WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer cell metabolism

  1. Cancer Cell Metabolism: One Hallmark, Many Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Cantor, Jason R.; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells must rewire cellular metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and proliferation. Although many of the metabolic alterations are largely similar to those in normal proliferating cells, they are aberrantly driven in cancer by a combination of genetic lesions and nongenetic factors such as the tumor microenvironment. However, a single model of altered tumor metabolism does not describe the sum of metabolic changes that can support cell growth. Instead, the diversity of such chang...

  2. Cancer cell metabolism: one hallmark, many faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Jason R; Sabatini, David M

    2012-10-01

    Cancer cells must rewire cellular metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and proliferation. Although many of the metabolic alterations are largely similar to those in normal proliferating cells, they are aberrantly driven in cancer by a combination of genetic lesions and nongenetic factors such as the tumor microenvironment. However, a single model of altered tumor metabolism does not describe the sum of metabolic changes that can support cell growth. Instead, the diversity of such changes within the metabolic program of a cancer cell can dictate by what means proliferative rewiring is driven, and can also impart heterogeneity in the metabolic dependencies of the cell. A better understanding of this heterogeneity may enable the development and optimization of therapeutic strategies that target tumor metabolism.

  3. Actionable Metabolic Pathways in Heart Failure and Cancer—Lessons From Cancer Cell Metabolism

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    Anja Karlstaedt

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in cancer cell metabolism provide unprecedented opportunities for a new understanding of heart metabolism and may offer new approaches for the treatment of heart failure. Key questions driving the cancer field to understand how tumor cells reprogram metabolism and to benefit tumorigenesis are also applicable to the heart. Recent experimental and conceptual advances in cancer cell metabolism provide the cardiovascular field with the unique opportunity to target metabolism. This review compares cancer cell metabolism and cardiac metabolism with an emphasis on strategies of cellular adaptation, and how to exploit metabolic changes for therapeutic benefit.

  4. From gametogenesis and stem cells to cancer: common metabolic themes.

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    Pereira, Sandro L; Rodrigues, Ana Sofia; Sousa, Maria Inês; Correia, Marcelo; Perestrelo, Tânia; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-01-01

    Both pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and cancer cells have been described as having similar metabolic pathways, most notably a penchant for favoring glycolysis even under aerobiosis, suggesting common themes that might be explored for both stem cell differentiation and anti-oncogenic purposes. A search of the scientific literature available in the PubMed/Medline was conducted for studies on metabolism and mitochondrial function related to gametogenesis, early development, stem cells and cancers in the reproductive system, notably breast, prostate, ovarian and testicular cancers. Both PSCs and some types of cancer cells, particularly reproductive cancers, were found to obtain energy mostly by glycolysis, often reducing mitochondrial activity and oxidative phosphorylation. This strategy links proliferating cells, allowing for the biosynthesis reactions necessary for cell division. Interventions that affect metabolic pathways, and force cells to change their preferences, can lead to shifts in cell status, increasing either pluripotency or differentiation of stem cells, and causing cancer cells to become more or less aggressive. Interestingly metabolic changes in many cases seemed to lead to cell transformation, not necessarily follow it, suggesting a direct role of metabolic choices in influencing the (epi)genetic program of different cell types. There are uncanny similarities between PSCs and cancer cells at the metabolic level. Furthermore, metabolism may also play a direct role in cell status and targeting metabolic pathways could therefore be a promising strategy for both the control of cancer cell proliferation and the regulation of stem cell physiology, in terms of manipulating stem cells toward relevant phenotypes that may be important for tissue engineering, or making cancer cells become less tumorigenic. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For

  5. B-Cell Metabolic Remodeling and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Grusdat, Melanie; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Cells of the immune system display varying metabolic profiles to fulfill their functions. B lymphocytes overcome fluctuating energy challenges as they transition from the resting state and recirculation to activation, rapid proliferation, and massive antibody production. Only through a controlled...

  6. Metabolic cooperation between cancer and non-cancerous stromal cells is pivotal in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Coelho, Filipa; Gouveia-Fernandes, Sofia; Serpa, Jacinta

    2018-02-01

    The way cancer cells adapt to microenvironment is crucial for the success of carcinogenesis, and metabolic fitness is essential for a cancer cell to survive and proliferate in a certain organ/tissue. The metabolic remodeling in a tumor niche is endured not only by cancer cells but also by non-cancerous cells that share the same microenvironment. For this reason, tumor cells and stromal cells constitute a complex network of signal and organic compound transfer that supports cellular viability and proliferation. The intensive dual-address cooperation of all components of a tumor sustains disease progression and metastasis. Herein, we will detail the role of cancer-associated fibroblasts, cancer-associated adipocytes, and inflammatory cells, mainly monocytes/macrophages (tumor-associated macrophages), in the remodeling and metabolic adaptation of tumors.

  7. Metabolic Plasticity of Stem Cells and Macrophages in Cancer

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    Jelena Krstic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In addition to providing essential molecules for the overall function of cells, metabolism plays an important role in cell fate and can be affected by microenvironmental stimuli as well as cellular interactions. As a specific niche, tumor microenvironment (TME, consisting of different cell types including stromal/stem cells and immune cells, is characterized by distinct metabolic properties. This review will be focused on the metabolic plasticity of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC and macrophages in TME, as well as on how the metabolic state of cancer stem cells (CSC, as key drivers of oncogenesis, affects their generation and persistence. Namely, heterogenic metabolic phenotypes of these cell populations, which include various levels of dependence on glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation are closely linked to their complex roles in cancer progression. Besides well-known extrinsic factors, such as cytokines and growth factors, the differentiation and activation states of CSC, MSC, and macrophages are coordinated by metabolic reprogramming in TME. The significance of mutual metabolic interaction between tumor stroma and cancer cells in the immune evasion and persistence of CSC is currently under investigation.

  8. Metabolism during ECM Detachment: Achilles Heel of Cancer Cells?

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    Mason, Joshua A; Hagel, Kimberly R; Hawk, Mark A; Schafer, Zachary T

    2017-07-01

    Integrin-mediated attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is required to combat the induction of programmed cell death in a variety of distinct cell types. If cells fail to maintain proper ECM attachment, they become subject to elimination via an apoptotic cell death program known as anoikis. However, anoikis inhibition is not sufficient to promote the long-term survival of ECM-detached cells. Several recent studies have unveiled the profound (anoikis-independent) impact of cell metabolism on the viability of ECM-detached cells. Thus, we posit that, during metastatic dissemination (when cancer cells are exposed to periods of ECM detachment), cancer cells must alter their metabolism in a fashion that promotes survival and ultimately contributes to metastatic outgrowth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism.

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    Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Achreja, Abhinav; Bernard, Vincent; Moss, Tyler; Marini, Juan C; Tudawe, Thavisha; Seviour, Elena G; San Lucas, F Anthony; Alvarez, Hector; Gupta, Sonal; Maiti, Sourindra N; Cooper, Laurence; Peehl, Donna; Ram, Prahlad T; Maitra, Anirban; Nagrath, Deepak

    2016-02-27

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate that exosomes secreted by patient-derived CAFs can strikingly reprogram the metabolic machinery following their uptake by cancer cells. We find that CAF-derived exosomes (CDEs) inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby increasing glycolysis and glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation in cancer cells. Through 13C-labeled isotope labeling experiments we elucidate that exosomes supply amino acids to nutrient-deprived cancer cells in a mechanism similar to macropinocytosis, albeit without the previously described dependence on oncogenic-Kras signaling. Using intra-exosomal metabolomics, we provide compelling evidence that CDEs contain intact metabolites, including amino acids, lipids, and TCA-cycle intermediates that are avidly utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promoting tumor growth under nutrient deprivation or nutrient stressed conditions.

  10. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyun; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Achreja, Abhinav; Bernard, Vincent; Moss, Tyler; Marini, Juan C; Tudawe, Thavisha; Seviour, Elena G; San Lucas, F Anthony; Alvarez, Hector; Gupta, Sonal; Maiti, Sourindra N; Cooper, Laurence; Peehl, Donna; Ram, Prahlad T; Maitra, Anirban; Nagrath, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate that exosomes secreted by patient-derived CAFs can strikingly reprogram the metabolic machinery following their uptake by cancer cells. We find that CAF-derived exosomes (CDEs) inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, thereby increasing glycolysis and glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation in cancer cells. Through 13C-labeled isotope labeling experiments we elucidate that exosomes supply amino acids to nutrient-deprived cancer cells in a mechanism similar to macropinocytosis, albeit without the previously described dependence on oncogenic-Kras signaling. Using intra-exosomal metabolomics, we provide compelling evidence that CDEs contain intact metabolites, including amino acids, lipids, and TCA-cycle intermediates that are avidly utilized by cancer cells for central carbon metabolism and promoting tumor growth under nutrient deprivation or nutrient stressed conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10250.001 PMID:26920219

  11. Influence of the Tumor Microenvironment on Cancer Cells Metabolic Reprogramming

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    Victoire Gouirand

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As with castles, tumor cells are fortified by surrounding non-malignant cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts, immune cells, but also nerve fibers and extracellular matrix. In most cancers, this fortification creates a considerable solid pressure which limits oxygen and nutrient delivery to the tumor cells and causes a hypoxic and nutritional stress. Consequently, tumor cells have to adapt their metabolism to survive and proliferate in this harsh microenvironment. To satisfy their need in energy and biomass, tumor cells develop new capacities to benefit from metabolites of the microenvironment, either by their uptake through the macropinocytosis process or through metabolite transporters, or by a cross-talk with stromal cells and capture of extracellular vesicles that are released by the neighboring cells. However, the microenvironments of primary tumor and metastatic niches differ tremendously in their cellular/acellular components and available nutrients. Therefore, cancer cells must develop a metabolic flexibility conferring on them the ability to satisfy their biomass and energetic demands at both primary and metastasis sites. In this review, we propose a brief overview of how proliferating cancer cells take advantage of their surrounding microenvironment to satisfy their high metabolic demand at both primary and metastasis sites.

  12. Natural Compounds as Regulators of the Cancer Cell Metabolism

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    Claudia Cerella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though altered metabolism is an “old” physiological mechanism, only recently its targeting became a therapeutically interesting strategy and by now it is considered an emerging hallmark of cancer. Nevertheless, a very poor number of compounds are under investigation as potential modulators of cell metabolism. Candidate agents should display selectivity of action towards cancer cells without side effects. This ideal favorable profile would perfectly overlap the requisites of new anticancer therapies and chemopreventive strategies as well. Nature represents a still largely unexplored source of bioactive molecules with a therapeutic potential. Many of these compounds have already been characterized for their multiple anticancer activities. Many of them are absorbed with the diet and therefore possess a known profile in terms of tolerability and bioavailability compared to newly synthetized chemical compounds. The discovery of important cross-talks between mediators of the most therapeutically targeted aberrancies in cancer (i.e., cell proliferation, survival, and migration and the metabolic machinery allows to predict the possibility that many anticancer activities ascribed to a number of natural compounds may be due, in part, to their ability of modulating metabolic pathways. In this review, we attempt an overview of what is currently known about the potential of natural compounds as modulators of cancer cell metabolism.

  13. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

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    Tim A D Smith

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined.MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography.Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U]glucose.This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism.

  14. Metabolic reprogramming in the tumour microenvironment: a hallmark shared by cancer cells and T lymphocytes.

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    Allison, Katrina E; Coomber, Brenda L; Bridle, Byram W

    2017-10-01

    Altered metabolism is a hallmark of cancers, including shifting oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and up-regulating glutaminolysis to divert carbon sources into biosynthetic pathways that promote proliferation and survival. Therefore, metabolic inhibitors represent promising anti-cancer drugs. However, T cells must rapidly divide and survive in harsh microenvironments to mediate anti-cancer effects. Metabolic profiles of cancer cells and activated T lymphocytes are similar, raising the risk of metabolic inhibitors impairing the immune system. Immune checkpoint blockade provides an example of how metabolism can be differentially impacted to impair cancer cells but support T cells. Implications for research with metabolic inhibitors are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Targeting lipid metabolism of cancer cells: A promising therapeutic strategy for cancer.

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    Liu, Qiuping; Luo, Qing; Halim, Alexander; Song, Guanbin

    2017-08-10

    One of the most important metabolic hallmarks of cancer cells is deregulation of lipid metabolism. In addition, enhancing de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis, increasing lipid uptake and lipolysis have also been considered as means of FA acquisition in cancer cells. FAs are involved in various aspects of tumourigenesis and tumour progression. Therefore, targeting lipid metabolism is a promising therapeutic strategy for human cancer. Recent studies have shown that reprogramming lipid metabolism plays important roles in providing energy, macromolecules for membrane synthesis, and lipid signals during cancer progression. Moreover, accumulation of lipid droplets in cancer cells acts as a pivotal adaptive response to harmful conditions. Here, we provide a brief review of the crucial roles of FA metabolism in cancer development, and place emphasis on FA origin, utilization and storage in cancer cells. Understanding the regulation of lipid metabolism in cancer cells has important implications for exploring a new therapeutic strategy for management and treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered metabolism in cancer

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    Locasale Jason W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements from their normal counterparts. Understanding the consequences of this differential metabolism requires a detailed understanding of glucose metabolism and its relation to energy production in cancer cells. A recent study in BMC Systems Biology by Vasquez et al. developed a mathematical model to assess some features of this altered metabolism. Here, we take a broader look at the regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells, considering their anabolic as well as catabolic needs. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/4/58/

  17. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier function determines cell stemness and metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells

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    Li, Xiaoran; Kan, Quancheng; Fan, Zhirui; Li, Yaqing; Ji, Yasai; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Mingzhi; Grigalavicius, Mantas; Berge, Viktor; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; M. Nesland, Jahn; Suo, Zhenhe

    2017-01-01

    One of the remarkable features of cancer cells is aerobic glycolysis, a phenomenon known as the “Warburg Effect”, in which cells rely preferentially on glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) as the main energy source even in the presence of high oxygen tension. Cells with dysfunctional mitochondria are unable to generate sufficient ATP from mitochondrial OXPHOS, and then are forced to rely on glycolysis for ATP generation. Here we report our results in a prostate cancer cell line in which the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) gene was knockout. It was discovered that the MPC1 gene knockout cells revealed a metabolism reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis with reduced ATP production, and the cells became more migratory and resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In addition, the MPC1 knockout cells expressed significantly higher levels of the stemness markers Nanog, Hif1α, Notch1, CD44 and ALDH. To further verify the correlation of MPC gene function and cell stemness/metabolic reprogramming, MPC inhibitor UK5099 was applied in two ovarian cancer cell lines and similar results were obtained. Taken together, our results reveal that functional MPC may determine the fate of metabolic program and the stemness status of cancer cells in vitro. PMID:28624784

  18. Oral cancer cells may rewire alternative metabolic pathways to survive from siRNA silencing of metabolic enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Min; Chai, Yang D; Brumbaugh, Jeffrey; Liu, Xiaojun; Rabii, Ramin; Feng, Sizhe; Misuno, Kaori; Messadi, Diana; Hu, Shen

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells may undergo metabolic adaptations that support their growth as well as drug resistance properties. The purpose of this study is to test if oral cancer cells can overcome the metabolic defects introduced by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knock down their expression of important metabolic enzymes. UM1 and UM2 oral cancer cells were transfected with siRNA to transketolase (TKT) or siRNA to adenylate kinase (AK2), and Western blotting was used to confirm the knockdown. Cellular uptake of glucose and glutamine and production of lactate were compared between the cancer cells with either TKT or AK2 knockdown and those transfected with control siRNA. Statistical analysis was performed with student T-test. Despite the defect in the pentose phosphate pathway caused by siRNA knockdown of TKT, the survived UM1 or UM2 cells utilized more glucose and glutamine and secreted a significantly higher amount of lactate than the cells transferred with control siRNA. We also demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of AK2 constrained the proliferation of UM1 and UM2 cells but similarly led to an increased uptake of glucose/glutamine and production of lactate by the UM1 or UM2 cells survived from siRNA silencing of AK2. Our results indicate that the metabolic defects introduced by siRNA silencing of metabolic enzymes TKT or AK2 may be compensated by alternative feedback metabolic mechanisms, suggesting that cancer cells may overcome single defective pathways through secondary metabolic network adaptations. The highly robust nature of oral cancer cell metabolism implies that a systematic medical approach targeting multiple metabolic pathways may be needed to accomplish the continued improvement of cancer treatment

  19. Metabolic characterization of invaded cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC?1

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Imai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that about 0.4% of cells in the cultured human pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC?1, can invade matrigel during the transwell invasion assay, suggesting that these invaded PANC?1 cells may have specific characteristics to keep their invasive potential. To identify the metabolic characterization specific in the invaded PANC?1 cells, metabolome analysis of the invaded PANC?1 compared with the whole cultured PANC?1 was performed using CE?TOFMS, and concentrations of 110 met...

  20. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines...... based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted...... for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies....

  1. Metabolic characterization of invaded cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Imai, Takashi

    2017-05-01

    We previously reported that about 0.4% of cells in the cultured human pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1, can invade matrigel during the transwell invasion assay, suggesting that these invaded PANC-1 cells may have specific characteristics to keep their invasive potential. To identify the metabolic characterization specific in the invaded PANC-1 cells, metabolome analysis of the invaded PANC-1 compared with the whole cultured PANC-1 was performed using CE-TOFMS, and concentrations of 110 metabolites were measured. In contrast to the whole cultured cells, the invaded PANC-1 was characterized as a population with reduced levels of amino acids and TCA cycle intermediates, and decreased and increased intermediates in glycolysis and nucleic acid metabolism. In particular, the ratio of both adenosine and guanosine energy charge was reduced in the invaded cells, revealing that the consumption of ATP and GTP was high in the invaded cells, and thus suggesting that ATP- or GTP-generating pathways are stimulated. In addition, the GSH/GSSG ratio was low in the invaded cells, but these cells had a higher surviving fraction after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, the invaded cells were the population resistant to oxidative stress. Furthermore, reduction in intracellular GSH content inhibited PANC-1 invasiveness, indicated that GSH has an important role in PANC-1 invasiveness. Overall, we propose the invaded cells have several unique metabolic profiles. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. Metabolic enzymes: key modulators of functionality in cancer stem-like cells.

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    Dong, Bo-Wen; Qin, Guang-Ming; Luo, Yan; Mao, Jian-Shan

    2017-02-21

    Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with self-renewal capacity and are important for the initiation, progression and recurrence of cancer diseases. The metabolic profile of CSCs is consistent with their stem-like properties. Studies have indicated that enzymes, the main regulators of cellular metabolism, dictate functionalities of CSCs in both catalysis-dependent and catalysis-independent manners. This paper reviews diverse studies of metabolic enzymes, and describes the effects of these enzymes on metabolic adaptation, gene transcription and signal transduction, in CSCs.

  3. Investigation of the selenium metabolism in cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Stürup, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different selenium species for their ability to induce cell death in different cancer cell lines, while investigating the underlying chemistry by speciation analysis. A prostate cancer cell line (PC-3), a colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and a leukaemia cell line...... (Jurkat E6-1) were incubated with five selenium compounds representing inorganic as well as organic Se compounds in different oxidation states. Selenomethionine (SeMet), Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), methylseleninic acid (MeSeA), selenite and selenate in the concentration range 5-100 mu M were...... incubated with cells for 24 h and the induction of cell death was measured using flow cytometry. The amounts of total selenium in cell medium, cell lysate and the insoluble fractions was determined by ICP-MS. Speciation analysis of cellular fractions was performed by reversed phase, anion exchange and size...

  4. Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analogs inhibit breast cancer cell energy metabolism and promote cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Jacek; McAllister, Donna M; Mackinnon, A Craig Jr; Joseph, Joy; Dwinell, Michael B; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetic metabolism is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy. Key to successful implementation of this chemotherapeutic strategy is the use of new and improved mitochondria-targeted cationic agents that selectively inhibit energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, while exerting little or no long-term cytotoxic effect in normal cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and alterations in bioenergetic metabolism induced by mitochondria-targeted vitamin E analog (Mito-chromanol, Mito-ChM) and its acetylated ester analog (Mito-ChMAc). Assays of cell death, colony formation, mitochondrial bioenergetic function, intracellular ATP levels, intracellular and tissue concentrations of tested compounds, and in vivo tumor growth were performed. Both Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc selectively depleted intracellular ATP and caused prolonged inhibition of ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate in breast cancer cells, but not in non-cancerous cells. These effects were significantly augmented by inhibition of glycolysis. Mito-ChM and Mito-ChMAc exhibited anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in several breast cancer cells with different genetic background. Furthermore, Mito-ChM selectively accumulated in tumor tissue and inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human breast cancer. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted small molecular weight chromanols exhibit selective anti-proliferative effects and cytotoxicity in multiple breast cancer cells, and that esterification of the hydroxyl group in mito-chromanols is not a critical requirement for its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effect

  5. Metabolic cooperation between co-cultured lung cancer cells and lung fibroblasts.

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    Koukourakis, Michael I; Kalamida, Dimitra; Mitrakas, Achilleas G; Liousia, Maria; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Sivridis, Efthimios; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    Cooperation of cancer cells with stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), has been revealed as a mechanism sustaining cancer cell survival and growth. In the current study, we focus on the metabolic interactions of MRC5 lung fibroblasts with lung cancer cells (A549 and H1299) using co-culture experiments and studying changes of the metabolic protein expression profile and of their growth and migration abilities. Using western blotting, confocal microscopy and RT-PCR, we observed that in co-cultures MRC5 respond by upregulating pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1. In contrast, cancer cells increase the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT1), LDH5, PDH kinase and the levels of phosphorylated/inactivated pPDH. H1299 cells growing in the same culture medium with fibroblasts exhibit a 'metastasis-like' phenomenon by forming nests within the fibroblast area. LDH5 and pPDH were drastically upregulated in these nests. The growth rate of both MRC5 and cancer cells increased in co-cultures. Suppression of LDHA or PDK1 in cancer cells abrogates the stimulatory signal from cancer cells to fibroblasts. Incubation of MRC5 fibroblasts with lactate resulted in an increase of LDHB and of PDH expression. Silencing of PDH gene in fibroblasts, or silencing of PDK1 or LDHA gene in tumor cells, impedes cancer cell's migration ability. Overall, a metabolic cooperation between lung cancer cells and fibroblasts has been confirmed in the context of direct Warburg effect, thus the fibroblasts reinforce aerobic metabolism to support the intensified anaerobic glycolytic pathways exploited by cancer cells.

  6. Rewiring carbohydrate catabolism differentially affects survival of pancreatic cancer cell lines with diverse metabolic profiles

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    Tataranni, Tiziana; Agriesti, Francesca; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Scrima, Rosella; Pazienza, Valerio; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Piccoli, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that targeting cellular metabolism represents a promising effective approach to treat pancreatic cancer, overcome chemoresistance and ameliorate patient's prognosis and survival. In this study, following whole-genome expression analysis, we selected two pancreatic cancer cell lines, PANC-1 and BXPC-3, hallmarked by distinct metabolic profiles with specific concern to carbohydrate metabolism. Functional comparative analysis showed that BXPC-3 displayed a marked deficit of the mitochondrial respiratory and oxidative phosphorylation activity and a higher production of reactive oxygen species and a reduced NAD+/NADH ratio, indicating their bioenergetic reliance on glycolysis and a different redox homeostasis as compared to PANC-1. Both cell lines were challenged to rewire their metabolism by substituting glucose with galactose as carbon source, a condition inhibiting the glycolytic flux and fostering full oxidation of the sugar carbons. The obtained data strikingly show that the mitochondrial respiration-impaired-BXPC-3 cell line was unable to sustain the metabolic adaptation required by glucose deprivation/substitution, thereby resulting in a G2\\M cell cycle shift, unbalance of the redox homeostasis, apoptosis induction. Conversely, the mitochondrial respiration-competent-PANC-1 cell line did not show clear evidence of cell sufferance. Our findings provide a strong rationale to candidate metabolism as a promising target for cancer therapy. Defining the metabolic features at time of pancreatic cancer diagnosis and likely of other tumors, appears to be crucial to predict the responsiveness to therapeutic approaches or coadjuvant interventions affecting metabolism. PMID:28476035

  7. Metabolic Plasticity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells: Adaptation to Changes in the Microenvironment

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    Rui V. Simões

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 13C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells, leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1 provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2 lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism.

  8. Mapping cancer cell metabolism with 13 C flux analysis: Recent progress and future challenges

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    Casey Scott Duckwall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reprogramming of energy metabolism is emerging as an important molecular hallmark of cancer cells. Recent discoveries linking specific metabolic alterations to cancer development have strengthened the idea that altered metabolism is more than a side effect of malignant transformation, but may in fact be a functional driver of tumor growth and progression in some cancers. As a result, dysregulated metabolic pathways have become attractive targets for cancer therapeutics. This review highlights the application of 13 C metabolic flux analysis (MFA to map the flow of carbon through intracellular biochemical pathways of cancer cells. We summarize several recent applications of MFA that have identified novel biosynthetic pathways involved in cancer cell proliferation and shed light on the role of specific oncogenes in regulating these pathways. Through such studies, it has become apparent that the metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells are not as homogeneous as once thought, but instead depend strongly on the molecular alterations and environmental factors at play in each case.

  9. Basal metabolic state governs AIF-dependent growth support in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Andrew J.; Wilkinson, Amanda S.; Wilkinson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), named for its involvement in cell death pathways, is a mitochondrial protein that regulates metabolic homeostasis. In addition to supporting the survival of healthy cells, AIF also plays a contributory role to the development of cancer through its enzymatic activity, and we have previously shown that AIF preferentially supports advanced-stage prostate cancer cells. Here we further evaluated the role of AIF in tumorigenesis by exploring its function in pancreatic cancer, a disease setting that most often presents at an advanced stage by the time of diagnosis. A bioinformatics approach was first employed to investigate AIF mRNA transcript levels in pancreatic tumor specimens vs. normal tissues. AIF-deficient pancreatic cancer cell lines were then established via lentiviral infection. Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein quantities within cells. Cell viability was measured by flow cytometry; in vitro and Matrigel™ growth/survival using Coulter™ counting and phase contrast microscopy; and glucose consumption in the absence and presence of Matrigel™ using spectrophotometric methods. Archival gene expression data revealed a modest elevation of AIF transcript levels in subsets of pancreatic tumor specimens, suggesting a possible role in disease progression. AIF expression was then suppressed in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines that display diverse metabolic phenotypes. AIF ablation selectively crippled the growth of cells in vitro in a manner that directly correlated with the loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits and altered glucose metabolism, and these effects were exacerbated in the presence of Matrigel™ substrate. This suggests a critical metabolic role for AIF to pancreatic tumorigenesis, while the spectrum of sensitivities to AIF ablation depends on basal cellular metabolic phenotypes. Altogether these data indicate that AIF supports the growth and survival of metabolically defined

  10. Mechanisms of redox metabolism and cancer cell survival during extracellular matrix detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mark A; Schafer, Zachary T

    2018-01-16

    Non-transformed cells that become detached from the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergo dysregulation of redox homeostasis and cell death. In contrast, cancer cells often acquire the ability to mitigate programmed cell death pathways and recalibrate the redox balance to survive after ECM detachment, facilitating metastatic dissemination. Accordingly, recent studies of the mechanisms by which cancer cells overcome ECM detachment-induced metabolic alterations have focused on mechanisms in redox homeostasis. The insights into these mechanisms may inform the development of therapeutics that manipulate redox homeostasis to eliminate ECM-detached cancer cells. Here, we review how ECM-detached cancer cells balance redox metabolism for survival. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The Xenopus oocyte: a model for studying the metabolic regulation of cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Leta K

    2012-06-01

    Abnormal metabolism and the evasion of apoptosis are both considered hallmarks of cancer. A remarkable biochemical model system, the Xenopus laevis oocyte, exhibits altered metabolism coupled to its apoptotic machinery in a similar fashion to cancer cells. This review considers the theory that these two hallmarks of cancer are coupled in tumor cells and provides strong proof that the Xenopus laevis oocyte system is an appropriate model in which to dissect the biochemical events underlying the connection between the two hallmarks. By further elucidating the mechanisms through which metabolism suppresses apoptotic machinery, we may gain a better understanding about how normal cells transform into cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Genetic-metabolic model of cancer cell behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dil'man, V M; Blagosklonnyĭ, M V

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that the transforming protein (type pp60) induce "insulinization" of the cell membrane. It is mostly due to this effect that the cell sensitivity to insulin and insulin-like factors of the body internal medium is enhanced, which in turn results in the increased glucosa transport into cell. The transforming protein is also supposed to increase the activity of the glycolysis key enzymes by phosphorylating them. The presence of these two effects seems to be sufficient enough to explain "the biochemical behaviour" of the cancerous cell.

  13. Selection of metastatic breast cancer cells based on adaptability of their metabolic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis

  14. Selection of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Based on Adaptability of Their Metabolic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balraj; Tai, Karen; Madan, Simran; Raythatha, Milan R.; Cady, Amanda M.; Braunlin, Megan; Irving, LaTashia R.; Bajaj, Ankur; Lucci, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind) variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis and then primary

  15. PDHA1 gene knockout in prostate cancer cells results in metabolic reprogramming towards greater glutamine dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoran; Li, Xiaoli; Zhong, Yali; Ji, Yasai; Yu, Dandan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Hongquan; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pathways of metabolism endowed cancer cells with metabolic stress. Inhibiting the related compensatory pathways might achieve synergistic anticancer results. This study demonstrated that pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α gene knockout (PDHA1 KO) resulted in alterations in tumor cell metabolism by rendering the cells with increased expression of glutaminase1 (GLS1) and glutamate dehydrogenase1 (GLUD1), leading to an increase in glutamine-dependent cell survival. Deprivation of glutamine induced cell growth inhibition, increased reactive oxygen species and decreased ATP production. Pharmacological blockade of the glutaminolysis pathway resulted in massive tumor cells apoptosis and dysfunction of ROS scavenge in the LNCaP PDHA1 KO cells. Further examination of the key glutaminolysis enzymes in human prostate cancer samples also revealed that higher levels of GLS1 and GLUD1 expression were significantly associated with aggressive clinicopathological features and poor clinical outcome. These insights supply evidence that glutaminolysis plays a compensatory role for cell survival upon alternative energy metabolism and targeting the glutamine anaplerosis of energy metabolism via GLS1 and GLUD1 in cancer cells may offer a potential novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462778

  16. Nesting of colon and ovarian cancer cells in the endothelial niche is associated with alterations in glycan and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halama, Anna; Guerrouahen, Bella S; Pasquier, Jennifer; Satheesh, Noothan J; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash

    2017-01-04

    The metabolic phenotype of a cancer cell is determined by its genetic makeup and microenvironment, which dynamically modulates the tumor landscape. The endothelial cells provide both a promoting and protective microenvironment - a niche for cancer cells. Although metabolic alterations associated with cancer and its progression have been fairly defined, there is a significant gap in our understanding of cancer metabolism in context of its microenvironment. We deployed an in vitro co-culture system based on direct contact of cancer cells with endothelial cells (E4 + EC), mimicking the tumor microenvironment. Metabolism of colon (HTC15 and HTC116) and ovarian (OVCAR3 and SKOV3) cancer cell lines was profiled with non-targeted metabolic approaches at different time points in the first 48 hours after co-culture was established. We found significant, coherent and non-cell line specific changes in fatty acids, glycerophospholipids and carbohydrates over time, induced by endothelial cell contact. The metabolic patterns pinpoint alterations in hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, glycosylation and lipid metabolism as crucial for cancer - endothelial cells interaction. We demonstrated that "Warburg effect" is not modulated in the initial stage of nesting of cancer cell in the endothelial niche. Our study provides novel insight into cancer cell metabolism in the context of the endothelial microenvironment.

  17. SIRT3 opposes reprogramming of cancer cell metabolism through HIF1α destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Lydia W.S.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Lee, Jaewon; Souza, Amanda; Egia, Ainara; Zhang, Jiangwen; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Moreira, Paula I.; Cardoso, Sandra M.; Clish, Clary B.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tumor cells exhibit aberrant metabolism characterized by high glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This metabolic reprogramming, known as the Warburg effect, provides tumor cells with the substrates required for biomass generation. Here, we show that the mitochondrial NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT3 is a crucial regulator of the Warburg effect. Mechanistically, SIRT3 mediates metabolic reprogramming by destabilizing hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α), a transcription factor that controls glycolytic gene expression. SIRT3 loss increases reactive oxygen species production, leading to HIF1α stabilization. SIRT3 expression is reduced in human breast cancers, and its loss correlates with the upregulation of HIF1α target genes. Finally, we find that SIRT3 overexpression represses glycolysis and proliferation in breast cancer cells, providing a metabolic mechanism for tumor suppression. PMID:21397863

  18. Antimetabolic Effects of Polyphenols in Breast Cancer Cells: Focus on Glucose Uptake and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Elisa; Martel, Fátima

    2018-01-01

    In the last years, metabolic reprogramming became a new key hallmark of tumor cells. One of its components is a deviant energetic metabolism, known as Warburg effect-an aerobic lactatogenesis- characterized by elevated rates of glucose uptake and consumption with high-lactate production even in the presence of oxygen. Because many cancer cells display a greater sensitivity to glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity than normal cells, inhibitors of glucose cellular uptake (facilitative glucose transporter 1 inhibitors) and oxidative metabolism (glycolysis inhibitors) are potential therapeutic targets in cancer treatment. Polyphenols, abundantly contained in fruits and vegetables, are dietary components with an established protective role against cancer. Several molecular mechanisms are involved in the anticancer effect of polyphenols, including effects on apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, plasma membrane receptors, signaling pathways, and epigenetic mechanisms. Additionally, inhibition of glucose cellular uptake and metabolism in cancer cell lines has been described for several polyphenols, and this effect was shown to be associated with their anticarcinogenic effect. This work will review data showing an antimetabolic effect of polyphenols and its involvement in the chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic potential of these dietary compounds, in relation to breast cancer.

  19. The metabolic switch of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although remarkable progress has been made in oncology research, cancer is still a leading cause of death worldwide. It is well recognized that cancer is a genetic disease, yet metabolic alterations or reprogramming are the major phenotypes associated with the (epi-genetic modifications of cancer cells. Thus, understanding the metabolic changes of tumor cells will facilitate the diagnosis of cancer, alleviate drug resistance and provide novel druggable targets that can lead to cures for cancer. The first Sino-US Symposium on Cancer Metabolism was held in Chongqing on October 10th and 11th, with the theme of “cancer metabolism and precision cancer therapy”. The symposium brought about a dozen keynote speakers each from the US and mainland China, as well as one hundred delegates with an interest in cancer metabolism. This short article will briefly summarize the advances reported during this meeting.

  20. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  1. Metabolic and hemodynamic evaluation of brain metastases from small cell lung cancer with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Andersen, P; Daugaard, G

    1998-01-01

    for studies of metabolic and hemodynamic features. This study was performed to determine regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in brain metastases from small cell lung cancer and the surrounding brain. Tumor r......Brain metastases from small cell lung cancer respond to chemotherapy, but response duration is short and the intracerebral concentration of chemotherapy may be too low because of the characteristics of the blood-brain barrier. Positron emission tomography has been applied in a variety of tumors...

  2. Cancer cell metabolism and mitochondria: Nutrient plasticity for TCA cycle fueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Cyril; Feron, Olivier

    2017-08-01

    Warburg's hypothesis that cancer cells take up a lot of glucose in the presence of ambient oxygen but convert pyruvate into lactate due to impaired mitochondrial function led to the misconception that cancer cells rely on glycolysis as their major source of energy. Most recent 13 C-based metabolomic studies, including in cancer patients, indicate that cancer cells may also fully oxidize glucose. In addition to glucose-derived pyruvate, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids supply substrates to the TCA cycle to sustain mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we discuss how the metabolic flexibility afforded by these multiple mitochondrial inputs allows cancer cells to adapt according to the availability of the different fuels and the microenvironmental conditions such as hypoxia and acidosis. In particular, we focused on the role of the TCA cycle in interconnecting numerous metabolic routes in order to highlight metabolic vulnerabilities that represent attractive targets for a new generation of anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution of Energy Metabolism, Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells: How the Warburg and Barker Hypotheses Might Be Linked

    OpenAIRE

    Trosko, James E.; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary transition from single cells to the metazoan forced the appearance of adult stem cells and a hypoxic niche, when oxygenation of the environment forced the appearance of oxidative phosphorylation from that of glycolysis. The prevailing paradigm in the cancer field is that cancers start from the “immortalization” or “re-programming” of a normal, differentiated cell with many mitochondria, that metabolize via oxidative phosphorylation. This paradigm has been challenged with one ...

  4. Stem Cell Metabolism in Cancer and Healthy Tissues: Pyruvate in the Limelight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Corbet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal and cancer stem cells (CSCs share the remarkable potential to self-renew and differentiate into many distinct cell types. Although most of the stem cells remain under quiescence to maintain their undifferentiated state, they can also undergo cell divisions as required to regulate tissue homeostasis. There is now a growing evidence that cell fate determination from stem cells implies a fine-tuned regulation of their energy balance and metabolic status. Stem cells can shift their metabolic substrate utilization, between glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, during specification and/or differentiation, as well as in order to adapt their microenvironmental niche. Pyruvate appears as a key metabolite since it is at the crossroads of cytoplasmic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. This Review describes how metabolic reprogramming, focusing on pyruvate utilization, drives the fate of normal and CSCs by modulating their capacity for self-renewal, clonal expansion/differentiation, as well as metastatic potential and treatment resistance in cancer. This Review also explores potential therapeutic strategies to restore or manipulate stem cell function through the use of small molecules targeting the pyruvate metabolism.

  5. Myostatin induces mitochondrial metabolic alteration and typical apoptosis in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Cheng, H; Zhou, Y; Zhu, Y; Bian, R; Chen, Y; Li, C; Ma, Q; Zheng, Q; Zhang, Y; Jin, H; Wang, X; Chen, Q; Zhu, D

    2013-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, regulates the glucose metabolism of muscle cells, while dysregulated myostatin activity is associated with a number of metabolic disorders, including muscle cachexia, obesity and type II diabetes. We observed that myostatin induced significant mitochondrial metabolic alterations and prolonged exposure of myostatin induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells addicted to glycolysis. To address the underlying mechanism, we found that the protein levels of Hexokinase II (HKII) and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), two key regulators of glucose metabolisms as well as metabolic stress-induced apoptosis, were negatively correlated. In particular, VDAC1 was dramatically upregulated in cells that are sensitive to myostatin treatment whereas HKII was downregulated and dissociated from mitochondria. Myostatin promoted the translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, and knockdown of VDAC1 inhibited myostatin-induced Bax translocation and apoptosis. These apoptotic changes can be partially rescued by repletion of ATP, or by ectopic expression of HKII, suggesting that perturbation of mitochondrial metabolism is causally linked with subsequent apoptosis. Our findings reveal novel function of myostatin in regulating mitochondrial metabolism and apoptosis in cancer cells. PMID:23412387

  6. Inhibition of Sphingolipid Metabolism Enhances Resveratrol Chemotherapy in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kyong-Oh; Park, Nam-Young; Seo, Cho-Hee; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hong, Jin-Tae; Han, Sang-Kil; Lee, Yong-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a chemopreventive agent, is rapidly metabolized in the intestine and liver via glucuronidation. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of resveratrol limits its efficacy. To improve efficacy, the activity of resveratrol was investigated in the context of sphingolipid metabolism in human gastric cancer cells. Diverse sphingolipid metabolites, including dihydroceramides (DHCer), were tested for their ability to induce resveratrol cytotoxicity. Exposure to resveratrol (100 ?M) for 24 hr induced...

  7. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth by modulating cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available Tumor cells in vivo encounter diverse types of microenvironments both at the site of the primary tumor and at sites of distant metastases. Understanding how the various mechanical properties of these microenvironments affect the biology of tumor cells during disease progression is critical in identifying molecular targets for cancer therapy.This study uses flexible polyacrylamide gels as substrates for cell growth in conjunction with a novel proteomic approach to identify the properties of rigidity-dependent cancer cell lines that contribute to their differential growth on soft and rigid substrates. Compared to cells growing on more rigid/stiff substrates (>10,000 Pa, cells on soft substrates (150-300 Pa exhibited a longer cell cycle, due predominantly to an extension of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and were metabolically less active, showing decreased levels of intracellular ATP and a marked reduction in protein synthesis. Using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC and mass spectrometry, we measured the rates of protein synthesis of over 1200 cellular proteins under growth conditions on soft and rigid/stiff substrates. We identified cellular proteins whose syntheses were either preferentially inhibited or preserved on soft matrices. The former category included proteins that regulate cytoskeletal structures (e.g., tubulins and glycolysis (e.g., phosphofructokinase-1, whereas the latter category included proteins that regulate key metabolic pathways required for survival, e.g., nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a regulator of the NAD salvage pathway.The cellular properties of rigidity-dependent cancer cells growing on soft matrices are reminiscent of the properties of dormant cancer cells, e.g., slow growth rate and reduced metabolism. We suggest that the use of relatively soft gels as cell culture substrates would allow molecular pathways to be studied under conditions that reflect the different mechanical

  8. Susceptibility of human head and neck cancer cells to combined inhibition of glutathione and thioredoxin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Sobhakumari

    Full Text Available Increased glutathione (GSH and thioredoxin (Trx metabolism are mechanisms that are widely implicated in resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. The current study determined if simultaneous inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism enhanced cell killing of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells by a mechanism involving oxidative stress. Inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO and auranofin (AUR, respectively, induced significant decreases in clonogenic survival compared to either drug alone in FaDu, Cal-27 and SCC-25 HNSCC cells in vitro and in vivo in Cal-27 xenografts. BSO+AUR significantly increased glutathione and thioredoxin oxidation and suppressed peroxiredoxin activity in vitro. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine completely reversed BSO+AUR-induced cell killing in FaDu and Cal-27 cells, while catalase and selenium supplementation only inhibited BSO+AUR-induced cell killing in FaDu cells. BSO+AUR decreased caspase 3/7 activity in HNSCC cells and significantly reduced the viability of both Bax/Bak double knockout (DKO and DKO-Bax reconstituted hematopoietic cells suggesting that necrosis was involved. BSO+AUR also significantly sensitized FaDu, Cal-27, SCC-25 and SQ20B cells to cell killing induced by the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib in vitro. These results support the conclusion that simultaneous inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism pathways induces oxidative stress and clonogenic killing in HNSCCs and this strategy may be useful in sensitizing HNSCCs to EGFR inhibitors.

  9. Neurotensin is metabolized by endogenous proteases in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, T W; Mayr, C A; Gillespie, T J; Davis, T P

    1998-01-01

    The formation and processing of neurotensin (NT) by three prostate cancer cell lines was investigated. Neurotensin (NT) immunoreactivity was detected in conditioned media and extracts of LNCaP cells. Using HPLC techniques, the immunoreactivity extracted from LNCaP cells coeluted with synthetic NT standard. Metalloendopeptidase 3.4.24.15 activity was detected in PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP cells, whereas high levels of neutral endopeptidase 3.4.24.1 1 activity was detected only in LNCaP cells. NT was relatively stable when incubated with PC-3 or D-145 cells but was rapidly degraded by LNCaP cells to NT1-11 and NT1-10. Phosphoramidon inhibited the metabolism of NT by LNCaP cells. These data suggest that NT is present in and metabolized by LNCaP cellular enzymes.

  10. Spheroid cancer stem cells display reprogrammed metabolism and obtain energy by actively running the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Takahashi, Juri; Eguchi, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-31

    The Warburg effect is a metabolic hallmark of cancer cells; cancer cells, unlike normal cells, exclusively activate glycolysis, even in the presence of enough oxygen. On the other hand, intratumoral heterogeneity is currently of interest in cancer research, including that involving cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the present study, we attempted to gain an understanding of metabolism in CSCs that is distinct from that in non-CSCs. After forming spheroids from the OVTOKO (ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma) and SiHa (cervical squamous cell carcinoma) cell lines, the metabolites of these cells were compared with the metabolites of cancer cells that were cultured in adherent plates. A principle components analysis clearly divided their metabolic features. Amino acids that participate in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle reactions, such as serine and glutamine, were significantly increased in the spheroids. Indeed, spheroids from each cell line contained more total adenylates than did their corresponding cells in adherent cultures. This study demonstrated that cancer metabolism is not limited to aerobic glycolysis (i.e. the Warburg effect), but is flexible and context-dependent. In addition, activation of TCA cycles was suggested to be a metabolic feature of CSCs that was distinct from non-CSCs. The amino acid metabolic pathways discussed here are already considered as targets for cancer therapy, and they are additionally proposed as potential targets for CSC treatment.

  11. Cancer Metabolism: A Modeling Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    suggest that utilization of amino acids and lipids contributes significantly to cancer cell metabolism. Also recent progresses in our understanding of carcinogenesis have revealed that cancer is a complex disease and cannot be understood through simple investigation of genetic mutations of cancerous cells...

  12. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Kye Sook; Kang, Keon Wook; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ki Ho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2011-01-01

    Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, it remains to be determined whether changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism occur in cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutic medications. We compared expression/activity of sulfur amino acid metabolizing enzymes and cellular levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites between normal MCF-7 cells and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Adr) cells. The S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in MCF-7/Adr cells decreased to ∼ 10% relative to that in MCF-7 cells, which may have resulted from down-regulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Expression of homocysteine-clearing enzymes, such as cystathionine beta-synthase, methionine synthase/methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, was up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells, suggesting that acquiring doxorubicin resistance attenuated methionine-dependence and activated transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine. Homocysteine was similar, which is associated with a balance between the increased expressions of homocysteine-clearing enzymes and decreased extracellular homocysteine. Despite an elevation in cysteine, cellular GSH decreased in MCF-7/Adr cells, which was attributed to over-efflux of GSH into the medium and down-regulation of the GSH synthesis enzyme. Consequently, MCF-7/Adr cells were more sensitive to the oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione than MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target for chemoresistant cancer cells. These results warrant further investigations to determine the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in acquiring anticancer drug resistance in cancer cells using chemical and biological regulators involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. - Research highlights: → MCF-7/Adr cells showed decreases in cellular GSH

  13. Metabolic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to glucose limitation and biguanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Possemato, Richard; Lorbeer, Franziska K.; Bayraktar, Erol C.; Thiru, Prathapan; Yucel, Burcu; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter W.; Clish, Clary B.; Sabatini, David M.

    2014-04-01

    As the concentrations of highly consumed nutrients, particularly glucose, are generally lower in tumours than in normal tissues, cancer cells must adapt their metabolism to the tumour microenvironment. A better understanding of these adaptations might reveal cancer cell liabilities that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Here we developed a continuous-flow culture apparatus (Nutrostat) for maintaining proliferating cells in low-nutrient media for long periods of time, and used it to undertake competitive proliferation assays on a pooled collection of barcoded cancer cell lines cultured in low-glucose conditions. Sensitivity to low glucose varies amongst cell lines, and an RNA interference (RNAi) screen pinpointed mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) as the major pathway required for optimal proliferation in low glucose. We found that cell lines most sensitive to low glucose are defective in the OXPHOS upregulation that is normally caused by glucose limitation as a result of either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in complex I genes or impaired glucose utilization. These defects predict sensitivity to biguanides, antidiabetic drugs that inhibit OXPHOS, when cancer cells are grown in low glucose or as tumour xenografts. Notably, the biguanide sensitivity of cancer cells with mtDNA mutations was reversed by ectopic expression of yeast NDI1, a ubiquinone oxidoreductase that allows bypass of complex I function. Thus, we conclude that mtDNA mutations and impaired glucose utilization are potential biomarkers for identifying tumours with increased sensitivity to OXPHOS inhibitors.

  14. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tolstikov

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  15. Systems biology analysis of drivers underlying hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Jamshidi, Neema; Corbett, Austin J.; Bordbar, Aarash; Thomas, Alex; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant transformation is often accompanied by significant metabolic changes. To identify drivers underlying these changes, we calculated metabolic flux states for the NCI60 cell line collection and correlated the variance between metabolic states of these lines with their other properties. The analysis revealed a remarkably consistent structure underlying high flux metabolism. The three primary uptake pathways, glucose, glutamine and serine, are each characterized by three features: (1) metabolite uptake sufficient for the stoichiometric requirement to sustain observed growth, (2) overflow metabolism, which scales with excess nutrient uptake over the basal growth requirement, and (3) redox production, which also scales with nutrient uptake but greatly exceeds the requirement for growth. We discovered that resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in these lines broadly correlates with the amount of glucose uptake. These results support an interpretation of the Warburg effect and glutamine addiction as features of a growth state that provides resistance to metabolic stress through excess redox and energy production. Furthermore, overflow metabolism observed may indicate that mitochondrial catabolic capacity is a key constraint setting an upper limit on the rate of cofactor production possible. These results provide a greater context within which the metabolic alterations in cancer can be understood.

  16. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...

  17. Effects of extracellular modulation through hypoxia on the glucose metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustisia, I.; Jusman, S. W. A.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer stem cells have been reported to maintain stemness under certain extracellular changes. This study aimed to analyze the effect of extracellular O2 level modulation on the glucose metabolism of human CD24-/CD44+ breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) for 0.5, 4, 6, 24 and 48 hours. After each incubation period, HIF1α, GLUT1 and CA9 expressions, as well as glucose metabolism status, including glucose consumption, lactate production, O2 consumption and extracellular pH (pHe) were analyzed using qRT-PCR, colorimetry, fluorometry, and enzymatic reactions, respectively. Hypoxia caused an increase in HIF1α mRNA expressions and protein levels and shifted the metabolic states to anaerobic glycolysis, as demonstrated by increased glucose consumption and lactate production, as well as decreased O2 consumption and pHe. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GLUT1 and CA9 mRNA expressions simultaneously increased, in line with HIF1α expression. In conclusion, modulation of the extracellular environment of human BCSCs through hypoxia shifedt the metabolic state of BCSCs to anaerobic glycolysis, which might be associated with GLUT1 and CA9 expressions regulated by HIFlα transcription factor.

  18. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Gene Variants and Renal Cell Cancer: A Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, Julia E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moore, Lee E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Yuan-Chin A. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McKay, James D. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Hung, Rayjean J. [Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Karami, Sara [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gaborieau, Valérie [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila [Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Zaridze, David G. [Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Carcinogenesis, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mukeriya, Anush [Cancer Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mates, Dana [Institute of Public Health, Bucharest (Romania); Foretova, Lenka [Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno (Czech Republic); Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena [Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Bencko, Vladimir [First Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Rothman, Nathaniel [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Brennan, Paul [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France); Chow, Wong-Ho [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Boffetta, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.boffetta@mssm.edu [International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon (France); Tisch Cancer Institute, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-02-20

    Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have among the highest worldwide rates of renal cell cancer (RCC). Few studies have examined whether genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes may modify risk for this cancer. Methods: The Central and Eastern Europe Renal Cell Cancer study was a hospital-based case–control study conducted between 1998 and 2003 across seven centers in Central and Eastern Europe. Detailed data were collected from 874 cases and 2053 controls on demographics, work history, and occupational exposure to chemical agents. Genes [cytochrome P-450 family, N-acetyltransferases, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase I (NQO1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] were selected for the present analysis based on their putative role in xenobiotic metabolism. Haplotypes were calculated using fastPhase. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for country of residence, age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and hypertension. Results: We observed an increased risk of RCC with one SNP. After adjustment for multiple comparisons it did not remain significant. Neither NAT1 nor NAT2 slow acetylation was associated with disease. Conclusion: We observed no association between this pathway and renal cell cancer.

  19. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Gene Variants and Renal Cell Cancer: A Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, Julia E.; Moore, Lee E.; Lee, Yuan-Chin A.; McKay, James D.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Karami, Sara; Gaborieau, Valérie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Zaridze, David G.; Mukeriya, Anush; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kollárová, Helena; Bencko, Vladimir; Rothman, Nathaniel; Brennan, Paul; Chow, Wong-Ho; Boffetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background: The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have among the highest worldwide rates of renal cell cancer (RCC). Few studies have examined whether genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes may modify risk for this cancer. Methods: The Central and Eastern Europe Renal Cell Cancer study was a hospital-based case–control study conducted between 1998 and 2003 across seven centers in Central and Eastern Europe. Detailed data were collected from 874 cases and 2053 controls on demographics, work history, and occupational exposure to chemical agents. Genes [cytochrome P-450 family, N-acetyltransferases, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase I (NQO1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] were selected for the present analysis based on their putative role in xenobiotic metabolism. Haplotypes were calculated using fastPhase. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for country of residence, age, sex, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and hypertension. Results: We observed an increased risk of RCC with one SNP. After adjustment for multiple comparisons it did not remain significant. Neither NAT1 nor NAT2 slow acetylation was associated with disease. Conclusion: We observed no association between this pathway and renal cell cancer.

  20. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  1. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar

    2015-01-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER + and ER − breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of one-carbon metabolism pathway gene variants and renal cell cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Gibson

    Full Text Available Folate and one-carbon metabolism are linked to cancer risk through their integral role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Variation in one-carbon metabolism genes, particularly MTHFR, has been associated with risk of a number of cancers in epidemiologic studies, but little is known regarding renal cancer.Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected to produce high genomic coverage of 13 gene regions of one-carbon metabolism (ALDH1L1, BHMT, CBS, FOLR1, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, SHMT1, SLC19A1, TYMS and the closely associated glutathione synthesis pathway (CTH, GGH, GSS were genotyped for 777 renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases and 1,035 controls in the Central and Eastern European Renal Cancer case-control study. Associations of individual SNPs (n = 163 with RCC risk were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and study center. Minimum p-value permutation (Min-P tests were used to identify gene regions associated with risk, and haplotypes were evaluated within these genes.The strongest associations with RCC risk were observed for SLC19A1 (P(min-P = 0.03 and MTHFR (P(min-P = 0.13. A haplotype consisting of four SNPs in SLC19A1 (rs12483553, rs2838950, rs2838951, and rs17004785 was associated with a 37% increased risk (p = 0.02, and exploratory stratified analysis suggested the association was only significant among those in the lowest tertile of vegetable intake.To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively examine variation in one-carbon metabolism genes in relation to RCC risk. We identified a novel association with SLC19A1, which is important for transport of folate into cells. Replication in other populations is required to confirm these findings.

  3. Inhibition of Glutathione and Thioredoxin Metabolism Enhances Sensitivity to Perifosine in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrean L. Simons

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that the Akt inhibitor, perifosine (PER, combined with inhibitors of glutathione (GSH and thioredoxin (Trx metabolism will induce cytotoxicity via metabolic oxidative stress in human head and neck cancer (HNSCC cells was tested. PER induced increases in glutathione disulfide (%GSSG in FaDu, Cal-27, and SCC-25 HNSCCs as well as causing significant clonogenic cell killing in FaDu and Cal-27, which was suppressed by simultaneous treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC. An inhibitor of GSH synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, sensitized Cal-27 and SCC-25 cells to PER-induced clonogenic killing as well as decreased total GSH and increased %GSSG. Additionally, inhibition of thioredoxin reductase activity (TrxRed with auranofin (AUR was able to induce PER sensitization in SCC-25 cells that were initially refractory to PER. These results support the conclusion that PER induces oxidative stress and clonogenic killing in HNSCC cells that is enhanced with inhibitors of GSH and Trx metabolism.

  4. Glucose metabolism determines resistance of cancer cells to bioenergetic crisis after cytochrome-c release.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Huber, Heinrich J

    2011-03-01

    Many anticancer drugs activate caspases via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Activation of this pathway triggers a concomitant bioenergetic crisis caused by the release of cytochrome-c (cyt-c). Cancer cells are able to evade these processes by altering metabolic and caspase activation pathways. In this study, we provide the first integrated system study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and apoptosis signalling and examine the role of mitochondrial cyt-c release in these events. In accordance with single-cell experiments, our model showed that loss of cyt-c decreased mitochondrial respiration by 95% and depolarised mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨ(m) from -142 to -88 mV, with active caspase-3 potentiating this decrease. ATP synthase was reversed under such conditions, consuming ATP and stabilising ΔΨ(m). However, the direction and level of ATP synthase activity showed significant heterogeneity in individual cancer cells, which the model explained by variations in (i) accessible cyt-c after release and (ii) the cell\\'s glycolytic capacity. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic explanation for the protective role of enhanced glucose utilisation for cancer cells to avert the otherwise lethal bioenergetic crisis associated with apoptosis initiation.

  5. Blocking CD147 induces cell death in cancer cells through impairment of glycolytic energy metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Miyako; Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Nishizawa, Yasuko

    2008-01-01

    CD147 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein and promotes cancer progression. We found that the anti-human CD147 mouse monoclonal antibody MEM-M6/1 strongly induces necrosis-like cell death in LoVo, HT-29, WiDr, and SW620 colon cancer cells and A2058 melanoma cells, but not in WI-38 and TIG-113 normal fibroblasts. Silencing or overexpression of CD147 in LoVo cells enhanced or decreased the MEM-M6/1 induced cell death, respectively. CD147 is known to form complex with proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which is critical for lactate transport and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. In LoVo cells, CD147 and MCT-1 co-localized on the cell surface, and MEM-M6/1 inhibited the association of these molecules. MEM-M6/1 inhibited lactate uptake, lactate release, and reduced pHi. Further, the induction of acidification was parallel to the decrease of the glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were not found in the normal fibroblasts. As cancer cells depend on glycolysis for their energy production, CD147 inhibition might induce cell death specific to cancer cells

  6. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Study of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is important for basic understanding and therapeutic management of cancer progression. We here used metabolic labeling and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a strategy of bioorthogonal chemical imaging, to directly visualize changes in anabolic metabolism during cancer EMT at a single-cell level. MCF-7 breast cancer cell is employed as a model system. Four types of metabolites (amino acids, glucose, fatty acids, and choline) are labeled with either deuterium or alkyne (C≡C) tag. Their intracellular incorporations into MCF-7 cells before or after EMT are visualized by SRS imaging targeted at the signature vibration frequency of C-D or C≡C bonds. Overall, after EMT, anabolism of amino acids, glucose, and choline is less active, reflecting slower protein and membrane synthesis in mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, we also observed less incorporation of glucose and palmitate acids into membrane lipids, but more of them into lipid droplets in mesenchymal cells. This result indicates that, although mesenchymal cells synthesize fewer membrane lipids, they are actively storing energy into lipid droplets, either through de novo lipogenesis from glucose or direct scavenging of exogenous free fatty acids. Hence, metabolic labeling coupled with SRS can be a straightforward method in imaging cancer metabolism.

  7. Extracellular pH Modulates Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Cell Metabolism and Susceptibility to the Mitochondrial Inhibitor Niclosamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Joseph E.; Brandenburg, Matthew W.; Ge, Xia; Crowley, Jan R.; Kirmess, Kristopher M.; Som, Avik; D’Avignon, D. Andre; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is a lethal variant of prostate cancer that is associated with castrate-resistant growth, metastasis, and mortality. The tumor environment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer is heterogeneous and characterized by hypoxia, necrosis, and numerous mitoses. Although acidic extracellular pH has been implicated in aggressive cancer features including metastasis and therapeutic resistance, its role in neuroendocrine prostate cancer physiology and metabolism has not yet been explored. We used the well-characterized PNEC cell line as a model to establish the effects of extracellular pH (pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.5) on neuroendocrine prostate cancer cell metabolism. We discovered that alkalinization of extracellular pH converted cellular metabolism to a nutrient consumption-dependent state that was susceptible to glucose deprivation, glutamine deprivation, and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) mediated inhibition of glycolysis. Conversely, acidic pH shifted cellular metabolism toward an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent state that was susceptible to OXPHOS inhibition. Based upon this mechanistic knowledge of pH-dependent metabolism, we identified that the FDA-approved anti-helminthic niclosamide depolarized mitochondrial potential and depleted ATP levels in PNEC cells whose effects were enhanced in acidic pH. To further establish relevance of these findings, we tested the effects of extracellular pH on susceptibility to nutrient deprivation and OXPHOS inhibition in a cohort of castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines C4-2B, PC-3, and PC-3M. We discovered similar pH-dependent toxicity profiles among all cell lines with these treatments. These findings underscore a potential importance to acidic extracellular pH in the modulation of cell metabolism in tumors and development of an emerging paradigm that exploits the synergy of environment and therapeutic efficacy in cancer. PMID:27438712

  8. Raman Microspectroscopic Evidence for the Metabolism of a Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, Neratinib, in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljakouch, Karim; Lechtonen, Tatjana; Yosef, Hesham K; Hammoud, Mohamad K; Alsaidi, Wissam; Kötting, Carsten; Mügge, Carolin; Kourist, Robert; El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Gerwert, Klaus

    2018-06-11

    Tyrosine kinase receptors are one of the main targets in cancer therapy. They play an essential role in the modulation of growth factor signaling and thereby inducing cell proliferation and growth. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as neratinib bind to EGFR and HER2 receptors and exhibit antitumor activity. However, little is known about their detailed cellular uptake and metabolism. Here, we report for the first time the intracellular spatial distribution and metabolism of neratinib in different cancer cells using label-free Raman imaging. Two new neratinib metabolites were detected and fluorescence imaging of the same cells indicate that neratinib accumulates in lysosomes. The results also suggest that both EGFR and HER2 follow the classical endosome lysosomal pathway for degradation. A combination of Raman microscopy, DFT calculations, and LC-MS was used to identify the chemical structure of neratinib metabolites. These results show the potential of Raman microscopy to study drug pharmacokinetics. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. Mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Ikenaga, Naoki; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Setoyama, Daiki; Irie, Miho; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Masaharu; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Hashizume, Makoto; Tanaka, Masao

    2014-03-01

    Gemcitabine resistance (GR) is one of the critical issues for therapy for pancreatic cancer, but the mechanism still remains unclear. Our aim was to increase the understanding of GR by metabolic profiling approach. To establish GR cells, 2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and CAPAN-1, were exposed to increasing concentration of gemcitabine. Both parental and chemoresistant cells obtained by this treatment were subjected to metabolic profiling based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistical analyses, both principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, distinguished metabolic signature of responsiveness and resistance to gemcitabine in both SUIT-2 and CAPAN-1 cells. Among significantly different (P metabolic pathways such as amino acid, nucleotide, energy, cofactor, and vitamin pathways. Decreases in glutamine and proline levels as well as increases in aspartate, hydroxyproline, creatine, and creatinine levels were observed in chemoresistant cells from both cell lines. These results suggest that metabolic profiling can isolate distinct features of pancreatic cancer in the metabolome of gemcitabine-sensitive and GR cells. These findings may contribute to the biomarker discovery and an enhanced understanding of GR in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Therapeutic potential of the metabolic modulator Metformin on osteosarcoma cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva-Oliveira, Daniela I; Martins-Neves, Sara R; Abrunhosa, Antero J; Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos; Gomes, Célia M F

    2018-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour appearing in children and adolescents. Recent studies demonstrate that osteosarcoma possesses a stem-like cell subset, so-called cancer stem-like cells, refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics and pointed out as responsible for relapses frequently observed in osteosarcoma patients. Here, we explored the therapeutic potential of Metformin on osteosarcoma stem-like cells, alone and as a chemosensitizer of doxorubicin. Stem-like cells were isolated from human osteosarcoma cell lines, MNNG/HOS and MG-63, using the sphere-forming assay. Metformin cytotoxicity alone and combined with doxorubicin were evaluated using MTT/BrdU assays. Protein levels of AMPK and AKT were evaluated by Western Blot. Cellular metabolic status was assessed based on [ 18 F]-FDG uptake and lactate production measurements. Sphere-forming efficiency and expression of pluripotency transcription factors analysed by qRT-PCR were tested as readout of Metformin effects on stemness features. Metformin induced a concentration-dependent decrease in the metabolic activity and proliferation of sphere-forming cells and improved doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. This drug also down-regulated the expression of master regulators of pluripotency (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG), and decreased spheres' self-renewal ability. Metformin effects on mitochondria led to the activation and phosphorylation of the energetic sensor AMPK along with an upregulation of the pro-survival AKT pathway in both cell populations. Furthermore, Metformin-induced mitochondrial stress increased [ 18 F]-FDG uptake and lactate production in parental cells but not in the quiescent stem-like cells, suggesting the inability of the latter to cope with the energy crisis induced by metformin. This preclinical study suggests that Metformin may be a potentially useful therapeutic agent and chemosensitizer of osteosarcoma stem-like cells to doxorubicin.

  11. Glutaminolysis: A Hallmark of Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lifeng; Venneti, Sriram; Nagrath, Deepak

    2017-06-21

    Glutamine is the most abundant circulating amino acid in blood and muscle and is critical for many fundamental cell functions in cancer cells, including synthesis of metabolites that maintain mitochondrial metabolism; generation of antioxidants to remove reactive oxygen species; synthesis of nonessential amino acids (NEAAs), purines, pyrimidines, and fatty acids for cellular replication; and activation of cell signaling. In light of the pleiotropic role of glutamine in cancer cells, a comprehensive understanding of glutamine metabolism is essential for the development of metabolic therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer cells. In this article, we review oncogene-, tumor suppressor-, and tumor microenvironment-mediated regulation of glutamine metabolism in cancer cells. We describe the mechanism of glutamine's regulation of tumor proliferation, metastasis, and global methylation. Furthermore, we highlight the therapeutic potential of glutamine metabolism and emphasize that clinical application of in vivo assessment of glutamine metabolism is critical for identifying new ways to treat patients through glutamine-based metabolic therapy.

  12. In silico-based identification of human α-enolase inhibitors to block cancer cell growth metabolically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Jrhau; Chen, Kuan-Liang; Hung, Chien-Hui; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Hung, Ming-Szu; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Ching-Yuan; Lee, Kuan-Der; Shih, Neng-Yao; Tsai, Ying Huang

    2017-01-01

    Unlimited growth of cancer cells requires an extensive nutrient supply. To meet this demand, cancer cells drastically upregulate glucose uptake and metabolism compared to normal cells. This difference has made the blocking of glycolysis a fascinating strategy to treat this malignant disease. α-enolase is not only one of the most upregulated glycolytic enzymes in cancer cells, but also associates with many cellular processes or conditions important to cancer cell survival, such as cell migration, invasion, and hypoxia. Targeting α-enolase could simultaneously disturb cancer cells in multiple ways and, therefore, is a good target for anticancer drug development. In the current study, more than 22 million chemical structures meeting the criteria of Lipinski’s rule of five from the ZINC database were docked to α-enolase by virtual screening. Twenty-four chemical structures with docking scores better than that of the enolase substrate, 2-phosphoglycerate, were further screened by the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) properties prediction. Four of them were classified as non-mutagenic, non-carcinogenic, and capable of oral administration where they showed steady interactions to α-enolase that were comparable, even superior, to the currently available inhibitors in molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. These compounds may be considered promising leads for further development of the α-enolase inhibitors and could help fight cancer metabolically. PMID:29180852

  13. Metabolic Study of Cancer Cells Using a pH Sensitive Hydrogel Nanofiber Light Addressable Potentiometric Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibani, Parmiss Mojir; Etayash, Hashem; Naicker, Selvaraj; Kaur, Kamaljit; Thundat, Thomas

    2017-01-27

    We report a simple, fast, and cost-effective approach that measures cancer cell metabolism and their response to anticancer drugs in real time. Using a Light Addressable Potentiometric Sensor integrated with pH sensitive hydrogel nanofibers (NF-LAPS), we detect localized changes in pH of the media as cancer cells consume glucose and release lactate. NF-LAPS shows a sensitivity response of 74 mV/pH for cancer cells. Cancer cells (MDA MB231) showed a response of ∼0.4 unit change in pH compared to virtually no change observed for normal cells (MCF10A). We also observed a drop in pH for the multidrug-resistant cancer cells (MDA-MB-435MDR) in the presence of doxorubicin. However, inhibition of the metabolic enzymes such as hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase-A suggested an improvement in the efficacy of doxorubicin by decreasing the level of acidification. This approach, based on extracellular acidification, enhances our understanding of cancer cell metabolic modes and their response to chemotherapies, which will help in the development of better treatments, including choice of drugs and dosages.

  14. Consequences of Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cachexia on Muscle Metabolic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Andrew J; Maddocks, Matthew; Stephens, Francis B; Marimuthu, Kanagaraj; England, Ruth; Wilcock, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The loss of muscle is common in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of this group. The exact mechanisms behind the muscle loss are unclear. To investigate this, 4 patients with stage IV NSCLC who met the clinical definitions for sarcopenia and cachexia were recruited, along with 4 age-matched healthy volunteers. After an overnight fast, biopsy specimens were obtained from the vastus lateralis, and the key components associated with inflammation and the control of muscle protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism were assessed. Compared with the healthy volunteers, significant increases in mRNA levels for interleukin-6 and NF-κB signaling and lower intramyocellular lipid content in slow-twitch fibers were observed in NSCLC patients. Although a significant decrease in phosphorylation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling protein 4E-BP1 (Ser 65 ) was observed, along with a trend toward reduced p70 S6K (Thr 389 ) phosphorylation (P = .06), no difference was found between groups for the mRNA levels of MAFbx (muscle atrophy F box) and MuRF1 (muscle ring finger protein 1), chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, or protein levels of multiple proteasome subunits. Moreover, despite decreases in intramyocellular lipid content, no robust changes in mRNA levels for key proteins involved in insulin signaling, glycolysis, oxidative metabolism, or fat metabolism were observed. These findings suggest that examining the contribution of suppressed mTOR signaling in the loss of muscle mass in late-stage NSCLC patients is warranted and reinforces our need to understand the potential contribution of impaired fat metabolism and muscle protein synthesis in the etiology of cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 regulates glucose metabolism in bladder cancer cells through coactivation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Chang, Cunjie; Cui, Yangyan; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yang, Jun; Shen, Lan; Zhou, Ji; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhen; Ye, Changxiao; Hasenmayer, Donald; Perkins, Robert; Huang, Xiaojing; Yao, Xin; Yu, Like; Huang, Ruimin; Zhang, Dianzheng; Guo, Hongqian; Yan, Jun

    2014-04-18

    Cancer cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process, requiring high glycolysis, which is known as "Warburg effect," to support anabolic growth. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3), a steroid receptor coactivator, is overexpressed and/or amplified in multiple cancer types, including non-steroid targeted cancers, such as urinary bladder cancer (UBC). However, whether SRC-3 regulates the metabolic reprogramming for cancer cell growth is unknown. Here, we reported that overexpression of SRC-3 accelerated UBC cell growth, accompanied by the increased expression of genes involved in glycolysis. Knockdown of SRC-3 reduced the UBC cell glycolytic rate under hypoxia, decreased tumor growth in nude mice, with reduction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and lactate dehydrogenase expression levels. We further revealed that SRC-3 could interact with hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), which is a key transcription factor required for glycolysis, and coactivate its transcriptional activity. SRC-3 was recruited to the promoters of HIF1α-target genes, such as glut1 and pgk1. The positive correlation of expression levels between SRC-3 and Glut1 proteins was demonstrated in human UBC patient samples. Inhibition of glycolysis through targeting HK2 or LDHA decelerated SRC-3 overexpression-induced cell growth. In summary, overexpression of SRC-3 promoted glycolysis in bladder cancer cells through HIF1α to facilitate tumorigenesis, which may be an intriguing drug target for bladder cancer therapy.

  17. 3-Bromopyruvate induces rapid human prostate cancer cell death by affecting cell energy metabolism, GSH pool and the glyoxalase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; Vacca, Rosa A; de Bari, Lidia

    2015-12-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an anti-tumour drug effective on hepatocellular carcinoma and other tumour cell types, which affects both glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, depleting cellular ATP pool. Here we tested 3-BP on human prostate cancer cells showing, differently from other tumour types, efficient ATP production and functional mitochondrial metabolism. We found that 3-BP rapidly induced cultured androgen-insensitive (PC-3) and androgen-responsive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cell death at low concentrations (IC(50) values of 50 and 70 μM, respectively) with a multimodal mechanism of action. In particular, 3-BP-treated PC-3 cells showed a selective, strong reduction of glyceraldeide 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, due to the direct interaction of the drug with the enzyme. Moreover, 3-BP strongly impaired both glutamate/malate- and succinate-dependent mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential generation and ATP synthesis, concomitant with the inhibition of respiratory chain complex I, II and ATP synthase activities. The drastic reduction of cellular ATP levels and depletion of GSH pool, associated with significant increase in cell oxidative stress, were found after 3-BP treatment of PC-3 cells. Interestingly, the activity of both glyoxalase I and II, devoted to the elimination of the cytotoxic methylglyoxal, was strongly inhibited by 3-BP. Both N-acetylcysteine and aminoguanidine, GSH precursor and methylglyoxal scavenger, respectively, prevented 3-BP-induced PC-3 cell death, showing that impaired cell antioxidant and detoxifying capacities are crucial events leading to cell death. The provided information on the multi-target cytotoxic action of 3-BP, finally leading to PC-3 cell necrosis, might be useful for future development of 3-BP as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  18. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Croteau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The body's main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose, proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET imaging using the glucose analog 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication–-all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  19. Metabolic signature of breast cancer cell line MCF-7: profiling of modified nucleosides via LC-IT MS coupling

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    Gleiter Christoph H

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer, like other diseases accompanied by strong metabolic disorders, shows characteristic effects on cell turnover rate, activity of modifying enzymes and DNA/RNA modifications, resulting also in elevated amounts of excreted modified nucleosides. For a better understanding of the impaired RNA metabolism in breast cancer cells, we screened these metabolites in the cell culture supernatants of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and compared it to the human mammary epithelial cells MCF-10A. The nucleosides were isolated and analyzed via 2D-chromatographic techniques: In the first dimension by cis-diol specific boronate affinity extraction and subsequently by reversed phase chromatography coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer. Results Besides the determination of ribonucleosides, additional compounds with cis-diol structure, deriving from cross-linked biochemical pathways, like purine-, histidine- and polyamine metabolism were detected. In total, 36 metabolites were identified by comparison of fragmentation patterns and retention time. Relation to the internal standard isoguanosine yielded normalized area ratios for each identified compound and enabled a semi-quantitative metabolic signature of both analyzed cell lines. 13 of the identified 26 modified ribonucleosides were elevated in the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7 cells, with 5-methyluridine, N2,N2,7-trimethylguanosine, N6-methyl-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine and 3-(3-aminocarboxypropyl-uridine showing the most significant differences. 1-ribosylimidazole-4-acetic acid, a histamine metabolite, was solely found in the supernatants of MCF-10A cells, whereas 1-ribosyl-4-carboxamido-5-aminoimidazole and S-adenosylmethionine occurred only in supernatants of MCF-7 cells. Conclusion The obtained results are discussed against the background of pathological changes in cell metabolism, resulting in new perspectives for modified nucleosides and related metabolites as possible

  20. Melatonin Decreases Glucose Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells: A 13C Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, David; Gonzalez-Menendez, Pedro; Fernandez-Fernandez, Mario; Cueto, Sergio; Mayo, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    The pineal neuroindole melatonin exerts an exceptional variety of systemic functions. Some of them are exerted through its specific membrane receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2) while others are mediated by receptor-independent mechanisms. A potential transport of melatonin through facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT/SLC2A) was proposed in prostate cancer cells. The prostate cells have a particular metabolism that changes during tumor progression. During the first steps of carcinogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation is reactivated while the switch to the “Warburg effect” only occurs in advanced tumors and in the metastatic stage. Here, we investigated whether melatonin might change prostate cancer cell metabolism. To do so, 13C stable isotope-resolved metabolomics in androgen sensitive LNCaP and insensitive PC-3 prostate cancer cells were employed. In addition to metabolite 13C-labeling, ATP/AMP levels, and lactate dehydrogenase or pentose phosphate pathway activity were measured. Melatonin reduces lactate labeling in androgen-sensitive cells and it also lowers 13C-labeling of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and ATP production. In addition, melatonin reduces lactate 13C-labeling in androgen insensitive prostate cancer cells. Results demonstrated that melatonin limits glycolysis as well as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway in prostate cancer cells, suggesting that the reduction of glucose uptake is a major target of the indole in this tumor type. PMID:28933733

  1. Melatonin Decreases Glucose Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells: A 13C Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, David; Gonzalez-Menendez, Pedro; Fernandez-Fernandez, Mario; Cueto, Sergio; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Garcia-Alonso, Jose I; Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M

    2017-07-26

    The pineal neuroindole melatonin exerts an exceptional variety of systemic functions. Some of them are exerted through its specific membrane receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2) while others are mediated by receptor-independent mechanisms. A potential transport of melatonin through facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT/ SLC2A ) was proposed in prostate cancer cells. The prostate cells have a particular metabolism that changes during tumor progression. During the first steps of carcinogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation is reactivated while the switch to the "Warburg effect" only occurs in advanced tumors and in the metastatic stage. Here, we investigated whether melatonin might change prostate cancer cell metabolism. To do so, 13 C stable isotope-resolved metabolomics in androgen sensitive LNCaP and insensitive PC-3 prostate cancer cells were employed. In addition to metabolite 13 C-labeling, ATP/AMP levels, and lactate dehydrogenase or pentose phosphate pathway activity were measured. Melatonin reduces lactate labeling in androgen-sensitive cells and it also lowers 13 C-labeling of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and ATP production. In addition, melatonin reduces lactate 13 C-labeling in androgen insensitive prostate cancer cells. Results demonstrated that melatonin limits glycolysis as well as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway in prostate cancer cells, suggesting that the reduction of glucose uptake is a major target of the indole in this tumor type.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Agent Indomethacin Reduces Invasion and Alters Metabolism in a Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ackerstaff

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Hostile physiological environments such as hypoxia and acidic extracellular pH, which exist in solid tumors, may promote invasion and metastasis through inflammatory responses and formation of eicosanoids. Here, we have investigated the effects of the antiinflammatory agent indomethacin on the invasion and metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-435 in Dulbecco's Modified Eagles (DME-based or Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI-based cell medium, using a magnetic resonance-compatible invasion assay. Indomethacin treatment significantly reduced the invasion of MDA-MB-435 cells independent of the culture and perfusion conditions examined. Significant changes were detected in levels of intracellular choline phospholipid metabolites and in triglyceride (TG concentrations of these cells, depending on indomethacin treatment and basal cell medium used. Additionally, genetic profiling of breast cancer cells, grown and treated with low-dose indomethacin in cell culture using an RPMI-based medium, revealed the upregulation of several genes implicating cyclooxygenaseindependent targets of indomethacin. These data confirm the ability of an anti-inflammatory agent to reduce breast cancer invasion and demonstrate, depending on cell culture and perfusion conditions, that the indomethacin-induced decrease in invasion is associated with changes in choline phospholipid metabolism, TG metabolism, and gene expression.

  3. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A; Lauritsen, J; Oturai, P S; Mortensen, J; Hojman, P; Helge, J W; Daugaard, G

    2017-10-01

    Twenty to thirty percent of testicular cancer (TC) survivors have elevated serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH) with or without corresponding low testosterone levels (Leydig cell dysfunction) during clinical follow-up for TC. However, it remains to be clarified if this subgroup of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up were eligible for participation in the study. Markers of systemic inflammation and prevalence of MetS were compared between TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and the control group. Of 158 included TC survivors, 28 (18%) had uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction, 59 (37%) had compensated Leydig cell dysfunction and 71 (45%) had normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. MetS and markers of systemic inflammation were evaluated at a median follow-up of 9.7 years (interquartile range 4.1-17.1) after TC treatment. The prevalence of MetS was significantly lower among patients with compensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up (12% versus 27%, p = 0.04), whereas there was no difference between TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction and controls (33% versus 27%, p = 0.5). Apart from high-sensitivity C-reactive protein which was higher in TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up, there was no evidence of increased systemic inflammation in patients with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated with MetS, whereas there was no association between LH and MetS. We did not find evidence that TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up had increased long-term risk of MetS. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated

  4. Sub-sets of cancer stem cells differ intrinsically in their patterns of oxygen metabolism.

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    Luke Gammon

    Full Text Available The glycolytic response of hypoxic cells is primarily mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α but even in the presence of abundant oxygen tumours typically show high rates of glycolysis. Higher levels of HIF-1α in tumours are associated with a poorer prognosis and up-regulation of markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT due to HIF-1α actions. We have recently shown that EMT occurs within the CD44(high cancer stem cell (CSC fraction and that epithelial and EMT CSCs are distinguished by high and low ESA expression, respectively. We here show that hypoxia induces a marked shift of the CSC fraction towards EMT leading to altered cell morphology, an increased proportion of CD44(high/ESA(low cells, patterns of gene expression typical of EMT, and enhanced sphere-forming ability. The size of EMT fractions returned to control levels in normoxia indicating a reversible process. Surprisingly, however, even under normoxic conditions a fraction of EMT CSCs was present and maintained high levels of HIF-1α, apparently due to actions of cytokines such as TNFα. Functionally, this EMT CSC fraction showed decreased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, consumed far less oxygen per cell, and produced markedly reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. These differences in the patterns of oxygen metabolism of sub-fractions of tumour cells provide an explanation for the general therapeutic resistance of CSCs and for the even greater resistance of EMT CSCs. They also identify potential mechanisms for manipulation of CSCs.

  5. Aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in liver cancer cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Liu, Yunxia; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Man; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-05-06

    Abnormal lipid metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Hence, the alterations of metabolism enhance the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aspirin is able to inhibit the growth of cancers through targeting nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the role of aspirin in disrupting abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that aspirin can suppress the abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC cells through inhibiting acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (ACSL1), a lipid metabolism-related enzyme. Interestingly, oil red O staining showed that aspirin suppressed lipogenesis in HepG2 cells and Huh7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspirin attenuated the levels of triglyceride and cholesterol in the cells, respectively. Strikingly, we identified that aspirin was able to down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein. Moreover, we validated that aspirin decreased the nuclear levels of NF-κB in HepG2 cells. Mechanically, PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB, could down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein in the cells. Functionally, PDTC reduced the levels of lipid droplets, triglyceride and cholesterol in HepG2 cells. Thus, we conclude that aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which aspirin inhibits abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC. Therapeutically, aspirin is potentially available for HCC through controlling abnormal lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Association of cancer metabolism-related proteins with oral carcinogenesis – indications for chemoprevention and metabolic sensitizing of oral squamous cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor metabolism is a crucial factor for the carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, TKTL1), mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n = 11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n = 35), and OSCC specimen (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in OSCC cell lines. Metabolism-related proteins were correlated with proliferation activity (Ki-67) and apoptotic properties (TUNEL assay) in OSCC. Specificity of antibodies was confirmed by western blotting in cancer cell lines. Results Expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins (GLUT-1, HK 2, LDHA, TKTL1), and mitochondrial enzymes (SDHA, SDHB, ATP synthase) were significantly increased in the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Metabolic active regions of OSCC were strongly correlated with proliferating cancer (Ki-67+) cells without detection of apoptosis (TUNEL assay). Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the expression of IGF-R1, glycolysis-related proteins GLUT-1, HK 2, PFK-1, LDHA, and TKTL1, as well as mitochondrial enzymes SDHA, SDHB, and ATP synthase in the multi-step carcinogenesis of OSCC. Both, hypoxia-related glucose metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation characteristics are associated with the carcinogenesis of OSCC. Acidosis and OXPHOS may drive a metabolic shift towards the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Therefore, inhibition of the PPP, glycolysis, and targeted anti-mitochondrial therapies (ROS generation) by natural compounds or synthetic vitamin derivatives may act as sensitizer for apoptosis in cancer cells mediated by adjuvant therapies in OSCC. PMID:25048361

  7. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Kotze, Helen L; Allwood, J William; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J

    2015-10-28

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments.

  8. Enantioselective Effects of Metalaxyl Enantiomers on Breast Cancer Cells Metabolic Profiling Using HPLC-QTOF-Based Metabolomics

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    Ping Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrative high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF based metabolomics approach was performed to evaluate the enantioselective metabolic perturbations in MCF-7 cells after treatment with R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl, respectively. Untargeted metabolomics profile, multivariate pattern recognition, metabolites identification, and pathway analysis were determined after metalaxyl enantiomer exposure. Principal component analysis (PCA and partitial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA directly reflected the enantioselective metabolic perturbations induced by metalaxyl enantiomers. On the basis of multivariate statistical results, a total of 49 metabolites including carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, organic acids, phospholipids, indoles, derivatives, etc. were found to be the most significantly changed metabolites and metabolic fluctuations caused by the same concentration of R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl were enantioselective. Pathway analysis indicated that R-metalaxyl and S-metalaxyl mainly affected the 7 and 10 pathways in MCF-7 cells, respectively, implying the perturbed pathways induced by metalaxyl enantiomers were also enantioselective. Furthermore, the significantly perturbed metabolic pathways were highly related to energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. Such results provide more specific insights into the enantioselective metabolic effects of chiral pesticides in breast cancer progression, reveal the underlying mechanisms, and provide available data for the health risk assessments of chiral environmental pollutants at the molecular level.

  9. Hypoxia-inducing factors as master regulators of stemness properties and altered metabolism of cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating lines of experimental evidence have revealed that hypoxia-inducible factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α, are key regulators of the adaptation of cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells and their differentiated progenies to oxygen and nutrient deprivation during cancer progression under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Particularly, the sustained stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), stem cell factor (SCF) receptor KIT, transforming growth factor-β receptors (TGF-βRs) and Notch and their downstream signalling elements such as phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/molecular target of rapamycin (mTOR) may lead to an enhanced activity of HIFs. Moreover, the up-regulation of HIFs in cancer cells may also occur in the hypoxic intratumoral regions formed within primary and secondary neoplasms as well as in leukaemic cells and metastatic prostate and breast cancer cells homing in the hypoxic endosteal niche of bone marrow. The activated HIFs may induce the expression of numerous gene products such as induced pluripotency-associated transcription factors (Oct-3/4, Nanog and Sox-2), glycolysis- and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme-associated molecules, including CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), snail and twist, microRNAs and angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These gene products in turn can play critical roles for high self-renewal ability, survival, altered energy metabolism, invasion and metastases of cancer cells, angiogenic switch and treatment resistance. Consequently, the targeting of HIF signalling network and altered metabolic pathways represents new promising strategies to eradicate the total mass of cancer cells and improve the efficacy of current therapies against aggressive and metastatic cancers and prevent disease relapse. PMID:23301832

  10. Metabolomics Analysis of Hormone-Responsive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Responses to Paclitaxel Identify Key Metabolic Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Delisha A; Winnike, Jason H; McRitchie, Susan L; Clark, Robert F; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-09-02

    To date, no targeted therapies are available to treat triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), while other breast cancer subtypes are responsive to current therapeutic treatment. Metabolomics was conducted to reveal differences in two hormone receptor-negative TNBC cell lines and two hormone receptor-positive Luminal A cell lines. Studies were conducted in the presence and absence of paclitaxel (Taxol). TNBC cell lines had higher levels of amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleotide sugars and lower levels of proliferation-related metabolites like choline compared with Luminal A cell lines. In the presence of paclitaxel, each cell line showed unique metabolic responses, with some similarities by type. For example, in the Luminal A cell lines, levels of lactate and creatine decreased while certain choline metabolites and myo-inositol increased with paclitaxel. In the TNBC cell lines levels of glutamine, glutamate, and glutathione increased, whereas lysine, proline, and valine decreased in the presence of drug. Profiling secreted inflammatory cytokines in the conditioned media demonstrated a greater response to paclitaxel in the hormone-positive Luminal cells compared with a secretion profile that suggested greater drug resistance in the TNBC cells. The most significant differences distinguishing the cell types based on pathway enrichment analyses were related to amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways, whereas several biological pathways were differentiated between the cell lines following treatment.

  11. Aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in liver cancer cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Liu, Yunxia; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Man; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Hence, the alterations of metabolism enhance the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aspirin is able to inhibit the growth of cancers through targeting nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the role of aspirin in disrupting abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that aspirin can suppress the abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC cells through inhibiting acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (ACSL1), a lipid metabolism-related enzyme. Interestingly, oil red O staining showed that aspirin suppressed lipogenesis in HepG2 cells and Huh7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspirin attenuated the levels of triglyceride and cholesterol in the cells, respectively. Strikingly, we identified that aspirin was able to down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein. Moreover, we validated that aspirin decreased the nuclear levels of NF-κB in HepG2 cells. Mechanically, PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB, could down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein in the cells. Functionally, PDTC reduced the levels of lipid droplets, triglyceride and cholesterol in HepG2 cells. Thus, we conclude that aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which aspirin inhibits abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC. Therapeutically, aspirin is potentially available for HCC through controlling abnormal lipid metabolism. - Highlights: • Aspirin inhibits the levels of liquid droplets, triglyceride and cholesterol in HCC cells. • Aspirin is able to down-regulate ACSL1 in HCC cells. • NF-κB inhibitor PDTC can down-regulate ACSL1 and reduces lipogenesis in HCC cells. • Aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling.

  12. Metabolomics reveals metabolic targets and biphasic responses in breast cancer cells treated by curcumin alone and in association with docetaxel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Bayet-Robert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin (CUR has deserved extensive research due to its anti-inflammatory properties, of interest in human diseases including cancer. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical responses of tumor cells have been reported, and the mechanisms of action of CUR remain uncompletely elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics was applied to get novel insight into responses of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to CUR alone, and MCF7 cells to CUR in cotreatment with docetaxel (DTX. In both cell types, a major target of CUR was glutathione metabolism. Total glutathione (GSx increased at low dose CUR (≤ 10 mg.l(-1-28 µM- (up to +121% in MCF7 cells, P<0.01, and +138% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.01, but decreased at high dose (≥ 25 mg.l(-1 -70 µM- (-49%, in MCF7 cells, P<0.02, and -56% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.025. At high dose, in both cell types, GSx-related metabolites decreased, including homocystein, creatine and taurine (-60 to -80%, all, P<0.05. Together with glutathione-S-transferase actvity, data established that GSx biosynthesis was upregulated at low dose, and GSx consumption activated at high dose. Another major target, in both cell types, was lipid metabolism involving, at high doses, accumulation of polyunsaturated and total free fatty acids (between ×4.5 and ×11, P<0.025, and decrease of glycerophospho-ethanolamine and -choline (about -60%, P<0.025. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a metabolic transition, even a biphasic behavior of some metabolites including GSx, between low and high doses. In addition, CUR at 10 mg.l(-1 in cotreatment with DTX induced modifications in glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, and glucose utilization. Some of these changes were biphasic depending on the duration of exposure to CUR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Metabolomics reveals major metabolic targets of CUR in breast cancer cells, and biphasic responses that challenge the widely accepted

  13. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase rewires cancer metabolism to allow cancer cells to survive inhibition of the Warburg effect by cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingtao; Hong, Yun; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Zhang, Lun; Wang, Xudong; Li, Qiang; Fan, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Cetuximab inhibits HIF-1-regulated glycolysis in cancer cells, thereby reversing the Warburg effect and leading to inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated after cetuximab treatment, and a sustained AMPK activity is a mechanism contributing to cetuximab resistance. Here, we investigated how acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, rewires cancer metabolism in response to cetuximab treatment. We found that introduction of experimental ACC mutants lacking the AMPK phosphorylation sites (ACC1_S79A and ACC2_S212A) into head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells protected HNSCC cells from cetuximab-induced growth inhibition. HNSCC cells with acquired cetuximab resistance contained not only high levels of T172-phosphorylated AMPK and S79-phosphorylated ACC1 but also an increased level of total ACC. These findings were corroborated in tumor specimens of HNSCC patients treated with cetuximab. Cetuximab plus TOFA (an allosteric inhibitor of ACC) achieved remarkable growth inhibition of cetuximab-resistant HNSCC xenografts. Our data suggest a novel paradigm in which cetuximab-mediated activation of AMPK and subsequent phosphorylation and inhibition of ACC is followed by a compensatory increase in total ACC, which rewires cancer metabolism from glycolysis-dependent to lipogenesis-dependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between intracellular pH, metabolic co-factors and caspase-3 activation in cancer cells during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Tatiana F; Shirmanova, Marina V; Zlobovskaya, Olga A; Gavrina, Alena I; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Lukina, Maria M; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Zagaynova, Elena V

    2017-03-01

    A complex cascade of molecular events occurs in apoptotic cells but cell-to-cell variability significantly complicates determination of the order and interconnections between different processes. For better understanding of the mechanisms of programmed cell death, dynamic simultaneous registration of several parameters is required. In this paper we used multiparameter fluorescence microscopy to analyze energy metabolism, intracellular pH and caspase-3 activation in living cancer cells in vitro during staurosporine-induced apoptosis. We performed metabolic imaging of two co-factors, NAD(P)H and FAD, and used the genetically encoded pH-indicator SypHer1 and the FRET-based sensor for caspase-3 activity, mKate2-DEVD-iRFP, to visualize these parameters by confocal fluorescence microscopy and two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The correlation between energy metabolism, intracellular pH and caspase-3 activation and their dynamic changes were studied in CT26 cancer cells during apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis was accompanied by a switch to oxidative phosphorylation, cytosol acidification and caspase-3 activation. We showed that alterations in cytosolic pH and the activation of oxidative phosphorylation are relatively early events associated with the induction of apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A

    2017-01-01

    of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig...

  16. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  17. Kidney cancer progression linked to shifts in tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have uncovered a connection between how tumor cells use energy from metabolic processes and the aggressiveness of the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Prisoner's dilemma in cancer metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available As tumors outgrow their blood supply and become oxygen deprived, they switch to less energetically efficient but oxygen-independent anaerobic glucose metabolism. However, cancer cells maintain glycolytic phenotype even in the areas of ample oxygen supply (Warburg effect. It has been hypothesized that the competitive advantage that glycolytic cells get over aerobic cells is achieved through secretion of lactic acid, which is a by-product of glycolysis. It creates acidic microenvironment around the tumor that can be toxic to normal somatic cells. This interaction can be seen as a prisoner's dilemma: from the point of view of metabolic payoffs, it is better for cells to cooperate and become better competitors but neither cell has an incentive to unilaterally change its metabolic strategy. In this paper a novel mathematical technique, which allows reducing an otherwise infinitely dimensional system to low dimensionality, is used to demonstrate that changing the environment can take the cells out of this equilibrium and that it is cooperation that can in fact lead to the cell population committing evolutionary suicide.

  19. Glucose metabolism determines resistance of cancer cells to bioenergetic crisis after cytochrome-c release

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Heinrich J.; Dussmann, Heiko; Kilbride, Sean M.; Rehm, Markus; Prehn, Jochen H. M.

    2011-01-01

    How can cells cope with a bioenergetic crisis? In particular, how can cancer cells survive the bioenergetic consequences of cyt-c release that are often induced by chemotherapeutic agents, and that lead to depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, result in loss of ionic homeostasis and induce cell death? Is there an inherent population heterogeneity that can lead to a non-synchronous response to above cell death stimuli, thereby aggravating treatment and contributing to cli...

  20. A study on the functions of ubiquitin metabolic system related gene FBG2 in gastric cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Benyan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FBG2 (F-BOX6 gene is an important member in ubiquitin metabolic system F-BOX family, and forms E3 complex with the other members in the family. But its role in gastric cancer is still not clear. In the present study, we intended to investigate the influence of FBG2 on the growth, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and cell cycle of the gastric cancer line MKN45 and gastric cell line HFE145. Methods As a critical component of ubiquitin-protein ligase complex, FBG2 cDNA was subcloned into a constitutive vector PCDNA3.1 followed by transfection in MKN45 and HFE145 by using liposome. Then stable transfectants were selected and appraised. The apoptosis and cell cycles of these clones were analyzed by using flow cytometry. The growth and proliferation were analyzed by cell growth curves and colony-forming assay respectively. The invasion of these clones was tested by using cancer cell migration assay. The FBG2 stable expression clones(MKN-FBG2 and HFE-FBG2 and their control groups were detected and compared respectively. Results MKN-FBG2 grew faster than MKN45 and MKN-PC(MKN45 transfected with PCDNA3.1 vector. HFE-FBG2 grew faster than HFE145 and HFE-PC(HFE145 transfected with PCDNA3.1 vector. The cell counts of MKN-FBG2 in the forth, fifth, sixth and seventh days were significantly more than those of others (P Conclusion FBG2 can promote the growth and proliferation of gastric cancer cells and normal gastric cells. It can help tumor cell maintain malignant phenotype too. But it can have a negative influence on the apoptosis or the ability of invasion of gastric cancer cells.

  1. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Mario Cesari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ, an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1 arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2 causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis pathways, (3 detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4 induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5 stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6 inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7 inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  2. An integrated analysis of genes and pathways exhibiting metabolic differences between estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Soma; Davie, James R

    2007-01-01

    The sex hormone estrogen (E2) is pivotal to normal mammary gland growth and differentiation and in breast carcinogenesis. In this in silico study, we examined metabolic differences between ER(+)ve breast cancer cells during E2 deprivation. Public repositories of SAGE and MA gene expression data generated from E2 deprived ER(+)ve breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and ZR75-1 were compared with normal breast tissue. We analyzed gene ontology (GO), enrichment, clustering, chromosome localization, and pathway profiles and performed multiple comparisons with cell lines and tumors with different ER status. In all GO terms, biological process (BP), molecular function (MF), and cellular component (CC), MCF-7 had higher gene utilization than ZR75-1. Various analyses showed a down-regulated immune function, an up-regulated protein (ZR75-1) and glucose metabolism (MCF-7). A greater percentage of 77 common genes localized to the q arm of all chromosomes, but in ZR75-1 chromosomes 11, 16, and 19 harbored more overexpressed genes. Despite differences in gene utilization (electron transport, proteasome, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis) and expression (ribosome) in both cells, there was an overall similarity of ZR75-1 with ER(-)ve cell lines and ER(+)ve/ER(-)ve breast tumors. This study demonstrates integral metabolic differences may exist within the same cell subtype (luminal A) in representative ER(+)ve cell line models. Selectivity of gene and pathway usage for strategies such as energy requirement minimization, sugar utilization by ZR75-1 contrasted with MCF-7 cells, expressing genes whose protein products require ATP utilization. Such characteristics may impart aggressiveness to ZR75-1 and may be prognostic determinants of ER(+)ve breast tumors

  3. Application of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier blocker UK5099 creates metabolic reprogram and greater stem-like properties in LnCap prostate cancer cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yali; Li, Xiaoran; Yu, Dandan; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Yaqing; Long, Yuan; Yuan, Yuan; Ji, Zhenyu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jian-Guo; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is one of the important hallmarks of cancer cells and eukaryotic cells. In this study, we have investigated the relationship between blocking mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) with UK5099 and the metabolic alteration as well as stemness phenotype of prostatic cancer cells. It was found that blocking pyruvate transportation into mitochondrial attenuated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and increased glycolysis. The UK5099 treated cells showed significantly...

  4. Metformin targets the metabolic achilles heel of human pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Lonardo

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas contain a subset of exclusively tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are capable of repopulating the entire heterogeneous cancer cell populations and are highly resistant to standard chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate that metformin selectively ablated pancreatic CSCs as evidenced by diminished expression of pluripotency-associated genes and CSC-associated surface markers. Subsequently, the ability of metformin-treated CSCs to clonally expand in vitro was irreversibly abrogated by inducing apoptosis. In contrast, non-CSCs preferentially responded by cell cycle arrest, but were not eliminated by metformin treatment. Mechanistically, metformin increased reactive oxygen species production in CSC and reduced their mitochondrial transmembrane potential. The subsequent induction of lethal energy crisis in CSCs was independent of AMPK/mTOR. Finally, in primary cancer tissue xenograft models metformin effectively reduced tumor burden and prevented disease progression; if combined with a stroma-targeting smoothened inhibitor for enhanced tissue penetration, while gemcitabine actually appeared dispensable.

  5. Quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate inhibit glucose uptake and metabolism by breast cancer cells by an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Liliana, E-mail: lilianam87@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Araújo, Isabel, E-mail: isa.araujo013@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Costa, Tito, E-mail: tito.fmup16@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Correia-Branco, Ana, E-mail: ana.clmc.branco@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Ana, E-mail: anafaria@med.up.pt [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Chemistry Investigation Centre (CIQ), Faculty of Sciences of University of Porto, Rua Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences of University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Martel, Fátima, E-mail: fmartel@med.up.pt [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); Keating, Elisa, E-mail: keating@med.up.pt [Department of Biochemistry (U38-FCT), Faculty of Medicine of University of Porto, Alameda Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-07-15

    In this study we characterized {sup 3}H-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 3}H -DG) uptake by the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF7 and the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines and investigated the effect of quercetin (QUE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) upon {sup 3}H-DG uptake, glucose metabolism and cell viability and proliferation. In both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells {sup 3}H-DG uptake was (a) time-dependent, (b) saturable with similar capacity (V{sub max}) and affinity (K{sub m}), (c) potently inhibited by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), (d) sodium-independent and (e) slightly insulin-stimulated. This suggests that {sup 3}H-DG uptake by both cell types is mediated by members of the GLUT family, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4 or GLUT12, while being independent of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1). QUE and EGCG markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited {sup 3}H-DG uptake by MCF7 and by MDA-MB-231 cells, and both compounds blocked lactate production by MCF7 cells. Additionally, a 4 h-treatment with QUE or EGCG decreased MCF7 cell viability and proliferation, an effect that was more potent when glucose was available in the extracellular medium. Our results implicate QUE and EGCG as metabolic antagonists in breast cancer cells, independently of estrogen signalling, and suggest that these flavonoids could serve as therapeutic agents/adjuvants even for ER-negative breast tumors. -- Highlights: • Glucose uptake by MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is mainly mediated by GLUT1. • QUE and EGCG inhibit cellular glucose uptake thus abolishing the Warburg effect. • This process induces cytotoxicity and proliferation arrest in MCF7 cells. • The flavonoids’ effects are independent of estrogen receptor signalling.

  6. Quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate inhibit glucose uptake and metabolism by breast cancer cells by an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Liliana; Araújo, Isabel; Costa, Tito; Correia-Branco, Ana; Faria, Ana; Martel, Fátima; Keating, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    In this study we characterized 3 H-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 3 H -DG) uptake by the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF7 and the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines and investigated the effect of quercetin (QUE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) upon 3 H-DG uptake, glucose metabolism and cell viability and proliferation. In both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells 3 H-DG uptake was (a) time-dependent, (b) saturable with similar capacity (V max ) and affinity (K m ), (c) potently inhibited by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), (d) sodium-independent and (e) slightly insulin-stimulated. This suggests that 3 H-DG uptake by both cell types is mediated by members of the GLUT family, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4 or GLUT12, while being independent of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1). QUE and EGCG markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited 3 H-DG uptake by MCF7 and by MDA-MB-231 cells, and both compounds blocked lactate production by MCF7 cells. Additionally, a 4 h-treatment with QUE or EGCG decreased MCF7 cell viability and proliferation, an effect that was more potent when glucose was available in the extracellular medium. Our results implicate QUE and EGCG as metabolic antagonists in breast cancer cells, independently of estrogen signalling, and suggest that these flavonoids could serve as therapeutic agents/adjuvants even for ER-negative breast tumors. -- Highlights: • Glucose uptake by MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is mainly mediated by GLUT1. • QUE and EGCG inhibit cellular glucose uptake thus abolishing the Warburg effect. • This process induces cytotoxicity and proliferation arrest in MCF7 cells. • The flavonoids’ effects are independent of estrogen receptor signalling

  7. Imaging metabolic heterogeneity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Debanti; Pratx, Guillem

    2016-01-06

    As our knowledge of cancer metabolism has increased, it has become apparent that cancer metabolic processes are extremely heterogeneous. The reasons behind this heterogeneity include genetic diversity, the existence of multiple and redundant metabolic pathways, altered microenvironmental conditions, and so on. As a result, methods in the clinic and beyond have been developed in order to image and study tumor metabolism in the in vivo and in vitro regimes. Both regimes provide unique advantages and challenges, and may be used to provide a picture of tumor metabolic heterogeneity that is spatially and temporally comprehensive. Taken together, these methods may hold the key to appropriate cancer diagnoses and treatments in the future.

  8. Metabolic reprogramming by PCK1 promotes TCA cataplerosis, oxidative stress and apoptosis in liver cancer cells and suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Xi; Jin, Lei; Sun, Si-Jia; Liu, Peng; Feng, Xu; Cheng, Zhou-Li; Liu, Wei-Ren; Guan, Kun-Liang; Shi, Ying-Hong; Yuan, Hai-Xin; Xiong, Yue

    2018-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK or PCK) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in hepatic gluconeogenesis pathway to maintain blood glucose levels. Mammalian cells express two PCK genes, encoding for a cytoplasmic (PCPEK-C or PCK1) and a mitochondrial (PEPCK-M or PCK2) isoforms, respectively. Increased expressions of both PCK genes are found in cancer of several organs, including colon, lung, and skin, and linked to increased anabolic metabolism and cell proliferation. Here, we report that the expressions of both PCK1 and PCK2 genes are downregulated in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and low PCK expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with HCC. Forced expression of either PCK1 or PCK2 in liver cancer cell lines results in severe apoptosis under the condition of glucose deprivation and suppressed liver tumorigenesis in mice. Mechanistically, we show that the pro-apoptotic effect of PCK1 requires its catalytic activity. We demonstrate that forced PCK1 expression in glucose-starved liver cancer cells induced TCA cataplerosis, leading to energy crisis and oxidative stress. Replenishing TCA intermediate α-ketoglutarate or inhibition of reactive oxygen species production blocked the cell death caused by PCK expression. Taken together, our data reveal that PCK1 is detrimental to malignant hepatocytes and suggest activating PCK1 expression as a potential treatment strategy for patients with HCC.

  9. Metabolic reprogramming: a cancer hallmark even warburg did not anticipate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patrick S; Thompson, Craig B

    2012-03-20

    Cancer metabolism has long been equated with aerobic glycolysis, seen by early biochemists as primitive and inefficient. Despite these early beliefs, the metabolic signatures of cancer cells are not passive responses to damaged mitochondria but result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming required to support anabolic growth. Recent evidence suggests that metabolites themselves can be oncogenic by altering cell signaling and blocking cellular differentiation. No longer can cancer-associated alterations in metabolism be viewed as an indirect response to cell proliferation and survival signals. We contend that altered metabolism has attained the status of a core hallmark of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 4-Hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal metabolism differs in Apc(+/+) cells and in Apc(Min/+) cells: it may explain colon cancer promotion by heme iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Dalleau, Sabine; Taché, Sylviane; Gieules, Mathilde; Debrauwer, Laurent; Canlet, Cécile; Huc, Laurence; Dupuy, Jacques; Pierre, Fabrice H F; Guéraud, Françoise

    2011-11-21

    Animal and epidemiological studies suggest that dietary heme iron would promote colorectal cancer. Oxidative properties of heme could lead to the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic secondary lipid oxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE). This compound is more cytotoxic to mouse wild-type colon cells than to isogenic cells with a mutation on the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The latter thus have a selective advantage, possibly leading to cancer promotion. This mutation is an early and frequent event in human colorectal cancer. To explain this difference, the HNE biotransformation capacities of the two cell types have been studied using radiolabeled and stable isotope-labeled HNE. Apc-mutated cells showed better biotransformation capacities than nonmutated cells did. Thiol compound conjugation capacities were higher for mutated cells, with an important advantage for the extracellular conjugation to cysteine. Both cells types were able to reduce HNE to 4-hydroxynonanal, a biotransformation pathway that has not been reported for other intestinal cells. Mutated cells showed higher capacities to oxidize 4-hydroxynonanal into 4-hydroxynonanoic acid. The mRNA expression of different enzymes involved in HNE metabolism such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1, 2 and 3A1, glutathione transferase A4-4, or cystine transporter xCT was upregulated in mutated cells compared with wild-type cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that Apc-mutated cells are more efficient than wild-type cells in metabolizing HNE into thiol conjugates and 4-hydroxynonanoic acid due to the higher expression of key biotransformation enzymes. These differential biotransformation capacities would explain the differences of susceptibility between normal and Apc-mutated cells regarding secondary lipid oxidation products.

  11. The relationship of thioredoxin-1 and cisplatin resistance: its impact on ROS and oxidative metabolism in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Sullivan, Elizabeth J; Theodoropoulos, George; Wu, Chunjing; You, Min; Feun, Lynn G; Lampidis, Theodore J; Kuo, Macus T; Savaraj, Niramol

    2012-03-01

    Elimination of cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells remains a major obstacle. We have shown that cisplatin-resistant tumors have higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and can be exploited for targeted therapy. Here, we show that increased secretion of the antioxidant thioredoxin-1 (TRX1) resulted in lowered intracellular TRX1 and contributed to higher ROS in cisplatin-resistant tumors in vivo and in vitro. By reconstituting TRX1 protein in cisplatin-resistant cells, we increased sensitivity to cisplatin but decreased sensitivity to elesclomol (ROS inducer). Conversely, decreased TRX1 protein in parental cells reduced the sensitivity to cisplatin but increased sensitivity to elesclomol. Cisplatin-resistant cells had increased endogenous oxygen consumption and mitochondrial activity but decreased lactic acid production. They also exhibited higher levels of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and fumarase mRNA, which contributed to oxidative metabolism (OXMET) when compared with parental cells. Restoring intracellular TRX1 protein in cisplatin-resistant cells resulted in lowering ASS and fumarase mRNAs, which in turn sensitized them to arginine deprivation. Interestingly, cisplatin-resistant cells also had significantly higher basal levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). Overexpressing TRX1 lowered ACC and FAS proteins expressions in cisplatin-resistant cells. Chemical inhibition and short interfering RNA of ACC resulted in significant cell death in cisplatin-resistant compared with parental cells. Conversely, TRX1 overexpressed cisplatin-resistant cells resisted 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA)-induced death. Collectively, lowering TRX1 expression through increased secretion leads cisplatin-resistant cells to higher ROS production and increased dependency on OXMET. These changes raise an intriguing therapeutic potential for future therapy in cisplatin-resistant lung cancer.

  12. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 activity controls 4-hydroxynonenal metabolism and activity in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Ciamporcero, Eric; Medana, Claudio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Dal Bello, Federica; Minero, Valerio Giacomo; Toaldo, Cristina; Minelli, Rosalba; Uchida, Koji; Dianzani, Mario Umberto; Pili, Roberto; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2011-10-15

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is an end product of lipoperoxidation with antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties in various tumors. Here we report a greater sensitivity to HNE in PC3 and LNCaP cells compared to DU145 cells. In contrast to PC3 and LNCaP cells, HNE-treated DU145 cells showed a smaller reduction in growth and did not undergo apoptosis. In DU145 cells, HNE did not induce ROS production and DNA damage and generated a lower amount of HNE-protein adducts. DU145 cells had a greater GSH and GST A4 content and GSH/GST-mediated HNE detoxification. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a regulator of the antioxidant response. Nrf2 protein content and nuclear accumulation were higher in DU145 cells compared to PC3 and LNCaP cells, whereas the expression of KEAP1, the main negative regulator of Nrf2 activity, was lower. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression with specific siRNA resulted in a reduction in GST A4 expression and GS-HNE formation, indicating that Nrf2 controls HNE metabolism. In addition, Nrf2 knockdown sensitized DU145 cells to HNE-mediated antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity. In conclusion, we demonstrated that increased Nrf2 activity resulted in a reduction in HNE sensitivity in prostate cancer cells, suggesting a potential mechanism of resistance to pro-oxidant therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA Damage, Repair, and Cancer Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Marc-Olivier; Perry, Nicholas J. S.; Poulogiannis, George

    2018-01-01

    Although there has been a renewed interest in the field of cancer metabolism in the last decade, the link between metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair in cancer has yet to be appreciably explored. In this review, we examine the evidence connecting DNA damage and repair mechanisms with cell metabolism through three principal links. (1) Regulation of methyl- and acetyl-group donors through different metabolic pathways can impact DNA folding and remodeling, an essential part of accurate double strand break repair. (2) Glutamine, aspartate, and other nutrients are essential for de novo nucleotide synthesis, which dictates the availability of the nucleotide pool, and thereby influences DNA repair and replication. (3) Reactive oxygen species, which can increase oxidative DNA damage and hence the load of the DNA-repair machinery, are regulated through different metabolic pathways. Interestingly, while metabolism affects DNA repair, DNA damage can also induce metabolic rewiring. Activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers an increase in nucleotide synthesis and anabolic glucose metabolism, while also reducing glutamine anaplerosis. Furthermore, mutations in genes involved in the DDR and DNA repair also lead to metabolic rewiring. Links between cancer metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair are increasingly apparent, yielding opportunities to investigate the mechanistic basis behind potential metabolic vulnerabilities of a substantial fraction of tumors. PMID:29459886

  14. Interactions between epigenetics and metabolism in cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Jihye; Johnson, Jared L.; Hanigan, Christin L.; Locasale, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by widespread transcriptional changes and metabolic alterations. While it is widely accepted that the origin of cancer can be traced to the mutations that accumulate over time, relatively recent evidence favors a similarly fundamental role for alterations in the epigenome during tumorigenesis. Changes in epigenetics that arise from post-translational modifications of histones and DNA are exploited by cancer cells to upregulate and/or downregulate the expression levels of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, respectively. Although the mechanisms behind these modifications, in particular how they lead to gene silencing and activation, are still being understood, most of the enzymatic machinery of epigenetics require metabolites as substrates or cofactors. As a result, their activities can be influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of cancer epigenetics and metabolism and provide examples of where they converge.

  15. Interactions between epigenetics and metabolism in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihye eYun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progression is accompanied by widespread transcriptional changes and metabolic alterations. Although it is widely accepted that the origin of cancer can be traced to the mutations that accumulate over time, relatively recent evidence favors a similarly fundamental role for alterations in the epigenome during tumorigenesis. Changes in epigenetics that arise from post-translational modifications of histones and DNA, are exploited by cancer cells to upregulate and/or downregulate the expression levels of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, respectively. Although the mechanisms behind these modifications, in particular how they lead to gene silencing and activation, are still being understood, many enzymes that carry out post-translational modifications that alter epigenetics require metabolites as substrates or cofactors. As a result, their activities can be influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of cancer epigenetics and metabolism and provide examples of where they converge.

  16. Metabolic Reprogramming: A Cancer Hallmark Even Warburg Did Not Anticipate

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Patrick S.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has long been equated with aerobic glycolysis, seen by early biochemists as primitive and inefficient. Despite these early beliefs, the metabolic signatures of cancer cells are not passive responses to damaged mitochondria, but result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming required to support anabolic growth. Recent evidence suggests that metabolites themselves can be oncogenic by altering cell signaling and blocking cellular differentiation. No longer can cancer-ass...

  17. Mathematical modeling of cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2018-04-01

    Systemic approaches are needed and useful for the study of the very complex issue of cancer. Modeling has a central position in these systemic approaches. Metabolic reprogramming is nowadays acknowledged as an essential hallmark of cancer. Mathematical modeling could contribute to a better understanding of cancer metabolic reprogramming and to identify new potential ways of therapeutic intervention. Herein, I review several alternative approaches to metabolic modeling and their current and future impact in oncology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Metabolic Basis of Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W. Marston; Ricketts, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease; it is made up of a number of different types of cancer that occur in the kidney. Each of these different types of kidney cancer can have a different histology, have a different clinical course, can respond differently to therapy and is caused by a different gene. Kidney cancer is essentially a metabolic disease; each of the known genes for kidney cancer, VHL, MET, FLCN, TSC1, TSC2, TFE3, TFEB, MITF, fumarate hydratase (FH), succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB), succinate dehydrogenase D (SDHD), and PTEN genes is involved in the cells ability to sense oxygen, iron, nutrients or energy. Understanding the metabolic basis of kidney cancer will hopefully provide the foundation for the development of effective forms of therapy for this disease. PMID:22705279

  19. Targeting the latest hallmark of cancer: another attempt at 'magic bullet' drugs targeting cancers' metabolic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, M; Culf, A S; Touaibia, M; Lefort, N

    2012-10-01

    The metabolism of tumors is remarkably different from the metabolism of corresponding normal cells and tissues. Metabolic alterations are initiated by oncogenes and are required for malignant transformation, allowing cancer cells to resist some cell death signals while producing energy and fulfilling their biosynthetic needs with limiting resources. The distinct metabolic phenotype of cancers provides an interesting avenue for treatment, potentially with minimal side effects. As many cancers show similar metabolic characteristics, drugs targeting the cancer metabolic phenotype are, perhaps optimistically, expected to be 'magic bullet' treatments. Over the last few years there have been a number of potential drugs developed to specifically target cancer metabolism. Several of these drugs are currently in clinical and preclinical trials. This review outlines examples of drugs developed for different targets of significance to cancer metabolism, with a focus on small molecule leads, chemical biology and clinical results for these drugs.

  20. Recent advances in cancer metabolism: a technological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Pyo; Ward, Nathan P; DeNicola, Gina M

    2018-04-16

    Cancer cells are highly dependent on metabolic pathways to sustain both their proliferation and adaption to harsh microenvironments. Thus, understanding the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in tumors can provide critical insights for the development of therapies targeting metabolism. In this review, we will discuss recent advancements in metabolomics and other multidisciplinary techniques that have led to the discovery of novel metabolic pathways and mechanisms in diverse cancer types.

  1. Restoration of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase expression in renal cancer cells downregulates oncoproteins and affects key metabolic pathways as well as anti-oxidative system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popławski, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Rijntjes, Eddy; Richards, Keith; Rybicka, Beata; Köhrle, Josef; Piekiełko-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO1) contributes to deiodination of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (thyroxine, T4) yielding of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), a powerful regulator of cell differentiation, proliferation, and metabolism. Our previous work showed that loss of DIO1 enhances proliferation and migration of renal cancer cells. However, the global effects of DIO1 expression in various tissues affected by cancer remain unknown. Here, the effects of stable DIO1 re-expression were analyzed on the proteome of renal cancer cells, followed by quantitative real-time PCR validation in two renal cancer-derived cell lines. DIO1-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of thyroid hormones were quantified by L-MS/MS and correlations between expression of DIO1 and potential target genes were determined in tissue samples from renal cancer patients. Stable re-expression of DIO1, resulted in 26 downregulated proteins while 59 proteins were overexpressed in renal cancer cells. The 'downregulated' group consisted mainly of oncoproteins (e.g. STAT3, ANPEP, TGFBI, TGM2) that promote proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, DIO1 re-expression enhanced concentrations of two subunits of thyroid hormone transporter (SLC7A5, SLC3A2), enzymes of key pathways of cellular energy metabolism (e.g. TKT, NAMPT, IDH2), sex steroid metabolism and anti-oxidative response (AKR1C2, AKR1B10). DIO1 expression resulted in elevated intracellular concentration of T4. Expression of DIO1-affected genes strongly correlated with DIO1 transcript levels in tissue samples from renal cancer patients as well as with their poor survival. This first study addressing effects of deiodinase re-expression on proteome of cancer cells demonstrates that induced DIO1 re-expression in renal cancer robustly downregulates oncoproteins, affects key metabolic pathways, and triggers proteins involved in anti-oxidative protection. This data supports the notion that suppressed DIO1 expression and changes

  2. Restoration of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase expression in renal cancer cells downregulates oncoproteins and affects key metabolic pathways as well as anti-oxidative system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Popławski

    Full Text Available Type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO1 contributes to deiodination of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (thyroxine, T4 yielding of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3, a powerful regulator of cell differentiation, proliferation, and metabolism. Our previous work showed that loss of DIO1 enhances proliferation and migration of renal cancer cells. However, the global effects of DIO1 expression in various tissues affected by cancer remain unknown. Here, the effects of stable DIO1 re-expression were analyzed on the proteome of renal cancer cells, followed by quantitative real-time PCR validation in two renal cancer-derived cell lines. DIO1-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of thyroid hormones were quantified by L-MS/MS and correlations between expression of DIO1 and potential target genes were determined in tissue samples from renal cancer patients. Stable re-expression of DIO1, resulted in 26 downregulated proteins while 59 proteins were overexpressed in renal cancer cells. The 'downregulated' group consisted mainly of oncoproteins (e.g. STAT3, ANPEP, TGFBI, TGM2 that promote proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, DIO1 re-expression enhanced concentrations of two subunits of thyroid hormone transporter (SLC7A5, SLC3A2, enzymes of key pathways of cellular energy metabolism (e.g. TKT, NAMPT, IDH2, sex steroid metabolism and anti-oxidative response (AKR1C2, AKR1B10. DIO1 expression resulted in elevated intracellular concentration of T4. Expression of DIO1-affected genes strongly correlated with DIO1 transcript levels in tissue samples from renal cancer patients as well as with their poor survival. This first study addressing effects of deiodinase re-expression on proteome of cancer cells demonstrates that induced DIO1 re-expression in renal cancer robustly downregulates oncoproteins, affects key metabolic pathways, and triggers proteins involved in anti-oxidative protection. This data supports the notion that suppressed DIO1 expression

  3. Cancer-specific Therapeutic Potential of Resveratrol: Metabolic Approach against Hallmarks of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon Suh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCancer hallmarks include evading apoptosis, limitless replicative potential, sustained angiogenesis, tissue invasion and metastasis. Cancer cells undergo metabolic reprogramming and inevitably take advantage of glycolysis to meet the increased metabolic demand: rapid energy generation and macromolecular synthesis. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin, is known to exhibit pleiotropic anti-cancer effects most of which are linked to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells. This review summarizes various anti-cancer effects of resveratrol in the context of cancer hallmarks in relation to metabolic reprogramming.

  4. 1,25(OH)2D3 disrupts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer cells leading to a truncation of the TCA cycle and inhibition of TXNIP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Maaty, Mohamed A; Alborzinia, Hamed; Khan, Shehryar J; Büttner, Michael; Wölfl, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cell metabolism exhibits distinct profiles pre- and post-malignancy. The malignant metabolic shift converts prostate cells from "citrate-producing" to "citrate-oxidizing" cells, thereby enhancing glucose metabolism, a phenotype that contrasts classical tumoral Warburg metabolism. An on-line biosensor chip system (BIONAS 2500) was used to monitor metabolic changes (glycolysis and respiration) in response to the putative anti-cancer nutraceutical 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ], in different prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (LNCaP, VCaP, DU145 and PC3). LNCaP cells exhibited profound metabolic responsiveness to the treatment and thus extensive analysis of metabolism-modulating effects of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 were performed, including mRNA expression analysis of key metabolic genes (e.g. GLUT1 and PDHK1), analysis of TCA cycle metabolites, glucose uptake/consumption measurements, ATP production, and mitochondrial biogenesis/activity. Altogether, data demonstrate a vivid disruption of glucose metabolism by 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , illustrated by a decreased glucose uptake and an accumulation of citrate/isocitrate due to TCA cycle truncation. Depletion of glycolytic intermediates led to a consistent decrease in TXNIP expression in response to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , an effect that coincided with the activation of AMPK signaling and a reduction in c-MYC expression. Reduction in TXNIP levels in response to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 was rescued by an AMPK signaling inhibitor and mimicked by a MYC inhibitor highlighting the possible involvement of both pathways in mediating 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 's metabolic effects in PCa cells. Furthermore, pharmacological and genetic modulation of the androgen receptor showed similar and disparate effects on metabolic parameters compared to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 treatment, highlighting the AR-independent nature of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 's metabolism-modulating effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic syndrome induced by anticancer treatment in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Hee Won; Yoo, Jae Ho

    2017-06-01

    The number of childhood cancer survivors is increasing as survival rates improve. However, complications after treatment have not received much attention, particularly metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome comprises central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, and cancer survivors have higher risks of cardiovascular events compared with the general population. The mechanism by which cancer treatment induces metabolic syndrome is unclear. However, its pathophysiology can be categorized based on the cancer treatment type administered. Brain surgery or radiotherapy may induce metabolic syndrome by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which may induce pituitary hormone deficiencies. Local therapy administered to particular endocrine organs directly damages the organs and causes hormone deficiencies, which induce obesity and dyslipidemia leading to metabolic syndrome. Chemotherapeutic agents interfere with cell generation and growth, damage the vascular endothelial cells, and increase the cardiovascular risk. Moreover, chemotherapeutic agents induce oxidative stress, which also induces metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity caused by cancer treatment or the cancer itself, dietary restrictions, and the frequent use of antibiotics may also be risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Since childhood cancer survivors with metabolic syndrome have higher risks of cardiovascular events at an earlier age, early interventions should be considered. The optimal timing of interventions and drug use has not been established, but lifestyle modifications and exercise interventions that begin during cancer treatment might be beneficial and tailored education and interventions that account for individual patients' circumstances are needed. This review evaluates the recent literature that describes metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors, with a focus on its pathophysiology.

  6. Application of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier blocker UK5099 creates metabolic reprogram and greater stem-like properties in LnCap prostate cancer cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yali; Li, Xiaoran; Yu, Dandan; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Yaqing; Long, Yuan; Yuan, Yuan; Ji, Zhenyu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jian-Guo; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is one of the important hallmarks of cancer cells and eukaryotic cells. In this study, we have investigated the relationship between blocking mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) with UK5099 and the metabolic alteration as well as stemness phenotype of prostatic cancer cells. It was found that blocking pyruvate transportation into mitochondrial attenuated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and increased glycolysis. The UK5099 treated cells showed significantly higher proportion of side population (SP) fraction and expressed higher levels of stemness markers Oct3/4 and Nanog. Chemosensitivity examinations revealed that the UK5099 treated cells became more resistant to chemotherapy compared to the non-treated cells. These results demonstrate probably an intimate connection between metabolic reprogram and stem-like phenotype of LnCap cells in vitro. We propose that MPC blocker (UK5099) application may be an ideal model for Warburg effect studies, since it attenuates mitochondrial OXPHOS and increases aerobic glycolysis, a phenomenon typically reflected in the Warburg effect. We conclude that impaired mitochondrial OXPHOS and upregulated glycolysis are related with stem-like phenotype shift in prostatic cancer cells. PMID:26413751

  7. Pyruvate Kinase Triggers a Metabolic Feedback Loop that Controls Redox Metabolism in Respiring Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüning, N.M.; Rinnerthaler, M.; Bluemlein, K.; Mulleder, M.; Wamelink, M.M.C.; Lehrach, H.; Jakobs, C.A.J.M.; Breitenbach, M.; Ralser, M.

    2011-01-01

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism

  8. Melphalan metabolism in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagrave, J.C.; Valdez, J.G.; Tobey, R.A.; Gurley, L.R.

    1985-06-01

    Procedures are presented for the adaptation of reversed-phase-HPLC methods to accomplish separation and isolation of the cancer therapeutic drug melphalan (L-phenylalanine mustard) and its metabolic products from whole cells. Five major degradation products of melphalan were observed following its hydrolysis in phosphate buffer in vitro. The two most polar of these products (or modifications of them) were also found in the cytosol of Chinese hamster CHO cells. The amounts of these two polar products (shown not to be mono- or dihydroxymelphalan) were significantly changed by the pretreatment of cells with ZnC1 2 , one being increased in amount while the other was reduced to an insignificant level. In ZnC1 2 -treated cells, there was also an increased binding of melphalan (or its derivatives) to one protein fraction resolved by gel filtration-HPLC. These observations suggest that changes in polar melphalan products, and perhaps their interaction with a protein, may by involved in the reduction of melphalan cytotoxicity observed in ZnC1 2 -treated cells. While ZnC1 2 is also known to increase the level of glutathione in cells, no significant amounts of glutathione-melphalan derivatives of the type formed non-enzymatically in vitro could be detected in ZnC1 2 -treated or untreated cells. Formation of derivatives of melphalan with glutathione catabolic products in ZnC1 2 -treated cells has not yet been eliminated, however. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  9. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Burhan; Aziz, Shiekh Aejaz; Ganaie, Mohammad Ashraf; Mir, Mohammad Hussain

    2017-01-01

    The study was meant to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with breast cancer and to establish its role as an independent risk factor on occurrence of breast cancer. Fifty women aged between 40 and 80 years with breast cancer and fifty controls of similar age were assessed for metabolic syndrome prevalence and breast cancer risk factors, including age at menarche, reproductive status, live births, breastfeeding, and family history of breast cancer, age at diagnosis of breast cancer, body mass index, and metabolic syndrome parameters. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was found in 40.0% of breast cancer patients, and 18.0% of those in control group ( P = 0.02). An independent and positive association was seen between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer risk (odds ratio = 3.037; 95% confidence interval 1.214-7.597). Metabolic syndrome is more prevalent in breast cancer patients and is an independent risk factor for breast cancer.

  10. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Deepak [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-09-09

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  11. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  12. Lipid Metabolism, Apoptosis and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfa Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy.

  13. Berberine Regulated Lipid Metabolism in the Presence of C75, Compound C, and TOFA in Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen; Zhong, Zhangfeng; Wang, Shengpeng; Suo, Zhanwei; Yang, Xian; Hu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yitao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine interfering with cancer reprogramming metabolism was confirmed in our previous study. Lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function were also the core parts in reprogramming metabolism. In the presence of some energy-related inhibitors, including C75, compound C, and TOFA, the discrete roles of berberine in lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function were elucidated. An altered lipid metabolism induced by berberine was observed under the inhibition of FASN, AMPK, and ACC in breast cancer cell MCF-7. And the reversion of berberine-induced lipid suppression indicated that ACC inhibition might be involved in that process instead of FASN inhibition. A robust apoptosis induced by berberine even under the inhibition of AMPK and lipid synthesis was also indicated. Finally, mitochondrial function regulation under the inhibition of AMPK and ACC might be in an ACL-independent manner. Undoubtedly, the detailed mechanisms of berberine interfering with lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function combined with energy-related inhibitors need further investigation, including the potential compensatory mechanisms for ATP production and the upregulation of ACL.

  14. Berberine Regulated Lipid Metabolism in the Presence of C75, Compound C, and TOFA in Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine interfering with cancer reprogramming metabolism was confirmed in our previous study. Lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function were also the core parts in reprogramming metabolism. In the presence of some energy-related inhibitors, including C75, compound C, and TOFA, the discrete roles of berberine in lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function were elucidated. An altered lipid metabolism induced by berberine was observed under the inhibition of FASN, AMPK, and ACC in breast cancer cell MCF-7. And the reversion of berberine-induced lipid suppression indicated that ACC inhibition might be involved in that process instead of FASN inhibition. A robust apoptosis induced by berberine even under the inhibition of AMPK and lipid synthesis was also indicated. Finally, mitochondrial function regulation under the inhibition of AMPK and ACC might be in an ACL-independent manner. Undoubtedly, the detailed mechanisms of berberine interfering with lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function combined with energy-related inhibitors need further investigation, including the potential compensatory mechanisms for ATP production and the upregulation of ACL.

  15. Elucidating the Metabolic Plasticity of Cancer: Mitochondrial Reprogramming and Hybrid Metabolic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongya Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis, also referred to as the Warburg effect, has been regarded as the dominant metabolic phenotype in cancer cells for a long time. More recently, it has been shown that mitochondria in most tumors are not defective in their ability to carry out oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Instead, in highly aggressive cancer cells, mitochondrial energy pathways are reprogrammed to meet the challenges of high energy demand, better utilization of available fuels and macromolecular synthesis for rapid cell division and migration. Mitochondrial energy reprogramming is also involved in the regulation of oncogenic pathways via mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling and post-translational modification of oncoproteins. In addition, neoplastic mitochondria can engage in crosstalk with the tumor microenvironment. For example, signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts can drive tumor mitochondria to utilize OXPHOS, a process known as the reverse Warburg effect. Emerging evidence shows that cancer cells can acquire a hybrid glycolysis/OXPHOS phenotype in which both glycolysis and OXPHOS can be utilized for energy production and biomass synthesis. The hybrid glycolysis/OXPHOS phenotype facilitates metabolic plasticity of cancer cells and may be specifically associated with metastasis and therapy-resistance. Moreover, cancer cells can switch their metabolism phenotypes in response to external stimuli for better survival. Taking into account the metabolic heterogeneity and plasticity of cancer cells, therapies targeting cancer metabolic dependency in principle can be made more effective.

  16. Regulation of the Metabolism of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Butyrate in Colon Cancer Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmanová, Jiřina; Vaculová, Alena; Kozubík, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2013), s. 274-288 ISSN 1389-2010 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/07/1178; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/07/1557; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/1730 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : NF-KAPPA-B * HUMAN COLORECTAL - CANCER * INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.511, year: 2013

  17. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  18. Metabolic changes in cancer: beyond the Warburg effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Wu; Shimin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Altered metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells.The best-known metabolic abnormality in cancer cells is the Warburg effect,which demonstrates an increased glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen.However,tumor-related metabolic abnormalities are not limited to altered balance between glucose fermentation and oxidative phosphorylation.Key tumor genes such as p53 and c-myc are found to be master regulators of metabolism.Metabolic enzymes such as succinate dehydrogenase,fumarate hydratase,pyruvate kinase,and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations or expressing level alterations are all linked to tumorigenesis.In this review,we introduce some of the cancer-associated metabolic disorders and current understanding of their molecular tumorigenic mechanisms.

  19. Keratin 8/18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal versus cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulation of hexokinase status and insulin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jasmin; Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l' Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada); Faure, Robert [Département de Pédiatrie, Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (Centre Mère-Enfant), Québec, Qc, Canada G1V 4G2 (Canada); Marceau, Normand, E-mail: normand.marceau@crhdq.ulaval.ca [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l' Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    As differentiated cells, hepatocytes primarily metabolize glucose for ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation of glycolytic pyruvate, whereas proliferative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells undergo a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis despite oxygen availability. Keratins, the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, are expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatocyte and HCC (hepatoma) cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), thus providing models of choice to address K8/K18 IF functions in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate distinctive increases in glucose uptake, glucose-6-phosphate formation, lactate release, and glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatocytes and/or hepatoma cells versus their respective IF-containing counterparts. We also show that the K8/K18-dependent glucose uptake/G6P formation is linked to alterations in hexokinase I/II/IV content and localization at mitochondria, with little effect on GLUT1 status. In addition, we find that the insulin-stimulated glycogen formation in normal hepatocytes involves the main PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathway and that the K8/K18 IF loss makes them more efficient glycogen producers. In comparison, the higher insulin-dependent glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatoma cells is associated with a signaling occurring through a mTOR-dependent pathway, along with an augmentation in cell proliferative activity. Together, the results uncover a key K8/K18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal and cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulations of mitochondrial HK status and insulin-mediated signaling.

  20. Metabolically active tumour volume segmentation from dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET studies in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, Lieke L; Frings, Virginie; Hoekstra, Otto S; Kenny, Laura M; Aboagye, Eric O; Boellaard, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ([(18)F]FLT) can be used to assess tumour proliferation. A kinetic-filtering (KF) classification algorithm has been suggested for segmentation of tumours in dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET data. The aim of the present study was to evaluate KF segmentation and its test-retest performance in [(18)F]FLT PET in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Nine NSCLC patients underwent two 60-min dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET scans within 7 days prior to treatment. Dynamic scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) as well as with ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM). Twenty-eight lesions were identified by an experienced physician. Segmentation was performed using KF applied to the dynamic data set and a source-to-background corrected 50% threshold (A50%) was applied to the sum image of the last three frames (45- to 60-min p.i.). Furthermore, several adaptations of KF were tested. Both for KF and A50% test-retest (TRT) variability of metabolically active tumour volume and standard uptake value (SUV) were evaluated. KF performed better on OSEM- than on FBP-reconstructed PET images. The original KF implementation segmented 15 out of 28 lesions, whereas A50% segmented each lesion. Adapted KF versions, however, were able to segment 26 out of 28 lesions. In the best performing adapted versions, metabolically active tumour volume and SUV TRT variability was similar to those of A50%. KF misclassified certain tumour areas as vertebrae or liver tissue, which was shown to be related to heterogeneous [(18)F]FLT uptake areas within the tumour. For [(18)F]FLT PET studies in NSCLC patients, KF and A50% show comparable tumour volume segmentation performance. The KF method needs, however, a site-specific optimisation. The A50% is therefore a good alternative for tumour segmentation in NSCLC [(18)F]FLT PET studies in multicentre studies. Yet, it was observed that KF has the potential to subsegment

  1. Exosome-derived microRNAs in cancer metabolism: possible implications in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Marco; Lee, Wan; Santarelli, Lory; Neuzil, Jiri

    2017-01-20

    Malignant progression is greatly affected by dynamic cross-talk between stromal and cancer cells. Exosomes are secreted nanovesicles that have key roles in cell-cell communication by transferring nucleic acids and proteins to target cells and tissues. Recently, MicroRNAs (miRs) and their delivery in exosomes have been implicated in physiological and pathological processes. Tumor-delivered miRs, interacting with stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment, modulate tumor progression, angiogenesis, metastasis and immune escape. Altered cell metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of different types of tumor rely on mitochondrial metabolism by triggering adaptive mechanisms to optimize their oxidative phosphorylation in relation to their substrate supply and energy demands. Exogenous exosomes can induce metabolic reprogramming by restoring the respiration of cancer cells and supress tumor growth. The exosomal miRs involved in the modulation of cancer metabolism may be potentially utilized for better diagnostics and therapy.

  2. [The cancer tumor: a metabolic parasite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icard, Philippe; Lincet, Hubert

    2013-05-01

    Cancer cells activate glycolysis, glutaminolysis and β-oxidation to promote their biosynthesis. The low activity of pyruvate kinase, reexpressed in its embryonic isoform PKM2, generates a bottleneck at the end of glycolysis, which reorients glucose catabolism towards formation of molecules implied in numerous synthesis: ribose for nucleic acids, glycerol for lipid synthesis, etc. However, a part of glucose is transformed in pyruvate, which also comes from aminoacids catabolism. Due to the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, pyruvate is preferentially transformed into lactate, either in the presence of oxygen (Warburg effect). Lactate dehydrogenase reaction furnishes lactic acid, which acidifies the tumoral microenvironment, a process which favors the cellular growth and regenerates NAD(+), a crucial cofactor for the functioning of various metabolic pathways (glycolysis, DNA synthesis and repair…). Cancer cells consume a lot of glutamine, which replenish Krebs cycle (coupled with ATP production), and/or furnishes aspartate for nucleotides synthesis. This particular metabolism is sustained by activation of oncogenes (Myc, AKT, etc.) and suppressors inactivation (P53, PTEN…). Like a parasite, cells draw on reserves of the host to supply their own biosynthesis, while they secrete waste products (NO, polyamines, ammonia, lactate…) that promote cellular growth. A "symbiotic" cooperation could be established between tumor cells themselves, and/or with environmental cells, to maximize ATP production in relation with resources and oxygen concentration.

  3. Changes of Brain Glucose Metabolism in the Pretreatment Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Retrospective PET/CT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weishan; Ning, Ning; Li, Xianjun; Niu, Gang; Bai, Lijun; Guo, Youmin; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-to-brain communication has been emphasized by recent converging evidences. This study aimed to compare the difference of brain glucose metabolism between patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and control subjects. NSCLC patients prior to oncotherapy and control subjects without malignancy confirmed by 6 months follow-up were collected and underwent the resting state 18F-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) PET/CT. Normalized FDG metabolism was calculated by a signal intensity ratio of each brain region to whole brain. Brain glucose metabolism was compared between NSCLC patients and control group using two samples t-test and multivariate test by statistical parametric maps (SPM) software. Compared with the control subjects (n = 76), both brain glucose hyper- and hypometabolism regions with significant statistical differences (Pbrain signal transduction pathways, and the hypometabolism regions (the left superior parietal lobule, bilateral inferior parietal lobule and left fusiform gyrus) lied in dorsal attention network and visuospatial function areas. The changes of brain glucose metabolism exist in NSCLC patients prior to oncotherapy, which might be attributed to lung-cancer related visceral sympathetic activation and decrease of dorsal attention network function.

  4. Squamous cell cancer (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squamous cell cancer involves cancerous changes to the cells of the middle portion of the epidermal skin layer. It is ... malignant tumor, and is more aggressive than basal cell cancer, but still may be relatively slow-growing. It ...

  5. The effect of extracellular alkalinization on lactate metabolism of breast cancer stem cells: Overview of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1 and MCT4 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neolaka, G. M. G.; Yustisia, I.; Sadikin, M.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Changes in the metabolic status of cancer cells are presumed to be correlated with the adjustment of these cells to extracellular changes. Cell glycolysis increases the production of intracellular lactate catalyzed by the lactate dehydrogenases, both LDH-A and LDH-B. An increase in intracellular lactate can affect extracellular pH balance through monocarboxylate transporters, particularly MCT1 and MCT4. This study aimed to analyze the effects of extracellular alkalinization on the lactate metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In this study, human primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were treated with 100 mM sodium bicarbonate for 0.5, 24, and 48 h in DMEM F12/HEPES. After incubation, extracellular pH was measured and cells were harvested to extract the total RNA and protein. The expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 mRNA genes were analyzed using qRT-PCR method. Our study shows that administration of sodium bicarbonate in the BCSC culture medium could increase extracellular pH. To balance the increase of extracellular pH, BCSCs regulated the expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 genes. As the extracellular pH increases, the expression of LDH-A that converts pyruvate to lactate increased along with the increase of MCT 4 and MCT 1 expression, which act as lactate transporters. As the incubation time increases, the pH decreases, leading to the suppression of LDH-A and increase of LDH-B expression that converts lactate into pyruvate. Therefore, we suggest that the extracellular alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate in BCSCs affected the genes that regulate lactate metabolism.

  6. Lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia.

    OpenAIRE

    Mulligan, H. D.; Beck, S. A.; Tisdale, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of cancer cachexia on the oxidative metabolism of lipids has been studied in mice transplanted either with the MAC16 adenocarcinoma, which induces profound loss of body weight and depletion of lipid stores, or the MAC13 adenocarcinoma, which is the same histological type, but which grows without an effect on host body weight or lipid stores. While oxidation of D-[U-14C]glucose did not differ between animals bearing tumours of either type and non-tumour bearing controls, oxidation o...

  7. The NQO1 bioactivatable drug, β-lapachone, alters the redox state of NQO1+ pancreatic cancer cells, causing perturbation in central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, Molly A; Deja, Stanislaw; Singh, Naveen; Egnatchik, Robert A; Sudderth, Jessica; Luo, Xiuquan; Beg, Muhammad S; Burgess, Shawn C; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Boothman, David A; Merritt, Matthew E

    2017-11-03

    Many cancer treatments, such as those for managing recalcitrant tumors like pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, cause off-target toxicities in normal, healthy tissue, highlighting the need for more tumor-selective chemotherapies. β-Lapachone is bioactivated by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This enzyme exhibits elevated expression in most solid cancers and therefore is a potential cancer-specific target. β-Lapachone's therapeutic efficacy partially stems from the drug's induction of a futile NQO1-mediated redox cycle that causes high levels of superoxide and then peroxide formation, which damages DNA and causes hyperactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, resulting in extensive NAD + /ATP depletion. However, the effects of this drug on energy metabolism due to NAD + depletion were never described. The futile redox cycle rapidly consumes O 2 , rendering standard assays of Krebs cycle turnover unusable. In this study, a multimodal analysis, including metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized pyruvate, points to reduced oxidative flux due to NAD + depletion after β-lapachone treatment of NQO1+ human pancreatic cancer cells. NAD + -sensitive pathways, such as glycolysis, flux through lactate dehydrogenase, and the citric acid cycle (as inferred by flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase), were down-regulated by β-lapachone treatment. Changes in flux through these pathways should generate biomarkers useful for in vivo dose responses of β-lapachone treatment in humans, avoiding toxic side effects. Targeting the enzymes in these pathways for therapeutic treatment may have the potential to synergize with β-lapachone treatment, creating unique NQO1-selective combinatorial therapies for specific cancers. These findings warrant future studies of intermediary metabolism in patients treated with β-lapachone. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  9. Aerobic glycolysis and high level of lactate in cancer metabolism and microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic abnormalities is a hallmark of cancer. About 100 years ago, Nobel laureate Otto Heinrich Warburg first described high rate of glycolysis in cancer cells. Recently more and more novel opinions about cancer metabolism supplement to this hypothesis, consist of glucose uptake, lactic acid generation and secretion, acidification of the microenvironment and cancer immune evasion. Here we briefly review metabolic pathways generating lactate, and discuss the function of higher lactic acid in cancer microenvironments.

  10. NAD+ salvage pathway in cancer metabolism and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Barry E; Sharif, Tanveer; Martell, Emma; Dai, Cathleen; Kim, Youra; Lee, Patrick W K; Gujar, Shashi A

    2016-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) is an essential coenzyme for various physiological processes including energy metabolism, DNA repair, cell growth, and cell death. Many of these pathways are typically dysregulated in cancer cells, making NAD + an intriguing target for cancer therapeutics. NAD + is mainly synthesized by the NAD + salvage pathway in cancer cells, and not surprisingly, the pharmacological targeting of the NAD + salvage pathway causes cancer cell cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Several studies have described the precise consequences of NAD + depletion on cancer biology, and have demonstrated that NAD+ depletion results in depletion of energy levels through lowered rates of glycolysis, reduced citric acid cycle activity, and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. Additionally, depletion of NAD + causes sensitization of cancer cells to oxidative damage by disruption of the anti-oxidant defense system, decreased cell proliferation, and initiation of cell death through manipulation of cell signaling pathways (e.g., SIRT1 and p53). Recently, studies have explored the effect of well-known cancer therapeutics in combination with pharmacological depletion of NAD + levels, and found in many cases a synergistic effect on cancer cell cytotoxicity. In this context, we will discuss the effects of NAD + salvage pathway inhibition on cancer cell biology and provide insight on this pathway as a novel anti-cancer therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lipogenic metabolism: a viable target for prostate cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Liang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells often depend on altered metabolism compared with their normal counterparts. [1],[2],[3],[4] As observed in 1924 by Otto Warburg, cancer cells show preferential glucose consumption by way of aerobic glycolysis while normal cells generally assume mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. [4] Another metabolic hallmark of carcinogenesis is altered lipid metabolism, whereby cancer cells may adopt enhanced de novo lipid production (lipogenesis. [1],[2],[3] Enhanced lipid metabolism is also observed in individuals with metabolic syndromes potentially a consequence of increasing popularity of the Standard American Diet, composed of high levels of saturated fats and carbohydrates. [5] A growing body of epidemiological data indicates a positive correlation between the occurrence of metabolic syndromes, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, type-2 diabetes and associated hyperinsulemia, with the aggressiveness of cancer. [6],[7],[8],[9] Remarkably, it is estimated that for every 1% reduction in saturated fats, replaced by polyunsaturated, there would be a 2%-3% reduction in cardiovascular disease. [10] Thus, it is conceivable that an equally remarkable attenuation in cancer progression might be achieved with such a reduction in lipid accumulation.

  12. The metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Esther C.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Sleijfer, Dirk Th; Gietema, Jourik A.

    The metabolic syndrome, as a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors, may represent an important connection between cancer treatment and its common late effect of cardiovascular disease. Insight into the aetiology of the metabolic syndrome after cancer treatment might help to identify and treat

  13. Analysis of primary tumor metabolic volume during chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Eze, Chukwuka; Li, Minglun; Dantes, Maurice; Taugner, Julian [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Wijaya, Cherylina [Asklepios Fachkliniken Muenchen-Gauting, Department of Pulmonology, Munich (Germany); Tufman, Amanda; Huber, Rudolf Maria [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich and Thoracic Oncology Centre Munich, Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, Internal Medicine V, Munich (Germany); German Centre for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M) (Germany); Belka, Claus; Manapov, Farkhad [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital, Munich (Germany); German Centre for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M) (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-d-glucose integrated with computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) has an established role in the initial diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. However, a prognostic value of PET/CT during multimodality treatment has not yet been fully clarified. This study evaluated the role of primary tumor metabolic volume (PT-MV) changes on PET/CT before, during, and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). A total of 65 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) UICC stage IIIA/B (TNM 7th Edition) were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (sequential or concurrent setting). PET/CT was acquired before the start, at the end of the third week, and 6 weeks following CRT. Median overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 16 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12-20). In all, 60 (92.3%) patients were eligible for pre-treatment (pre-PT-MV), 28 (43%) for mid-treatment (mid-PT-MV), and 53 (81.5%) for post-treatment (post-PT-MV) volume analysis. Patients with pre-PT-MV >63 cm{sup 3} had worse OS (p < 0.0001). A reduction from mid-PT-MV to post-PT-MV of >15% improved OS (p = 0.001). In addition, patients with post-PT-MV > 25 cm{sup 3} had significantly worse outcome (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, performance status (p = 0.002, hazard ratio [HR] 0.007; 95% CI 0.00-0.158), pre-PT-MV1 < 63 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.027, HR 3.98; 95% CI 1.17-13.49), post-PT-MV < 25 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.013, HR 11.90; 95% CI 1.70-83.27), and a reduction from mid-PT-MV to post-PT-MV > 15% (p = 0.004, HR 0.25; 95% CI 0.02-0.31) correlated with improved OS. Our results demonstrated that pre- and post-treatment PT-MV, as well as an at least 15% reduction in mid- to post-PT-MV, significantly correlates with OS in patients with inoperable locally advanced NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Die kombinierte Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) mit {sup 18}F-2-Fluor-2-desoxy-D-Glukose und Computertomographie ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) hat sich in der initialen

  14. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Chattopadhyay

    Full Text Available In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  15. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Nibedita; Berger, Allison J; Koenig, Erik; Bannerman, Bret; Garnsey, James; Bernard, Hugues; Hales, Paul; Maldonado Lopez, Angel; Yang, Yu; Donelan, Jill; Jordan, Kristen; Tirrell, Stephen; Stringer, Bradley; Xia, Cindy; Hather, Greg; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Rhodes, Nelson; Amidon, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT) KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  16. Tumor cells have decreased ability to metabolize H2O2: Implications for pharmacological ascorbate in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Doskey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbate (AscH− functions as a versatile reducing agent. At pharmacological doses (P-AscH−; [plasma AscH−] ≥≈20 mM, achievable through intravenous delivery, oxidation of P-AscH− can produce a high flux of H2O2 in tumors. Catalase is the major enzyme for detoxifying high concentrations of H2O2. We hypothesize that sensitivity of tumor cells to P-AscH− compared to normal cells is due to their lower capacity to metabolize H2O2. Rate constants for removal of H2O2 (kcell and catalase activities were determined for 15 tumor and 10 normal cell lines of various tissue types. A differential in the capacity of cells to remove H2O2 was revealed, with the average kcell for normal cells being twice that of tumor cells. The ED50 (50% clonogenic survival of P-AscH− correlated directly with kcell and catalase activity. Catalase activity could present a promising indicator of which tumors may respond to P-AscH−.

  17. Metabolic Alterations Caused by KRAS Mutations in Colorectal Cancer Contribute to Cell Adaptation to Glutamine Depletion by Upregulation of Asparagine Synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Toda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of clinical trials have shown that KRAS mutations of colorectal cancer (CRC can predict a lack of responses to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor–based therapy. Recently, there have been several studies to elucidate metabolism reprogramming in cancer. However, it remains to be investigated how mutated KRAS can coordinate the metabolic shift to sustain CRC tumor growth. In this study, we found that KRAS mutation in CRC caused alteration in amino acid metabolism. KRAS mutation causes a marked decrease in aspartate level and an increase in asparagine level in CRC. Using several human CRC cell lines and clinical specimens of primary CRC, we demonstrated that the expression of asparagine synthetase (ASNS, an enzyme that synthesizes asparagine from aspartate, was upregulated by mutated KRAS and that ASNS expression was induced by KRAS-activated signaling pathway, in particular PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. Importantly, we demonstrated that KRAS-mutant CRC cells could become adaptive to glutamine depletion through asparagine biosynthesis by ASNS and that asparagine addition could rescue the inhibited growth and viability of cells grown under the glutamine-free condition in vitro. Notably, a pronounced growth suppression of KRAS-mutant CRC was observed upon ASNS knockdown in vivo. Furthermore, combination of L-asparaginase plus rapamycin markedly suppressed the growth of KRAS-mutant CRC xenografts in vivo, whereas either L-asparaginase or rapamycin alone was not effective. These results indicate ASNS might be a novel therapeutic target against CRCs with mutated KRAS.

  18. Constraint based modeling of metabolism allows finding metabolic cancer hallmarks and identifying personalized therapeutic windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordel, Sergio

    2018-04-13

    In order to choose optimal personalized anticancer treatments, transcriptomic data should be analyzed within the frame of biological networks. The best known human biological network (in terms of the interactions between its different components) is metabolism. Cancer cells have been known to have specific metabolic features for a long time and currently there is a growing interest in characterizing new cancer specific metabolic hallmarks. In this article it is presented a method to find personalized therapeutic windows using RNA-seq data and Genome Scale Metabolic Models. This method is implemented in the python library, pyTARG. Our predictions showed that the most anticancer selective (affecting 27 out of 34 considered cancer cell lines and only 1 out of 6 healthy mesenchymal stem cell lines) single metabolic reactions are those involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Excluding cholesterol biosynthesis, all the considered cell lines can be selectively affected by targeting different combinations (from 1 to 5 reactions) of only 18 metabolic reactions, which suggests that a small subset of drugs or siRNAs combined in patient specific manners could be at the core of metabolism based personalized treatments.

  19. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  20. Glycogen metabolism has a key role in the cancer microenvironment and provides new targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zois, Christos E; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells and contributes to their adaption within the tumour microenvironment and resistance to anticancer therapies. Recently, glycogen metabolism has become a recognised feature of cancer cells since it is upregulated in many tumour types, suggesting that it is an important aspect of cancer cell pathophysiology. Here, we provide an overview of glycogen metabolism and its regulation, with a focus on its role in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells under stress conditions such as hypoxia, glucose deprivation and anticancer treatment. The various methods to detect glycogen in tumours in vivo as well as pharmacological modulators of glycogen metabolism are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic value of targeting glycogen metabolism as a strategy for combinational approaches in cancer treatment.

  1. A POX on Renal Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proline oxidase, or POX, is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing the amino acid proline. POX contributes to the regulation of cell death that occurs when cellular systems malfunction, a process called apoptosis. Previous studies have determined that levels of POX are reduced in several types of human cancer. Likewise, many cancer cells become resistant to apoptosis, suggesting a link between POX and cancer cell survival.

  2. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  3. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis

  4. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  5. Signaling Pathways Regulating Redox Balance in Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Maria Chiara; Porporato, Paolo Ettore; Martini, Miriam; Morandi, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The interplay between rewiring tumor metabolism and oncogenic driver mutations is only beginning to be appreciated. Metabolic deregulation has been described for decades as a bystander effect of genomic aberrations. However, for the biology of malignant cells, metabolic reprogramming is essential to tackle a harsh environment, including nutrient deprivation, reactive oxygen species production, and oxygen withdrawal. Besides the well-investigated glycolytic metabolism, it is emerging that several other metabolic fluxes are relevant for tumorigenesis in supporting redox balance, most notably pentose phosphate pathway, folate, and mitochondrial metabolism. The relationship between metabolic rewiring and mutant genes is still unclear and, therefore, we will discuss how metabolic needs and oncogene mutations influence each other to satisfy cancer cells' demands. Mutations in oncogenes, i.e., PI3K/AKT/mTOR, RAS pathway, and MYC, and tumor suppressors, i.e., p53 and liver kinase B1, result in metabolic flexibility and may influence response to therapy. Since metabolic rewiring is shaped by oncogenic driver mutations, understanding how specific alterations in signaling pathways affect different metabolic fluxes will be instrumental for the development of novel targeted therapies. In the era of personalized medicine, the combination of driver mutations, metabolite levels, and tissue of origins will pave the way to innovative therapeutic interventions.

  6. Metabolic oxidative stress in cancer biology and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) exhibit increased glycolysis and pentose cycle activity. These metabolic alterations were thought to arise from damage to the respiratory mechanism and cancer cells were thought to compensate for this defect by increasing glycolysis (Science 132:309). In addition to its role in ATP production, glucose metabolism results in the formation of pyruvate and NADPH which both play an integral role in peroxide detoxification (Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 899:349). Recently, cancer cells have been shown to have enhanced susceptibility to glucose deprivation-induced oxidative stress, relative to normal cells, that is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS; Biochem.J. 418:29-37). These results support the hypothesis that cancer cells may have a defect in mitochondrial respiration leading to increased steady-state levels of ROS (i.e., O 2 and H 2 O 2 ) and glucose metabolism may be increased to provide reducing equivalents to compensate for this defect. The application of these findings to developing new combined modality cancer therapy protocols will be discussed. (author)

  7. Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Cholangiocarcinoma Stem-like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raggi, Chiara; Gammella, Elena; Correnti, Margherita

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating liver tumour arising from malignant transformation of bile duct epithelial cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are a subset of tumour cells endowed with stem-like properties, which play a role in tumour initiation, recurrence and metastasis. In appropriate con...... compartment as a novel metabolic factor involved in CCA growth, may have implications for a better therapeutic approach....

  8. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  9. Targeting cancer cells using 3-bromopyruvate for selective cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam H Baghdadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment deserves more research efforts despite intensive conventional treatment modalities for many types of malignancies. Metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy receive a lot of global research efforts. The current advances in cancer biology may improve targeting the critical metabolic differences that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Cancer cells are highly glycolytic for energy production, exhibit the Warburg effect, establish aggressive acidic microenvironment, maintain cancer stem cells, exhibit resistance to chemotherapy, have low antioxidant systems but different ΔΨm (delta psi, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, express P-glycoprotein for multidrug resistance, upregulate glucose transporters and monocarboxylate transporters and are under high steady-state reactive oxygen species conditions. Normal cells differ in all these aspects. Lactate produced through the Warburg effect helps cancer metastasis. Targeting glycolysis reactions for energy production in cancer cells seems promising in decreasing the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. 3-bromopyruvate makes use of cancer biology in treating cancer cells, cancer stem cells and preventing metastasis in human cancer as discussed in this review. Updated advances are analyzed here, which include research analysis of background, experience, readings in the field of cancer biology, oncology and biochemistry.

  10. Tumor Delineation and Quantitative Assessment of Glucose Metabolic Rate within Histologic Subtypes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Using Dynamic 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Tineke W H; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visser, Eric P; Oyen, Wim J G; Looijen-Salamon, Monika G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Verhagen, Ad F T M; Bussink, Johan; Vriens, Dennis

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To assess whether dynamic fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has added value over static 18 F-FDG PET for tumor delineation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiation therapy planning by using pathology volumes as the reference standard and to compare pharmacokinetic rate constants of 18 F-FDG metabolism, including regional variation, between NSCLC histologic subtypes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board. Patients gave written informed consent. In this prospective observational study, 1-hour dynamic 18 F-FDG PET/computed tomographic examinations were performed in 35 patients (36 resectable NSCLCs) between 2009 and 2014. Static and parametric images of glucose metabolic rate were obtained to determine lesion volumes by using three delineation strategies. Pathology volume was calculated from three orthogonal dimensions (n = 32). Whole tumor and regional rate constants and blood volume fraction (V B ) were computed by using compartment modeling. Results Pathology volumes were larger than PET volumes (median difference, 8.7-25.2 cm 3 ; Wilcoxon signed rank test, P PET images is in best agreement with pathology volume and could be useful for NSCLC autocontouring. Differences in glycolytic rate and V B between SCC and AC are relevant for research in targeting agents and radiation therapy dose escalation. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesori, V.; Piscaglia, A.C.; Samengo, D.; Barba, M.; Bernardini, C.; Scatena, R.; Pontoglio, A.; Castellini, L.; Spelbrink, H.; Maulucci, G.; Puglisi, M.A.; Pani, G.; Gasbarrini, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to

  12. Prognostic value of volumetric metabolic parameters measured by [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the prognostic value of volume-based metabolic positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) compared with other factors. Methods The subjects were 202 patients with pathologically proven SCLC who underwent pretreatment 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT). Volumetric metabolic parameters of intrathoracic malignant hypermetabolic lesions, including maximum and average standardized uptake value, sum of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and sum of total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were measured. Results 164 patients had died during follow-up (median 17.4 months) and median overall survival was 14 months. On univariate survival analysis, age, stage, treatment modality, sum of MTV (cutoff = 100 cm3), and sum of TLG (cutoff = 555) were significant predictors of survival. There was a very high correlation between the sum of MTV and the sum of TLG (r = 0.963, P < 0.001). On multivariate survival analysis, age (HR = 1.04, P < 0.001), stage (HR = 2.442, P < 0.001), and sum of MTV (HR = 1.662, P = 0.002) were independent prognostic factors. On subgroup analysis based on limited disease (LD) and extensive disease (ED), sum of MTV and sum of TLG were significant prognostic factors only in LD. Conclusion Both sum of MTV and sum of TLG of intrathoracic malignant hypermetabolic lesions are important independent prognostic factors for survival in patients with SCLC, in addition to age and clinical stage. However, it may be more useful in limited disease rather than in extensive disease. PMID:25609313

  13. Multiparametric imaging of patient and tumour heterogeneity in non-small-cell lung cancer: quantification of tumour hypoxia, metabolism and perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmpt, Wouter van; Zegers, Catharina M.L.; Reymen, Bart; Even, Aniek J.G.; Oellers, Michel; Troost, Esther G.C.; Lambin, Philippe [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Multiple imaging techniques are nowadays available for clinical in-vivo visualization of tumour biology. FDG PET/CT identifies increased tumour metabolism, hypoxia PET visualizes tumour oxygenation and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT characterizes vasculature and morphology. We explored the relationships among these biological features in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at both the patient level and the tumour subvolume level. A group of 14 NSCLC patients from two ongoing clinical trials (NCT01024829 and NCT01210378) were scanned using FDG PET/CT, HX4 PET/CT and DCE CT prior to chemoradiotherapy. Standardized uptake values (SUV) in the primary tumour were calculated for the FDG and hypoxia HX4 PET/CT scans. For hypoxia imaging, the hypoxic volume, fraction and tumour-to-blood ratio (TBR) were also defined. Blood flow and blood volume were obtained from DCE CT imaging. A tumour subvolume analysis was used to quantify the spatial overlap between subvolumes. At the patient level, negative correlations were observed between blood flow and the hypoxia parameters (TBR >1.2): hypoxic volume (-0.65, p = 0.014), hypoxic fraction (-0.60, p = 0.025) and TBR (-0.56, p = 0.042). At the tumour subvolume level, hypoxic and metabolically active subvolumes showed an overlap of 53 ± 36 %. Overlap between hypoxic sub-volumes and those with high blood flow and blood volume was smaller: 15 ± 17 % and 28 ± 28 %, respectively. Half of the patients showed a spatial mismatch (overlap <5 %) between increased blood flow and hypoxia. The biological imaging features defined in NSCLC tumours showed large interpatient and intratumour variability. There was overlap between hypoxic and metabolically active subvolumes in the majority of tumours, there was spatial mismatch between regions with high blood flow and those with increased hypoxia. (orig.)

  14. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  15. Exploiting immune cell metabolic machinery for functional HIV cure and the prevention of inflammaging

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Clovis S.; Palchaudhuri, Riya; Albargy, Hassan; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2018-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in immunology suggests that metabolic reprogramming and immune cell activation and functions are intricately linked. Viral infections, such as HIV infection, as well as cancer force immune cells to undergo major metabolic challenges. Cells must divert energy resources in order to mount an effective immune response. However, the fact that immune cells adopt specific metabolic programs to provide host defense against intracellular pathogens and how this metabolic shift impa...

  16. Improving the efficacy of hormone therapy in breast cancer: The role of cholesterol metabolism in SERM-mediated autophagy, cell differentiation and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leignadier, Julie; Dalenc, Florence; Poirot, Marc; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine

    2017-11-15

    Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most common female cancers in the world, with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BC the most frequent subtype. Tamoxifen (Tam) is an effective drug that competitively binds to the ER and is routinely used for the treatment of ER-positive BC. However, a number of ER-positive BC do not respond to Tam treatment and acquired resistance is often observed, constituting a major challenge for extending patient life expectancy. The mechanisms responsible for these treatment failures remain unclear, indicating the requirement for other targets and better predictors for patient response to Tam. One of Tam's off-targets of interest is the microsomal antiestrogen binding site (AEBS), a multiproteic complex made up of the cholesterol-5,6-epoxide hydrolase (ChEH) enzymes that are involved in the late stages of cholesterol biosynthesis. Tam and other selective ER modulators stimulate oxidative stress and inhibit the ChEH subunits at pharmacological doses, triggering the production and accumulation of cholesterol-5,6-epoxide metabolites responsible for BC cell differentiation and death. However, inhibition of the cholesterogenic activity of the AEBS subunits also induces the accumulation of sterol precursors, which triggers a survival autophagy to impair Tam's efficacy. Altogether, these studies have highlighted the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the pharmacology of Tam that has provided new clues on how to improve its therapeutic efficacy in both BC and other cancers as well as offering a new rationale for developing more efficient drugs for BC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism reduces human myeloma cells proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Tirado-Vélez

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of plasma cells. It has been proposed that targeting cancer cell metabolism would provide a new selective anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis would reduce cell proliferation in human myeloma cells. We evaluated the effect of etomoxir and orlistat on fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, cell cycle distribution, proliferation, cell death and expression of G1/S phase regulatory proteins in myeloma cells. Etomoxir and orlistat inhibited β-oxidation and de novo fatty acid synthesis respectively in myeloma cells, without altering significantly glucose metabolism. These effects were associated with reduced cell viability and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1. Specifically, etomoxir and orlistat reduced by 40-70% myeloma cells proliferation. The combination of etomoxir and orlistat resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Orlistat induced apoptosis and sensitized RPMI-8226 cells to apoptosis induction by bortezomib, whereas apoptosis was not altered by etomoxir. Finally, the inhibitory effect of both drugs on cell proliferation was associated with reduced p21 protein levels and phosphorylation levels of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid metabolism represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat human multiple myeloma.

  18. Alternative Cell Death Pathways and Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While necroptosis has for long been viewed as an accidental mode of cell death triggered by physical or chemical damage, it has become clear over the last years that necroptosis can also represent a programmed form of cell death in mammalian cells. Key discoveries in the field of cell death research, including the identification of critical components of the necroptotic machinery, led to a revised concept of cell death signaling programs. Several regulatory check and balances are in place in order to ensure that necroptosis is tightly controlled according to environmental cues and cellular needs. This network of regulatory mechanisms includes metabolic pathways, especially those linked to mitochondrial signaling events. A better understanding of these signal transduction mechanisms will likely contribute to open new avenues to exploit our knowledge on the regulation of necroptosis signaling for therapeutic application in the treatment of human diseases.

  19. Tumor microenvironment and metabolic synergy in breast cancers: critical importance of mitochondrial fuels and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Metabolic synergy or metabolic coupling between glycolytic stromal cells (Warburg effect) and oxidative cancer cells occurs in human breast cancers and promotes tumor growth. The Warburg effect or aerobic glycolysis is the catabolism of glucose to lactate to obtain adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This review summarizes the main findings on this stromal metabolic phenotype, and the associated signaling pathways, as well as the critical role of oxidative stress and autophagy, all of which promote carcinoma cell mitochondrial metabolism and tumor growth. Loss of Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) and the upregulation of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4) in stromal cells are novel markers of the Warburg effect and metabolic synergy between stromal and carcinoma cells. MCT4 and Cav-1 are also breast cancer prognostic biomarkers. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of the stromal Warburg effect. High ROS also favors cancer cell mitochondrial metabolism and tumorigenesis, and anti-oxidants can reverse this altered stromal and carcinoma metabolism. A pseudo-hypoxic state with glycolysis and low mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of hypoxia is a common feature in breast cancer. High ROS induces loss of Cav-1 in stromal cells and is sufficient to generate a pseudo-hypoxic state. Loss of Cav-1 in the stroma drives glycolysis and lactate extrusion via HIF-1α stabilization and the upregulation of MCT4. Stromal cells with loss of Cav-1 and/or high expression of MCT4 also show a catabolic phenotype, with enhanced macroautophagy. This catabolic state in stromal cells is driven by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), and JNK activation and high ROS generation. A feed-forward loop in stromal cells regulates pseudo-hypoxia and metabolic synergy, with Cav-1, MCT4, HIF-1α, NFκB, and ROS as its key elements. Metabolic synergy also may occur between cancer cells and cells in distant organs from the tumor. Cancer cachexia, which is due to severe organismal

  20. Metabolic microscopy of head and neck cancer organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies for head and neck cancer have primarily relied on cell lines or in vivo animal studies. However, a technique that combines the benefits of high-throughput in vitro studies with a complex, physiologically relevant microenvironment would be advantageous for understanding drug effects. Organoids provide a unique platform that fulfills these goals. Organoids are generated from excised and digested tumor tissue and are grown in culture. Fluorescence microscopy provides high-resolution images on a similar spatial scale as organoids. In particular, autofluorescence imaging of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can provide insight into response to anti-cancer treatment. The optical redox ratio reflects relative amounts of NAD(P)H and FAD, and the fluorescence lifetime reflects enzyme activity of NAD(P)H and FAD. This study optimizes and characterizes the generation and culture of organoids grown from head and neck cancer tissue. Additionally, organoids were treated for 24 hours with a standard chemotherapy, and metabolic response in the organoids was measured using optical metabolic imaging. Ultimately, combining head and neck cancer organoids with optical metabolic imaging could be applied to test drug sensitivity for drug development studies as well as treatment planning for cancer patients.

  1. Metabolic imaging for breast cancer detection and treatment: a role for mitochondrial Complex I function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2018-02-01

    Cancer cells are known to display a variety of metabolic reprogramming strategies to fulfill their own growth and proliferative agenda. With the advent of high resolution imaging strategies, metabolomics techniques etc., there is an increasing appreciation of critical role that tumor cell metabolism plays in the overall breast cancer (BC) growth. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated that the development of invasive cancers could be causally connected to deficits in mitochondrial function. Using this study as a rationale, we hypothesize that the widely accepted multistep tumor growth model might have a strong metabolic component as well. In this study, we explore the possibility of targeting mitochondrial Complex I enzyme system for not only metabolic detection of cancer-associated redox changes but also for modulating breast cancer cell growth characteristics. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two approaches (pharmacological and genetic) for modulating mitochondrial Complex I function so as to achieve breast cancer control.

  2. Cancer Clocks Out for Lunch: Disruption of Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Oscillation in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-h oscillations present in most eukaryotes and many prokaryotes that synchronize activity to the day-night cycle. They are an essential feature of organismal and cell physiology that coordinate many of the metabolic, biosynthetic, and signal transduction pathways studied in biology. The molecular mechanism of circadian rhythm is controlled both by signal transduction and gene transcription as well as by metabolic feedback. The role of circadian rhythm in cancer cell development and survival is still not well understood, but as will be discussed in this Review, accumulated research suggests that circadian rhythm may be altered or disrupted in many human cancers downstream of common oncogenic alterations. Thus, a complete understanding of the genetic and metabolic alterations in cancer must take potential circadian rhythm perturbations into account, as this disruption itself will influence how gene expression and metabolism are altered in the cancer cell compared to its non-transformed neighbor. It will be important to better understand these circadian changes in both normal and cancer cell physiology to potentially design treatment modalities to exploit this insight.

  3. Commentary on: "An integrated metabolic atlas of clear cell renal cell carcinoma." Hakimi AA, Reznik E, Lee CH, Creighton CJ, Brannon AR, Luna A, Aksoy BA, Liu EM, Shen R, Lee W, Chen Y, Stirdivant SM, Russo P, Chen YB, Tickoo SK, Reuter VE, Cheng EH, Sander C, Hsieh JJ.: Cancer Cell. 2016 Jan 11;29(1):104-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byron H

    2017-09-01

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, manifested through alterations in metabolites. We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response. Tumor progression and metastasis were associated with metabolite increases in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism pathways. We develop an analytic pipeline and visualization tool (metabolograms) to bridge the gap between TCGA transcriptomic profiling and our metabolomic data, which enables us to assemble an integrated pathway-level metabolic atlas and to demonstrate discordance between transcriptome and metabolome. Lastly, expression profiling was performed on a high-glutathione cluster, which corresponds to a poor-survival subgroup in the ccRCC TCGA cohort. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patients with old age or proximal tumors benefit from metabolic syndrome in early stage gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-li Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. METHODS: Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. RESULTS: Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P=0.036. Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P=0.009 in multivariate analysis or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P=0.047 in multivariate analysis. No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P=0.052 in univariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome X and Colon Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoulek, M.; Svobodová, S.; Svačina, Š.; Plavcová, Marie; Zvárová, Jana; Visokai, V.; Lipská, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 27, suppl. 1 (2003), s. 86 ISSN 0307-0565. [European Congress on Obesity /12./. 29.05.2003-01.06.2003, Helsinki] R&D Projects: GA MZd NB6635; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : metabolic syndrome X * colon cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  6. Metabolic features of the cell danger response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviaux, Robert K

    2014-05-01

    The cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis. The resulting metabolic mismatch between available resources and functional capacity produces a cascade of changes in cellular electron flow, oxygen consumption, redox, membrane fluidity, lipid dynamics, bioenergetics, carbon and sulfur resource allocation, protein folding and aggregation, vitamin availability, metal homeostasis, indole, pterin, 1-carbon and polyamine metabolism, and polymer formation. The first wave of danger signals consists of the release of metabolic intermediates like ATP and ADP, Krebs cycle intermediates, oxygen, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and is sustained by purinergic signaling. After the danger has been eliminated or neutralized, a choreographed sequence of anti-inflammatory and regenerative pathways is activated to reverse the CDR and to heal. When the CDR persists abnormally, whole body metabolism and the gut microbiome are disturbed, the collective performance of multiple organ systems is impaired, behavior is changed, and chronic disease results. Metabolic memory of past stress encounters is stored in the form of altered mitochondrial and cellular macromolecule content, resulting in an increase in functional reserve capacity through a process known as mitocellular hormesis. The systemic form of the CDR, and its magnified form, the purinergic life-threat response (PLTR), are under direct control by ancient pathways in the brain that are ultimately coordinated by centers in the brainstem. Chemosensory integration of whole body metabolism occurs in the brainstem and is a prerequisite for normal brain, motor, vestibular, sensory, social, and speech development. An understanding of the CDR permits us to reframe old concepts of pathogenesis for a broad array of chronic, developmental

  7. Paradigm shift in cancer treatment: Cancer treatment as a metabolic disease – fusion of Eastern and Western medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reo Hamaguchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current standard therapies for cancer, including surgery, anti-cancer drugs, and radiotherapy, are thought to contribute to the improvement in the survival rates of cancer patients. However, such standard therapies have 3 major problems: in advanced cancers, it is unlikely that standard cancer treatments will cure the disease; adverse side effects that accompany standard cancer treatments put many patients in distress; and a large amount of medical expenditure is required for new and expensive anti-cancer drugs. These problems may be viewed as a result of establishing treatments without any consideration regarding the root cause of the cancer. Otto Warburg suggested that particular changes in the energy metabolism of cells, which are associated with a shortage of oxygen, are the root cause of cancer. Cancer cells have unique metabolic characteristics, and thus we believe that it is important to treat cancer as a metabolic disease. More specifically, not only is it important to suppress cancer cell metabolism, but it is also important to improve the chronic inflammation that is associated with the development and progression of cancer, and to support the functions of immune cells. This type of view of cancer treatment coincides with the principles of Chinese medicine, which has a history of 4000 years, such as “fuzheng quxie” and “zhibing qiuben”, which can assist in the establishment of cancer treatments for patients. In this article, we discuss cancer treatments from the view of cancer as a metabolic disease and their association with Chinese medicine, and introduce some clinical cases along with a review of the literature.

  8. Cancer progression by reprogrammed BCAA metabolism in myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Ayuna; Tsunoda, Makoto; Konuma, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Nagy, Tamas; Glushka, John; Tayyari, Fariba; McSkimming, Daniel; Kannan, Natarajan; Tojo, Arinobu; Edison, Arthur S; Ito, Takahiro

    2017-05-25

    Reprogrammed cellular metabolism is a common characteristic observed in various cancers. However, whether metabolic changes directly regulate cancer development and progression remains poorly understood. Here we show that BCAT1, a cytosolic aminotransferase for branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), is aberrantly activated and functionally required for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in humans and in mouse models of CML. BCAT1 is upregulated during progression of CML and promotes BCAA production in leukaemia cells by aminating the branched-chain keto acids. Blocking BCAT1 gene expression or enzymatic activity induces cellular differentiation and impairs the propagation of blast crisis CML both in vitro and in vivo. Stable-isotope tracer experiments combined with nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic analysis demonstrate the intracellular production of BCAAs by BCAT1. Direct supplementation with BCAAs ameliorates the defects caused by BCAT1 knockdown, indicating that BCAT1 exerts its oncogenic function through BCAA production in blast crisis CML cells. Importantly, BCAT1 expression not only is activated in human blast crisis CML and de novo acute myeloid leukaemia, but also predicts disease outcome in patients. As an upstream regulator of BCAT1 expression, we identified Musashi2 (MSI2), an oncogenic RNA binding protein that is required for blast crisis CML. MSI2 is physically associated with the BCAT1 transcript and positively regulates its protein expression in leukaemia. Taken together, this work reveals that altered BCAA metabolism activated through the MSI2-BCAT1 axis drives cancer progression in myeloid leukaemia.

  9. Survival prognostic value of morphological and metabolic variables in patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domachevsky, L. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva (Israel); Groshar, D.; Bernstine, H. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Galili, R. [Lady Davis-Carmel Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Haifa (Israel); Saute, M. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Petah Tiqva (Israel)

    2015-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important, as patients with resectable disease and poor prognostic variables might benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate SUVmax, SUVmax ratio, CT volume (CTvol), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolisis (TLG) as survival prognostic markers. In addition, we defined two variables; MTV x SUVmax (MTVmax) and CTvol x SUVmax (CTvolmax) and assessed whether they can be used as prognostic markers. Patients with stage I-II NSCLC who underwent 18 F FDG PET/CT and surgery were evaluated. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to determine the association between variables and survival. Similar analysis was performed in cases with no lymph node (LN) involvement. One hundred and eighty-one patients were included (at the end of the study, 140 patients were alive). SUVmax with a cut-off value of 8.2 was significant survival prognostic factor regardless of LN involvement (P = 0.012). In cases with no LN involvement, SUVmax and CTvol (≥7.1 ml) were significant survival prognostic factors with P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively. SUVmax may be a useful prognostic variable in stage I-II NSCLC while morphologic tumour volume might be useful in cases with no lymph node involvement. (orig.)

  10. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Angela S. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roberts, Paul C. [Biomedical Science and Pathobiology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Frisard, Madlyn I. [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Hulver, Matthew W., E-mail: hulvermw@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Schmelz, Eva M., E-mail: eschmelz@vt.edu [Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L{sub FFLv} (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth.

  11. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Angela S.; Roberts, Paul C.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L FFLv (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth

  12. Early Change in Metabolic Tumor Heterogeneity during Chemoradiotherapy and Its Prognostic Value for Patients with Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhe Dong

    Full Text Available To observe the early change of metabolic tumor heterogeneity during chemoradiotherapy and to determine its prognostic value for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC.From January 2007 to March 2010, 58 patients with NSCLC were included who were received 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET/CT before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy with the concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CCRT. Primary tumor FDG uptake heterogeneity was determined using global and local scale textural features extracted from standardized uptake value (SUV histogram analysis (coefficient of variation [COV], skewness, kurtosis, area under the curve of the cumulative SUV histogram [AUC-CSH] and normalized gray-level co-occurrence matrix (contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, homogeneity. SUVmax and metabolic tumor volume (MTV were also evaluated. Correlations were analyzed between parameters on baseline or during treatments with tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS, and overall survival (OS.Compared with non-responders, responders showed significantly greater pre-treatment COV, contrast and MTV (AUC = 0.781, 0.804, 0.686, respectively. Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that early change of tumor textural analysis serves as a response predictor with higher sensitivity (73.2%~92.1% and specificity (80.0%~83.6% than baseline parameters. Change in AUC-CSH and dissimilarity during CCRT could also predict response with optimal cut-off values (33.0% and 28.7%, respectively. The patients with greater changes in contrast and AUC-CSH had significantly higher 5-year OS (P = 0.008, P = 0.034 and PFS (P = 0.007, P = 0.039. In multivariate analysis, only change in contrast was found as the independent prognostic factor of PFS (HR 0.476, P = 0.021 and OS (HR 0.519, P = 0.015.The metabolic tumor heterogeneity change during CCRT characterized by global and local scale textural features may be valuable for predicting treatment response

  13. Different energy metabolism in two human small cell lung cancer subpopulations examined by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Spang-Thomsen, M; Quistorff, B

    1991-01-01

    Two human small cell lung cancer tumor lines, maintained as solid tumor xenografts on nude mice and as in vitro cell cultures, were studied by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by biochemical analysis of extracts of solid tumors and cell cultures. The tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and CPH...

  14. Thymoquinone regulates gene expression levels in the estrogen metabolic and interferon pathways in MCF7 breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    MOTAGHED, MARJANEH; AL-HASSAN, FAISAL MUTI; HAMID, SHAHRUL SAHUL

    2013-01-01

    New drugs are continuously being developed for the treatment of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Thymoquinone is one of the drugs that exhibits anticancer characteristics based on in vivo and in vitro models. This study further investigates the effects of thymoquinone on human gene expression using cDNA microarray technology. The quantification of RNA samples was carried out using an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyser to determine the RNA integrity number (RIN). The Agilent Low I...

  15. One-Carbon Metabolism in Prostate Cancer: The Role of Androgen Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Corbin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cell metabolism differs significantly from the metabolism of non-transformed cells. This altered metabolic reprogramming mediates changes in the uptake and use of nutrients that permit high rates of proliferation, growth, and survival. The androgen receptor (AR plays an essential role in the establishment and progression of prostate cancer (PCa, and in the metabolic adaptation that takes place during this progression. In its role as a transcription factor, the AR directly affects the expression of several effectors and regulators of essential catabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Indirectly, as a modulator of the one-carbon metabolism, the AR can affect epigenetic processes, DNA metabolism, and redox balance, all of which are important factors in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on the role of AR-signaling on one-carbon metabolism in tumorigenesis. Clinical implications of one-carbon metabolism and AR-targeted therapies for PCa are discussed in this context.

  16. One-Carbon Metabolism in Prostate Cancer: The Role of Androgen Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Joshua M.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell metabolism differs significantly from the metabolism of non-transformed cells. This altered metabolic reprogramming mediates changes in the uptake and use of nutrients that permit high rates of proliferation, growth, and survival. The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the establishment and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and in the metabolic adaptation that takes place during this progression. In its role as a transcription factor, the AR directly affects the expression of several effectors and regulators of essential catabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Indirectly, as a modulator of the one-carbon metabolism, the AR can affect epigenetic processes, DNA metabolism, and redox balance, all of which are important factors in tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on the role of AR-signaling on one-carbon metabolism in tumorigenesis. Clinical implications of one-carbon metabolism and AR-targeted therapies for PCa are discussed in this context. PMID:27472325

  17. Cancer metabolism and the Warburg effect: the role of HIF-1 and PI3K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtnay, Rupert; Ngo, Darleen C; Malik, Neha; Ververis, Katherine; Tortorella, Stephanie M; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells have been shown to have altered metabolism when compared to normal non-malignant cells. The Warburg effect describes a phenomenon in which cancer cells preferentially metabolize glucose by glycolysis, producing lactate as an end product, despite being the presence of oxygen. The phenomenon was first described by Otto Warburg in the 1920s, and has resurfaced as a controversial theory, with both supportive and opposing arguments. The biochemical aspects of the Warburg effect outline a strong explanation for the cause of cancer cell proliferation, by providing the biological requirements for a cell to grow. Studies have shown that pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) as well as hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) are central regulators of glycolysis, cancer metabolism and cancer cell proliferation. Studies have shown that PI3K signaling pathways have a role in many cellular processes such as metabolism, inflammation, cell survival, motility and cancer progression. Herein, the cellular aspects of the PI3K pathway are described, as well as the influence HIF has on cancer cell metabolism. HIF-1 activation has been related to angiogenesis, erythropoiesis and modulation of key enzymes involved in aerobic glycolysis, thereby modulating key processes required for the Warburg effect. In this review we discuss the molecular aspects of the Warburg effect with a particular emphasis on the role of the HIF-1 and the PI3K pathway.

  18. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Probing energy metabolism and microviscosity in cancer using FLIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lukina, Maria M.; Shimolina, Lyubov'E.; Kuimova, Marina K.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Shcheslavskiy, Vladislav I.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a promising non-invasive highly sensitive technique for probing multiple physiological and physicochemical parameters in living cells and tissues. The present study is focused on the investigation of bioenergetics and microscopic viscosity of cultured cancer cells and animal tumors using FLIM during natural growth and chemotherapy. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of the metabolic cofactor NAD(P)H revealed a decrease of the relative amplitude of free NAD(P)H after cisplatin treatment, indicating a change towards a more oxidative metabolic state. Microviscosity mapping performed with the use of fluorescent molecular rotor BODIPY-2 showed a pronounced increase in the plasma membrane viscosity in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. Although biochemical mechanisms underlying the metabolic and viscosity alterations during chemotherapy have yet to be clarified, our data suggest that the cisplatin-induced changes in cellular metabolism and membrane viscosity play a role in the cytotoxicity of the drug. The results of the study contribute to an understanding of mechanisms of cisplatin action and will be useful for development new approach for assessing response to a therapy.

  20. New paradigms for metabolic modeling of human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    review recent work on reconstruction of GEMs for human cell/tissue types and cancer, and the use of GEMs for identification of metabolic changes occurring in response to disease development. We further discuss how GEMs can be used for the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. Finally......, challenges in integration of cell/tissue models for simulation of whole body functions as well as integration of GEMs with other biological networks for generating complete cell/tissue models are presented.......Abnormalities in cellular functions are associated with the progression of human diseases, often resulting in metabolic reprogramming. GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs) have enabled studying global metabolic reprogramming in connection with disease development in a systematic manner. Here we...

  1. Metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer associations: biochemical and pathophysiological evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Palo, Rossella; Lamantia, Elvira; Castaldo, Luigi; Nocerino, Flavia; Ametrano, Gianluca; Cappuccio, Francesca; Malzone, Gabriella; Montanari, Micaela; Vanacore, Daniela; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pepe, Maria Filomena; Berretta, Massimiliano; D'Aniello, Carmine; Perdonà, Sisto; Muto, Paolo; Botti, Gerardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; De Falco, Francesco; Maiolino, Piera; Caraglia, Michele; Montella, Maurizio; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the main pathophysiological basis of the relationship between metabolic syndrome, endocrine disruptor exposure and prostate cancer that is the most common cancer among men in industrialized countries. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic and hormonal factors having a central role in the initiation and recurrence of many western chronic diseases including hormonal-related cancers and it is considered as the worlds leading health problem in the coming years. Many biological factors correlate metabolic syndrome to prostate cancer and this review is aimed to focus, principally, on growth factors, cytokines, adipokines, central obesity, endocrine abnormalities and exposure to specific endocrine disruptors, a cluster of chemicals, to which we are daily exposed, with a hormone-like structure influencing oncogenes, tumor suppressors and proteins with a key role in metabolism, cell survival and chemo-resistance of prostate cancer cells. Finally, this review will analyze, from a molecular point of view, how specific foods could reduce the relative risk of incidence and recurrence of prostate cancer or inhibit the biological effects of endocrine disruptors on prostate cancer cells. On the basis of these considerations, prostate cancer remains a great health problem in terms of incidence and prevalence and interventional studies based on the treatment of metabolic syndrome in cancer patients, minimizing exposure to endocrine disruptors, could be a key point in the overall management of this disease. PMID:28389628

  2. Nutritional Ketosis Condition and Specific Ketogenic Diet, May Benefit Cancer Patients as an Alternative Treatment by Sudden Change in the Metabolic State of Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Somayeh Zaminpira; Somayeh Zaminpira

    2017-01-01

    Cancer disease is the second cause of death in the United States and world-wide. Most Researchers estimate that 595,690 of American people will die from cancer at the end of the year 2017. That means 1,600 deaths/day approximately [1]. Cancer in modern societies is commonly treated with the combination of organ surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Many kinds of diet strategies have been experimented. However, none of them have been particularly effective. Interestingly, the...

  3. Metabolic Signaling and Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by...which makes them attractive therapeutic targets. However, the development of targeted agents in lung cancer is still in its infancy, despite the...notion that metabolites can act as signaling molecules in distant metabolic pathways is gaining significant attentionand support (Figure 1A). Some of the

  4. The importance of the stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 in the uptake of transferrin and in iron metabolism in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Bourseau-Guilmain

    Full Text Available As the pentaspan stem cell marker CD133 was shown to bind cholesterol and to localize in plasma membrane protrusions, we investigated a possible function for CD133 in endocytosis. Using the CD133 siRNA knockdown strategy and non-differentiated human colon cancer Caco-2 cells that constitutively over-expressed CD133, we provide for the first time direct evidence for a role of CD133 in the intracellular accumulation of fluorescently labeled extracellular compounds. Assessed using AC133 monoclonal antibody, CD133 knockdown was shown to improve Alexa488-transferrin (Tf uptake in Caco-2 cells but had no impact on FITC-dextran or FITC-cholera-toxin. Absence of effect of the CD133 knockdown on Tf recycling established a role for CD133 in inhibiting Tf endocytosis rather than in stimulating Tf exocytosis. Use of previously identified inhibitors of known endocytic pathways and the positive impact of CD133 knockdown on cellular uptake of clathrin-endocytosed synthetic lipid nanocapsules supported that CD133 impact on endocytosis was primarily ascribed to the clathrin pathway. Also, cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrine up regulated Tf uptake at greater intensity in the CD133(high situation than in the CD133(low situation, thus suggesting a role for cholesterol in the inhibitory effect of CD133 on endocytosis. Interestingly, cell treatment with the AC133 antibody down regulated Tf uptake, thus demonstrating that direct extracellular binding to CD133 could affect endocytosis. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy established that down regulation of CD133 improved the accessibility to the TfR from the extracellular space, providing a mechanism by which CD133 inhibited Tf uptake. As Tf is involved in supplying iron to the cell, effects of iron supplementation and deprivation on CD133/AC133 expression were investigated. Both demonstrated a dose-dependent down regulation here discussed to the light of transcriptional and post

  5. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  6. Connecting Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Stem Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanet, Anaïs; Arnould, Thierry; Najimi, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    As sites of cellular respiration and energy production, mitochondria play a central role in cell metabolism. Cell differentiation is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and activity and with a metabolic shift toward increased oxidative phosphorylation activity. The opposite occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies have provided evidence of mitochondrial and metabolic changes during the differentiation of both embryonic and somatic (or adult) stem cells (SSCs), such as hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and tissue-specific progenitor cells. We thus propose to consider those mitochondrial and metabolic changes as hallmarks of differentiation processes. We review how mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and function are directly involved in embryonic and SSC differentiation and how metabolic and sensing pathways connect mitochondria and metabolism with cell fate and pluripotency. Understanding the basis of the crosstalk between mitochondria and cell fate is of critical importance, given the promising application of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In addition to the development of novel strategies to improve the in vitro lineage-directed differentiation of stem cells, understanding the molecular basis of this interplay could lead to the identification of novel targets to improve the treatment of degenerative diseases. PMID:26134242

  7. Metabolic tumor volume measured by F 18 FDG PET/CT can further stratify the prognosis of patients with stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Ja Hae; Chong, Ar I; Kwon, Seong Young; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    This study aimed to further stratify prognostic factors in patients with stage IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by measuring their metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The subjects of this retrospective study were 57 patients with stage IV NSCLC. MTV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured on F 18 FDG PET/CT in both the primary lung lesion as well as metastatic lesions in torso. Optimal cutoff values of PET parameters were mea measured by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve anal analysis. Kaplan Meier survival (PET). The univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards models were used to select the significant prognostic factors. Univariate analysis showed that both MTV and TLG of primary lung lesion (MTV lung and TLG lung) were significant factors for prediction of PFS ( <0.001 =0.038, respectively). Patients showing lower values of MTV lung and TLG lung than the cutoff values had significantly longer mean PFS than those with higher values. hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of MTV lung and TLG lung measured by univariate analysis were 6.4 (2.5 16.3) and 2.4 (1.0 5.5), respectively. multivariate analysis revealed that MTV lung was the only significant factor for prediction of prognosis. Hazard ratio was 13,5 (1.6 111.1, =0,016). patients with stage IV NSCLC could be further stratified into subgroups of significantly better and worse prognosis by MTV of primary lung lesion.

  8. Metabolic tumor volume measured by F 18 FDG PET/CT can further stratify the prognosis of patients with stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Ja Hae; Chong, Ar I; Kwon, Seong Young; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to further stratify prognostic factors in patients with stage IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by measuring their metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The subjects of this retrospective study were 57 patients with stage IV NSCLC. MTV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured on F 18 FDG PET/CT in both the primary lung lesion as well as metastatic lesions in torso. Optimal cutoff values of PET parameters were mea measured by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve anal analysis. Kaplan Meier survival (PET). The univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards models were used to select the significant prognostic factors. Univariate analysis showed that both MTV and TLG of primary lung lesion (MTV lung and TLG lung) were significant factors for prediction of PFS ( <0.001 =0.038, respectively). Patients showing lower values of MTV lung and TLG lung than the cutoff values had significantly longer mean PFS than those with higher values. hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of MTV lung and TLG lung measured by univariate analysis were 6.4 (2.5 16.3) and 2.4 (1.0 5.5), respectively. multivariate analysis revealed that MTV lung was the only significant factor for prediction of prognosis. Hazard ratio was 13,5 (1.6 111.1, =0,016). patients with stage IV NSCLC could be further stratified into subgroups of significantly better and worse prognosis by MTV of primary lung lesion

  9. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  10. INPP4B-mediated tumor resistance is associated with modulation of glucose metabolism via hexokinase 2 regulation in laryngeal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Joong Won [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Il [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Noh, Woo Chul [Department of Surgery, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hong Bae [Biomedical Research Institute, MEDIPOST Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-Hyung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong Su [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: jaesung@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •HIF-1α-regulated INPP4B enhances glycolysis. •INPP4B regulates aerobic glycolysis by inducing HK2 via Akt-mTOR pathway. •Blockage of INPP4B and HK2 sensitizes radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to radiation and anticancer drug. •INPP4B is associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) was recently identified as a tumor resistance factor in laryngeal cancer cells. Herein, we show that INPP4B-mediated resistance is associated with increased glycolytic phenotype. INPP4B expression was induced by hypoxia and irradiation. Intriguingly, overexpression of INPP4B enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Of the glycolysis-regulatory genes, hexokinase 2 (HK2) was mainly regulated by INPP4B and this regulation was mediated through the Akt-mTOR pathway. Notably, codepletion of INPP4B and HK2 markedly sensitized radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells to irradiation or anticancer drug. Moreover, INPP4B was significantly associated with HK2 in human laryngeal cancer tissues. Therefore, these results suggest that INPP4B modulates aerobic glycolysis via HK2 regulation in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells.

  11. Metabolic and nutritional aspects of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Joanna; Kraj, Leszek; Ziarkiewicz, Mateusz; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław

    2014-08-22

    Cancer, being in fact a generalized disease involving the whole organism, is most frequently associated with metabolic deregulation, a latent inflammatory state and anorexia of various degrees. The pathogenesis of this disorder is complex, with multiple dilemmas remaining unsolved. The clinical consequences of the above-mentioned disturbances include cancer-related cachexia and anorexia-cachexia syndrome. These complex clinical entities worsen the prognosis, and lead to deterioration of the quality of life and performance status, and thus require multimodal treatment. Optimal therapy should include nutritional support coupled with pharmacotherapy targeted at underlying pathomechanisms of cachexia. Nevertheless, many issues still need explanation, and efficacious and comprehensive therapy of cancer-related cachexia remains a future objective.

  12. Substituted 2-hydroxy-N-(arylalkyl)benzamide sensitizes cancer cells to metabolic stress by disrupting actin cytoskeleton and inhibiting autophagic flux

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pachnikova, G.; Uldrijan, S.; Imramovský, A.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Slaninová, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, DEC (2016), s. 70-78 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : hepatocellular-carcinoma cells * sorafenib * apoptosis * death * maturation * membrane * melanoma * Actin * Autophagy * Melanoma * Metabolic stress * Sorafenib * Substituted 2-hydroxy-N-(arylalkyl)benzamide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.866, year: 2016

  13. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance...

  14. Inter-relationships between single carbon units' metabolism and resting energy expenditure in weight-losing patients with small cell lung cancer. Effects of methionine supply and chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, H; Hansen, O P; Simonsen, L

    1994-01-01

    The one-carbon unit metabolism was investigated in 8 weight-losing patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). At diagnosis, 6 of the 8 patients had elevated formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) excretion after a histidine load, suggesting a lack of one-carbon units. In accordance, a signifi...

  15. SU-E-J-102: Separation of Metabolic Supply and Demand: From Power Grid Economics to Cancer Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, T; Xu, L; Gillies, R; Gatenby, R [Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study a new model of glucose metabolism which is primarily governed by the timescale of the energetic demand and not by the oxygen level, and its implication on cancer metabolism (Warburg effect) Methods: 1) Metabolic profiling of membrane transporters activity in several cell lines, which represent the spectrum from normal breast epithelium to aggressive, metastatic cancer, using Seahorse XF reader.2) Spatial localization of oxidative and non-oxidative metabolic components using immunocytochemical imaging of the glycolytic ATP-producing enzyme, pyruvate kinase and mitochondria. 3) Finite element simulations of coupled partial differential equations using COMSOL and MATLAB. Results: Inhibition or activation of pumps on the cell membrane led to reduction or increase in aerobic glycolysis, respectively, while oxidative phosphorylation remained unchanged. These results were consistent with computational simulations of changes in short-timescale demand for energy by cell membrane processes. A specific model prediction was that the spatial distribution of ATP-producing enzymes in the glycolytic pathway must be primarily localized adjacent to the cell membrane, while mitochondria should be predominantly peri-nuclear. These predictions were confirmed experimentally. Conclusion: The results in this work support a new model for glucose metabolism in which glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation supply different types of energy demand. Similar to power grid economics, optimal metabolic control requires the two pathways, even in normoxic conditions, to match two different types of energy demands. Cells use aerobic metabolism to meet baseline, steady energy demand and glycolytic metabolism to meet short-timescale energy demands, mainly from membrane transport activities, even in the presence of oxygen. This model provides a mechanism for the origin of the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Here, the Warburg effect emerges during carcinogenesis is a physiological

  16. SU-E-J-102: Separation of Metabolic Supply and Demand: From Power Grid Economics to Cancer Metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, T; Xu, L; Gillies, R; Gatenby, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study a new model of glucose metabolism which is primarily governed by the timescale of the energetic demand and not by the oxygen level, and its implication on cancer metabolism (Warburg effect) Methods: 1) Metabolic profiling of membrane transporters activity in several cell lines, which represent the spectrum from normal breast epithelium to aggressive, metastatic cancer, using Seahorse XF reader.2) Spatial localization of oxidative and non-oxidative metabolic components using immunocytochemical imaging of the glycolytic ATP-producing enzyme, pyruvate kinase and mitochondria. 3) Finite element simulations of coupled partial differential equations using COMSOL and MATLAB. Results: Inhibition or activation of pumps on the cell membrane led to reduction or increase in aerobic glycolysis, respectively, while oxidative phosphorylation remained unchanged. These results were consistent with computational simulations of changes in short-timescale demand for energy by cell membrane processes. A specific model prediction was that the spatial distribution of ATP-producing enzymes in the glycolytic pathway must be primarily localized adjacent to the cell membrane, while mitochondria should be predominantly peri-nuclear. These predictions were confirmed experimentally. Conclusion: The results in this work support a new model for glucose metabolism in which glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation supply different types of energy demand. Similar to power grid economics, optimal metabolic control requires the two pathways, even in normoxic conditions, to match two different types of energy demands. Cells use aerobic metabolism to meet baseline, steady energy demand and glycolytic metabolism to meet short-timescale energy demands, mainly from membrane transport activities, even in the presence of oxygen. This model provides a mechanism for the origin of the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Here, the Warburg effect emerges during carcinogenesis is a physiological

  17. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, K.

    1994-01-01

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  18. Precision Nutrition for Targeting Lipid Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Aguirre-Portolés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a multistage and multifactorial condition with genetic and environmental factors modulating tumorogenesis and disease progression. Nevertheless, cancer is preventable, as one third of cancer deaths could be avoided by modifying key risk factors. Nutrients can directly affect fundamental cellular processes and are considered among the most important risk factors in colorectal cancer (CRC. Red and processed meat, poultry consumption, fiber, and folate are the best-known diet components that interact with colorectal cancer susceptibility. In addition, the direct association of an unhealthy diet with obesity and dysbiosis opens new routes in the understanding of how daily diet nutrients could influence cancer prognosis. In the “omics” era, traditional nutrition has been naturally evolved to precision nutrition where technical developments have contributed to a more accurate discipline. In this sense, genomic and transcriptomic studies have been extensively used in precision nutrition approaches. However, the relation between CRC carcinogenesis and nutrition factors is more complex than originally expected. Together with classical diet-nutrition-related genes, nowadays, lipid-metabolism-related genes have acquired relevant interest in precision nutrition studies. Lipids regulate very diverse cellular processes from ATP synthesis and the activation of essential cell-signaling pathways to membrane organization and plasticity. Therefore, a wide range of tumorogenic steps can be influenced by lipid metabolism, both in primary tumours and distal metastasis. The extent to which genetic variants, together with the intake of specific dietary components, affect the risk of CRC is currently under investigation, and new therapeutic or preventive applications must be explored in CRC models. In this review, we will go in depth into the study of co-occurring events, which orchestrate CRC tumorogenesis and are essential for the evolution of precision

  19. Glucose metabolism regulates T cell activation, differentiation and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Steve Palmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system is equipped to eliminate both tumors and pathogenic microorganisms. It requires a series of complex and coordinated signals to drive the activation, proliferation and differentiation of appropriate T cell subsets. It is now established that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, emerging evidence now suggest that specific metabolic alterations associated with distinct T cell subsets may be ancillary to their differentiation and influential in their immune functions. The Warburg effect originally used to describe a phenomenon in which most cancer cells relied on aerobic glycolysis for their growth is a key process that sustain T cell activation and differentiation. Here we review how different aspects of metabolism in T cells influence their functions, focusing on the emerging role of key regulators of glucose metabolism such as HIF-1α. A thorough understanding of the role of metabolism in T cell function could provide insights into mechanisms involved in inflammatory-mediated conditions, with the potential for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat these diseases.

  20. Metabolic profiling of human lung cancer blood plasma using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokova, Daria; Dementeva, Natalia; Kotelnikov, Oleg; Ponomaryova, Anastasia; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda; Kzhyshkowska, Juliya

    2017-11-01

    Lung cancer (both small cell and non-small cell) is the second most common cancer in both men and women. The article represents results of evaluating of the plasma metabolic profiles of 100 lung cancer patients and 100 controls to investigate significant metabolites using 400 MHz 1H NMR spectrometer. The results of multivariate statistical analysis show that a medium-field NMR spectrometer can obtain the data which are already sufficient for clinical metabolomics.

  1. Insulin priming effect on estradiol-induced breast cancer metabolism and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagu, Peninah M; Phan, Ai N H; Kim, Min-Kyu; Han, Jeongwoo; Kim, Hyun-Won; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Ki Woo; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Park, Kwang Hwa; Jeong, Yangsik

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for breast cancer development and is associated with poor prognosis for breast cancer patients. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and breast cancer have not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated estradiol response in MCF-7 breast cancer cells with or without chronic exposure to insulin. We found that insulin priming is necessary and specific for estradiol-induced cancer cell growth, and induces anaplerotic shunting of glucose into macromolecule biosynthesis in the estradiol treated cells. Treatment with ERK or Akt specific inhibitors, U0126 or LY294002, respectively, suppressed estradiol-induced growth. Interestingly, molecular analysis revealed that estradiol treatment markedly increases expression of cyclin A and B, and decreases p21 and p27 in the insulin-primed cells. In addition, estradiol treatment activated metabolic genes in pentose phosphate (PPP) and serine biosynthesis pathways in the insulin-primed cells while insulin priming decreased metabolic gene expression associated with glucose catabolism in the breast cancer cells. Finally, we found that anti-diabetic drug metformin and AMPK ligand AICAR, but not thiazolidinediones (TZDs), specifically suppress the estradiol-induced cellular growth in the insulin-primed cells. These findings suggest that estrogen receptor (ER) activation under chronic hyperinsulinemic condition increases breast cancer growth through the modulation of cell cycle and apoptotic factors and nutrient metabolism, and further provide a mechanistic evidence for the clinical benefit of metformin use for ER-positive breast cancer patients with diabetes.

  2. Cancer Metabolism and Tumor Heterogeneity: Imaging Perspectives Using MR Imaging and Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Gigin; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Park, Jae Mo

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to maintain viability via genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations, expressing overall dynamic heterogeneity. The complex relaxation mechanisms of nuclear spins provide unique and convertible tissue contrasts, making magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) pertinent imaging tools in both clinics and research. In this review, we summarized MR methods that visualize tumor characteristics and its metabolic phenotypes ...

  3. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  4. Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Testicular Cancer Resource Center Extragonadal Germ Cell Cancer (EGC) 95% of all testicular tumors are germ cell tumors. That is, the tumors originate in the sperm forming cells in the testicles ( ...

  5. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  6. Cancer metabolism and the dynamics of metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattoli, G; Guiot, C; Delsanto, P P; Ottaviani, P L; Pagnutti, S; Deisboeck, T S

    2009-02-07

    Cancer growth dynamics, commonly simulated with a Gompertzian model, is analyzed in the framework of a more recent and realistic model. In particular, we consider the setting of a tumor embedded in a host organ and investigate their interaction. We assume that, at least in some cases, tumor metastasis may be triggered by an 'energetic crisis', when the tumor exceeds the 'carrying capacity' of the host organ. As a consequence, dissemination of clusters of cancer cells is set in motion, with a statistical probability given by a Poisson distribution. The model, although still at a preclinical level, is fully quantitative and is applied, as an example, to the case of prostate cancer. The results confirm that, at least for the more aggressive cancers, metastasis starts very early during tumorigenesis and a quantitative link is found between the tumor's doubling time, its 'aggressiveness' and the metastatic potential.

  7. Exploiting immune cell metabolic machinery for functional HIV cure and the prevention of inflammaging [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Clovis S. Palmer; Riya Palchaudhuri; Hassan Albargy; Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen; Suzanne M. Crowe

    2018-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in immunology suggests that metabolic reprogramming and immune cell activation and functions are intricately linked. Viral infections, such as HIV infection, as well as cancer force immune cells to undergo major metabolic challenges. Cells must divert energy resources in order to mount an effective immune response. However, the fact that immune cells adopt specific metabolic programs to provide host defense against intracellular pathogens and how this metabolic shift impa...

  8. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  9. Preliminary study of brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Ling; Fu, Chang; Xuan, Ang; Shi, Da-Peng; Gao, Yong-Ju; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Jun-Ling

    2015-02-05

    Cerebral glucose metabolism changes are always observed in patients suffering from malignant tumors. This preliminary study aimed to investigate the brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types. One hundred and twenty patients with primary untreated lung cancer, who visited People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University from February 2012 to July 2013, were divided into three groups based on histological types confirmed by biopsy or surgical pathology, which included adenocarcinoma (52 cases), squamous cell carcinoma (43 cases), and small-cell carcinoma (25 cases). The whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of these cases was retrospectively studied. The brain PET data of three groups were analyzed individually using statistical parametric maps (SPM) software, with 50 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls for comparison. The brain resting glucose metabolism in all three lung cancer groups showed regional cerebral metabolic reduction. The hypo-metabolic cerebral regions were mainly distributed at the left superior and middle frontal, bilateral superior and middle temporal and inferior and middle temporal gyrus. Besides, the hypo-metabolic regions were also found in the right inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus in the small-cell carcinoma group. The area of the total hypo-metabolic cerebral regions in the small-cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 3255) was larger than those in the adenocarcinoma group (total voxel value 1217) and squamous cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 1292). The brain resting glucose metabolism in patients with lung cancer shows regional cerebral metabolic reduction and the brain hypo-metabolic changes are related to the histological types of lung cancer.

  10. Preliminary Study of Brain Glucose Metabolism Changes in Patients with Lung Cancer of Different Histological Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ling Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral glucose metabolism changes are always observed in patients suffering from malignant tumors. This preliminary study aimed to investigate the brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with primary untreated lung cancer, who visited People′s Hospital of Zhengzhou University from February 2012 to July 2013, were divided into three groups based on histological types confirmed by biopsy or surgical pathology, which included adenocarcinoma (52 cases, squamous cell carcinoma (43 cases, and small-cell carcinoma (25 cases. The whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT of these cases was retrospectively studied. The brain PET data of three groups were analyzed individually using statistical parametric maps (SPM software, with 50 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls for comparison. Results: The brain resting glucose metabolism in all three lung cancer groups showed regional cerebral metabolic reduction. The hypo-metabolic cerebral regions were mainly distributed at the left superior and middle frontal, bilateral superior and middle temporal and inferior and middle temporal gyrus. Besides, the hypo-metabolic regions were also found in the right inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus in the small-cell carcinoma group. The area of the total hypo-metabolic cerebral regions in the small-cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 3255 was larger than those in the adenocarcinoma group (total voxel value 1217 and squamous cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 1292. Conclusions: The brain resting glucose metabolism in patients with lung cancer shows regional cerebral metabolic reduction and the brain hypo-metabolic changes are related to the histological types of lung cancer.

  11. TOR, the Gateway to Cellular Metabolism, Cell Growth, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenis, John

    2017-09-21

    Michael N. Hall is this year's recipient of the Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for the identification of the target of rapamycin, TOR. TOR is a master regulator of the cell's growth and metabolic state, and its dysregulation contributes to a variety of diseases, including diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, aging, and cancer, making the TOR pathway an attractive therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  14. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but

  16. Tryptophan metabolism in breast cancers: molecular imaging and immunohistochemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhász, Csaba; Nahleh, Zeina; Zitron, Ian; Chugani, Diane C.; Janabi, Majid Z.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mangner, Thomas J.; Chakraborty, Pulak K.; Mittal, Sandeep; Muzik, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tryptophan oxidation via the kynurenine pathway is an important mechanism of tumoral immunoresistance. Increased tryptophan metabolism via the serotonin pathway has been linked to malignant progression in breast cancer. In this study, we combined quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) with tumor immunohistochemistry to analyze tryptophan transport and metabolism in breast cancer. Methods: Dynamic α-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT) PET was performed in nine women with stage II–IV breast cancer. PET tracer kinetic modeling was performed in all tumors. Expression of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO; the initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the kynurenine pathway) and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1; the initial enzyme of the serotonin pathway) was assessed by immunostaining of resected tumor specimens. Results: Tumor AMT uptake peaked at 5–20 min postinjection in seven tumors; the other two cases showed protracted tracer accumulation. Tumor standardized uptake values (SUVs) varied widely (2.6–9.8) and showed a strong positive correlation with volume of distribution values derived from kinetic analysis (P < .01). Invasive ductal carcinomas (n = 6) showed particularly high AMT SUVs (range, 4.7–9.8). Moderate to strong immunostaining for LAT1, IDO and TPH1 was detected in most tumor cells. Conclusions: Breast cancers show differential tryptophan kinetics on dynamic PET. SUVs measured 5–20 min postinjection reflect reasonably the tracer's volume of distribution. Further studies are warranted to determine if in vivo AMT accumulation in these tumors is related to tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine and serotonin pathways.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  18. Glutathione Primes T Cell Metabolism for Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tak W.; Grusdat, Melanie; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR) and expression of NFAT and Myc transcription factors, abrogating the energy utilization and Myc-dependent metabolic reprogramming that allows activated T cells to switch to glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In vivo, T-cell-specific ablation of murine Gclc...

  19. Molecular Effects of Doxorubicin on Choline Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglin Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal choline phospholipid metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS detected total choline (tCho signal can serve as an early noninvasive imaging biomarker of chemotherapy response in breast cancer. We have quantified the individual components of the tCho signal, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, phosphocholine (PC and free choline (Cho, before and after treatment with the commonly used chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin in weakly metastatic human MCF7 and triple-negative human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. While the tCho concentration did not change following doxorubicin treatment, GPC significantly increased and PC decreased. Of the two phosphatidylcholine-specific PLD enzymes, only PLD1, but not PLD2, mRNA was down-regulated by doxorubicin treatment. For the two reported genes encoding GPC phosphodiesterase, the mRNA of GDPD6, but not GDPD5, decreased following doxorubicin treatment. mRNA levels of choline kinase α (ChKα, which converts Cho to PC, were reduced following doxorubicin treatment. PLD1 and ChKα protein levels decreased following doxorubicin treatment in a concentration dependent manner. Treatment with the PLD1 specific inhibitor VU0155069 sensitized MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. Low concentrations of 100 nM of doxorubicin increased MDA-MB-231 cell migration. GDPD6, but not PLD1 or ChKα, silencing by siRNA abolished doxorubicin-induced breast cancer cell migration. Doxorubicin induced GPC increase and PC decrease are caused by reductions in PLD1, GDPD6, and ChKα mRNA and protein expression. We have shown that silencing or inhibiting these genes/proteins can promote drug effectiveness and reduce adverse drug effects. Our findings emphasize the importance of detecting PC and GPC individually.

  20. Epstein–Barr Virus-Induced Metabolic Rearrangements in Human B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier P. Piccaluga

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor metabolism has been the object of several studies in the past, leading to the pivotal observation of a consistent shift toward aerobic glycolysis (so-called Warburg effect. More recently, several additional investigations proved that tumor metabolism is profoundly affected during tumorigenesis, including glucose, lipid and amino-acid metabolism. It is noticeable that metabolic reprogramming can represent a suitable therapeutic target in many cancer types. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV was the first virus linked with cancer in humans when Burkitt lymphoma (BL was described. Besides other well-known effects, it was recently demonstrated that EBV can induce significant modification in cell metabolism, which may lead or contribute to neoplastic transformation of human cells. Similarly, virus-induced tumorigenesis is characterized by relevant metabolic abnormalities directly induced by the oncoviruses. In this article, the authors critically review the most recent literature concerning EBV-induced metabolism alterations in lymphomas.

  1. Radiation Changes the Metabolic Profiling of Melanoma Cell Line B16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lige Wu

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy can be an effective way to kill cancer cells using ionizing radiation, but some tumors are resistant to radiation therapy and the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. It is therefore necessary to establish an appropriate working model to study and monitor radiation-mediated cancer therapy. In response to cellular stress, the metabolome is the integrated profiling of changes in all metabolites in cells, which can be used to investigate radiation tolerance mechanisms and identify targets for cancer radiation sensibilization. In this study, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance for untargeted metabolic profiling in radiation-tolerant mouse melanoma cell line B16, we comprehensively investigated changes in metabolites and metabolic network in B16 cells in response to radiation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis indicated the difference in cellular metabolites between the untreated cells and X-ray radiated cells. In radiated cells, the content of alanine, glutamate, glycine and choline was increased, while the content of leucine, lactate, creatine and creatine phosphate was decreased. Enrichment analysis of metabolic pathway showed that the changes in metabolites were related to multiple metabolic pathways including the metabolism of glycine, arginine, taurine, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. Taken together, with cellular metabolome study followed by bioinformatic analysis to profile specific metabolic pathways in response to radiation, we deepened our understanding of radiation-resistant mechanisms and radiation sensibilization in cancer, which may further provide a theoretical and practical basis for personalized cancer therapy.

  2. Warburg effect or reverse Warburg effect? A review of cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao Dong; Shao, Shi Xiu; Jiang, Hai Ping; Cao, Yan Wei; Wang, Yong Hua; Yang, Xue Cheng; Wang, You Lin; Wang, Xin Sheng; Niu, Hai Tao

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. A considerable amount of research has focused on elucidating the nature of cancer from its pathogenesis to treatment and prevention. Tumor cell metabolism has been considered a hallmark of cancer. Cancer cells differ from normal cells through unlimited cell division, and show a greater need for energy for their rapid growth and duplication. Research on glycometabolism, as the key point of energy metabolism, has played a unique role. In the 1920s, Warburg found that cancer cells prefer to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by glycolysis, which is a less efficient pathway compared to oxidative phosphorylation. This striking discovery, called 'the Warburg effect', has influenced and guided the study of the mechanism and treatment of tumors for generations, but its causal relationship with cancer progression is still unclear. Some studies have now shown contradicting evidence and a new hypothesis, the reverse Warburg effect, has been put forward, in which cancer cells produce most of their ATP via glycolysis, even under aerobic conditions. In this review we discuss the new points concerning the energy metabolism of a tumor, as well as the current facts and perspectives. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  3. Zinc finger nuclease mediated knockout of ADP-dependent glucokinase in cancer cell lines: effects on cell survival and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Richter

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN are powerful tools for editing genes in cells. Here we use ZFNs to interrogate the biological function of ADPGK, which encodes an ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADPGK, in human tumour cell lines. The hypothesis we tested is that ADPGK utilises ADP to phosphorylate glucose under conditions where ATP becomes limiting, such as hypoxia. We characterised two ZFN knockout clones in each of two lines (H460 and HCT116. All four clones had frameshift mutations in all alleles at the target site in exon 1 of ADPGK, and were ADPGK-null by immunoblotting. ADPGK knockout had little or no effect on cell proliferation, but compromised the ability of H460 cells to survive siRNA silencing of hexokinase-2 under oxic conditions, with clonogenic survival falling from 21±3% for the parental line to 6.4±0.8% (p = 0.002 and 4.3±0.8% (p = 0.001 for the two knockouts. A similar increased sensitivity to clonogenic cell killing was observed under anoxia. No such changes were found when ADPGK was knocked out in HCT116 cells, for which the parental line was less sensitive than H460 to anoxia and to hexokinase-2 silencing. While knockout of ADPGK in HCT116 cells caused few changes in global gene expression, knockout of ADPGK in H460 cells caused notable up-regulation of mRNAs encoding cell adhesion proteins. Surprisingly, we could discern no consistent effect on glycolysis as measured by glucose consumption or lactate formation under anoxia, or extracellular acidification rate (Seahorse XF analyser under oxic conditions in a variety of media. However, oxygen consumption rates were generally lower in the ADPGK knockouts, in some cases markedly so. Collectively, the results demonstrate that ADPGK can contribute to tumour cell survival under conditions of high glycolytic dependence, but the phenotype resulting from knockout of ADPGK is cell line dependent and appears to be unrelated to priming of glycolysis in these lines.

  4. Zinc finger nuclease mediated knockout of ADP-dependent glucokinase in cancer cell lines: effects on cell survival and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Susan; Morrison, Shona; Connor, Tim; Su, Jiechuang; Print, Cristin G; Ronimus, Ron S; McGee, Sean L; Wilson, William R

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) are powerful tools for editing genes in cells. Here we use ZFNs to interrogate the biological function of ADPGK, which encodes an ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADPGK), in human tumour cell lines. The hypothesis we tested is that ADPGK utilises ADP to phosphorylate glucose under conditions where ATP becomes limiting, such as hypoxia. We characterised two ZFN knockout clones in each of two lines (H460 and HCT116). All four clones had frameshift mutations in all alleles at the target site in exon 1 of ADPGK, and were ADPGK-null by immunoblotting. ADPGK knockout had little or no effect on cell proliferation, but compromised the ability of H460 cells to survive siRNA silencing of hexokinase-2 under oxic conditions, with clonogenic survival falling from 21±3% for the parental line to 6.4±0.8% (p = 0.002) and 4.3±0.8% (p = 0.001) for the two knockouts. A similar increased sensitivity to clonogenic cell killing was observed under anoxia. No such changes were found when ADPGK was knocked out in HCT116 cells, for which the parental line was less sensitive than H460 to anoxia and to hexokinase-2 silencing. While knockout of ADPGK in HCT116 cells caused few changes in global gene expression, knockout of ADPGK in H460 cells caused notable up-regulation of mRNAs encoding cell adhesion proteins. Surprisingly, we could discern no consistent effect on glycolysis as measured by glucose consumption or lactate formation under anoxia, or extracellular acidification rate (Seahorse XF analyser) under oxic conditions in a variety of media. However, oxygen consumption rates were generally lower in the ADPGK knockouts, in some cases markedly so. Collectively, the results demonstrate that ADPGK can contribute to tumour cell survival under conditions of high glycolytic dependence, but the phenotype resulting from knockout of ADPGK is cell line dependent and appears to be unrelated to priming of glycolysis in these lines.

  5. Cancer metabolism meets systems biology: Pyruvate kinase isoform PKM2 is a metabolic master regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian V Filipp

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase activity is controlled by a tightly woven regulatory network. The oncofetal isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is a master regulator of cancer metabolism. PKM2 engages in parallel, feed-forward, positive and negative feedback control contributing to cancer progression. Besides its metabolic role, non-metabolic functions of PKM2 as protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator for c-MYC and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha are essential for epidermal growth factor receptor acti...

  6. Breast cancer and steroid metabolizing enzymes: the role of progestogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2009-12-01

    It is well documented that breast tissue, both normal and cancerous, contains all the enzymatic systems necessary for the bioformation and metabolic transformation of estrogens, androgens and progesterone. These include sulfatases, aromatase, hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenases, sulfotransferases, hydroxylases and glucuronidases. The control of these enzymes plays an important role in the development and pathogenesis of hormone-dependent breast cancer. As discussed in this review, various progestogens including dydrogesterone and its 20alpha-dihydro-derivative, medrogestone, promegestone, nomegestrol acetate and norelgestromin can reduce intratissular levels of estradiol in breast cancer by blocking sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 1 activities. A possible correlation has been postulated between breast cell proliferation and estrogen sulfotransferase activity. Progesterone is largely transformed in the breast; normal breast produces mainly 4-ene derivatives, whereas 5alpha-derivatives are most common in breast cancer tissue. It has been suggested that this specific conversion of progesterone may be involved in breast carcinogenesis. In conclusion, treatment with anti-aromatases combined with anti-sulfatase or 17beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 1 could provide new therapeutic possibilities in the treatment of patients with hormone-dependent breast cancer. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging Prostate Cancer Invasion with Multi-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods: The Metabolic Boyden Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Pilatus

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The physiological milieu within solid tumors can influence invasion and metastasis. To determine the impact of the physiological environment and cellular metabolism on cancer cell invasion, it is necessary to measure invasion during well-controlled modulation of the physiological environment. Recently, we demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging can be used to monitor cancer cell invasion into a Matrigel layer [Artemov D, Pilatus U, Chou S, Mori N, Nelson JB, and Bhujwalla ZM. (1999. Dynamics of prostate cancer cell invasion studied in vitro by NMR microscopy. Mag Res Med 42, 277–282.]. Here we have developed an invasion assay (“Metabolic Boyden Chamber” that combines this capability with the properties of our isolated cell perfusion system. Long-term experiments can be performed to determine invasion as well as cellular metabolism under controlled environmental conditions. To characterize the assay, we performed experiments with prostate cancer cell lines preselected for different invasive characteristics. The results showed invasion into, and degradation of the Matrigel layer, by the highly invasive/metastatic line (MatLyLu, whereas no significant changes were observed for the less invasive/metastatic cell line (DU-145. With this assay, invasion and metabolism was measured dynamically, together with oxygen tensions within the cellular environment and within the Matrigel layer. Such a system can be used to identify physiological and metabolic characteristics that promote invasion, and evaluate therapeutic interventions to inhibit invasion.

  8. Obesity and Cancer Metabolism: A Perspective on Interacting Tumor-Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerstling, Steven S; O'Flanagan, Ciara H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased risk and poor prognosis of many types of cancers. Several obesity-related host factors involved in systemic metabolism can influence tumor initiation, progression, and/or response to therapy, and these have been implicated as key contributors to the complex effects of obesity on cancer incidence and outcomes. Such host factors include systemic metabolic regulators including insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, adipokines, inflammation-related molecules, and steroid hormones, as well as the cellular and structural components of the tumor microenvironment, particularly adipose tissue. These secreted and structural host factors are extrinsic to, and interact with, the intrinsic metabolic characteristics of cancer cells to influence their growth and spread. This review will focus on the interplay of these tumor cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the context of energy balance, with the objective of identifying new intervention targets for preventing obesity-associated cancer.

  9. Prognostic impact of vitamin B6 metabolism in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Olaussen, Ken André; Pinna, Guillaume; Eisenberg, Tobias; Goubar, Aïcha; Martins, Isabelle; Michels, Judith; Kratassiouk, Gueorgui; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Scoazec, Marie; Vacchelli, Erika; Schlemmer, Frederic; Kepp, Oliver; Shen, Shensi; Tailler, Maximilien; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Adjemian, Sandy; Jemaà, Mohamed; Chaba, Kariman; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Pietrocola, Federico; Tajeddine, Nicolas; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Araujo, Natalia; Morozova, Nadya; Robert, Thomas; Ripoche, Hugues; Commo, Frederic; Besse, Benjamin; Validire, Pierre; Fouret, Pierre; Robin, Angélique; Dorvault, Nicolas; Girard, Philippe; Gouy, Sébastien; Pautier, Patricia; Jägemann, Nora; Nickel, Ann-Christin; Marsili, Sabrina; Paccard, Caroline; Servant, Nicolas; Hupé, Philippe; Behrens, Carmen; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Cremer, Isabelle; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Midttun, Oivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Lazar, Vladimir; Dessen, Philippe; Zischka, Hans; Chatelut, Etienne; Castedo, Maria; Madeo, Frank; Barillot, Emmanuel; Thomale, Juergen; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivan; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Soria, Jean-Charles; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-08-30

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are routinely treated with cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin. Through a genome-wide siRNA-based screen, we identified vitamin B6 metabolism as a central regulator of cisplatin responses in vitro and in vivo. By aggravating a bioenergetic catastrophe that involves the depletion of intracellular glutathione, vitamin B6 exacerbates cisplatin-mediated DNA damage, thus sensitizing a large panel of cancer cell lines to apoptosis. Moreover, vitamin B6 sensitizes cancer cells to apoptosis induction by distinct types of physical and chemical stress, including multiple chemotherapeutics. This effect requires pyridoxal kinase (PDXK), the enzyme that generates the bioactive form of vitamin B6. In line with a general role of vitamin B6 in stress responses, low PDXK expression levels were found to be associated with poor disease outcome in two independent cohorts of patients with NSCLC. These results indicate that PDXK expression levels constitute a biomarker for risk stratification among patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  11. Modulators of arginine metabolism support cancer immunosurveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freschi Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated accrual of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC in the blood, lymphoid organs and tumor tissues may lead to perturbation of the arginine metabolism and impairment of the endogenous antitumor immunity. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether accumulation of MDSC occurred in Th2 prone BALB/c and Th1 biased C57BL/6 mice bearing the C26GM colon carcinoma and RMA T lymphoma, respectively, and to investigate whether N(G nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and sildenafil, both modulators of the arginine metabolism, restored antitumor immunity. Results We report here that MDSC accumulate in the spleen and blood of mice irrespective of the mouse and tumor model used. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with either the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil or the nitric-oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor L-NAME significantly restrained tumor growth and expanded the tumor-specific immune response. Conclusion Our data emphasize the role of MDSC in modulating the endogenous tumor-specific immune response and underline the anti-neoplastic therapeutic potential of arginine metabolism modulators.

  12. Metabolic Effects of Hypoxia in Colorectal Cancer by 13C NMR Isotopomer Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Abrantes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 13C NMR isotopomer analysis was used to characterize intermediary metabolism in three colorectal cancer cell lines (WiDr, LS1034, and C2BBe1 and determine the “metabolic remodeling” that occurs under hypoxia. Under normoxia, the three colorectal cancer cell lines present high rates of lactate production and can be seen as “Warburg” like cancer cells independently of substrate availability, since such profile was dominant at both high and low glucose media contents. The LS1034 was the less glycolytic of the three cell lines and was the most affected by the event of hypoxia, raising abruptly glucose consumption and lactate production. The other two colorectal cell lines, WiDr and C2BBe1, adapted better to hypoxia and were able to maintain their oxidative fluxes even at the very low levels of oxygen. These differential metabolic behaviors of the three colorectal cell lines show how important an adequate knowledge of the “metabolic remodeling” that follows a given cancer treatment is towards the correct (redesign of therapeutic strategies against cancer.

  13. Early prediction of therapy response and disease free survival after induction chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer by FDG-PET: Correlation between tumor FDG-metabolism and morphometric tumor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Niesen, A.; Przetak, C.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Chemotherapy with Docetaxel and Carboplatin (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction VIP-chemotherapy has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. The aim of the present study was to correlate the tumor FDG metabolism as measured by F-18 FDG-PET with morphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Erythropoietin (10,000 IU Epo s.c. three times a week). Material and Methods: In this prospective multicenter study, 54 patients with NSCLC stage IIIA (9 patients) or IIIB (45 patients) were enrolled and received neoadjuvant treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 d1 and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles prior to surgery. Postoperatively, all patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. WB-PET-studies (ECAT Exact 47) were obtained p.i. of 400 MBq F-18 FDG. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and metabolic tumor index (MTI SUV x MTD) were assessed. Image fusion of PET and CT data was applied on a HERMES computer. Results: Of 54 enrolled patients, 46 were evaluable for response by CT. 30/46 patients (65%) achieved complete remission (CR, 1 patient) or partial remission (PR 29 patients.). Of the 46 patients, 37 patients completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Chx) and were studied before and after Chx by FDG-PET. 14 (30% of the 46 evaluable patients) had SUV < 2.5, corresponding to metabolic complete remission (mCR), 23 had PR or stable disease (non-mCR); in 9 patients, PET was not performed because of progressive disease demonstrated by CT. The R0-resection rate was 56% (27/48 evaluable patients). Of the 14 patients with metabolic CR, 9 were evaluated by morphometry. All had regression grades III (no vital tumor cells) or grade IIB (< 10% vital tumor cells and induced apoptosis). With a median

  14. Metabolic profiling and correlation analysis for the determination of killer compounds of proliferating and clonogenic HRT-18 colon cancer cells from Lafoensia pacari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Cristiane Loiva; da Silva, Denise Brentan; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Weffort-Santos, Almeriane Maria; de Moraes Santos, Cid Aimbiré

    2018-06-18

    Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., belonging to the family Lythraceae and popularly known as 'dedaleira' and 'mangava-brava,' is a native tree of the Brazilian Cerrado, and its barks have been traditionally used as a tonic to treat inflammatory conditions, particularly related to gastric ulcers, wounds or fevers and various types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated the apoptogenic effects of the methanolic extract of L. pacari using various cancer cell lines. In the present study, this extract has been partitioned into fractions to identify the components that might be responsible for the apoptogenic effects using HRT-18 cells, which have been previously demonstrated to be sensitive to this extract. A standard methanolic extract was prepared and fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography. The fractions were submitted to cytotoxicity and clonogenic assays to monitor the effects in parallel with LC-DAD-MS and statistical analyses to suggest the potential bioactive compounds. Besides ellagic acid, the primary constituent of the plant and also the biomarker of the species, one punicalin isomer, three pedunculagin I isomers, two castalagin isomers, three punicalagin HHDP-gallagyl-hexoside isomers, one ellagic acid deoxyhexose conjugate and one methyl ellagic acid deoxyhexose conjugate were putatively identified. The barks of L. pacari are rich in ellagic acid and various hydrolysable tannins, some of which were reported for the first time in this species, such as punicalagin and ellagitannins. This mixture of substances had the ability to kill proliferating cells and abrogate the growth of clonogenic cells in a similar manner shown by the methanolic extract of our previous study. The collective data reported herein suggest that the biological activities of the L. pacari barks used by the Cerrado's population to treat cancer conditions are due to the apoptogenic effects promoted by a mixed content of ellagitannins. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Molecular Imaging Of Metabolic Reprogramming In Mutant IDH Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra eViswanath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70-90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG. In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an oncometabolite, inhibits key α-KG- dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprogramming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprogramming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprogramming of mutant IDH cells and how this reprogramming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo.

  16. Combined Treatment of MCF-7 Cells with AICAR and Methotrexate, Arrests Cell Cycle and Reverses Warburg Metabolism through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK and FOXO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fodor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are characterized by metabolic alterations, namely, depressed mitochondrial oxidation, enhanced glycolysis and pentose phosphate shunt flux to support rapid cell growth, which is called the Warburg effect. In our study we assessed the metabolic consequences of a joint treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells with AICAR, an inducer of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK jointly with methotrexate (MTX, a folate-analog antimetabolite that blunts de novo nucleotide synthesis. MCF7 cells, a model of breast cancer cells, were resistant to the individual application of AICAR or MTX, however combined treatment of AICAR and MTX reduced cell proliferation. Prolonged joint application of AICAR and MTX induced AMPK and consequently enhanced mitochondrial oxidation and reduced the rate of glycolysis. These metabolic changes suggest an anti-Warburg rearrangement of metabolism that led to the block of the G1/S and the G2/M transition slowing down cell cycle. The slowdown of cell proliferation was abolished when mitotropic transcription factors, PGC-1α, PGC-1β or FOXO1 were silenced. In human breast cancers higher expression of AMPKα and FOXO1 extended survival. AICAR and MTX exerts similar additive antiproliferative effect on other breast cancer cell lines, such as SKBR and 4T1 cells, too. Our data not only underline the importance of Warburg metabolism in breast cancer cells but nominate the AICAR+MTX combination as a potential cytostatic regime blunting Warburg metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest the targeting of AMPK and FOXO1 to combat breast cancer.

  17. Metabolic Risk Profile and Cancer in Korean Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seulki; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Kim, Dongwoo; Kim, A-Rim; Kim, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hye-Young

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Associations between metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer have recently been documented. We analyzed the sample cohort data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2002, with a follow-up period extending to 2013. The cohort data included 99 565 individuals who participated in the health examination program and whose data were therefore present in the cohort database. The metabolic risk profile of each participant was assessed based on obesity, high serum glucose and total cholesterol levels, and high blood pressure. The occurrence of cancer was identified using Korean National Health Insurance claims data. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age group, smoking status, alcohol intake, and regular exercise. A total of 5937 cases of cancer occurred during a mean follow-up period of 10.4 years. In men with a high-risk metabolic profile, the risk of colon cancer was elevated (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.71). In women, a high-risk metabolic profile was associated with a significantly increased risk of gallbladder and biliary tract cancer (HR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.42). Non-significantly increased risks were observed in men for pharynx, larynx, rectum, and kidney cancer, and in women for colon, liver, breast, and ovarian cancer. The findings of this study support the previously suggested association between metabolic syndrome and the risk of several cancers. A high-risk metabolic profile may be an important risk factor for colon cancer in Korean men and gallbladder and biliary tract cancer in Korean women.

  18. Absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin; Sui, Zhong-Quan; Corke, Harold

    2018-04-13

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, especially in Asian countries. Consumption of green tea has been demonstrated to possess many health benefits, which mainly attributed to the main bioactive compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a flavone-3-ol polyphenol, in green tea. EGCG is mainly absorbed in the intestine, and gut microbiota play a critical role in its metabolism prior to absorption. EGCG exhibits versatile bioactivities, with its anti-cancer effect most attracting due to the cancer preventive effect of green tea consumption, and a great number of studies intensively investigated its anti-cancer effect. In this review, we therefore, first stated the absorption and metabolism process of EGCG, and then summarized its anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, including its manifold anti-cancer actions and mechanisms, especially its anti-cancer stem cell effect, and next highlighted its various molecular targets involved in cancer inhibition. Finally, the anti-cancer effect of EGCG analogs and nanoparticles, as well as the potential cancer promoting effect of EGCG were also discussed. Understanding of the absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of EGCG can be of importance to better utilize it as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

  19. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  20. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  1. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  3. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  4. Local advanced transitional cell cancer and squamous cell cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: A 51-year-old man presented with a locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the periurethral tissues as well as an underlying isolated transitional cell cancer of the urethra. Chemotherapy with Gemcitabin and Cisplatinum together with local radiation to the pelvis and the perineum was given. There was ...

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell fate through metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2018-05-25

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain a quiescent state in the bone marrow to preserve their self-renewal capacity, but also undergo cell divisions as required. Organelles such as the mitochondria sustain cumulative damage during these cell divisions, and this damage may eventually compromise the cells' self-renewal capacity. HSC divisions result in either self-renewal or differentiation, with the balance between the two directly impacting hematopoietic homeostasis; but the heterogeneity of available HSC-enriched fractions, together with the technical challenges of observing HSC behavior, has long hindered the analysis of individual HSCs, and prevented the elucidation of this process. However, recent advances in genetic models, metabolomics analyses and single-cell approaches have revealed the contributions made to HSC self-renewal by metabolic cues, mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy/mitophagy, which have highlighted mitochondrial quality as a key control factor in the equilibrium of HSCs. A deeper understanding of precisely how specific modes of metabolism control HSC fate at the single cell level is therefore not only of great biological interest, but will have clear clinical implications for the development of therapies for hematological disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-12-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  7. Mechanisms of metabolic dysfunction in cancer-associated cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, Michele; Wagner, Erwin F.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction contributes to the clinical deterioration observed in advanced cancer patients and is characterized by weight loss, skeletal muscle wasting, and atrophy of the adipose tissue. This systemic syndrome, termed cancer-associated cachexia (CAC), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. While once attributed solely to decreased food intake, the present description of cancer cachexia is a disorder of multiorgan energy imbalance. Here we review the molecules and pathways responsible for metabolic dysfunction in CAC and the ideas that led to the current understanding. PMID:26944676

  8. Novel small molecule drugs inhibit tumor cell metabolism and show potent anti-tumorigenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojel-Hansen, Christina; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Christensen, Mette Knak

    2011-01-01

    oxyphenisatine analogs TOP001 and TOP216 exert their anti-cancer effect by affecting tumor cell metabolism and inducing intracellular amino acid deprivation, leading to a block of cell proliferation. GCN2-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2a as well as mTOR pathway inhibition supports the above notion. In addition...

  9. Novel small molecule drugs inhibit tumor cell metabolism and show potent anti-tumorigenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojel-Hansen, Christina; Erichsen, Kamille Dumong; Christensen, Mette Knak

    2011-01-01

    oxyphenisatine analogs TOP001 and TOP216 exert their anti-cancer effect by affecting tumor cell metabolism and inducing intracellular amino acid deprivation, leading to a block of cell proliferation. GCN2-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α as well as mTOR pathway inhibition supports the above notion. In addition...

  10. CLCA2 epigenetic regulation by CTBP1, HDACs, ZEB1, EP300 and miR-196b-5p impacts prostate cancer cell adhesion and EMT in metabolic syndrome disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretti, Juliana; Dalton, Guillermo N; Massillo, Cintia; Scalise, Georgina D; Farré, Paula L; Elble, Randolph; Gerez, Esther N; Accialini, Paula; Cabanillas, Ana M; Gardner, Kevin; De Luca, Paola; De Siervi, Adriana

    2018-03-14

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer among men. Metabolic syndrome (MeS) is associated with increased PCa aggressiveness and recurrence. Previously, we proposed C-terminal binding protein 1 (CTBP1), a transcriptional co-repressor, as a molecular link between these two conditions. Notably, CTBP1 depletion decreased PCa growth in MeS mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms that explain the link between MeS and PCa mediated by CTBP1. We found that CTBP1 repressed chloride channel accessory 2 (CLCA2) expression in prostate xenografts developed in MeS animals. CTBP1 bound to CLCA2 promoter and repressed its transcription and promoter activity in PCa cell lines. Furthermore, we found that CTBP1 formed a repressor complex with ZEB1, EP300 and HDACs that modulates the CLCA2 promoter activity. CLCA2 promoted PCa cell adhesion inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activating CTNNB1 together with epithelial marker (CDH1) induction, and mesenchymal markers (SNAI2 and TWIST1) repression. Moreover, CLCA2 depletion in PCa cells injected subcutaneously in MeS mice increased the circulating tumor cells foci compared to control. A microRNA (miRNA) expression microarray from PCa xenografts developed in MeS mice, showed 21 miRNAs modulated by CTBP1 involved in angiogenesis, extracellular matrix organization, focal adhesion and adherents junctions, among others. We found that miR-196b-5p directly targets CLCA2 by cloning CLCA2 3'UTR and performing reporter assays. Altogether, we identified a new molecular mechanism to explain PCa and MeS link based on CLCA2 repression by CTBP1 and miR-196b-5p molecules that might act as key factors in the progression onset of this disease. © 2018 UICC.

  11. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  12. Gender Differences in Adipocyte Metabolism and Liver Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Ka-Wing Cheung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the third most common cancer type and the second leading cause of deaths in men. Large population studies have demonstrated remarkable gender disparities in the incidence and the cumulative risk of liver cancer. A number of emerging risk factors regarding metabolic alterations associated with obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia have been ascribed to the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD and ultimately liver cancer. The deregulation of fat metabolism derived from excessive insulin, glucose and lipid promotes cancer-causing inflammatory signaling and oxidative stress, which eventually triggers the uncontrolled hepatocellular proliferation. This review presents the current standing on the gender differences in body fat compositions and their mechanistic linkage with the development of NAFLD-related liver cancer, with an emphasis on genetic, epigenetic and microRNA control. The potential roles of sex hormones in instructing adipocyte metabolic programs may help unravel the mechanisms underlying gender dimorphism in liver cancer and identify the metabolic targets for disease management.

  13. Metabolic recycling of ammonia via glutamate dehydrogenase supports breast cancer biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Jessica B; Yoon, Haejin; Ringel, Alison E; Jeanfavre, Sarah; Clish, Clary B; Haigis, Marcia C

    2017-11-17

    Ammonia is a ubiquitous by-product of cellular metabolism; however, the biological consequences of ammonia production are not fully understood, especially in cancer. We found that ammonia is not merely a toxic waste product but is recycled into central amino acid metabolism to maximize nitrogen utilization. In our experiments, human breast cancer cells primarily assimilated ammonia through reductive amination catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH); secondary reactions enabled other amino acids, such as proline and aspartate, to directly acquire this nitrogen. Metabolic recycling of ammonia accelerated proliferation of breast cancer. In mice, ammonia accumulated in the tumor microenvironment and was used directly to generate amino acids through GDH activity. These data show that ammonia is not only a secreted waste product but also a fundamental nitrogen source that can support tumor biomass. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: implications for breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with "stemness," more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This "two-compartment" metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert "low-risk" breast cancer patients to "high-risk" status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results also show that

  15. C282Y-HFE gene variant affects cholesterol metabolism in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Huang, Michael A; Schengrund, C-L; Connor, James R; Lee, Sang Y

    2014-01-01

    Although disruptions in the maintenance of iron and cholesterol metabolism have been implicated in several cancers, the association between variants in the HFE gene that is associated with cellular iron uptake and cholesterol metabolism has not been studied. The C282Y-HFE variant is a risk factor for different cancers, is known to affect sphingolipid metabolism, and to result in increased cellular iron uptake. The effect of this variant on cholesterol metabolism and its possible relevance to cancer phenotype was investigated using wild type (WT) and C282Y-HFE transfected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Expression of C282Y-HFE in SH-SY5Y cells resulted in a significant increase in total cholesterol as well as increased transcription of a number of genes involved in its metabolism compared to cells expressing WT-HFE. The marked increase in expression of NPC1L1 relative to that of most other genes, was accompanied by a significant increase in expression of NPC1, a protein that functions in cholesterol uptake by cells. Because inhibitors of cholesterol metabolism have been proposed to be beneficial for treating certain cancers, their effect on the viability of C282Y-HFE neuroblastoma cells was ascertained. C282Y-HFE cells were significantly more sensitive than WT-HFE cells to U18666A, an inhibitor of desmosterol Δ24-reductase the enzyme catalyzing the last step in cholesterol biosynthesis. This was not seen for simvastatin, ezetimibe, or a sphingosine kinase inhibitor. These studies indicate that cancers presenting in carriers of the C282Y-HFE allele might be responsive to treatment designed to selectively reduce cholesterol content in their tumor cells.

  16. Impact of Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome, cancer and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa; Vidiri, Maria Francesca; Moriconi, Eleonora; Marrone, Giulia; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; D'Urso, Gabriele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Rovella, Valentina; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2017-01-31

    Obesity symbolizes a major public health problem. Overweight and obesity are associated to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome and to adipose tissue dysfunction. The adipose tissue is metabolically active and an endocrine organ, whose dysregulation causes a low-grade inflammatory state and ectopic fat depositions. The Mediterranean Diet represents a possible therapy for metabolic syndrome, preventing adiposopathy or "sick fat" formation.The Mediterranean Diet exerts protective effects in elderly subjects with and without baseline of chronic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between cancer and obesity. In the US, diet represents amount 30-35% of death causes related to cancer. Currently, the cancer is the second cause of death after cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Furthermore, populations living in the Mediterranean area have a decreased incidence of cancer compared with populations living in Northern Europe or the US, likely due to healthier dietary habits. The bioactive food components have a potential preventive action on cancer. The aims of this review are to evaluate the impact of Mediterranean Diet on onset, progression and regression of metabolic syndrome, cancer and on longevity.

  17. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  18. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  19. Prostate cancer, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes, among men with metabolic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Stocks, Tanja; Nagel, Gabriele; Manjer, Jonas; Bjørge, Tone; Hallmans, Göran; Engeland, Anders; Ulmer, Hanno; Lindkvist, Björn; Selmer, Randi; Concin, Hans; Tretli, Steinar; Jonsson, Håkan; Stattin, Pär

    2014-11-01

    Few previous studies of metabolic aberrations and prostate cancer risk have taken into account the fact that men with metabolic aberrations have an increased risk of death from causes other than prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to calculate, in a real-life scenario, the risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes. In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project, prospective data on body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were collected from 285,040 men. Risks of prostate cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes were calculated by use of competing risk analysis for men with normal (bottom 84%) and high (top 16%) levels of each factor, and a composite score. During a mean follow-up period of 12 years, 5,893 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, 1,013 died of prostate cancer, and 26,328 died of other causes. After 1996, when prostate-specific antigen testing was introduced, men up to age 80 years with normal metabolic levels had 13% risk of prostate cancer, 2% risk of prostate cancer death, and 30% risk of death from other causes, whereas men with metabolic aberrations had corresponding risks of 11%, 2%, and 44%. In contrast to recent studies using conventional survival analysis, in a real-world scenario taking risk of competing events into account, men with metabolic aberrations had lower risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, similar risk of prostate cancer death, and substantially higher risk of death from other causes compared with men who had normal metabolic levels.

  20. SU-G-TeP3-10: Radiation Induces Prompt Live-Cell Metabolic Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W; Bussink, J [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Burkel, B; Kimple, R; Kogel, A van der; Eliceiri, K [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare metabolic dynamics and HIF-1α expression following radiation between a cancerous cell line (UM-SCC-22B) and a normal, immortalized cell line, NOK (Normal Oral Keratinocyte). HIF-1 is a key factor in metabolism and radiosensitivity. A better understanding of how radiation affects the interplay of metabolism and HIF-1 might give a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiosensitivity. Methods: Changes in cellular metabolism in response to radiation are tracked by fluorescence lifetime of NADH. Expression of HIF-1α was measured by immunofluorescence for both cell lines with and without irradiation. Radiation response is also monitored with additional treatment of a HIF-1α inhibitor (chrysin) as well as a radical scavenger (glutathione). Changes in oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity are also monitored using the Seahorse XF analyzer. Results: An increase in HIF-1α was found to be in response to radiation for the cancer cell line, but not the normal cell line. Radiation was found to shift metabolism toward glycolytic pathways in cancer cells as measured by oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity. Radiation response was found to be muted by addition of glutathione to cell media. HIF-1α inhibition similarly muted radiation response in cancer. Conclusion: The HIF-1 protein complex is a key regulator cellular metabolism through the regulation of glycolysis and glucose transport enzymes. Moreover, HIF-1 has shown radio-protective effects in tumor vascular endothelia, and has been implicated in metastatic aggression. Monitoring interplay between metabolism and the HIF-1 protein complex can give a more fundamental understanding of radiotherapy response.

  1. SU-G-TeP3-10: Radiation Induces Prompt Live-Cell Metabolic Fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Peeters, W; Bussink, J; Nickel, K; Burkel, B; Kimple, R; Kogel, A van der; Eliceiri, K; Kissick, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare metabolic dynamics and HIF-1α expression following radiation between a cancerous cell line (UM-SCC-22B) and a normal, immortalized cell line, NOK (Normal Oral Keratinocyte). HIF-1 is a key factor in metabolism and radiosensitivity. A better understanding of how radiation affects the interplay of metabolism and HIF-1 might give a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiosensitivity. Methods: Changes in cellular metabolism in response to radiation are tracked by fluorescence lifetime of NADH. Expression of HIF-1α was measured by immunofluorescence for both cell lines with and without irradiation. Radiation response is also monitored with additional treatment of a HIF-1α inhibitor (chrysin) as well as a radical scavenger (glutathione). Changes in oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity are also monitored using the Seahorse XF analyzer. Results: An increase in HIF-1α was found to be in response to radiation for the cancer cell line, but not the normal cell line. Radiation was found to shift metabolism toward glycolytic pathways in cancer cells as measured by oxygen consumption and respiratory capacity. Radiation response was found to be muted by addition of glutathione to cell media. HIF-1α inhibition similarly muted radiation response in cancer. Conclusion: The HIF-1 protein complex is a key regulator cellular metabolism through the regulation of glycolysis and glucose transport enzymes. Moreover, HIF-1 has shown radio-protective effects in tumor vascular endothelia, and has been implicated in metastatic aggression. Monitoring interplay between metabolism and the HIF-1 protein complex can give a more fundamental understanding of radiotherapy response.

  2. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise von Stechow

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells.

  3. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer through calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyfried B

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are largely unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration (the Warburg effect, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are mostly dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome, honed through millions of years of environmental forcing and variability selection, can transition from one energy state to another. We propose a different approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and less metabolically flexible tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are discussed.

  4. Classical NF-κB Metabolically Reprograms Sarcoma Cells Through Regulation of Hexokinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Londhe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMetabolic reprogramming has emerged as a cancer hallmark, and one of the well-known cancer-associated metabolic alterations is the increase in the rate of glycolysis. Recent reports have shown that both the classical and alternative signaling pathways of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB play important roles in controlling the metabolic profiles of normal cells and cancer cells. However, how these signaling pathways affect the metabolism of sarcomas, specifically rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS and osteosarcoma (OS, has not been characterized.MethodsClassical NF-κB activity was inhibited through overexpression of the IκBα super repressor of NF-κB in RMS and OS cells. Global gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0, and data were interpreted using gene set enrichment analysis. Seahorse Bioscience XFe24 was used to analyze oxygen consumption rate as a measure of aerobic respiration.ResultsInhibition of classical NF-κB activity in sarcoma cell lines restored alternative signaling as well as an increased oxidative respiratory metabolic phenotype in vitro. In addition, microarray analysis indicated that inhibition of NF-κB in sarcoma cells reduced glycolysis. We showed that a glycolytic gene, hexokinase (HK 2, is a direct NF-κB transcriptional target. Knockdown of HK2 shifted the metabolic profile in sarcoma cells away from aerobic glycolysis, and re-expression of HK2 rescued the metabolic shift induced by inhibition of NF-κB activity in OS cells.ConclusionThese findings suggest that classical signaling of NF-κB plays a crucial role in the metabolic profile of pediatric sarcomas potentially through the regulation of HK2.

  5. Contributions of 3D Cell Cultures for Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maddaly; Ramesh, Aarthi; Pattabhi, Aishwarya

    2017-10-01

    Cancer cell lines have contributed immensely in understanding the complex physiology of cancers. They are excellent material for studies as they offer homogenous samples without individual variations and can be utilised with ease and flexibility. Also, the number of assays and end-points one can study is almost limitless; with the advantage of improvising, modifying or altering several variables and methods. Literally, a new dimension to cancer research has been achieved by the advent of 3Dimensional (3D) cell culture techniques. This approach increased many folds the ways in which cancer cell lines can be utilised for understanding complex cancer biology. 3D cell culture techniques are now the preferred way of using cancer cell lines to bridge the gap between the 'absolute in vitro' and 'true in vivo'. The aspects of cancer biology that 3D cell culture systems have contributed include morphology, microenvironment, gene and protein expression, invasion/migration/metastasis, angiogenesis, tumour metabolism and drug discovery, testing chemotherapeutic agents, adaptive responses and cancer stem cells. We present here, a comprehensive review on the applications of 3D cell culture systems for these aspects of cancers. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2679-2697, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  7. Folic acid, one-carbon metabolism & childhood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Roy Moulik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate has been studied in relation to many diseases, especially cancer. Although it has been postulated to exert a dual effect on development of cancer, its role remains to be clearly defined. Its effect on cancer is the result of gene-nutrient interaction between the genes in folate metabolic pathway and dietary folate availability; mutations in genes of folate metabolism have been shown to alter individual susceptibility to certain childhood cancers as well as response to cancer chemotherapy. Although mandatory fortification of food items with folate has been initiated in some countries, many countries are yet to adopt this due to concerns about undesired adverse effects of high folate levels on health, especially cancer. However, initial reports suggest that folate fortification has led to reduction in incidence of certain childhood cancers such as neuroblastoma, wilms tumour and leukaemias. Despite studies showing folate depletion during antifolate chemotherapy and higher toxicity of chemotherapy in folate-depleted individuals, folate supplementation during cancer chemotherapy is not routinely recommended. Studies investigating the precise effect of folate supplementation during chemotherapy on both short- and long-term outcomes of cancer are needed to arrive at a consensus guideline.

  8. Prioritizing Popular Proteins in Liver Cancer: Remodelling One-Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, María Isabel; Molina, Manuela; Odriozola, Leticia; Elortza, Félix; Mato, José María; Sitek, Barbara; Zhang, Pumin; He, Fuchu; Latasa, María Uxue; Ávila, Matías Antonio; Corrales, Fernando José

    2017-12-01

    Primary liver cancer (HCC) is recognized as the fifth most common neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Most risk factors are known, and the molecular pathogenesis has been widely studied in the past decade; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be unveiled, as they will facilitate the definition of novel biomarkers and clinical targets for more effective patient management. We utilize the B/D-HPP popular protein strategy. We report a list of popular proteins that have been highly cocited with the expression "liver cancer". Several enzymes highlight the known metabolic remodeling of liver cancer cells, four of which participate in one-carbon metabolism. This pathway is central to the maintenance of differentiated hepatocytes, as it is considered the connection between intermediate metabolism and epigenetic regulation. We designed a targeted selective reaction monitoring (SRM) method to follow up one-carbon metabolism adaptation in mouse HCC and in regenerating liver following exposure to CCl 4 . This method allows systematic monitoring of one-carbon metabolism and could prove useful in the follow-up of HCC and of chronically liver-diseased patients (cirrhosis) at risk of HCC. The SRM data are available via ProteomeXchange in PASSEL (PASS01060).

  9. TRAP1 Regulation of Cancer Metabolism: Dual Role as Oncogene or Tumor Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Swann Matassa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is an important issue in tumor biology. An unexpected inter- and intra-tumor metabolic heterogeneity has been strictly correlated to tumor outcome. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Protein 1 (TRAP1 is a molecular chaperone involved in the regulation of energetic metabolism in cancer cells. This protein is highly expressed in several cancers, such as glioblastoma, colon, breast, prostate and lung cancers and is often associated with drug resistance. However, TRAP1 is also downregulated in specific tumors, such as ovarian, bladder and renal cancers, where its lower expression is correlated with the worst prognoses and chemoresistance. TRAP1 is the only mitochondrial member of the Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90 family that directly interacts with respiratory complexes, contributing to their stability and activity but it is still unclear if such interactions lead to reduced or increased respiratory capacity. The role of TRAP1 is to enhance or suppress oxidative phosphorylation; the effects of such regulation on tumor development and progression are controversial. These observations encourage the study of the mechanisms responsible for the dualist role of TRAP1 as an oncogene or oncosuppressor in specific tumor types. In this review, TRAP1 puzzling functions were recapitulated with a special focus on the correlation between metabolic reprogramming and tumor outcome. We wanted to investigate whether metabolism-targeting drugs can efficiently interfere with tumor progression and whether they might be combined with chemotherapeutics or molecular-targeted agents to counteract drug resistance and reduce therapeutic failure.

  10. Antilipolytic drug boosts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Koziorowski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The antilipolytic drug Acipimox reduces free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the blood stream. We examined the effect of reduced FFAs on glucose metabolism in androgen-dependent (CWR22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts.......The antilipolytic drug Acipimox reduces free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the blood stream. We examined the effect of reduced FFAs on glucose metabolism in androgen-dependent (CWR22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts....

  11. Targeting Lipid Metabolic Reprogramming as Anticancer Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Ji-Young; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to satisfy the demands of growth and survival, and this metabolic reprogramming has been recognized as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is pivotal in cellular process that converts nutrients into energy, building blocks for membrane biogenesis and the generation of signaling molecules. Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells show alterations in different aspects of lipid metabolism. The changes in lipid metabolism of cancer cells c...

  12. The Keap1-Nrf2 system in cancers: Stress response and anabolic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro eMitsuishi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Keap1-Nrf2 pathway plays a central role in the protection of cells against oxidative and xenobiotic stresses. Nrf2 is a potent transcription activator that recognizes a unique DNA sequence known as the antioxidant response element (ARE. Under normal conditions, Nrf2 binds to Keap1 in the cytoplasm, resulting in proteasomal degradation. Following exposure to electrophiles or reactive oxygen species, Nrf2 becomes stabilized, translocates into the nucleus and activates the transcription of various cytoprotective genes. Increasing attention has been paid to the role of Nrf2 in cancer cells because the constitutive stabilization of Nrf2 has been observed in many human cancers with poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown that the antioxidant and detoxification activities of Nrf2 confer chemo- and radio-resistance to cancer cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the Keap1-Nrf2 system and discuss its role under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancers. We also introduce the results of our recent study describing Nrf2 function in the metabolism of cancer cells. Nrf2 likely confers a growth advantage to cancer cells through enhancing cytoprotection and anabolism. Finally, we discuss the possible impact of Nrf2 inhibitors on cancer therapy.

  13. General Information about Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  15. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) Axitinib Bevacizumab Cabometyx ( ...

  16. Disturbance of Mammary UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Represses Estrogen Metabolism and Exacerbates Experimental Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueyan; Zheng, Ziqiang; Xu, Chang; Wang, Juan; Min, Mengjun; Zhao, Yun; Wang, Xi; Gong, Yinhan; Yin, Jiale; Guo, Meng; Guo, Dong; Zheng, Junnian; Zhang, Bei; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2017-08-01

    The progression of breast cancer is closely related to the levels of estrogens within the body. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) is an important class of phase II metabolizing enzymes, playing a pivotal role in detoxifying steroid hormone. In the present study, we aim at uncovering the potential dysregulation pattern of UGT and its role in estrogen metabolism and in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 100 mg/kg dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to induce breast cancer. Our results showed that the expression and activity of UGT in mammary tissues were downregulated significantly in DMBA rats. Consistent with this, levels of estradiol, 4-hydroxylated estradiol, and 2-hydroxylated estradiol were increased in both mammary tissues and serum, supporting a notable accumulation of toxic estrogen species in the target tissue of breast cancer. In addition, we also observed the decreased cell migration, cell proliferation, and DNA damage in UGT-transfected MCF-7 cells, suggesting a protective role of UGT against estrogen-induced mammary carcinogenesis. Taken together, these results indicated that accumulation of estrogens induced by UGT deficiency is a critical factor to induce the development of breast cancer. UGT contributes to estrogen elimination, and its glucuronidation capacity influences the estrogen signaling pathway and the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Significance of Metabolic Super scan in Patients With Locally Advanced Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotb, M.H.; El-Kholy, E.; Omar, W.; El-Refaei, S.; Taher, A.N.; El-Marakby, H.

    2011-01-01

    Non-metastatic metabolic related skeletal changes are predicted in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. Renal impairment may be a contributing factor in such abnormalities. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of metabolic bone disease in patients with different pathological subgroups of locally advanced bladder cancer and determine its clinical impact, and to correlate these metabolic super scan features with variable laboratory tests of bone bio markers and renal functions. In this study, a total of 350 patients (mean age = 58±8.4 y) with histopathologically proven locally advanced bladder cancer; 238 transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), 100 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 7 adenocarcinoma, 2 mucinous adenocarcinoma, 2 undifferentiated carcinoma and 1 leiomyosarcoma. The patients were referred to the Nuclear Medicine Unit, National Cancer Institute, Cairo, Egypt, between July 2006 and December 2009. Whole body bone scan was obtained 3 hours following IV administration of 555-925 MBq Tc-99m MDP. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels were monitored as markers for bone metabolism while serum creatinine was used to monitor kidney function. The exclusion criteria included patients who had liver disease or those taking calcium or vitamin D supplement or any medication that affects bone metabolism. All bone scan results in the study were verified by correlation with other radiological imaging, laboratory data and follow-up for at least 12 months. According to bone scan results, patients were classified into four groups: group A: normal scan (n=223), group B: metabolic super scan features (MSS) (n=70), group C: metastatic bone disease (n=45) and group D: bone scan with indeterminate lesions (n=12). Osteomalacic MSS features were detected in 20 % of the studied patients (locally advanced bladder cancer) compared to 14.5% who had bone metastases. Contrary to metastases which showed high prevalence in TCC (P<0.001), MSS

  18. [Efficacy of zoledronic acid combined with chemotherapy in treatment of skeletal metastases of non-small cell lung cancer and the bone metabolic markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-ye; Zou, Qing-feng; Jin, Chuan; Li, Wei-dong; Chen, Wen-sheng; Ma, Lei

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of zoledronic acid combined with chemotherapy in the management of skeletal metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate the value in urine amino-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (uNTX) and serum bone specific alkaline phosphatase (sBALP) in monitoring skeletal metastasis of NSCLC. From February, 2007 to January, 2009, 32 NSCLC patients with bone metastases received treatment with zoledronic acid at the dose of 4 mg given every 3 weeks and platinum-based chemotherapy (each cycle lasting for 3 weeks). Before and during the treatments, uNTX and sBALP were measured in these patients using ELISA and precipitation with wheat germ lectin, respectively. The patients were followed up for skeletal-related events (SREs) and status of survival. A significant decrease occurred in the pain scores and analgesic use in the patients after the therapy. SREs were not observed during the treatment. Serum creatinine and calcium levels underwent no significant variation during the treatment. Eleven patients reported 14 possible zoledronic acid-related adverse events. The concentration of uNTX and sBALP in patients with bone metastases was above the upper limit of the normal range. A positive correlation was observed between the levels of the markers and the extent of bone metastases. At the third month, uNTX and sBALP were significantly lowered, but radionuclide whole-body bone imaging showed no obvious changes. Of the 32 patients, 24 had elevated uNTX values, which became normal after the treatment in 15 patients and remained elevated in the other 9 patients. SREs occurred in these two subgroups at the rates of 53% and 89% (P=0.039), respectively. Twenty-six patients had elevated sBALP level, and 16 of them exhibited normal sBALP level after the treatment. The incidences of SREs in the patients with elevated and normal sBALP level were 50% and 90% (P=0.038), respectively. The levels of uNTX/Cr and sBALP were not correlated

  19. Circadian and Metabolic Perspectives in the Role Played by NADPH in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Méndez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Physiological activity in healthy conditions requires a coordinated interaction between the molecular circadian clock and the network of biochemical pathways. An important metabolic parameter in the interface between these two entities is the redox state. Among the redox coenzymes that regulate the fluxes of enzymatic reactions is the NADP+/NADPH pair. Indeed, the main biosynthetic pathways need NADPH to serve as an electron donor for cellular anabolic transformations. The existence of a metabolic circadian clock is well established, and it was first identified in mammalian red blood cells. The metabolic circadian clock is independent of transcriptional activity and is sustained by the enzymatic complex peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin/NADPH. This complex shows 24-h redox fluctuations metabolizing H2O2 in various tissues and species (fungi, insects, and mammals. Although this NADPH-sensitive metabolic clock is autonomous in erythrocytes that lack a nucleus, it functions in concert with the transcriptional circadian clock in other cell types to accomplish the task of timing cellular physiology. During carcinogenesis, circadian alterations influence cell cycle onset and promote tumoral growth. These alterations also deregulate cellular energetics through a process known as aerobic glycolysis, or the Warburg effect. The Warburg effect is a typical response of cancer cells in which the metabolism turns into glycolysis even in the presence of functional mitochondria. This alteration has been interpreted as a cellular strategy to increase biomass during cancer, and one of its main factors is the availability of NADPH. This minireview explores the potential role of NADPH as a circadian and cancer-promoting metabolite.

  20. Comprehensive Evaluation of Altered Systemic Metabolism and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing...individuals provide extensive data on metabolic phenotypes, such as obesity and diabetes, and banked plasma samples for interrogation . The potential...banked plasma samples for interrogation . The potential impact of understanding the mechanisms underlying early pancreatic cancer growth is

  1. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong; Tao, Meng-Hua

    2010-01-01

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer

  2. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  3. Association Between Sarcopenia and Metabolic Syndrome in Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jung; Kim, Nam Cho

    Advanced cancer treatments have improved survival from cancer, but the incidence of cardiovascular disease in survivors has recently increased. Sarcopenia and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are related to cancer survival, and sarcopenia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, evidence of a relationship between sarcopenia and MetS in cancer survivors is lacking. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and MetS in cancer survivors and to investigate independent predictors of MetS in cancer survivors. From the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Exam Survey (2008-2011), 798 consecutive cancer survivors were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as the appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by weight less than 1 SD below the sex-specific healthy population aged 20 to 39 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program definition. Among 798 cancer survivors, the prevalence rates of sarcopenia and MetS were 23.1% and 30.0%, respectively. Survivors with sarcopenia were more likely to have a higher waist circumference, body mass index, triglyceride level, and blood pressure and to have a lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level compared with those without sarcopenia. In multivariable analysis, sarcopenia was an independent predictor of MetS (odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.92-3.97). In addition, age and type of cancer were independent predictors of MetS. Sarcopenia was associated with an increased prevalence of MetS in cancer survivors. Interventions to prevent sarcopenia may be necessary to improve cardiovascular outcome in cancer survivors.

  4. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-05

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but essential to cure the malignant foci completely. Herein, we review the recent evidence for intestinal stem cells and colon cancer stem cells, methods to detect the tumor-initiating cells, and clinical significance of cancer stem cell markers. We also describe the emerging problems of cancer stem cell theory, including bidirectional conversion and intertumoral heterogeneity of stem cell phenotype.

  5. The role of cholesterol metabolism and cholesterol transport in carcinogenesis; A review of scientific findings, relevant to future cancer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miguel Cruz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While the unique metabolic activities of malignant tissues as potential targets for cancer therapeutics has been the subject of several recent reviews, the role of cholesterol metabolism in this context is yet to be fully explored. Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cell membranes as well as a precursor of bile acids and steroid hormones. The hypothesis that cancer cells need excess cholesterol and intermediates of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway to maintain a high level of proliferation is well accepted, however the mechanisms by which malignant cells and tissues reprogram cholesterol synthesis, uptake and efflux are yet to be fully elucidated as potential therapeutic targets. High and low density plasma lipoproteins, area the likely major suppliers of cholesterol to cancer cells and tumors, potentially via receptor mediated mechanisms. This review is primarily focused on the role(s of lipoproteins in carcinogenesis, and their future roles as drug delivery vehicles for targeted cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes: important regulators of cancer metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ming Yang,1 Huizhong Su,1 Tomoyoshi Soga,2 Kamil R Kranc,3 Patrick J Pollard1 1Cancer Biology and Metabolism Group, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Mizukami, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; 3MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs regulate the stability of HIF protein by post-translational hydroxylation of two conserved prolyl residues in its α subunit in an oxygen-dependent manner. Trans-4-prolyl hydroxylation of HIFα under normal oxygen (O2 availability enables its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor pVHL E3 ligase complex, leading to the degradation of HIFα via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Due to the obligatory requirement of molecular O2 as a co-substrate, the activity of PHDs is inhibited under hypoxic conditions, resulting in stabilized HIFα, which dimerizes with HIFβ and, together with transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300, activates the transcription of its target genes. As a key molecular regulator of adaptive response to hypoxia, HIF plays important roles in multiple cellular processes and its overexpression has been detected in various cancers. The HIF1α isoform in particular has a strong impact on cellular metabolism, most notably by promoting anaerobic, whilst inhibiting O2-dependent, metabolism of glucose. The PHD enzymes also seem to have HIF-independent functions and are subject to regulation by factors other than O2, such as by metabolic status, oxidative stress, and abnormal levels of endogenous metabolites (oncometabolites that have been observed in some types of cancers. In this review, we aim to summarize current understandings of the function and regulation of PHDs in cancer with an emphasis on their roles in metabolism. Keywords: prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD

  7. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome: Improving outcome with lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerink, N L; Nuver, J; Lefrandt, J D; Vrieling, A H; Gietema, J A; Walenkamp, A M E

    2016-12-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but effective treatment and prevention methods are probably similar. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms leading to the development of CTIMetS after various types of cancer treatment. Furthermore, we propose a safe and accessible method to treat or prevent CTIMetS through lifestyle change. In particular, we suggest that a lifestyle intervention and optimization of energy balance can prevent or mitigate the development of CTIMetS, which may contribute to optimal survivorship care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ataxin-10 is part of a cachexokine cocktail triggering cardiac metabolic dysfunction in cancer cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Schäfer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cancer cachexia affects the majority of tumor patients and significantly contributes to high mortality rates in these subjects. Despite its clinical importance, the identity of tumor-borne signals and their impact on specific peripheral organ systems, particularly the heart, remain mostly unknown. Methods and results: By combining differential colon cancer cell secretome profiling with large-scale cardiomyocyte phenotyping, we identified a signature panel of seven “cachexokines”, including Bridging integrator 1, Syntaxin 7, Multiple inositol-polyphosphate phosphatase 1, Glucosidase alpha acid, Chemokine ligand 2, Adamts like 4, and Ataxin-10, which were both sufficient and necessary to trigger cardiac atrophy and aberrant fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes. As a prototypical example, engineered secretion of Ataxin-10 from non-cachexia-inducing cells was sufficient to induce cachexia phenotypes in cardiomyocytes, correlating with elevated Ataxin-10 serum levels in murine and human cancer cachexia models. Conclusions: As Ataxin-10 serum levels were also found to be elevated in human cachectic cancer patients, the identification of Ataxin-10 as part of a cachexokine cocktail now provides a rational approach towards personalized predictive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures in cancer cachexia. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Cancer cachexia, Ataxin-10, Cardiac dysfunction, Fatty acid metabolism

  9. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer with calorically restricted ketogenic diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Mukherjee, Purna; Marsh, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Information is presented on the calorically restricted ketogenic diet (CRKD) as an alternative therapy for brain cancer. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which evolved to metabolize ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose under energy-restricted conditions, brain tumor cells are largely glycolytic due to mitochondrial defects and have a reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies. The CRKD is effective in managing brain tumor growth in animal models and in patients, and appears to act through antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  11. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, Vanessa R. [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Oliveira, Pedro F. [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Department of Microscopy, Laboratory of Cell Biology and Unit for Multidisciplinary Research in Biomedicine, Abel Salazar Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Porto – UMIB/ICBAS/UP (Portugal); Nunes, Ana R.; Rocha, Cátia S. [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A. [Mountain Research Centre (CIMO), School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança (Portugal); Alves, Marco G., E-mail: alvesmarc@gmail.com [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Silva, Branca M., E-mail: bmcms@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  12. The prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume in FDG PET/CT evaluation of post-operative survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Wanqi; Yu Jinming; Sun Xiaorong; Xing Ligang; Xie Peng; Sun Xindong; Guo Hongbo; Yang Guoren; Kong Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic value of MTV on 18 F-FDG PET/CT in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: Forty-nine patients with esophageal cancer underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan before surgery. The median follow-up time for the patients was 29 months (range, 8-57 months). The prognostic significance of MTV, age, sex, histologic grade, SUV max of the primary tumor, tumor size measured on PET/CT, T stage, N stage, M stage, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, number and location of lymph nodes metastases were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox model. Results: In the univariate analysis, AJCC stage (χ 2 =16.206, hazard ratio (HR)=1.177, P<0.001), N stage (χ 2 =9.536, HR=10.833, P=0.002), T stage (χ 2 =5.810, HR=2.397, P=0.016), number of lymph nodes metastases (χ 2 =11.423, HR=1.567, P=0.001), and MTV (χ 2 =3.872, HR=2.433, P=0.049) were significant predictors of survival.Multivariate analysis showed that MTV and AJCC stage were independent predictors of survival (χ 2 =4.525, HR 1.170, P=0.033; χ 2 =4.875, HR=3.071, P=0.027). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed longer survival time of low-MTV group as compared to high-MTV group (Log-rank, χ 2 =4.186, P=0.041). Conclusion: MTV on 18 F-FDG PET/CT may be an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal cancer. (authors)

  13. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  14. The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease. Liver cancer is highly fatal, it has very few treatment options, and it is one of the few cancers whose incidence is rising worldwide. One poorly understood risk factor for liver cancer is obesity/metabolic disease (such as diabetes and fatty liver disease).

  15. The emerging role and targetability of the TCA cycle in cancer metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle is a central route for oxidative phosphorylation in cells, and fulfills their bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox balance requirements. Despite early dogma that cancer cells bypass the TCA cycle and primarily utilize aerobic glycolysis, emerging evidence demonstrates that certain cancer cells, especially those with deregulated oncogene and tumor suppressor expression, rely heavily on the TCA cycle for energy production and macromolecule synthesis. As the field progresses, the importance of aberrant TCA cycle function in tumorigenesis and the potentials of applying small molecule inhibitors to perturb the enhanced cycle function for cancer treatment start to evolve. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the fuels feeding the cycle, effects of oncogenes and tumor suppressors on fuel and cycle usage, common genetic alterations and deregulation of cycle enzymes, and potential therapeutic opportunities for targeting the TCA cycle in cancer cells. With the application of advanced technology and in vivo model organism studies, it is our hope that studies of this previously overlooked biochemical hub will provide fresh insights into cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis, subsequently revealing vulnerabilities for therapeutic interventions in various cancer types.

  16. The emerging role and targetability of the TCA cycle in cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nicole M; Mucka, Patrick; Kern, Joseph G; Feng, Hui

    2018-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central route for oxidative phosphorylation in cells, and fulfills their bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox balance requirements. Despite early dogma that cancer cells bypass the TCA cycle and primarily utilize aerobic glycolysis, emerging evidence demonstrates that certain cancer cells, especially those with deregulated oncogene and tumor suppressor expression, rely heavily on the TCA cycle for energy production and macromolecule synthesis. As the field progresses, the importance of aberrant TCA cycle function in tumorigenesis and the potentials of applying small molecule inhibitors to perturb the enhanced cycle function for cancer treatment start to evolve. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the fuels feeding the cycle, effects of oncogenes and tumor suppressors on fuel and cycle usage, common genetic alterations and deregulation of cycle enzymes, and potential therapeutic opportunities for targeting the TCA cycle in cancer cells. With the application of advanced technology and in vivo model organism studies, it is our hope that studies of this previously overlooked biochemical hub will provide fresh insights into cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis, subsequently revealing vulnerabilities for therapeutic interventions in various cancer types.

  17. Random distribution of nucleoli in metabolic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, R.J.; Waterman, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Hasofer (1974) has studied a probabilistic model for the fusion of nucleoli in metabolic cells. The nucleoli are uniformly distributed at points in the nucleus, assumed to be a sphere. The nucleoli grow from a point to a maximum size during interphase, and fusion is said to occur if the nucleoli touch. For this model, Hasofer calculated the probability of fusion and found it much smaller than experimental data would indicate. Experimental data of this type is taken by use of a microscope where a two-dimensional view or projection of the three-dimensional cell is obtained. Hasofer implicitly assumes that actual fusion can be distinguished from the case where the two nucleoli do not touch but their two-dimensional projections overlap. It is assumed, in this letter, that these two cases cannot be distinguished. The probability obtained by Beckman and Waterman is larger than Hasofer's and a much better fit to the experimental data is obtained. Even if true fusion can be unfailingly distinguished from overlap of the two-dimensional projections, it is hoped that these calculations will allow someone to propose the correct (non-uniform) model. It is concluded, for the assumptions used, that there is not sufficient evidence to reject the hypothesis of uniform distribution of the nucleoli.

  18. Metabolic response to surgery in the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.F.

    1979-01-01

    The metabolic response to uncomplicated surgery in the patient undergoing primary therapy for malignancy is no different than the response to surgery of similar magnitude for benign disease. Hemodynamic, nutritional-endocrine, and convalescent changes are similar. However, with current aggressive approaches to the management of cancer, the patient often comes to surgery with evidence of major debilitating side effects from his progressive malignancy or from aggressive multimodality therapy. The surgeon must be aware of the consequences of the use of combination therapies on the expected metabolic response to surgery. Awareness of such problems such as the nutritional deficit will allow preventive methods to supercede mtabolic salvage procedures

  19. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  20. Stem cell metabolism in tissue development and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyh-Chang, Ng; Daley, George Q.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in metabolomics and computational analysis have deepened our appreciation for the role of specific metabolic pathways in dictating cell fate. Once thought to be a mere consequence of the state of a cell, metabolism is now known to play a pivotal role in dictating whether a cell proliferates, differentiates or remains quiescent. Here, we review recent studies of metabolism in stem cells that have revealed a shift in the balance between glycolysis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress during the maturation of adult stem cells, and during the reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency. These insights promise to inform strategies for the directed differentiation of stem cells and to offer the potential for novel metabolic or pharmacological therapies to enhance regeneration and the treatment of degenerative disease. PMID:23715547

  1. Care of the cancer survivor: metabolic syndrome following hormone-modifying therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Redig, Amanda J.; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates metabolic syndrome as a long-term cancer risk factor but also suggests that certain cancer therapies may increase patients’ risk of developing metabolic syndrome secondary to cancer therapy. In particular, breast cancer and prostate cancer are driven in part by sex hormones, thus treatment for both diseases is often based on hormone-modifying therapy. Androgen suppression therapy in men with prostate cancer is associated with dyslipidemia, increasing risk of cardi...

  2. MCT4 Defines a Glycolytic Subtype of Pancreatic Cancer with Poor Prognosis and Unique Metabolic Dependencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GuemHee Baek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available KRAS mutation, which occurs in ∼95% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA, has been shown to program tumor metabolism. MCT4 is highly upregulated in a subset of PDA with a glycolytic gene expression program and poor survival. Models with high levels of MCT4 preferentially employ glycolytic metabolism. Selectively in such “addicted” models, MCT4 attenuation compromised glycolytic flux with compensatory induction of oxidative phosphorylation and scavenging of metabolites by macropinocytosis and autophagy. In spite of these adaptations, MCT4 depletion induced cell death characterized by elevated reactive oxygen species and metabolic crisis. Cell death induced by MCT4-depletion was augmented by inhibition of compensatory pathways. In xenograft models, MCT4 had a significant impact on tumor metabolism and was required for rapid tumor growth. Together, these findings illustrate the metabolic diversity of PDA described by MCT4, delineate pathways through which this lactate transporter supports cancer growth, and demonstrate that PDA can be rationally targeted based on metabolic addictions.

  3. Tumor-stroma metabolic relationship based on lactate shuttle can sustain prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanità, Patrizia; Capulli, Mattia; Teti, Anna; Galatioto, Giuseppe Paradiso; Vicentini, Carlo; Chiarugi, Paola; Bologna, Mauro; Angelucci, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell adopts peculiar metabolic strategies aimed to sustain the continuous proliferation in an environment characterized by relevant fluctuations in oxygen and nutrient levels. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 can drive such adaptation permitting the transport across plasma membrane of different monocarboxylic acids involved in energy metabolism. Role of MCTs in tumor-stroma metabolic relationship was investigated in vitro and in vivo using transformed prostate epithelial cells, carcinoma cell lines and normal fibroblasts. Moreover prostate tissues from carcinoma and benign hypertrophy cases were analyzed for individuating clinical-pathological implications of MCT1 and MCT4 expression. Transformed prostate epithelial (TPE) and prostate cancer (PCa) cells express both MCT1 and MCT4 and demonstrated variable dependence on aerobic glycolysis for maintaining their proliferative rate. In glucose-restriction the presence of L-lactate determined, after 24 h of treatment, in PCa cells the up-regulation of MCT1 and of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COX1), and reduced the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase respect to untreated cells. The blockade of MCT1 function, performed by si RNA silencing, determined an appreciable antiproliferative effect when L-lactate was utilized as energetic fuel. Accordingly L-lactate released by high glycolytic human diploid fibroblasts WI-38 sustained survival and growth of TPE and PCa cells in low glucose culture medium. In parallel, the treatment with conditioned medium from PCa cells was sufficient to induce glycolytic metabolism in WI-38 cells, with upregulation of HIF-1a and MCT4. Co-injection of PCa cells with high glycolytic WI-38 fibroblasts determined an impressive increase in tumor growth rate in a xenograft model that was abrogated by MCT1 silencing in PCa cells. The possible interplay based on L-lactate shuttle between tumor and stroma was confirmed also in human PCa tissue where we observed a positive

  4. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Rahal, Daoud [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Alloisio, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Thoracic Surgery, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Roncalli, Massimo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Armando [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Marchesi, Federica [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  5. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura; Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela; Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina; Rahal, Daoud; Alloisio, Marco; Roncalli, Massimo; Allavena, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Marchesi, Federica; Chiti, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  6. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  7. Reprogramming to developmental plasticity in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Ball, Caitlin; Biddle, Adrian

    2017-10-15

    During development and throughout adult life, sub-populations of cells exist that exhibit phenotypic plasticity - the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. This behaviour is important in embryogenesis, is exhibited in a more limited context by adult stem cells, and can be re-activated in cancer cells to drive important processes underlying tumour progression. A well-studied mechanism of phenotypic plasticity is the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process which has been observed in both normal and cancerous cells. The epigenetic and metabolic modifications necessary to facilitate phenotypic plasticity are first seen in development and can be re-activated both in normal regeneration and in cancer. In cancer, the re-activation of these mechanisms enables tumour cells to acquire a cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype with enhanced ability to survive in hostile environments, resist therapeutic interventions, and undergo metastasis. However, recent research has suggested that plasticity may also expose weaknesses in cancer cells that could be exploited for future therapeutic development. More research is needed to identify developmental mechanisms that are active in cancer, so that these may be targeted to reduce tumour growth and metastasis and overcome therapeutic resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. small Cell Lung Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were analyzed for CTC count before and after chemotherapy. Clinical relevance of. CTCs with ... reduction (p < 0.001) in CTC count was also observed after one cycle of chemotherapy. Conclusion: Patients with low CTC ... type of cancer in China with 21.7 % of males and. 14.3 % of females. The incidence of ...

  9. Transgenic Mouse Models for Alcohol Metabolism, Toxicity and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Heit, Claire; Dong, Hongbin; Chen, Ying; Shah, Yatrik M.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse leads to tissue damage including a variety of cancers; however, the molecular mechanisms by which this damage occurs remains to be fully understood. The primary enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism include alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1, (CYP2E1), catalase (CAT), and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). Genetic polymorphisms in human genes encoding these enzymes are associated with increased risks of alcohol-related tissue damage, as well as differences in...

  10. Importance of glutamine metabolism in leukemia cells by energy production through TCA cycle and by redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Mineaki; Miwa, Hiroshi; Shikami, Masato; Tsunekawa-Imai, Norikazu; Suganuma, Kazuto; Mizuno, Shohei; Takahashi, Miyuki; Mizutani, Motonori; Hanamura, Ichiro; Nitta, Masakazu

    2014-07-01

    Some cancer cells depend on glutamine despite of pronounced glycolysis. We examined the glutamine metabolism in leukemia cells, and found that HL-60 cells most depended on glutamine in the 4 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines examined: growth of HL-60 cells was most suppressed by glutamine deprivation and by inhibition of glutaminolysis, which was rescued by tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate, oxaloacetic acid. Glutamine is also involved in antioxidant defense function by increasing glutathione. Glutamine deprivation suppressed the glutathione content and elevated reactive oxygen species most evidently in HL-60 cells. Glutamine metabolism might be a therapeutic target in some leukemia.

  11. INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Coordinates Metabolic Homeostasis with Cell Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme J. Gowans

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive survival requires the coordination of nutrient availability with expenditure of cellular resources. For example, in nutrient-limited environments, 50% of all S. cerevisiae genes synchronize and exhibit periodic bursts of expression in coordination with respiration and cell division in the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC. Despite the importance of metabolic and proliferative synchrony, the majority of YMC regulators are currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex is required to coordinate respiration and cell division with periodic gene expression. Specifically, INO80 mutants have severe defects in oxygen consumption and promiscuous cell division that is no longer coupled with metabolic status. In mutant cells, chromatin accessibility of periodic genes, including TORC1-responsive genes, is relatively static, concomitant with severely attenuated gene expression. Collectively, these results reveal that the INO80 complex mediates metabolic signaling to chromatin to restrict proliferation to metabolically optimal states.

  12. Introduction to the molecular basis of cancer metabolism and the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Darleen C; Ververis, Katherine; Tortorella, Stephanie M; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2015-04-01

    In differentiated normal cells, the conventional route of glucose metabolism involves glycolysis, followed by the citric acid cycle and electron transport chain to generate usable energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This occurs in the presence of oxygen. In hypoxic conditions, normal cells undergo anaerobic glycolysis to yield significantly less energy producing lactate as a product. As first highlighted in the 1920s by Otto Warburg, the metabolism exhibited by tumor cells involves an increased rate of aerobic glycolysis, known as the Warburg effect. In aerobic glycolysis, pyruvate molecules yielded from glycolysis are converted into fewer molecules of ATP even in the presence of oxygen. Evidence indicates that the reasons as to why tumor cells undergo aerobic glycolysis include: (1) the shift in priority to accumulate biomass rather than energy production, (2) the evasion of apoptosis as fewer reactive oxygen species are released by the mitochondria and (3) the production of lactate to further fuel growth of tumors. In this mini-review we discuss emerging molecular aspects of cancer metabolism and the Warburg effect. Aspects of the Warburg effect are analyzed in the context of the established hallmarks of cancer including the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  13. FLIM-FRET image analysis of tryptophan in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Alam, Shagufta R.; Svindrych, Zdenek; Wallrabe, Horst

    2017-07-01

    A region of interest (ROI) based quantitative FLIM-FRET image analysis is developed to quantitate the autofluorescence signals of the essential amino acid tryptophan as a biomarker to investigate the metabolism in prostate cancer cells.

  14. Addiction to Coupling of the Warburg Effect with Glutamine Catabolism in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is critical to oncogenesis, but the emergence and function of this profound reorganization remain poorly understood. Here we find that cooperating oncogenic mutations drive large-scale metabolic reprogramming, which is both intrinsic to cancer cells and obligatory for the transition to malignancy. This involves synergistic regulation of several genes encoding metabolic enzymes, including the lactate dehydrogenases LDHA and LDHB and mitochondrial glutamic pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2. Notably, GPT2 engages activated glycolysis to drive the utilization of glutamine as a carbon source for TCA cycle anaplerosis in colon cancer cells. Our data indicate that the Warburg effect supports oncogenesis via GPT2-mediated coupling of pyruvate production to glutamine catabolism. Although critical to the cancer phenotype, GPT2 activity is dispensable in cells that are not fully transformed, thus pinpointing a metabolic vulnerability specifically associated with cancer cell progression to malignancy.

  15. Metabolism modifications and apoptosis induction after Cellfood™ administration to leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; Carbonaro, Valentina; Palma, Francesco; Arshakyan, Marselina; Galati, Rossella; Nuvoli, Barbara; Battistelli, Serafina; Canestrari, Franco; Benedetti, Serena

    2013-09-09

    Cellfood™ (CF) is a nutritional supplement containing deuterium sulphate, minerals, amino acids, and enzymes, with well documented antioxidant properties. Its organic and inorganic components are extracted from the red algae Lithothamnion calcareum, whose mineral extract has shown growth-inhibitory effect both on in vitro and in vivo models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of CF on leukemic cells. In fact, according to its capacity to modulate O2 availability and to improve mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, we wondered if CF could affect cancer cell metabolism making cells susceptible to apoptosis. Three leukemic cell lines, Jurkat, U937, and K562, were treated with CF 5 μl/ml up to 72 hours. Cell viability, apoptosis (i.e. caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation), hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) concentration, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and lactate release in the culture medium were detected and compared with untreated cells. CF significantly inhibited leukemic cell viability by promoting cell apoptosis, as revealed by caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering. In particular, CF treated cells showed lower HIF-1α levels and lower GLUT-1 expression as compared to untreated cells. At the same time, CF was able to reduce LDH activity and, consequently, the amount of lactate released in the extracellular environment. We supplied evidence for an antiproliferative effect of CF on leukemia cell lines by inducing cell death through an apoptotic mechanism and by altering cancer cell metabolism through HIF-1α and GLUT-1 regulation. Thanks to its antioxidative and proapoptotic properties, CF might be a good candidate for cancer prevention.

  16. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... certain genes, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene or the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... certain genes, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene or the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... certain genes, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene or the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) ...

  19. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... certain genes, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene or the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) ...

  20. How Can We Treat Cancer Disease Not Cancer Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Won; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Woo-Young; Seo, Ji Hae; Lee, Ho-Young

    2017-01-01

    Since molecular biology studies began, researches in biological science have centered on proteins and genes at molecular level of a single cell. Cancer research has also focused on various functions of proteins and genes that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Accordingly, most contemporary anticancer drugs have been developed to target abnormal characteristics of cancer cells. Despite the great advances in the development of anticancer drugs, vast majority of patients with advanced cancer have shown grim prognosis and high rate of relapse. To resolve this problem, we must reevaluate our focuses in current cancer research. Cancer should be considered as a systemic disease because cancer cells undergo a complex interaction with various surrounding cells in cancer tissue and spread to whole body through metastasis under the control of the systemic modulation. Human body relies on the cooperative interaction between various tissues and organs, and each organ performs its specialized function through tissue-specific cell networks. Therefore, investigation of the tumor-specific cell networks can provide novel strategy to overcome the limitation of current cancer research. This review presents the limitations of the current cancer research, emphasizing the necessity of studying tissue-specific cell network which could be a new perspective on treating cancer disease, not cancer cells.

  1. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  2. Cancer Metabolism and Tumor Heterogeneity: Imaging Perspectives Using MR Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigin Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to maintain viability via genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations, expressing overall dynamic heterogeneity. The complex relaxation mechanisms of nuclear spins provide unique and convertible tissue contrasts, making magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS pertinent imaging tools in both clinics and research. In this review, we summarized MR methods that visualize tumor characteristics and its metabolic phenotypes on an anatomical, microvascular, microstructural, microenvironmental, and metabolomics scale. The review will progress from the utilities of basic spin-relaxation contrasts in cancer imaging to more advanced imaging methods that measure tumor-distinctive parameters such as perfusion, water diffusion, magnetic susceptibility, oxygenation, acidosis, redox state, and cell death. Analytical methods to assess tumor heterogeneity are also reviewed in brief. Although the clinical utility of tumor heterogeneity from imaging is debatable, the quantification of tumor heterogeneity using functional and metabolic MR images with development of robust analytical methods and improved MR methods may offer more critical roles of tumor heterogeneity data in clinics. MRI/MRS can also provide insightful information on pharmacometabolomics, biomarker discovery, disease diagnosis and prognosis, and treatment response. With these future directions in mind, we anticipate the widespread utilization of these MR-based techniques in studying in vivo cancer biology to better address significant clinical needs.

  3. Inhibition of glucose turnover by 3-bromopyruvate counteracts pancreatic cancer stem cell features and sensitizes cells to gemcitabine

    OpenAIRE

    Isayev, Orkhan; Rausch, Vanessa; Bauer, Nathalie; Liu, Li; Fan, Pei; Zhang, Yiyao; Gladkich, Jury; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Jürgen; Mollenhauer, Martin; Rückert, Felix; Zach, Sebastian; Haberkorn, Uwe; Gross, Wolfgang; Schönsiegel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, the aggressive growth and early metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is due to the activity of CSCs, which are not targeted by current therapies. Otto Warburg suggested that the growth of cancer cells is driven by a high glucose metabolism. Here, we investigated whether glycolysis inhibition targets CSCs and thus may enhance therapeutic efficacy. Four established and 3 primary PDA cell lines, non-malignant cells, and 3 patien...

  4. Obesity, metabolic factors and risk of different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Carreras-Torres

    Full Text Available Assessing the relationship between lung cancer and metabolic conditions is challenging because of the confounding effect of tobacco. Mendelian randomization (MR, or the use of genetic instrumental variables to assess causality, may help to identify the metabolic drivers of lung cancer.We identified genetic instruments for potential metabolic risk factors and evaluated these in relation to risk using 29,266 lung cancer cases (including 11,273 adenocarcinomas, 7,426 squamous cell and 2,664 small cell cases and 56,450 controls. The MR risk analysis suggested a causal effect of body mass index (BMI on lung cancer risk for two of the three major histological subtypes, with evidence of a risk increase for squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio (OR [95% confidence interval (CI] = 1.20 [1.01-1.43] and for small cell lung cancer (OR [95%CI] = 1.52 [1.15-2.00] for each standard deviation (SD increase in BMI [4.6 kg/m2], but not for adenocarcinoma (OR [95%CI] = 0.93 [0.79-1.08] (Pheterogeneity = 4.3x10-3. Additional analysis using a genetic instrument for BMI showed that each SD increase in BMI increased cigarette consumption by 1.27 cigarettes per day (P = 2.1x10-3, providing novel evidence that a genetic susceptibility to obesity influences smoking patterns. There was also evidence that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was inversely associated with lung cancer overall risk (OR [95%CI] = 0.90 [0.84-0.97] per SD of 38 mg/dl, while fasting insulin was positively associated (OR [95%CI] = 1.63 [1.25-2.13] per SD of 44.4 pmol/l. Sensitivity analyses including a weighted-median approach and MR-Egger test did not detect other pleiotropic effects biasing the main results.Our results are consistent with a causal role of fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in lung cancer etiology, as well as for BMI in squamous cell and small cell carcinoma. The latter relation may be mediated by a previously unrecognized effect of obesity on smoking behavior.

  5. Optical imaging of metabolic adaptability in metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Lisa; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Accurate methods for determining metastatic risk from the primary tumor are crucial for patient survival. Cell metabolism could potentially be used as a marker of metastatic risk. Optical imaging of the endogenous fluorescent molecules nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) provides a non-destructive and label-free method for determining cell metabolism. The optical redox ratio (FAD/FAD+NADH) is sensitive to the balance between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We have previously established that hypoxia-reoxygenation stress leads to metastatic potential-dependent changes in optical redox ratio. The objective of this study was to monitor the changes in optical redox ratio in breast cancer cells in response to different periods of hypoxic stress as well various levels of hypoxia to establish an optimal protocol. We measured the optical redox ratio of highly metastatic 4T1 murine breast cancer cells under normoxic conditions and after exposure to 30, 60, and 120 minutes of 0.5% O2. This was followed by an hour of reoxygenation. We found an increase in the optical redox ratio following reoxygenation from hypoxia for all durations. Statistically significant differences were observed at 60 and 120 minutes (p˂0.01) compared with normoxia, implying an ability to adapt to OXPHOS after reoxygenation. The switch to OXPHOS has been shown to be a key promoter of cell invasion. We will present our results from these investigations in human breast cancer cells as well as non-metastatic breast cancer cells exposed to various levels of hypoxia.

  6. Targeted Inhibition of EGFR and Glutaminase Induces Metabolic Crisis in EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momcilovic, Milica; Bailey, Sean T; Lee, Jason T; Fishbein, Michael C; Magyar, Clara; Braas, Daniel; Graeber, Thomas; Jackson, Nicholas J; Czernin, Johannes; Emberley, Ethan; Gross, Matthew; Janes, Julie; Mackinnon, Andy; Pan, Alison; Rodriguez, Mirna; Works, Melissa; Zhang, Winter; Parlati, Francesco; Demo, Susan; Garon, Edward; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M; Sadeghi, Saman; Christofk, Heather R; Shackelford, David B

    2017-01-17

    Cancer cells exhibit increased use of nutrients, including glucose and glutamine, to support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferation. We tested the small-molecule inhibitor of glutaminase CB-839 in combination with erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a therapeutic strategy to simultaneously impair cancer glucose and glutamine utilization and thereby suppress tumor growth. Here, we show that CB-839 cooperates with erlotinib to drive energetic stress and activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in EGFR (del19) lung tumors. Tumor cells undergo metabolic crisis and cell death, resulting in rapid tumor regression in vivo in mouse NSCLC xenografts. Consistently, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and 11 C-glutamine ( 11 C-Gln) of xenografts indicated reduced glucose and glutamine uptake in tumors following treatment with CB-839 + erlotinib. Therefore, PET imaging with 18 F-FDG and 11 C-Gln tracers can be used to non-invasively measure metabolic response to CB-839 and erlotinib combination therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeted Inhibition of EGFR and Glutaminase Induces Metabolic Crisis in EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Momcilovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells exhibit increased use of nutrients, including glucose and glutamine, to support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferation. We tested the small-molecule inhibitor of glutaminase CB-839 in combination with erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as a therapeutic strategy to simultaneously impair cancer glucose and glutamine utilization and thereby suppress tumor growth. Here, we show that CB-839 cooperates with erlotinib to drive energetic stress and activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK pathway in EGFR (del19 lung tumors. Tumor cells undergo metabolic crisis and cell death, resulting in rapid tumor regression in vivo in mouse NSCLC xenografts. Consistently, positron emission tomography (PET imaging with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG and 11C-glutamine (11C-Gln of xenografts indicated reduced glucose and glutamine uptake in tumors following treatment with CB-839 + erlotinib. Therefore, PET imaging with 18F-FDG and 11C-Gln tracers can be used to non-invasively measure metabolic response to CB-839 and erlotinib combination therapy.

  8. SR-BI: Linking Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism with Breast and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Gutierrez-Pajares

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated the significant role of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the progression of cancer. The SCARB1 gene encodes the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI, which is an 82-kDa glycoprotein with two transmembrane domains separated by a large extracellular loop. SR-BI plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol exchange between cells and high-density lipoproteins. Accordingly, hepatic SR-BI has been shown to play an essential role in the regulation of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, which promotes the removal and excretion of excess body cholesterol. In the context of atherosclerosis, SR-BI has been implicated in the regulation of intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell formation, and cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, since lipid metabolism is a relevant target for cancer treatment, recent studies have focused on examining the role of SR-BI in this pathology. While signaling pathways have initially been explored in non-tumoral cells, studies with cancer cells have now demonstrated SR-BI’s function in tumor progression. In this review, we will discuss the role of SR-BI during tumor development and malignant progression. In addition, we will provide insights into the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the SCARB1 gene. Overall, studying the role of SR-BI in tumor development and progression should allow us to gain useful information for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  9. The metabolic syndrome in long-term cancer survivors, an important target for secondary preventive measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; Postma, A; Sleijfer, DT; Gietema, JA

    With increasing numbers of cancer survivors, attention has been drawn to long-term complications of curative cancer treatment, including a range of metabolic disorders. These metabolic disorders often resemble the components of the so-called metabolic syndrome, or syndrome X, which is an important

  10. Adoptive T cell cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhandzhugazyan, Karine N.; Guldberg, Per; Kirkin, Alexei F.

    2018-06-01

    Tumour heterogeneity and off-target toxicity are current challenges of cancer immunotherapy. Karine Dzhandzhugazyan, Per Guldberg and Alexei Kirkin discuss how epigenetic induction of tumour antigens in antigen-presenting cells may form the basis for multi-target therapies.

  11. Uptake of DNA by cancer cells without a transfection reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Kong

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells exhibit elevated levels of glucose uptake and may obtain pre-formed, diet-derived fatty acids from the bloodstream to boost their rapid growth; they may also use nucleic acid from their microenvironment. The study of processing nucleic acid by cancer cells will help improve the understanding of the metabolism of cancer. DNA is commonly packaged into a viral or lipid particle to be transferred into cells; this process is called transfection in laboratory. Cancer cells are known for having gene mutations and the evolving ability of endocytosis. Their uptake of DNAs might be different from normal cells; they may take in DNAs directly from the environment. In this report, we studied the uptake of DNAs in cancer cells without a transfection reagent. Methods A group of DNA fragments were prepared with PCR and labeled with isotope phosphorous-32 to test their uptake by Huh 7 (liver cancer and THLE3 (normal liver cells after incubation overnight by counting radioactivity of the cells’ genomic DNA. Multiple cell lines including breast cancer and lung cancer were tested with the same method. DNA molecules were also labeled with fluorescence to test the location in the cells using a kit of “label it fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH” from Mirus (USA. Results The data demonstrated that hepatocellular carcinoma cells possess the ability to take in large DNA fragments directly without a transfection reagent whereas normal liver cells cannot. Huh7 and MDA-MB231 cells displayed a significantly higher Rhodamine density in the cytoplasmic phagosomes and this suggests that the mechanism of uptake of large DNA by cancer cells is likely endocytosis. The efficacy of uptake is related to the DNA’s size. Some cell lines of lung cancer and breast cancer also showed similar uptake of DNA. Conclusions In the present study, we have revealed the evidence that some cancer cells, but not nontumorigenic cells, can take DNA

  12. Multiple metabolic alterations exist in mutant PI3K cancers, but only glucose is essential as a nutrient source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Foster

    Full Text Available Targeting tumour metabolism is becoming a major new area of pharmaceutical endeavour. Consequently, a systematic search to define whether there are specific energy source dependencies in tumours, and how these might be dictated by upstream driving genetic mutations, is required. The PI3K-AKT-mTOR signalling pathway has a seminal role in regulating diverse cellular processes including cell proliferation and survival, but has also been associated with metabolic dysregulation. In this study, we sought to define how mutations within PI3KCA may affect the metabolic dependency of a cancer cell, using precisely engineered isogenic cell lines. Studies revealed gene expression signatures in PIK3CA mutant cells indicative of a consistent up-regulation of glycolysis. Interestingly, the genes up- and down-regulated varied between isogenic models suggesting that the primary node of regulation is not the same between models. Additional gene expression changes were also observed, suggesting that metabolic pathways other than glycolysis, such as glutaminolysis, were also affected. Nutrient dependency studies revealed that growth of PIK3CA mutant cells is highly dependent on glucose, whereas glutamine dependency is independent of PIK3CA status. In addition, the glucose dependency exhibited by PIK3CA mutant cells could not be overridden by supplementation with other nutrients. This specific dependence on glucose for growth was further illustrated by studies evaluating the effects of targeted disruption of the glycolytic pathway using siRNA and was also found to be present across a wider panel of cancer cell lines harbouring endogenous PIK3CA mutations. In conclusion, we have found that PIK3CA mutations lead to a shift towards a highly glycolytic phenotype, and that despite suggestions that cancer cells are adept at utilising alternative nutrient sources, PIK3CA mutant cells are not able to compensate for glucose withdrawal. Understanding the metabolic

  13. Effects of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase on PANC-1 cells proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yong-Tao; Chen, Pan; Li, Yu-Hua; Chen, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Hang; Yu, Ai-Ming; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) has been reported in pancreatic cancer. However, the role of NNMT in pancreatic cancer development remains elusive. Therefore, the present study was to investigate the impact of NNMT on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress. Pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 was transfected with NNMT expression plasmid or small interfering RNA of NNMT to overexpress or knockdown intracellular NNMT expression, respectively. Rate of cell proliferation was monitored. Transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays were conducted to assess cell migration and invasion capacity. Resistance to glucose deprivation, sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition, mitochondrial inhibtion and resistance to rapamycin were examined to evaluate cell survival under metabolic stress. NNMT silencing markedly reduced cell proliferation, whereas NNMT overexpression promoted cell growth moderately. Knocking down NNMT also significantly suppressed the migration and invasion capacities of PANC-1 cells. Conversely, NNMT upregulation enhanced cell migration and invasion capacities. In addition, NNMT knockdown cells were much less resistant to glucose deprivation and rapamycin as well as glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose whereas NNMT-expressing cells showed opposite effects although the effects were not so striking. These data sugguest that NNMT plays an important role in PANC-1 cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effects of Nicotinamide N-Methyltransferase on PANC-1 Cells Proliferation, Metastatic Potential and Survival Under Metabolic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aberrant expression of Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT has been reported in pancreatic cancer. However, the role of NNMT in pancreatic cancer development remains elusive. Therefore, the present study was to investigate the impact of NNMT on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress. Methods: Pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 was transfected with NNMT expression plasmid or small interfering RNA of NNMT to overexpress or knockdown intracellular NNMT expression, respectively. Rate of cell proliferation was monitored. Transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays were conducted to assess cell migration and invasion capacity. Resistance to glucose deprivation, sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition, mitochondrial inhibtion and resistance to rapamycin were examined to evaluate cell survival under metabolic stress. Results: NNMT silencing markedly reduced cell proliferation, whereas NNMT overexpression promoted cell growth moderately. Knocking down NNMT also significantly suppressed the migration and invasion capacities of PANC-1 cells. Conversely, NNMT upregulation enhanced cell migration and invasion capacities. In addition, NNMT knockdown cells were much less resistant to glucose deprivation and rapamycin as well as glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose whereas NNMT-expressing cells showed opposite effects although the effects were not so striking. Conclusions: These data sugguest that NNMT plays an important role in PANC-1 cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress.

  15. Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Arem

    Full Text Available Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713 and controls (n = 878. The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830. Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186, LRP2 (rs4668123, CYP24A1 (rs2762932, GC (rs2282679, and CUBN (rs1810205 genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037, but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  16. Sulphur XANES Analysis of Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatek, W.M.; Podgorczyk, M.; Paluszkiewicz, Cz.; Balerna, A.; Kisiel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men throughout the world. It is believed that changes to the structure of protein binding sites, altering its metabolism, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. Sulphur, often present in binding sites, can influence such changes through its chemical speciation. Hence there is a need for precise investigation of coordination environment of sulphur. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy offers such possibility. Cell culture samples offer histologically well defined areas of good homogeneity, suitable for successful and reliable X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. This paper presents sulphur speciation data collected from three different human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145). Sulphur X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis was performed on K-edge structure. The spectra of cells were compared with those of cancerous tissue and with organic substances as well as inorganic compounds. (authors)

  17. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  18. Gastric stem cells and gastric cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2013-01-01

    The gastric epithelium is continuously regenerated by gastric stem cells, which give rise to various kinds of daughter cells, including parietal cells, chief cells, surface mucous cells, mucous neck cells, and enteroendocrine cells. The self-renewal and differentiation of gastric stem cells need delicate regulation to maintain the normal physiology of the stomach. Recently, it was hypothesized that cancer stem cells drive the cancer growth and metastasis. In contrast to conventional clonal ev...

  19. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  20. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0644 TITLE: Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chun-Ju...Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0644 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a cell population with acquired perpetuating self-renewal properties which

  1. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation

  2. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  3. Rhabdomyosarcoma cells show an energy producing anabolic metabolic phenotype compared with primary myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi Richard M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional status of a cell is expressed in its metabolic activity. We have applied stable isotope tracing methods to determine the differences in metabolic pathways in proliferating Rhabdomysarcoma cells (Rh30 and human primary myocytes in culture. Uniformly 13C-labeled glucose was used as a source molecule to follow the incorporation of 13C into more than 40 marker metabolites using NMR and GC-MS. These include metabolites that report on the activity of glycolysis, Krebs' cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and pyrimidine biosynthesis. Results The Rh30 cells proliferated faster than the myocytes. Major differences in flux through glycolysis were evident from incorporation of label into secreted lactate, which accounts for a substantial fraction of the glucose carbon utilized by the cells. Krebs' cycle activity as determined by 13C isotopomer distributions in glutamate, aspartate, malate and pyrimidine rings was considerably higher in the cancer cells than in the primary myocytes. Large differences were also evident in de novo biosynthesis of riboses in the free nucleotide pools, as well as entry of glucose carbon into the pyrimidine rings in the free nucleotide pool. Specific labeling patterns in these metabolites show the increased importance of anaplerotic reactions in the cancer cells to maintain the high demand for anabolic and energy metabolism compared with the slower growing primary myocytes. Serum-stimulated Rh30 cells showed higher degrees of labeling than serum starved cells, but they retained their characteristic anabolic metabolism profile. The myocytes showed evidence of de novo synthesis of glycogen, which was absent in the Rh30 cells. Conclusion The specific 13C isotopomer patterns showed that the major difference between the transformed and the primary cells is the shift from energy and maintenance metabolism in the myocytes toward increased energy and anabolic metabolism for proliferation in the Rh30 cells

  4. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiong; Jin, Xun; Kim, Hyunggee

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells can generate tumors from only a small number of cells, whereas differentiated cancer cells cannot. The prominent feature of cancer stem cells is its ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple types of cancer cells. Cancer stem cells have several distinct tumorigenic abilities, including stem cell signal transduction, tumorigenicity, metastasis, and resistance to anticancer drugs, which are regulated by genetic or epigenetic changes. Like normal adult stem cells involved in various developmental processes and tissue homeostasis, cancer stem cells maintain their self-renewal capacity by activating multiple stem cell signaling pathways and inhibiting differentiation signaling pathways during cancer initiation and progression. Recently, many studies have focused on targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate malignancies by regulating stem cell signaling pathways, and products of some of these strategies are in preclinical and clinical trials. In this review, we describe the crucial features of cancer stem cells related to tumor relapse and drug resistance, as well as the new therapeutic strategy to target cancer stem cells named "differentiation therapy."

  5. Molecular Characterization and Clinical Relevance of Metabolic Expression Subtypes in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Peng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metabolic reprogramming provides critical information for clinical oncology. Using molecular data of 9,125 patient samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we identified tumor subtypes in 33 cancer types based on mRNA expression patterns of seven major metabolic processes and assessed their clinical relevance. Our metabolic expression subtypes correlated extensively with clinical outcome: subtypes with upregulated carbohydrate, nucleotide, and vitamin/cofactor metabolism most consistently correlated with worse prognosis, whereas subtypes with upregulated lipid metabolism showed the opposite. Metabolic subtypes correlated with diverse somatic drivers but exhibited effects convergent on cancer hallmark pathways and were modulated by highly recurrent master regulators across cancer types. As a proof-of-concept example, we demonstrated that knockdown of SNAI1 or RUNX1—master regulators of carbohydrate metabolic subtypes—modulates metabolic activity and drug sensitivity. Our study provides a system-level view of metabolic heterogeneity within and across cancer types and identifies pathway cross-talk, suggesting related prognostic, therapeutic, and predictive utility. : Peng et al. analyze a cohort of 9,125 TCGA samples across 33 cancer types to characterize tumor subtypes based on the expression of seven metabolic pathways. They find metabolic expression subtypes are associated with patient survivals and suggest the therapeutic and predictive relevance of subtype-related master regulators. Keywords: The Cancer Genome Atlas, tumor subtypes, prognostic markers, somatic drivers, master regulator, therapeutic targets, drug sensitivity, carbohydrate metabolism

  6. Challenges and future perspectives of T cell immunotherapy in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Maria Teresa P; Malhotra, Anshu; Mishra, Manoj K; Shanker, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Since the formulation of the tumour immunosurveillance theory, considerable focus has been on enhancing the effectiveness of host antitumour immunity, particularly with respect to T cells. A cancer evades or alters the host immune response by various ways to ensure its development and survival. These include modifications of the immune cell metabolism and T cell signaling. An inhibitory cytokine milieu in the tumour microenvironment also leads to immune suppression and tumour progression within a host. This review traces the development in the field and attempts to summarize the hurdles that the approach of adoptive T cell immunotherapy against cancer faces, and discusses the conditions that must be improved to allow effective eradication of cancer. PMID:26096822

  7. Vitamin K metabolism in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Recent investigations suggest that vitamin K may have functions other than in blood coagulation and calcification. The present study was undertaken to investigate this hypothesis using cells in culture. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were chosen due to their active metabolism and growth and lack of similarity to liver and bone cells, in which vitamin K metabolism is well known. Cells were adapted to serum-free media, incubated in media containing the appropriate concentrations of vitamin K for specified times, scraped from plates, pelleted, extensively washed to remove adhering vitamin K, extracted with chloroform:methanol (2:1, v/v) and analyzed on C18 HPLC columns. Uptake of vitamin K by CHO cells follows saturation kinetics at vitamin K concentrations up to 25 μ M and is transported into cells at the rate of 10 pmol/min. 10 6 cells. After 24 hours, 3 H vitamin K is metabolized by CHO cells to several compounds, the major of which was isolated and identified as vitamin K epoxide. In 3 experiments, after 24 hours, the average cellular uptake of vitamin K was 8% with approximately half being metabolized to vitamin K epoxide. These results demonstrate that vitamin K is metabolized in cells with widely different functions and suggest a generalized function for vitamin K which has yet to be elucidated

  8. SRT1720 induces lysosomal-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahusen, Tyler J; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2015-01-01

    SRT1720 is an activator of SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein and histone deacetylase that plays an important role in numerous biologic processes. Several studies have illustrated that SRT1720 treatment could improve metabolic conditions in mouse models and in a study in cancer SRT1720 caused increased apoptosis of myeloma cells. However, the effect of SRT1720 on cancer may be complex, as some recent studies have demonstrated that SRT1720 may not directly activate SIRT1 and another study showed that SRT1720 treatment could promote lung metastasis. To further investigate the role of SRT1720 in breast cancer, we treated SIRT1 knockdown and control breast cancer cell lines with SRT1720 both in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SRT1720 more effectively decreased the viability of basal-type MDA-MB-231 and BT20 cells as compared with luminal-type MCF-7 breast cancer cells or nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. We demonstrated that SRT1720 induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and necrosis, which could be blocked by lysosomal inhibitors. In contrast, SRT1720-induced cell death occurred in vitro irrespective of SIRT1 status, whereas in nude mice, SRT1720 exhibited a more profound effect in inhibiting the growth of allograft tumors of SIRT1 proficient cells as compared with tumors of SIRT1-deficient cells. Thus, SRT1720 causes lysosomal-dependent necrosis and may be used as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Contributions of Cell Metabolism and H+ Diffusion to the Acidic pH of Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Schornack

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is hypoxic and acidic. These conditions have a significant impact on tumor progression and response to therapies. There is strong evidence that tumor hypoxia results from inefficient perfusion due to a chaotic vasculature. Consequently, some tumor regions are well oxygenated and others are hypoxic. It is commonly believed that hypoxic regions are acidic due to a stimulation of glycolysis through hypoxia, yet this is not yet demonstrated. The current study investigates the causes of tumor acidity by determining acid production rates and the mechanism of diffusion for H+ equivalents through model systems. Two breast cancer cell lines were investigated with divergent metabolic profiles: nonmetastatic MCF-7/s and highly metastatic MDA-mb-435 cells. Glycolysis and acid production are inhibited by oxygen in MCF-7/s cells, but not in MDA-mb-435 cells. Tumors of MDAmb-435 cells are significantly more acidic than are tumors of MCF-7/s cells, suggesting that tumor acidity is primarily caused by endogenous metabolism, not the lack of oxygen. Metabolically produced protons are shown to diffuse in association with mobile buffers, in concordance with previous studies. The metabolic and diffusion data were analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model to demonstrate that the consequent pH profiles conform well to measured pH values for tumors of these two cell lines.

  10. Metabolic rate determines haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, P S R K

    2004-01-01

    The number of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) per animal is conserved across species. This means the HSCs need to maintain hematopoiesis over a longer period in larger animals. This would result in the requirement of stem cell self-renewal. At present the three existing models are the stochastic model, instructive model and the third more recently proposed is the chiaro-scuro model. It is a well known allometric law that metabolic rate scales to the three quarter power. Larger animals have a lower metabolic rate, compared to smaller animals. Here it is being hypothesized that metabolic rate determines haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. At lower metabolic rate the stem cells commit for self-renewal, where as at higher metabolic rate they become committed to different lineages. The present hypothesis can explain the salient features of the different models. Recent findings regarding stem cell self-renewal suggest an important role for Wnt proteins and their receptors known as frizzleds, which are an important component of cell signaling pathway. The role of cGMP in the Wnts action provides further justification for the present hypothesis as cGMP is intricately linked to metabolic rate. One can also explain the telomere homeostasis by the present hypothesis. One prediction of the present hypothesis is with reference to the limit of cell divisions known as Hayflick limit, here it is being suggested that this is the result of metabolic rate in laboratory conditions and there can be higher number of cell divisions in vivo if the metabolic rate is lower. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Road for understanding cancer stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Erzik, Can

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that stem cells are susceptive to carcinogenesis and, consequently, can be the origin of many cancers. Recently, the neoplastic potential of stem cells has been supported by many groups showing the existence of subpopulations with stem cell characteristics...... in tumor biopsies such as brain and breast. Evidence supporting the cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained impact due to progress in stem cell biology and development of new models to validate the self-renewal potential of stem cells. Recent evidence on the possible identification of cancer stem cells may...... offer an opportunity to use these cells as future therapeutic targets. Therefore, model systems in this field have become very important and useful. This review will focus on the state of knowledge on cancer stem cell research, including cell line models for cancer stem cells. The latter will, as models...

  12. Induction of autophagy by ARHI (DIRAS3) alters fundamental metabolic pathways in ovarian cancer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornelas, Argentina; McCullough, Christopher R.; Lu, Zhen; Zacharias, Niki M.; Kelderhouse, Lindsay E.; Gray, Joshua; Yang, Hailing; Engel, Brian J.; Wang, Yan; Mao, Weiqun; Sutton, Margie N.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.; Bast, Robert C. Jr.; Millward, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a bulk catabolic process that modulates tumorigenesis, therapeutic resistance, and dormancy. The tumor suppressor ARHI (DIRAS3) is a potent inducer of autophagy and its expression results in necroptotic cell death in vitro and tumor dormancy in vivo. ARHI is down-regulated or lost in over 60 % of primary ovarian tumors yet is dramatically up-regulated in metastatic disease. The metabolic changes that occur during ARHI induction and their role in modulating death and dormancy are unknown. We employed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic strategies to characterize changes in key metabolic pathways in both cell culture and xenograft models of ARHI expression and autophagy. These pathways were further interrogated by cell-based immunofluorescence imaging, tracer uptake studies, targeted metabolic inhibition, and in vivo PET/CT imaging. Induction of ARHI in cell culture models resulted in an autophagy-dependent increase in lactate production along with increased glucose uptake and enhanced sensitivity to glycolytic inhibitors. Increased uptake of glutamine was also dependent on autophagy and dramatically sensitized cultured ARHI-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines to glutaminase inhibition. Induction of ARHI resulted in a reduction in mitochondrial respiration, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased Tom20 staining suggesting an ARHI-dependent loss of mitochondrial function. ARHI induction in mouse xenograft models resulted in an increase in free amino acids, a transient increase in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake, and significantly altered choline metabolism. ARHI expression has previously been shown to trigger autophagy-associated necroptosis in cell culture. In this study, we have demonstrated that ARHI expression results in decreased cellular ATP/ADP, increased oxidative stress, and decreased mitochondrial function. While this bioenergetic shock is consistent with programmed necrosis, our data indicates that the accompanying up

  13. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-04

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

  14. Metabolic Response to NAD Depletion across Cell Lines Is Highly Variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Kwong, Mandy; Daemen, Anneleen; Belvin, Marcia; Liang, Xiaorong; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; O'Brien, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a cofactor involved in a wide range of cellular metabolic processes and is a key metabolite required for tumor growth. NAMPT, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, which converts nicotinamide (NAM) to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the immediate precursor of NAD, is an attractive therapeutic target as inhibition of NAMPT reduces cellular NAD levels and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. However, there is limited understanding of the metabolic response to NAD depletion across cancer cell lines and whether all cell lines respond in a uniform manner. To explore this we selected two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines that are sensitive to the NAMPT inhibitor GNE-617 (A549, NCI-H1334), one that shows intermediate sensitivity (NCI-H441), and one that is insensitive (LC-KJ). Even though NAD was reduced in all cell lines there was surprising heterogeneity in their metabolic response. Both sensitive cell lines reduced glycolysis and levels of di- and tri-nucleotides and modestly increased oxidative phosphorylation, but they differed in their ability to combat oxidative stress. H1334 cells activated the stress kinase AMPK, whereas A549 cells were unable to activate AMPK as they contain a mutation in LKB1, which prevents activation of AMPK. However, A549 cells increased utilization of the Pentose Phosphate pathway (PPP) and had lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than H1334 cells, indicating that A549 cells are better able to modulate an increase in oxidative stress. Inherent resistance of LC-KJ cells is associated with higher baseline levels of NADPH and a delayed reduction of NAD upon NAMPT inhibition. Our data reveals that cell lines show heterogeneous response to NAD depletion and that the underlying molecular and genetic framework in cells can influence the metabolic response to NAMPT inhibition.

  15. Metabolic Response to NAD Depletion across Cell Lines Is Highly Variable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD is a cofactor involved in a wide range of cellular metabolic processes and is a key metabolite required for tumor growth. NAMPT, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, which converts nicotinamide (NAM to nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN, the immediate precursor of NAD, is an attractive therapeutic target as inhibition of NAMPT reduces cellular NAD levels and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. However, there is limited understanding of the metabolic response to NAD depletion across cancer cell lines and whether all cell lines respond in a uniform manner. To explore this we selected two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines that are sensitive to the NAMPT inhibitor GNE-617 (A549, NCI-H1334, one that shows intermediate sensitivity (NCI-H441, and one that is insensitive (LC-KJ. Even though NAD was reduced in all cell lines there was surprising heterogeneity in their metabolic response. Both sensitive cell lines reduced glycolysis and levels of di- and tri-nucleotides and modestly increased oxidative phosphorylation, but they differed in their ability to combat oxidative stress. H1334 cells activated the stress kinase AMPK, whereas A549 cells were unable to activate AMPK as they contain a mutation in LKB1, which prevents activation of AMPK. However, A549 cells increased utilization of the Pentose Phosphate pathway (PPP and had lower reactive oxygen species (ROS levels than H1334 cells, indicating that A549 cells are better able to modulate an increase in oxidative stress. Inherent resistance of LC-KJ cells is associated with higher baseline levels of NADPH and a delayed reduction of NAD upon NAMPT inhibition. Our data reveals that cell lines show heterogeneous response to NAD depletion and that the underlying molecular and genetic framework in cells can influence the metabolic response to NAMPT inhibition.

  16. Metformin is synthetically lethal with glucose withdrawal in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2012-08-01

    Glucose deprivation is a distinctive feature of the tumor microecosystem caused by the imbalance between poor supply and an extraordinarily high consumption rate. The metabolic reprogramming from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells (the "Warburg effect") is linked to oncogenic transformation in a manner that frequently implies the inactivation of metabolic checkpoints such as the energy rheostat AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Because the concept of synthetic lethality in oncology can be applied not only to genetic and epigenetic intrinsic differences between normal and cancer cells but also to extrinsic ones such as altered microenvironment, we recently hypothesized that stress-energy mimickers such as the AMPK agonist metformin should produce metabolic synthetic lethality in a glucose-starved cell culture milieu imitating the adverse tumor growth conditions in vivo. Under standard high-glucose conditions, metformin supplementation mostly caused cell cycle arrest without signs of apoptotic cell death. Under glucose withdrawal stress, metformin supplementation circumvented the ability of oncogenes (e.g., HER2) to protect breast cancer cells from glucose-deprivation apoptosis. Significantly, representative cell models of breast cancer heterogeneity underwent massive apoptosis (by >90% in some cases) when glucose-starved cell cultures were supplemented with metformin. Our current findings may uncover crucial issues regarding the cell-autonomous metformin's anti-cancer actions: (1) The offently claimed clinically irrelevant, non-physiological concentrations needed to observe the metformin's anti-cancer effects in vitro merely underlie the artifactual interference of erroneous glucose-rich experimental conditions that poorly reflect glucose-starved in vivo conditions; (2) the preferential killing of cancer stem cells (CSC) by metformin may simply expose the best-case scenario for its synthetically lethal activity because an increased

  17. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploiting immune cell metabolic machinery for functional HIV cure and the prevention of inflammaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Clovis S; Palchaudhuri, Riya; Albargy, Hassan; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2018-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in immunology suggests that metabolic reprogramming and immune cell activation and functions are intricately linked. Viral infections, such as HIV infection, as well as cancer force immune cells to undergo major metabolic challenges. Cells must divert energy resources in order to mount an effective immune response. However, the fact that immune cells adopt specific metabolic programs to provide host defense against intracellular pathogens and how this metabolic shift impacts immune cell functions and the natural course of diseases have only recently been appreciated. A clearer insight into how these processes are inter-related will affect our understanding of several fundamental aspects of HIV persistence. Even in patients with long-term use of anti-retroviral therapies, HIV infection persists and continues to cause chronic immune activation and inflammation, ongoing and cumulative damage to multiple organs systems, and a reduction in life expectancy. HIV-associated fundamental changes to the metabolic machinery of the immune system can promote a state of "inflammaging", a chronic, low-grade inflammation with specific immune changes that characterize aging, and can also contribute to the persistence of HIV in its reservoirs. In this commentary, we will bring into focus evolving concepts on how HIV modulates the metabolic machinery of immune cells in order to persist in reservoirs and how metabolic reprogramming facilitates a chronic state of inflammation that underlies the development of age-related comorbidities. We will discuss how immunometabolism is facilitating the changing paradigms in HIV cure research and outline the novel therapeutic opportunities for preventing inflammaging and premature development of age-related conditions in HIV + individuals.

  19. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  20. Alterations in cellular metabolism modulate CD1d-mediated NKT-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tonya J; Carey, Gregory B; East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Bollino, Dominique R; Kimball, Amy S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a critical role in the host's innate immune response. CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipid antigens to NKT cells has been established; however, the mechanisms by which NKT cells recognize infected or cancerous cells remain unclear. 5(')-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of lipogenic pathways. We hypothesized that activation of AMPK during infection and malignancy could alter the repertoire of antigens presented by CD1d and serve as a danger signal to NKT cells. In this study, we examined the effect of alterations in metabolism on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells and found that an infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus rapidly increased CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) enhance T-cell effector functions during infection, therefore antigen presenting cells pretreated with pharmacological agents that inhibit glycolysis, induce HIF and activate AMPK were assessed for their ability to induce NKT-cell responses. Pretreatment with 2-deoxyglucose, cobalt chloride, AICAR and metformin significantly enhanced CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation. In addition, NKT cells preferentially respond to malignant B cells and B-cell lymphomas express HIF-1α. These data suggest that targeting cellular metabolism may serve as a novel means of inducing innate immune responses. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), fumarate hydratase (FH), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology.

  3. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cardaci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, fumarate hydratase (FH, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology.

  4. Hormone-metabolic status in moderately smoking breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, L M; Tsyrlina, E V; Semiglazov, V F; Kovalenko, I G; Gamayunova, V B; Evtushenko, T P; Ivanova, O A

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and eighteen primary breast cancer (BC) patients, 35 of whom were smokers, in clinical stages I-II of the disease were examined. In order to investigate whether smoking changes endocrine function in BC patients, some indices of the hormone-metabolic status of smoking and non-smoking patients of reproductive and menopausal age were compared. It was found that in smokers with BC there was a decline in body weight and body fat content, a lack of lean body mass accumulation along with body mass increase, a tendency to hypotriglyceridemia and hypoinsulinemia, accelerated development of the upper type of body fat distribution with ageing, intensified gonadotropin secretion, shifts in steroidogenesis and SHBG level and elevated catecholamine execretion. It is suggested that a possible relation between hormone-mediated effects inherent to smoking and the mechanisms promoting genotoxic type of hormonal carcinogenesis and the factors of breast cancer prognosis cannot be excluded.

  5. Metabolic Regulation of a Bacterial Cell System with Emphasis on Escherichia coli Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    It is quite important to understand the overall metabolic regulation mechanism of bacterial cells such as Escherichia coli from both science (such as biochemistry) and engineering (such as metabolic engineering) points of view. Here, an attempt was made to clarify the overall metabolic regulation mechanism by focusing on the roles of global regulators which detect the culture or growth condition and manipulate a set of metabolic pathways by modulating the related gene expressions. For this, it was considered how the cell responds to a variety of culture environments such as carbon (catabolite regulation), nitrogen, and phosphate limitations, as well as the effects of oxygen level, pH (acid shock), temperature (heat shock), and nutrient starvation. PMID:25937963

  6. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation by synthetic catalysts in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J.

    2018-03-01

    Catalytic anticancer metallodrugs active at low doses could minimize side-effects, introduce novel mechanisms of action that combat resistance and widen the spectrum of anticancer-drug activity. Here we use highly stable chiral half-sandwich organometallic Os(II) arene sulfonyl diamine complexes, [Os(arene)(TsDPEN)] (TsDPEN, N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine), to achieve a highly enantioselective reduction of pyruvate, a key intermediate in metabolic pathways. Reduction is shown both in aqueous model systems and in human cancer cells, with non-toxic concentrations of sodium formate used as a hydride source. The catalytic mechanism generates selectivity towards ovarian cancer cells versus non-cancerous fibroblasts (both ovarian and lung), which are commonly used as models of healthy proliferating cells. The formate precursor N-formylmethionine was explored as an alternative to formate in PC3 prostate cancer cells, which are known to overexpress a deformylase enzyme. Transfer-hydrogenation catalysts that generate reductive stress in cancer cells offer a new approach to cancer therapy.

  7. Extinction models for cancer stem cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Lange, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tools are birth–death Markov chains in continuous time. In this framework, we investigate the extinction times of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells. Application of extreme value theory from mathematical statistics yields an accurate asymptotic distribution and corresponding moments for both extinction times. We compare these distributions for the two cell populations as a function of the killing rates. Perhaps a more telling comparison involves the number of normal stem cells NH at the extinction time of the cancer stem cells. Conditioning on the asymptotic time to extinction of the cancer stem cells allows us to calculate the asymptotic mean and variance of NH. The full distribution of NH can be retrieved by the finite Fourier transform and, in some parameter regimes, by an eigenfunction expansion. Finally, we discuss the impact of quiescence (the resting state) on stem cell dynamics. Quiescence can act as a sanctuary for cancer stem cells and imperils the proposed therapy. We approach the complication of quiescence via multitype branching process models and stochastic simulation. Improvements to the τ-leaping method of stochastic simulation make it a versatile tool in this context. We conclude that the proposed therapy must target quiescent cancer stem cells as well as actively dividing cancer stem cells. The current cancer models demonstrate the virtue of attacking the same quantitative questions from a variety of modeling, mathematical, and computational perspectives

  8. CD147: a small molecule transporter ancillary protein at the crossroad of multiple hallmarks of cancer and metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Agnieszka A; Schafer, Johnathon; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Nemkov, Travis; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Neelakantan, Deepika; Ford, Heide L; Pearson, Chad G; Weekes, Colin D; Hansen, Kirk C; Eisenmesser, Elan Z

    2017-01-24

    Increased expression of CD147 in pancreatic cancer has been proposed to play a critical role in cancer progression via CD147 chaperone function for lactate monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Here, we show for the first time that CD147 interacts with membrane transporters beyond MCTs and exhibits a protective role for several of its interacting partners. CD147 prevents its interacting partner's proteasome-dependent degradation and incorrect plasma membrane localization through the CD147 transmembrane (TM) region. The interactions with transmembrane small molecule and ion transporters identified here indicate a central role of CD147 in pancreatic cancer metabolic reprogramming, particularly with respect to amino acid anabolism and calcium signaling. Importantly, CD147 genetic ablation prevents pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo in conjunction with metabolic rewiring towards amino acid anabolism, thus paving the way for future combined pharmacological treatments.

  9. The early predictive value of a decrease of metabolic tumor volume in repeated 18F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with concurrent radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Bo; Fan, Min; Zhou, Tao; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Li, Hongsheng; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •The patients underwent the second FDG PET during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). •To our knowledge, this could be the first study showing that the repeated FDG PET during the early stage of CCRT has added value by being a prognostic factor for recurrence of the locally advanced NSCLC patients. •This is a result of continuous research. •The decrease of MTV was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. -- Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the value of [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F FDG PET/CT) to predict recurrence of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the early stage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods: A total of 53 stage III NSCLC patients without diabetics or undergoing surgery were enrolled in the prospective study. Those patients were evaluated by FDG PET before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy (RT) with a concurrent cisplatin-based heterogeneous chemotherapy regimen. Semiquantitative assessment was used to determine maximum and mean SUVs (SUVmax/SUVmean) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of the primary tumor. The prognostic significance of PET/CT parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox regression analyses. The cutoffs of PET/CT parameters which have been determined by the previous study were used to separate the groups with Kaplan–Meier curves. Results: Recurrence rates at 1- and 2-years were 18.9% (10/53) and 50.9% (27/53) for all patients, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the only prognostic factor for recurrence was a decrease of MTV. Using the cutoff of 29.7%, a decrease of MTV can separate the patients into 2 groups with Kaplan–Meier curve successfully. Conclusion: The prospective study has reinforced the early predictive value of MTV in repeated 18 F-FDG PET/CT for recurrence in a subgroup of locally advanced NSCLC who underwent CCRT. A

  10. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  11. Antilipolytic drug boosts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Koziorowski, Jacek; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The antilipolytic drug Acipimox reduces free fatty acid (FFA) levels in the blood stream. We examined the effect of reduced FFAs on glucose metabolism in androgen-dependent (CWR22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts. Methods: Subcutaneous tumors were produced in nude mice by injection of PC3 and CWR22Rv1 PCa cells. The mice were divided into two groups (Acipimox vs. controls). Acipimox (50 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 1 h before injection of tracers. 1 h after i.v. co-injection of 8.2 MBq (222 ± 6.0 μCi) 18 F-FDG and ∼ 0.0037 MBq (0.1 μCi) 14 C-acetate, 18 F-FDG imaging was performed using a small-animal PET scanner. Counting rates in reconstructed images were converted to activity concentrations. Quantification was obtained by region-of-interest analysis using dedicated software. The mice were euthanized, and blood samples and organs were harvested. 18 F radioactivity was measured in a calibrated γ-counter using a dynamic counting window and decay correction. 14 C radioactivity was determined by liquid scintillation counting using external standard quench corrections. Counts were converted into activity, and percentage of the injected dose per gram (%ID/g) tissue was calculated. Results: FDG biodistribution data in mice with PC3 xenografts demonstrated doubled average %ID/g tumor tissue after administration of Acipimox compared to controls (7.21 ± 1.93 vs. 3.59 ± 1.35, P = 0.02). Tumor-to-organ ratios were generally higher in mice treated with Acipimox. This was supported by PET imaging data, both semi-quantitatively (mean tumor FDG uptake) and visually (tumor-to-background ratios). In mice with CWR22Rv1 xenografts there was no effect of Acipimox on FDG uptake, either in biodistribution or PET imaging. 14 C-acetate uptake was unaffected in PC3 and CWR22Rv1 xenografts. Conclusions: In mice with PC3 PCa xenografts, acute administration of Acipimox increases tumor uptake of 18 F-FDG with general

  12. Vitamin D metabolism and effects on pluripotency genes and cell differentiation in testicular germ cell tumors in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John Erik

    2012-01-01

    and express pluripotency factors (NANOG/OCT4). Vitamin D (VD) is metabolized in the testes, and here, we examined VD metabolism in TGCT differentiation and pluripotency regulation. We established that the VD receptor (VDR) and VD-metabolizing enzymes are expressed in human fetal germ cells, CIS, and invasive......) treatment in vivo. These novel findings show that VD metabolism is involved in the mesodermal transition during differentiation of cancer cells with embryonic stem cell characteristics, which points to a function for VD during early embryonic development and possibly in the pathogenesis of TGCTs.......Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are classified as either seminomas or nonseminomas. Both tumors originate from carcinoma in situ (CIS) cells, which are derived from transformed fetal gonocytes. CIS, seminoma, and the undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma (EC) retain an embryonic phenotype...

  13. Prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic differentiation via semaphorin 3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuzhou; Shen, Weiwei; Qiu, Hao; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is the second most commonly diagnosed malignant disease among men worldwide. Such metastatic disease is characterized by the presence of osteoblastic bone lesions, and is associated with high rates of mortality. However, the various mechanisms involved in prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation have not been fully explored. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A) is a newly identified regulator of bone metabolism which stimulates differentiation of pre-osteoblastic cells under physiological conditions. We investigated in this study whether prostate cancer cells can mediate osteoblastic activity through Sema 3A. We cultured osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells in prostate cancer-conditioned medium, and analyzed levels of Sema 3A protein in diverse prostate cancer cell lines to identify cell lines in which Sema 3A production showed a positive correlation with osteo-stimulation. C4-2 cells were stably transfected with Sema 3A short hairpin RNA to further determine whether Sema 3A contributes to the ability of C4-2 cells to induce osteoblastic differentiation. Down-regulation of Sema 3A expression decreased indicators of C4-2 CM-induced osteoblastic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase production and mineralization. Additionally, silencing or neutralizing Sema 3A in C4-2 cells resulted in diminished β-catenin expression in osteogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results suggest that prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation is at least partially mediated by Sema 3A, and may be regulated by the β-catenin signalling pathway. Sema 3A may represent a novel target for treatment of prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A New Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, A.A.; Kaklamani, V.G.

    2012-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. The evidence linking TNBC with the metabolic syndrome, which consists of central obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, has emerged from clinical studies and experiments using cell lines and mouse models. Epidemiological studies have associated abdominal obesity with increased incidence of TNBC. Additionally, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer across all subtypes. The insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis has been implicated mechanistically in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Specifically, increased leptin and decreased adiponectin levels disrupt homeostatic signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, cell-cycle regulation, and angio genesis. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may mediate interactions between these two hormones. Further research will facilitate the development of targeted therapeutics and programs to modify lifestyle factors to modulate the insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis for TNBC

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A New Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A A; Kaklamani, V G [Cancer Genetics Program, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (Ukraine)

    2012-07-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. The evidence linking TNBC with the metabolic syndrome, which consists of central obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, has emerged from clinical studies and experiments using cell lines and mouse models. Epidemiological studies have associated abdominal obesity with increased incidence of TNBC. Additionally, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer across all subtypes. The insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis has been implicated mechanistically in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Specifically, increased leptin and decreased adiponectin levels disrupt homeostatic signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, cell-cycle regulation, and angio genesis. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may mediate interactions between these two hormones. Further research will facilitate the development of targeted therapeutics and programs to modify lifestyle factors to modulate the insulin-leptin-adiponectin axis for TNBC

  16. Pluripotent Stem Cell Metabolism and Mitochondria: Beyond ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmon G. Lees

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is central to embryonic stem cell (ESC pluripotency and differentiation, with distinct profiles apparent under different nutrient milieu, and conditions that maintain alternate cell states. The significance of altered nutrient availability, particularly oxygen, and metabolic pathway activity has been highlighted by extensive studies of their impact on preimplantation embryo development, physiology, and viability. ESC similarly modulate their metabolism in response to altered metabolite levels, with changes in nutrient availability shown to have a lasting impact on derived cell identity through the regulation of the epigenetic landscape. Further, the preferential use of glucose and anaplerotic glutamine metabolism serves to not only support cell growth and proliferation but also minimise reactive oxygen species production. However, the perinuclear localisation of spherical, electron-poor mitochondria in ESC is proposed to sustain ESC nuclear-mitochondrial crosstalk and a mitochondrial-H2O2 presence, to facilitate signalling to support self-renewal through the stabilisation of HIFα, a process that may be favoured under physiological oxygen. The environment in which a cell is grown is therefore a critical regulator and determinant of cell fate, with metabolism, and particularly mitochondria, acting as an interface between the environment and the epigenome.

  17. Motile hepatocellular carcinoma cells preferentially secret sugar metabolism regulatory proteins via exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lu, Shaohua; Zhou, Ye; Meng, Kun; Chen, Zhipeng; Cui, Yizhi; Shi, Yunfeng; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are deliverers of critically functional proteins, capable of transforming target cells in numerous cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We hypothesize that the motility of HCC cells can be featured by comparative proteome of exosomes. Hence, we performed the super-SILAC-based MS analysis on the exosomes secreted by three human HCC cell lines, including the non-motile Hep3B cell, and the motile 97H and LM3 cells. More than 1400 exosomal proteins were confidently quantified in each MS analysis with highly biological reproducibility. We justified that 469 and 443 exosomal proteins represented differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the 97H/Hep3B and LM3/Hep3B comparisons, respectively. These DEPs focused on sugar metabolism-centric canonical pathways per ingenuity pathway analysis, which was consistent with the gene ontology analysis on biological process enrichment. These pathways included glycolysis I, gluconeogenesis I and pentose phosphate pathways; and the DEPs enriched in these pathways could form a tightly connected network. By analyzing the relative abundance of proteins and translating mRNAs, we found significantly positive correlation between exosomes and cells. The involved exosomal proteins were again focusing on sugar metabolism. In conclusion, motile HCC cells tend to preferentially export more sugar metabolism-associated proteins via exosomes that differentiate them from non-motile HCC cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Controlling cell-free metabolism through physiochemical perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ashty S; Heggestad, Jacob T; Crowe, Samantha A; Jewett, Michael C

    2018-01-01

    Building biosynthetic pathways and engineering metabolic reactions in cells can be time-consuming due to complexities in cellular metabolism. These complexities often convolute the combinatorial testing of biosynthetic pathway designs needed to define an optimal biosynthetic system. To simplify the optimization of biosynthetic systems, we recently reported a new cell-free framework for pathway construction and testing. In this framework, multiple crude-cell extracts are selectively enriched with individual pathway enzymes, which are then mixed to construct full biosynthetic pathways on the time scale of a day. This rapid approach to building pathways aids in the study of metabolic pathway performance by providing a unique freedom of design to modify and control biological systems for both fundamental and applied biotechnology. The goal of this work was to demonstrate the ability to probe biosynthetic pathway performance in our cell-free framework by perturbing physiochemical conditions, using n-butanol synthesis as a model. We carried out three unique case studies. First, we demonstrated the power of our cell-free approach to maximize biosynthesis yields by mapping physiochemical landscapes using a robotic liquid-handler. This allowed us to determine that NAD and CoA are the most important factors that govern cell-free n-butanol metabolism. Second, we compared metabolic profile differences between two different approaches for building pathways from enriched lysates, heterologous expression and cell-free protein synthesis. We discover that phosphate from PEP utilization, along with other physiochemical reagents, during cell-free protein synthesis-coupled, crude-lysate metabolic system operation inhibits optimal cell-free n-butanol metabolism. Third, we show that non-phosphorylated secondary energy substrates can be used to fuel cell-free protein synthesis and n-butanol biosynthesis. Taken together, our work highlights the ease of using cell-free systems to explore

  19. Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Ensinger, C., Tumer , Z., Tommerup, N. et al.: Hedgehog signaling in small-cell lung cancer : frequent in vivo but a rare event in vitro. Lung Cancer , 52...W81XWH-04-1-0157 TITLE: Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jingxian Zhang, Ph.D...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Feb 2004 – 14 Feb 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer

  20. Polyamine metabolism in synchronously growing mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heby, O.; Marton, L.J.; Gray, J.W.; Lindl, P.A.; Wilson, C.B.

    1976-03-02

    The times of synthesis of the polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine in relation to the cell cycle have been examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells synchronized by selective detachment of mitotic cells. This technique produced cell populations with narrow age distributions. Following plating, the cells grew with high synchrony for more than one cell cycle in monolayer culture. At various times after plating, the distribution of cells among the G1, S and G2M phases of the cell cycle was calculated from DNA histograms obtained by flow microfluorometric analysis. At these same times L-ornithine decarboxylase assays and polyamine determinations showed that the synthesis of the polyamines was initiated in mid-G1 and that the polyamines started to accumulate towards the end of the G1 phase. Maximal rate of synthesis was obtained as the cells started to synthesize DNA and the highest polyamine content was obtained in the beginning of the S phase. Synthesis and accumulation of the polyamines decreased significantly during mid-S but towards the end of the S phase they increased again. The polyamine biosynthetic activity and the concentration of the polyamines reached a second maximum prior to cell division. The role of the polyamines in the traverse of the cell cycle and especially in the initiation or continuation of DNA synthesis is indicated also by the fact that fewer cells were found in the S phase when spermidine and spermine synthesis was inhibited by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone).

  1. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  2. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0115 TITLE: Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kyuson Yun...CA130273 - Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM...hypothesis, we originally proposed to transform neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vivo by expressing an activated form

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells of the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (A549) Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Noor Hanis Abu; Zakaria, Norashikin; Satar, Nazilah Abdul; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The failure of current treatments to completely eradicate cancer cells often leads to cancer recurrence and dissemination. Studies have suggested that tumor growth and spread are driven by a minority of cancer cells that exhibit characteristics similar to those of normal stem cells, thus these cells are called cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are believed to play an important role in initiating and promoting cancer. CSCs are resistant to currently available cancer therapies, and understanding the mechanisms that control the growth of CSCs might have great implications for cancer therapy. Cancer cells are consist of heterogeneous population of cells, thus methods of identification, isolation, and characterisation of CSCs are fundamental to obtain a pure CSC populations. Therefore, this chapter describes in detail a method for isolating and characterizing a pure population of CSCs from heterogeneous population of cancer cells and CSCs based on specific cell surface markers.

  4. Dose-response relationship between probability of pathologic tumor control and glucose metabolic rate measured with FDG PET after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Noah C.; Fischman, Alan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Lynch, Thomas; Wain, John; Wright, Cameron; Fidias, Panos; Mathisen, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship between the probability of tumor control on the basis of pathologic tumor response (pTCP) and the residual metabolic rate of glucose (MRglc) in response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and to define the level of residual MRglc that corresponds to pTCP 50% and pTCP ≥95%. Methods and Materials: Quantitative dynamic 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography was performed to measure regional MRglc at the primary lesion before and 2 weeks after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in an initial group of 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC. A simplified kinetic method was developed subsequently from the initial dynamic study and used in the subsequent 16 patients. The preoperative radiotherapy programs consisted of (1) a split course of 42 Gy in 28 fractions within a period of 28 days using a twice-daily treatment schedule for Stage IIIA(N2) NSCLC (n=18) and (2) standard once-daily radiation schedule of 45-63 Gy in 25-35 fractions during a 5-7-week period (n=11). The preoperative chemotherapy regimens included two cycles of cisplatin, vinblastine, and 5-fluorouracil (n=24), cisplatin and etoposide (n=2), and cisplatin, Taxol, and 5-fluorouracil (n=3). Patients free of tumor progression after preoperative chemoradiotherapy underwent surgery. The degree of residual MRglc measured 2 weeks after preoperative chemoradiotherapy and 2 weeks before surgery was correlated with the pathologic tumor response. The relationship between MRglc and pTCP was modeled using logistic regression. Results: Of 32 patients entered into the study, 29 (16 men and 13 women; 30 lesions) were evaluated for the correlation between residual MRglc and pathologic tumor response. Three patients did not participate in the second study because of a steady decline in general condition. The median age was 60 years (range 42-78). One of the 29 patients had two separate lesions, and

  5. Glucose Metabolism of Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that the glucose metabolism of prostate cancer is modulated by androgen. We performed in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies of [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG accumulation in androgen-sensitive (CWR-22 and androgen-independent (PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts implanted in castrated and noncastrated male athymic mice. The growth pattern of the CWR-22 tumor was best approximated by an exponential function (tumor size in mm3 = 14.913 e0.108 × days, R2 = .96, n = 5. The growth pattern of the PC-3 tumor was best approximated by a quadratic function (tumor size in mm3 = 0.3511 × days2 + 49.418 × day −753.33, R2 = .96, n = 3. The FDG accumulation in the CWR-22 tumor implanted in the castrated mice was significantly lower, by an average of 55%, in comparison to that implanted in the noncastrated host (1.27 vs. 2.83, respectively, p < .05. The 3-week maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax was 0.99 ± 0.43 (mean ± SD for CWR-22 and 1.21 ± 0.32 for PC-3, respectively. The 5-week SUVmax was 1.22 ± 0.08 for CWR-22 and 1.35 ± 0.17 for PC-3, respectively. The background muscle SUVmax was 0.53 ± 0.11. Glucose metabolism was higher in the PC-3 tumor than in the CWR-22 tumor at both the 3-week (by 18% and the 5-week (by 9.6% micro-PET imaging sessions. Our results support the notions that FDG PET may be useful in the imaging evaluation of response to androgen ablation therapy and in the early prediction of hormone refractoriness in men with metastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Stem cells and cancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ullah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are the small units of multicellular creature. Regeneration and self-renewal are the ability of the stem cells. Each tissue is having particular stem cells, specific to it. These normal stem cells are converted into cancer stem cells through mutations in it. Although the expression of oncogenes is enhanced a lot, the tumor-supressing gene is lessened. Cancer stem cells are isolated and visualized through different techniques like immunocytochemical staining, spectral karyotyping, immunohistochemistry, induction method and dissection measures, then are performed histological procedures which include fascination, immunohistochemistry, dispensation, in situ hybridization and also quantitative examination of tissue flow cytometric analysis. For the analysis of quantization, statistical tests are also performed as two-sample t-test, Chi-square test, SD and arithmetic mean. Tumor cells generate glioma spheres. These are used in cancer study. Axin 1 is the gene suppressing cancer. Its removal causes the generation of liver cancer. Curcumin is the most effective for suppressing cancer as it increases the normal stem cell function and decreases the cancer stem cell function. Brahma-related gene 1 is crucial for the safeguarding of the stem cell residents in tissue-specific comportment. Different types of cancers originate through genetic mutation, tissue disorganization and cell proliferation. Tumor configuration is produced by the alteration in original cell culture having stem cells and progenitor cell populations. The developmental facets about cancer cells and cancer stem cells as well as their personal natal functions sustain an intricate steadiness to settle on their personal donations to the efficacy or harmfulness of the biological organization.

  7. The stem cell division theory of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2018-03-01

    All cancer registries constantly show striking differences in cancer incidence by age and among tissues. For example, lung cancer is diagnosed hundreds of times more often at age 70 than at age 20, and lung cancer in nonsmokers occurs thousands of times more frequently than heart cancer in smokers. An analysis of these differences using basic concepts in cell biology indicates that cancer is the end-result of the accumulation of cell divisions in stem cells. In other words, the main determinant of carcinogenesis is the number of cell divisions that the DNA of a stem cell has accumulated in any type of cell from the zygote. Cell division, process by which a cell copies and separates its cellular components to finally split into two cells, is necessary to produce the large number of cells required for living. However, cell division can lead to a variety of cancer-promoting errors, such as mutations and epigenetic mistakes occurring during DNA replication, chromosome aberrations arising during mitosis, errors in the distribution of cell-fate determinants between the daughter cells, and failures to restore physical interactions with other tissue components. Some of these errors are spontaneous, others are promoted by endogenous DNA damage occurring during quiescence, and others are influenced by pathological and environmental factors. The cell divisions required for carcinogenesis are primarily caused by multiple local and systemic physiological signals rather than by errors in the DNA of the cells. As carcinogenesis progresses, the accumulation of DNA errors promotes cell division and eventually triggers cell division under permissive extracellular environments. The accumulation of cell divisions in stem cells drives not only the accumulation of the DNA alterations required for carcinogenesis, but also the formation and growth of the abnormal cell populations that characterize the disease. This model of carcinogenesis provides a new framework for understanding the

  8. Obesity and Cancer Progression: Is There a Role of Fatty Acid Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Balaban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression.

  9. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  10. Cytologic studies on irradiated gestric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isono, S; Takeda, T; Amakasu, H; Asakawa, H; Yamada, S [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1981-06-01

    The smears of the biopsy and resected specimens obtained from 74 cases of irradiated gastric cancer were cytologically analyzed for effects of irradiation. Irradiation increased the amount of both necrotic materials and neutrophils in the smears. Cancer cells were decreased in number almost in inverse proportion to irradiation dose. Clusters of cancer cells shrank in size and cells were less stratified after irradiation. Irradiated cytoplasms were swollen, vacuolated and stained abnormally. Irradiation with less than 3,000 rads gave rise to swelling of cytoplasms in almost all cases. Nuclei became enlarged, multiple, pyknotic and/or stained pale after irradiation. Nuclear swelling was more remarkable in cancer cells of differentiated adenocarcinomas.

  11. DNA-barcode directed capture and electrochemical metabolic analysis of single mammalian cells on a microelectrode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Erik S; Hsiao, Sonny C; Onoe, Hiroaki; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Francis, Matthew B; Mathies, Richard A

    2009-07-21

    A microdevice is developed for DNA-barcode directed capture of single cells on an array of pH-sensitive microelectrodes for metabolic analysis. Cells are modified with membrane-bound single-stranded DNA, and specific single-cell capture is directed by the complementary strand bound in the sensor area of the iridium oxide pH microelectrodes within a microfluidic channel. This bifunctional microelectrode array is demonstrated for the pH monitoring and differentiation of primary T cells and Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Single Jurkat cells exhibited an extracellular acidification rate of 11 milli-pH min(-1), while primary T cells exhibited only 2 milli-pH min(-1). This system can be used to capture non-adherent cells specifically and to discriminate between visually similar healthy and cancerous cells in a heterogeneous ensemble based on their altered metabolic properties.

  12. 1H NMR metabolomics identification of markers of hypoxia-induced metabolic shifts in a breast cancer model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weljie, Aalim M.; Bondareva, Alla; Zang, Ping; Jirik, Frank R.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia can promote invasive behavior in cancer cells and alters the response to therapeutic intervention as a result of changes in the expression many genes, including genes involved in intermediary metabolism. Although metabolomics technologies are capable of simultaneously measuring a wide range of metabolites in an untargeted manner, these methods have been relatively under utilized in the study of cancer cell responses to hypoxia. Thus, 1 H NMR metabolomics was used to examine the effects of hypoxia in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures were compared with respect to their metabolic responses during growth under either hypoxic (1% O 2 ) or normoxic conditions. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify a set of metabolites that were responsive to hypoxia. Via intracardiac administration, MDA-MB-231 cells were also used to generate widespread metastatic disease in immuno-compromised mice. Serum metabolite analysis was conducted to compare animals with and without a large tumor burden. Intriguingly, using a cross-plot of the OPLS loadings, both the in vitro and in vivo samples yielded a subset of metabolites that were significantly altered by hypoxia. These included primarily energy metabolites and amino acids, indicative of known alterations in energy metabolism, and possibly protein synthesis or catabolism. The results suggest that the metabolite pattern identified might prove useful as a marker for intra-tumoral hypoxia.

  13. Tumor initiating cells and chemoresistance: which is the best strategy to target colon cancer stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldino, Emanuela; Tesori, Valentina; Casalbore, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging body of evidence that chemoresistance and minimal residual disease result from selective resistance of a cell subpopulation from the original tumor that is molecularly and phenotypically distinct. These cells are called "cancer stem cells" (CSCs). In this review, we analyze the potential targeting strategies for eradicating CSCs specifically in order to develop more effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic colon cancer. These include induction of terminal epithelial differentiation of CSCs or targeting some genes expressed only in CSCs and involved in self-renewal and chemoresistance. Ideal targets could be cell regulators that simultaneously control the stemness and the resistance of CSCs. Another important aspect of cancer biology, which can also be harnessed to create novel broad-spectrum anticancer agents, is the Warburg effect, also known as aerobic glycolysis. Actually, little is yet known with regard to the metabolism of CSCs population, leaving an exciting unstudied avenue in the dawn of the emerging field of metabolomics.

  14. Critical protein GAPDH and its regulatory mechanisms in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Fan; Hong, Chao-Qun; Giuliano, Armando E.; Cui, Xiao-Jiang; Zhou, Guang-Ji; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Cui, Yu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), initially identified as a glycolytic enzyme and considered as a housekeeping gene, is widely used as an internal control in experiments on proteins, mRNA, and DNA. However, emerging evidence indicates that GAPDH is implicated in diverse functions independent of its role in energy metabolism; the expression status of GAPDH is also deregulated in various cancer cells. One of the most common effects of GAPDH is its inconsistent role in the determination of cancer cell fate. Furthermore, studies have described GAPDH as a regulator of cell death; other studies have suggested that GAPDH participates in tumor progression and serves as a new therapeutic target. However, related regulatory mechanisms of its numerous cellular functions and deregulated expression levels remain unclear. GAPDH is tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, which are involved in the regulation of diverse GAPDH functions. Several cancer-related factors, such as insulin, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), p53, nitric oxide (NO), and acetylated histone, not only modulate GAPDH gene expression but also affect protein functions via common pathways. Moreover, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occurring in GAPDH in cancer cells result in new activities unrelated to the original glycolytic function of GAPDH. In this review, recent findings related to GAPDH transcriptional regulation and PTMs are summarized. Mechanisms and pathways involved in GAPDH regulation and its different roles in cancer cells are also described

  15. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  16. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Deves, Guillaume

    2003-01-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material

  17. Potential Role of Metabolic Intervention in the Management of Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Harsha Tella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC is the most common endocrine malignancy that has an excellent prognosis with a 5-year survival rate of about 98%. However, approximately 50% of the patients with DTC who present with distant metastases (advanced DTC die from the disease within 5 years of initial diagnosis even after getting the appropriate therapy. Apart from recent advancements in chemotherapy agents, the potential role of metabolic interventions, including the use of metformin, ketogenic diet, and high-dose vitamin C in the management of advanced cancers have been investigated as a less toxic co-adjuvant therapies. The role of vitamin C has been of interest again after a preclinical mice study showed that high-dose vitamin C is selectively lethal to KRAS and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer cells by targeting the glutathione pathway. This raises the possibility of utilizing high-doses of vitamin C in the treatment of aDTC where KRAS and BRAF mutations are common. Similarly, alteration of cellular metabolism by low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets can be an important therapeutic strategy to selectively kill cancer cells that mainly survive on glycolysis. Among the potential adjuvant therapies proposed in this paper, metformin is the only agent that has shown benefit in human model of aDTC, the others have shown benefit but in preclinical/animal studies only and need to be further evaluated in large clinical trials. In conclusion, in addition to concurrent chemotherapy options, these metabolic interventions may have a great potential as co-adjuvant therapy in the management of aDTC.

  18. The impact of transcription on metabolism in prostate and breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Ninu; Mills, Ian G; Steele, Rebecca E

    2018-05-14

    Metabolic dysregulation is regarded as an important driver in cancer development and progression. The impact of transcriptional changes on metabolism have been intensively studied in hormone-dependent cancers, and in particular in prostate and breast cancer. These cancers have strong similarities in the function of important transcriptional drivers, such as the estrogen and androgen receptor, at the level of dietary risk and epidemiology, genetics and therapeutically. In this review we will focus on the function of these nuclear hormone receptors and their downstream impact on metabolism, with a particular focus on lipid metabolism. We go on to discuss how lipid metabolism remains dysregulated as the cancers progress. We conclude by discussing the opportunities that this presents for drug repurposing, imaging and the development and testing of new therapeutics and treatment combinations.

  19. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Metabolism of murine TH 17 cells: Impact on cell fate and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Solt, Laura A

    2016-04-01

    An effective adaptive immune response relies on the ability of lymphocytes to rapidly act upon a variety of insults. In T lymphocytes, this response includes cell growth, clonal expansion, differentiation, and cytokine production, all of which place a significant energy burden on the cell. Recent evidence shows that T-cell metabolic reprogramming is an essential component of the adaptive immune response and specific metabolic pathways dictate T-cell fate decisions, including the development of TH 17 versus T regulatory (Treg) cells. TH 17 cells have garnered significant attention due to their roles in the pathology of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Attempts to characterize TH 17 cells have demonstrated that they are highly dynamic, adjusting their function to environmental cues, which dictate their metabolic program. In this review, we highlight recent data demonstrating the impact of cellular metabolism on the TH 17/Treg balance and present factors that mediate TH 17-cell metabolism. Some examples of these include the differential impact of the mTOR signaling complexes on T-helper-cell differentiation, hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α) promotion of glycolysis to favor TH 17-cell development, and ACC1-dependent de novo fatty acid synthesis favoring TH 17-cell development over Treg cells. Finally, we discuss the potential therapeutic options and the implications of modulating TH 17-cell metabolism for the treatment of TH 17-mediated diseases. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Metabolic profiles of triple-negative and luminal A breast cancer subtypes in African-American identify key metabolic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyari, Fariba; Gowda, G A Nagana; Olopade, Olufunmilayo F; Berg, Richard; Yang, Howard H; Lee, Maxwell P; Ngwa, Wilfred F; Mittal, Suresh K; Raftery, Daniel; Mohammed, Sulma I

    2018-02-20

    Breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease with variable pathophysiology and biology, is classified into four major subtypes. While hormonal- and antibody-targeted therapies are effective in the patients with luminal and HER-2 subtypes, the patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype do not benefit from these therapies. The incidence rates of TNBC subtype are higher in African-American women, and the evidence indicates that these women have worse prognosis compared to women of European descent. The reasons for this disparity remain unclear but are often attributed to TNBC biology. In this study, we performed metabolic analysis of breast tissues to identify how TNBC differs from luminal A breast cancer (LABC) subtypes within the African-American and Caucasian breast cancer patients, respectively. We used High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) 1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to perform the metabolomic analysis of breast cancer and adjacent normal tissues (total n=82 samples). TNBC and LABC subtypes in African American women exhibited different metabolic profiles. Metabolic profiles of these subtypes were also distinct from those revealed in Caucasian women. TNBC in African-American women expressed higher levels of glutathione, choline, and glutamine as well as profound metabolic alterations characterized by decreased mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolysis concomitant with decreased levels of ATP. TNBC in Caucasian women was associated with increased pyrimidine synthesis. These metabolic alterations could potentially be exploited as novel treatment targets for TNBC.

  2. SYSTEMS BIOLOGY AND METABOLIC ENGINEERING OF ARTHROSPIRA CELL FACTORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpan Klanchui

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Arthrospira are attractive candidates to serve as cell factories for production of many valuable compounds useful for food, feed, fuel and pharmaceutical industries. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocessing, it is a challenge to design and develop efficient Arthrospira cell factories which can certify effective conversion from the raw materials (i.e. CO2 and sun light into desired products. With the current availability of the genome sequences and metabolic models of Arthrospira, the development of Arthrospira factories can now be accelerated by means of systems biology and the metabolic engineering approach. Here, we review recent research involving the use of Arthrospira cell factories for industrial applications, as well as the exploitation of systems biology and the metabolic engineering approach for studying Arthrospira. The current status of genomics and proteomics through the development of the genome-scale metabolic model of Arthrospira, as well as the use of mathematical modeling to simulate the phenotypes resulting from the different metabolic engineering strategies are discussed. At the end, the perspective and future direction on Arthrospira cell factories for industrial biotechnology are presented.

  3. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB 1 receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB 1 antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB 1 receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB 1 receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo

  4. Hyperglycemia-induced metabolic compensation inhibits metformin sensitivity in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Lacey M.; Mukherjee, Abir; Eckert, Mark A.; Johnson, Alyssa; Mills, Kathryn A.; Pan, Shawn; Shridhar, Viji; Lengyel, Ernst; Romero, Iris L.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing interest in repurposing the diabetic medication metformin for cancer treatment has raised important questions about the translation of promising preclinical findings to therapeutic efficacy, especially in non-diabetic patients. A significant limitation of the findings to date is the use of supraphysiologic metformin doses and hyperglycemic conditions in vitro. Our goals were to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on metformin response and to address the applicability of metformin as a cancer therapeutic in non-diabetic patients. In normoglycemic conditions, lower concentrations of metformin were required to inhibit cell viability, while metformin treatment in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux, contributing to cell survival. Mechanistically, maintenance of c-Myc expression under conditions of hyperglycemia or via gene amplification facilitated metabolic escape from the effects of metformin. In vivo, treatment of an ovarian cancer mouse model with metformin resulted in greater tumor weight reduction in normoglycemic vs. hyperglycemic mice, with increased c-Myc expression observed in metformin-treated hyperglycemic mice. These findings indicate that hyperglycemia inhibits the anti-cancer effects of metformin in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our results suggest that metformin may elicit stronger responses in normoglycemic vs. hyperglycemic patients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical testing in patients without diabetes. PMID:26172303

  5. Regulatory T cells as suppressors of anti-tumor immunity: Role of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Veronica; Di Rella, Francesca; Di Giacomo, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    Novel concepts in immunometabolism support the hypothesis that glucose consumption is also used to modulate anti-tumor immune responses, favoring growth and expansion of specific cellular subsets defined in the past as suppressor T cells and currently reborn as regulatory T (Treg) cells. During the 1920s, Otto Warburg and colleagues observed that tumors consumed high amounts of glucose compared to normal tissues, even in the presence of oxygen and completely functioning mitochondria. However, the role of the Warburg Effect is still not completely understood, particularly in the context of an ongoing anti-tumor immune response. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-derived metabolic restrictions can drive T cell hyporesponsiveness and immune tolerance. For example, several glycolytic enzymes, deregulated in cancer, contribute to tumor progression independently from their canonical metabolic activity. Indeed, they can control apoptosis, gene expression and activation of specific intracellular pathways, thus suggesting a direct link between metabolic switches and pro-tumorigenic transcriptional programs. Focus of this review is to define the specific metabolic pathways controlling Treg cell immunobiology in the context of anti-tumor immunity and tumor progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypoxia Pathway Proteins As Central Mediators of Metabolism in the Tumor Cells and Their Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundary Sormendi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low oxygen tension or hypoxia is a determining factor in the course of many different processes in animals, including when tissue expansion and cellular metabolism result in high oxygen demands that exceed its supply. This is mainly happening when cells actively proliferate and the proliferating mass becomes distant from the blood vessels, such as in growing tumors. Metabolic alterations in response to hypoxia can be triggered in a direct manner, such as the switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis or inhibition of fatty acid desaturation. However, as the modulated action of hypoxia-inducible factors or the oxygen sensors (prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes can also lead to changes in enzyme expression, these metabolic changes can also be indirect. With this review, we want to summarize our current knowledge of the hypoxia-induced changes in metabolism during cancer development, how they are affected in the tumor cells and in the cells of the microenvironment, most prominently in immune cells.

  7. Phase I metabolic genes and risk of lung cancer: multiple polymorphisms and mRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Rotunno

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes that activate tobacco lung carcinogens may generate inter-individual differences in lung cancer risk. Previous studies had limited sample sizes, poor exposure characterization, and a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs tested in candidate genes. We analyzed 25 SNPs (some previously untested in 2101 primary lung cancer cases and 2120 population controls from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE study from six phase I metabolic genes, including cytochrome P450s, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, and myeloperoxidase. We evaluated the main genotype effects and genotype-smoking interactions in lung cancer risk overall and in the major histology subtypes. We tested the combined effect of multiple SNPs on lung cancer risk and on gene expression. Findings were prioritized based on significance thresholds and consistency across different analyses, and accounted for multiple testing and prior knowledge. Two haplotypes in EPHX1 were significantly associated with lung cancer risk in the overall population. In addition, CYP1B1 and CYP2A6 polymorphisms were inversely associated with adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma risk, respectively. Moreover, the association between CYP1A1 rs2606345 genotype and lung cancer was significantly modified by intensity of cigarette smoking, suggesting an underlying dose-response mechanism. Finally, increasing number of variants at CYP1A1/A2 genes revealed significant protection in never smokers and risk in ever smokers. Results were supported by differential gene expression in non-tumor lung tissue samples with down-regulation of CYP1A1 in never smokers and up-regulation in smokers from CYP1A1/A2 SNPs. The significant haplotype associations emphasize that the effect of multiple SNPs may be important despite null single SNP-associations, and warrants consideration in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Our findings emphasize the necessity of post

  8. A Consensus Genome-scale Reconstruction of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hefzi, Hooman; Ang, Kok Siong; Hanscho, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells dominate biotherapeutic protein production and are widely used in mammalian cell line engineering research. To elucidate metabolic bottlenecks in protein production and to guide cell engineering and bioprocess optimization, we reconstructed the metabolic pathways...

  9. Natural Killer T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shiny; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are specialized CD1d-restricted T cells that recognize lipid antigens. Following stimulation, NKT cells lead to downstream activation of both innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. This has impelled the development of NKT cell-targeted immunotherapies for treating cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the stimulatory and regulatory functions of NKT cells in tumor immunity as well as highlight preclinical and clinical studies based on NKT cells. Finally, we discuss future perspectives to better harness the potential of NKT cells for cancer therapy. PMID:29018445

  10. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  11. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research

  12. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000675.htm Low white blood cell count and cancer To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. White blood cells (WBCs) fight infections from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and ...

  13. Adipocyte activation of cancer stem cell signaling in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin; Wolfson; Gabriel; Eades; Qun; Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Signaling within the tumor microenvironment has a critical role in cancer initiation and progression. Adipocytes, one of the major components of the breast microenvironment,have been shown to provide pro-tumorigenic signals that promote cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Adipocyte secreted factors such as leptin and interleukin-6(IL-6) have a paracrine effect on breast cancer cells. In adipocyte-adjacent breast cancer cells, the leptin and IL-6 signaling pathways activate janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activatorof transcription 5, promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and upregulating stemness regulators such as Notch, Wnt and the Sex determining region Y-box 2/octamer binding transcription factor 4/Nanog signaling axis. In this review we will summarize the major signaling pathways that regulate cancer stem cells in breast cancer and describe the effects that adipocyte secreted IL-6 and leptin have on breast cancer stem cell signaling. Finally we will introduce a new potential treatment paradigm of inhibiting the adipocyte-breast cancer cell signaling via targeting the IL-6 or leptin pathways.

  14. The role of fructose in metabolism and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrez, Bérénice; Qiao, Liang; Hebbard, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Fructose consumption has dramatically increased in the last 30 years. The principal form has been in the form of high-fructose corn syrup found in soft drinks and processed food. The effect of excessive fructose consumption on human health is only beginning to be understood. Fructose has been confirmed to induce several obesity-related complications associated with the metabolic syndrome. Here we present an overview of fructose metabolism and how it contrasts with that of glucose. In addition, we examine how excessive fructose consumption can affect de novo lipogenesis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and reactive oxygen species production. Fructose can also induce a change in the gut permeability and promote the release of inflammatory factors to the liver, which has potential implications in increasing hepatic inflammation. Moreover, fructose has been associated with colon, pancreas, and liver cancers, and we shall discuss the evidence for these observations. Taken together, data suggest that sustained fructose consumption should be curtailed as it is detrimental to long-term human health.

  15. Highly adaptable triple-negative breast cancer cells as a functional model for testing anticancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance.

  16. Optimized Method for Untargeted Metabolomics Analysis of MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Peterson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells often have dysregulated metabolism, which is largely characterized by the Warburg effect—an increase in glycolytic activity at the expense of oxidative phosphorylation—and increased glutamine utilization. Modern metabolomics tools offer an efficient means to investigate metabolism in cancer cells. Currently, a number of protocols have been described for harvesting adherent cells for metabolomics analysis, but the techniques vary greatly and they lack specificity to particular cancer cell lines with diverse metabolic and structural features. Here we present an optimized method for untargeted metabolomics characterization of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells, which are commonly used to study metastatic breast cancer. We found that an approach that extracted all metabolites in a single step within the culture dish optimally detected both polar and non-polar metabolite classes with higher relative abundance than methods that involved removal of cells from the dish. We show that this method is highly suited to diverse applications, including the characterization of central metabolic flux by stable isotope labelling and differential analysis of cells subjected to specific pharmacological interventions.

  17. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion

  18. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  19. BRCA1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase: the metabolic syndrome of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Joan; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Colomer, Ramon; Graña-Suarez, Begoña; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer-associated mutations affecting the highly-conserved C-terminal BRCT domains of the tumor suppressor gene breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) fully disrupt the ability of BRCA1 to interact with acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCA), the rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing de novo fatty acid biogenesis. Specifically, BRCA1 interacts solely with the phosphorylated (inactive) form of ACCA (P-ACCA), and the formation of the BRCA1/P-ACCA complex interferes with ACCA activity by preventing P-ACCA dephosphorylation. One of the hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells is a high rate of energy-consuming anabolic processes driving the synthesis of lipids, proteins, and DNA (all of which are regulated by the energy status of the cell). The ability of BRCA1 to stabilize the phosphorylated/inactive form of ACCA strongly suggests that the tumor suppressive function of BRCA1 closely depends on its ability to mimic a cellular-low-energy status, which is known to block tumor cell anabolism and suppress the malignant phenotype. Interestingly, physical exercise and lack of obesity in adolescence have been associated with significantly delayed breast cancer onset for Ashkenazi Jewish women carrying BRCA1 gene mutations. Further clinical work may explore a chemopreventative role of "low-energy-mimickers" deactivating the ACCA-driven "lipogenic phenotype" in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1. This goal might be obtained with current therapeutic approaches useful in treating the metabolic syndrome and associated disorders in humans (e.g., type 2 diabetes and obesity), including metformin, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), calorie deprivation, and exercise. Alternatively, new forthcoming ACCA inhibitors may be relevant in the management of BRCA1-dependent breast cancer susceptibility and development. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Concentration-dependent metabolic effects of metformin in healthy and Fanconi anemia lymphoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Silvia; Cossu, Vanessa; Tappino, Barbara; Nicchia, Elena; Dufour, Carlo; Cavani, Simona; Sciutto, Andrea; Bolognesi, Claudia; Columbaro, Marta; Degan, Paolo; Cappelli, Enrico

    2018-02-01

    Metformin (MET) is the drug of choice for patients with type 2 diabetes and has been proposed for use in cancer therapy and for treating other metabolic diseases. More than 14,000 studies have been published addressing the cellular mechanisms affected by MET. However, several in vitro studies have used concentrations of the drug 10-100-fold higher than the plasmatic concentration measured in patients. Here, we evaluated the biochemical, metabolic, and morphologic effects of various concentrations of MET. Moreover, we tested the effect of MET on Fanconi Anemia (FA) cells, a DNA repair genetic disease with defects in energetic and glucose metabolism, as well as on human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cell lines. We found that the response of wild-type cells to MET is concentration dependent. Low concentrations (15 and 150 µM) increase both oxidative phosphorylation and the oxidative stress response, acting on the AMPK/Sirt1 pathway, while the high concentration (1.5 mM) inhibits the respiratory chain, alters cell morphology, becoming toxic to the cells. In FA cells, MET was unable to correct the energetic/respiratory defect and did not improve the response to oxidative stress and DNA damage. By contrast, HL60 cells appear sensitive also at 150 μM. Our findings underline the importance of the MET concentration in evaluating the effect of this drug on cell metabolism and demonstrate that data obtained from in vitro experiments, that have used high concentrations of MET, cannot be readily translated into improving our understanding of the cellular effects of metformin when used in the clinical setting. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer. Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination.

  2. Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    165-72. 60. Vestergaard J, Pedersen MW, Pedersen N, Ensinger C, Tumer Z, Tommerup N, et al. Hedgehog signaling in small-cell lung cancer : frequent......NUMBER Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0471 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  3. Mitochondrial uncoupling and the reprogramming of intermediary metabolism in leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana eVélez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 60 years ago Otto Warburg proposed, in a seminal publication, that an irreparable defect in the oxidative capacity of normal cells sup