b)-restricted epitope PSA(65-73) (mCMV/PSA(65-73)) or the full-length gene for PSA (mCMV/PSA(FL)) induced comparable levels of CD8 T-cell responses that increased (inflated) with time. Upon challenge with TRAMP-PSA tumor cells, animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(65-73) had delay of tumor growth and increased PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses, whereas animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(FL) showed progressive tumor growth and no increase in number of splenic PSA(65-73)-specific T cells. The data show that a prototype CMV-based prostate cancer vaccine can induce an effective antitumor immune response in a "humanized" double-transgenic mouse model. The observation that mCMV/PSA(FL) is not effective against TRAMP-PSA is consistent with our previous findings that HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted immune responses to PSA are associated with suppression of effective CD8 T-cell responses to TRAMP-PSA tumors.

  7. Natural Killer cells as helper cells in Dendritic cell cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Betina Pampena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy has generated highly variable clinical results due to differing methods of vaccine preparation and variation in patient populations, among other lesser factors. Moreover, these clinical responses do not necessarily correspond with the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. Here we review the participation of natural killer (NK cells as alternative immune components that could cooperate in successful vaccination treatment. NK cells have been described as helper cells in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, but the role in other kinds of vaccination strategies (whole cells, peptide or DNA- based vaccines is poorly understood. In this article we address the following issues regarding the role of NK cells in cancer vaccines: NK cell anti-tumor action sites, and the loci of NK cell interaction with other immune cells; descriptions of new data on the memory characteristics of NK cells described in infectious diseases; and finally phenotypical and functional changes after vaccination measured by immunomonitoring in preclinical and clinical settings.

  8. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    which resemble normal stem cells, specifically in the ability to infinitely give rise to the bulk of a tumor as the “ seed ” of the cancer, account for...evolutionarily- conserved role in regulating the cell fate in both normal and neoplastic stem cell populations, which suggests that therapeutic targeting of this...specifically in the ability to infinitely give rise to the bulk of a tumor as the “ seed ” of the cancer, account for cancer initiation, progression

  9. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  10. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jia-hua; CHENG Hai-yan; YU Ze-qian; HE Dao-wei; PAN Zheng; YANG De-tong

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers with a very low survival rate of 5 years.Conventional cancer treatments including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or combinations of these show little effect on this disease. Several proteins have been proved critical to the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells.Methods Several pancreatic cancer cell lines were screened by resveratrol, and its toxicity was tested by normal pancreatic cells. Western blotting was then performed to analyze the molecular mechanism of resveratrol induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cell lines.Results In the screened pancreatic cancer cell lines, capan-2 and colo357 showed high sensitivity to resveratrol induced apoptosis. Resveratrol exhibited insignificant toxicity to normal pancreatic cells. In resveratrol sensitive cells,capan-2 and colo357, the activation of caspase-3 was detected and showed significant caspase-3 activation upon resveratrol treatment; p53 and p21 were also detected up-regulated upon resveratrol treatment.Conclusion Resveratrol provides a promising anti-tumor stratagy to fight against pancreatic cancer.

  11. Reprogramming cancer cells: a novel approach for cancer therapy or a tool for disease-modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Açelya; de Lázaro, Irene; Taheri, Hadiseh

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin dynamics have been the major focus of many physiological and pathological processes over the past 20 years. Epigenetic mechanisms have been shown to be reshaped during both cellular reprogramming and tumorigenesis. For this reason, cancer cell reprogramming can provide a powerful tool to better understand both regenerative and cancer-fate processes, with a potential to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Recent studies showed that cancer cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by the overexpression of reprogramming transcription factors. Activation of transcription factors and modification of chromatin regulators may result in the remodeling of epigenetic status and refueling of tumorigenicity in these reprogrammed cancer cells. However, studies focusing on cancer cell reprogramming are contradictory; some studies reported increased tumor progression whereas others showed that cellular reprogramming has a treatment potential for cancer. In this review, first, the current knowledge on the epigenetic mechanisms involved during cancer development and cellular reprogramming will be presented. Later, different reports and key factors about pluripotency-based reprogramming of cancer cells will be reviewed in detail. New insights will be provided on cancer biology and therapy in the light of cellular reprogramming.

  12. Targeting the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common type of solid bone cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in pediatric patients. Many patients are not cured by the current osteosarcoma therapy consisting of combination chemotherapy along with surgery and thus new treatments are urgently needed. In the last decade, cancer stem cells have been identified in many tumors such as leukemia, brain, breast, head and neck, colon, skin, pancreatic, and prostate cancers and these cells are proposed to play major roles in drug resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown evidence that osteosarcoma also possesses cancer stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the osteosarcoma cancer stem cell including the methods used for its isolation, its properties, and its potential as a new target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  13. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  14. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  15. Quantifying tumor associated macrophages in breast cancer: a comparison of iron and fluorine-based MRI cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makela, Ashley V.; Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are associated with tumor growth and metastasis. MRI can detect TAMs labeled with iron oxide (USPIO) or perfluorocarbon (PFC) agents. This study compared these two cell tracking approaches for imaging TAMs in vivo. 4T1 tumors were imaged with MRI at 4 days or 3 weeks post cell implantation after intravenous (i.v.) administration of either USPIO or PFC. Signal loss was detected within tumors at both time points post USPIO. Images acquired at 4 days demonstrated signal loss encompassing the entire tumor and around the periphery at 3 weeks. Number of black voxels suggested higher numbers of TAMs in the tumor at the later time point. After PFC administration, Fluorine-19 (19F) signal was detected in a similar spatial distribution as signal loss post USPIO. 19F signal quantification revealed that the number of 19F spins was not significantly different at the two time points, suggesting a similar number of TAMs were present in tumors but accumulated in different regions. 19F signal was higher centrally in tumors at 4 days and heterogenous around the periphery at 3 weeks. This study revealed that 19F-based cell tracking methods better represent TAM density and provides additional information not achievable with iron-based methods. PMID:28176853

  16. Single-cell analysis in cancer genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatpour, Assieh; Lai, Shujing; Guo, Guoji; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Genetic changes and environmental differences result in cellular heterogeneity among cancer cells within the same tumor, thereby complicating treatment outcomes. Recent advances in single-cell technologies have opened new avenues to characterize the intra-tumor cellular heterogeneity, identify rare cell types, measure mutation rates, and, ultimately, guide diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review the recent single-cell technological and computational advances at the genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels, and discuss their applications in cancer research. PMID:26450340

  17. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  18. Microfluidic channel for characterizing normal and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    TruongVo, T. N.; Kennedy, R. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, A.; Berndt, A.; Agarwal, M.; Zhu, L.; Nakshatri, H.; Wallace, J.; Na, S.; Yokota, H.; Ryu, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    A microfluidic channel was designed and fabricated for the investigation of behaviors of normal and cancer cells in a narrow channel. A specific question addressed in this study was whether it is possible to distinguish normal versus cancer cells by detecting their stationary and passing behaviors through a narrow channel. We hypothesized that due to higher deformability, softer cancer cells will pass through the channel further and quicker than normal cells. Two cell lines, employed herein, were non-tumor breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A; 11.2  ±  2.4 µm in diameter) and triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231; 12.4  ±  2.1 µm in diameter). The microfluidic channel was 300 µm long and linearly tapered with a width of 30 µm at an inlet to 5 µm at an outlet. The result revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells entered and stuck further toward the outlet than MCF-10A cells in response to a slow flow (2 µl min‑1). Further, in response to a fast flow (5 µl min‑1), the passage time (mean  ±  s.d.) was 26.6  ±  43.9 s for normal cells (N  =  158), and 1.9  ±  1.4 s for cancer cells (N  =  128). The measurement of stiffness by atomic force microscopy as well as model-based predictions pointed out that MDA-MB-231 cells are significantly softer than MCF-10A cells. Collectively, the result in this study suggests that analysis of an individual cell’s behavior through a narrow channel can characterize deformable cancer cells from normal ones, supporting the possibility of enriching circulating tumor cells using novel microfluidics-based analysis.

  19. Proteome-based biomarkers in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Sun; Ann H Rosendahl; Daniel Ansari; Roland Andersson

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, as a highly malignant cancer and the fourth cause of cancer-related death in world, is characterized by dismal prognosis, due to rapid disease progression, highly invasive tumour phenotype, and resistance to chemotherapy. Despite significant advances in treatment of the disease during the past decade,the survival rate is little improved. A contributory factor to the poor outcome is the lack of appropriate sensitive and specific biomarkers for early diagnosis. Furthermore, biomarkers for targeting, directing and assessing therapeutic intervention, as well as for detection of residual or recurrent cancer are also needed. Thus, the identification of adequate biomarkers in pancreatic cancer is of extreme importance. Recently, accompanying the development of proteomic technology and devices, more and more potential biomarkers have appeared and are being reported. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of proteome-based biomarkers in pancreatic cancer, including tissue, serum, juice, urine and cell lines. We also discuss the possible mechanism and prospects in the future. That information hopefully might be helpful for further research in the field.

  20. Stemness & Niche sans Frontiers – The Cancer Stem Cell myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2014-04-01

    malignant and aggressive metastatic phenotype during their period of latency in the bone marrow [5]. Based on these findings, it is pessimistically fascinating to wonder how these cancer stem cells are able to maintain their stemness and tissue characteristic properties inspite of moving across environments where the niche characteristics might be drastically different from their site of origin. Also what is the factor that makes these cancer stem cells different from normal stem cells; is it a component in their cell or is it the niche that moulds itself to the tunes of the cancer stem cell, the charmer. The article by Kasai and colleagues in this issue is an article of high relevance, in which they propose the micro-environment as a ‘cancerous niche’ and they have discussed its role in the formation and maintenance of cancer stem cells based on recent experimental evidence of creating cancer stem cell models from induced pluripotent stem cells. Elaborate researches are warranted to study the nature of the cancer stem cells in conserving their ‘stemness’ and their ability to create a niche even at distant sites different from their tissues/organs of origin to endure their viability and propagation.

  1. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  2. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  3. Novel CD44 receptor targeting multifunctional “nano-eggs” based on double pH-sensitive nanoparticles for co-delivery of curcumin and paclitaxel to cancer cells and cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daquan, E-mail: cdq1981@126.com [Peking University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Health Science Center (China); Wang, Guohua [China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Institute of Chinese Materia Madica (China); Song, Weiguo [Shouguang Fukang Pharmceutial Co., Ltd. (China); Zhang, Qiang, E-mail: zqdodo@bjmu.edu.cn [Peking University, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Health Science Center (China)

    2015-10-15

    Most anticancer drugs cannot kill cancer stem cells (CSCs) effectively, which lead to the failure of anticancer chemotherapy, such as relapse and metastasis. In this study, we prepared a multifunctional oligosaccharides of hyaluronan (oHA) conjugates, oHA-histidine-menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (oHM). The oHM conjugates possess pH-sensitive menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (MGK) as hydrophobic moieties and oHA as the target of CD44 receptor. Anticancer drugs, curcumin(Cur) and paclitaxel(PTX), were loaded into oHM micelles via self-assembly. Then, oHM micelles were mineralized through controlled deposition of inorganic calcium and phosphate ions on the nanoparticular shell via a sequential addition method to fabricate the “nano-eggs.” The formed nano-eggs had a smaller size (120.6 ± 4.5 nm) than oHM micelles (158.6 ± 6.4 nm), indicating that mineralization made the appearance of compact nanoparticles. Interestingly, when the nano-eggs were put into the acidic conditions (pH 6.5), their outer shell(inorganic minerals) will be destroyed with the larger size, while the “nano-eggs” were stable under pH 7.4. For both nano-eggs and oHM micelles, the Cur and PTX were released in a sustained manner depending on the pH of the solution. However, the nano-eggs showed much lower released than the oHM micelles due to the dissolution of the inorganic minerals and pH-sensitive ketal at mildly acidic environments (pH 6.5). In vivo study, the nano-eggs could get to the tumor site more effectively than oHM micelles. CSCs were sorted by a side population assay from MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines over-expressing CD44 receptors. Antitumor activity was also evaluated on MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice. The antitumor efficacy indicated that nano-eggs with co-delivery of Cur and PTX produced the strongest antitumor efficacy, and nano-eggs showed strong activity against cancer stem cells. These double pH-sensitive nano-eggs may provide a promising strategy for drug

  4. An immunosurveillance mechanism controls cancer cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, Laura; Vitale, Ilio; Martins, Isabelle; Tailler, Maximilien; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adjemian, Sandy; Kepp, Oliver; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Shen, Shensi; Mariño, Guillermo; Criollo, Alfredo; Boilève, Alice; Job, Bastien; Ladoire, Sylvain; Ghiringhelli, François; Sistigu, Antonella; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Locher, Clara; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Talbot, Monique; Valent, Alexander; Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Fueyo, Antonio; Messina, Nicole L; Li, Ming; Chan, Christopher J; Sigl, Verena; Pourcher, Guillaume; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Lazar, Vladimir; Penninger, Josef M; Madeo, Frank; López-Otín, Carlos; Smyth, Mark J; Zitvogel, Laurence; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-09-28

    Cancer cells accommodate multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations that initially activate intrinsic (cell-autonomous) and extrinsic (immune-mediated) oncosuppressive mechanisms. Only once these barriers to oncogenesis have been overcome can malignant growth proceed unrestrained. Tetraploidization can contribute to oncogenesis because hyperploid cells are genomically unstable. We report that hyperploid cancer cells become immunogenic because of a constitutive endoplasmic reticulum stress response resulting in the aberrant cell surface exposure of calreticulin. Hyperploid, calreticulin-exposing cancer cells readily proliferated in immunodeficient mice and conserved their increased DNA content. In contrast, hyperploid cells injected into immunocompetent mice generated tumors only after a delay, and such tumors exhibited reduced DNA content, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and calreticulin exposure. Our results unveil an immunosurveillance system that imposes immunoselection against hyperploidy in carcinogen- and oncogene-induced cancers.

  5. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    .... We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic...

  6. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  7. Mast cells and cancer: enemies or allies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyduch, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells are a component of cancer microenvironment the role of which is complex and poorly understood. Mast cells promote cancer growth by stimulation of neoangiogenesis, tissue remodeling and by modulation of the host immune response. The mediators of cancer promotion include protease-activated receptors, mitogen activated protein kinases, prostaglandins and histamine. Histamine may induce tumor proliferation and immunosuppression through H1 and H2 receptors, respectively. The mast cell-derived modulators of immune response include also interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and CD30L. Possibly stimulation of angiogenesis is the most important. Mast cells release potent proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), TNF- α and IL-8, and mast cells' enzymes, like metaloproteinases (MMPs), tryptase and chymase participate in vessels' formation. The anti-cancer actions of mast cells include direct growth inhibition, immunologic stimulation, inhibition of apoptosis and decreased cell mobility; the mediators of these processes include chymase, tryptase, TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. The very same mediators may exert both pro- or anti-cancer effects depending on concentration, presence of cofactors or location of secreting cells. In fact, peri- and intra-tumoral mast cells may have dissimilar effects. Understanding of the role of mast cells in cancer could lead to improved prognostication and development of therapeutic methods targeting the mast cells.

  8. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  10. Cervical cancer cells with positive Sox2 expression exhibit the properties of cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although Sox2 expression has been found in several types of cancer, it has not yet been used to identify or isolate CSCs in somatic carcinoma. METHODS: SiHa and C33A cells stably transfected with a plasmid containing human Sox2 transcriptional elements driving the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP reporter were sorted into the Sox2-positive and the Sox2-negative populations by FACS, and Sox2 expression was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The differentiation, self-renewal and tumor formation abilities, as well as the expression of the stemness and the EMT related genes of the Sox2-positive and the Sox2-negative cervical cancer cells were characterized in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: A pSox2/EGFP system was used to separate the Sox2-positive and the Sox2-negative cells from cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and C33A cells. Compared with the Sox2-negative cells, the Sox2-positive SiHa and C33A cells exhibited greater capacities for self-renewal, differentiation and tumor formation. Furthermore, Sox2-positive SiHa and C33A cells expressed higher levels of stemness-related genes, such as Sox2/Bmi-1/Oct4/ALDH1, and EMT-related genes, such as vimentin/snail/β-catenin. Taken together, all these results indicated that cells expressing endogenous Sox2 are CSCs in cervical carcinomas. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to establish a functional link between endogenous Sox2 expression and CSCs in cervical carcinomas. Additionally, this study demonstrated that it is feasible to develop a tool to isolate CSCs from somatic tumors based on the expression of the endogenous nuclear protein Sox2 instead of cell surface markers.

  11. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-06-27

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells that are responsible for fueling tumor growth. As therapeutic targeting of these tumor stem cells is an intense area of investigation, a concise understanding on how Wnt activity relates to cancer stem cell traits is needed. This review attempts at summarizing the intricacies between Wnt signaling and cancer stem cell biology with a special emphasis on colorectal cancer.

  12. Breast cancer stem cells and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tiffany Marie

    2007-12-01

    The present studies explore the response of breast cancer stem cells (BCSC's) to radiation and the implications for clinical cancer treatment. Current cancer therapy eliminates bulky tumor mass but may fail to eradicate a critical tumor initiating cell population termed "cancer stem cells". These cells are potentially responsible for tumor formation, metastasis, and recurrence. Recently cancer stem cells have been prospectively identified in various malignancies, including breast cancer. The breast cancer stem cell has been identified by the surface markers CD44+/CD24 -(low). In vitro mammosphere cultures allow for the enrichment of the cancer stem cell population and were utilized in order to study differential characteristics of BCSC's. Initial studies found that BCSC's display increased radiation resistance as compared to other non-stem tumor cells. This resistance was accompanied by decreased H2AX phosphorylation, decreased reactive oxygen species formation, and increased phosphorylation of the checkpoint protein Chk1. These studies suggest differential DNA damage and repair within the BCSC population. Studies then examined the consequences of fractionated radiation on the BCSC population and found a two-fold increase in BCSC's following 5 x 3Gy. This observation begins to tie cancer stem cell self-renewal to the clinical stem cell phenomenon of accelerated repopulation. Accelerated repopulation is observed when treatment gaps increase between sequential fractions of radiotherapy and may be due to cancer stem cell symmetric self-renewal. The balance between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division is vital for proper maintenance; deregulation is likely linked to cancer initiation and progression. The developmental Notch-1 pathway was found to regulate BCSC division. Over-expressing the constitutively active Notch-1-ICD in MCF7 cells produced an increase in the BCSC population. Additionally, radiation was observed to increase the expression of the Notch-1

  13. Holoclone forming cells from pancreatic cancer cells enrich tumor initiating cells and represent a novel model for study of cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is one of the direct causes of cancer-related death. High level of chemoresistance is one of the major obstacles of clinical treatment. In recent years, cancer stem cells have been widely identified and indicated as the origin of chemoresistance in multi-types of solid tumors. Increasing evidences suggest that cancer stem cells reside in the cells capable of forming holoclones continuously. However, in pancreatic cancer, holoclone-forming cells have not been characterized yet. Therefore, the goal of our present study was to indentify the holoclone-forming pancreatic cancer stem cells and develop an in vitro continuous colony formation system, which will greatly facilitate the study of pancreatic cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 was submitted to monoclonal cultivation to generate colonies. Based on the morphologies, colonies were classified and analyzed for their capacities of secondary colony formation, long-term survival in vitro, tumor formation in vivo, and drug resistance. Flowcytometry and quantitative RT-PCR were performed to detect the expression level of cancer stem cells associated cell surface markers, regulatory genes and microRNAs in distinct types of colonies. Three types of colonies with distinct morphologies were identified and termed as holo-, mero-, and paraclones, in which only holoclones generated descendant colonies of all three types in further passages. Compared to mero- and paraclones, holoclones possessed higher capacities of long-term survival, tumor initiation, and chemoresistance. The preferential expression of cancer stem cells related marker (CXCR4, regulatory genes (BMI1, GLI1, and GLI2 and microRNAs (miR-214, miR-21, miR-221, miR-222 and miR-155 in holoclones were also highlighted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the pancreatic tumor-initiating cells with high level of chemoresistance were enriched in holoclones

  14. Wnt and the cancer niche: paracrine interactions with gastrointestinal cancer cells undergoing asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M; Ray, Satyajit; Kim, Bo-Kyu; Koizumi, Tomotake; Wiegand, Gordon W; Hari, Danielle; Mullinax, John E; Jaiswal, Kshama R; Garfield, Susan H; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2013-01-01

    Stem-like cancer cells contribute to cancer initiation and maintenance. Stem cells can self-renew by asymmetric cell division (ACD). ACD with non-random chromosomal cosegregation (ACD-NRCC) is one possible self-renewal mechanism. There is a paucity of evidence supporting ACD-NRCC in human cancer. Our aim was to investigate ACD-NRCC and its potential interactions with the cancer niche (microenvironment) in gastrointestinal cancers. We used DNA double and single labeling approaches with FACS to isolate live cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain rare subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. ACD-NRCC was detected preferentially in subpopulations of cells previously suggested to be stem-like/tumor-initiating cancer cells. ACD-NRCC was independent of cell-to-cell contact, and was regulated by the cancer niche in a heat-sensitive paracrine fashion. Wnt pathway genes and proteins are differentially expressed in cells undergoing ACD-NRCC vs. symmetric cell division. Blocking the Wnt pathway with IWP2 (WNT antagonist) or siRNA-TCF4 resulted in suppression of ACD-NRCC. However, using a Wnt-agonist did not increase the relative proportion of cells undergoing ACD-NRCC. Gastrointestinal cancers contain subpopulations of cells capable of ACD-NRCC. Here we show for the first time that ACD-NRCC can be regulated by the Wnt pathway, and by the cancer niche in a paracrine fashion. However, whether ACD-NRCC is exclusively associated with stem-like cancer cells remains to be determined. Further study of these findings might generate novel insights into stem cell and cancer biology. Targeting the mechanism of ACD-NRCC might engender novel approaches for cancer therapy.

  15. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  16. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyamohan P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prashanti Jeyamohan, Takashi Hasumura, Yutaka Nagaoka, Yasuhiko Yoshida, Toru Maekawa, D Sakthi Kumar Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Japan Abstract: The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4 and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0, which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light–heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy. Keywords: cancer, nanotherapy, SWCNTs, targeted drug delivery

  17. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28165047

  18. Relevance of mortalin to cancer cell stemness and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chae-Ok; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Na, Youjin; Lee, Jung-Sun; Ryu, Jihoon; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2017-02-06

    Mortalin/mtHsp70 is a member of Hsp70 family of proteins. Enriched in a large variety of cancers, it has been shown to contribute to the process of carcinogenesis by multiple ways including inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 protein, deregulation of apoptosis and activation of EMT signaling. In this study, we report that upregulation of mortalin contributes to cancer cell stemness. Several cancer cell stemness markers, such as ABCG2, OCT-4, CD133, ALDH1, CD9, MRP1 and connexin were upregulated in mortalin-overexpressing cells that showed higher ability to form spheroids. These cells also showed higher migration, and were less responsive to a variety of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. Of note, knockdown of mortalin by specific shRNA sensitized these cells to all the drugs used in this study. We report that low doses of anti-mortalin molecules, MKT-077 and CAPE, also caused similar sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and hence are potential candidates for effective cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  20. Insights into the field carcinogenesis of ovarian cancer based on the nanocytology of endocervical and endometrial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Damania, Dhwanil; Roy, Hemant K.; Kunte, Dhananja; Hurteau, Jean A.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Krosnjar, Nela; Shah, Maitri; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer fatalities among American women. Although curable at early stages with surgery, most women are diagnosed with symptoms of late-stage metastatic disease. Moreover, none of the current diagnostic techniques are clinically recommended for at-risk women as they preferentially target low-grade tumors (which do not affect longevity) and fail to capture early signatures of more lethal serous tumors which originate in the fimbrae region of the fallopian tubes. Hen...

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  3. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  4. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and preven

  5. Nucleolar function and size in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Derenzini, M; Trerè, D; Pession, A; Montanaro, L; Sirri, V.; Ochs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have have studied the relationship between nucleolar function and size and cell doubling time in cancer cells. Seven human cancer cell lines characterized by different proliferation rates were used. Nucleolar functional activity was evaluated by measuring RNA polymerase I activity and expression of RNA polymerase I upstream binding factor (UBF), DNA topoisomerase I, and fibrillarin, three proteins involved in synthesis and processing of rRNA. Transcriptional activity of RNA polymerase I wa...

  6. Difference in Membrane Repair Capacity Between Cancer Cell Lines and a Normal Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K; Novak, Ivana; McNeil, Paul L; Gehl, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested cancer cell lines (p normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher than in the three tested cancer cell lines (81-88 % viable cells). These data suggest more effective membrane repair in normal, primary cells and supplement previous explanations why electroporation-based therapies and other therapies permeabilizing the plasma membrane are more effective on malignant cells compared to normal cells in cancer treatment.

  7. Developing FGFR4 inhibitors as potential anti-cancer agents via in silico design, supported by in vitro and cell-based testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, H K; Németh, G; Ng, Y R; Pang, E; Szántai-Kis, C; Zsákai, L; Breza, N; Greff, Z; Horváth, Z; Pató, J; Szabadkai, I; Szokol, B; Baska, F; Őrfî, L; Ullrich, A; Kéri, G; Chua, B T

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (FGFR4) is a tyrosine kinase with a range of important physiological functions. However, it is also frequently mutated in various cancers and is now generating significant interest as a potential therapeutic target. Unfortunately, biochemical characterization of its role in disease, and further evaluation as a drug target is hampered by lack of a specific inhibitor. We aimed to discover new inhibitors for FGFR4 ab initio using a strategy combining in silico, in vitro and cell-based assays. We used the homologous FGFR1 to calculate docking scores of a chemically-diverse library of approximately 2000 potential kinase inhibitors. Nineteen potential inhibitors and ten randomly- selected negative controls were taken forward for in vitro FGFR4 kinase assays. All compounds with good docking scores significantly inhibited FGFR4 kinase activity, some with sub-micromolar (most potent being V4-015 with an IC(50) of 0.04 μM). Four of these compounds also demonstrated substantial activity in cellular assays using the FGFR4- overexpressing breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB453. Through immunoblot assays, these compounds were shown to block the phosphorylation of the FGFR4 adaptor protein, FGFR substrate protein-2α (FRS2α). The most potent compound to date, V4-015, suppressed proliferation of MDA-MB453 cells at sub-micromolar concentrations, activated the pro-apoptotic caspases 3/7 and inhibited cellular migration. While achieving complete selectivity of this compound for FGFR4 will require further lead optimization, this study has successfully identified new chemical scaffolds with unprecedented FGFR4 inhibition capacities that will support mechanism of action studies and future anti-cancer drug design.

  8. Guidelines on renal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickisch, G; Carballido, J; Hellsten, S; Schuize, H; Mensink, H

    2001-01-01

    Objectives., On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), Guidelines for Diagnosis, Therapy and. Follow Up of Renal. Cell Carcinoma Patients were established. Criteria for recommendations were evidence based and included aspects of cost-effectiveness and clinical feasibility. Method: A sy

  9. Interdisciplinary evidence-based recommendations for the follow-up of early stage seminomatous testicular germ cell cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hartmann, Michael [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Krege, Susanne [Krankenhaus Maria-Hilf GmbH, Krefeld (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Lorch, Anja [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Mayer, Frank [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Santis, Maria de [KFJ-Spital, ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP and LBI-ACR VIEnna-CTO, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Oncology; Gillessen, Silke [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Beyer, Joerg [Vivantes Klinikum am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Cathomas, Richard [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland). Medical Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To provide guidance regarding follow-up procedures after initial treatment of early stage testicular seminoma (clinical stages (CS) I-II A/B) based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Material: An interdisciplinary, multinational working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists analyzed the published evidence regarding follow-up procedures in various stages of seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular cancers. Focusing on radiooncological aspects, the recommendations contained herein are restricted to early stage seminoma (with radiotherapy being a standard treatment option). In particular, extent, frequency, and duration of imaging at follow-up were analyzed concerning relapse patterns, risk factors, and mode of relapse detection. Results: Active surveillance, adjuvant carboplatin or radiotherapy are equally accepted options for CS I seminoma but they result in different relapse rates and patterns. Usually relapses occur within the first 2(-6) years. Routinely performed follow-up using computerized tomography (CT) after adjuvant treatment yield only low detection rates of recurrences. Therefore, there is no evidence to maintain routine examinations every 3-4 months. After treatment of stage IIA/B, detection rates of relapses or progression identified solely by routinely performed CT during follow-up are low. Conclusion: Considering lifelong cure rates of up to 99% for patients treated for seminoma CS I-IIA/B, the negative impact of unnecessary ionizing radiation exposure has to be considered. The presented recommendations for various follow-up scenarios for early stage seminoma strongly promote the restrictive use of imaging procedures that utilize ionizing radiation (especially CT), due to its potential to induce secondary malignancies. (orig.)

  10. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  11. In Silico Oncology: Quantification of the In Vivo Antitumor Efficacy of Cisplatin-Based Doublet Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) through a Multiscale Mechanistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokotroni, Eleni; Dionysiou, Dimitra; Veith, Christian; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Franz, Astrid; Grgic, Aleksandar; Bohle, Rainer M.; Stamatakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The 5-year survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients can be as low as 1% in advanced stages. For patients with resectable disease, the successful choice of preoperative chemotherapy is critical to eliminate micrometastasis and improve operability. In silico experimentations can suggest the optimal treatment protocol for each patient based on their own multiscale data. A determinant for reliable predictions is the a priori estimation of the drugs’ cytotoxic efficacy on cancer cells for a given treatment. In the present work a mechanistic model of cancer response to treatment is applied for the estimation of a plausible value range of the cell killing efficacy of various cisplatin-based doublet regimens. Among others, the model incorporates the cancer related mechanism of uncontrolled proliferation, population heterogeneity, hypoxia and treatment resistance. The methodology is based on the provision of tumor volumetric data at two time points, before and after or during treatment. It takes into account the effect of tumor microenvironment and cell repopulation on treatment outcome. A thorough sensitivity analysis based on one-factor-at-a-time and latin hypercube sampling/partial rank correlation coefficient approaches has established the volume growth rate and the growth fraction at diagnosis as key features for more accurate estimates. The methodology is applied on the retrospective data of thirteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine, vinorelbine or docetaxel in the neoadjuvant context. The selection of model input values has been guided by a comprehensive literature survey on cancer-specific proliferation kinetics. The latin hypercube sampling has been recruited to compensate for patient-specific uncertainties. Concluding, the present work provides a quantitative framework for the estimation of the in-vivo cell-killing ability of various chemotherapies. Correlation studies of such estimates with

  12. [Circulating tumor cells and prostate cancer prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoun, Otakar; Soukup, Viktor; Mikulová, Veronika; Jančíková, Markéta; Honová, Hana; Kološtová, Katarína; Zima, Tomáš; Hanuš, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common malignant disease in men. Prognosis of patients with metastatic PC is generally unfavourable; however there are significant differences in survival at this stage of the disease. The definition of prognosis is essential for the selection of therapy, respecting an individual risk. In recent years, the association between circulating tumor cells (CTC) detection and response to PC treatment has been widely investigated. Detection of CTC is based on a metastatic process theory and uses well-known tumor-specific antigens on the cell surface. Individual methods assess CTC with different sensitivity and are not yet efficient at the localised PC stage. Only the method of immunomagnetic separation and semi-automatic visualisation (CellSearchTM) has been validated and approved for the use in the PC management. Assessment of the CTC count directly correlates with the prognosis of patients with castration-resistant PC. Change in the CTC count during the therapy also considerably improves risk estimation and represents a marker of overall survival. New methods of CTC cultivation and gene profiling may contribute to individualisation of the treatment similarly to breast cancer. The authors present a review article about theory, methods of detection and clinical use of CTC in castration-resistant PC.

  13. Human cancer cell line based approach of 1,3,4-thiadiazole and its fused ring: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Vinit; Rai, Amit; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-10-13

    The chemistry of heterocyclic containing, 1,3,4-thiadiazole has been an interesting field of study from ancient years. Subsequently, 1,3,4-thiadiazole nucleus constitutes a significant class of compounds for new drug development. Recently, various 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated their biological activities including antimicrobial, antituberculosis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsants, antidepressant and anxiolytic, antihypertensive, anticancer and antifungal activity. The search for anticancer compounds with more selective activity and lower side effect continue to be an active area of argument examination in medicinal chemistry. This review is elaborately described the medicinal chemistry, their structural activity relationship and anticancer properties with respect to human cell line based approach related to synthesized 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives.

  14. A bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system based on a microfluidic co-culture model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Peng-Fei; Cao, Yan-wei; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Xiao-guang; Shi, Hao-qing; Hu, Ke-yao; Zhu, Guan-qun; Ma, Bo; Niu, Hai-Tao

    2015-01-01

    A tumor microenvironment may promote tumor metastasis and progression through the dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and stromal cells. In this work, the most representative and significant stromal cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages were used as vital component elements and combined with bladder cancer cells to construct a bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system. This is the first report to explore bladder cancer microenvironments based on 4 types of cell...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of siRNA-Based Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Chen, Zhihang; Mori, Noriko; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is routinely used as a biological tool to silence specific genes, and is under active investigation in cancer treatment strategies. Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides the ability to assess the functional effects of siRNA-mediated gene silencing in cultured cancer cells, and following nanoparticle-based delivery in tumors in vivo. Here we describe the use of siRNA to downregulate choline kinase, a critical enzyme in choline phospholipid metabolism of cancer cells and tumors, and the use of 1H MRS of cells and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of tumors to assess the efficacy of the downregulation. PMID:26530913

  16. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  17. Stem cell concepts renew cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, John E

    2008-12-15

    Although uncontrolled proliferation is a distinguishing property of a tumor as a whole, the individual cells that make up the tumor exhibit considerable variation in many properties, including morphology, proliferation kinetics, and the ability to initiate tumor growth in transplant assays. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in the design of therapeutic strategies. The mechanistic basis of tumor heterogeneity has been uncertain; however, there is now strong evidence that cancer is a cellular hierarchy with cancer stem cells at the apex. This review provides a historical overview of the influence of hematology on the development of stem cell concepts and their linkage to cancer.

  18. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  19. Metformin induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role and mechanism of mefformin in inducing apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS: The human pancreatic cancer cell lines ASPC-1, BxPc-3, PANC-1 and SW1990 were exposed to mefformin. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation via apoptosis induction and S phase arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines of mefformin was tested.RESULTS: In each pancreatic cancer cell line tested, metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner in MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assays). Flow cytometric analysis showed that metformin reduced the number of cells in G1 and increased the percentage of cells in S phase as well as the apoptotic fraction. Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (EUSA) showed that metformin induced apaptosis in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In Western blot studies, metformin induced oly-ADP-ribose polymerase(PARP) cleavage (an indicator of aspase activation) in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. The general caspase inhibitor (VAD-fmk) completely abolished metformin-induced PARP cleavage and apoptosis in ASPC-1 BxPc-3 and PANC-1, the caspase-8 specific inhibitor (IETD-fmk) and the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (LEHD-fmk) only partially abrogated metformin-induced apoptosis and PARP cleavage in BxPc-3 and PANC-1 cells. We also observed that metformin treatment ramatically reduced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase (P-MAPK) in both a time- and dose-dependent manner in all cell lines tested.CONCLUSION: Metformin significantly inhibits cell proliferation and apoptosis in all pancreatic cell lines. And the metformin-induced apoptosis is associated with PARP leavage, activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hence, both caspase-8 and -9-initiated apoptotic signaling pathways contribute to metforrnin-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cell lines.

  20. Renal-cell carcinoma risk estimates based on participants in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial and national lung screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Yair; Karam, Jose A; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Gupta, Amit; Roupret, Morgan; Bensalah, Karim; Margulis, Vitaly

    2016-04-01

    Current knowledge regarding risk of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) is based on meta-analyses of case-control studies. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial and National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) provide robust prospective databases with clinical information and rates of cancer development. PLCO and NLST were used to identify risk factors for RCC. Data were extracted from PLCO and NLST to stratify risk of RCC by sex, race, age at inclusion, obesity, and smoking status. Incidence rates between groups were compared using the chi-square test. We excluded urothelial carcinomas. Overall, 701/154,118 and 190/53,242 RCCs were detected in PLCO and NLST, respectively. Incidence rates were higher in men (PLCO: 0.56 vs. 0.28/1000 person y, NLST: 0.73 vs. 0.35/1000 person y; both with P60 years, obesity, and intensity of smoking were associated with higher risk of developing RCC. In the NLST, sex and morbid obesity increased the risk for RCC but age, ethnicity, and smoking intensity were not predictors. There was no effect of screening for other cancers on detection of RCC. High-grade (grades ≥3) RCCs were diagnosed in 145 (20.7%) and 60 (31.6%) in the PLCO and NLST. In PLCO, age (60-64y), male sex, obesity, and current smokers with>50 pack years were at increased risk for high-grade RCC. In NLST, only male sex was an independent predictor of high-grade RCC. Age over 60 years, male sex, smoking intensity, and obesity affect the risk of RCC. Identification of a high-risk population may allow a pilot study of rational screening for RCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Interconnectedness of Cancer Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The elegance of fundamental and applied research activities have begun to reveal a myriad of spatial and temporal alterations in downstream signaling networks affected by cell surface receptor stimulation including G protein– coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Interconnected biochemical pathways serve to integrate and distribute the signaling information throughout the cell by orchestration of complex biochemical circuits consisting of protein interactions and covalent modification processes. It is clear that scientific literature summarizing results from both fundamental and applied scientific research activities has served to provide a broad foundational biologic data-base that has been instrumental in advancing our continued understanding of underlying cancer biology. This article reflects on historical advances and the role of innovation in the competitive world of grant-sponsored research.

  2. 基于纳米粒子的光学细胞传感器在癌细胞研究中的应用%Application of Nanoparticles-based Optical Cell Biosensor in the Research of Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锦慧; 杨培慧; 蔡继业

    2011-01-01

    Optical biosensors based on different optical phenomena have been used widely over the past decade to analyse biomolecular interactions. With the advent of the nanoparticle technology, the probing of individual living cells, and the measuring of chemical species in specific locations within the cell for living cell sensing have become possible. Optical biosensors based on nanoparticles offer high sensitivity, specificity and rapid detection in the study of cancer cell or biomarker. In this paper, the applications of nanoparticles-based optical biosensor for the specific identification of molecules on the cell membrane surface for the study of cancer cells, the research of enzyme molecule in cancer cells and intracellular and the reactive oxygen, glutathione and physiological pH value in the smallest environment are reviewed. The prospect of this novel technique is also discussed.%作为一种极为灵敏、快速的新型生物检测技术,光学细胞传感器在生物医学领域的研究应用备受关注,成为当今生物分析化学领域的研究前沿和热点.它是以细胞作为传感元件来研究信号识别、传导和指示的过程,在毒性物质、病原体等外界条件作用下,研究细胞中活性分子及其生理条件的变化,通过光学信号的变化定量分析细胞膜表面分子、胞内酶分子及微环境中活性氧、谷胱甘肽、pH值等的变化,从而获取细胞功能性信息,这对疾病的诊断和治疗具有重要的指导意义.该文主要介绍以纳米粒子作为光学探针的光学细胞传感器在癌细胞研究中的最新进展.

  3. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Natural Killer Cell Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Jesus I; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Murphy, William J; Canter, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Standard cytoreductive cancer therapy, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are frequently resisted by a small portion of cancer cells with 'stem-cell' like properties including quiescence and repopulation. Immunotherapy represents a breakthrough modality for improving oncologic outcomes in cancer patients. Since the success of immunotherapy is not contingent on target cell proliferation, it may also be uniquely suited to address the problem of resistance and repopulation exerted by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Areas covered: Natural killer (NK) cells have long been known for their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells, and there are increasing data demonstrating that NK cells can selectively identify and lyse CSCs. The authors review the current knowledge of CSCs and NK cells and highlight recent studies that support the concept that NK cells are capable of targeting CSC in solid tumors, especially in the context of combination therapy simultaneously targeting non-CSCs and CSCs. Expert opinion: Unlike cytotoxic cancer treatments, NK cells can target and eliminate quiescent/non-proliferating cells such as CSCs, and these enigmatic cells are an important source of relapse and metastasis. NK targeting of CSCs represents a novel and potentially high impact method to capitalize on the intrinsic therapeutic potential of NK cells.

  4. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Induction of cancer cell stemness by chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingwang; Ghisolfi, Laura; Keates, Andrew C; Zhang, Jian; Xiang, Shuanglin; Lee, Dong-ki; Li, Chiang J

    2012-07-15

    Recent studies indicate that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in most hematological and solid tumors. CSCs are characterized by their ability to self-renew and their capacity to differentiate into the multitude of cells that comprise the tumor mass. Moreover, these cells have been shown to be intrinsically resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Despite their fundamental role in cancer pathogenesis, the cellular origin of CSCs remains highly controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether heterogeneous cancer cells can acquire stem cell-like properties in response to chemotherapy. We demonstrate that carboplatin can induce the self-renewal (spherogenesis) and pluripotency (Sox2 and Oct3/4 expression) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells grown under stem cell culture conditions. Moreover, we show that non-CSC cells, obtained by side population flow cytometric sorting using Hoechst 33342, can acquire stem-like properties after exposure to carboplatin. Finally, we show that knockdown of Sox2 and Oct3/4 gene expression in HCC cells can reduce carboplatin-mediated increases in s