WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer cell killing

  1. Metformin kills and radiosensitizes cancer cells and preferentially kills cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang W.; Lee, Hyemi; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Williams, Brent; Powers, John; Santos, Troy Dos; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Park, Heon Joo

    2012-01-01

    The anti-cancer effects of metformin, the most widely used drug for type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation were studied with MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and FSaII mouse fibrosarcoma cells. Clinically achievable concentrations of metformin caused significant clonogenic death in cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer stem cells relative to non-cancer stem cells. Metformin increased the radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, and significantly enhanced the radiation-induced growth delay of FSaII tumors (s.c.) in the legs of C3H mice. Both metformin and ionizing radiation activated AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR and suppression of its downstream effectors such as S6K1 and 4EBP1, a crucial signaling pathway for proliferation and survival of cancer cells, in vitro as well as in the in vivo tumors. Conclusion: Metformin kills and radiosensitizes cancer cells and eradicates radioresistant cancer stem cells by activating AMPK and suppressing mTOR. PMID:22500211

  2. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) kills human cancer-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sakakita, Hajime; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Hori, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    Medical non-thermal plasma (NTP) treatments for various types of cancers have been reported. Cells with tumorigenic potential (cancer-initiating cells; CICs) are few in number in many types of tumors. CICs efficiently eliminate anti-cancer chemicals and exhibit high-level aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. We previously examined the effects of direct irradiation via NTP on cancer cells; even though we targeted CICs expressing high levels of ALDH, such treatment affected both non-CICs and CICs. Recent studies have shown that plasma-activated medium (PAM) (culture medium irradiated by NTP) selectively induces apoptotic death of cancer but not normal cells. Therefore, we explored the anti-cancer effects of PAM on CICs among endometrioid carcinoma and gastric cancer cells. PAM reduced the viability of cells expressing both low and high levels of ALDH. Combined PAM/cisplatin appeared to kill cancer cells more efficiently than did PAM or cisplatin alone. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, PAM exerted an anti-cancer effect on CICs. Thus, our results suggest that PAM effectively kills both non-CICs and CICs, as does NTP. Therefore, PAM may be a useful new anti-cancer therapy, targeting various cancer cells including CICs. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Role of nitric oxide in Salmonella typhimurium-mediated cancer cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barak, Yoram; Schreiber, Frank; Thorne, Steve H; Contag, Christopher H; DeBeer, Dirk; Matin, A

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial targeting of tumours is an important anti-cancer strategy. We previously showed that strain SL7838 of Salmonella typhimurium targets and kills cancer cells. Whether NO generation by the bacteria has a role in SL7838 lethality to cancer cells is explored. This bacterium has the mechanism for generating NO, but also for decomposing it. Mechanism underlying Salmonella typhimurium tumour therapy was investigated through in vitro and in vivo studies. NO measurements were conducted either by chemical assays (in vitro) or using Biosensors (in vivo). Cancer cells cytotoxic assay were done by using MTS. Bacterial cell survival and tumour burden were determined using molecular imaging techniques. SL7838 generated nitric oxide (NO) in anaerobic cell suspensions, inside infected cancer cells in vitro and in implanted 4T1 tumours in live mice, the last, as measured using microsensors. Thus, under these conditions, the NO generating pathway is more active than the decomposition pathway. The latter was eliminated, in strain SL7842, by the deletion of hmp- and norV genes, making SL7842 more proficient at generating NO than SL7838. SL7842 killed cancer cells more effectively than SL7838 in vitro, and this was dependent on nitrate availability. This strain was also ca. 100% more effective in treating implanted 4T1 mouse tumours than SL7838. NO generation capability is important in the killing of cancer cells by Salmonella strains

  4. Can dendritic cells improve whole cancer cell vaccines based on immunogenically killed cancer cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchelero, Laetitia; Denies, Sofie; Devriendt, Bert; de Rooster, Hilde; Sanders, Niek N

    2015-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) offers interesting opportunities in cancer cell (CC) vaccine manufacture, as it increases the immunogenicity of the dead CC. Furthermore, fusion of CCs with dendritic cells (DCs) is considered a superior method for generating whole CC vaccines. Therefore, in this work, we determined in naive mice whether immunogenically killed CCs per se (CC vaccine) elicit an antitumoral immune response different from the response observed when immunogenically killed CCs are associated with DCs through fusion (fusion vaccine) or through co-incubation (co-incubation vaccine). After tumor inoculation, the type of immune response in the prophylactically vaccinated mice differed between the groups. In more detail, fusion vaccines elicited a humoral anticancer response, whereas the co-incubation and CC vaccine mainly induced a cellular response. Despite these differences, all three approaches offered a prophylactic protection against tumor development in the murine mammary carcinoma model. In summary, it can be concluded that whole CC vaccines based on immunogenically killed CCs may not necessarily require association with DCs to elicit a protective anticancer immune response. If this finding can be endorsed in other cancer models, the manufacture of CC vaccines would greatly benefit from this new insight, as production of DC-based vaccines is laborious, time-consuming and expensive. PMID:26587315

  5. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  6. Epirubicin-adsorbed nanodiamonds kill chemoresistant hepatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Low, Xinyi Casuarine; Hou, Weixin; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Toh, Tan Boon; Mohd Abdul Rashid, Masturah; Ho, Dean; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2014-12-23

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Epirubicin to nanodiamonds creates a rapidly synthesized and stable nanodiamond-drug complex that promotes endocytic uptake and enhanced tumor cell retention. These attributes mediate the effective killing of both cancer stem cells and noncancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Enhanced treatment of both tumor cell populations results in an improved impairment of secondary tumor formation in vivo compared with treatment by unmodified chemotherapeutics. On the basis of these results, nanodiamond-mediated drug delivery may serve as a powerful method for overcoming chemoresistance in cancer stem cells and markedly improving overall treatment against hepatic cancers.

  7. Sulindac enhances the killing of cancer cells exposed to oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marchetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac is an FDA-approved non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID that affects prostaglandin production by inhibiting cyclooxygenases (COX 1 and 2. Sulindac has also been of interest for more than decade as a chemopreventive for adenomatous colorectal polyps and colon cancer.Pretreatment of human colon and lung cancer cells with sulindac enhances killing by an oxidizing agent such as tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP or hydrogen peroxide. This effect does not involve cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition. However, under the conditions used, there is a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS within the cancer cells and a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting that cell death is due to apoptosis, which was confirmed by Tunel assay. In contrast, this enhanced killing was not observed with normal lung or colon cells.These results indicate that normal and cancer cells handle oxidative stress in different ways and sulindac can enhance this difference. The combination of sulindac and an oxidizing agent could have therapeutic value.

  8. Interleukin-15 stimulates natural killer cell-mediated killing of both human pancreatic cancer and stellate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Audenaerde, Jonas R.M.; De Waele, Jorrit; Marcq, Elly; Van Loenhout, Jinthe; Lion, Eva; Van den Bergh, Johan M.J.; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Masamune, Atsushi; Roeyen, Geert; Pauwels, Patrick; Lardon, Filip; Peeters, Marc; Smits, Evelien L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the 4th leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. One of the hallmarks of this cancer is the strong desmoplastic reaction within the tumor microenvironment (TME), orchestrated by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). This results in a functional and mechanical shield which causes resistance to conventional therapies. Aiming to overcome this resistance by tackling the stromal shield, we assessed for the first time the capacity of IL-15 stimulated natural killer (NK) cells to kill PSC and pancreatic cancer cells (PCC). The potency of IL-15 to promote NK cell-mediated killing was evaluated phenotypically and functionally. In addition, NK cell and immune checkpoint ligands on PSC were charted. We demonstrate that IL-15 activated NK cells kill both PCC and PSC lines (range 9-35% and 20-50%, respectively) in a contact-dependent manner and significantly higher as compared to resting NK cells. Improved killing of these pancreatic cell lines is, at least partly, dependent on IL-15 induced upregulation of TIM-3 and NKG2D. Furthermore, we confirm significant killing of primary PSC by IL-15 activated NK cells in an ex vivo autologous system. Screening for potential targets for immunotherapeutic strategies, we demonstrate surface expression of both inhibitory (PD-L1, PD-L2) and activating (MICA/B, ULBPs and Galectin-9) ligands on primary PSC. These data underscore the therapeutic potential of IL-15 to promote NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity as a treatment of pancreatic cancer and provide promising future targets to tackle remaining PSC. PMID:28915646

  9. Mechanistic insights into selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent cancer cells by arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Karin; Riebel, Virginie; Couttet, Philippe; Paech, Franziska; Wolf, Armin; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Pognan, Francois; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Uteng, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Arctigenin has previously been identified as a potential anti-tumor treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanism of how arctigenin kills cancer cells is not fully understood. In the present work we studied the mechanism of toxicity by arctigenin in the human pancreatic cell line, Panc-1, with special emphasis on the mitochondria. A comparison of Panc-1 cells cultured in glucose versus galactose medium was applied, allowing assessments of effects in glycolytic versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-dependent Panc-1 cells. For control purposes, the mitochondrial toxic response to treatment with arctigenin was compared to the anti-cancer drug, sorafenib, which is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor known for mitochondrial toxic off-target effects (Will et al., 2008). In both Panc-1 OXPHOS-dependent and glycolytic cells, arctigenin dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was demonstrated to be due to inhibition of the mitochondrial complexes II and IV. However, arctigenin selectively killed only the OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells. This selective killing of OXPHOS-dependent Panc-1 cells was accompanied by generation of ER stress, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspase activation leading to apoptosis and aponecrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CD47-CAR-T Cells Effectively Kill Target Cancer Cells and Block Pancreatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Berahovich, Robert; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Shirley; Harto, Hizkia; Li, Le; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Mao, Mike Ming; Wu, Lijun

    2017-10-21

    CD47 is a glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is often overexpressed in different types of hematological and solid cancer tumors and plays important role in blocking phagocytosis, increased tumor survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. In the present report, we designed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor)-T cells that bind CD47 antigen. We used ScFv (single chain variable fragment) from mouse CD47 antibody to generate CD47-CAR-T cells for targeting different cancer cell lines. CD47-CAR-T cells effectively killed ovarian, pancreatic and other cancer cells and produced high level of cytokines that correlated with expression of CD47 antigen. In addition, CD47-CAR-T cells significantly blocked BxPC3 pancreatic xenograft tumor growth after intratumoral injection into NSG mice. Moreover, we humanized mouse CD47 ScFv and showed that it effectively bound CD47 antigen. The humanized CD47-CAR-T cells also specifically killed ovarian, pancreatic, and cervical cancer cell lines and produced IL-2 that correlated with expression of CD47. Thus, CD47-CAR-T cells can be used as a novel cellular therapeutic agent for treating different types of cancer.

  11. ONC201 kills breast cancer cells in vitro by targeting mitochondria.

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    Greer, Yoshimi Endo; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Nagashima, Kunio; Stuelten, Christina; Crooks, Dan; Koparde, Vishal N; Gilbert, Samuel F; Islam, Celia; Ubaldini, Ashley; Ji, Yun; Gattinoni, Luca; Soheilian, Ferri; Wang, Xiantao; Hafner, Markus; Shetty, Jyoti; Tran, Bao; Jailwala, Parthav; Cam, Maggie; Lang, Martin; Voeller, Donna; Reinhold, William C; Rajapakse, Vinodh; Pommier, Yves; Weigert, Roberto; Linehan, W Marston; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2018-04-06

    We report a novel mechanism of action of ONC201 as a mitochondria-targeting drug in cancer cells. ONC201 was originally identified as a small molecule that induces transcription of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and subsequently kills cancer cells by activating TRAIL death receptors. In this study, we examined ONC201 toxicity on multiple human breast and endometrial cancer cell lines. ONC201 attenuated cell viability in all cancer cell lines tested. Unexpectedly, ONC201 toxicity was not dependent on either TRAIL receptors nor caspases. Time-lapse live cell imaging revealed that ONC201 induces cell membrane ballooning followed by rupture, distinct from the morphology of cells undergoing apoptosis. Further investigation found that ONC201 induces phosphorylation of AMP-dependent kinase and ATP loss. Cytotoxicity and ATP depletion were significantly enhanced in the absence of glucose, suggesting that ONC201 targets mitochondrial respiration. Further analysis indicated that ONC201 indirectly inhibits mitochondrial respiration. Confocal and electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that ONC201 triggers mitochondrial structural damage and functional impairment. Moreover, ONC201 decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). RNAseq analysis revealed that ONC201 suppresses expression of multiple mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and other mitochondrial functions. Importantly, fumarate hydratase deficient cancer cells and multiple cancer cell lines with reduced amounts of mtDNA were resistant to ONC201. These results indicate that cells not dependent on mitochondrial respiration are ONC201-resistant. Our data demonstrate that ONC201 kills cancer cells by disrupting mitochondrial function and further suggests that cancer cells that are dependent on glycolysis will be resistant to ONC201.

  12. DC-CIK cells derived from ovarian cancer patient menstrual blood activate the TNFR1-ASK1-AIP1 pathway to kill autologous ovarian cancer stem cells.

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    Qin, Wenxing; Xiong, Ying; Chen, Juan; Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Te

    2018-03-22

    Ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs) are highly carcinogenic and have very strong resistance to traditional chemotherapeutic drugs; therefore, they are an important factor in ovarian cancer metastasis and recurrence. It has been reported that dendritic cell (DC)-cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have significant killing effects on all cancer cells across many systems including the blood, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. However, whether DC-CIK cells can selectively kill OCSCs is currently unclear. In this study, we collected ovarian cancer patient menstrual blood (OCPMB) samples to acquire mononuclear cells and isolated DC-CIK cells in vitro. In addition, autologous CD44+/CD133+ OCSCs were isolated and used as target cells. The experimental results showed that when DC-CIK cells and OCSCs were mixed and cultured in vitro at ratios of 5:1, 10:1 and 50:1, the DC-CIK cells killed significant amounts of OCSCs, inhibited their invasion in vitro and promoted their apoptosis. The qPCR and Western blot results showed that DC-CIK cells stimulated high expression levels and phosphorylation of TNFR1, ASK1, AIP1 and JNK in OCSCs through the release of TNF-α. After the endogenous TNFR1 gene was knocked out in OCSCs using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, the killing function of DC-CIK cells on target OCSCs was significantly attenuated. The results of the analyses of clinical samples suggested that the TNFR1 expression level was negatively correlated with ovarian cancer stage and prognosis. Therefore, we innovatively confirmed that DC-CIK cells derived from OCPMB could secret TNF-α to activate the expression of the TNFR1-ASK1-AIP1-JNK pathway in OCSCs and kill autologous OCSCs. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E selectively induces oxidative DNA damage for selective killing of oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jen-Yang; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Wang, Hui-Ru; Chan, Ya-Ching; Haung, Jo-Wen; Shu, Chih-Wen; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction had been previously reported in 4β-hydroxywithanolide (4βHWE)-induced selective killing of oral cancer cells, but the mechanism involving ROS and the DNA damage effect remain unclear. This study explores the role of ROS and oxidative DNA damage of 4βHWE in the selective killing of oral cancer cells. Changes in cell viability, morphology, ROS, DNA double strand break (DSB) signaling (γH2AX foci in immunofluorescence and DSB signaling in western blotting), and oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-2'deoxyguanosine [8-oxodG]) were detected in 4βHWE-treated oral cancer (Ca9-22) and/or normal (HGF-1) cells. 4βHWE decreased cell viability, changed cell morphology and induced ROS generation in oral cancer cells rather than oral normal cells, which were recovered by a free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). For immunofluorescence, 4βHWE also accumulated more of the DSB marker, γH2AX foci, in oral cancer cells than in oral normal cells. For western blotting, DSB signaling proteins such as γH2AX and MRN complex (MRE11, RAD50, and NBS1) were overexpressed in 4βHWE-treated oral cancer cells in different concentrations and treatment time. In the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycolyase (Fpg)-based comet assay and 8-oxodG-based flow cytometry, the 8-oxodG expressions were higher in 4βHWE-treated oral cancer cells than in oral normal cells. All the 4βHWE-induced DSB and oxidative DNA damage to oral cancer cells were recovered by NAC pretreatment. Taken together, the 4βHWE selectively induced DSB and oxidative DNA damage for the ROS-mediated selective killing of oral cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise [Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)], E-mail: denisewingett@boisestate.edu

    2008-07-23

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells ({approx}28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity.

  15. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise; Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells (∼28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity

  16. Sinularin Selectively Kills Breast Cancer Cells Showing G2/M Arrest, Apoptosis, and Oxidative DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurng-Wern Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound sinularin, isolated from marine soft corals, is antiproliferative against several cancers, but its possible selective killing effect has rarely been investigated. This study investigates the selective killing potential and mechanisms of sinularin-treated breast cancer cells. In 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H- tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS assay, sinularin dose-responsively decreased the cell viability of two breast cancer (SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells, but showed less effect on breast normal (M10 cells after a 24 h treatment. According to 7-aminoactinomycin D (7AAD flow cytometry, sinularin dose-responsively induced the G2/M cycle arrest of SKBR3 cells. Sinularin dose-responsively induced apoptosis on SKBR3 cells in terms of a flow cytometry-based annexin V/7AAD assay and pancaspase activity, as well as Western blotting for cleaved forms of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, caspases 3, 8, and 9. These caspases and PARP activations were suppressed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC pretreatment. Moreover, sinularin dose-responsively induced oxidative stress and DNA damage according to flow cytometry analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential (MitoMP, mitochondrial superoxide, and 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG. In conclusion, sinularin induces selective killing, G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and oxidative DNA damage of breast cancer cells.

  17. Photochemical internalisation of chemotherapy potentiates killing of multidrug-resistant breast and bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigbli, D K; Wilson, D G G; Farooqui, N; Sousi, E; Risley, P; Taylor, I; Macrobert, A J; Loizidou, M

    2007-08-20

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major confounding factor in adjuvant solid tumour chemotherapy. Increasing intracellular amounts of chemotherapeutics to circumvent MDR may be achieved by a novel delivery method, photochemical internalisation (PCI). PCI consists of the co-administration of drug and photosensitiser; upon light activation the latter induces intracellular release of organelle-bound drug. We investigated whether co-administration of hypericin (photosensitiser) with mitoxantrone (MTZ, chemotherapeutic) plus illumination potentiates cytotoxicity in MDR cancer cells. We mapped the extent of intracellular co-localisation of drug/photosensitiser. We determined whether PCI altered drug-excreting efflux pump P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression or function in MDR cells. Bladder and breast cancer cells and their Pgp-overexpressing MDR subclones (MGHU1, MGHU1/R, MCF-7, MCF-7/R) were given hypericin/MTZ combinations, with/without blue-light illumination. Pilot experiments determined appropriate sublethal doses for each. Viability was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Intracellular localisation was mapped by confocal microscopy. Pgp expression was detected by immunofluorescence and Pgp function investigated by Rhodamine123 efflux on confocal microscopy. MTZ alone (0.1-0.2 microg ml(-1)) killed up to 89% of drug-sensitive cells; MDR cells exhibited less cytotoxicity (6-28%). Hypericin (0.1-0.2 microM) effects were similar for all cells; light illumination caused none or minimal toxicity. In combination, MTZ /hypericin plus illumination, potentiated MDR cell killing, vs hypericin or MTZ alone. (MGHU1/R: 38.65 and 36.63% increase, Phypericin increased killing by 28.15% (Phypericin was evident before illumination and at serial times post-illumination. MTZ was always found in sensitive cell nuclei, but not in dark resistant cell nuclei. In illuminated resistant cells there was some mobilisation of MTZ into the nucleus. Pgp

  18. A novel class of chemicals that react with abasic sites in DNA and specifically kill B cell cancers.

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    Shanqiao Wei

    Full Text Available Most B cell cancers overexpress the enzyme activation-induced deaminase at high levels and this enzyme converts cytosines in DNA to uracil. The constitutive expression of this enzyme in these cells greatly increases the uracil content of their genomes. We show here that these genomes also contain high levels of abasic sites presumably created during the repair of uracils through base-excision repair. We further show that three alkoxyamines with an alkyne functional group covalently link to abasic sites in DNA and kill immortalized cell lines created from B cell lymphomas, but not other cancers. They also do not kill normal B cells. Treatment of cancer cells with one of these chemicals causes strand breaks, and the sensitivity of the cells to this chemical depends on the ability of the cells to go through the S phase. However, other alkoxyamines that also link to abasic sites- but lack the alkyne functionality- do not kill cells from B cell lymphomas. This shows that the ability of alkoxyamines to covalently link to abasic sites is insufficient for their cytotoxicity and that the alkyne functionality may play a role in it. These chemicals violate the commonly accepted bioorthogonality of alkynes and are attractive prototypes for anti-B cell cancer agents.

  19. Killing effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated by γ ray on human gastric cancer MKN-28 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Daocheng; Zhang Xianqing; Mu Shijie; Liu Zhongxiang; Xia Aijun; Huang Xiaofeng; An Qunxing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the killing effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) irradiated by γ ray on cultured human gastric cancer cell line MKN-28. Methods: The experiment were divided into MKN-28 tumor cell control group, PBMCs groups and MKN-28 cells with irradiated or non-irradiated PBMCs co-culture groups. Radidation dosage were from 0.5 to 3 Gy, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining were used to observe the kill effect of PBMCs on tumor cells in different period. Results: After culture for 144h, the dead cells of several dosage irradiated PBMCs are much more than those of non-irradiated PBMCs group. At 240 hours of culture, the alive PBMCs deareses in number in both irradiated and non-irradiared groups, but decreases in radiated groups are more obvious. After culture for 72 h in the co-cultured groups, the difference is not evident among all radiation dosage groups. After 96-240 h of co-culture, the killing effect of 0.5-2Gy irradiated PBMCs on tumor cells is very strong, especially in 1Gy group, but the killing effect of PBMCs irradiated by 2.5-3Gy on tumor cells were weaker than that of 0.5-2Gy irradiated groups. At 240 hours co-cultured groups irradiated by 2.5-3Gy, tumor cells still survive and proliferate. Conclusion: Gamma ray irradiation have killing effect to some PBMCs. The cytocidal effect of PBMCs irradiated by 0.5-2Gy on tumor cells were increased. Chemotaxis and cytocidal effect of tumor cells to postirradiated PBMCs were also found. The killing effect of PBMCs irradiated by 2.5 and 3 Gy on tumor cells were restrained. (authors)

  20. Photochemical internalisation of chemotherapy potentiates killing of multidrug-resistant breast and bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigbli, D K; Wilson, D G G; Farooqui, N; Sousi, E; Risley, P; Taylor, I; MacRobert, A J; Loizidou, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major confounding factor in adjuvant solid tumour chemotherapy. Increasing intracellular amounts of chemotherapeutics to circumvent MDR may be achieved by a novel delivery method, photochemical internalisation (PCI). PCI consists of the co-administration of drug and photosensitiser; upon light activation the latter induces intracellular release of organelle-bound drug. We investigated whether co-administration of hypericin (photosensitiser) with mitoxantrone (MTZ, chemotherapeutic) plus illumination potentiates cytotoxicity in MDR cancer cells. We mapped the extent of intracellular co-localisation of drug/photosensitiser. We determined whether PCI altered drug-excreting efflux pump P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression or function in MDR cells. Bladder and breast cancer cells and their Pgp-overexpressing MDR subclones (MGHU1, MGHU1/R, MCF-7, MCF-7/R) were given hypericin/MTZ combinations, with/without blue-light illumination. Pilot experiments determined appropriate sublethal doses for each. Viability was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Intracellular localisation was mapped by confocal microscopy. Pgp expression was detected by immunofluorescence and Pgp function investigated by Rhodamine123 efflux on confocal microscopy. MTZ alone (0.1–0.2 μg ml−1) killed up to 89% of drug-sensitive cells; MDR cells exhibited less cytotoxicity (6–28%). Hypericin (0.1–0.2 μM) effects were similar for all cells; light illumination caused none or minimal toxicity. In combination, MTZ /hypericin plus illumination, potentiated MDR cell killing, vs hypericin or MTZ alone. (MGHU1/R: 38.65 and 36.63% increase, P<0.05; MCF-7/R: 80.2 and 46.1% increase, P<0.001). Illumination of combined MTZ/hypericin increased killing by 28.15% (P<0.05 MGHU1/R) compared to dark controls. Intracytoplasmic vesicular co-localisation of MTZ/hypericin was evident before illumination and at serial times post

  1. Selective Killing of Breast Cancer Cells by Doxorubicin-Loaded Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters: Confocal Microscopy and FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Amin, Asif; Jana, Batakrishna; Mohapatra, Saswat; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-01-18

    Fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) capped with lysozymes are used to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin to cancer and noncancer cells. Doxorubicin-loaded AuNCs cause the highly selective and efficient killing (90 %) of breast cancer cells (MCF7) (IC50 =155 nm). In contrast, the killing of the noncancer breast cells (MCF10A) by doxorubicin-loaded AuNCs is only 40 % (IC50 =4500 nm). By using a confocal microscope, the fluorescence spectrum and decay of the AuNCs were recorded inside the cell. The fluorescence maxima (at ≈490-515 nm) and lifetime (≈2 ns), of the AuNCs inside the cells correspond to Au10-13 . The intracellular release of doxorubicin from AuNCs is monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha: components, activity and pathway analyses.

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    Widodo, Nashi; Takagi, Yasuomi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2008-04-08

    Ashwagandha, also called as "Queen of Ayurveda" and "Indian ginseng", is a commonly used plant in Indian traditional medicine, Ayurveda. Its roots have been used as herb remedy to treat a variety of ailments and to promote general wellness. However, scientific evidence to its effects is limited to only a small number of studies. We had previously identified anti-cancer activity in the leaf extract (i-Extract) of Ashwagandha and demonstrated withanone as a cancer inhibitory factor (i-Factor). In the present study, we fractionated the i-Extract to its components by silica gel column chromatography and subjected them to cell based activity analyses. We found that the cancer inhibitory leaf extract (i-Extract) has, at least, seven components that could cause cancer cell killing; i-Factor showed the highest selectivity for cancer cells and i-Factor rich Ashwagandha leaf powder was non-toxic and anti-tumorigenic in mice assays. We undertook a gene silencing and pathway analysis approach and found that i-Extract and its components kill cancer cells by at least five different pathways, viz. p53 signaling, GM-CFS signaling, death receptor signaling, apoptosis signaling and G2-M DNA damage regulation pathway. p53 signaling was most common. Visual analysis of p53 and mortalin staining pattern further revealed that i-Extract, fraction F1, fraction F4 and i-Factor caused an abrogation of mortalin-p53 interactions and reactivation of p53 function while the fractions F2, F3, F5 work through other mechanisms.

  3. Smart Plasmonic Glucose Nanosensors as Generic Theranostic Agents for Targeting-Free Cancer Cell Screening and Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Limei; Li, Haijuan; He, Haili; Wu, Haoxi; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-07-07

    Fast and accurate identification of cancer cells from healthy normal cells in a simple, generic way is very crucial for early cancer detection and treatment. Although functional nanoparticles, like fluorescent quantum dots and plasmonic Au nanoparticles (NPs), have been successfully applied for cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy, they suffer from the main drawback of needing time-consuming targeting preparation for specific cancer cell detection and selective ablation. The lack of a generic and effective method therefore limits their potential high-throughput cancer cell preliminary screening and theranostic applications. We report herein a generic in vitro method for fast, targeting-free (avoiding time-consuming preparations of targeting moiety for specific cancer cells) visual screening and selective killing of cancer cells from normal cells, by using glucose-responsive/-sensitive glucose oxidase-modified Ag/Au nanoshells (Ag/Au-GOx NSs) as a smart plasmonic theranostic agent. The method is generic to some extent since it is based on the distinct localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) responses (and colors) of the smart nanoprobe with cancer cells (typically have a higher glucose uptake level) and normal cells.

  4. Monoclonal TCR-redirected tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Nathaniel; Bossi, Giovanna; Adams, Katherine J; Lissina, Anna; Mahon, Tara M; Hassan, Namir J; Gavarret, Jessie; Bianchi, Frayne C; Pumphrey, Nicholas J; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Sewell, Andrew K; Lissin, Nikolai M; Harwood, Naomi E; Molloy, Peter E; Li, Yi; Cameron, Brian J; Sami, Malkit; Baston, Emma E; Todorov, Penio T; Paston, Samantha J; Dennis, Rebecca E; Harper, Jane V; Dunn, Steve M; Ashfield, Rebecca; Johnson, Andy; McGrath, Yvonne; Plesa, Gabriela; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Price, David A; Vuidepot, Annelise; Williams, Daniel D; Sutton, Deborah H; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-06-01

    T cell immunity can potentially eradicate malignant cells and lead to clinical remission in a minority of patients with cancer. In the majority of these individuals, however, there is a failure of the specific T cell receptor (TCR)–mediated immune recognition and activation process. Here we describe the engineering and characterization of new reagents termed immune-mobilizing monoclonal TCRs against cancer (ImmTACs). Four such ImmTACs, each comprising a distinct tumor-associated epitope-specific monoclonal TCR with picomolar affinity fused to a humanized cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3)-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv), effectively redirected T cells to kill cancer cells expressing extremely low surface epitope densities. Furthermore, these reagents potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Thus, ImmTACs overcome immune tolerance to cancer and represent a new approach to tumor immunotherapy.

  5. Improved Killing of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells by Combining a Novel Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Based Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapdor, Rüdiger; Wang, Shuo; Hacker, Ulrich; Büning, Hildegard; Morgan, Michael; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Schambach, Axel

    2017-10-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological cancer. Although cytoreductive chemotherapy and surgery lead to complete macroscopic tumor removal, most of the patients in advanced stages suffer from recurrent disease and subsequently die. This may be explained by the activity of cancer stem cells (CSC), which are a subpopulation of cells with an elevated chemoresistance and an increased capacity for self-renewal and metastatic spread. Specifically targeting these cells by adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising strategy to reduce the risk for recurrent disease. This study selected the widely accepted CSC marker CD133 as a target for a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based immunotherapeutic approach to treat ovarian cancer. A lentiviral vector was generated encoding a third-generation anti-CD133-CAR, and clinically used NK92 cells were transduced. These engineered natural killer (NK) cells showed specific killing against CD133-positive ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian cancer cells cultured from sequential ascites harvests. Additionally, specific activation of these engineered NK cells was demonstrated via interferon-gamma secretion assays. To improve clinical efficacy of ovarian cancer treatment, the effect of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin was evaluated together with CAR-transduced NK cell treatment. It was demonstrated that NK cells remain cytotoxic and active under cisplatin treatment and, importantly, that sequential treatment with cisplatin followed by CAR-NK cells led to the strongest killing effect. The specific eradication of ovarian CSCs by anti-CD133-CAR expressing NK92 cells represents a promising strategy and, when confirmed in vivo, shall be the basis of future clinical studies with the aim to prevent recurrent disease.

  6. Trastuzumab triggers phagocytic killing of high HER2 cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by interaction with Fcγ receptors on macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yun; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Brezski, Randall J; Rycyzyn, Michael; Jordan, Robert E; Strohl, William R; Zou, Quanming; Zhang, Ningyan; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-05-01

    Trastuzumab has been used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer for more than a decade, but the mechanisms of action for the therapy are still being actively investigated. Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity mediated by NK cells is well recognized as one of the key mechanisms of action for trastuzumab, but trastuzumab-mediated Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) has not been established. In this study, we demonstrate that macrophages, by way of phagocytic engulfment, can mediate ADCP and cancer cell killing in the presence of trastuzumab. Increased infiltration of macrophages in the tumor tissue was associated with enhanced efficacy of trastuzumab whereas depletion of macrophages resulted in reduced antitumor efficacy in mouse xenograft tumor models. Among the four mouse FcγRs, FcγRIV exhibits the strongest binding affinity to trastuzumab. Knockdown of FcγRIV in mouse macrophages reduced cancer cell killing and ADCP activity triggered by trastuzumab. Consistently, an upregulation of FcγRIV expression by IFN-γ triggered an increased ADCP activity by trastuzumab. In an analogous fashion, IFN-γ priming of human macrophages increased the expression of FcγRIII, the ortholog of murine FcγRIV, and increased trastuzumab-mediated cancer cell killing. Thus, in two independent systems, the results indicated that activation of macrophages in combination with trastuzumab can serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating high HER2 breast cancer by boosting ADCP killing of cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Carbon-ion beam irradiation kills X-ray-resistant p53-null cancer cells by inducing mitotic catastrophe.

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    Napapat Amornwichet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To understand the mechanisms involved in the strong killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation on cancer cells with TP53 tumor suppressor gene deficiencies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DNA damage responses after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation in isogenic HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines with and without TP53 (p53+/+ and p53-/-, respectively were analyzed as follows: cell survival by clonogenic assay, cell death modes by morphologic observation of DAPI-stained nuclei, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by immunostaining of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX, and cell cycle by flow cytometry and immunostaining of Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3. RESULTS: The p53-/- cells were more resistant than the p53+/+ cells to X-ray irradiation, while the sensitivities of the p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation were comparable. X-ray and carbon-ion beam irradiations predominantly induced apoptosis of the p53+/+ cells but not the p53-/- cells. In the p53-/- cells, carbon-ion beam irradiation, but not X-ray irradiation, markedly induced mitotic catastrophe that was associated with premature mitotic entry with harboring long-retained DSBs at 24 h post-irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Efficient induction of mitotic catastrophe in apoptosis-resistant p53-deficient cells implies a strong cancer cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation that is independent of the p53 status, suggesting its biological advantage over X-ray treatment.

  8. The irreversible ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor neratinib interacts with the PARP1 inhibitor niraparib to kill ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Samuel, Peter; Avogadri-Connors, Francesca; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2018-06-03

    The irreversible ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor neratinib has been shown to rapidly down-regulate the expression of ERBB1/2/4 as well as the levels of c-MET, PDGFRα and mutant RAS proteins via autophagic degradation. Neratinib interacted in an additive to synergistic fashion with the approved PARP1 inhibitor niraparib to kill ovarian cancer cells. Neratinib and niraparib caused the ATM-dependent activation of AMPK which in turn was required to cause mTOR inactivation, ULK-1 activation and ATG13 phosphorylation. The drug combination initially increased autophagosome levels followed later by autolysosome levels. Preventing autophagosome formation by expressing activated mTOR or knocking down of Beclin1, or knock down of the autolysosome protein cathepsin B, reduced drug combination lethality. The drug combination caused an endoplasmic reticulum stress response as judged by enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation that was responsible for reducing MCL-1 and BCL-XL levels and increasing ATG5 and Beclin1 expression. Knock down of BIM, but not of BAX or BAK, reduced cell killing. Expression of activated MEK1 prevented the drug combination increasing BIM expression and reduced cell killing. Downstream of the mitochondrion, drug lethality was partially reduced by knock down of AIF, but expression of dominant negative caspase 9 was not protective. Our data demonstrate that neratinib and niraparib interact to kill ovarian cancer cells through convergent DNA damage and endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling. Cell killing required the induction of autophagy and was cathepsin B and AIF -dependent, and effector caspase independent.

  9. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical steps in glycan elongation that make aberrantly glycosylated mucins affect the interaction between cancer cells and cytotoxic effector cells of the immune system. Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr, STn (NeuAcα2-6GalNAc-Ser/Thr, T (Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr, and ST (NeuAcα2-6Galβ1-3GalNAc-Ser/Thr antigens are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn. Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN knockout (KO of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps, as demonstrated for glycan elongation beyond Tn and STn, can be important for fine tuning of the immune escape mechanisms in cancer cells.

  10. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  11. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-01-01

    Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension) than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted. PMID:27656243

  12. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Prakash Somasekharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted.

  13. Fiber mediated receptor masking in non-infected bystander cells restricts adenovirus cell killing effect but promotes adenovirus host co-existence.

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    Johan Rebetz

    Full Text Available The basic concept of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAD as oncolytic agents is that progenies generated from each round of infection will disperse, infect and kill new cancer cells. However, CRAD has only inhibited, but not eradicated tumor growth in xenograft tumor therapy, and CRAD therapy has had only marginal clinical benefit to cancer patients. Here, we found that CRAD propagation and cancer cell survival co-existed for long periods of time when infection was initiated at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, and cancer cell killing was inefficient and slow compared to the assumed cell killing effect upon infection at high MOI. Excessive production of fiber molecules from initial CRAD infection of only 1 to 2% cancer cells and their release prior to the viral particle itself caused a tropism-specific receptor masking in both infected and non-infected bystander cells. Consequently, the non-infected bystander cells were inefficiently bound and infected by CRAD progenies. Further, fiber overproduction with concomitant restriction of adenovirus spread was observed in xenograft cancer therapy models. Besides the CAR-binding Ad4, Ad5, and Ad37, infection with CD46-binding Ad35 and Ad11 also caused receptor masking. Fiber overproduction and its resulting receptor masking thus play a key role in limiting CRAD functionality, but potentially promote adenovirus and host cell co-existence. These findings also give important clues for understanding mechanisms underlying the natural infection course of various adenoviruses.

  14. Killing malignant melanoma cells with protoporphyrin IX-loaded polymersome-mediated photodynamic therapy and cold atmospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mian Wang,1 Benjamin M Geilich,2 Michael Keidar,3 Thomas J Webster1,4 1Department of Chemical Engineering, 2Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, 3Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 4Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Traditional cancer treatments contain several limitations such as incomplete ablation and multidrug resistance. It is known that photodynamic therapy (PDT is an effective treatment for several tumor types especially melanoma cells. During the PDT process, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, an effective photosensitizer, can selectively kill cancer cells by activating a special light source. When tumor cells encapsulate a photosensitizer, they can be easily excited into an excited state by a light source. In this study, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP was used as a novel light source. Results of some studies have showed that cancer cells can be effectively killed by using either a light source or an individual treatment due to the generation of reactive oxygen species and electrons from a wide range of wavelengths, which suggest that CAP can act as a potential light source for anticancer applications compared with UV light sources. Results of the present in vitro study indicated for the first time that PpIX can be successfully loaded into polymersomes. Most importantly, cell viability studies revealed that PpIX-loaded polymersomes had a low toxicity to healthy fibroblasts (20% were killed at a concentration of 400 µg/mL, but they showed a great potential to selectively kill melanoma cells (almost 50% were killed. With the application of CAP posttreatment, melanoma cell viability significantly decreased (80% were killed compared to not using a light source (45% were killed or using a UV light source (65% were killed. In summary, these results indicated for the

  15. Activated human primary NK cells efficiently kill colorectal cancer cells in 3D spheroid cultures irrespectively of the level of PD-L1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, Pilar M; Vigueras, Alan; Olivan, Sara; Prats, Anne C; Costas, Santiago; Llamazares, Guillermo; Sanchez-Martinez, Diego; Ayuso, José María; Fernandez, Luis; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pardo, Julián

    2018-01-01

    Haploidentical Natural Killer (NK) cells have been shown as an effective and safe alternative for the treatment of haematological malignancies with poor prognosis for which traditional therapies are ineffective. In contrast to haematological cancer cells, that mainly grow as single suspension cells, solid carcinomas are characterised by a tridimensional (3D) architecture that provide specific surviving advantages and resistance against chemo- and radiotherapy. However, little is known about the impact of 3D growth on solid cancer immunotherapy especially adoptive NK cell transfer. We have recently developed a protocol to activate ex vivo human primary NK cells using B lymphoblastic cell lines, which generates NK cells able to overcome chemoresistance in haematological cancer cells. Here we have analysed the activity of these allogeneic NK cells against colorectal (CRC) human cell lines growing in 3D spheroid culture and correlated with the expression of some of the main ligands regulating NK cell activity. Our results indicate that activated NK cells efficiently kill colorectal tumour cell spheroids in both 2D and 3D cultures. Notably, although 3D CRC cell cultures favoured the expression of the inhibitory immune checkpoint PD-L1, it did not correlate with increased resistance to NK cells. Finally, we have analysed in detail the infiltration of NK cells in 3D spheroids by microscopy and found that at low NK cell density, cell death is not observed although NK cells are able to infiltrate into the spheroid. In contrast, higher densities promote tumoural cell death before infiltration can be detected. These findings show that highly dense activated human primary NK cells efficiently kill colorectal carcinoma cells growing in 3D cultures independently of PD-L1 expression and suggest that the use of allogeneic activated NK cells could be beneficial for the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  16. Melanoma stem cells in experimental melanoma are killed by radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandl, Thomas; Revskaya, Ekaterina; Jiang, Zewei; Harris, Matthew; Dorokhova, Olena; Tsukrov, Dina; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In spite of recently approved B-RAF inhibitors and immunomodulating antibodies, metastatic melanoma has poor prognosis and novel treatments are needed. Melanoma stem cells (MSC) have been implicated in the resistance of this tumor to chemotherapy. Recently we demonstrated in a Phase I clinical trial in patients with metastatic melanoma that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 188-Rhenium( 188 Re)-6D2 antibody to melanin was a safe and effective modality. Here we investigated the interaction of MSC with RIT as a possible mechanism for RIT efficacy. Methods: Mice bearing A2058 melanoma xenografts were treated with either 1.5 mCi 188 Re-6D2 antibody, saline, unlabeled 6D2 antibody or 188 Re-labeled non-specific IgM. Results: On Day 28 post-treatment the tumor size in the RIT group was 4-times less than in controls (P < 0.001). The tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and FACS for two MSC markers — chemoresistance mediator ABCB5 and H3K4 demethylase JARID1B. There were no significant differences between RIT and control groups in percentage of ABCB5 or JARID1B-positive cells in the tumor population. Our results demonstrate that unlike chemotherapy, which kills tumor cells but leaves behind MSC leading to recurrence, RIT kills MSC at the same rate as the rest of tumor cells. Conclusions: These results have two main implications for melanoma treatment and possibly other cancers. First, the susceptibility of ABCB5 + and JARID1B + cells to RIT in melanoma might be indicative of their susceptibility to antibody-targeted radiation in other cancers where they are present as well. Second, specifically targeting cancer stem cells with radiolabeled antibodies to ABCB5 or JARID1B might help to completely eradicate cancer stem cells in various cancers

  17. [Synergetic killing effects of external magnetic fields combined with porphyrin-dextran magnetic nanoparticles on the human bladder cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dao-sheng; Mi, Qi-wu; Meng, Xiang-jun; Gao, Yong; Dai, Yu-ping; Deng, Chun-hua

    2012-08-18

    To study the synergetic killing effects of external magnetic fields combined with the photodynamic action of porphyrin-dextran iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (PDMN) on human bladder cancer cells in vitro. The PDMN were produced by using the chemical co-precipitation and redox process and the physicochemical properties were characterized. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to determine the effects of photodynamic therapy of PDMN combined with external pulsed electromagnetic fields (5 mT) on killing human bladder cancer BIU-87 cells respectively. The diameters of PDMN were 10-15 nm and the saturation magnetization was 0.20 emu/g. Effective diameter of PDMN was 94.8 nm. PDMN could remarkably inhibit the proliferation and induce the obvious apoptosis of BIU-87 cells, and the rates of growth inhibition and apoptosis were (17.61±2.73)% and (24.53±5.74)% respectively. Moreover, external pulsed electromagnetic fields (5 mT) could also suppress the proliferation and induce apoptosis of BIU-87 cells. Furthermore, the photodynamic action of PDMN combined with external magnetic fields significantly inhibited the proliferation and promote apoptosis of BIU-87 cells, and the rates of growth inhibition and apoptosis was (28.11±4.25)% and (24.53±5.74)%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other groups (Peffectively inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of BIU-87 cells. Moreover, these effects on BIU-87 cells could be strengthened by the combination with external magnetic fields.

  18. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Peter J.; Wilson, George D.

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program

  19. NK-cell-dependent killing of colon carcinoma cells is mediated by natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and stimulated by parvovirus infection of target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, Rauf; Rommelaere, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Investigating how the immune system functions during malignancies is crucial to developing novel therapeutic strategies. Natural killer (NK) cells, an important component of the innate immune system, play a vital role in immune defense against tumors and virus-infected cells. The poor survival rate in colon cancer makes it particularly important to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Oncolytic viruses, in addition to lysing tumor cells, may have the potential to augment antitumor immune responses. In the present study, we investigate the role of NK cells and how parvovirus H-1PV can modulate NK-cell mediated immune responses against colon carcinoma. Human NK cells were isolated from the blood of healthy donors. The cytotoxicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of NK cells were measured in chromium release assays. Phenotypic assessment of colon cancer and dendritic cells was done by FACS. The statistical significance of the results was calculated with Student’s t test (*p <0.05; **, p < 0.01; ***, p < 0.001). We show that IL-2-activated human NK cells can effectively kill colon carcinoma cells. Killing of colon carcinoma cells by NK cells was further enhanced upon infection of the former cells with parvovirus H-1PV. H-1PV has potent oncolytic activity against various tumors, yet its direct killing effect on colon carcinoma cells is limited. The cytotoxicity of NK cells towards colon carcinoma cells, both mock- and H-1PV-infected, was found to be mostly mediated by a combination of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs), namely NKp30, 44, and 46. Colon carcinoma cells displayed low to moderate expression of NK cell ligands, and this expression was modulated upon H-1PV infection. Lysates of H-1PV-infected colon carcinoma cells were found to increase MHC class II expression on dendritic cells. Altogether, these data suggest that IL-2-activated NK cells actively kill colon carcinoma cells and that this killing is mediated by several natural cytotoxicity receptors

  20. Hypofractionation results in reduced tumor cell kill compared to conventional fractionation for tumors with regions of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, David J; Keall, Paul J; Loo, Billy W; Chen, Zhe J; Brown, J Martin

    2011-03-15

    Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10(5) over a distance of 130 μm. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of ∼10(3) as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y; Heery, Christopher R; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2016-06-07

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC.

  2. Targeted alpha therapy in vivo: direct evidence for single cancer cell kill using 149Tb-rituximab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, G.J.; Soloviev, D.; Buchegger, F.; Miederer, M.; Vranjes-Duric, S.; Comor, J.J.; Kuenzi, G.; Hartley, O.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates high-efficiency sterilisation of single cancer cells in a SCID mouse model of leukaemia using rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that targets CD20, labelled with terbium-149, an alpha-emitting radionuclide. Radio-immunotherapy with 5.5 MBq labelled antibody conjugate (1.11 GBq/mg) 2 days after an intravenous graft of 5.10 6 Daudi cells resulted in tumour-free survival for >120 days in 89% of treated animals. In contrast, all control mice (no treatment or treated with 5 or 300 μg unlabelled rituximab) developed lymphoma disease. At the end of the study period, 28.4%±4% of the long-lived daughter activity remained in the body, of which 91.1% was located in bone tissue and 6.3% in the liver. A relatively high daughter radioactivity concentration was found in the spleen (12%±2%/g), suggesting that the killed cancer cells are mainly eliminated through the spleen. This promising preliminary in vivo study suggests that targeted alpha therapy with 149 Tb is worthy of consideration as a new-generation radio-immunotherapeutic approach. (orig.)

  3. Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells by inducing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through blocking PDK1–AKT interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xian-Ying; Chen, Wei; Fan, Jun-Ting; Song, Ran; Wang, Lu; Gu, Yan-Hong; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xue-Feng; Tan, Ning-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we examined the effects of a natural cyclopeptide RA-V on human breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. RA-V significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 cells and murine breast cancer 4T1 cells. In addition, RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase cascade. Further study showed that RA-V dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, RA-V disrupted the interaction between PDK1 and AKT in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, RA-V-induced apoptosis could be enhanced by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor or attenuated by over-expression of AKT in all the three kinds of breast cancer cells. Taken together, this study shows that RA-V, which can induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, exerts strong anti-tumor activity against human breast cancer. The underlying anti-cancer mechanism of RA-V is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT. - Highlights: ► Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and PDK1 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. ► Its mechanism is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT

  4. Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells by inducing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through blocking PDK1–AKT interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xian-Ying; Chen, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Fan, Jun-Ting [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China); Song, Ran; Wang, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Gu, Yan-Hong [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zeng, Guang-Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China); Shen, Yan; Wu, Xue-Feng [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Tan, Ning-Hua, E-mail: nhtan@mail.kib.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Sun, Yang, E-mail: yangsun@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China)

    2013-02-15

    In the present paper, we examined the effects of a natural cyclopeptide RA-V on human breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. RA-V significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 cells and murine breast cancer 4T1 cells. In addition, RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase cascade. Further study showed that RA-V dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, RA-V disrupted the interaction between PDK1 and AKT in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, RA-V-induced apoptosis could be enhanced by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor or attenuated by over-expression of AKT in all the three kinds of breast cancer cells. Taken together, this study shows that RA-V, which can induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, exerts strong anti-tumor activity against human breast cancer. The underlying anti-cancer mechanism of RA-V is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT. - Highlights: ► Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and PDK1 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. ► Its mechanism is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT.

  5. HAMLET kills tumor cells by apoptosis: structure, cellular mechanisms, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Fischer, Walter; Aronsson, Annika; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-05-01

    New cancer treatments should aim to destroy tumor cells without disturbing normal tissue. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) offers a new molecular approach to solving this problem, because it induces apoptosis in tumor cells but leaves normal differentiated cells unaffected. After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and freezes their metabolic machinery. The cells proceed to fragment their DNA, and they disintegrate with apoptosis-like characteristics. HAMLET kills a wide range of malignant cells in vitro and maintains this activity in vivo in patients with skin papillomas. In addition, HAMLET has striking effects on human glioblastomas in a rat xenograft model. After convection-enhanced delivery, HAMLET diffuses throughout the brain, selectively killing tumor cells and controlling tumor progression without apparent tissue toxicity. HAMLET thus shows great promise as a new therapeutic with the advantage of selectivity for tumor cells and lack of toxicity.

  6. Scientific projection paper for mutagenesis, transformation and cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, P.

    1980-01-01

    Our knowledge about mutagenesis, transformation, and cell killing by ionizing radiation consists of large bodies of data, which are potentially useful in terms of application to human risk assessment and to the constructive use of radiation, as in cancer treatment. The three end-points discussed above are united by at least five significant concepts in radiation research strategy: (1) The inter-relationships among the important end-points, mutation, carcinogenesis, and cell killing. Research on one is meaningful only in the context of information about the other two. (2) The interaction of radiations with other agents in producing these end-points. (3) The mechanisms of action of other environmental mutagenic, carcinogenic, and cytotoxic agents. (4) The use of repair deficient human mutant cells. (5) The study of radiation damage mechanisms. There is no better way to extrapolate laboratory data to the clinical and public worlds than to understand the underlying biological mechanisms that produced the data

  7. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); He, Huabin [Department of Orthopedics, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Wang, Jinghe, E-mail: Xiaofeili2000@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  8. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis

  9. Vitamin C selectively kills KRAS and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer cells by targeting GAPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jihye; Mullarky, Edouard; Lu, Changyuan; Bosch, Kaitlyn N; Kavalier, Adam; Rivera, Keith; Roper, Jatin; Chio, Iok In Christine; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Rago, Carlo; Muley, Ashlesha; Asara, John M; Paik, Jihye; Elemento, Olivier; Chen, Zhengming; Pappin, Darryl J; Dow, Lukas E; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Gross, Steven S; Cantley, Lewis C

    2015-12-11

    More than half of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) carry either KRAS or BRAF mutations and are often refractory to approved targeted therapies. We found that cultured human CRC cells harboring KRAS or BRAF mutations are selectively killed when exposed to high levels of vitamin C. This effect is due to increased uptake of the oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbate (DHA), via the GLUT1 glucose transporter. Increased DHA uptake causes oxidative stress as intracellular DHA is reduced to vitamin C, depleting glutathione. Thus, reactive oxygen species accumulate and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Inhibition of GAPDH in highly glycolytic KRAS or BRAF mutant cells leads to an energetic crisis and cell death not seen in KRAS and BRAF wild-type cells. High-dose vitamin C impairs tumor growth in Apc/Kras(G12D) mutant mice. These results provide a mechanistic rationale for exploring the therapeutic use of vitamin C for CRCs with KRAS or BRAF mutations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Gambogic Acid Efficiently Kills Stem-Like Colorectal Cancer Cells by Upregulating ZFP36 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Gambogic acid (GA, the main active compound of Gamboge hanburyi, has been reported to be a potential novel antitumor drug. Whether GA inhibits putative cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are considered to be the major cause of cancer treatment failure, remains largely unknown. This study investigated whether GA inhibits the CSCs of colorectal cancer (CRC and its possible mechanisms. Methods: We performed CCK8 and tumor sphere formation assays, percentage analysis of both side population and CD133+CD44+ cells, and the detection of stem cells markers, in order to assess the role of GA in inhibiting the stem celllike features of CRC. An mRNA microarray was performed to identify the downstream gene affected by GA and rescue assays were performed to further clarify whether the downstream gene is involved in the GA induced decrease of the stem cell-like CRC population. CRC cells were engineered with a CSC detector vector encoding GFP and luciferase (Luc under the control of the Nanog promoter, which were utilized to investigate the effect of GA on putative CSC in human tumor xenograft-bearing mice using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Results: Our results showed that GA significantly reduced tumor sphere formation and the percentages of side population and CD133+CD44+ cells, while also decreasing the expression of stemness and EMT-associated markers in CRC cells in vitro. GA killed stem-like CRC cells by upregulating the expression of ZFP36, which is dependent on the inactivation of the EGFR/ ERK signaling pathway. GFP+ cells harboring the PNanog-GFP-T2A-Luc transgene exhibited CSC characteristics. The in vivo results showed that GA significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice, accompanied by a remarkable reduction in the putative CSC number, based on whole-body bioluminescence imaging. Conclusion: These findings suggest that GA significantly inhibits putative CSCs of CRC both in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the activation of the

  11. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  12. Killing multiple myeloma cells with the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Lis, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Anna; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), which has emerged recently as the first member of a new class of potent anticancer agents, was tested for its capacity to kill multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells. Human MM cells (RPMI 8226) begin to lose viability significantly within 8 h of incubation in the presence of 3-BP. The Km (0.3 mmol/l) for intracellular accumulation of 3-BP in MM cells is 24 times lower than that in control cells (7.2 mmol/l). Therefore, the uptake of 3-BP by MM cells is significantly higher than that by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Further, the IC50 values for human MM cells and control peripheral blood mononuclear cells are 24 and 58 µmol/l, respectively. Therefore, specificity and selectivity of 3-BP toward MM cancer cells are evident on the basis of the above. In MM cells the transcription levels of the gene encoding the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 is significantly amplified compared with control cells. The level of intracellular ATP in MM cells decreases by over 90% within 1 h after addition of 100 µmol/l 3-BP. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP, exemplified by a marked decrease in viability of MM cells, is potentiated by the inhibitor of glutathione synthesis buthionine sulfoximine. In addition, the lack of mutagenicity and its superior capacity relative to Glivec to kill MM cancer cells are presented in this study.

  13. Photomedicine and Stem Cells; The Janus face of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill cancer stem cells, and photobiomodulation (PBM) to stimulate normal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, Heidi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2017-12-01

    Janus, the ancient Roman god depicted with two faces is an appropriate metaphor for light therapy. In the right photodynamic therapy conditions, light is able to kill nearly anything that is living such as cancers, microorganisms, parasites, and more. On the opposite face, light of the correct wavelength and proper dose (photobiomodulation) can heal, regenerate, protect, revitalize and restore any kind of dead, damaged, stressed, dying, degenerating cells, tissue, or organ system. This book discusses both sides of Janus' face in regards to light therapy.

  14. A rationally designed photo-chemo core-shell nanomedicine for inhibiting the migration of metastatic breast cancer cells followed by photodynamic killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Chandran, Parwathy; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Ramachandran, Ranjith; Gupta, Neha; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-04-01

    A multifunctional core-shell nanomedicine capable of inhibiting the migratory capacity of metastatic cancer cells followed by imparting cytotoxic stress by photodynamic action is reported. Based on in silico design, we have developed a core-shell nanomedicine comprising of ~80nm size poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nano-core encapsulating photosensitizer, m-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC), and ~20nm size albumin nano-shell encapsulating tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Dasatinib, which impair cancer migration. This system was prepared by a sequential process involving electrospray of polymer core and coacervation of protein shell. Cell studies using metastatic breast cancer cells demonstrated disruption of Src kinase involved in the cancer migration by albumin-dasatinib nano-shell and generation of photoactivated oxidative stress by mTHPC-PLGA nano-core. This unique combinatorial photo-chemo nanotherapy resulted synergistic cytotoxicity in ~99% of the motility-impaired metastatic cells. This approach of blocking cancer migration followed by photodynamic killing using rationally designed nanomedicine is a promising new strategy against cancer metastasis. A multifunctional core-shell nanomedicine capable of inhibiting metastatic cancer cell migration, in addition to inducing photodynamic effects, is described in this paper. The authors document cytotoxicity in approximately 99% of the studied metastatic breast cancer cells. Similar approaches would be a very welcome addition to the treatment protocols of advanced metastatic breast cancer and other types of neoplasms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extinction models for cancer stem cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Lange, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Cells with stem cell-like properties are now viewed as initiating and sustaining many cancers. This suggests that cancer can be cured by driving these cancer stem cells to extinction. The problem with this strategy is that ordinary stem cells are apt to be killed in the process. This paper sets bounds on the killing differential (difference between death rates of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells) that must exist for the survival of an adequate number of normal stem cells. Our main tools are birth–death Markov chains in continuous time. In this framework, we investigate the extinction times of cancer stem cells and normal stem cells. Application of extreme value theory from mathematical statistics yields an accurate asymptotic distribution and corresponding moments for both extinction times. We compare these distributions for the two cell populations as a function of the killing rates. Perhaps a more telling comparison involves the number of normal stem cells NH at the extinction time of the cancer stem cells. Conditioning on the asymptotic time to extinction of the cancer stem cells allows us to calculate the asymptotic mean and variance of NH. The full distribution of NH can be retrieved by the finite Fourier transform and, in some parameter regimes, by an eigenfunction expansion. Finally, we discuss the impact of quiescence (the resting state) on stem cell dynamics. Quiescence can act as a sanctuary for cancer stem cells and imperils the proposed therapy. We approach the complication of quiescence via multitype branching process models and stochastic simulation. Improvements to the τ-leaping method of stochastic simulation make it a versatile tool in this context. We conclude that the proposed therapy must target quiescent cancer stem cells as well as actively dividing cancer stem cells. The current cancer models demonstrate the virtue of attacking the same quantitative questions from a variety of modeling, mathematical, and computational perspectives

  16. Improving the selective cancer killing ability of ZnO nanoparticles using Fe doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Aaron; Wingett, Denise G; Rasmussen, John W; Layne, Janet; Johnson, Lydia; Tenne, Dmitri A; Zhang, Jianhui; Hanna, Charles B; Punnoose, Alex

    2012-06-01

    This work reports a new method to improve our recent demonstration of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively killing certain human cancer cells, achieved by incorporating Fe ions into the NPs. Thoroughly characterized cationic ZnO NPs (∼6 nm) doped with Fe ions (Zn(1-x )Fe (x) O, x = 0-0.15) were used in this work, applied at a concentration of 24 μg/ml. Cytotoxicity studies using flow cytometry on Jurkat leukemic cancer cells show cell viability drops from about 43% for undoped ZnO NPs to 15% for ZnO NPs doped with 7.5% Fe. However, the trend reverses and cell viability increases with higher Fe concentrations. The non-immortalized human T cells are markedly more resistant to Fe-doped ZnO NPs than cancerous T cells, confirming that Fe-doped samples still maintain selective toxicity to cancer cells. Pure iron oxide samples displayed no appreciable toxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated with NP introduction to cells increased with increasing Fe up to 7.5% and decreased for >7.5% doping.

  17. Heavy-ion-induced bystander killing of human lung cancer cells. Role of gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kosaku; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Takashi; Funayama, Tomoo; Kakizaki, Takehiko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanisms of cell death induced by heavy-ion irradiation focusing on the bystander effect in human lung cancer A549 cells. In microbeam irradiation, each of 1, 5, and 25 cells under confluent cell conditions was irradiated with 1, 5, or 10 particles of carbon ions (220 MeV), and then the surviving fraction of the population was measured by a clonogenic assay in order to investigate the bystander effect of heavy-ions. In this experiment, the limited number of cells (0.0001-0.002%, 5-25 cells) under confluent cell conditions irradiated with 5 or 10 carbon ions resulted in an exaggerated 8-14% increase in cell death by clonogenic assay. However, these overshooting responses were not observed under exponentially growing cell conditions. Furthermore, these responses were inhibited in cells treated with an inhibitor of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), whereas they were markedly enhanced by the addition of a stimulator of GJIC. The present results suggest that bystander cell killing by heavy-ions was induced mainly by direct cell-to-cell communication, such as GJIC, which might play important roles in bystander responses. (author)

  18. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  19. Cancer cells become susceptible to natural killer cell killing after exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors due to glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Søren; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Andresen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    We show that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors lead to functional expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) on cancer cells, making them potent targets for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing through a NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) restricted mechanism. Blocking either...

  20. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate efficiently kills breast tumour-initiating cells in a complex II-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Bing; Stantic, Marina; Zobalova, Renata; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Stapelberg, Michael; Stursa, Jan; Prokopova, Katerina; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that breast cancer involves tumour-initiating cells (TICs), which play a role in initiation, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and relapse of the disease. Emerging drugs that target TICs are becoming a focus of contemporary research. Mitocans, a group of compounds that induce apoptosis of cancer cells by destabilising their mitochondria, are showing their potential in killing TICs. In this project, we investigated mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES), a recently developed mitocan, for its in vitro and in vivo efficacy against TICs. The mammosphere model of breast TICs was established by culturing murine NeuTL and human MCF7 cells as spheres. This model was verified by stem cell marker expression, tumour initiation capacity and chemotherapeutic resistance. Cell susceptibility to MitoVES was assessed and the cell death pathway investigated. In vivo efficacy was studied by grafting NeuTL TICs to form syngeneic tumours. Mammospheres derived from NeuTL and MCF7 breast cancer cells were enriched in the level of stemness, and the sphere cells featured altered mitochondrial function. Sphere cultures were resistant to several established anti-cancer agents while they were susceptible to MitoVES. Killing of mammospheres was suppressed when the mitochondrial complex II, the molecular target of MitoVES, was knocked down. Importantly, MitoVES inhibited progression of syngeneic HER2 high tumours derived from breast TICs by inducing apoptosis in tumour cells. These results demonstrate that using mammospheres, a plausible model for studying TICs, drugs that target mitochondria efficiently kill breast tumour-initiating cells. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1394-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  1. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    are recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... only the shortest possible mucin-like glycans (Tn and STn). Glyco-engineering was performed by zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) knockout (KO) of the Core 1 enzyme chaperone COSMC, thereby preventing glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAc residue in O-linked glycans. We find that COSMC KO in the breast...

  2. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation

  3. γδ T cells as a potential tool in colon cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramutton, Thiranut; Buccheri, Simona; Dieli, Francesco; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Meraviglia, Serena

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are capable of recognizing tumor cells and exert potent cellular cytotoxicity against a large range of tumors, including colon cancer. However, tumors utilize numerous strategies to escape recognition or killing by patrolling γδ T cells, such a downregulation of NKG2D ligands, MICA/B and ULBPs. Therefore, the combined upregulation of T-cell receptorand NKG2D ligands on tumor cells and induction of NKG2D expression on γδ T cells may greatly enhance tumor killing and unlock the functions of γδ T cells. Here, we briefly review current data on the mechanisms of γδ T-cell recognition and killing of colon cancer cells and propose that γδ T cells may represent a promising target for the design of novel and highly innovative immunotherapy in patients with colon cancer.

  4. Selective killing of hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells by three-dimensional nanographene nanoparticles based on triptycene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoqin; Gan, Lu; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chun; Yong, Tuying; Wang, Ziyi; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-based materials have been widely used in the biomedical fields including drug delivery and cancer therapies. In this paper, a recently synthesized three-dimensional nanographene (NG) based on triptycene self-assembles into nanoparticles which selectively kill human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells as compared to human normal liver HL7702 cells. Obvious differences in cellular accumulation, the endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking of NG nanoparticles are observed in HepG2 cells and HL7702 cells. Further studies reveal that NG nanoparticles significantly increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, but not in HL7702 cells. NG nanoparticle-induced ROS result in apoptosis induction and the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Moreover, IKK/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling is found to be activated by NG nanoparticle-induced ROS and serves to antagonize NG nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Our studies show that the distinct behaviors of cellular uptake and ROS-mediated cytotoxicity are responsible for the selective killing of HepG2 cells. This study provides a foundation for understanding the mechanism of selective induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by NG nanoparticles and designing more effective chemotherapeutical agents.Carbon-based materials have been widely used in the biomedical fields including drug delivery and cancer therapies. In this paper, a recently synthesized three-dimensional nanographene (NG) based on triptycene self-assembles into nanoparticles which selectively kill human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells as compared to human normal liver HL7702 cells. Obvious differences in cellular accumulation, the endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking of NG nanoparticles are observed in HepG2 cells and HL7702 cells. Further studies reveal that NG nanoparticles significantly increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, but not in HL7702

  5. Killing Cancer Cells with the Help of Infrared Light – Photoimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy uses an antibody–photoabsorber conjugate that binds to cancer cells. When near-infrared light is applied, the cells swell and then burst, causing the cancer cell to die. Photoimmunotherapy is in clinical trials in patients with inoperable tumors.

  6. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaini, Ramesh R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and UNM Cancer and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hu, Chien-An A., E-mail: AHu@salud.unm.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and UNM Cancer and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaini, Ramesh R.; Hu, Chien-An A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. ► Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. ► Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. ► Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Cell injury, retrodifferentiation and the cancer treatment paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriel, José

    2015-09-01

    This "opinion article" is an attempt to take an overview of some significant changes that have happened in our understanding of cancer status during the last half century and its evolution under the progressive influence of molecular biology. As an active worker in cancer research and developmental biology during most of this period, I would like to comment briefly on these changes and to give my critical appreciation of their outcome as it affects our knowledge of cancer development as well as the current treatment of the disease. A recall of my own contribution to the subject is also included. Two subjects are particularly developed: cell injury and cell-killing therapies. Cell injury, whatever its origin, has acquired the status of a pivotal event for the initiation of cancer emergence. It is postulated that cell injury, a potential case of cellular death, may also be the origin of a process of stepwise cell reversion (retrodifferentiation or retroprogrammation) leading, by division, mature or stem cells to progressive immaturity. The genetic instability and mutational changes that accompanies this process of cell injury and rejuvenation put normal cells in a status favourable to neoplastic transformation or may evolve cancer cells toward clones with higher malignant potentiality. Thus, cell injury suggests lifestyle as the major upstream initiator of cancer development although this not exclude randomness as an unavoidable contributor to the disease. Cell-killing agents (mainly cytotoxic drugs and radiotherapy) are currently used to treat cancer. At the same time, it is agreed that agents with high cell injury potential (ultraviolet light, ionising radiations, tobacco, environmental pollutants, etc.) contribute to the emergence of malignant tumours. This represents a real paradox. In spite of the progress accomplished in cancer survival, one is tempted to suggest that we have very few chances of really cure cancer as long as we continue to treat malignancies

  9. Enhanced cell killing and apoptosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells with ultrasound in combination with cetuximab coated albumin microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narihira, Kyoichi; Watanabe, Akiko; Sheng, Hong; Endo, Hitomi; Feril, Loreto B; Irie, Yutaka; Ogawa, Koichi; Moosavi-Nejad, Seyedeh; Kondo, Seiji; Kikuta, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2018-03-01

    Targeted microbubbles have the potential to be used for ultrasound (US) therapy and diagnosis of various cancers. In the present study, US was irradiated to oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-2) in the presence of cetuximab-coated albumin microbubbles (CCAM). Cell killing rate with US treatment at 0.9 W/cm 2 and 1.0 W/cm 2 in the presence of CCAM was greater compared to non-targeted albumin microbubbles (p < .05). On the other hand, selective cell killing was not observed in human myelomonocytic lymphoma cell line (U937) that had no affinity to cetuximab. Furthermore, US irradiation in the presence of CCAM showed a fivefold increase of cell apoptotic rate for HSC-2 cells (21.0 ± 3.8%) as compared to U937 cells (4.0 ± 0.8%). Time-signal intensity curve in a tissue phantom demonstrated clear visualisation of CCAM with conventional US imaging device. Our experiment verifies the hypothesis that CCAM was selective to HSC-2 cells and may be applied as a novel therapeutic/diagnostic microbubble for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D

    2003-02-01

    To review the relative importance of the single-hit mechanism of radiation killing for tumour response to 1.8-2.0 Gy day(-1) fractions and to low dose-rate brachytherapy. Tumour cell killing by ionizing radiation is well described by the linear-quadratic equation that contains two independent components distinguished by dose kinetics. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves that contain six or more dose points usually provide good estimates of the alpha- and beta-inactivation coefficients. Superior estimates of tumour cell intrinsic radiosensitivity are obtained when synchronized populations are employed. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation of tumour cells are reviewed and compared with the characteristics of beta-inactivation. Potential molecular targets associated with single-hit inactivation are discussed along with strategies for potentiating cell killing by this mechanism. The single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing shows no dependence on dose-rate and, consequently, no evidence of sublethal damage repair. It is uniquely potentiated by high linear-energy-transfer radiation, exhibits a smaller oxygen enhancement ratio and exhibits a larger indirect effect by hydroxyl radicals than the beta-mechanism. alpha-inactivation coefficients vary slightly throughout interphase but mitotic cells exhibit extremely high alpha-coefficients in the range of those observed for lymphocytes and some repair-deficient cells. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that chromatin in compacted form could be a radiation-hypersensitive target associated with single-hit radiation killing. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves demonstrate that it is the single-hit mechanism (alpha) that determines the majority of cell killing after doses of 2Gy and that this mechanism is highly variable between tumour cell lines. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation are qualitatively and quantitatively distinct from those of beta-inactivation. Compacted chromatin in tumour cells

  11. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct', we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. Γ rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that γ-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture

  12. Preliminary study of steep pulse irreversible electroporation technology in human large cell lung cancer cell lines L9981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Zuoqing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to validate the effectiveness of steep pulse irreversible electroporation technology in human large cell lung cancer cells and to screen the optimal treatment of parameters for human large cell lung cancer cells. Three different sets of steep pulse therapy parameters were applied on the lung cancer cell line L9981. The cell line L9981 inhibition rate and proliferation capacity were detected by Vi-Cell vitality analysis and MTT. Steep pulsed irreversible electroporation technology for large cell lung cancer L9981 presents killing effects with various therapy parameters. The optimal treatment parameters are at a voltage amplitude of 2000V/cm, pulse width of 100μs, pulse frequency of 1 Hz, pulse number 10. With this group of parameters, steep pulse could have the best tumor cell-killing effects.

  13. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  14. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M., E-mail: mlarouss@odu.edu; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H. [Plasma Engineering and Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  15. Comparison of two mathematical models for describing heat-induced cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roti Roti, J.L.; Henle, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer-based minimization algorithm is utilized to obtain the optimum fits of two models to hyperthermic cell killing data. The models chosen are the multitarget, single-hit equation, which is in general use, and the linear-quadratic equation, which has been applied to cell killing by ionizing irradiation but not to heat-induced cell killing. The linear-quadratic equation fits hyperthermic cell killing data as well as the multitarget, single-hit equation. Both parameters of the linear-quadratic equation obey the Arrhenius law, whereas only one of the two parameters of the multitarget, single-hit equation obeys the Arrhenius law. Thus the linear-quadratic function can completely define cell killing as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, the linear-quadratic model will provide a simplified approach to the study of the synergism between heat and X irradiation

  16. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  17. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP)-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity of alpha conjugates for human pancreatic cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, C.; Li, Y.; Rizvi, M.A.; Allen, B.; Samra, J.; Smith, R.

    2003-01-01

    Targeted Alpha therapy (TAT) can inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the cytotoxicity of different alpha conjugates in vitro to human metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines (CAPAN-1, CFPAN-1 and PANC-1). We are labeling the C595 and J591 (non-specific controls) monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) with 213 Bi were performed according to the standard methods in our laboratory. 213 Bi-C595 is specifically cytotoxic to CAPAN-1, CFPAN-1 and PANC-1cell lines in a concentration-dependent fashion. While non-specific alpha conjugates only killed very small fractions of pancreatic cancer cells. These alpha conjugates might be useful agents for the treatment of micro-metastases in pancreatic cancer patients with over-expression of the targeted receptors

  19. Chlorin e6 Conjugated Interleukin-6 Receptor Aptamers Selectively Kill Target Cells Upon Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kruspe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT uses the therapeutic properties of light in combination with certain chemicals, called photosensitizers, to successfully treat brain, breast, prostate, and skin cancers. To improve PDT, current research focuses on the development of photosensitizers to specifically target cancer cells. In the past few years, aptamers have been developed to directly deliver cargo molecules into target cells. We conjugated the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (ce6 with a human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R binding RNA aptamer, AIR-3A yielding AIR-3A-ce6 for application in high efficient PDT. AIR-3A-ce6 was rapidly and specifically internalized by IL-6R presenting (IL-6R+ cells. Upon light irradiation, targeted cells were selectively killed, while free ce6 did not show any toxic effect. Cells lacking the IL-6R were also not affected by AIR-3A-ce6. With this approach, we improved the target specificity of ce6-mediated PDT. In the future, other tumor-specific aptamers might be used to selectively localize photosensitizers into cells of interest and improve the efficacy and specificity of PDT in cancer and other diseases.

  20. Magnetic Nanowires as Materials for Cancer Cell Destruction

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2015-12-01

    Current cancer therapies are highly cytotoxic and their delivery to exclusively the affected site is poorly controlled, resulting in unavoidable and often severe side effects. In an effort to overcome such issues, magnetic nanoparticles have been recently gaining relevance in the areas of biomedical applications and therapeutics, opening pathways to alternative methods. This led to the concept of magnetic particle hyperthermia in which magnetic nano beads are heated by a high power magnetic field. The increase in temperature kills the cancer cells, which are more susceptible to heat in comparison to healthy cells. In this dissertation, the possibility to kill cancer cells with magnetic nanowires is evaluated. The idea is to exploit a magnetomechanical effect, where nanowires cause cancer cell death through vibrating in a low power magnetic field. Specifically, the magnetic nanowires effects to cells in culture and their ability to induce cancer cell death, when combined with an alternating magnetic field, was investigated. Nickel and iron nanowires of 35 nm diameter and 1 to 5 μm long were synthesized by electrodeposition into nanoporous alumina templates, which were prepared using a two-step anodization process on highly pure aluminum substrates. For the cytotoxicity studies, the nanowires were added to cancer cells in culture, varying the incubation time and the concentration. The cell-nanowire interaction was thoroughly studied at the cellular level (mitochondrial metabolic activity, cell membrane integrity and, apoptosis/necrosis assay), and optical level (transmission electron and confocal microscopy). Furthermore, to investigate their therapeutic potential, an alternating magnetic field was applied varying its intensity and frequency. After the magnetic field application, cells health was measured at the mitochondrial activity level. Cytotoxicity results shed light onto the cellular tolerance to the nanowires, which helped in establishing the appropriate

  1. In Situ Gelation-Induced Death of Cancer Cells Based on Proteinosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuting; Song, Jianmin; Wang, Lei; Xue, Xuting; Liu, Xiaoman; Xie, Hui; Huang, Xin

    2017-08-14

    Hydrogels are an excellent type of material that can be utilized as a platform for cell culture. However, when a bulky hydrogel forms on the inside of cancer cells, the result would be different. In this study, we demonstrate a method for in situ gelation inside cancer cells that can efficiently induce cell death. Glutathione-responsive proteinosomes with good biocompatibility were prepared as carriers for sodium alginate to be endocytosed by cancer cells, where the chelation between sodium alginate and free calcium ions in the culture medium occurs during the diffusion process. The uptake of the hydrogel-loaded proteinosomes into the cancer cells, and then the triggered release of hydrogel with concomitant aggregation, was well-confirmed by monitoring the change of the Young's modulus of the cells based on AFM force measurements. Accordingly, when a large amount of hydrogel formed in cells, the cell viability would be inhibited by ∼90% by MTT assay at a concentration of 5.0 μM of hydrogel-loaded proteinosomes after 48 h incubation, which clearly proves the feasibility of the demonstrated method for killing cancer cells. Although more details regarding the mechanism of cell death should be conducted in the near future, such a demonstrated method of in situ gelation inside cells provides another choice for killing cancer cells.

  2. ROS accumulation by PEITC selectively kills ovarian cancer cells via UPR-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-hee eHong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unfolded protein response (UPR is crucial for both survival and death of mammalian cells, which is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS and nutrient depletion. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of ROS-accumulation, induced by β-phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC, on UPR mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. We used ovarian cancer cell lines, PA-1 and SKOV-3, with different p53 status (wild- and null- type, respectively. PEITC caused increased ROS-accumulation and inhibited proliferation selectively in ovarian cancer cells, and glutathione (GSH depletion in SKOV-3. However, PEITC did not cause any effect in normal ovarian epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After 48 h of PEITC treatment (5 µM, apoptotic cell death was shown to increase significantly in the ovarian cancer cells and not in the normal cells. The key regulator of UPR-mediated apoptosis, CHOP/GADD153 and ER resident chaperone BiP/GRP78 were parallely up-regulated with activation of two major sensors of the UPR (PERK and ATF-6 in PA-1; PERK, and IRE1α in SKOV-3 in response to ROS accumulation induced by PEITC (5 µM. ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, attenuated the effect of PEITC on UPR signatures (P-PERK, IRE1α, CHOP/GADD153, and BiP/GRP78, suggesting the involvement of ROS in UPR-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, PEITC induces UPR-mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via accumulation of ROS in a cancer-specific manner.

  3. Killing Effect of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA Recombinant Adenovirus in Combination with Hematoporphrphyrin Derivative-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy on Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to investigate the killing effects and molecular mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT mediated by the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus in combination with a hematoporphrphyrin derivative (HpD in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line in vitro to provide a theoretical reference for treating lung cancer by HpD-PDT. By using the technologies of MTT, flow cytometry, ELISA, and western blot, we observed that the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of the A549 cells were significantly higher than the control group ( after HpD-PDT was performed. The inhibitory efficiency is dependent on the HpD concentration and laser intensity dose. The inhibitory effect on the proliferation of A549 cells of Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA is more significant after combining with PDT, as indicated by a significant elevation of the intracellular ROS level and the expression of inflammatory factors (. The HpD-PDT-induced expression of the APE1 protein reached the peak after 24 h in A549 cells. The inhibition of APE1 expression in A549 cells was most significant after 48 hours of infection by Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus (10 MOI. In conclusion, the Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA recombinant adenovirus could efficiently inhibit the HpD-PDT-induced APE1 expression hence could significantly enhance the killing effect of HpD-PDT in lung cancer cells.

  4. High hydrostatic pressure affects antigenic pool in tumor cells: Implication for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanova, Linda; Hradilova, Nada; Moserova, Irena; Vosahlikova, Sarka; Sadilkova, Lenka; Hensler, Michal; Spisek, Radek; Adkins, Irena

    2017-07-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) can be used to generate dendritic cell (DC)-based active immunotherapy for prostate, lung and ovarian cancer. We showed here that HHP treatment of selected human cancer cell lines leads to a degradation of tumor antigens which depends on the magnitude of HHP applied and on the cancer cell line origin. Whereas prostate or ovarian cell lines displayed little protein antigen degradation with HHP treatment up to 300MPa after 2h, tumor antigens are hardly detected in lung cancer cell line after treatment with HHP 250MPa at the same time. On the other hand, quick reduction of tumor antigen-coding mRNA was observed at HHP 200MPa immediately after treatment in all cell lines tested. To optimize the DC-based active cellular therapy protocol for HHP-sensitive cell lines the immunogenicity of HHP-treated lung cancer cells at 150, 200 and 250MPa was compared. Lung cancer cells treated with HHP 150MPa display characteristics of immunogenic cell death, however cells are not efficiently phagocytosed by DC. Despite induction of the highest number of antigen-specific CD8 + T cells, 150 MPa-treated lung cancer cells survive in high numbers. This excludes their use in DC vaccine manufacturing. HHP of 200MPa treatment of lung cancer cells ensures the optimal ratio of efficient immunogenic killing and delivery of protein antigens in DC. These results represent an important pre-clinical data for generation of immunogenic killed lung cancer cells in ongoing NSCLC Phase I/II clinical trial using DC-based active cellular immunotherapy (DCVAC/LuCa). Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, C.K.C.

    1982-11-01

    Applying radiation directly on cells, far-uv is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Gold light has no killing and mutagenic effects on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells. Use of filters showed that a small percentage of shorter wavelengths in the far-uv region is responsible for most of the killing and mutagenic effects in the unfiltered broad spectra of black and white light

  6. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, C.K.C.

    1982-11-01

    Applying radiation directly on cells, far-uv is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Gold light has no killing and mutagenic effects on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells. Use of filters showed that a small percentage of shorter wavelengths in the far-uv region is responsible for most of the killing and mutagenic effects in the unfiltered broad spectra of black and white light.

  7. Gefitinib-induced killing of NSCLC cell lines expressing mutant EGFR requires BIM and can be enhanced by BH3 mimetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Cragg

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR plays a critical role in the control of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Abnormalities in EGF-EGFR signaling, such as mutations that render the EGFR hyperactive or cause overexpression of the wild-type receptor, have been found in a broad range of cancers, including carcinomas of the lung, breast, and colon. EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib have proven successful in the treatment of certain cancers, particularly non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs harboring activating mutations within the EGFR gene, but the molecular mechanisms leading to tumor regression remain unknown. Therefore, we wished to delineate these mechanisms.We performed biochemical and genetic studies to investigate the mechanisms by which inhibitors of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, such as gefitinib, inhibit the growth of human NSCLCs. We found that gefitinib triggered intrinsic (also called "mitochondrial" apoptosis signaling, involving the activation of BAX and mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, ultimately unleashing the caspase cascade. Gefitinib caused a rapid increase in the level of the proapoptotic BH3-only protein BIM (also called BCL2-like 11 through both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors indicated that blockade of MEK-ERK1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 signaling, but not blockade of PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase or mitogen-activated protein kinase 8, or AKT (protein kinase B, was critical for BIM activation. Using RNA interference, we demonstrated that BIM is essential for gefitinib-induced killing of NSCLC cells. Moreover, we found that gefitinib-induced apoptosis is enhanced by addition of the BH3 mimetic ABT-737.Inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosine kinase have proven useful in the therapy of certain cancers, in particular NSCLCs possessing

  8. The hydroxypyridinone iron chelator CP94 increases methyl-aminolevulinate-based photodynamic cell killing by increasing the generation of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuktee Dogra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT is utilised clinically for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and pre-cancers and the hydroxypyridinone iron chelator, CP94, has successfully been demonstrated to increase MAL-PDT efficacy in an initial clinical pilot study. However, the biochemical and photochemical processes leading to CP94-enhanced photodynamic cell death, beyond the well-documented increases in accumulation of the photosensitiser protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, have not yet been fully elucidated. This investigation demonstrated that MAL-based photodynamic cell killing of cultured human squamous carcinoma cells (A431 occurred in a predominantly necrotic manner following the generation of singlet oxygen and ROS. Augmenting MAL-based photodynamic cell killing with CP94 co-treatment resulted in increased PpIX accumulation, MitoSOX-detectable ROS generation (probably of mitochondrial origin and necrotic cell death, but did not affect singlet oxygen generation. We also report (to our knowledge, for the first time the detection of intracellular PpIX-generated singlet oxygen in whole cells via electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with a spin trap.

  9. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Dotan

    Full Text Available The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches.Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining.TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls.A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with

  10. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  11. 5-Fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in cultured oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, D; Poot, M; Hu, D; Oda, D

    2000-03-01

    Chemotherapy is commonly used to treat advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and is known to kill cancer cells through apoptosis. Our hypothesis states that 5-fluorouracil (5FU) also kills cultured oral epithelial cells through programmed cell death or apoptosis. Cultured oral cancer cells were exposed to an optimum dose of 20 mg/ml of 5FU. Cells were analyzed for changes in cell cycle distribution and induction of cell death including apoptosis. Normal control, human papilloma virus-immortalized (PP), ATCC SCC cell line (CA1) and two primary oral SCC cell lines (CA3 and -4) were studied. Inhibition of apoptosis by a pan-caspase inhibitor was used. SYTO 11 flow cytometry showed increased apoptosis in all 5FU-treated cell cultures compared to untreated controls. The results show biological variation in apoptotic response. CA1 had the lowest apoptotic rate of the cancer cell lines at 1.5%. Next lowest was CA3, followed by CA4 and PP. In addition, alteration in the G1 and S phase fractions were found. Untreated CA1 showed 28% G1, 53% S compared to 43% G1, and 40% S of treated. We investigated the pathway of apoptosis using the pan-caspase inhibitor IDN-1529 by methylthiazolyl diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric analysis. Results showed mild inhibition of cell death when cells were incubated with 50 microM IDN-1529 for 24 h. This suggests a probable caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, our data suggest that 5FU induces oral cancer cell death through apoptosis and that biological variation exists between normal and cancer cells and between different types of cancer cells themselves. Our data indicate that cultures of a useful in vitro model for chemosensitivity assays are possible. Our results also suggest a caspase-dependent pathway for chemocytotoxicity in oral SCC.

  12. A visualized investigation at the atomic scale of the antitumor effect of magnetic nanomedicine on gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaokang; Deng, Xia; Li, Xinghua; Xue, Desheng; Zhang, Haoli; Liu, Tao; Liu, Qingfang; Mellors, Nigel J; Li, Yumin; Peng, Yong

    2014-07-01

    Discovering which anticancer drugs attack which organelle(s) of cancer cells is essential and significant, not only for understanding their therapeutic and adverse effects, but also to enable the development of new-generation therapeutics. Here, we show that novel Fe3O4-carboxymethyl cellulose-5-fluorouracil (Fe3O4-CMC-5FU) nanomedicine can apparently enhance the antitumor effect on gastric cancer cells, and its mechanism of killing the SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells can be directly observed at the atomic scale. The novel nanomedicine was prepared using the traditional antitumor drug 5FU to chemically bond onto the functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine), and then was fed into SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used to track the distribution and antitumor effect of the nanomedicine within individual SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. Atomic-level observation and tracking the elemental distribution inside individual cells proved that the magnetic nanomedicine killed the gastric cells mainly by attacking their mitochondria. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy derives from the localized high concentration and poor mobility of the aggregated Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine in the cytoplasm. A brand new mechanism of Fe3O4-CMC-5FU nanomedicine killing SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells by attacking their mitochondria was discovered, which is different from the classical mechanism utilized by traditional medicine 5FU, which kills gastric cancer cells by damaging their DNA. Our work might provide a partial solution in nanomedicines or even modern anticancer medicine for the visualized investigation of their antitumor effect.

  13. Individual motile CD4+ T cells can participate in efficient multi-killing through conjugation to multiple tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liadi, Ivan; Singh, Harjeet; Romain, Gabrielle; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Adolacion, Jay R T.; Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Qiu, Peng; Roysam, Badrinath; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Varadarajan, Navin

    2015-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) for the investigational treatment of B-cell malignancies comprise a heterogeneous population, and their ability to persist and participate in serial killing of tumor cells is a predictor of therapeutic success. We implemented Timelapse Imaging Microscopy In Nanowell Grids (TIMING) to provide direct evidence that CD4+CAR+ T cells (CAR4 cells) can engage in multi-killing via simultaneous conjugation to multiple tumor cells. Comparisons of the CAR4 cells and CD8+CAR+ T cells (CAR8 cells) demonstrate that while CAR4 cells can participate in killing and multi-killing, they do so at slower rates, likely due to the lower Granzyme B content. Significantly, in both sets of T cells, a minor sub-population of individual T cells identified by their high motility, demonstrated efficient killing of single tumor cells. By comparing both the multi-killer and single killer CAR+ T cells it appears that the propensity and kinetics of T-cell apoptosis was modulated by the number of functional conjugations. T cells underwent rapid apoptosis, and at higher frequencies, when conjugated to single tumor cells in isolation and this effect was more pronounced on CAR8 cells. Our results suggest that the ability of CAR+ T cells to participate in multi-killing should be evaluated in the context of their ability to resist activation induced cell death (AICD). We anticipate that TIMING may be utilized to rapidly determine the potency of T-cell populations and may facilitate the design and manufacture of next-generation CAR+ T cells with improved efficacy. PMID:25711538

  14. Nitric oxide prodrug JS-K inhibits ubiquitin E1 and kills tumor cells retaining wild-type p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, J; Yang, Y; Saavedra, J E; Colburn, N H; Keefer, L K; Perantoni, A O

    2009-01-29

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a major effector molecule in cancer prevention. A number of studies have shown that NO prodrug JS-K (O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate) induces apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it is a promising new therapeutic for cancer. However, the mechanism of its tumor-killing activity remains unclear. Ubiquitin plays an important role in the regulation of tumorigenesis and cell apoptosis. Our earlier report has shown that inactivation of the ubiquitin system through blocking E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzyme) activity preferentially induces apoptosis in p53-expressing transformed cells. As E1 has an active cysteine residue that could potentially interact with NO, we hypothesized that JS-K could inactivate E1 activity. E1 activity was evaluated by detecting ubiquitin-E1 conjugates through immunoblotting. JS-K strikingly inhibits the ubiquitin-E1 thioester formation in cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of approximately 2 microM, whereas a JS-K analog that cannot release NO did not affect these levels in cells. Moreover, JS-K decreases total ubiquitylated proteins and increases p53 levels, which is mainly regulated by ubiquitin and proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, JS-K preferentially induces cell apoptosis in p53-expressing transformed cells. These findings indicate that JS-K inhibits E1 activity and kills transformed cells harboring wild-type p53.

  15. Rate-limiting events in hyperthermic cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, J.; Marceau, N.

    1978-01-01

    The inactivation rate of HeLa cells for temperatures ranging from 41 to 55 0 C and treatment durations varying from 2 to 300 min was analyzed in thermodynamic terms by considering the dependence of cell free energy (ΔG + ) on temperature. Within this temperature range the loss of proliferative capacity exhibits a complex temperature dependence which is characterized by entropy and enthalpy values that gradually decrease as temperature increases. This complex process of heat-induced cell killing was postulated to be the result of a series of reactions, each of them being alternatively rate limiting within a certain temperature range. From this kinetic scheme a mathematical model was derived and, in the case of HeLa cells, the use of a least-squares search parameter procedure (as applied to the derived survival regression function) demonstrated that three such sequential reactions were sufficient to explain all experimental data points obtained within the 41 to 55 0 C range. The proposed model was also shown to be adequate for explaining survival data of HeLa cells exposed to nanosecond heat pulses of infrared laser energy. Considerations of thermodynamic properties of known biochemical reactions suggest plausible rate-limiting events in hyperthermic cell killing

  16. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    .... The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  17. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    .... The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  18. The kinematics of cytotoxic lymphocytes influence their ability to kill target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnima Bhat

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL have been reported to show a range of motility patterns from rapid long-range tracking to complete arrest, but how and whether these kinematics affect their ability to kill target cells is not known. Many in vitro killing assays utilize cell lines and tumour-derived cells as targets, which may be of limited relevance to the kinetics of CTL-mediated killing of somatic cells. Here, live-cell microscopy is used to examine the interactions of CTL and primary murine skin cells presenting antigens. We developed a qualitative and quantitative killing assay using extended-duration fluorescence time-lapse microscopy coupled with large-volume objective software-based data analysis to obtain population data of cell-to-cell interactions, motility and apoptosis. In vivo and ex vivo activated antigen-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes were added to primary keratinocyte targets in culture with fluorometric detection of caspase-3 activation in targets as an objective determinant of apoptosis. We found that activated CTL achieved contact-dependent apoptosis of non-tumour targets after a period of prolonged attachment - on average 21 hours - which was determined by target cell type, amount of antigen, and activation status of CTL. Activation of CTL even without engagement of the T cell receptor was sufficient to mobilise cells significantly above baseline, while the addition of cognate antigen further enhanced their motility. Highly activated CTL showed markedly increased vector displacement, and velocity, and lead to increased antigen-specific target cell death. These data show that the inherent kinematics of CTL correlate directly with their ability to kill non-tumour cells presenting cognate antigen.

  19. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy

  20. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy.

  1. Identification and structural analysis of an L-asparaginase enzyme from guinea pig with putative tumor cell killing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Amanda M; Nguyen, Hien-Anh; Rigouin, Coraline; Lavie, Arnon

    2014-11-28

    The initial observation that guinea pig serum kills lymphoma cells marks the serendipitous discovery of a new class of anti-cancer agents. The serum cell killing factor was shown to be an enzyme with L-asparaginase (ASNase) activity. As a direct result of this observation, several bacterial L-asparaginases were developed and are currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of the subset of hematological malignancies that are dependent on the extracellular pool of the amino acid asparagine. As drugs, these enzymes act to hydrolyze asparagine to aspartate, thereby starving the cancer cells of this amino acid. Prior to the work presented here, the precise identity of this guinea pig enzyme has not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We discovered that the guinea pig enzyme annotated as H0W0T5_CAVPO, which we refer to as gpASNase1, has the required low Km property consistent with that possessed by the cell-killing guinea pig serum enzyme. Elucidation of the ligand-free and aspartate complex gpASNase1 crystal structures allows a direct comparison with the bacterial enzymes and serves to explain the lack of L-glutaminase activity in the guinea pig enzyme. The structures were also used to generate a homology model for the human homolog hASNase1 and to help explain its vastly different kinetic properties compared with gpASNase1, despite a 70% sequence identity. Given that the bacterial enzymes frequently present immunogenic and other toxic side effects, this work suggests that gpASNase1 could be a promising alternative to these bacterial enzymes. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Deprive to kill: Glutamine closes the gate to anticancer monocarboxylic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Killing properties of antitumor drugs can be enhanced by strategies targeting biochemical adaptations of cancer cells. Recently, we reported that depriving cancer cells of glutamine is a feasible approach to enhance antitumor effects of the alkylating analog of pyruvic acid, 3-bromopyruvate, which rely on the induction of autophagic cell death by metabolic-oxidative stress. 3-bromopyruvate chemopotentiation is the result of its increased intracellular uptake mediated by the monocarboxylate tr...

  3. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron L. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. (20Dex and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine. (20DFMO and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone. (20MGBG, on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase. (20ODC, the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity.

  4. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on human colorectal cancer cells exposed to high doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Gong, Aimin; Ji, Jun; Wu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Lv, Suqing; Lv, Hongzhu; Sun, Xizhuo

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of a new radiosensitizer, doranidazole, and enhancing irradiation on colorectal cancer cells. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole was determined using colony formation and propidium iodide (PI) assays to measure cell growth inhibition and the cell killing effect of human colorectal cancer cell lines exposed to high doses of γ-ray irradiation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Fluorescence staining and cell migration assays were also used to assess the radiosensitizing effect. Cell proliferation evaluated by clonogenic survival curves was significantly inhibited by 5 mmol/L doranidazole, particularly at doses ranging from 10 to 30 Gy of irradiation. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on colorectal cancer cells occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Doranidazole also inhibited the mobility of cell invasion and migration. Doranidazole can enhance the killing effect and the cell growth inhibition of colorectal cancer after high-dose irradiation in a time and dose-dependent manner

  5. Selective Killing of Prostate Tumor Cells by Cytocidal Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyles, Douglas S

    2005-01-01

    ...). The novelty in our approach is our ability to enhance the selectivity of VSV-induced killing of tumor cells versus normal cells by manipulating the viral genes that control the antiviral interferon response...

  6. Co-delivery of siRNA and doxorubicin to cancer cells from additively manufactured implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Muwan; Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Dillschneider, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    , capable of physically supporting the void while killing residual cancer cells, would be an attractive solution. Here we describe a novel additively manufactured implant that can be functionalized with chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. These induce long term gene silencing in adjacent cancer cells without...

  7. Mathematical models in cell biology and cancer chemotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to show how mathematics can be applied to improve cancer chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most drugs used in treating cancer kill both normal and abnormal cells. However, more cancer cells than normal cells can be destroyed by the drug because tumor cells usually exhibit different growth kinetics than normal cells. To capitalize on this last fact, cell kinetics must be studied by formulating mathematical models of normal and abnormal cell growth. These models allow the therapeutic and harmful effects of cancer drugs to be simulated quantitatively. The combined cell and drug models can be used to study the effects of different methods of administering drugs. The least harmful method of drug administration, according to a given criterion, can be found by applying optimal control theory. The prerequisites for reading this book are an elementary knowledge of ordinary differential equations, probability, statistics, and linear algebra. In order to make this book self-contained, a chapter on...

  8. Sildenafil (Viagra) sensitizes prostate cancer cells to doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis through CD95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Durrant, David; Mitchell, Clint; Dent, Paul; Batra, Surinder K.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Sildenafil enhances apoptosis and antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin (DOX) while attenuating its cardiotoxic effect in prostate cancer. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which sildenafil sensitizes DOX in killing of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, DU145. The death receptor Fas (APO-1 or CD95) induces apoptosis in many carcinoma cells, which is negatively regulated by anti-apoptotic molecules such as FLIP (Fas-associated death domain (FADD) interleukin-1-converting enzyme (FLICE)-like inhibitory protein). Co-treatment of PCa cells with sildenafil and DOX for 48 hours showed reduced expression of both long and short forms of FLIP (FLIP-L and -S) as compared to individual drug treatment. Over-expression of FLIP-s with an adenoviral vector attentuated the enhanced cell-killing effect of DOX and sildenafil. Colony formation assays also confirmed that FLIP-S over-expression inhibited the DOX and sildenafil-induced synergistic killing effect as compared to the cells infected with an empty vector. Moreover, siRNA knock-down of CD95 abolished the effect of sildenafil in enhancing DOX lethality in cells, but had no effect on cell killing after treatment with a single agent. Sildenafil co-treatment with DOX inhibited DOX-induced NF-κB activity by reducing phosphorylation of IκB and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, in addition to down regulation of FAP-1 (Fas associated phosphatase-1, a known inhibitor of CD95-mediated apoptosis) expression. This data provides evidence that the CD95 is a key regulator of sildenafil and DOX mediated enhanced cell death in prostate cancer. PMID:26716643

  9. Potential Therapeutic Roles of Tanshinone IIA in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Chiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan-IIA, one of the major lipophilic components isolated from the root of Salviae Miltiorrhizae, has been found to exhibit anticancer activity in various cancer cells. We have demonstrated that Tan-IIA induces apoptosis in several human cancer cells through caspase- and mitochondria-dependent pathways. Here we explored the anticancer effect of Tan-IIA in human bladder cancer cell lines. Our results showed that Tan-IIA caused bladder cancer cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Tan-IIA induced apoptosis through the mitochondria-dependent pathway in these bladder cancer cells. Tan-IIA also suppressed the migration of bladder cancer cells as revealed by the wound healing and transwell assays. Finally, combination therapy of Tan-IIA with a lower dose of cisplatin successfully killed bladder cancer cells, suggesting that Tan-IIA can serve as a potential anti-cancer agent in bladder cancer.

  10. Prodrug strategy for cancer cell-specific targeting: A recent overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiang; You, Qidong; Zhang, Xiaojin

    2017-10-20

    The increasing development of targeted cancer therapy provides extensive possibilities in clinical trials, and numerous strategies have been explored. The prodrug is one of the most promising strategies in targeted cancer therapy to improve the selectivity and efficacy of cytotoxic compounds. Compared with normal tissues, cancer cells are characterized by unique aberrant markers, thus inactive prodrugs targeting these markers are excellent therapeutics to release active drugs, killing cancer cells without damaging normal tissues. In this review, we explore an integrated view of potential prodrugs applied in targeted cancer therapy based on aberrant cancer specific markers and some examples are provided for inspiring new ideas of prodrug strategy for cancer cell-specific targeting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Carbon nanotubes enhance the internalization of drugs by cancer cells and decrease their chemoresistance to cytostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, M.; Xu, Y.; Dantuluri, V.; Mustafa, T.; Zhang, Y.; Karmakar, A.; Casciano, D.; Ali, S.; Biris, A.

    2013-02-01

    Etoposide is a semisynthetic, chemotherapeutic drug widely recommended to treat an extensive range of human cancers. Our studies indicate that, while etoposide is capable of killing human cancer cells, exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and etoposide results in enhanced cell death that appears to be synergistic and not merely additive. In this study, we used high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to quantify the internal effective dose of etoposide when the human pancreatic cancer cell (PANC-1) was exposed to the combination of these agents. Our results unequivocally indicate that SWCNTs improve etoposide uptake and increase its capacity to kill cancer cells. We suggest that a combination of SWCNTs and etoposide may prove to be a more efficient chemotherapeutic protocol, especially because of the potential to lower toxic drug doses to levels that may be useful in decreasing adverse side effects, as well as in lowering the probability of inducing chemoresistance in exposed cancer cells.

  12. Carbon nanotubes enhance the internalization of drugs by cancer cells and decrease their chemoresistance to cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, M; Xu, Y; Dantuluri, V; Mustafa, T; Karmakar, A; Casciano, D; Biris, A; Zhang, Y; Ali, S

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide is a semisynthetic, chemotherapeutic drug widely recommended to treat an extensive range of human cancers. Our studies indicate that, while etoposide is capable of killing human cancer cells, exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and etoposide results in enhanced cell death that appears to be synergistic and not merely additive. In this study, we used high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to quantify the internal effective dose of etoposide when the human pancreatic cancer cell (PANC-1) was exposed to the combination of these agents. Our results unequivocally indicate that SWCNTs improve etoposide uptake and increase its capacity to kill cancer cells. We suggest that a combination of SWCNTs and etoposide may prove to be a more efficient chemotherapeutic protocol, especially because of the potential to lower toxic drug doses to levels that may be useful in decreasing adverse side effects, as well as in lowering the probability of inducing chemoresistance in exposed cancer cells. (paper)

  13. Ganetespib, an HSP90 inhibitor, kills Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B and T cells and reduces the percentage of EBV-infected cells in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatzer, Amber; Ali, Mir A; Chavez, Mayra; Dowdell, Kennichi; Lee, Min-Jung; Tomita, Yusuke; El-Hariry, Iman; Trepel, Jane B; Proia, David A; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-04-01

    HSP90 inhibitors have been shown to kill Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells by reducing the level of EBV EBNA-1 and/or LMP1. We treated virus-infected cells with ganetespib, an HSP90 inhibitor currently being evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer and found that the drug killed EBV-positive B and T cells and reduced the level of both EBV EBNA-1 and LMP1. Treatment of cells with ganetespib also reduced the level of pAkt. Ganetespib delayed the onset of EBV-positive lymphomas and prolonged survival in SCID mice inoculated with one EBV-transformed B-cell line, but not another B-cell line. The former cell line showed lower levels of EBNA-1 after treatment with ganetespib in vitro. Treatment of a patient with T-cell chronic active EBV with ganetespib reduced the percentage of EBV-positive cells in the peripheral blood. These data indicate that HSP90 inhibitors may have a role in the therapy of certain EBV-associated diseases.

  14. Effect of pulsed electron beam on cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Santhosh; Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Narayana, Y.; Bhat, N.N.

    2009-01-01

    The extent of repairable and irreparable damage in a living cell produced by ionizing radiation depends on the quality of the radiation. In the case of sparsely ionizing radiation, the dose rate and the pattern of energy deposition of the radiation are the important physical factors which can affect the amount of damage in living cells. In the present study, radio-sensitive and radioresistive bacteria cells were exposed to 8 MeV pulsed electron beam and the efficiency of cell-killing was investigated to evaluate the Do, the mean lethal dose. The dose to the cell was delivered in micro-second pulses at an instantaneous dose rate of 2.6 x 10 5 Gy s -1 . Fricke dosimeter was used to measure the absorbed dose of electron beam. The results were compared with those of gamma rays. The survival curve of radio-resistive Deinococcus-radiodurans (DR) is found to be sigmoidal and the survival response for radio-sensitive Escherichia-coli (E-coli) is found to be exponential without any shoulder. Comparison of Do values indicate that irradiation with pulsed electron beam resulted in more cell-killing than was observed for gamma irradiation. (author)

  15. High-dimensional single-cell cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Jonathan M; Doxie, Deon B

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are distinguished from each other and from healthy cells by features that drive clonal evolution and therapy resistance. New advances in high-dimensional flow cytometry make it possible to systematically measure mechanisms of tumor initiation, progression, and therapy resistance on millions of cells from human tumors. Here we describe flow cytometry techniques that enable a "single-cell " view of cancer. High-dimensional techniques like mass cytometry enable multiplexed single-cell analysis of cell identity, clinical biomarkers, signaling network phospho-proteins, transcription factors, and functional readouts of proliferation, cell cycle status, and apoptosis. This capability pairs well with a signaling profiles approach that dissects mechanism by systematically perturbing and measuring many nodes in a signaling network. Single-cell approaches enable study of cellular heterogeneity of primary tissues and turn cell subsets into experimental controls or opportunities for new discovery. Rare populations of stem cells or therapy-resistant cancer cells can be identified and compared to other types of cells within the same sample. In the long term, these techniques will enable tracking of minimal residual disease (MRD) and disease progression. By better understanding biological systems that control development and cell-cell interactions in healthy and diseased contexts, we can learn to program cells to become therapeutic agents or target malignant signaling events to specifically kill cancer cells. Single-cell approaches that provide deep insight into cell signaling and fate decisions will be critical to optimizing the next generation of cancer treatments combining targeted approaches and immunotherapy.

  16. Enhanced killing of mammalian cells by radiation combined with m-AMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.; Millar, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    m-AMSA is an intercalating agent at present on Phase II trial as a chemotherapeutic drug. A 30min exposure of Chinese hamster (Line V79-753B) cells to submicromolar concentrations of m-AMSA killed 50% of the cells. The survivors had an enhanced sensitivity to radiation-induced cell killing. Depending upon the conditions, m-AMSA enhanced the radiation effect by either a decrease in the survival-curve shoulder or by an increase in slope. m-AMSA may act partly by suppressing the accumulation of sublethal damage but, if so, recovery from damage as measured in split-dose experiments with cells pretreated with the drug is not affected. m-AMSA increased radiation lethality throughout the cell cycle, but a contribution to its radiation effect from selective toxicity to cells in a radioresistant phase of the cell cycle cannot be excluded. Radiation and the drug interacted to give increased cell killing, even when the exposures to each agent were separated in time. It is concluded that m-ASMA may behave like actinomycin D and adriamycin, and enhance clinical radiation responses. In vivo testing to determine the effect of m-AMSA on the therapeutic index is recommended. (author)

  17. Enhanced killing of mammalian cells by radiation combined with m-AMSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P B; Millar, B C [Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch

    1980-11-01

    m-AMSA is an intercalating agent at present on Phase II trial as a chemotherapeutic drug. A 30 min exposure of Chinese hamster (Line V79-753B) cells to submicromolar concentrations of m-AMSA killed 50% of the cells. The survivors had an enhanced sensitivity to radiation-induced cell killing. Depending upon the conditions, m-AMSA enhanced the radiation effect by either a decrease in the survival-curve shoulder or by an increase in slope. m-AMSA may act partly by suppressing the accumulation of sublethal damage but, if so, recovery from damage as measured in split-dose experiments with cells pretreated with the drug is not affected. m-AMSA increased radiation lethality throughout the cell cycle, but a contribution to its radiation effect from selective toxicity to cells in a radioresistant phase of the cell cycle cannot be excluded. Radiation and the drug interacted to give increased cell killing, even when the exposures to each agent were separated in time. It is concluded that m-ASMA may behave like actinomycin D and adriamycin, and enhance clinical radiation responses. In vivo testing to determine the effect of m-AMSA on the therapeutic index is recommended.

  18. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  19. Strong synergy of heat and modulated electromagnetic field in tumor cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andocs, Gabor; Renner, Helmut; Balogh, Lajos; Fonyad, Laszlo; Jakab, Csaba; Szasz, Andras

    2009-02-01

    Hyperthermia is an emerging complementary method in radiooncology. Despite many positive studies and comprehensive reviews, the method is not widely accepted as a combination to radiotherapy. Modulated electrohyperthermia (mEHT; capacitive, electric field modulated, 13.56 MHz) has been used in clinical practice for almost 2 decades in Germany, Austria and Hungary. This in vivo study in nude mice xenograft tumors compares mEHT with "classic" radiative hyperthermia (radHT). Nude mice were xenografted with HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. 28 mice in four groups with seven animals each and two tumors per animal (totally 56 tumors) were included in the present study: group 1 as untreated control; group 2 treated with radHT at 42 degrees C; group 3 treated with mEHT at identical 42 degrees C; group 4 treated with mEHT at 38 degrees C (by intensively cooling down the tumor). 24 h after treatment, animals were sacrificed and the tumor cross sections studied by precise morphological methods for the respective relative amount of "dead" tumor cells. The effect of mEHT established a double effect as a synergy between the purely thermal (temperature-dependent) and nonthermal (not directly temperature-dependent) effects. The solely thermal enhancement ratio (TER) of cell killing was shown to be 2.9. The field enhancement ratio (FER) at a constant temperature of 42 degrees C was measured as 3.2. Their complex application significantly increased the therapeutic enhancement to 9.4. mEHT had a remarkable cancer cell-killing effect in a nude mice xenograft model.

  20. Strong synergy of heat and modulated electromagnetic field in tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andocs, Gabor; Fonyad, Laszlo; Jakab, Csaba; Szasz, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Hyperthermia is an emerging complementary method in radiooncology. Despite many positive studies and comprehensive reviews, the method is not widely accepted as a combination to radiotherapy. Modulated electrohyperthermia (mEHT; capacitive, electric field modulated, 13.56 MHz) has been used in clinical practice for almost 2 decades in Germany, Austria and Hungary. This in vivo study in nude mice xenograft tumors compares mEHT with ''classic'' radiative hyperthermia (radHT). Nude mice were xenografted with HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. 28 mice in four groups with seven animals each and two tumors per animal (totally 56 tumors) were included in the present study: group 1 as untreated control; group 2 treated with radHT at 42 C; group 3 treated with mEHT at identical 42 C; group 4 treated with mEHT at 38 C (by intensively cooling down the tumor). 24 h after treatment, animals were sacrificed and the tumor cross sections studied by precise morphological methods for the respective relative amount of ''dead'' tumor cells. The effect of mEHT established a double effect as a synergy between the purely thermal (temperature-dependent) and nonthermal (not directly temperature-dependent) effects. The solely thermal enhancement ratio (TER) of cell killing was shown to be 2.9. The field enhancement ratio (FER) at a constant temperature of 42 C was measured as 3.2. Their complex application significantly increased the therapeutic enhancement to 9.4. mEHT had a remarkable cancer cell-killing effect in a nude mice xenograft model. (orig.)

  1. Strong synergy of heat and modulated electromagnetic field in tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andocs, Gabor [Frederic Joliot Curie National Research Inst. for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary)]|[St. Istvan Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Renner, Helmut [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Clinic of Radiooncology; Balogh, Lajos [Frederic Joliot Curie National Research Inst. for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary); Fonyad, Laszlo [Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary). 1. Dept. of of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research; Jakab, Csaba [St. Istvan Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Pathology; Szasz, Andras [St. Istvan Univ., Goedoelloe (Hungary). Biotechnics Dept.

    2009-02-15

    Hyperthermia is an emerging complementary method in radiooncology. Despite many positive studies and comprehensive reviews, the method is not widely accepted as a combination to radiotherapy. Modulated electrohyperthermia (mEHT; capacitive, electric field modulated, 13.56 MHz) has been used in clinical practice for almost 2 decades in Germany, Austria and Hungary. This in vivo study in nude mice xenograft tumors compares mEHT with 'classic' radiative hyperthermia (radHT). Nude mice were xenografted with HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. 28 mice in four groups with seven animals each and two tumors per animal (totally 56 tumors) were included in the present study: group 1 as untreated control; group 2 treated with radHT at 42 C; group 3 treated with mEHT at identical 42 C; group 4 treated with mEHT at 38 C (by intensively cooling down the tumor). 24 h after treatment, animals were sacrificed and the tumor cross sections studied by precise morphological methods for the respective relative amount of 'dead' tumor cells. The effect of mEHT established a double effect as a synergy between the purely thermal (temperature-dependent) and nonthermal (not directly temperature-dependent) effects. The solely thermal enhancement ratio (TER) of cell killing was shown to be 2.9. The field enhancement ratio (FER) at a constant temperature of 42 C was measured as 3.2. Their complex application significantly increased the therapeutic enhancement to 9.4. mEHT had a remarkable cancer cell-killing effect in a nude mice xenograft model. (orig.)

  2. A leukocyte antigen, Leu-13, is involved in induction of resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing by interferon-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kazuko; Zhai, Ling; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on human interferon (HuIFN)-induced resistance of human cells to X-ray and UV cell killing. In this study, we searched for the genes whose expression is responsible for the resistance, using a PCR-based mRNA differential display method and Northern blotting analysis. RSa cells were used for this analysis, because they show increased resistance to X-ray- and UV-caused cell killing by HuIFN-α treatment prior to irradiation. Messenger RNA expression levels for Leu-13, a leukocyte antigen, were markedly up-regulated in RSa cells after HuIFN-α treatment. Furthermore, pretreatment of RSa cells with antisense oligonucleotides for Leu-13 mRNA resulted in the suppression of the HuIFN-α-induced resistance of the cells to X-ray cell killing, but did not modulate HuIFN-α-induced resistance to UV cell killing. These results suggest that Leu-13 is involved in HuIFN-α-induced resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing, but not to UV cell killing. (author)

  3. Salinomycin Exerts Anticancer Effects on PC-3 Cells and PC-3-Derived Cancer Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinomycin is an antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces albus that selectively kills cancer stem cells (CSCs. However, the antitumor mechanism of salinomycin is unclear. This study investigated the chemotherapeutic efficacy of salinomycin in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. We found that cytotoxicity of salinomycin to PC-3 cells was stronger than to nonmalignant prostate cell RWPE-1, and exposure to salinomycin induced G2/M phage arrest and apoptosis of PC-3 cells. A mechanistic study found salinomycin suppressed Wnt/β-catenin pathway to induce apoptosis of PC-3 cells. An in vivo experiment confirmed that salinomycin suppressed tumorigenesis in a NOD/SCID mice xenograft model generated from implanted PC-3 cells by inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, since the total β-catenin protein level was reduced and the downstream target c-Myc level was significantly downregulated. We also showed that salinomycin, but not paclitaxel, triggered more apoptosis in aldehyde dehydrogenase- (ALDH- positive PC-3 cells, which were considered as the prostate cancer stem cells, suggesting that salinomycin may be a promising chemotherapeutic to target CSCs. In conclusion, this study suggests that salinomycin reduces resistance and relapse of prostate tumor by killing cancer cells as well as CSCs.

  4. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate 125I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.; Jia, R.F.; Yu, L.; Zhao, M.J.; Shao, C.L.; Cheng, W.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) 125 I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR 125 I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), γH2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with 125 I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of γH2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p 125 I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes

  5. TOFA (5-tetradecyl-oxy-2-furoic acid) reduces fatty acid synthesis, inhibits expression of AR, neuropilin-1 and Mcl-1 and kills prostate cancer cells independent of p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, Natalya V; Rokhlin, Oskar W; Glover, Rebecca A; Cohen, Michael B

    2011-07-01

    A key player in prostate cancer development and progression is the androgen receptor (AR). Tumor-associated lipogenesis can protect cancer cells from carcinogenic- and therapeutic-associated treatments. Increased synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol is regulated by androgens through induction of several genes in androgen-responsive cancer cells. Acetyl-CoA-carboxylase-α (ACCA) is a key enzyme in the regulation of fatty acids synthesis. Here we show that AR binds in vivo to intron regions of human ACCA gene. We also show that the level of ACCA protein in LNCaP depends on AR expression and that DHT treatment increases ACCA expression and fatty acid synthesis. Inhibition of ACCA by TOFA (5-tetradecyl-oxy-2-furoic acid) decreases fatty acid synthesis and induces caspase activation and cell death in most PCa cell lines. Our data suggest that TOFA can kill cells via the mitochondrial pathway since we found cytochrome c release after TOFA treatment in androgen sensitive cell lines. The results also imply that the pro-apoptotic effect of TOFA may be mediated via a decrease of neuropilin-1(NRP1) and Mcl-1expression. We have previously reported that Mcl-1 is under AR regulation and plays an important role in resistance to drug-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, and NRP1 is known to regulate Mcl-1 expression. Here, we show for the first time that NRP1 expression is under AR control. Taken together, our data suggest that TOFA is a potent cell death inducing agent in prostate cancer cells.

  6. Effects of oxygen and misonidazole on cell transformation and cell killing in C3H 10T1/2 cells by X rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsa, J.; Sargent, M.D.; Einspenner, M.; Azzam, E.I.; Raaphorst, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of oxygen (air) and misonidazole on the transformation and killing of 10T1/2 cells by X rays were examined. The oxygen effect for the cell transformation end point was very similar to that for cell killing. Misonidazole enhanced both cell killing and cell transformation to a similar extent. The enhancement of both end points by misonidazole occurred only in the absence of oxygen during irradiation and was of lesser magnitude than that observed for oxygen. These results demonstrate that the radiation chemical processes leading to cell killing and cell transformation, respectively, are affected similarly by these two enhancers of radiation action. 22 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  7. A Lipopeptide Facilitate Induction of Mycobacterium leprae Killing in Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Fukutomi, Yasuo; Mukai, Tetsu; Kai, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Little is known of the direct microbicidal activity of T cells in leprosy, so a lipopeptide consisting of the N-terminal 13 amino acids lipopeptide (LipoK) of a 33-kD lipoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae, was synthesized. LipoK activated M. leprae infected human dendritic cells (DCs) to induce the production of IL-12. These activated DCs stimulated autologous CD4+ or CD8+ T cells towards type 1 immune response by inducing interferon-gamma secretion. T cell proliferation was also evident from the CFSE labeling of target CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. The direct microbicidal activity of T cells in the control of M. leprae multiplication is not well understood. The present study showed significant production of granulysin, granzyme B and perforin from these activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells when stimulated with LipoK activated, M. leprae infected DCs. Assessment of the viability of M. leprae in DCs indicated LipoK mediated T cell-dependent killing of M. leprae. Remarkably, granulysin as well as granzyme B could directly kill M. leprae in vitro. Our results provide evidence that LipoK could facilitate M. leprae killing through the production of effector molecules granulysin and granzyme B in T cells. PMID:22132248

  8. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seula; Woo, Jong Kyu; Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Evodiamine selectively kills breast cancer stem like cells at G1 phase. • Evodiamine utilizes different mechanism of cell cycle modulation in CSLC and in bulk cancer cells. • Evodiamine activate the p53, p21 and Rb pathway.

  9. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seula [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Jong Kyu [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Hyun [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Ha [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young, E-mail: wykim@sookmyung.ac.kr [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-22

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Evodiamine selectively kills breast cancer stem like cells at G1 phase. • Evodiamine utilizes different mechanism of cell cycle modulation in CSLC and in bulk cancer cells. • Evodiamine activate the p53, p21 and Rb pathway.

  10. Inactivated Sendai virus particle upregulates cancer cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and enhances natural killer cell sensitivity on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2017-12-01

    We have already reported that the inactivated Sendai virus (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; HVJ) envelope (HVJ-E) has multiple anticancer effects, including induction of cancer-selective cell death and activation of anticancer immunity. The HVJ-E stimulates dendritic cells to produce cytokines and chemokines such as β-interferon, interleukin-6, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10, which activate both CD8 + T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and recruit them to the tumor microenvironment. However, the effect of HVJ-E on modulating the sensitivity of cancer cells to immune cell attack has yet to be investigated. In this study, we found that HVJ-E induced the production of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54), a ligand of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1, in several cancer cell lines through the activation of nuclear factor-κB downstream of retinoic acid-inducible gene I and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathway. The upregulation of ICAM-1 on the surface of cancer cells increased the sensitivity of cancer cells to NK cells. Knocking out expression of ICAM-1 in MDA-MB-231 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 method significantly reduced the killing effect of NK cells on ICAM-1-depleted MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, HVJ-E suppressed tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing SCID mice, and the HVJ-E antitumor effect was impaired when NK cells were depleted by treatment with the anti-asialo GM1 antibody. Our findings suggest that HVJ-E enhances NK cell sensitivity against cancer cells by increasing ICAM-1 expression on the cancer cell surface. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Salinomycin kills cancer stem cells by sequestering iron in lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang Thi; Hamaï, Ahmed; Hienzsch, Antje; Cañeque, Tatiana; Müller, Sebastian; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Leroy, Christine; David, Amandine; Acevedo, Verónica; Ryo, Akihide; Ginestier, Christophe; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Codogno, Patrice; Mehrpour, Maryam; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells within tumours that exhibit self-renewal properties and the capacity to seed tumours. CSCs are typically refractory to conventional treatments and have been associated to metastasis and relapse. Salinomycin operates as a selective agent against CSCs through mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that a synthetic derivative of salinomycin, which we named ironomycin (AM5), exhibits a more potent and selective activity against breast CSCs in vitro and in vivo, by accumulating and sequestering iron in lysosomes. In response to the ensuing cytoplasmic depletion of iron, cells triggered the degradation of ferritin in lysosomes, leading to further iron loading in this organelle. Iron-mediated production of reactive oxygen species promoted lysosomal membrane permeabilization, activating a cell death pathway consistent with ferroptosis. These findings reveal the prevalence of iron homeostasis in breast CSCs, pointing towards iron and iron-mediated processes as potential targets against these cells.

  12. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron L; Johnson, Betty H; Medh, Rheem D; Townsend, Courtney M; Thompson, E Brad

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone (MGBG), on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity. PMID:11922393

  13. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  14. Protease activation involved in resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-Chang; Takahashi, Shuji; Karata, Kiyonobu; Kita, Kazuko; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    Little is known of proteases that play roles in the early steps of X-ray irradiation response. In the present study, we first searched for proteases whose activity is induced in human RSa-R cells after X-ray irradiation. The activity was identified as fibrinolytic, using 125 I-labeled fibrin as a substrate. Protease samples were prepared by lysation of cells with a buffer containing MEGA-8. RSa-R cells showed an increased level of protease activity 10 min after X-ray (up to 3 Gy) irradiation. We next examined whether this protease inducibility is causally related with the X-ray susceptibility of cells. Leupeptin, a serine-cysteine protease inhibitor, inhibited the protease activity in samples obtained from X-ray-irradiated RSa-R cells. Treatment of RSa-R cells with the inhibitor before and after X-ray irradiation resulted in an increased susceptibility of the cells to X-ray cell killing. However, the treatment of cells with other inhibitors tested did not modulate the X-ray susceptibility. These results suggest that leupeptin-sensitive proteases are involved in the resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing. (author)

  15. Prolonged early G1 arrest by selective CDK4/CDK6 inhibition sensitizes myeloma cells to cytotoxic killing through cell cycle–coupled loss of IRF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangao; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Jayabalan, David; Liang, Jun; Ely, Scott; Bretz, Jamieson; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Louie, Tracey; Chen, Isan; Randolph, Sophia; Hahn, William C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Moore, Malcolm A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 by gain of function or loss of inhibition is common in human cancer, including multiple myeloma, but success in targeting CDK with broad-spectrum inhibitors has been modest. By selective and reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, we have developed a strategy to both inhibit proliferation and enhance cytotoxic killing of cancer cells. We show that induction of prolonged early-G1 arrest (pG1) by CDK4/CDK6 inhibition halts gene expression in early-G1 and prevents expression of genes programmed for other cell-cycle phases. Removal of the early-G1 block leads to S-phase synchronization (pG1-S) but fails to completely restore scheduled gene expression. Consequently, the IRF4 protein required to protect myeloma cells from apoptosis is markedly reduced in pG1 and further in pG1-S in response to cytotoxic agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. The coordinated loss of IRF4 and gain of Bim sensitize myeloma tumor cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in pG1 in the absence of Noxa and more profoundly in pG1-S in cooperation with Noxa in vitro. Induction of pG1 and pG1-S by reversible CDK4/CDK6 inhibition further augments tumor-specific bortezomib killing in myeloma xenografts. Reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 in sequential combination therapy thus represents a novel mechanism-based cancer therapy. PMID:22718837

  16. Prolonged early G(1) arrest by selective CDK4/CDK6 inhibition sensitizes myeloma cells to cytotoxic killing through cell cycle-coupled loss of IRF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangao; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Jayabalan, David; Liang, Jun; Ely, Scott; Bretz, Jamieson; Shaffer, Arthur L; Louie, Tracey; Chen, Isan; Randolph, Sophia; Hahn, William C; Staudt, Louis M; Niesvizky, Ruben; Moore, Malcolm A S; Chen-Kiang, Selina

    2012-08-02

    Dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 by gain of function or loss of inhibition is common in human cancer, including multiple myeloma, but success in targeting CDK with broad-spectrum inhibitors has been modest. By selective and reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, we have developed a strategy to both inhibit proliferation and enhance cytotoxic killing of cancer cells. We show that induction of prolonged early-G(1) arrest (pG1) by CDK4/CDK6 inhibition halts gene expression in early-G(1) and prevents expression of genes programmed for other cell-cycle phases. Removal of the early-G(1) block leads to S-phase synchronization (pG1-S) but fails to completely restore scheduled gene expression. Consequently, the IRF4 protein required to protect myeloma cells from apoptosis is markedly reduced in pG1 and further in pG1-S in response to cytotoxic agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. The coordinated loss of IRF4 and gain of Bim sensitize myeloma tumor cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in pG1 in the absence of Noxa and more profoundly in pG1-S in cooperation with Noxa in vitro. Induction of pG1 and pG1-S by reversible CDK4/CDK6 inhibition further augments tumor-specific bortezomib killing in myeloma xenografts. Reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 in sequential combination therapy thus represents a novel mechanism-based cancer therapy.

  17. Characterization of cell lysis in Pseudomonas putida induced upon expression of heterologous killing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronchel, M.C.; Molina, L.; Witte, A.

    1998-01-01

    Active biological containment systems are based on the controlled expression of killing genes. These systems are of interest for the Pseudomonadaceae because of the potential applications of these microbes as bioremediation agents and biopesticides, The physiological effects that lead to cell dea...... protein was the killing agent. In both cases, cell death occurred as a result of impaired respiration, altered membrane permeability, and the release of some cytoplasmic contents to the extracellular medium.......Active biological containment systems are based on the controlled expression of killing genes. These systems are of interest for the Pseudomonadaceae because of the potential applications of these microbes as bioremediation agents and biopesticides, The physiological effects that lead to cell death......, respectively. Expression of the killing genes is controlled by the LacI protein, whose expression is initiated from the XylS-dependent Pm promoter. Under induced conditions, killing of P. putida CMC12 cells mediated by phi X174 lysis protein E was faster than that observed for P. putida CMC4, for which the Gef...

  18. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesori, V.; Piscaglia, A.C.; Samengo, D.; Barba, M.; Bernardini, C.; Scatena, R.; Pontoglio, A.; Castellini, L.; Spelbrink, H.; Maulucci, G.; Puglisi, M.A.; Pani, G.; Gasbarrini, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to

  19. Nonimmune cells equipped with T-cell-receptor-like signaling for cancer cell ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Scheller, Leo; Fussenegger, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The ability to engineer custom cell-contact-sensing output devices into human nonimmune cells would be useful for extending the applicability of cell-based cancer therapies and for avoiding risks associated with engineered immune cells. Here we have developed a new class of synthetic T-cell receptor-like signal-transduction device that functions efficiently in human nonimmune cells and triggers release of output molecules specifically upon sensing contact with a target cell. This device employs an interleukin signaling cascade, whose OFF/ON switching is controlled by biophysical segregation of a transmembrane signal-inhibitory protein from the sensor cell-target cell interface. We further show that designer nonimmune cells equipped with this device driving expression of a membrane-penetrator/prodrug-activating enzyme construct could specifically kill target cells in the presence of the prodrug, indicating its potential usefulness for target-cell-specific, cell-based enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. Our study also contributes to the advancement of synthetic biology by extending available design principles to transmit extracellular information to cells.

  20. The human cyclin B1 protein modulates sensitivity of DNA mismatch repair deficient prostate cancer cell lines to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L J; Rasmussen, M; Lützen, A; Bisgaard, H C; Singh, K K

    2000-05-25

    DNA damage caused by alkylating agents results in a G2 checkpoint arrest. DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficient cells are resistant to killing by alkylating agents and are unable to arrest the cell cycle in G2 phase after alkylation damage. We investigated the response of two MMR-deficient prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP to the alkylating agent MNNG. Our studies reveal that DU145 cancer cells are more sensitive to killing by MNNG than LNCaP. Investigation of the underlying reasons for lower resistance revealed that the DU145 cells contain low endogenous levels of cyclin B1. We provide direct evidence that the endogenous level of cyclin B1 modulates the sensitivity of MMR-deficient prostate cancer cells to alkylating agents.

  1. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O.; Coughlin, Jason J.; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E.; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P.; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R.; Befus, A. Dean; Bleackley, R. Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24 h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1 ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 μg/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo

  2. Potential use of [gammadelta] T cell-based vaccines in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Wajid A. Khan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is a fast advancing methodology involving one of two approaches: 1 compounds targeting immune checkpoints, and 2 cellular immunomodulators. The latter approach is still largely experimental and features in vitro generated, live immune effector cells or antigen-presenting cells (APC. [gammadelta] T cells are known for their efficient in vitro tumor killing activities. Consequently, many laboratories worldwide are currently testing the tumor killing function of [gammadelta] T cells in clinical trials. Reported benefits are modest; however, these studies have demonstrated that large [gammadelta] T cell infusions were well tolerated. Here, we discuss the potential of using human [gammadelta] T cells not as effector cells but as a novel cellular vaccine for treatment of cancer patients. Antigen-presenting [gammadelta] T cells do not require to home to tumor tissues but, instead, need to interact with endogenous, tumor-specific [alphabeta] T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Newly mobilised effector [alphabeta] T cells are then thought to overcome the immune blockade by creating proinflammatory conditions fit for effector T cell homing to and killing of tumor cells. Immunotherapy may include tumor antigen-loaded [gammadelta] T cells alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  3. Spontaneous presence of FOXO3-specific T cells in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Idorn, Manja

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe forkhead box O3 (FOXO3)-specific, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells existent among peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cancer patients. FOXO3 immunogenicity appears specific, as we did not detect reactivity toward FOXO3 among T cells in healthy individuals. FOXO3...... may naturally serve as a target antigen for tumor-reactive T cells as it is frequently over-expressed in cancer cells. In addition, expression of FOXO3 plays a critical role in immunosuppression mediated by tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs). Indeed, FOXO3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs......) were able to specifically recognize and kill both FOXO3-expressing cancer cells as well as dendritic cells. Thus, FOXO3 was processed and presented by HLA-A2 on the cell surface of both immune cells and cancer cells. As FOXO3 programs TADCs to become tolerogenic, FOXO3 signaling thereby comprises...

  4. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when

  5. Dendritic Cells Loaded with Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) Lysates Induce Antitumor Immune Killing Effect In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; Shi, Pengfei; Gou, Shanmiao; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chunyou

    2014-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory, malignant tumors may be heterogeneous in which a small population of CSCs drive the progression of cancer. Because of their intrinsic abilities, CSCs may survive a variety of treatments and then lead to therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence. Pancreatic CSCs have been reported to be responsible for the malignant behaviors of pancreatic cancer, including suppression of immune protection. Thus, development of immune strategies to eradicate pancreatic CSCs may be of great value for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we enriched pancreatic CSCs by culturing Panc-1 cells under sphere-forming conditions. Panc-1 CSCs expressed low levels of HLA-ABC and CD86, as measured by flow cytometry analysis. We further found that the Panc-1 CSCs modulate immunity by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation which is promoted by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. The monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs) were charged with total lysates generated from Panc-1 CSCs obtained from tumor sphere culturing. After co-culturing with lymphocytes at different ratios, the Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC effectively promoted lymphocyte proliferation. The activating efficiency reached 72.4% and 74.7% at the ratios of 1∶10 and 1∶20 with lymphocytes. The activated lymphocytes secreted high levels of INF-γ and IL-2, which are strong antitumor cytokines. Moreover, Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC induced significant cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes on Panc-1 CSCs and parental Panc-1 cells, respectively, as shown by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Our study demonstrates that the development of CSCs-based vaccine is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic cancer. PMID:25521461

  6. Dendritic cells loaded with pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs lysates induce antitumor immune killing effect in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yin

    Full Text Available According to the cancer stem cells (CSCs theory, malignant tumors may be heterogeneous in which a small population of CSCs drive the progression of cancer. Because of their intrinsic abilities, CSCs may survive a variety of treatments and then lead to therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence. Pancreatic CSCs have been reported to be responsible for the malignant behaviors of pancreatic cancer, including suppression of immune protection. Thus, development of immune strategies to eradicate pancreatic CSCs may be of great value for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we enriched pancreatic CSCs by culturing Panc-1 cells under sphere-forming conditions. Panc-1 CSCs expressed low levels of HLA-ABC and CD86, as measured by flow cytometry analysis. We further found that the Panc-1 CSCs modulate immunity by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation which is promoted by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. The monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs were charged with total lysates generated from Panc-1 CSCs obtained from tumor sphere culturing. After co-culturing with lymphocytes at different ratios, the Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC effectively promoted lymphocyte proliferation. The activating efficiency reached 72.4% and 74.7% at the ratios of 1∶10 and 1∶20 with lymphocytes. The activated lymphocytes secreted high levels of INF-γ and IL-2, which are strong antitumor cytokines. Moreover, Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC induced significant cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes on Panc-1 CSCs and parental Panc-1 cells, respectively, as shown by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay. Our study demonstrates that the development of CSCs-based vaccine is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic cancer.

  7. Influence of sequential 125I particle chain implantation and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization on tumor cell killing effect in patients with liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of sequential 125I particle chain implantation and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE on tumor cell killing effect in patients with liver cancer. Methods: A total of 82 cases of patients with advanced liver cancer who were treated in our hospital between September 2014 and December 2016 were collected, reviewed and then divided into the control group (n=45 who received TACE alone and the observation group (n=37 who received sequential 125I particle chain implantation and TACE. Serum levels of tumor markers, angiogenesis indexes and apoptosis molecules before and after treatments were compared between two groups of patients. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of tumor markers, angiogenesis indexes and apoptosis molecules were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After treatment, serum tumor markers AFP, CA199, CA153 and Ferritin levels in observation group were lower than those in control group; serum angiogenesis indexes VEGF, PEDF, ES and bFGF contents were lower than those in control group; serum apoptosis molecules p53 and Fas contents were higher than those in control group. Conclusion: Sequential 125I particle chain implantation and TACE treatment of advanced liver cancer can effectively reduce tumor malignancy and promote tumor apoptosis.

  8. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Frenkel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/- retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/- and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/- C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136 but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144 prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei

  9. Effects of concomitant cisplatin and radiotherapy on inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van den Bogaert, W.; Dalesio, O.; Festen, J.; Hoogenhout, J.; van Houtte, P.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Koolen, M.; Maat, B.; Nijs, A.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) has been reported to enhance the cell-killing effect of radiation, an effect whose intensity varies with the schedule of administration. We randomly assigned 331 patients with nonmetastatic inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer to one

  10. Radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer by kaempferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Yuan-Chung; Wu, His-Chin; Ho, Yung-Jen; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yao, Chen-Han; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether kaempferol has a radiosensitization potential for lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro radio-sensitization activity of kaempferol was elucidated in A-549 lung cancer cells by using an MTT (3-(4 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-25-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay, cell cycle analysis and clonogenic assay. The in vivo activity was evaluated in the BALB/c nude mouse xenograft model of A-549 cells by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, and the tumor volume was recorded. Protein levels of the apoptotic pathway were detected by western blot analysis. Treatment with kaempferol inhibited the growth of A-549 cells through activation of apoptotic pathway. However, the same doses did not affect HFL1 normal lung cell growth. Kaempferol induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and the enhancement of radiation-induced death and clonogenic survival inhibition. The in vivo data showed that kaempferol increased tumor cell apoptosis and killing of radiation. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that kaempferol increased tumor cell killing by radiation in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of the AKT/PI3K and ERK pathways and activation of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway. The results of the present study provided solid evidence that kaempferol is a safe and potential radiosensitizer.

  11. Simultaneous targeting of prostate stem cell antigen and prostate-specific membrane antigen improves the killing of prostate cancer cells using a novel modular T cell-retargeting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Claudia; Feldmann, Anja; Koristka, Stefanie; Cartellieri, Marc; Dimmel, Maria; Ehninger, Armin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bachmann, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Recently, we described a novel modular platform technology in which T cell-recruitment and tumor-targeting domains of conventional bispecific antibodies are split to independent components, a universal effector module (EM) and replaceable monospecific/monovalent target modules (TMs) that form highly efficient T cell-retargeting complexes. Theoretically, our unique strategy should allow us to simultaneously retarget T cells to different tumor antigens by combining the EM with two or more different monovalent/monospecific TMs or even with bivalent/bispecific TMs, thereby overcoming limitations of a monospecific treatment such as the selection of target-negative tumor escape variants. In order to advance our recently introduced prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-specific modular system for a dual-targeting of prostate cancer cells, two additional TMs were constructed: a monovalent/monospecific TM directed against the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and a bivalent/bispecific TM (bsTM) with specificity for PSMA and PSCA. The functionality of the novel dual-targeting strategies was analyzed by performing T cell activation and chromium release assays. Similar to the PSCA-specific modular system, the novel PSMA-specific modular system mediates an efficient target-dependent and -specific tumor cell lysis at low E:T ratios and picomolar Ab concentrations. Moreover, by combination of the EM with either the bispecific TM directed to PSMA and PSCA or both monospecifc TMs directed to either PSCA or PSMA, dual-specific targeting complexes were formed which allowed us to kill potential escape variants expressing only one or the other target antigen. Overall, the novel modular system represents a promising tool for multiple tumor targeting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Potential Combinational Anti-Cancer Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Traditional Chinese Medicine Sun-Bai-Pi Extract and Cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Chung, Meng-Chi; Chang, Jing-Fen; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional lung cancer treatments involve chemical or radiation therapies after surgical tumor removal; however, these procedures often kill normal cells as well. Recent studies indicate that chemotherapies, when combined with Traditional Chinese Medicines, may offer a new way to treat cancer. In vitro tests measuring the induction of autophagy and/or apoptosis were used to examine the cytotoxicity of SBPE, commonly used for lung inflammation on A549 cell line. The results indicated that intercellular levels of p62 and Atg12 were increased, LC3-I was cleaved into LC3-II, and autophagy was induced with SBPE only. After 24 hours, the apoptotic mechanism was induced. If the Cisplatin was added after cells reached the autophagy state, we observed synergistic effects of the two could achieve sufficient death of lung cancer cells. Therefore, the Cisplatin dosage used to induce apoptosis could be reduced by half, and the amount of time needed to achieve the inhibitory concentration of 50% was also half that of the original. In addition to inducing autophagy within a shortened period of time, the SBPE and chemotherapy drug combination therapy was able to achieve the objective of rapid low-dosage cancer cell elimination. Besides, SBPE was applied with Gemcitabine or Paclitaxel, and found that the combination treatment indeed achieve improved lung cancer cell killing effects. However, SBPE may also be less toxic to normal cells. PMID:27171432

  13. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  14. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Hagit; Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:18387177

  15. In vitro cytotoxicity of galvanically coupled magnesium-titanium particles on human osteosarcoma SAOS2 cells: A potential cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jua; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2018-04-10

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant bone cancer that occurs mostly in children and young adults. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of Mg and Mg-Ti microparticles to human osteosarcoma cells. Osteosarcoma cells were killed in a dosage-dependent manner when cells, with a cell seeding density of 30,000 cells/cm 2 , were cultured with 0 to 2500 µg/mL of Mg or Mg-Ti in cell culture media for 24-72 h. Mg-Ti killed cells more effectively, where 1250 µg/mL of Mg-Ti killed cells completely by 24 h, while 2500 µg/mL of Mg killed nearly all cells, but not all. Killing due to particle corrosion occurred mostly during the first 24 h, and so the percent cell viability between 24 and 72 h showed not much variability. However, the measurement of live and dead cell numbers, over the timeframe of 24-72 h, showed more insight, such as cell recovery. If particle concentrations were low, the number of live cells increased after 24 h, indicating cell proliferation. If particle concentrations were high, the number of live cells either remained steady or decreased, indicating cell quiescence or continued killing, respectively. Increase in the number of dead cells also indicated killing, while plateau meant discontinued killing. In addition, repeated killing of recovered cells exhibited the same dose-dependent killing profile as the initial experiment, implying little development of cell resistance to treatment. These results, together, show that osteosarcoma cells are susceptible to killing by way of exposure to corroding particles, showing highly effective killing using the galvanic couple of Mg-Ti. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. LDR brachytherapy: can low dose rate hypersensitivity from the "inverse" dose rate effect cause excessive cell killing to peripherial connective tissues and organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B E; Lucas, A C

    2009-02-01

    Examined here are the possible effects of the "inverse" dose rate effect (IDRE) on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) effect benefits cell killing in radiotherapy, and IDRE and HRS/IRR seem to be generated from the same radioprotective mechanisms. We have computed the IDRE excess cell killing experienced in LDR brachytherapy using permanent seed implants. We conclude, firstly, that IDRE is a dose rate-dependent manifestation of HRS/IRR. Secondly, the presence of HRS/IRR or IDRE in a cell species or tissue must be determined by direct dose-response measurements. Thirdly, a reasonable estimate is that 50-80% of human adjoining connective and organ tissues experience IDRE from permanent implanted LDR brachytherapy. If IDRE occurs for tissues at point A for cervical cancer, the excess cell killing will be about a factor of 3.5-4.0 if the initial dose rate is 50-70 cGy h(-1). It is greater for adjacent tissues at lower dose rates and higher for lower initial dose rates at point A. Finally, higher post-treatment complications are observed in LDR brachytherapy, often for unknown reasons. Some of these are probably a result of IDRE excess cell killing. Measurements of IDRE need be performed for connective and adjacent organ tissues, i.e. bladder, rectum, urinary tract and small bowels. The measured dose rate-dependent dose responses should extended to tissues and organs remain above IDRE thresholds).

  17. Development and characterization of multifunctional nanoparticles for drug delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahire, Rahul Rajaram

    Lipid and polymeric nanoparticles, although proven to be effective drug delivery systems compared to free drugs, have shown considerable limitations pertaining to their uptake and release at tumor sites. Spatial and temporal control over the delivery of anticancer drugs has always been challenge to drug delivery scientists. Here, we have developed and characterized multifunctional nanoparticles (liposomes and polymersomes) which are targeted specifically to cancer cells, and release their contents with tumor specific internal triggers. To enable these nanoparticles to be tracked in blood circulation, we have imparted them with echogenic characteristic. Echogenicity of nanoparticles is evaluated using ultrasound scattering and imaging experiments. Nanoparticles demonstrated effective release with internal triggers such as elevated levels of MMP-9 enzyme found in the extracellular matrix of tumor cells, decreased pH of lysosome, and differential concentration of reducing agents in cytosol of cancer cells. We have also successfully demonstrated the sensitivity of these particles towards ultrasound to further enhance the release with internal triggers. To ensure the selective uptake by folate receptor- overexpressing cancer cells, we decorated these nanoparticles with folic acid on their surface. Fluorescence microscopic images showed significantly higher uptake of folate-targeted nanoparticles by MCF-7 (breast cancer) and PANC-1 (pancreatic cancer) cells compared to particles without any targeting ligand on their surface. To demonstrate the effectiveness of these nanoparticles to carry the drugs inside and kill cancer cells, we encapsulated doxorubicin and/or gemcitabine employing the pH gradient method. Drug loaded nanoparticles showed significantly higher killing of the cancer cells compared to their non-targeted counterparts and free drugs. With further development, these nanoparticles certainly have potential to be used as a multifunctional nanocarriers for image

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment inhibits growth in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christin; Arndt, Stephanie; Zimmermann, Julia L; Li, Yangfang; Karrer, Sigrid; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2018-06-01

    Plasma oncology is a relatively new field of research. Recent developments have indicated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technology is an interesting new therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. In this study, p53 wildtype (LoVo) and human p53 mutated (HT29 and SW480) colorectal cancer cells were treated with the miniFlatPlaSter - a device particularly developed for the treatment of tumor cells - that uses the Surface Micro Discharge (SMD) technology for plasma production in air. The present study analyzed the effects of plasma on colorectal cancer cells in vitro and on normal colon tissue ex vivo. Plasma treatment had strong effects on colon cancer cells, such as inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, and modulation of p21 expression. In contrast, CAP treatment of murine colon tissue ex vivo for up to 2 min did not show any toxic effect on normal colon cells compared to H2O2 positive control. In summary, these results suggest that the miniFlatPlaSter plasma device is able to kill colorectal cancer cells independent of their p53 mutation status. Thus, this device presents a promising new approach in colon cancer therapy.

  19. Multiple factors and processes involved in host cell killing by bacteriophage Mu: characterization and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, B T; Marrs, C F; Howe, M M; Pato, M L

    1984-07-15

    The regions of bacteriophage Mu involved in host cell killing were determined by infection of a lambda-immune host with 12 lambda pMu-transducing phages carrying different amounts of Mu DNA beginning at the left end. Infecting lambda pMu phages containing 5.0 (+/- 0.2) kb or less of the left end of Mu DNA did not kill the lambda-immune host, whereas lambda pMu containing 5.1 kb did kill, thus locating the right end of the kil gene between approximately 5.0 and 5.1 kb. For the Kil+ phages the extent of killing increased as the multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) increased. In addition, killing was also affected by the presence of at least two other regions of Mu DNA: one, located between 5.1 and 5.8 kb, decreased the extent of killing; the other, located between 6.3 and 7.9 kb, greatly increased host cell killing. Killing was also assayed after lambda pMu infection of a lambda-immune host carrying a mini-Mu deleted for most of the B gene and the middle region of Mu DNA. Complementation of mini-Mu replication by infecting B+ lambda pMu phages resulted in killing of the lambda-immune, mini-Mu-containing host, regardless of the presence or absence of the Mu kil gene. The extent of host cell killing increased as the m.o.i. of the infecting lambda pMu increased, and was further enhanced by both the presence of the kil gene and the region located between 6.3 and 7.9 kb. These distinct processes of kil-mediated killing in the absence of replication and non-kil-mediated killing in the presence of replication were also observed after induction of replication-deficient and kil mutant prophages, respectively.

  20. Flow cytometric analysis of cell killing by the jumper ant venom peptide pilosulin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M A; Wu, Q X; Donovan, G R; Baldo, B A

    1998-08-01

    Pilosulin 1 is a synthetic 56-amino acid residue polypeptide that corresponds to the largest allergenic polypeptide found in the venom of the jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula. Initial experiments showed that pilosulin 1 lysed erythrocytes and killed proliferating B cells. Herein, we describe how flow cytometry was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the peptide for human white blood cells. Cells were labeled with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies, incubated with the peptide and 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD), and then analyzed. The effects of varying the peptide concentration, serum concentration, incubation time, and incubation temperature were measured, and the cytotoxicity of pilosulin 1 was compared with that of the bee venom peptide melittin. The antibodies and the 7-AAD enabled the identification of cell subpopulations and dead cells, respectively. It was possible, using the appropriate mix of antibodies and four-color analysis, to monitor the killing of three or more cell subpopulations simultaneously. We found that 1) pilosulin 1 killed cells within minutes, with kinetics similar to those of melittin; 2) pilosulin 1 was a slightly more potent cytotoxic agent than melittin; 3) both pilosulin 1 and melittin were more potent against mononuclear leukocytes than against granulocytes; and 4) serum inhibited killing by either peptide.

  1. Immediate in vivo target-specific cancer cell death after near infrared photoimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunaga Makoto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near infrared (NIR photoimmunotherapy (PIT is a new type of cancer treatment based on a monoclonal antibody (mAb-NIR phthalocyanine dye, (IR700 conjugate. In vitro cancer-specific cell death occurs during NIR light exposure in cells previously incubated with mAb-IR700 conjugates. However, documenting rapid cell death in vivo is more difficult. Methods A luciferase-transfected breast cancer cell (epidermal growth factor receptor+, MDA-MB-468luc cells was produced and used for both in vitro and in vivo experiments for monitoring the cell killing effect of PIT. After validation of cytotoxicity with NIR exposure up to 8 J/cm2in vitro, we employed an orthotopic breast cancer model of bilateral MDA-MB-468luc tumors in female athymic mice, which subsequently received a panitumumab-IR700 conjugate in vivo. One side was used as a control, while the other was treated with NIR light of dose ranging from 50 to 150 J/cm2. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI was performed before and after PIT. Results Dose-dependent cell killing and regrowth was successfully monitored by the BLI signal in vitro. Although tumor sizes were unchanged, BLI signals decreased by >95% immediately after PIT in vivo when light intensity was high (>100 J/cm2, however, in mice receiving lower intensity NIR (50 J/cm2, tumors recurred with gradually increasing BLI signal. Conclusion PIT induced massive cell death of targeted tumor cells immediately after exposure of NIR light that was demonstrated with BLI in vivo.

  2. An Fc engineering approach that modulates antibody-dependent cytokine release without altering cell-killing functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R; Strohl, William R; Jordan, Robert E; Brezski, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often mediate target cell-killing by eliciting immune effector functions via Fc region interactions with cellular and humoral components of the immune system. Key functions include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, there has been increased appreciation that along with cell-killing functions, the induction of antibody-dependent cytokine release (ADCR) can also influence disease microenvironments and therapeutic outcomes. Historically, most Fc engineering approaches have been aimed toward modulating ADCC, ADCP, or CDC. In the present study, we describe an Fc engineering approach that, while not resulting in impaired ADCC or ADCP, profoundly affects ADCR. As such, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as effector cells against mAb-opsonized tumor cells, the described mAb variants elicit a similar profile and quantity of cytokines as IgG1. In contrast, although the variants elicit similar levels of tumor cell-killing as IgG1 with macrophage effector cells, the variants do not elicit macrophage-mediated ADCR against mAb-opsonized tumor cells. This study demonstrates that Fc engineering approaches can be employed to uncouple macrophage-mediated phagocytic and subsequent cell-killing functions from cytokine release.

  3. Herceptin Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Natural Killer Cells on Breast Cancer Cells Expressing Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Tian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal adoptive cell therapy (ACT should contribute to effective cancer treatment. The unique ability of natural killer (NK cells to kill cancer cells independent of major histocompatibility requirement makes them suitable as ACT tools. Herceptin, an antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, is used to treat HER2+ breast cancer. However, it has limited effectiveness and possible severe cardiotoxicity. Given that Herceptin may increase the cytotoxicity of lymphocytes, we explored the possible augmentation of NK cell cytotoxicity against HER2+ breast cancer cells by Herceptin. We demonstrated that Herceptin could interact with CD16 on NK cells to expand the cytotoxic NK (specifically, CD56dim cell population. Additionally, Herceptin increased NK cell migration and cytotoxicity against HER2+ breast cancer cells. In a pilot study, Herceptin-treated NK cells shrunk lung nodular metastasis in a woman with HER2+ breast cancer who could not tolerate the cardiotoxic side effects of Herceptin. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of Herceptin-treated NK cells in patients with HER2+ and Herceptin-intolerant breast cancer.

  4. An evolved ribosome-inactivating protein targets and kills human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

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    Green David E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few treatment options exist for patients with metastatic melanoma, resulting in poor prognosis. One standard treatment, dacarbazine (DTIC, shows low response rates ranging from 15 to 25 percent with an 8-month median survival time. The development of targeted therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action may improve patient outcome. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs such as Shiga-like Toxin 1 (SLT-1 represent powerful scaffolds for developing selective anticancer agents. Here we report the discovery and properties of a single chain ribosome-inactivating protein (scRIP derived from the cytotoxic A subunit of SLT-1 (SLT-1A, harboring the 7-amino acid peptide insertion IYSNKLM (termed SLT-1AIYSNKLM allowing the toxin variant to selectively target and kill human melanoma cells. Results SLT-1AIYSNKLM was able to kill 7 of 8 human melanoma cell lines. This scRIP binds to 518-A2 human melanoma cells with a dissociation constant of 18 nM, resulting in the blockage of protein synthesis and apoptosis in such cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies of radiolabeled SLT-1AIYSNKLM administered intravenously into SCID mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft indicate that SLT-1AIYSNKLM readily accumulates at the tumor site as opposed to non-target tissues. Furthermore, the co-administration of SLT-1AIYSNKLM with DTIC resulted in tumor regression and greatly increased survival in this mouse xenograft model in comparison to DTIC or SLT-1AIYSNKLM treatment alone (115 day median survival versus 46 and 47 days respectively; P values IYSNKLM is stable in serum and its intravenous administration resulted in modest immune responses following repeated injections in CD1 mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the evolution of a scRIP template can lead to the discovery of novel cancer cell-targeted compounds and in the case of SLT-1AIYSNKLM can specifically kill human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Analysis of Chemopredictive Assay for Targeting Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace M. Howard

    2017-04-01

    were estimated for CSC, bulk tumor, and combined assay responses for the standard-of-care TMZ treatment; sensitivities/specificities, areas under the curve (AUCs, and risk reclassification components were examined. Results: Median follow-up was 8 months (range 3-49 months. For every 5% increase in in vitro CSC cell kill by TMZ, 12-month patient response (nonrecurrence of cancer increased two-fold, OR = 2.2 (P = .016. Similar but somewhat less supported associations with the bulk tumor test were seen, OR = 2.75 (P = .07 for each 5% bulk tumor cell kill by TMZ. Combining CSC and bulk tumor assay results in a single model yielded a statistically supported CSC association, OR = 2.36 (P = .036, but a much attenuated remaining bulk tumor association, OR = 1.46 (P = .472. AUCs and [sensitivity/specificity] at optimal outpoints (>40% CSC cell kill and >55% bulk tumor cell kill were AUC = 0.989 [sensitivity = 100/specificity = 97], 0.972 [100/89], and 0.989 [100/97] for the CSC only, bulk tumor only, and combined models, respectively. Risk categorization of patients was improved by 11% when using the CSC test in conjunction with the bulk test (risk reclassification nonevent net reclassification improvement [NRI] and overall NRI = 0.111, P = .030. Median recurrence time was 20 months for patients with a positive (>40% cell kill CSC test versus only 3 months for those with a negative CSC test, whereas median recurrence time was 13 months versus 4 months for patients with a positive (>55% cell kill bulk test versus negative. Similar favorable results for the CSC test were observed for PFS and OS outcomes. Panel results across 14 potential other treatments indicated that 34/41 (83% potentially more optimal alternative therapies may have been chosen using CSC results, whereas 27/41 (66% alternative therapies may have been chosen using bulk tumor results. Conclusions: The ChemoID CSC drug response assay has the potential to increase the accuracy of bulk

  6. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  7. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya B. Karki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  8. Killing of targets by effector CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with antibody-based vaccines, it has been difficult to measure the efficacy of T cell-based vaccines and to correlate the efficacy of CD8 T cell responses with protection again viral infections. In part, this difficulty is due to poor understanding of the in vivo efficacy of CD8 T cells produced by vaccination. Using a: recently developed experimental method of in vivo cytotoxicity we have investigated quantitative aspects of killing of peptide-pulsed targets by effector and memory CD8 T cells, specific to three epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), in the mouse spleen. By analyzing data on killing of targets with varying number of epitope-specific effector and memory CD8 T cells, we find that killing of targets by effectors follows the law of mass-action, that is the death rate of peptide-pulsed targets is proportional to the frequency of CTLs in the spleen. In contrast, killing of targets by memory CD8 T cells does not follow the mass action law because the death rate of targets saturates at high frequencies of memory CD8 T cells. For both effector and memory cells, we also find little support for the killing term that includes the decrease of the death rate of targets with target cell density. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that at low CD8 T cell frequencies, memory CD8 T cells on the per capita basis are more efficient at killing peptide-pulsed targets than effectors, but at high frequencies, effectors are more efficient killers than memory T cells. Comparison of the estimated killing efficacy of effector T cells with the value that is predicted from theoretical physics and based on motility of T cells in lymphoid tissues, suggests that limiting step in the killing of peptide-pulsed targets is delivering the lethal hit and not finding the target. Our results thus form a basis for quantitative understanding of the process of killing of virus-infected cells by T cell responses in tissues and can be used to correlate the

  9. Radiosensitization effect of CMNa on hypoxic pancreatic cancer cell in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Lijie; Zhang Li; Ding Tiangui; Peng Zhaoxiang; Yu Huan; Gao Yuwei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of glycodidazolum natrium (CMNa) on pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxic condition. Methods: The human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells were exposed to a single fraction of high-dose γ-ray radiation either with CMNa or under hypoxic condition. The percentage of dead cells was detected with a multiwell plated reader, and fluorescence intensities of propidium iodide were measured before and after digitonin treatment. The sensitizing effect of CMNa on cell killing induced by high-dose irradiation was evaluated by time and concentration dependence. The selective radiosensitive effect of CMNa on hypoxia was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: The death rate of pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells paralleled with the increasing concentration of CMNa under hypoxic condition after 30 gray irradiation. The selective radiosensitive effect of CMNa on hypoxia was time-dependent. Conclusions: CMNa can enhance the radiosensitivity of pancreatic cancer Pane-1 cells under hypoxic condition with high-dose irradiation. (authors)

  10. Time-kill profiles and cell-surface morphological effects of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MK1201 mycelial extract on the viability and cell surface morphology of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Methods: Time-kill assays were conducted by incubating test ...

  11. Do protons and X-rays induce cell-killing in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by different mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczyk, J; Rawojć, K; Panek, A; Borkowska, A; Prasanna, P G S; Ahmed, M M; Swakoń, J; Gałaś, A

    2018-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the technological and physical aspects of dose delivery and distribution in proton therapy. However, mode of cell killing induced by protons is less understood in comparison with X-rays. The purpose of this study is to see if there is any difference in the mode of cell-killing, induced by protons and X-rays in an ex vivo human peripheral blood lymphocyte (HPBL) model. HPBL were irradiated with 60 MeV proton beam or 250-kVp X-rays in the dose range of 0.3-4.0 Gy. Frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells was determined by the Fluorescein (FITC)-Annexin V labelling procedure, 1 and 4 h after irradiation. Chip-based DNA Ladder Assay was used to confirm radiation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Chip-based DNA Ladder Assay was used to confirm radiation-induced apoptosis. Ex vivo irradiation of HPBL with proton beams of 60 MeV or 250 kVp X-rays resulted in apoptotic as well as necrotic modes of cell-killing, which were evident at both 1 and 4 h after irradiation in the whole dose and time range. Generally, our results indicated that protons cause relatively higher yields of cell death that appears to be necrosis compared to X-rays. The analysis also demonstrates that radiation type and dose play a critical role in mode of cell-killing. Obtained results suggest that X-rays and protons induce cell-killing by different modes. Such differences in cell-killing modes may have implications on the potential of a given therapeutic modality to cause immune modulation via programmed cell death (X-rays) or necrotic cell death (proton therapy). These studies point towards exploring for gene expression biomarkers related necrosis or apoptosis to predict immune response after proton therapy.

  12. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  13. Synergistic antitumor activity of oncolytic reovirus and chemotherapeutic agents in non-small cell lung cancer cells

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    Coffey Matthew C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reovirus type 3 Dearing strain (ReoT3D has an inherent propensity to preferentially infect and destroy cancer cells. The oncolytic activity of ReoT3D as a single agent has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo against various cancers, including colon, pancreatic, ovarian and breast cancers. Its human safety and potential efficacy are currently being investigated in early clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the in vitro combination effects of ReoT3D and chemotherapeutic agents against human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Results ReoT3D alone exerted significant cytolytic activity in 7 of 9 NSCLC cell lines examined, with the 50% effective dose, defined as the initial virus dose to achieve 50% cell killing after 48 hours of infection, ranging from 1.46 ± 0.12 ~2.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± SD log10 pfu/cell. Chou-Talalay analysis of the combination of ReoT3D with cisplatin, gemcitabine, or vinblastine demonstrated strong synergistic effects on cell killing, but only in cell lines that were sensitive to these compounds. In contrast, the combination of ReoT3D and paclitaxel was invariably synergistic in all cell lines tested, regardless of their levels of sensitivity to either agent. Treatment of NSCLC cell lines with the ReoT3D-paclitaxel combination resulted in increased poly (ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage and caspase activity compared to single therapy, indicating enhanced apoptosis induction in dually treated NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells treated with the ReoT3D-paclitaxel combination showed increased proportions of mitotic and apoptotic cells, and a more pronounced level of caspase-3 activation was demonstrated in mitotically arrested cells. Conclusion These data suggest that the oncolytic activity of ReoT3D can be potentiated by taxanes and other chemotherapeutic agents, and that the ReoT3D-taxane combination most effectively achieves synergy through accelerated apoptosis triggered by prolonged mitotic arrest.

  14. Natural Killer Cell Response to Chemotherapy-Stressed Cancer Cells: Role in Tumor Immunosurveillance

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    Alessandra Zingoni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate cytotoxic lymphoid cells that actively prevent neoplastic development, growth, and metastatic dissemination in a process called cancer immunosurveillance. An equilibrium between immune control and tumor growth is maintained as long as cancer cells evade immunosurveillance. Therapies designed to kill cancer cells and to simultaneously sustain host antitumor immunity are an appealing strategy to control tumor growth. Several chemotherapeutic agents, depending on which drugs and doses are used, give rise to DNA damage and cancer cell death by means of apoptosis, immunogenic cell death, or other forms of non-apoptotic death (i.e., mitotic catastrophe, senescence, and autophagy. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that they can trigger additional stress responses. Indeed, relevant immunostimulating effects of different therapeutic programs include also the activation of pathways able to promote their recognition by immune effector cells. Among stress-inducible immunostimulating proteins, changes in the expression levels of NK cell-activating and inhibitory ligands, as well as of death receptors on tumor cells, play a critical role in their detection and elimination by innate immune effectors, including NK cells. Here, we will review recent advances in chemotherapy-mediated cellular stress pathways able to stimulate NK cell effector functions. In particular, we will address how these cytotoxic lymphocytes sense and respond to different types of drug-induced stresses contributing to anticancer activity.

  15. Bystander Host Cell Killing Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

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    Archana Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE binds to claudin receptors, e.g., claudin-4, and then forms a pore that triggers cell death. Pure cultures of host cells that do not express claudin receptors, e.g., fibroblasts, are unaffected by pathophysiologically relevant CPE concentrations in vitro. However, both CPE-insensitive and CPE-sensitive host cells are present in vivo. Therefore, this study tested whether CPE treatment might affect fibroblasts when cocultured with CPE-sensitive claudin-4 fibroblast transfectants or Caco-2 cells. Under these conditions, immunofluorescence microscopy detected increased death of fibroblasts. This cytotoxic effect involved release of a toxic factor from the dying CPE-sensitive cells, since it could be reproduced using culture supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells, particularly Caco-2 cells, were found to contain high levels of membrane vesicles, often containing a CPE species. However, most cytotoxic activity remained in those supernatants even after membrane vesicle depletion, and CPE was not detected in fibroblasts treated with supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Instead, characterization studies suggest that a major cytotoxic factor present in supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells may be a 10- to 30-kDa host serine protease or require the action of that host serine protease. Induction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis was found to be important for triggering release of the cytotoxic factor(s from CPE-treated sensitive host cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factor(s in these supernatants was shown to induce a caspase-3-mediated killing of fibroblasts. This bystander killing effect due to release of cytotoxic factors from CPE-treated sensitive cells could contribute to CPE-mediated disease.

  16. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  17. Caffeine enhancement of x-ray killing in cultured human and rodent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldren, C.A.; Rasko, I.

    1978-01-01

    A 16 to 20 hr postirradiation incubation with caffeine enhances x-ray killing of rodent and human cells. Cells tested were Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1), lung (CHL), V79, mouse L, HeLa S3, human fibroblasts (AF288, TC171, FS9, CRL1166), and a human-hamster hybrid. The effect of caffeine on the x-ray survival curve of these cells was to remove the initial shoulder without significantly altering the mean lethal dose (D 0 ). This action can be achieved at caffeine concentrations which of themselves cause less than 15% killing. In randomly growing CHO-K1 cells the caffeine-sensitive process occurs with a half-time of 2 to 5 hr after irradiation. These experiments indicate the existence in human and rodent cells of caffeine-inhibited genome repair for x-ray damage

  18. Photothermal effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the viability of BT-474 cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hung-Tao; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chang, Hwan-You

    2013-01-01

    Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were conjugated to an antibody of BT-474 cancer cells (f-MWCNTs-ab), and the photothermal effect of the f-MWCNTs-ab for BT-474 cancer cell destruction was demonstrated. After near-infrared irradiation, the f-MWCNTs-ab were more capable of killing cancer cells and possessed higher cell specificity than f-MWCNTs. Quantitative results showed that the viability of the cancer cells was affected by the concentration of the f-MWCNTs-ab solution, irradiation time, and settling time after irradiation. The membrane impermeable fluorescence dye ethidium bromide was used to detect cell viability after near-infrared irradiation, and the results agreed with those obtained from the Alamar Blue cell viability assay. The EtBr fluorescence results suggest that the cell membrane, attached to f-MWCNTs-ab, was damaged after irradiation, which led to cell death and necrosis. Using confocal microscopy, a few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell, indicating the endocytosis effect. The results not only explain the improved efficiency of thermotherapy but also indicate that necrosis may result from protein denaturation attributing to the heated f-MWCNTs-ab in the cell. Highlights: ► f-MWCNTs conjugated with anti-HER2 antibody by chemical method. ► Kill breast cancer cells by using low dose f-MWCNTs-ab due to photothermal effect. ► Use EtBr fluorescent to prove that the cell membrane was broken by heated f-MWCNTs. ► Few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell indicating the endocytosis effect. ► Necrosis may result from protein denaturation due to contact with the heated CNTs.

  19. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Adenoviral delivery of pan-caspase inhibitor p35 enhances bystander killing by P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy using cyclophosphamide+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloff, Joshua C; Su, Ting; Waxman, David J

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome P450-based suicide gene therapy for cancer using prodrugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) increases anti-tumor activity, both directly and via a bystander killing mechanism. Bystander cell killing is essential for the clinical success of this treatment strategy, given the difficulty of achieving 100% efficient gene delivery in vivo using current technologies. Previous studies have shown that the pan-caspase inhibitor p35 significantly increases CPA-induced bystander killing by tumor cells that stably express P450 enzyme CYP2B6 (Schwartz et al, (2002) Cancer Res. 62: 6928-37). To further develop this approach, we constructed and characterized a replication-defective adenovirus, Adeno-2B6/p35, which expresses p35 in combination with CYP2B6 and its electron transfer partner, P450 reductase. The expression of p35 in Adeno-2B6/p35-infected tumor cells inhibited caspase activation, delaying the death of the CYP2B6 'factory' cells that produce active CPA metabolites, and increased bystander tumor cell killing compared to that achieved in the absence of p35. Tumor cells infected with Adeno-2B6/p35 were readily killed by cisplatin and doxorubicin, indicating that p35 expression is not associated with acquisition of general drug resistance. Finally, p35 did not inhibit viral release when the replication-competent adenovirus ONYX-017 was used as a helper virus to facilitate co-replication and spread of Adeno-2B6/p35 and further increase CPA-induced bystander cell killing. The introduction of p35 into gene therapeutic regimens constitutes an effective approach to increase bystander killing by cytochrome P450 gene therapy. This strategy may also be used to enhance other bystander cytotoxic therapies, including those involving the production of tumor cell toxic protein products

  1. Cell killing and radiosensitization by caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chun-Te; King, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a biologically active ingredient of honeybee propoplis. The cytotoxicity and radiation sensitization effects of CAPE were evaluated in human lung cancer A549 cells and normal lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. A549 cells treated with 6 μg/ml CAPE showed marked growth inhibition (60%) at 48 hr after treatments. During the same time, the number of viable cells decreased to 46% of the control value. In contrast, WI-38 cells showed 20% growth inhibition with no change in the number of viable cells under the same treatment conditions. At 72 hr after CAPE treatment (6 μg/ml), the percentage of apoptotic cells in A549 cultures increased significantly to 67% and an S/G2 arrest was also detected in the culture. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the level of intracellular glutathione and hydrogen peroxide contents within one hr after CAPE treatment, and the expression of cyclin B 1 was reduced 6 hr after treatment. The radiation sensitization effect of CAPE on A549 cells was determined from the clonogenic survival curves, and the results showed a small but significant difference in radiation survival between cells treated with or without CAPE. Taken together, our results suggest that the effects of CAPE on differential cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and radiosensitization are associated with glutathione depletion that occurred shortly after treatments. (author)

  2. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  3. Maximal killing of lymphoma cells by DNA damage–inducing therapy requires not only the p53 targets Puma and Noxa, but also Bim

    OpenAIRE

    Happo, Lina; Cragg, Mark S.; Phipson, Belinda; Haga, Jon M.; Jansen, Elisa S.; Herold, Marco J.; Dewson, Grant; Michalak, Ewa M.; Vandenberg, Cassandra J.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Strasser, Andreas; Cory, Suzanne; Scott, Clare L.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-damaging chemotherapy is the backbone of cancer treatment, although it is not clear how such treatments kill tumor cells. In nontransformed lymphoid cells, the combined loss of 2 proapoptotic p53 target genes, Puma and Noxa, induces as much resistance to DNA damage as loss of p53 itself. In Eμ-Myc lymphomas, however, lack of both Puma and Noxa resulted in no greater drug resistance than lack of Puma alone. A third B-cell lymphoma-2 homology domain (BH)3-only gene, Bim, although not a dire...

  4. Heat-killed Lactobacillus spp. cells enhance survivals of Caenorhabditis elegans against Salmonella and Yersinia infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Choe, J; Kim, J; Oh, S; Park, S; Kim, S; Kim, Y

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the effect of feeding heat-killed Lactobacillus cells on the survival of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes after Salmonella Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica infection. The feeding of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum 133 (LP133) and Lactobacillus fermentum 21 (LP21) cells to nematodes was shown to significantly increase the survival rate as well as stimulate the expression of pmk-1 gene that key factor for C. elegans immunity upon infection compared with control nematodes that were only fed Escherichia coli OP50 (OP50) cells. These results suggest that heat-killed LP133 and LF21 cells exert preventive or protective effects against the Gram-negative bacteria Salm. Typhimurium and Y. enterocolitica. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the LF21-mediated and LP133-mediated protection against bacterial infection in nematodes, transcriptional profiling was performed for each experimental group. These experiments showed that genes related to energy generation and ageing, regulators of insulin/IGF-1-like signalling, DAF genes, oxidation and reduction processes, the defence response and/or the innate immune response, and neurological processes were upregulated in nematodes that had been fed heat-killed Lactobacillus cells compared with nematodes that had been fed E. coli cells. In this study, the feeding of heat-killed Lactobacillus bacteria to Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes was shown to decrease infection by Gram-negative bacteria and increase the host lifespan. C. elegans has a small, well-organized genome and is an excellent in vivo model organism; thus, these results will potentially shed light on important Lactobacillus-host interactions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Chinese herb derived-Rocaglamide A is a potent inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baochun; Li, Yixiong; Tan, Fengbo; Xiao, Zhanxiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks No.1 in mortality rate worldwide. This study aims to identify the novel anti-pancreatic cancer drugs. Human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines were purchased from ATCC. CPE-based screening assay was used to examine the cell viability. Patient derived tumor xenografts in SCID mice was established. The Caspase-3 and 7 activities were measured using the Caspase Glo 3/7 Assay kit. Soft agar colony formation assay was used to evaluate the colony formation. Wound healing assay was employed to determine the cell migration. We screened a Chinese herbal product library and found three "hits" that kill cancer cells at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. One of these compounds, rocaglamide, was found to be potent inhibitors of a wide spectrum of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Rocaglamide reduced the tumor size in a patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model without noticeable toxicity in vivo. Rocaglamide also inhibits pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, these data support that Rocaglamide may be a promising anti-pancreatic cancer drug.

  6. Herbal tea extract combined with light-induced significant in vitro cytotoxicity of human bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, Unyime; Kim, Albert; Stavropoulos, Nicholas E.; Skalkos, Dimitris; Nseyo, U. U.; Chung, Theodore D.

    2005-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, antiviral, and antidepressant activities of the Greek herb, Hypericum Perforatum L, HP L, have been attributed to the total extract or single constituents. We investigated the use of the extract,specifically of the polar methanolic fraction (PMF) of Epirus"HPL in photodynamic therapy (PDT) alone and in combination with recombinant Interferon-a2b (IFN) and gemcitabine (GCB) in the treatment of human bladder cancer cells. The PMF was extracted from the dry herb with methanol, followed by liquid-liquid extraction with petroleum ether. T-24 bladder cancer cells were plated (105 cells/well) and placed in the incubator (370 C, 5%CO) for 24 hours prior to addition of drugs. PMF 60ug/ml was added and incubation continued. After 24 hours, the cells were subjected to laser light (630nm) treatment with 0, 1, 4 and 8 Joules. After reincubation for 24 hours, IFN, (50,000 IU) or GCB, (2ug/ml) was added to the PDT-treated cells. After this incubation cell survival was assessed by the MTT assay. PMF-PDT alone-induced percent cell kill of 0%, 8%, 44% and 80% versus 31%, 64 and 86 % for PMF-PDT and IFN, versus 63%, 80% and 88% for MPF-PDT plus GCB at 1, 2, 4 and 8 Joules respectively. IFN and GCB induced 20% and 53% cell kill respectively. Our data suggest that MPF may be an effective agent for in vitro photodynamic therapy. PMF-PDT combined with Intron A, or gemcitabine achieved improved kill of cultured bladder cancer cells. Confirmation of these results in preclinical studies may lead to clinical trials.

  7. Susceptibility of human head and neck cancer cells to combined inhibition of glutathione and thioredoxin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Sobhakumari

    Full Text Available Increased glutathione (GSH and thioredoxin (Trx metabolism are mechanisms that are widely implicated in resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. The current study determined if simultaneous inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism enhanced cell killing of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells by a mechanism involving oxidative stress. Inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO and auranofin (AUR, respectively, induced significant decreases in clonogenic survival compared to either drug alone in FaDu, Cal-27 and SCC-25 HNSCC cells in vitro and in vivo in Cal-27 xenografts. BSO+AUR significantly increased glutathione and thioredoxin oxidation and suppressed peroxiredoxin activity in vitro. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine completely reversed BSO+AUR-induced cell killing in FaDu and Cal-27 cells, while catalase and selenium supplementation only inhibited BSO+AUR-induced cell killing in FaDu cells. BSO+AUR decreased caspase 3/7 activity in HNSCC cells and significantly reduced the viability of both Bax/Bak double knockout (DKO and DKO-Bax reconstituted hematopoietic cells suggesting that necrosis was involved. BSO+AUR also significantly sensitized FaDu, Cal-27, SCC-25 and SQ20B cells to cell killing induced by the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib in vitro. These results support the conclusion that simultaneous inhibition of GSH and Trx metabolism pathways induces oxidative stress and clonogenic killing in HNSCCs and this strategy may be useful in sensitizing HNSCCs to EGFR inhibitors.

  8. DNA-repair, cell killing and normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahm-Daphi, J.; Dikomey, E.; Brammer, I.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Side effects of radiotherapy in normal tissue is determined by a variety of factors of which cellular and genetic contributions are described here. Material and methods: Review. Results: Normal tissue damage after irradiation is largely due to loss of cellular proliferative capacity. This can be due to mitotic cell death, apoptosis, or terminal differentiation. Dead or differentiated cells release cytokines which additionally modulate the tissue response. DNA damage, in particular non-reparable or misrepaired double-strand breaks are considered the basic lesion leading to G1-arrest and ultimately to cell inactivation. Conclusion: Evidence for genetic bases of normal tissue response, cell killing and DNA-repair capacity is presented. However, a direct link of all 3 endpoints has not yet been proved directly. (orig.) [de

  9. Conserved features of cancer cells define their sensitivity to HAMLET-induced death; c-Myc and glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, P; Aits, S; Puthia, M K; Urbano, A; Northen, T; Powers, S; Bowen, B; Chao, Y; Reindl, W; Lee, D Y; Sullivan, N L; Zhang, J; Trulsson, M; Yang, H; Watson, J D; Svanborg, C

    2011-12-01

    HAMLET is the first member of a new family of tumoricidal protein-lipid complexes that kill cancer cells broadly, while sparing healthy, differentiated cells. Many and diverse tumor cell types are sensitive to the lethal effect, suggesting that HAMLET identifies and activates conserved death pathways in cancer cells. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the difference in sensitivity between cancer cells and healthy cells. Using a combination of small-hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibition, proteomic and metabolomic technology, we identified the c-Myc oncogene as one essential determinant of HAMLET sensitivity. Increased c-Myc expression levels promoted sensitivity to HAMLET and shRNA knockdown of c-Myc suppressed the lethal response, suggesting that oncogenic transformation with c-Myc creates a HAMLET-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, HAMLET sensitivity was modified by the glycolytic state of tumor cells. Glucose deprivation sensitized tumor cells to HAMLET-induced cell death and in the shRNA screen, hexokinase 1 (HK1), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α modified HAMLET sensitivity. HK1 was shown to bind HAMLET in a protein array containing ∼8000 targets, and HK activity decreased within 15 min of HAMLET treatment, before morphological signs of tumor cell death. In parallel, HAMLET triggered rapid metabolic paralysis in carcinoma cells. Tumor cells were also shown to contain large amounts of oleic acid and its derivatives already after 15 min. The results identify HAMLET as a novel anti-cancer agent that kills tumor cells by exploiting unifying features of cancer cells such as oncogene addiction or the Warburg effect.

  10. Conserved features of cancer cells define their sensitivity of HAMLET-induced death; c-Myc and glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Petter; Puthia, Manoj Kumar; Aits, Sonja; Urbano, Alexander; Northen, Trent; Powers, Scott; Bowen, Ben; Chao, Yinxia; Reindl, Wolfgang; Lee, Do Yup; Sullivan, Nancy Liu; Zhang, Jianping; Trulsson, Maria; Yang, Henry; Watson, James; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    HAMLET is the first member of a new family of tumoricidal protein-lipid complexes that kill cancer cells broadly, while sparing healthy, differentiated cells. Many and diverse tumor cell types are sensitive to the lethal effect, suggesting that HAMLET identifies and activates conserved death pathways in cancer cells. Here we investigated the molecular basis for the difference in sensitivity between cancer cells and healthy cells. Using a combination of small hairpin RNA inhibition, proteomic and metabolomic technology we identified the c-Myc oncogene as one essential determinant of HAMLET sensitivity. Increased c-Myc expression levels promoted the sensitivity to HAMLET and shRNA knockdown of c-Myc suppressed the lethal response, suggesting that oncogenic transformation with c-Myc creates a HAMLET-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, the HAMLET sensitivity was modified by the glycolytic state of the tumor cells. Glucose deprivation sensitized tumor cells to HAMLET-induced cell death and in the shRNA screen Hexokinase 1, PFKFB1 and HIF1α modified HAMLET sensitivity. Hexokinase 1 was shown to bind HAMLET in a protein array containing approximately 8000 targets and Hexokinase activity decreased within 15 minutes of HAMLET treatment, prior to morphological signs of tumor cell death. In parallel, HAMLET triggered rapid metabolic paralysis in carcinoma cells. The glycolytic machinery was modified and glycolysis was shifted towards the pentose phosphate pathway. Tumor cells were also shown to contain large amounts of oleic acid and its derivatives already after 15 minutes. The results identify HAMLET as a novel anti-cancer agent that kills tumor cells by exploiting unifying features of cancer cells such as oncogene-addiction or the Warburg effect. PMID:21643007

  11. New trial evaluates investigational drug for endometrial and breast cancers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new clinical trial is testing ONC201, an investigational drug that in laboratory studies has been shown to kill breast and endometrial cancer cells most likely by destroying mitochondria within the tumor cells. Mitochondria are the “powerhouse” of the cell, and blocking its activity may kill tumor cells and shrink tumors in human patients.

  12. Photothermal effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the viability of BT-474 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Hung-Tao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsung-Pao [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tai, Nyan-Hwa, E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hwan-You, E-mail: hychang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-01

    Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were conjugated to an antibody of BT-474 cancer cells (f-MWCNTs-ab), and the photothermal effect of the f-MWCNTs-ab for BT-474 cancer cell destruction was demonstrated. After near-infrared irradiation, the f-MWCNTs-ab were more capable of killing cancer cells and possessed higher cell specificity than f-MWCNTs. Quantitative results showed that the viability of the cancer cells was affected by the concentration of the f-MWCNTs-ab solution, irradiation time, and settling time after irradiation. The membrane impermeable fluorescence dye ethidium bromide was used to detect cell viability after near-infrared irradiation, and the results agreed with those obtained from the Alamar Blue cell viability assay. The EtBr fluorescence results suggest that the cell membrane, attached to f-MWCNTs-ab, was damaged after irradiation, which led to cell death and necrosis. Using confocal microscopy, a few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell, indicating the endocytosis effect. The results not only explain the improved efficiency of thermotherapy but also indicate that necrosis may result from protein denaturation attributing to the heated f-MWCNTs-ab in the cell. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer f-MWCNTs conjugated with anti-HER2 antibody by chemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kill breast cancer cells by using low dose f-MWCNTs-ab due to photothermal effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use EtBr fluorescent to prove that the cell membrane was broken by heated f-MWCNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell indicating the endocytosis effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Necrosis may result from protein denaturation due to contact with the heated CNTs.

  13. Absence of synergistic enhancement of non-thermal effects of ultrasound on cell killing induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, T.; Kano, E.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the role of non-thermal effects (cavitation and direct effects) of ultrasound, in simultaneous combination with X-irradiation on the cytotoxicity of mouse L cells. Firstly, mouse L cells were exposed to X-rays and ultrasound (1 MHz continous wave, spatial peak temporal average intensity; 3.7 W/cm 2 ) simultaneously at 37 0 C under O 2 or Ar saturated conditions to examine the cavitational effect of ultrasound. Secondly, cells were exposed to X-rays and ultrasound at 37 0 C under N 2 O saturated conditions, which suppresses the cavitation, to examine the direct effects of ultrasound. The cavitational effect under O 2 and Ar saturated conditions induced an exponential decrease in cell survival, and resulted in an additive effect on cell killing with the combination of X-rays and ultrasound. The direct effect in the N 2 O conditions induced no cell killing and did not modify the cell killing induced by X-rays. These results suggested that the non-thermal effects of ultrasound did not interact synergistically with X-rays for cell killing. (author)

  14. Stressing the ubiquitin-proteasome system without 20S proteolytic inhibition selectively kills cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Anchoori

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells exhibit an increased requirement for ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation associated with an elevated metabolic turnover rate, and for specific signaling pathways, notably HPV E6-targeted degradation of p53 and PDZ proteins. Natural compounds with antioxidant properties including flavonoids and triterpenoids hold promise as anticancer agents by interfering with ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. An increasing body of evidence indicates that their α-β unsaturated carbonyl system is the molecular determinant for inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation up-stream of the catalytic sites of the 20S proteasome. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a new class of chalcone-based, potent and cell permeable chemical inhibitors of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, and a lead compound RAMB1. RAMB1 inhibits ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation without compromising the catalytic activities of the 20S proteasome, a mechanism distinct from that of Bortezomib. Treatment of cervical cancer cells with RAMB1 triggers unfolded protein responses, including aggresome formation and Hsp90 stabilization, and increases p53 steady state levels. RAMB1 treatment results in activation of lysosomal-dependent degradation pathways as a mechanism to compensate for increasing levels of poly-ubiquitin enriched toxic aggregates. Importantly, RAMB1 synergistically triggers cell death of cervical cancer cells when combined with the lysosome inhibitor Chloroquine.

  15. Interplay between Inflammation and Stemness in Cancer Cells: The Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small population of cancer cells that exhibit stemness. These cells contribute to cancer metastasis, treatment resistance, and relapse following therapy; therefore, they may cause malignancy and reduce the success of cancer treatment. Nuclear factor kappa B- (NF-κB- mediated inflammatory responses increase stemness in cancer cells, and CSCs constitutively exhibit higher NF-κB activation, which in turn increases their stemness. These opposite effects form a positive feedback loop that further amplifies inflammation and stemness in cancer cells, thereby expanding CSC populations in the tumor. Toll-like receptors (TLRs activate NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses when stimulated by carcinogenic microbes and endogenous molecules released from cells killed during cancer treatment. NF-κB activation by extrinsic TLR ligands increases stemness in cancer cells. Moreover, it was recently shown that increased NF-κB activity and inflammatory responses in CSCs may be caused by altered TLR signaling during the enrichment of stemness in cancer cells. Thus, the activation of TLR signaling by extrinsic and intrinsic factors drives a positive interplay between inflammation and stemness in cancer cells.

  16. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1-1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm-2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin.

  17. Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  18. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wei; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Li, Jessica; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC 50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC 50 around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs

  19. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Li, Jessica; Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-05-04

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC{sub 50} for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC{sub 50} around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  20. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs. Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS, we found that the IC50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 µM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC50 around 1 µM for SUM-149 and around 2 µM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs.

  1. Killing of melanoma cells and their metastases by human lactoferricin derivatives requires interaction with the cancer marker phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Sabrina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2014-10-01

    Despite favorable advancements in therapy cancer is still not curative in many cases, which is often due to inadequate specificity for tumor cells. In this study derivatives of a short cationic peptide derived from the human host defense peptide lactoferricin were optimized in their selective toxicity towards cancer cells. We proved that the target of these peptides is the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine (PS), specifically exposed on the surface of cancer cells. We have studied the membrane interaction of three peptides namely LF11-322, its N-acyl derivative 6-methyloctanoyl-LF11-322 and its retro repeat derivative R(etro)-DIM-P-LF11-322 with liposomes mimicking cancerous and non-cancerous cell membranes composed of PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. Calorimetric and permeability studies showed that N-acylation and even more the repeat derivative of LF11-322 leads to strongly improved interaction with the cancer mimic PS, whereas only the N-acyl derivative also slightly affects PC. Tryptophan fluorescence of selective peptide R-DIM-P-LF11-322 revealed specific peptide penetration into the PS membrane interface and circular dichroism showed change of its secondary structure by increase of proportion of β-sheets just in the presence of the cancer mimic. Data correlated with in vitro studies with cell lines of human melanomas, their metastases and melanocytes, revealing R-DIM-P-LF11-322 to exhibit strongly increased specificity for cancer cells. This indicates the need of high affinity to the target PS, a minimum length and net positive charge, an adequate but moderate hydrophobicity, and capability of adoption of a defined structure exclusively in presence of the target membrane for high antitumor activity.

  2. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benada, Jan; Macůrek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2015), s. 1912-1937 ISSN 2218-273X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-34264S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : checkpoint * DNA damage response * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Gold Nanotheranostics: Photothermal Therapy and Imaging of Mucin 7 Conjugated Antibody Nanoparticles for Urothelial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh Hsiao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To kill urothelial cancer cells while preserving healthy cells, this study used photothermal therapy (PTT. PTT techniques target urothelial cancer cells using gold nanoparticles (GNPs and a green light laser. Materials and Methods. The GNPs were conjugated with anti-Mucin 7 antibodies, which acted as a probe for targeting tumor cells. Conjugated GNPs were exposed to a green light laser (532 nm with sufficient thermal energy to kill the transitional cell carcinomas (TCCs. Results. According to our results, nanoparticles conjugated with Mucin 7 antibodies damaged all types of cancer cells (MBT2, T24, 9202, and 8301 at relatively low energy levels (i.e., 500 laser shots at 10 W/cm2 in power, 1.6 Hz in frequency, and 300 ms in duration. Nonconjugated nanoparticles required 30 W/cm2 or more to achieve the same effect. Cell damage was directly related to irradiation time and applied laser energy. Conclusions. The minimally invasive PTT procedure combined with Mucin 7 targeted GNPs is able to kill cancer cells and preserve healthy cells. The success of this treatment technique can likely be attributed to the lower amount of energy required to kill targeted cancer cells compared with that required to kill nontargeted cancer cells. Our in vitro pilot study yielded promising results; however, additional animal studies are required to confirm these findings.

  4. Hydrodynamic cavitation kills prostate cells and ablates benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itah, Zeynep; Oral, Ozlem; Perk, Osman Yavuz; Sesen, Muhsincan; Demir, Ebru; Erbil, Secil; Dogan-Ekici, A Isin; Ekici, Sinan; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is a physical phenomenon characterized by vaporization and bubble formation in liquids under low local pressures, and their implosion following their release to a higher pressure environment. Collapse of the bubbles releases high energy and may cause damage to exposed surfaces. We recently designed a set-up to exploit the destructive nature of hydrodynamic cavitation for biomedical purposes. We have previously shown that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill leukemia cells and erode kidney stones. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cavitation on prostate cells and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue. We showed that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill prostate cells in a pressure- and time-dependent manner. Cavitation did not lead to programmed cell death, i.e. classical apoptosis or autophagy activation. Following the application of cavitation, we observed no prominent DNA damage and cells did not arrest in the cell cycle. Hence, we concluded that cavitation forces directly damaged the cells, leading to their pulverization. Upon application to BPH tissues from patients, cavitation could lead to a significant level of tissue destruction. Therefore similar to ultrasonic cavitation, we propose that hydrodynamic cavitation has the potential to be exploited and developed as an approach for the ablation of aberrant pathological tissues, including BPH.

  5. Combining Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells with a Lipophilic Bisphosphonate Efficiently Kills Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs are now established as a central driver of fibrosis in human liver injury. In the presence of chronic or repeated injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC can occur, so there is interest in down-regulating aHSCs activity in order to treat these diseases. Here, we report that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are reduced in patients with liver cirrhosis, stimulating us to investigate possible interactions between Vγ9Vδ2 T cells and aHSCs. We find that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells kill aHSCs and killing is enhanced when aHSCs are pretreated with BPH-1236, a lipophilic analog of the bone resorption drug zoledronate. Cytotoxicity is mediated by direct cell-to-cell contact as shown by Transwell experiments and atomic force microscopy, with BPH-1236 increasing the adhesion between aHSCs and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Mechanistically, BPH-1236 functions by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase, leading to accumulation of the phosphoantigen isopentenyl diphosphate and recognition by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. The cytolytic process is largely dependent on the perforin/granzyme B pathway. In a Rag2−/−γc−/− immune-deficient mouse model, we find that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells home-in to the liver, and when accompanied by BPH-1236, kill not only orthotopic aHSCs but also orthotopic HCC tumors. Collectively, our results provide the first proof-of-concept of a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of fibrosis–cirrhosis–HCC diseases using adoptively transferred Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, combined with a lipophilic bisphosphonate.

  6. Stochastic Threshold Microdose Model for Cell Killing by Insoluble Metallic Nanomaterial Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel microdosimetric model for metallic nanomaterial-particles (MENAP)-induced cytotoxicity. The focus is on the engineered insoluble MENAP which represent a significant breakthrough in the design and development of new products for consumers, industry, and medicine. Increased production is rapidly occurring and may cause currently unrecognized health effects (e.g., nervous system dysfunction, heart disease, cancer); thus, dose-response models for MENAP-induced biological effects are needed to facilitate health risk assessment. The stochastic threshold microdose (STM) model presented introduces novel stochastic microdose metrics for use in constructing dose-response relationships for the frequency of specific cellular (e.g., cell killing, mutations, neoplastic transformation) or subcellular (e.g., mitochondria dysfunction) effects. A key metric is the exposure-time-dependent, specific burden (MENAP count) for a given critical target (e.g., mitochondria, nucleus). Exceeding a stochastic threshold specific burden triggers cell death. For critical targets in the cytoplasm, the autophagic mode of death is triggered. For the nuclear target, the apoptotic mode of death is triggered. Overall cell survival is evaluated for the indicated competing modes of death when both apply. The STM model can be applied to cytotoxicity data using Bayesian methods implemented via Markov chain Monte Carlo. PMID:21191483

  7. Inhibition of Glutathione and Thioredoxin Metabolism Enhances Sensitivity to Perifosine in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrean L. Simons

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that the Akt inhibitor, perifosine (PER, combined with inhibitors of glutathione (GSH and thioredoxin (Trx metabolism will induce cytotoxicity via metabolic oxidative stress in human head and neck cancer (HNSCC cells was tested. PER induced increases in glutathione disulfide (%GSSG in FaDu, Cal-27, and SCC-25 HNSCCs as well as causing significant clonogenic cell killing in FaDu and Cal-27, which was suppressed by simultaneous treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC. An inhibitor of GSH synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, sensitized Cal-27 and SCC-25 cells to PER-induced clonogenic killing as well as decreased total GSH and increased %GSSG. Additionally, inhibition of thioredoxin reductase activity (TrxRed with auranofin (AUR was able to induce PER sensitization in SCC-25 cells that were initially refractory to PER. These results support the conclusion that PER induces oxidative stress and clonogenic killing in HNSCC cells that is enhanced with inhibitors of GSH and Trx metabolism.

  8. The irreversible ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor neratinib interacts with the BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax to kill mammary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Avogadri-Connors, Francesca; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2018-03-04

    The irreversible ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor, neratinib, down-regulates the expression of ERBB1/2/4 as well as the levels of MCL-1 and BCL-XL. Venetoclax (ABT199) is a BCL-2 inhibitor. At physiologic concentrations neratinib interacted in a synergistic fashion with venetoclax to kill HER2 + and TNBC mammary carcinoma cells. This was associated with the drug-combination: reducing the expression and phosphorylation of ERBB1/2/3; in an eIF2α-dependent fashion reducing the expression of MCL-1 and BCL-XL and increasing the expression of Beclin1 and ATG5; and increasing the activity of the ATM-AMPKα-ULK1 S317 pathway which was causal in the formation of toxic autophagosomes. Although knock down of BAX or BAK reduced drug combination lethality, knock down of BAX and BAK did not prevent the drug combination from increasing autophagosome and autolysosome formation. Knock down of ATM, AMPKα, Beclin1 or over-expression of activated mTOR prevented the induction of autophagy and in parallel suppressed tumor cell killing. Knock down of ATM, AMPKα, Beclin1 or cathepsin B prevented the drug-induced activation of BAX and BAK whereas knock down of BID was only partially inhibitory. A 3-day transient exposure of established estrogen-independent HER2 + BT474 mammary tumors to neratinib or venetoclax did not significantly alter tumor growth whereas exposure to [neratinib + venetoclax] caused a significant 7-day suppression of growth by day 19. The drug combination neither altered animal body mass nor behavior. We conclude that venetoclax enhances neratinib lethality by facilitating toxic BH3 domain protein activation via autophagy which enhances the efficacy of neratinib to promote greater levels of cell killing.

  9. TRAIL-coated lipid-nanoparticles overcome resistance to soluble recombinant TRAIL in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Miguel, Diego; Gallego-Lleyda, Ana; Erviti-Ardanaz, Sandra; Anel, Alberto; Martinez-Lostao, Luis; Ayuso, José María; Fernández, Luis José; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pazo-Cid, Roberto; Del Agua, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one the types of cancer with higher prevalence and mortality. Apo2-Ligand/TRAIL is a TNF family member able to induce apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells. It has been tested in clinical trials against different types of human cancer including NSCLC. However, results of clinical trials have shown a limited efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies. Recently we have demonstrated that artificial lipid nanoparticles coated with bioactive Apo2L/TRAIL (LUV-TRAIL) greatly improved TRAIL cytotoxic ability being capable of killing chemoresistant hematological cancer cells. In the present work we have extended the study to NSCLC. Methods/patients. LUV-TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity was assessed on different NSCLC cell lines with different sensitivity to soluble TRAIL and on primary human tumor cells from three patients suffering from NSCLC cancer. We also tested LUV-TRAIL-cytotoxic ability in combination with several anti-tumor agents. Results. LUV-TRAIL exhibited a greater cytotoxic effect compared to soluble TRAIL both in A549 cells and primary human NSCLC cells. LUV-TRAIL-induced cell death was dependent on caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation. Moreover, combination of LUV-TRAIL with other anti-tumor agents such as flavopiridol, and SNS-032 clearly enhanced LUV-TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity against NSCLC cancer cells. Conclusion. The novel formulation of TRAIL based on displaying it on the surface of lipid nanoparticles greatly increases its anti-tumor activity and has clinical potential in cancer treatment. (paper)

  10. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  11. Combination of doxorubicin and low-intensity ultrasound causes a synergistic enhancement in cell killing and an additive enhancement in apoptosis induction in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toru; Kondo, Takashi; Ogawa, Ryohei; Feril, Loreto B; Zhao, Qing-Li; Watanabe, Akihiko; Tsukada, Kazuhiro

    2008-04-01

    Potential clinical use of ultrasound (US) in enhancing the effects of anticancer drugs in the treatment of cancers has been highlighted in previous reports. Increased uptake of drugs by the cancer cells due to US has been suggested as a mechanism. However, the precise mechanism of the enhancement has not yet been elucidated. Here, the combined effects of low-intensity pulsed US and doxorubicin (DOX) on cell killing and apoptosis induction of U937 cells, and mechanisms involved were investigated. Human myelomonocytic lymphoma U937 cells were used for the experiments. Experiments were conducted in 4 groups: (1) non-treated, (2) DOX treated (DOX), (3) US treated (US), and (4) combined (DOX + US). In DOX +US, cells were exposed to 5 microM DOX for 30 min and sonicated by 1 MHz pulsed US (PRF 100 Hz, DF 10%) at intensities of 0.2-0.5 W/cm(2) for 60 s. The cells were washed and incubated for 6 h. The viability was evaluated by Trypan blue dye exclusion test and apoptosis and incorporation of DOX was assessed by flow cytometry. Involvement of sonoporation in molecular incorporation was evaluated using FITC-dextran, hydroxyl radical formation was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance-spin trapping, membrane alteration including lipid peroxidation and membrane fluidity by DOX was evaluated using cis-parinaric acid and perylene fluorescence polarization method, respectively. Synergistic enhancement in cell killing and additive enhancement in induction of apoptosis were observed at and above 0.3 W/cm(2). No enhancement was observed at 0.2 W/cm(2) in cell killing and induction of apoptosis. Hydroxyl radicals formation was detected at and above 0.3 W/cm(2). The radicals were produced more in the DOX + US than US alone. Incorporation of DOX was increased 13% in DOX + US (vs. DOX) at 0.5 W/cm(2). Involvement of sonoporation for increase of drug uptake was suggested by experiment using FITC-labeled dextran. We made the hypothesis that DOX treatment made the cells weaken

  12. Enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity by gold nanoparticles in MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosli, Nur Shafawati binti; Rahman, Azhar Abdul [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Aziz, Azlan Abdul [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Nano-Biotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Shaharum [Nano-Biotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); School of Health Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Therapy combined with metallic nanoparticles is a new way to treat cancer, in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are injected through intravenous administration and bound to tumor sites. Radiotherapy aims to deliver a high therapeutic dose of ionizing radiation to the tumor without exceeding normal tissue tolerance. The use of AuNPs which is a high-atomic-number (Z) material in radiotherapy will provide a high probability for photon interaction by photoelectric effect. These provide advantages in terms of radiation dose enhancement. The high linear energy transfer and short range of photoelectric interaction products (photoelectrons, characteristic x-rays, Auger electrons) produce localized dose enhancement of the tumor. In this work, breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) are seeded in the 96-well plate and were treated with 13 nm AuNPs before they were irradiated with 6 MV and 10 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator at various radiation doses. To validate the enhanced killing effect, both with and without AuNPs MCF-7 cells is irradiated simultaneously. By comparison, the results show that AuNPs significantly enhance cancer killing.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans modulates extracellular killing by neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfia eQureshi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently established a key role for host sphingomyelin synthase (SMS in the regulation of the killing activity of neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans. In this work, we studied the effect of C. neoformans on the killing activity of neutrophils and whether SMS would still be a player against C. neoformans in immunocompromised mice lacking T and NK cells (Tgε26 mice. To this end, we analyzed whether C. neoformans would have any effect on neutrophil survival and killing in vitro and in vivo. We show that unlike C. albicans, neither the presence nor the capsule size of C. neoformans cells have any effect on neutrophil viability. Interestingly, melanized C. neoformans cells totally abrogated the killing activity of neutrophils. Next, we monitored how exposure of neutrophils to C. neoformans cells would interfere with any further killing activity of the medium and found that pre-incubation with live but not heat-killed fungal cells significantly inhibits further killing activity of the medium. We next studied whether activation of SMS at the site of C. neoformans infection is dependent on T and NK cells. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI tissue imaging in infected lung we found that similarly to previous observations in the isogenic wild type CBA/J mice, SM 16:0 levels are significantly elevated at the site of infection in mice lacking T and NK cells but only at early time points. This study highlights that C. neoformans may negatively regulate the killing activity of neutrophils and that SMS activation in neutrophils appears to be partially independent of T and/or NK cells.

  14. Sensitivity of cancer cells to truncated diphtheria toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin (DT has been utilized as a prospective anti-cancer agent for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic therapy to otherwise untreatable neoplasia. DT is an extremely potent toxin for which the entry of a single molecule into a cell can be lethal. DT has been targeted to cancer cells by deleting the cell receptor-binding domain and combining the remaining catalytic portion with targeting proteins that selectively bind to the surface of cancer cells. It has been assumed that "receptorless" DT cannot bind to and kill cells. In the present study, we report that "receptorless" recombinant DT385 is in fact cytotoxic to a variety of cancer cell lines.In vitro cytotoxicity of DT385 was measured by cell proliferation, cell staining and apoptosis assays. For in vivo studies, the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM system was used to evaluate the effect of DT385 on angiogenesis. The CAM and mouse model system was used to evaluate the effect of DT385 on HEp3 and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC tumor growth, respectively.Of 18 human cancer cell lines tested, 15 were affected by DT385 with IC(50 ranging from 0.12-2.8 microM. Furthermore, high concentrations of DT385 failed to affect growth arrested cells. The cellular toxicity of DT385 was due to the inhibition of protein synthesis and induction of apoptosis. In vivo, DT385 diminished angiogenesis and decreased tumor growth in the CAM system, and inhibited the subcutaneous growth of LLC tumors in mice.DT385 possesses anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activity and may have potential as a therapeutic agent.

  15. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, C.K.C.

    1982-01-01

    The subject matter of this investigation concerns the killing and mutagenic effects induced by far-UV radiation and broad spectra of black, white and gold lights. Applying radiation directly on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells, far-UV is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Cells in the G1/early S boundary are the most sensitive to far-UV or unfiltered fluorescent lights. When synchronous cells are irradiated with moderate doses of far-UV or unfiltered broad spectra of black light, mutations to 6-TG and ouabain resistance are slightly higher in early S period than in the remaining parts of the cell cycle. Mutation induction of 6-TG, ouabain or DT resistance is increased in the split-dose samples of the asynchronous and synchronous CHO cells. CHO cells predominantly express an error-prone repair mechanism after photoirradiation

  16. Enhancement of radiation effect on cancer cells by gold-pHLIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosh, Michael P.; Wijesinghe, Dayanjali D.; Shrestha, Samana; Lanou, Robert; Huang, Yun Hu; Hasselbacher, Thomas; Fox, David; Neretti, Nicola; Sun, Shouheng; Katenka, Natallia; Cooper, Leon N; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that gold nanoparticles can increase the effectiveness of radiation on cancer cells. Improved radiation effectiveness would allow lower radiation doses given to patients, reducing adverse effects; alternatively, it would provide more cancer killing at current radiation doses. Damage from radiation and gold nanoparticles depends in part on the Auger effect, which is very localized; thus, it is important to place the gold nanoparticles on or in the cancer cells. In this work, we use the pH-sensitive, tumor-targeting agent, pH Low-Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), to tether 1.4-nm gold nanoparticles to cancer cells. We find that the conjugation of pHLIP to gold nanoparticles increases gold uptake in cells compared with gold nanoparticles without pHLIP, with the nanoparticles distributed mostly on the cellular membranes. We further find that gold nanoparticles conjugated to pHLIP produce a statistically significant decrease in cell survival with radiation compared with cells without gold nanoparticles and cells with gold alone. In the context of our previous findings demonstrating efficient pHLIP-mediated delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors, the obtained results serve as a foundation for further preclinical evaluation of dose enhancement. PMID:25870296

  17. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  18. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  19. T-peptide Enhances the Killing Effects of Cisplatinum on Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi ZHANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective T peptide is extensively used in anti-tumor treatment. The aims of this study were to investigate whether T peptide enhances cisplatinum efficiency while reducing its side effects and to identify its effective mechanisms. Methods (1 Human macrophage U937 cells were treated with T peptide and/or cisplatinum. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ of each group were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; (2 Xenograft mouse models of human lung cancer were treated with T peptide and/or cisplatinum once every five days for three times. Tumor volumes were measured during treatment; (3 The percentages of macrophages in the peripheral blood of the xenograft mouse models were measured by FACS. Results (1 Compared with other groups, the level of TNF-α was significantly higher in the human macrophage U937 cells that were treated with T peptide combined with cisplatinum. The levels of IFN-γ were significantly higher in human macrophage U937 cells that were treated with T peptide alone or T peptide combined with cisplatinum; (2 In the xenograft mouse models, T peptide combined with cisplatinum treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth without weight loss compared with the other groups; (3 The percentages of macrophages in the peripheral blood were significantly higher in the xenograft mouse models that were treated with T peptide combined with cisplatinum compared with in the other groups. Conclusion T peptide promotes macrophage proliferation and increases tumor cell killing factors (TNF-α, IFN-γ in vitro. Moreover, T peptide enhances the efficacy of cisplatin and reduces its toxicity in vivo.

  20. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  1. NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy: from basic biology to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yin, Jie; Li, Ting; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Leavenworth, JianMei; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which recognize and kill target cells independent of antigen specificity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching, play pivotal roles in immune defence against tumors. However, tumor cells often acquire the ability to escape NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Thus, understanding mechanisms underlying regulation of NK cell phenotype and function within the tumor environment is instrumental for designing new approaches to improve the current cell-based immunotherapy. In this review, we elaborate the main biological features and molecular mechanisms of NK cells that pertain to regulation of NK cell-mediated anti-tumor activity. We further overview current clinical approaches regarding NK cell-based cancer therapy, including cytokine infusion, adoptive transfer of autologous or allogeneic NK cells, applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing NK cells and adoptive transfer of memory-like NK cells. With these promising clinical outcomes and fuller understanding the basic questions raised in this review, we foresee that NK cell-based approaches may hold great potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Rapamycin potentiates cytotoxicity by docetaxel possibly through downregulation of Survivin in lung cancer cells

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    Li Hui

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate whether rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin, can potentiate the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in lung cancer cells and to probe the mechanism underlying such enhancement. Methods Lung cancer cells were treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effect on the proliferation of lung cancer cells was evaluated using the MTT method, and cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Protein expression and level of phosphorylation were assayed using Western Blot method. Results Co-treatment of rapamycin and docetaxel was found to favorably enhance the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in four lung cancer cell lines. This tumoricidal boost is associated with a reduction in the expression and phosphorylation levels of Survivin and ERK1/2, respectively. Conclusion The combined application of mTOR inhibitor and docetaxel led to a greater degree of cancer cell killing than that by either compound used alone. Therefore, this combination warrants further investigation in its suitability of serving as a novel therapeutic scheme for treating advanced and recurrent lung cancer patients.

  3. Increased killing of SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma cells after the combination of Pc 4 photodynamic therapy and dasatinib is associated with enhanced caspase-3 activity and ceramide synthase 1 upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEPAROVIC, DUSKA; BREEN, PAUL; BOPPANA, NITHIN B.; VAN BUREN, ERIC; JOSEPH, NICHOLAS; KRAVEKA, JACQUELINE M.; RAHMANIYAN, MEHRDAD; LI, LI; GUDZ, TATYANA I.; BIELAWSKA, ALICJA; BAI, AIPING; BIELAWSKI, JACEK; PIERCE, JASON S.; KORBELIK, MLADEN

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is not always effective as an anticancer treatment, therefore, PDT is combined with other anticancer agents for improved efficacy. The combination of dasatinib and PDT with the silicone phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 was assessed for increased killing of SCCVII mouse squamous cell carcinoma cells, a preclinical model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using apoptotic markers and colony formation as experimental end-points. Because each of these treatments regulates the metabolism of the sphingolipid ceramide, their effects on mRNA levels of ceramide synthase, a ceramide-producing enzyme, and the sphingolipid profile were determined. PDT + dasatinib induced an additive loss of clonogenicity. Unlike PDT alone or PDT + dasatinib, dasatinib induced zVAD-fmk-dependent cell killing. PDT or dasatinib-induced caspase-3 activation was potentiated after the combination. PDT alone induced mitochondrial depolarization, and the effect was inhibited after the combination. Annexin V+ and propidium iodide+ cells remained at control levels after treatments. In contrast to PDT alone, dasatinib induced upregulation of ceramide synthase 1 mRNA, and the effect was enhanced after the combination. Dasatinib induced a modest increase in C20:1-and C22-ceramide but had no effect on total ceramide levels. PDT increased the levels of 12 individual ceramides and total ceramides, and the addition of dasatinib did not affect these increases. PDT alone decreased substantially sphingosine levels and inhibited the activity of acid ceramidase, an enzyme that converts ceramide to sphingosine. The data suggest that PDT-induced increases in ceramide levels do not correlate with ceramide synthase mRNA levels but rather with inhibition of ceramidase. Cell killing was zVAD-fmk-sensitive after dasatinib but not after either PDT or the combination and enhanced cell killing after the combination correlated with potentiated caspase-3 activation and upregulation of

  4. Tumour-cell killing by X-rays and immunity quantitated in a mouse model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porteous, D.D.; Porteous, K.M.; Hughes, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the interaction of X-rays and immune cytotoxicity in tumour control, an experimental mouse model system has been used in which quantitative anti-tumour immunity was raised in prospective recipients of tumour-cell suspensions exposed to varying doses of X-rays in vitro before injection. Findings reported here indicate that, whilst X-rays kill a proportion of cells, induced immunity deals with a fixed number dependent upon the immune status of the host, and that X-rays and anti-tumour immunity do not act synergistically in tumour-cell killing. The tumour used was the ascites sarcoma BP8. (author)

  5. T-Cell Warriors—Equipped to Kill Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    When the body recognizes tumor cells as foreign, a natural immune response arises to attack them. Unfortunately, tumors have ways to evade immune surveillance systems and antitumor responses are often too weak to defeat the disease. Rather than relying on the body’s natural response, scientists can now manipulate a patient’s own immune cells so that they latch on to tumor cells by recognizing specific proteins on their surface. A type of immune cell that has been explored for this purpose is the killer (cytotoxic) T cell, which eliminates cells infected by viruses, damaged cells, and tumor cells.

  6. Ku70 inhibits gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Jiali; Hui, Pingping; Meng, Wenying; Wang, Na; Xiang, Shihao

    2017-01-01

    The current study focused on the role of Ku70, a DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex protein, in pancreatic cancer cell resistance to gemcitabine. In both established cell lines (Mia-PaCa-2 and PANC-1) and primary human pancreatic cancer cells, shRNA/siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ku70 significantly sensitized gemcitabine-induced cell death and proliferation inhibition. Meanwhile, gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and subsequent pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis were also potentiated with Ku70 knockdown. On the other hand, exogenous overexpression of Ku70 in Mia-PaCa-2 cells suppressed gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and subsequent cell apoptosis. In a severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice Mia-PaCa-2 xenograft model, gemcitabine-induced anti-tumor activity was remarkably pontificated when combined with Ku70 shRNA knockdown in the xenografts. The results of this preclinical study imply that Ku70 might be a primary resistance factor of gemcitabine, and Ku70 silence could significantly chemo-sensitize gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. - Highlights: • Ku70 knockdown sensitizes gemcitabine-induced killing of pancreatic cancer cells. • Ku70 knockdown facilitates gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis. • Ku70 overexpression deceases gemcitabine's sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells. • Ku70 knockdown sensitizes gemcitabine-induced anti-tumor activity in vivo.

  7. Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy II. Cell-internal factors for conditional growth in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephanie A; Gromeier, Matthias

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of virus-host interactions have fueled new studies in the field of oncolytic viruses. The first part of this review explained how cell-external factors, such as cellular receptors, influence tumor tropism and specificity of oncolytic virus candidates. In the second part of this review, we focus on cellinternal factors that mediate tumor-specific virus growth. An oncolytic virus must be able to replicate within cancerous cells and kill them without collateral damage to healthy surrounding cells. This desirable property is inherent to some proposed oncolytic viral agents or has been achieved by genetic manipulation in others.

  8. The anti-fibrotic agent pirfenidone synergizes with cisplatin in killing tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Boateng, Kingsley; Noyes, David; Antonia, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-fibrotic drugs such as pirfenidone have been developed for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Because activated fibroblasts in inflammatory conditions have similar characteristics as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and CAFs contribute actively to the malignant phenotype, we believe that anti-fibrotic drugs have the potential to be repurposed as anti-cancer drugs. The effects of pirfenidone alone and in combination with cisplatin on human patient-derived CAF cell lines and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. The impact on cell death in vitro as well as tumor growth in a mouse model was determined. Annexin V/PI staining and Western blot analysis were used to characterize cell death. Synergy was assessed with the combination index method using Calcusyn software. Pirfenidone alone induced apoptotic cell death in lung CAFs at a high concentration (1.5 mg/mL). However, co-culture in vitro experiments and co-implantation in vivo experiments showed that the combination of low doses of cisplatin (10 μM) and low doses of pirfenidone (0.5 mg/mL), in both CAFs and tumors, lead to increased cell death and decreased tumor progression, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone in NSCLC cells (A549 and H157 cells) leads to increased apoptosis and synergistic cell death. Our studies reveal for the first time that the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone is active in preclinical models of NSCLC and therefore may be a new therapeutic approach in this disease. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2162-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. Peptide-targeted, stimuli-responsive polymersomes for delivering a cancer stemness inhibitor to cancer stem cell microtumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandish, Fataneh; Froberg, James; Borowicz, Pawel; Wilkinson, John C; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2018-03-01

    Often cancer relapses after an initial response to chemotherapy because of the tumor's heterogeneity and the presence of progenitor stem cells, which can renew. To overcome drug resistance, metastasis, and relapse in cancer, a promising approach is the inhibition of cancer stemness. In this study, the expression of the neuropilin-1 receptor in both pancreatic and prostate cancer stem cells was identified and targeted with a stimuli-responsive, polymeric nanocarrier to deliver a stemness inhibitor (napabucasin) to cancer stem cells. Reduction-sensitive amphiphilic block copolymers PEG 1900 -S-S-PLA 6000 and the N 3 -PEG 1900 -PLA 6000 were synthesized. The tumor penetrating iRGD peptide-hexynoic acid conjugate was linked to the N 3 -PEG 1900 -PLA 6000 polymer via a Cu 2+ catalyzed "Click" reaction. Subsequently, this peptide-polymer conjugate was incorporated into polymersomes for tumor targeting and tissue penetration. We prepared polymersomes containing 85% PEG 1900 -S-S-PLA 6000 , 10% iRGD-polymer conjugate, and 5% DPPE-lissamine rhodamine dye. The iRGD targeted polymersomes encapsulating the cancer stemness inhibitor napabucasin were internalized in both prostate and pancreatic cancer stem cells. The napabucasin encapsulated polymersomes significantly (p < .05) reduced the viability of both prostate and pancreatic cancer stem cells and decreased the stemness protein expression notch-1 and nanog compared to the control and vesicles without any drug. The napabucasin encapsulated polymersome formulations have the potential to lead to a new direction in prostate and pancreatic cancer therapy by penetrating deeply into the tumors, releasing the encapsulated stemness inhibitor, and killing cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: A New DNA Virus Associated with Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Margo; You, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV or MCV) is a novel human polyomavirus that has been discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive skin cancer. MCPyV infection is widespread in the general population. MCPyV-associated MCC is one of the most aggressive skin cancers, killing more patients than other well-known cancers such as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Currently, however, there is no effective drug for curing this cancer. The incidence of MCC has tripled over the past two decades. With the widespread infection of MCPyV and the increase in MCC diagnoses, it is critical to better understand the biology of MCPyV and its oncogenic potential. In this chapter, we summarize recent discoveries regarding MCPyV molecular virology, host cellular tropism, mechanisms of MCPyV oncoprotein-mediated oncogenesis, and current therapeutic strategies for MCPyV-associated MCC. We also present epidemiological evidence for MCPyV infection in HIV patients and links between MCPyV and non-MCC human cancers.

  11. Combination of anti-retroviral drugs and radioimmunotherapy specifically kills infected cells from HIV infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Tsukrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT, a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infect-ed cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely down-regulated in patients on an-tiretroviral therapy (ART, we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells us-ing both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal anti-body to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. conjugated to the human monoclonal antibody 2556, which binds to HIV gp41. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: ten on ART and five ART-naive. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART, and supports continued development of 213Bi

  12. Mechanoresponsive stem cells to target cancer metastases through biophysical cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linan; Zhang, Shirley X; Liao, Wenbin; Farhoodi, Henry P; Wong, Chi W; Chen, Claire C; Ségaliny, Aude I; Chacko, Jenu V; Nguyen, Lily P; Lu, Mengrou; Polovin, George; Pone, Egest J; Downing, Timothy L; Lawson, Devon A; Digman, Michelle A; Zhao, Weian

    2017-07-26

    Despite decades of effort, little progress has been made to improve the treatment of cancer metastases. To leverage the central role of the mechanoenvironment in cancer metastasis, we present a mechanoresponsive cell system (MRCS) to selectively identify and treat cancer metastases by targeting the specific biophysical cues in the tumor niche in vivo. Our MRCS uses mechanosensitive promoter-driven mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based vectors, which selectively home to and target cancer metastases in response to specific mechanical cues to deliver therapeutics to effectively kill cancer cells, as demonstrated in a metastatic breast cancer mouse model. Our data suggest a strong correlation between collagen cross-linking and increased tissue stiffness at the metastatic sites, where our MRCS is specifically activated by the specific cancer-associated mechano-cues. MRCS has markedly reduced deleterious effects compared to MSCs constitutively expressing therapeutics. MRCS indicates that biophysical cues, specifically matrix stiffness, are appealing targets for cancer treatment due to their long persistence in the body (measured in years), making them refractory to the development of resistance to treatment. Our MRCS can serve as a platform for future diagnostics and therapies targeting aberrant tissue stiffness in conditions such as cancer and fibrotic diseases, and it should help to elucidate mechanobiology and reveal what cells "feel" in the microenvironment in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Breast Cancer-Initiating Cells: Insights into Novel Treatment Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santilli, Guido; Binda, Mara; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer may arise from mutated mammary stem/progenitor cells which have been termed breast cancer-initiating cells (BCIC). BCIC identified in clinical specimens based on membrane phenotype (CD44 + /CD24 −/low and/or CD133 + expression) or enzymatic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 + ), have been demonstrated to have stem/progenitor cell properties, and are tumorigenic when injected in immunocompromized mice at very low concentrations. BCIC have also been isolated and in vitro propagated as non-adherent spheres of undifferentiated cells, and stem cell patterns have been recognized even in cancer cell lines. Recent findings indicate that aberrant regulation of self renewal is central to cancer stem cell biology. Alterations in genes involved in self-renewal pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, sonic hedgehog, PTEN and BMI, proved to play a role in breast cancer progression. Hence, targeting key elements mediating the self renewal of BCIC represents an attractive option, with a solid rationale, clearly identifiable molecular targets, and adequate knowledge of the involved pathways. Possible concerns are related to the poor knowledge of tolerance and efficacy of inhibiting self-renewal mechanisms, because the latter are key pathways for a variety of biological functions and it is unknown whether their interference would kill BCIC or simply temporarily stop them. Thus, efforts to develop BCIC-targeted therapies should not only be focused on interfering on self-renewal, but could seek to identify additional molecular targets, like those involved in regulating EMT-related pathways, in reversing the MDR phenotype, in inducing differentiation and controlling cell survival pathways

  14. Relationship of colony-stimulating activity to apparent kill of human colony-forming cells by irradiation and hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxmeyer, H.E.; Galbraith, P.R.; Baker, F.L.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of human bone marrow cells were subjected to 137 Cs irradiation in vitro and then cultured in semisolid agar medium. Cultures of irradiated cells were stimulated with colony-stimulating activity (CSA) of different potencies, and it was found that the amount of stimulation applied to cultures influenced the apparent kill of colony-forming cells (CFC). It was also found that the effects of irradiation on colony formation were not confined to CFC kill since medium conditioned by cells during irradiation exhibited stimulatory and inhibitory properties after treatment by 600 and 1000 rads, respectively. Studies in which irradiated cells were pretreated with hydroxyurea indicated that CFC in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were particularly sensitive to low doses of irradiation. The proliferative capacity of CFC surviving 1000 rads was undiminished as judged by their ability to form large colonies. Estimates of CFC kill by hydroxyurea were also affected by the level of CSA

  15. Enhanced spermatogonial stem cell killing and reduced translocation yield from X-irradiated 101/H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattanach, B M; Kirk, M J

    1987-01-01

    The spermatogonial stem cells of 101/H mice have been found to be more sensitive to killing by acute X-ray doses than those of the 'standard' C3H/HeH x 101/H F/sub 1/ hybrid. Duration of the sterile period was longer throughout the 0.5-8.0-Gy dose range tested and 'recovered' testis weights, taken after recovery of fertility, were more severely reduced. The shapes of the sterile period dose-response curves were similar, but with the 101/H mice the plateau occurred at 3-5 Gy, rather than at 6 Gy. An equivalent observation was made with the testis weight data. The translocation dose-response curve was bell-shaped, as previously found with the hybrid, but yields were lower at all but the lowest doses. Notably, peak yields occurred at 3-5 Gy, rather than at 6 Gy. The altered stem cell killing and genetic responses may be explained either by a higher proportion of radiosensitive cells in the heterogeneous stem cell population or by a higher ratio of cell killing to recoverable chromosome damage which might imply a reduced repair capacity. (Auth.). 43 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Geisen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1. Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  17. Killing tensors and conformal Killing tensors from conformal Killing vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Raffaele; Edgar, S Brian; Barnes, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Koutras has proposed some methods to construct reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors (which are, in general, irreducible) when a pair of orthogonal conformal Killing vectors exist in a given space. We give the completely general result demonstrating that this severe restriction of orthogonality is unnecessary. In addition, we correct and extend some results concerning Killing tensors constructed from a single conformal Killing vector. A number of examples demonstrate that it is possible to construct a much larger class of reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors than permitted by the Koutras algorithms. In particular, by showing that all conformal Killing tensors are reducible in conformally flat spaces, we have a method of constructing all conformal Killing tensors, and hence all the Killing tensors (which will in general be irreducible) of conformally flat spaces using their conformal Killing vectors

  18. ING1 and 5-azacytidine act synergistically to block breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satbir Thakur

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of Growth (ING proteins are epigenetic "readers" that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3 and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT and histone deacetylase (HDAC complexes to chromatin.Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that target the same epigenetic mechanism such as the HDAC inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat or a different epigenetic mechanism such as 5-azacytidine (5azaC, which inhibits DNA methyl transferases. Simultaneous treatment of breast cancer cell lines with LBH589 and 5azaC did not show significant synergy in killing cells. However, combination treatment of ING1 with either LBH589 or 5azaC did show synergy. The combination of ING1b with 5azaC, which targets two distinct epigenetic mechanisms, was more effective at lower doses and enhanced apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. ING1b plus 5azaC also acted synergistically to increase γH2AX staining indicating significant levels of DNA damage were induced. Adenoviral delivery of ING1b with 5azaC also inhibited cancer cell growth in a murine xenograft model and led to tumor regression when viral concentration was optimized in vivo.These data show that targeting distinct epigenetic pathways can be more effective in blocking cancer cell line growth than targeting the same pathway with multiple agents, and that using viral delivery of epigenetic regulators can be more effective in synergizing with a chemical agent than using two chemotherapeutic agents. This study also indicates that the ING1 epigenetic regulator may have additional activities in the cell when expressed at high levels.

  19. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

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    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  20. [gammadelta T cells stimulated by zoledronate kill osteosarcoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Yang, Chao; Cao, Zhen-Guo; Li, Zhao-Xu; Ye, Zhao-Ming

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of human γδT cells from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo and evaluate the relavent pathways. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)of healthy donors were stimulated by single dose zoledronate and cultured in the present of IL-2 for two weeks, analysising the percentage of γδT cells on a FACSCalibur cytometer.Study the cytotoxicity of γδT cells against the osteosarcoma line HOS using LDH release assay kit. Pre-treatment of γδT cells with anti-human γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A to bolck the relavent pathways for evaluating the mechenisms of its cytotoxicity. In vivo, BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously osteosarcoma cell HOS for developing hypodermal tumors. And they were randomized into two groups: unteated group, γδT cell therapy group. Tumor volume and weight of the two groups were compared. After two weeks of culture, γδT cells from zoledronate-stimulated PBMCs could reach (95±3)%. When the E:T as 6:1, 12:1, 25:1, 50:1, the percentage of osteosarcoma cell HOS killed by γδT cells was 26.8%, 31.5%, 37.8%, 40.9%, respectively.When anti-huma γδTCR antibody, anti-human NKG2D antibody and concanamycin A blocked the relavent pathways, the percentage was 32.3%, 4.7%, 16.7% ( E:T as 25:1), respectively. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rate of the group of γδT cell therapy was 42.78%. γδT cells derived from PBMCs stimulated by zoledronate can acquired pure γδT cells. And they show strong cytoxicity against osteosarcoma cell line HOS in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  2. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Choi, Eun Ha; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  3. Killing machines: three pore-forming proteins of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of early multicellular eukaryotes 400–500 million years ago required a defensive strategy against microbial invasion. Pore-forming proteins containing the membrane-attack-complex-perforin (MACPF) domain were selected as the most efficient means to destroy bacteria or virally infected cells. The mechanism of pore formation by the MACPF domain is distinctive in that pore formation is purely physical and unspecific. The MACPF domain polymerizes, refolds, and inserts itself into bilayer membranes or bacterial outer cell walls. The displacement of surface lipid/carbohydrate molecules by the polymerizing MACPF domain creates clusters of large, water-filled holes that destabilize the barrier function and provide access for additional anti-bacterial or anti-viral effectors to sensitive sites that complete the destruction of the invader via enzymatic or chemical attack. The highly efficient mechanism of anti-microbial defense by a combined physical and chemical strategy using pore-forming MACPF-proteins has been retargeted during evolution of vertebrates and mammals for three purposes: (1) to kill extracellular bacteria C9/polyC9 evolved in conjunction with complement, (2) to kill virus infected and cancer cells perforin-1/polyperforin-1 CTL evolved targeted by NK and CTL, and (3) to kill intracellular bacteria transmembrane perforin-2/putative polyperforin-2 evolved targeted by phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Our laboratory has been involved in the discovery and description of each of the three pore-formers that will be reviewed here. PMID:24293008

  4. TRAIL-receptor preferences in pancreatic cancer cells revisited: Both TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 have a licence to kill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, Andrea; Yu, Rui; Zwacka, Ralf M.

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL is a potent and specific inducer of apoptosis in tumour cells and therefore is a possible new cancer treatment. It triggers apoptosis by binding to its cognate, death-inducing receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. In order to increase its activity, receptor-specific ligands and agonistic antibodies have been developed and some cancer types, including pancreatic cancer, have been reported to respond preferentially to TRAIL-R1 triggering. The aim of the present study was to examine an array of TRAIL-receptor specific variants on a number of pancreatic cancer cells and test the generality of the concept of TRAIL-R1 preference in these cells. TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 specific sTRAIL variants were designed and tested on a number of pancreatic cancer cells for their TRAIL-receptor preference. These sTRAIL variants were produced in HEK293 cells and were secreted into the medium. After having measured and normalised the different sTRAIL variant concentrations, they were applied to pancreatic and control cancer cells. Twenty-four hours later apoptosis was measured by DNA hypodiploidy assays. Furthermore, the specificities of the sTRAIL variants were validated in HCT116 cells that were silenced either for TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. Our results show that some pancreatic cancer cells use TRAIL-R1 to induce cell death, whereas other pancreatic carcinoma cells such as AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells trigger apoptosis via TRAIL-R2. This observation extended to cells that were naturally TRAIL-resistant and had to be sensitised by silencing of XIAP (Panc1 cells). The measurement of TRAIL-receptor expression by FACS revealed no correlation between receptor preferences and the relative levels of TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 on the cellular surface. These results demonstrate that TRAIL-receptor preferences in pancreatic cancer cells are variable and that predictions according to cancer type are difficult and that determining factors to inform the optimal TRAIL-based treatments still have to be identified

  5. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S Klar

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC.We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165 peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels.These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment.

  6. Effects of radiation from a radiofrequency identification (RFID) microchip on human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Henry C; Chan, Ho Wing; Singh, Narendra P

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency identification (RFID) microchips are used to remotely identify objects, e.g. an animal in which a chip is implanted. A passive RFID microchip absorbs energy from an external source and emits a radiofrequency identification signal which is then decoded by a detector. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the radiofrequency energy emitted by a RFID microchip on human cancer cells. Molt-4 leukemia, BT474 breast cancer, and HepG2 hepatic cancer cells were exposed in vitro to RFID microchip-emitted radiofrequency field for 1 h. Cells were counted before and after exposure. Effects of pretreatment with the spin-trap compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone or the iron-chelator deferoxamine were also investigated. Results We found that the energy effectively killed/retarded the growth of the three different types of cancer cells, and the effect was blocked by the spin-trap compound or the iron-chelator, whereas an inactive microchip and energy from the external source had no significant effect on the cells. Conclusions Data of the present study suggest that radiofrequency field from the microchip affects cancer cells via the Fenton Reaction. Implantation of RFID microchips in tumors may provide a new method for cancer treatment.

  7. Pediatric medulloblastoma xenografts including molecular subgroup 3 and CD133+ and CD15+ cells are sensitive to killing by oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Gregory K; Moore, Blake P; Nan, Li; Kelly, Virginia M; Etminan, Tina; Langford, Catherine P; Xu, Hui; Han, Xiaosi; Markert, James M; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2016-02-01

    Childhood medulloblastoma is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies, including surgery, craniospinal radiation, and chemotherapy. Innate therapeutic resistance of some aggressive pediatric medulloblastoma has been attributed to a subpopulation of cells, termed cancer-initiating cells or cancer stemlike cells (CSCs), marked by the surface protein CD133 or CD15. Brain tumors characteristically contain areas of pathophysiologic hypoxia, which has been shown to drive the CSC phenotype leading to heightened invasiveness, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Novel therapies that target medulloblastoma CSCs are needed to improve outcomes and decrease toxicity. We hypothesized that oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (oHSV) therapy could effectively infect and kill pediatric medulloblastoma cells, including CSCs marked by CD133 or CD15. Using 4 human pediatric medulloblastoma xenografts, including 3 molecular subgroup 3 tumors, which portend worse patient outcomes, we determined the expression of CD133, CD15, and the primary HSV-1 entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Infectability and cytotoxicity of clinically relevant oHSVs (G207 and M002) were determined in vitro and in vivo by FACS, immunofluorescent staining, cytotoxicity assays, and murine survival studies. We demonstrate that hypoxia increased the CD133+ cell fraction, while having the opposite effect on CD15 expression. We established that all 4 xenografts, including the CSCs, expressed CD111 and were highly sensitive to killing by G207 or M002. Pediatric medulloblastoma, including Group 3 tumors, may be an excellent target for oHSV virotherapy, and a clinical trial in medulloblastoma is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The action of microsecond-pulsed plasma-activated media on the inactivation of human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Jeon, Su Nam; Park, Bong Sang; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we have generated reactive species (RS) through microsecond-pulsed plasma (MPP) in the cell culture media using a Marx generator with point–point electrodes of approximately 0.06 J discharge energy/pulse. RS generated in culture media through MPP have a selective action between growth of the H460 lung cancer cells and L132 normal lung cells. We observed that MPP-activated media (MPP-AM) induced apoptosis on H460 lung cancer cells through an oxidative DNA damage cascade. Additionally, we studied the apoptosis-related mRNA expression, DNA oxidation and polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleaved analysis from treated cancer cells. The result proves that radicals generated through MPP play a pivotal role in the activation of media that induces the selective killing effect. (paper)

  9. Killing of tumor cells: a drama in two acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Vincenzo; Tillhon, Micol; Mazzini, Giuliano; Prosperi, Ennio; Lombardi, Paolo; Scovassi, A Ivana

    2011-11-15

    Cancer still represents a major health problem worldwide, which urges the development of more effective strategies. Resistance to chemotherapy, a major obstacle for cancer eradication, is mainly related to an intrinsic failure to activate the apoptotic pathways. However, a protective effect of autophagy toward cancer cells has been recently observed, thus adding further complexity to the development of an effective approach counteracting cancer cell growth and improving the response to therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues.

  11. MTH1 deficiency selectively increases non-cytotoxic oxidative DNA damage in lung cancer cells: more bad news than good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Hussein H K; Alhamoudi, Kheloud M H; Evans, Mark D; Jones, George D D; Foster, Steven S

    2018-04-16

    Targeted therapies are based on exploiting cancer-cell-specific genetic features or phenotypic traits to selectively kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells unaffected. Oxidative stress is a cancer hallmark phenotype. Given that free nucleotide pools are particularly vulnerable to oxidation, the nucleotide pool sanitising enzyme, MTH1, is potentially conditionally essential in cancer cells. However, findings from previous MTH1 studies have been contradictory, meaning the relevance of MTH1 in cancer is still to be determined. Here we ascertained the role of MTH1 specifically in lung cancer cell maintenance, and the potential of MTH1 inhibition as a targeted therapy strategy to improve lung cancer treatments. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown or small-molecule inhibition, we tested the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of MTH1 deficiency on H23 (p53-mutated), H522 (p53-mutated) and A549 (wildtype p53) non-small cell lung cancer cell lines relative to normal MRC-5 lung fibroblasts. We also assessed if MTH1 inhibition augments current therapies. MTH1 knockdown increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA and DNA damage signaling alterations in all lung cancer cell lines but not normal fibroblasts, despite no detectable differences in reactive oxygen species levels between any cell lines. Furthermore, MTH1 knockdown reduced H23 cell proliferation. However, unexpectedly, it did not induce apoptosis in any cell line or enhance the effects of gemcitabine, cisplatin or radiation in combination treatments. Contrastingly, TH287 and TH588 MTH1 inhibitors induced apoptosis in H23 and H522 cells, but only increased oxidative DNA damage levels in H23, indicating that they kill cells independently of DNA oxidation and seemingly via MTH1-distinct mechanisms. MTH1 has a NSCLC-specific p53-independent role for suppressing DNA oxidation and genomic instability, though surprisingly the basis of this may not be reactive-oxygen-species-associated oxidative stress. Despite this, overall

  12. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen G Rowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL, human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1, contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1 to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  13. Stem Cell Therapy and Breast Cancer Treatment: review of stem cell research and potential therapeutic impact against cardiotoxicities due to breast cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Sharp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new problem has emerged with the ever-increasing number of breast cancer survivors. While early screening and advances in treatment have allowed these patients to overcome their cancer, these treatments often have adverse cardiovascular side effects that can produce abnormal cardiovascular function. Chemotherapeutic and radiation therapy have both been linked to cardiotoxicity; these therapeutics can cause a loss of cardiac muscle and deterioration of vascular structure that can eventually lead to heart failure (HF. This cardiomyocyte toxicity can leave the breast cancer survivor with a probable diagnosis of dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy (DCM or RCM. While current HF standard of care can alleviate symptoms, other than heart transplantation, there is no therapy that replaces cardiac myocytes that are killed during cancer therapies. There is a need to develop novel therapeutics that can either prevent or reverse the cardiac injury caused by cancer therapeutics. These new therapeutics should promote the regeneration of lost or deteriorating myocardium. Over the last several decades the therapeutic potential of cell-based therapy has been investigated for HF patients. In this review we discuss the progress of preclinical and clinical stem cell research for the diseased heart and discuss the possibility of utilizing these novel therapies to combat cardiotoxicity observed in breast cancer survivors.

  14. siRNA inhibition of telomerase enhances the anti-cancer effect of doxorubicin in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Xuejun; Liu, Anding; Zer, Cindy; Feng, Jianguo; Zhen, Zhuan; Yang, Mingfeng; Zhong, Li

    2009-01-01

    Doxorubicin is an effective breast cancer drug but is hampered by a severe, dose-dependent toxicity. Concomitant administration of doxorubicin and another cancer drug may be able to sensitize tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and lowers the therapeutic dosage. In this study, we examined the combined effect of low-dose doxorubicin and siRNA inhibition of telomerase on breast cancer cells. We found that when used individually, both treatments were rapid and potent apoptosis inducers; and when the two treatments were combined, we observed an enhanced and sustained apoptosis induction in breast cancer cells. siRNA targeting the mRNA of the protein component of telomerase, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), was transfected into two breast cancer cell lines. The siRNA inhibition was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blot on hTERT mRNA and protein levels, respectively, and by measuring the activity level of telomerase using the TRAP assay. The effect of the hTERT siRNA on the tumorigenicity of the breast cancer cells was also studied in vivo by injection of the siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells into nude mice. The effects on cell viability, apoptosis and senescence of cells treated with hTERT siRNA, doxorubicin, and the combined treatment of doxorubicin and hTERT siRNA, were examined in vitro by MTT assay, FACS and SA-β-galactosidase staining. The hTERT siRNA effectively knocked down the mRNA and protein levels of hTERT, and reduced the telomerase activity to 30% of the untreated control. In vivo, the tumors induced by the hTERT siRNA-transfected cells were of reduced sizes, indicating that the hTERT siRNA also reduced the tumorigenic potential of the breast cancer cells. The siRNA treatment reduced cell viability by 50% in breast cancer cells within two days after transfection, while 0.5 μM doxorubicin treatment had a comparable effect but with a slower kinetics. The combination of hTERT siRNA and 0.5 μM doxorubicin killed twice as many

  15. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity Drives Therapeutic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Doherty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The connection between epithelial-mesenchymal (E-M plasticity and cancer stem cell (CSC properties has been paradigm-shifting, linking tumor cell invasion and metastasis with therapeutic recurrence. However, despite their importance, the molecular pathways involved in generating invasive, metastatic, and therapy-resistant CSCs remain poorly understood. The enrichment of cells with a mesenchymal/CSC phenotype following therapy has been interpreted in two different ways. The original interpretation posited that therapy kills non-CSCs while sparing pre-existing CSCs. However, evidence is emerging that suggests non-CSCs can be induced into a transient, drug-tolerant, CSC-like state by chemotherapy. The ability to transition between distinct cell states may be as critical for the survival of tumor cells following therapy as it is for metastatic progression. Therefore, inhibition of the pathways that promote E-M and CSC plasticity may suppress tumor recurrence following chemotherapy. Here, we review the emerging appreciation for how plasticity confers therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence.

  16. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  17. Role of p38 MAPK in enhanced human cancer cells killing by the combination of aspirin and ABT-737

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Shi, Jing; Mao, Shi-ying; Xu, Ya-si; Zhang, Dan; Feng, Lin-yi; Zhang, Bo; Yan, You-you; Wang, Si-cong; Pan, Jian-ping; Yang, You-ping; Lin, Neng-ming

    2015-01-01

    Regular use of aspirin after diagnosis is associated with longer survival among patients with mutated-PIK3CA colorectal cancer, but not among patients with wild-type PIK3CA cancer. In this study, we showed that clinically achievable concentrations of aspirin and ABT-737 in combination could induce a synergistic growth arrest in several human PIK3CA wild-type cancer cells. In addition, our results also demonstrated that long-term combination treatment with aspirin and ABT-737 could synergistically induce apoptosis both in A549 and H1299 cells. In the meanwhile, short-term aspirin plus ABT-737 combination treatment induced a greater autophagic response than did either drug alone and the combination-induced autophagy switched from a cytoprotective signal to a death-promoting signal. Furthermore, we showed that p38 acted as a switch between two different types of cell death (autophagy and apoptosis) induced by aspirin plus ABT-737. Moreover, the increased anti-cancer efficacy of aspirin combined with ABT-737 was further validated in a human lung cancer A549 xenograft model. We hope that this synergy may contribute to failure of aspirin cancer therapy and ultimately lead to efficacious regimens for cancer therapy. PMID:25388762

  18. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library...... in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 si......), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide...

  19. Metformin is synthetically lethal with glucose withdrawal in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2012-08-01

    Glucose deprivation is a distinctive feature of the tumor microecosystem caused by the imbalance between poor supply and an extraordinarily high consumption rate. The metabolic reprogramming from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells (the "Warburg effect") is linked to oncogenic transformation in a manner that frequently implies the inactivation of metabolic checkpoints such as the energy rheostat AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Because the concept of synthetic lethality in oncology can be applied not only to genetic and epigenetic intrinsic differences between normal and cancer cells but also to extrinsic ones such as altered microenvironment, we recently hypothesized that stress-energy mimickers such as the AMPK agonist metformin should produce metabolic synthetic lethality in a glucose-starved cell culture milieu imitating the adverse tumor growth conditions in vivo. Under standard high-glucose conditions, metformin supplementation mostly caused cell cycle arrest without signs of apoptotic cell death. Under glucose withdrawal stress, metformin supplementation circumvented the ability of oncogenes (e.g., HER2) to protect breast cancer cells from glucose-deprivation apoptosis. Significantly, representative cell models of breast cancer heterogeneity underwent massive apoptosis (by >90% in some cases) when glucose-starved cell cultures were supplemented with metformin. Our current findings may uncover crucial issues regarding the cell-autonomous metformin's anti-cancer actions: (1) The offently claimed clinically irrelevant, non-physiological concentrations needed to observe the metformin's anti-cancer effects in vitro merely underlie the artifactual interference of erroneous glucose-rich experimental conditions that poorly reflect glucose-starved in vivo conditions; (2) the preferential killing of cancer stem cells (CSC) by metformin may simply expose the best-case scenario for its synthetically lethal activity because an increased

  20. Clonogenic cell line survival of a human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 after carbon ion irradiation with different LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Suwen; Su Xu; Wang Jifang; Li Wenjian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the survival fraction of a human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 following irradiation with carbon ions with different LET. Methods: cells of the human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 were irradiated with carbon ions (LET=30 and 70 keV/μm). The survival fraction was determined with clonogenic assay after 9 days incubation in a 5% CO 2 incubator at 37 degree C. Results: When the survival fractions of 70 keV/μm were D s = 0.1 and D s=0.01 absorption dose were 2.94 and 5.88 Gy respectively, and those of 30 keV/μm were 4.00 and 8.00 Gy respectively. Conclusion: For the SMMC-7721 cell line, 70 keV/μm is more effective for cell killing than 30 keV/μm

  1. Enhanced tumor cell killing following BNCT with hyperosmotic mannitol-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and intracarotid injection of boronophenylalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, C.H.; Hwang, J.J.; Chen, F.D.; Liu, R.S.; Liu, H.M.; Hsueh, Y.W.; Kai, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The delivery of boronophenylalanine (BPA) by means of intracarotid injection combined with opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been shown significantly enhanced the tumor boron concentration and the survival time of glioma-bearing rats. However, no direct evidence demonstrates whether this treatment protocol can enhance the cell killing of tumor cells or infiltrating tumor cells and the magnitude of enhanced cell killing. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the tumor cell killing of boron neutron capture therapy could be enhanced by hyperosmotic mannitol-induced BBB disruption using BPA-Fr as the capture agent. F98 glioma-bearing rats were injected intravenously or intracarotidly with BPA at doses of 500 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) and with or without mannitol-induced hyperosmotic BBB disruption. The rats were irradiated with an epithermal neutron beam at the reactor of National Tsing-Hua University (THOR). After neutron beam irradiation, the rats were euthanized and the ipsilateral brains containing intracerebral F98 glioma were removed to perform in vivo/in vitro soft agar clonogenic assay. The results demonstrate BNCT with optimizing the delivery of BPA by means of intracarotid injection combined with opening the BBB by infusing a hyperosmotic solution of mannitol significantly enhanced the cell killing of tumor cells and infiltrating tumor cells, the tumor boron concentration and the boron ratio of tumor to normal brain tissues. (author)

  2. Dendritic cells induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against prostate cancer TRAMP-C2 cells loaded with freeze- thaw antigen and PEP-3 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Qi; Jiang, Rong; Li, Si-Qi; Wang, Jing; Yi, Fa-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. In this study, we investigated immune responses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) against TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer cells after activation by dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with TRAMP-C2 freeze-thaw antigen and/or PEP-3 peptide in vitro. Bone marrow-derived DC from the bone marrow of the C57BL/6 were induced to mature by using the cytokine of rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4, and loaded with either the freeze-thaw antigen or PEP-3 peptide or both of them. Maturation of DCs was detected by flow cytometry. The killing efficiency of the CTLs on TRAMP-C2 cells were detected by flow cytometry, CCK8, colony formation, transwell migration, and wound-healing assay. The levels of the IFN-γ, TNF-β and IL-12 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with the unloaded DCs, the loaded DCs had significantly increased expression of several phenotypes related to DC maturation. CTLs activated by DCs loaded with freeze-thaw antigen and PEP-3 peptide had more evident cytotoxicity against TRAMP-C2 cells in vitro. The secretion levels of IFN-γ, TNF-β and IL-12, secreted by DCs loaded with antigen and PEP-3 and interaction with T cells, were higher than in the other groups. Our results suggest that the CTLs activated by DCs loaded with TRAMP-C2 freeze-thaw antigen and PEP-3 peptide exert a remarkable killing efficiency against TRAMP-C2 cells in vitro.

  3. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. IV. Progression delays and enhanced cell killing at high caffeine concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmach, L.J.; Busse, P.M.

    1980-01-01

    The response of x-irradiated and unirradiated HeLa S3 cells to treatment with caffeine at concentrations between 1 and 10 nM has been examined with respect to both delay in progression through the cell generation cycle and enhancement of the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage. Progression is delayed in a concentration-dependent fashion: the generation time is doubled at about 4 mM. The duration of G 1 is lengthened, and the rate of DNA synthesis is reduced, although the kinetics are different in the two phases; the rate of DNA synthesis is usually unaffected at 1 or 2 mM, while there is no concentration threshold for the slowing of progression through G 1 . Progression through G 2 appears to be unaffected by concentrations up to at least 10 mM. Killing of irradiated cells in G 2 is somewhat greater after treatment with the higher caffeine concentrations than reported previously for 1 mM. Moreover, an additional mode of killing is observed in irradiated G 1 cells which had been found previously to be only slightly affected by 1 mM caffeine; they suffer extensive killing at concentrations above 5 mM. The time-survival curves for irradiated, caffeine-treated G 1 and G 2 cells have characteristically different shapes. The dose-survival curves for cells treated with the higher caffeine concentrations display steeper terminal slopes and narrower shoulders

  4. Endocytosis of Cytotoxic Granules Is Essential for Multiple Killing of Target Cells by T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Fang; Bzeih, Hawraa; Schirra, Claudia; Chitirala, Praneeth; Halimani, Mahantappa; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Krause, Elmar; Rettig, Jens; Pattu, Varsha

    2016-09-15

    CTLs are serial killers that kill multiple target cells via exocytosis of cytotoxic granules (CGs). CG exocytosis is tightly regulated and has been investigated in great detail; however, whether CG proteins are endocytosed following exocytosis and contribute to serial killing remains unknown. By using primary CTLs derived from a knock-in mouse of the CG membrane protein Synaptobrevin2, we show that CGs are endocytosed in a clathrin- and dynamin-dependent manner. Following acidification, endocytosed CGs are recycled through early and late, but not recycling endosomes. CGs are refilled with granzyme B at the late endosome stage and polarize to subsequent synapses formed between the CTL and new target cells. Importantly, inhibiting CG endocytosis in CTLs results in a significant reduction of their cytotoxic activity. Thus, our data demonstrate that continuous endocytosis of CG membrane proteins is a prerequisite for efficient serial killing of CTLs and identify key events in this process. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Polyaniline nanoparticles for near-infrared photothermal destruction of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith Inés, E-mail: inesilla.yslas@gmail.com; Ibarra, Luis Exequiel [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Departamento de Biología Molecular (Argentina); Molina, María Alejandra; Rivarola, Claudia; Barbero, Cesar Alfredo [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Departamento de Química (Argentina); Bertuzzi, Mabel Lucía; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia, E-mail: vrivarola@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Departamento de Biología Molecular (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    Polyaniline nanoparticles (PANI-Nps) have been used in several applications; however, there are few publications related to the use in the photothermal therapy. PANI-Nps have high optical absorbance in the near-infrared region and in this wavelength range, biological systems are relatively transparent. For this reason, these materials can be used to absorb energy and to generate heat that destroys cancer cells selectively. PANI-Nps with average size of ca. 200 nm and neutral zeta potential were synthesized and characterized by DLS, SEM, and zeta potential. The kinetics of incorporation of PANI-Nps into LM2 cell line was monitored using UV–Vis spectrophotometry. The analysis of cell viability after PANI-Nps exposure shows that these nanoparticles are not cytotoxic even at high concentration and show no change in cell morphology and metabolic activity. Furthermore, we found that nanoparticle cell uptake reaches the maximum value c.a. 3 h after incubation. Cells were targeted by Pani-Nps and irradiated, resulting in significant elevation of intracellular ROS and heat production. One of the mechanisms of PANI-Nps-mediated photothermal killing of cancer cells apparently involved oxidative stress resulting in apoptotic cell death.

  6. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  7. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209... Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.209 Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. Rabies Vaccine (Killed Virus) shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell cultures or nerve tissues obtained from animals that have developed rabies...

  8. Stem-like tumor-initiating cells isolated from IL13Rα2 expressing gliomas are targeted and killed by IL13-zetakine-redirected T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christine E; Starr, Renate; Aguilar, Brenda; Shami, Andrew F; Martinez, Catalina; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Barish, Michael E; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate IL13Rα2 as an immunotherapeutic target for eliminating glioma stem-like cancer initiating cells (GSC) of high-grade gliomas, with particular focus on the potential of genetically engineered IL13Rα2-specific primary human CD8(+) CTLs (IL13-zetakine(+) CTL) to target this therapeutically resistant glioma subpopulation. A panel of low-passage GSC tumor sphere (TS) and serum-differentiated glioma lines were expanded from patient glioblastoma specimens. These glioblastoma lines were evaluated for expression of IL13Rα2 and for susceptibility to IL13-zetakine(+) CTL-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. We observed that although glioma IL13Rα2 expression varies between patients, for IL13Rα2(pos) cases this antigen was detected on both GSCs and more differentiated tumor cell populations. IL13-zetakine(+) CTL were capable of efficient recognition and killing of both IL13Rα2(pos) GSCs and IL13Rα2(pos) differentiated cells in vitro, as well as eliminating glioma-initiating activity in an orthotopic mouse tumor model. Furthermore, intracranial administration of IL13-zetakine(+) CTL displayed robust antitumor activity against established IL13Rα2(pos) GSC TS-initiated orthotopic tumors in mice. Within IL13Rα2 expressing high-grade gliomas, this receptor is expressed by GSCs and differentiated tumor populations, rendering both targetable by IL13-zetakine(+) CTLs. Thus, our results support the potential usefullness of IL13Rα2-directed immunotherapeutic approaches for eradicating therapeutically resistant GSC populations. ©2012 AACR.

  9. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. III. enhancement of x-ray-induced killing during G2 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busse, P.M.; Bose, S.K.; Jones, R.W.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of caffeine to enhance the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage in HeLa S3 cells was examined as a function of the age of the cells in the generation cycle. Synchronous populations were irradiated at different times after mitotic collection and treated for various intervals with 1 mM caffeiene, which causes negligible killing of unirradiated cells. The response was thereby determined as a function of cell age at both the time of irradiation and the time of exposure to caffeine. The amount of cell killing depends strongly on when in the cycle caffeine is present and only weakly on when the cells are irradiated. If cells are irradiated in early G 1 , caffeine treatment enhances killing for 2 to 3 hr. No additional enhancement is observed until 16 to 17 hr postcollection, corresponding to G 2 ; here they enter a second period of much greater sensitivity. Similarly, fluorodeoxyuridine resynchronized cells irradiated during S and treated with caffeine suffer no enhanced killing until they pass into this sensitive phase in G 2 , approximately 7 hr after release from the fluorodeoxyuridine block. The sensitive period appears to coincide with G 2 arrest. The rate and extent of killing during this period are dependent upon the x-ray dose and the caffeine concentration. In the absence of caffeine, cells irradiated in G 1 lose sensitivity to caffeine in about 9 hr; they do so faster in G 2 . It is concluded that the potentially lethal x-ray damage expressed on treatment with caffeine is retained for many hours in the presence of caffeine and is maximally manifested by G 2 -arrested cells

  10. Potentiation of radiation-induced cell kill by synthetic metalloporphyrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.A.; Douple, E.B.; Abrams, M.J.; Picker, D.J.; Giandomenico, C.M.; Vollano, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the combination of several meso-substituted, water soluble metalloporphyrins with ionizing radiation on hypoxic and oxic monolayers of Chinese hamster fibroblast (V79N) cells were studied. The metalloporphyrins tested included a series of cationic metalloporphyrins complexed with Co(III), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Pd(II) or Mn(III) and a series of anionic porphyrins chelated with Co(III), Fe(III), Cu(II), Rh(III), Mn(III) or Sn(IV). Both cationic and anionic free porphyrins were also tested. Cationic ligands were tetrakis(4N-methylpyridyl)porphine [TMPyP], tetrakis(4N-trimethylamino phenyl)porphine [TMAP], tetrakis(4N-butylpyridyl)porphine [TBPyP] and tetrakis(3N-methylpyridyl)porphine [3TMPyP]. Anionic ligands tested were tetrakis(4-sulfonato phenyl)porphine [TPPS], tetrakis(biphenyl)porphine sulfonate [TBPS] and tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine [TCPP]. SER calculated from survival curves and SFR from one radiation dose were used to assess the relative effectiveness of this class as non-cytotoxic hypoxic and oxic cell-kill potentiators. Comparisons were made at 100 microM, which was essentially non-toxic (greater than 70% survival) for all porphyrins tested except for Co[TMPyP] (approximately 50% survival after 1 hour at 37 degrees C under oxic conditions). The greatest effects on radiation-induced cell kill were achieved with Co[TPPS] and Co[TMPyP] with SER values of 2.3 and 2.4 respectively. Porphyrin analogs with no coordinated metal were found to be less active than the same compound with metal. The overall charge on the molecule did not systematically relate to the biological activity of the compounds tested

  11. General Information about Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as those found in the following jobs: Furniture-making. Sawmill work. Woodworking (carpentry). Shoemaking. Metal-plating. ... cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells ...

  12. Real-time cellular and molecular dynamics of bi-metallic self-therapeutic nanoparticle in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Sandeep Kumar; Bardia, Avinash; Lakkireddy, Chandrakala; Paspala, Syed Ameer Basha; Habeeb, Md. Aejaz; Khan, Aleem Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    Since last decades various kinds of nanoparticles have been functionalized to improve their biomedical applications. However, the biological effect of un-modified/non-functionalized bi-metallic magnetic nanoparticles remains under investigated. Herein we demonstrate a multifaceted non-functionalized bi-metallic inorganic Gd-SPIO nanoparticle which passes dual high MRI contrast and can kill the cancer cells through several mechanisms. The results of the present study demonstrate that Gd-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to induce cancer cell death by production of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic events. Furthermore, Gd-SPIO nanoparticles also enhance the expression levels of miRNA-199a and miRNA-181a-7p which results in decreased levels of cancer markers such as C-met, TGF-β and hURP. One very interesting finding of this study reveals side scatter-based real-time analysis of nanoparticle uptake in cancer cells using flow cytometry analysis. In conclusion, this study paves a way for future investigation of un-modified inorganic nanoparticles to purport enhanced therapeutic effect in combination with potential anti-tumor drugs/molecules in cancer cells.

  13. Novel psammaplin A derivatives sensitize human cancer cells to x-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Hak Jae; Wee, Chan Woo; Suh, Soo Youn; Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Eun Sook; Shin, Beom Soo [College of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Daegu. Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Since therapeutics such as temozolomide (TMZ) showed survival benefit in a particular subgroup of patients whose cancer cells carried methylated O6-methylguanin-DNA methyltransferase genes, the field of developing novel epigenic anticancer agents seems promising. DNA methylation and histone modifications are the two principal factors in epigenetic phenomena. These two mechanisms perform a crucial function in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. DNA methylation is controlled by DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), which have been detected to be over expressed in a variety of malignancies. As a nucleoside or a non-nucleoside, DNMT inhibitors demonstrate anticancer effects by directly trapping DNMTs or by blocking DNMTs at a proper site, respectively. Psammaplin A (PsA) is an inhibitor of both DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and histone deacetylase inhibitor, and as previously reported from our institution, enhances radiation cell killing by increasing the sub-G1 fraction of cancer cells compared to cells exposed to radiation alone.

  14. Aphidicolin synchronization of mouse L cells perturbs the relationship between cell killing and DNA double-strand breakage after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.; Broadhurst, S.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between X-ray-induced cell killing and DNA double-strand breakage was examined for synchronized mouse L cells that had entered S-phase, G2-phase, mitosis, and G1-phase following release from aphidicolin and compared to asynchronous culture response. Aphidicolin-synchronized cells showed cycle phase-dependent changes in dose-responses for both killing and DNA dsb. However, on the basis of DNA dsb per unit length of DNA required to produce a lethal lesion, aphidicolin-synchronized cells were more sensitive to X-rays than asynchronous cultures. This sensitivity peaked 2 h after release from aphidicolin treatment, and then progressively declined towards the asynchronous culture value. It is argued that results are due to deregulation of the temporal order of DNA replication following aphidicolin treatment, and can be incorporated into the critical DNA target size model by postulating that the targets for radiation action in mammalian cells are DNA-associated with potentially transcriptionally active proto-oncogenes or constitutive fragile sites. (author)

  15. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Treatment of colon cancer with oncolytic herpes simplex virus in preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Peng, T; Li, J; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Zhang, P; Peng, S; Du, T; Li, Y; Yan, Q; Liu, B

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are a rare population in any type of cancer, including colon cancer, are tumorigenic and responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a number of different solid tumors recently, although the isolation of CSCs in colon cancer is still challenging. We cultured colon cancer cells in stem cell medium to obtain colonosphere cells. These cells possessed the characteristics of CSCs, with a high capacity of tumorigenicity, migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. The isolation and identification of CSCs have provided new targets for the therapeutics. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSV) are an effective strategy for killing colon cancer cells in preclinical models. Here, we examined the efficacy of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 (oHSV2) in killing colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs). oHSV2 was found to be highly cytotoxic to the adherent and sphere cells in vitro, and oHSV2 treatment in vivo significantly inhibited tumor growth. This study demonstrates that oHSV2 is effective against colon cancer cells and colon CSLCs and could be a promising strategy for treating colon cancer patients.

  17. Understanding the role of type 1 interferon in resistance to cancer ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Chemotherapy is the main form of treatment for cancer, but it cannot cure most types of cancer. Another form of treatment is immunotherapy, which aims to stimulate cells of the body's immune system (T cells) to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, cancers may become resistant to T cells in the same way they learned to resist ...

  18. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in innate immunity. It shares the positive charge and amphipathic character of GA, and, as shown here, also the ability to kill human leukocyte. The cytotoxicity of both compounds depends on sialic acid in the cell membrane. The killing was associated with the generation of CD45 + debris, derived from cell...... membrane deformation. Nanoparticle tracking analysis confirmed the formation of such debris, even at low GA concentrations. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing measurements also recorded stable alterations in T lymphocytes following such treatment. LL-37 forms oligomers through weak hydrophobic...

  19. Targeted Anticancer Immunotoxins and Cytotoxic Agents with Direct Killing Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kawakami

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the progress of the bioinformatics approach to characterize cell-surface antigens and receptors on tumor cells, it remains difficult to generate novel cancer vaccines or neutralizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Among targeted cancer therapeutics, biologicals with targetable antibodies or ligands conjugated or fused to toxins or chemicals for direct cell-killing ability have been developed over the last 2 decades. These conjugated or fused chimeric proteins are termed immunotoxins or cytotoxic agents. Two agents, DAB389IL-2 (ONTAKTM targeting the interleukin-2 receptor and CD33-calicheamicin (Mylotarg®, have been approved by the FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML, respectively. Such targetable agents, including RFB4(dsFv-PE38 (BL22, IL13-PE38QQR, and Tf-CRM107, are being tested in clinical trials. Several agents using unique technology such as a cleavable adapter or immunoliposomes with antibodies are also in the preclinical stage. This review summarizes the generation, mechanism, and development of these agents. In addition, possible future directions of this therapeutic approach are discussed.

  20. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  1. Enhancement of tumor cell killing in vitro by pre- and post-irradiation exposure to aclacinomycin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bill, C.A.; Mendoza, A.; Vrdoljak, E.; Tofilon, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Aclacinomycin A (ACM), a potent inducer of leukemic cell differentiation, significantly enhances the radiosensitivity of a human colon tumor cell line (Clone A) when cultures are exposed to 15-nM concentrations for 3 days before irradiation. We now demonstrate that incubation with ACM after irradiation can also enhance Clone A cell killing. The maximum increase in cell killing, based on colony-forming ability, occurred when Clone A cells were exposed for 1 h to 5 μM ACM model added 1 or 2 h after irradiation. The post-irradiation ACM protocol reduced the terminal slope (as reflected by D o ) of the radiation cell survival curve with no change in the low-dose, shoulder region of the curve (D q value). In contrast, for pre-irradiation treatment with ACM (15 nM, 3 days), the shoulder region of the curve was reduced with no change in the terminal slope. For pre- and post-irradiation ACM treatment the dose enhancement factors at 0.10 survival were 1.22 and 1.28, respectively. When ACM was given both before and after irradiation both the shoulder and terminal slope values decreased to produce a dose enhancement factor at a surviving fraction of 0.10 of 1.50. These data suggest that the enhanced cell killing produced by pre- and post-irradiation treatment with ACM is achieved through different mechanisms. (author) 26 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  2. γ-rays kill grasshopper primary spermatocytes in groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Taweel, A.A.; Shawkit, M.A.; Fox, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Primary spermatocyte killing by γ-rays was studied in the grasshopper Heteracris littoralis in which spermatogenic development occurs in cysts containing a maximum of 64 cells during the first meiotic division. Cell killing at this stage is not random and mainly involves the death of whole cysts. The dose-response curve for cell killing has complex kinetics with at least two components but lacks any shoulder at low doses, thus indicating no repair of the lethal damage. Cell loss is apparent from surviving cysts as early as 45 min post irradiation but loss of > 24 cells is incompatible with cyst survival. Loss of fewer than 24 cells also is not random since certain values for cell loss are frequently observed while other, interspersed values are not seen at all. (Auth.)

  3. Mannose-functionalized porous silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for two-photon imaging or PDT of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, Marine; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Lartigue, Lenaïc; Brevet, David; Morère, Alain; Garcia, Marcel; Maillard, Philippe; Raehm, Laurence; Guari, Yannick; Larionova, Joulia; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2013-01-01

    An original fluorophore engineered for two-photon excitation or a porphyrin derivative were entrapped in the silica shell of magnetic porous silica nanoparticles during the synthesis of the silica moiety without damaging the structure of the organic part. The mild conditions involved allowed obtaining microporous or mesoporous silica magnetic nanoparticles, respectively. Mannose was grafted on the surface of the nanoparticles to target MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The studies of magnetic properties of these hybrid nanoparticles show that they present a blocking temperature at 190 K. The nano-objects designed with the two-photon fluorophore were efficient for two-photon imaging of MCF-7 cancer cells, whereas the nano-objects with the photosensitizer efficiently killed cancer cells. The presence of the mannose moiety was demonstrated to improve both imaging and therapy properties.

  4. Mannose-functionalized porous silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for two-photon imaging or PDT of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrier, Marine [UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (France); Gary-Bobo, Magali [Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Montpellier 1, Universite Montpellier 2, Institut des Biomolecules Max Mousseron UMR 5247 CNRS (France); Lartigue, Lenaiec; Brevet, David [UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (France); Morere, Alain; Garcia, Marcel [Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Montpellier 1, Universite Montpellier 2, Institut des Biomolecules Max Mousseron UMR 5247 CNRS (France); Maillard, Philippe [Universite Paris-Sud, UMR 176 CNRS, Institut Curie (France); Raehm, Laurence; Guari, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.guari@um2.fr; Larionova, Joulia; Durand, Jean-Olivier, E-mail: durand@univ-montp2.fr [UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (France); Mongin, Olivier [Universite de Rennes 1, Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, CNRS UMR 6226 (France); Blanchard-Desce, Mireille [Universite Bordeaux, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 5255 (France)

    2013-05-15

    An original fluorophore engineered for two-photon excitation or a porphyrin derivative were entrapped in the silica shell of magnetic porous silica nanoparticles during the synthesis of the silica moiety without damaging the structure of the organic part. The mild conditions involved allowed obtaining microporous or mesoporous silica magnetic nanoparticles, respectively. Mannose was grafted on the surface of the nanoparticles to target MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The studies of magnetic properties of these hybrid nanoparticles show that they present a blocking temperature at 190 K. The nano-objects designed with the two-photon fluorophore were efficient for two-photon imaging of MCF-7 cancer cells, whereas the nano-objects with the photosensitizer efficiently killed cancer cells. The presence of the mannose moiety was demonstrated to improve both imaging and therapy properties.

  5. Selective replication of oncolytic virus M1 results in a bystander killing effect that is potentiated by Smac mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Tan, Yaqian; Cavenee, Webster K; Yan, Guangmei

    2017-06-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment modality that uses native or genetically modified viruses that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells. Viruses represent a type of pathogen-associated molecular pattern and thereby induce the up-regulation of dozens of cytokines via activating the host innate immune system. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic compounds (SMCs), which antagonize the function of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and induce apoptosis, sensitize tumor cells to multiple cytokines. Therefore, we sought to determine whether SMCs sensitize tumor cells to cytokines induced by the oncolytic M1 virus, thus enhancing a bystander killing effect. Here, we report that SMCs potentiate the oncolytic effect of M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This strengthened oncolytic efficacy resulted from the enhanced bystander killing effect caused by the M1 virus via cytokine induction. Through a microarray analysis and subsequent validation using recombinant cytokines, we identified IL-8, IL-1A, and TRAIL as the key cytokines in the bystander killing effect. Furthermore, SMCs increased the replication of M1, and the accumulation of virus protein induced irreversible endoplasmic reticulum stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated apoptosis. Nevertheless, the combined treatment with M1 and SMCs had little effect on normal and human primary cells. Because SMCs selectively and significantly enhance the bystander killing effect and the replication of oncolytic virus M1 specifically in cancer cells, this combined treatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy.

  6. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shang-Lang; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug

  7. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shang-Lang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chao, Chuck C.-K., E-mail: cckchao@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Development, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-16

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug.

  8. Apoptotic Effect of the Urtica Dioica Plant Extracts on Breast Cancer Cell Line (MDA- MB- 468

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mohammadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Cancer is one of the most causes of mortality in worldwide. Components derived from natural plants that induce apoptosis are used for cancer treatment. Therefore investigation of different herbal components for new anti-cancer drug is one of the main research activities throughout the world. According to low cost, oral consumption and easy access to the public extracts of Urtica dioica, in this study we aimed to investigate the effectiveness of this herb on MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells.   Methods: Cytotoxic effect of Urtica dioica extract was measured using MTT assays. To show induction of apoptosis by this plant TUNEL and DNA Fragmentation test were performed.   Results: In the present study dichloromethane extracts noticeably killed cancer cells. IC50 values related to human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-468 were 29.46±1.05 µg/ml in 24 hours and 15.54±1.04 µg/ml in 48 hours. TUNEL test and DNA Fragmentation assay showed apoptotic characteristic in the extract treated cells.   Conclusion: The results showed that MDA-MB-468 cells after treatment with dichloromethane extract of Urtica dioica, induces apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 cancer cells which may be useful in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Resveratrol imparts photoprotection of normal cells and enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation spans a whole range of electromagnetic spectrum including UV radiation, which are potentially harmful to normal cells as well as ionizing radiations which are therapeutically beneficial towards the killing of cancer cells. UV radiation is an established cause of a majority of skin cancers as well as precancerous conditions such as actinic keratosis. However, despite efforts to educate people about the use of sunscreens and protective clothing as preventive strategies, the incidence of skin cancer and other skin-related disorders are on the rise. This has generated an enormous interest towards finding alternative approaches for management of UV-mediated damages. Chemoprevention via nontoxic agents, especially botanical antioxidants, is one such approach that is being considered as a plausible strategy for prevention of photodamages including photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we have discussed the photoprotective effects of resveratrol, an antioxidant found in grapes and red wine, against UVB exposure-mediated damages in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we have also discussed studies showing that resveratrol can act as a sensitizer to enhance the therapeutic effects of ionizing radiation against cancer cells. Based on available literature, we suggest that resveratrol may be useful for (1) prevention of UVB-mediated damages including skin cancer and (2) enhancing the response of radiation therapies against hyperproliferative, precancerous and neoplastic conditions.

  10. Protection against hyperthermic cell killing by alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, A.; Henle, K.J.; Moss, A.J.; Nagle, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Compounds capable of protecting cells against hyperthermia may provide new insights into potential mechanisms of thermotolerance and cellular heat death. The authors characterized heat protection by alanine and related compounds as a function of concentration, temperature and preincubation time. Alanine was added either to complete medium or to HBSS before hyperthermia. Maximal heat protection required 3 hr, 37 0 ; longer preincubation intervals resulted in lower levels of protection. Addition of alanine to medium after hyperthermia had no protective effect. Protection was concentration dependent with a 20- or 200-fold increase in cell survival after 40 min, 45 0 C at 60 mM in medium or in HBSS, respectively. Higher alanine concentrations up to 120mM did not significantly increase heat protection. A 45 0 -heat survival curve showed that 100mM alanine increased the D/sub q/ by approx. 12 min with little change in the D/sub o/. Hyperthermia of 1 hr at temperatures between 42 0 and 45 0 indicated that 100mM alanine shifted the isotoxic temperature by 0.5 Celsius degrees. Polymers of either L or D,L alanine and related compounds, like pyruvate, also protected cells against heat killing. These results indicate that heat protection by alanine shows characteristics that are not shared by polyhydroxy compounds

  11. Selective killing of tumors deficient in methylthioadenosine phosphorylase: a novel strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lubin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The gene for methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP lies on 9p21, close to the gene CDKN2A that encodes the tumor suppressor proteins p16 and p14ARF. MTAP and CDKN2A are homozygously co-deleted, with a frequency of 35 to 70%, in lung and pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, osteosarcoma, soft-tissue sarcoma, mesothelioma, and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In normal cells, but not in tumor cells lacking MTAP, MTAP cleaves the natural substrate, 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA, to adenine and 5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate (MTR-1-P, which are then converted to adenine nucleotides and methionine. This distinct difference between normal MTAP-positive cells and tumor MTAP-negative cells led to several proposals for therapy. We offer a novel strategy in which both MTA and a toxic adenine analog, such as 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP, 6-methylpurine (MeP, or 2-fluoroadenine (F-Ade, are administered. In MTAP-positive cells, abundant adenine, generated from supplied MTA, competitively blocks the conversion of an analog, by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT, to its active nucleotide form. In MTAP-negative tumor cells, the supplied MTA cannot generate adenine; hence conversion of the analog is not blocked.We show that this combination treatment--adenine analog plus MTA--kills MTAP-negative A549 lung tumor cells, while MTAP-positive human fibroblasts (HF are protected. In co-cultures of the breast tumor cell line, MCF-7, and HF cells, MCF-7 is inhibited or killed, while HF cells proliferate robustly. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and 6-thioguanine (6-TG may also be used with our strategy. Though neither analog is activated by APRT, in MTAP-positive cells, adenine produced from supplied MTA blocks conversion of 5-FU and 6-TG to their toxic nucleotide forms by competing for 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP. The combination of MTA with 5-FU or 6-TG, in the treatment of MTAP-negative tumors, may produce a significantly improved therapeutic index

  12. Tumor Cells Surviving Exposure to Proton or Photon Radiation Share a Common Immunogenic Modulation Signature, Rendering Them More Sensitive to T Cell–Mediated Killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bernstein, Michael B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Vassantachart, April; Sahoo, Narayan; Tailor, Ramesh; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guha, Chandan P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M.; Krishnan, Sunil [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodge, James W., E-mail: jh241d@nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the foundation for combining immunotherapy to induce tumor antigen–specific T cells with proton radiation therapy to exploit the activity of those T cells. Methods and Materials: Using cell lines of tumors frequently treated with proton radiation, such as prostate, breast, lung, and chordoma, we examined the effect of proton radiation on the viability and induction of immunogenic modulation in tumor cells by flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis of surface phenotype and the functional immune consequences. Results: These studies show for the first time that (1) proton and photon radiation induced comparable up-regulation of surface molecules involved in immune recognition (histocompatibility leukocyte antigen, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and mucin 1); (2) proton radiation mediated calreticulin cell-surface expression, increasing sensitivity to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of tumor cells; and (3) cancer stem cells, which are resistant to the direct cytolytic activity of proton radiation, nonetheless up-regulated calreticulin after radiation in a manner similar to non-cancer stem cells. Conclusions: These findings offer a rationale for the use of proton radiation in combination with immunotherapy, including for patients who have failed radiation therapy alone or have limited treatment options.

  13. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hualin, E-mail: hualin.zhang@northwestern.edu; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60611 (United States); Qi, Yujin [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0){sup 4} to (13

  14. Antiproliferative Effects of Bacillus coagulans Unique IS2 in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madempudi, Ratna Sudha; Kalle, Arunasree M

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, the in vitro anticancer (antiproliferative) effects of Bacillus coagulans Unique IS2 were evaluated on human colon cancer (COLO 205), cervical cancer (HeLa), and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cell lines with a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK 293T) as noncancerous control cells. The Cytotoxicity assay (MTT) clearly demonstrated a 22%, 31.7%, and 19.5% decrease in cell proliferation of COLO 205, HeLa, and K562 cells, respectively, when compared to the noncancerous HEK 293T cells. Normal phase-contrast microscopic images clearly suggested that the mechanism of cell death is by apoptosis. To further confirm the induction of apoptosis by Unique IS2, the sub-G0-G1 peak of the cell cycle was quantified using a flow cytometer and the data indicated 40% of the apoptotic cells in Unique IS2-treated COLO cells when compared with their untreated control cells. The Western blot analysis showed an increase in pro-apoptotic protein BAX, decrease in antiapoptotic protein, Bcl2, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in cytochrome c release, increase in Caspase 3 activity, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The present study suggests that the heat-killed culture supernatant of B. coagulans can be more effective in inducing apoptosis of colon cancer cells and that can be considered for adjuvant therapy in the treatment of colon carcinoma.

  15. β-Elemene-induced autophagy protects human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Ye; Qu, Jinglei; Xu, Ling; Hou, Kezuo; Zhang, Jingdong; Qu, Xiujuan; Liu, Yunpeng

    2011-01-01

    β-Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anti-cancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. The mechanism by which β-elemene kills cells remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to investigate the anti-tumor effect of β-elemene on human gastric cancer cells and the molecular mechanism involved. β-Elemene inhibited the viability of human gastric cancer MGC803 and SGC7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The suppression of cell viability was due to the induction of apoptosis. A robust autophagy was observed in the cells treated with β-elemene; it was characterized by the increase of punctate LC3 dots, the cellular morphology, and the increased levels of LC3-II protein. Further study showed that β-elemene treatment up-regulated Atg5-Atg12 conjugated protein but had little effect on other autophagy-related proteins. PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K1 activity was inhibited by β-elemene. Knockdown of Beclin 1 with small interfering RNA, or co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine or chlorochine enhanced significantly the antitumor effects of β-elemene. Our data provides the first evidence that β-elemene induces protective autophagy and prevents human gastric cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. A combination of β-elemene with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for advanced gastric cancer

  16. Studies of killing effect of ionization radiation associated with As2O3 on SHG44 human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Hui; Liu Fenju; Chen Jian; Ning Ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of ionization radiation combined with As 2 O 3 on the killing of SHG44 human glioma cells. Methods: The survival rates of SHG44 cells treated with different doses of ionization radiation, As 2 O 3 respectively and radiation associated were determined with As 2 O 3 by MTT assay. The change of cell morphology was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: (1) The survival rate of the group treated with ionization radiation combined with As 2 O 3 was significantly lower than that of the group treated with radiation or As 2 O 3 only (P 2 O 3 was significantly lower than that of the group treated with 6 Gy radiation (P 0.05); (3) Cells treated with radiation or As 2 O 3 had a morphological change indicating the apoptosis of SHG44 cells. Conclusion: The killing effect of ionization radiation combined with As 2 O 3 on the SHG44 cells is stronger than that of radiation or As 2 O 3 only. Inducing SHG44 cells' apoptosis may be the mechanism of As 2 O 3 killing effects on SHG44 cells. (authors)

  17. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by NiZn ferrite nanoparticles through mitochondrial cytochrome C release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Qubaisi MS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mothanna Sadiq Al-Qubaisi,1 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Moayad Husein Flaifel,3 Sahrim Hj Ahmad,3 Samer Hussein-Al-Ali,1 Mohd Zobir Hussein,4 Zulkarnain Zainal,4 Fatah H Alhassan,4 Yun H Taufiq-Yap,4 Eltayeb EM Eid,5 Ismail Adam Arbab,1 Bandar A Al-Asbahi,3 Thomas J Webster,6,7 Mohamed Ezzat El Zowalaty1,8,9 1Institute of Bioscience, 2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 3Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 4Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 5College of Pharmacy, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia; 6Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 7Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 8Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt; 9Faculty of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The long-term objective of the present study was to determine the ability of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles to kill cancer cells. NiZn ferrite nanoparticle suspensions were found to have an average hydrodynamic diameter, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of 254.2 ± 29.8 nm, 0.524 ± 0.013, and -60 ± 14 mV, respectively. We showed that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles had selective toxicity towards MCF-7, HepG2, and HT29 cells, with a lesser effect on normal MCF 10A cells. The quantity of Bcl-2, Bax, p53, and cytochrome C in the cell lines mentioned above was determined by colorimetric methods in order to clarify the mechanism of action of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles in the killing of cancer cells. Our results indicate that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles promote apoptosis in cancer cells via caspase-3 and caspase-9, downregulation of Bcl-2, and upregulation of Bax and p53, with cytochrome C translocation. There was a concomitant collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential in these cancer cells when treated

  18. Parainfluenza Virus Infection Sensitizes Cancer Cells to DNA-Damaging Agents: Implications for Oncolytic Virus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Candace R; Parks, Griffith D

    2018-04-01

    A parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) with mutations in the P/V gene (P/V-CPI - ) is restricted for spread in normal cells but not in cancer cells in vitro and is effective at reducing tumor burdens in mouse model systems. Here we show that P/V-CPI - infection of HEp-2 human laryngeal cancer cells results in the majority of the cells dying, but unexpectedly, over time, there is an emergence of a population of cells that survive as P/V-CPI - persistently infected (PI) cells. P/V-CPI - PI cells had elevated levels of basal caspase activation, and viability was highly dependent on the activity of cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins (IAPs) such as Survivin and XIAP. In challenge experiments with external inducers of apoptosis, PI cells were more sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and cell death. This increased cisplatin sensitivity correlated with defects in DNA damage signaling pathways such as phosphorylation of Chk1 and translocation of damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) to the nucleus. Cisplatin-induced killing of PI cells was sensitive to the inhibition of wild-type (WT) p53-inducible protein 1 (WIP1), a phosphatase which acts to terminate DNA damage signaling pathways. A similar sensitivity to cisplatin was seen with cells during acute infection with P/V-CPI - as well as during acute infections with WT PIV5 and the related virus human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2). Our results have general implications for the design of safer paramyxovirus-based vectors that cannot establish PI as well as the potential for combining chemotherapy with oncolytic RNA virus vectors. IMPORTANCE There is intense interest in developing oncolytic viral vectors with increased potency against cancer cells, particularly those cancer cells that have gained resistance to chemotherapies. We have found that infection with cytoplasmically replicating parainfluenza virus can result in increases in the killing of cancer cells by agents that induce DNA damage, and this is linked

  19. Understanding and potentially reducing second breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Long term survival after breast cancer diagnosis has increased markedly in the last decade: 15-year relative survival after breast cancer diagnosis is now 75% in the US. Associated with these excellent survival prospects, however, long term studies suggest that contralateral second breast cancer rates are in the range from 10 to 15% at 15 years post treatment, and are still higher for BRCA1/2 carriers, as well as for still longer term survivors. These second cancer risks are much higher than those for a comparable healthy woman to develop a first breast cancer. It follows that women with breast cancer are highly prone to develop a second breast cancer. We propose here a new option for reducing the disturbingly high risk of a contralateral second breast cancer. in patients with both estrogen positive and negative primary breast cancer: prophylactic mammary irradiation (PMI) of the contralateral breast. The rationale behind PMI is evidence that standard post-Iumpectomy radiotherapy of the affected (ipsilateral) breast substantially reduces the long-term genetically-based second cancer risk in the ipsilateral breast, by killing the existing premalignant cells in that breast. This suggests that there are relatively few premalignant cells in the breast (hundreds or thousands, not millions), so even a fairly modest radiation cell-kill level across the whole breast would be expected to kill essentially all of them. If this is so, then a modest radiation dose-much lower than that to the affected breast--delivered uniformly to the whole contralateral breast, and typically delivered at the same time as the radiotherapy of the ipsilateral breast, would have the potential to markedly reduce second-cancer risks in the contralateral breast by killing essentially all the pre-malignant cells in that breast while causing only a very low level of radiation-induced sequelae. Therefore we hypothesize that low-dose prophylactic mammary irradiation of the contralateral breast

  20. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks and cell killing by charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Yatagai, F.; Kanai, T.; Ohara, H.; Sato, K.

    It has been suggested that it is not simple double-strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks which correlate well with the high biological effectiveness of high LET radiations for cell killing. We have compared the effects of charged particles on cell death in 3 pairs of cell lines which are normal or defective in the repair of DNA dsbs. For the cell lines SL3-147, M10, and SX10 which are deficient in DNA dsb repair, RBE values were close to unity for cell killing induced by charged particles with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 200 keV/mum and were even smaller than unity for the LET region greater than 300 keV/mum. The inactivation cross section (ICS) increased with LET for all 3 pairs. The ICS of dsb repair deficient mutants was always larger than that of their parents for all the LET ranges, but with increasing LET the difference in ICS between the mutant and its parent became smaller. Since a small difference in ICS remained at LET of about 300 keV/mum, dsb repair may still take place at this high LET, even if its role is apparently small. These results suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role in protection against the attack of high LET radiations and that a main cause of cell death is non-reparable dsb which are produced at a higher yield compared with low LET radiations. No correlation was observed between DNA content or nuclear area and ICS.

  1. 3,3'-diindolylmethane potentiates tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yang; Miao, Shuhan; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jianwei; Lu, Rongzhu

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) specifically kills cancer cells without destroying the majority of healthy cells. However, numerous types of cancer cell, including gastric cancer cells, tend to be resistant to TRAIL. The bioactive product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), which is derived from cruciferous vegetables, is also currently recognized as a candidate anticancer agent. In the present study, a Cell Counting Kit 8 cell growth assay and an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate apoptosis assay were performed to investigate the potentiating effect of DIM on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, and the possible mechanisms of this potentiation. The results obtained demonstrated that, compared with TRAIL or DIM treatment alone, co-treatment with TRAIL (25 or 50 ng/ml) and DIM (10 µmol/l) induced cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in BGC-823 and SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed that the protein expression levels of death receptor 5 (DR5), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) were upregulated in the co-treated gastric cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to provide evidence that DIM sensitizes TRAIL-induced inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, accompanied by the upregulated expression of DR5, CHOP and GRP78 proteins, which may be involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanisms.

  2. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual stimuli polysaccharide nanovesicles for conjugated and physically loaded doxorubicin delivery in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, P. S.; Shah, Ruchira; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2015-04-01

    The present work reports the development of pH and enzyme dual responsive polysaccharide vesicular nano-scaffolds for the administration of doxorubicin via physical loading and polymer-drug conjugation to breast cancer cells. Dextran was suitably modified with a renewable resource 3-pentadecyl phenol unit through imine and aliphatic ester chemical linkages that acted as pH and esterase enzyme stimuli, respectively. These dual responsive polysaccharide derivatives self-organized into 200 +/- 10 nm diameter nano-vesicles in water. The water soluble anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX.HCl) was encapsulated in the hydrophilic pocket to produce core-loaded polysaccharide vesicles whereas chemical conjugation produced DOX anchored at the hydrophobic layer of the dextran nano-vesicles. In vitro studies revealed that about 70-80% of the drug was retained under circulatory conditions at pH = 7.4 and 37 °C. At a low pH of 6.0 to 5.0 and in the presence of esterase; both imine and ester linkages were cleaved instantaneously to release 100% of the loaded drugs. Cytotoxicity assays on Wild Type Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (WTMEFs) confirmed the non-toxicity of the newly developed dextran derivatives at up to 500 μg mL-1 in PBS. MTT assays on fibroblast cells revealed that DOX.HCl loaded nano-vesicles exhibited better killing abilities than DOX conjugated polymer nano-vesicles. Both DOX loaded and DOX conjugated nano-vesicles were found to show significant killing in breast cancer cells (MCF 7). Confocal microscopy images confirmed the uptake of DOX loaded (or conjugated) nano-vesicles by cells compared to free DOX. Thus, the newly developed pH and enzyme dual responsive polysaccharide vesicular assemblies are potential drug vectors for the administration of DOX in both loaded and chemically conjugated forms for the efficient killing of breast cancer cells.The present work reports the development of pH and enzyme dual responsive polysaccharide vesicular nano-scaffolds for the

  4. Methadone, commonly used as maintenance medication for outpatient treatment of opioid dependence, kills leukemia cells and overcomes chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Alt, Andreas; Miltner, Erich

    2008-08-01

    The therapeutic opioid drug methadone (d,l-methadone hydrochloride) is the most commonly used maintenance medication for outpatient treatment of opioid dependence. In our study, we found that methadone is also a potent inducer of cell death in leukemia cells and we clarified the unknown mechanism of methadone-induced cell killing in leukemia cells. Methadone inhibited proliferation in leukemia cells and induced cell death through apoptosis induction and activated apoptosis pathways through the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, down-regulation of Bcl-x(L) and X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, methadone induced cell death not only in anticancer drug-sensitive and apoptosis-sensitive leukemia cells but also in doxorubicin-resistant, multidrug-resistant, and apoptosis-resistant leukemia cells, which anticancer drugs commonly used in conventional therapies of leukemias failed to kill. Depending on caspase activation, methadone overcomes doxorubicin resistance, multidrug resistance, and apoptosis resistance in leukemia cells through activation of mitochondria. In contrast to leukemia cells, nonleukemic peripheral blood lymphocytes survived after methadone treatment. These findings show that methadone kills leukemia cells and breaks chemoresistance and apoptosis resistance. Our results suggest that methadone is a promising therapeutic approach not only for patients with opioid dependence but also for patients with leukemias and provide the foundation for new strategies using methadone as an additional anticancer drug in leukemia therapy, especially when conventional therapies are less effective.

  5. Intracellular Hyper-Acidification Potentiated by Hydrogen Sulfide Mediates Invasive and Therapy Resistant Cancer Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Wei Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Slow and continuous release of H2S by GYY4137 has previously been demonstrated to kill cancer cells by increasing glycolysis and impairing anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. This action is specific for cancer cells. The resulting lactate overproduction and defective pH homeostasis bring about intracellular acidification-induced cancer cell death. The present study investigated the potency of H2S released by GYY4137 against invasive and radio- as well as chemo-resistant cancers, known to be glycolytically active. We characterized and utilized cancer cell line pairs of various organ origins, based on their aggressive behaviors, and assessed their response to GYY4137. We compared glycolytic activity, via lactate production, and intracellular pH of each cancer cell line pair after exposure to H2S. Invasive and therapy resistant cancers, collectively termed aggressive cancers, are receptive to H2S-mediated cytotoxicity, albeit at a higher concentration of GYY4137 donor. While lactate production was enhanced, intracellular pH of aggressive cancers was only modestly decreased. Inherently, the magnitude of intracellular pH decrease is a key determinant for cancer cell sensitivity to H2S. We demonstrated the utility of coupling GYY4137 with either simvastatin, known to inhibit monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4, or metformin, to further boost glycolysis, in bringing about cell death for aggressive cancers. Simvastatin inhibiting lactate extrusion thence contained excess lactate induced by GYY4137 within intracellular compartment. In contrast, the combined exposure to both GYY4137 and metformin overwhelms cancer cells with lactate over-production exceeding its expulsion rate. Together, GYY4137 and simvastatin or metformin synergize to induce intracellular hyper-acidification-mediated cancer cell death.

  6. Decline in peripheral blood NKG2D+CD3+CD56+ NKT cells in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, M; Rezaei, A; Kalantari, H; Bahador, A; Hassannejad, N; Maracy, M; Nouri, N; Sedghi, M; Ghazanfari, H; Bayat, B

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of cancer deaths in the world. This cancer can be divided into non-metastatic and metastatic CRC stages. CD3+CD56+ NKT cell subsets are a minor T cell subset in peripheral blood and conduct the killing of tumor cells in direct manner. Little is obvious about levels and surface markers of these cells such as NKG2D in different cancers, especially in CRC. We included 15 non-metastatic (low-grade), 11 non-metastatic (high-grade), 10 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 18 healthy controls. The percentages of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and NKG2D+CD56+ NKT cells from samples were analyzed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of samples. We found that there was a significantly lower number of NKG2D+CD3+CD56+ cells in peripheral blood of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer compared with normal controls (77.53 ± 5.79 % vs 90.74 ± 9.84 %; pNKT cells was significantly lower in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer compared to healthy controls strengthens the hypothesis that NKT cells can play a substantial role in the protection against human colorectal cancer, and this opens up avenues for novel studies about elucidating the other aspects of tumor surveillance in CRC progression and immunotherapy (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 46).

  7. Adjuvant Therapy: Treatment to Keep Cancer from Returning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... significant side effects, and these treatments don't benefit everyone. Types of cancer treatment that are used as adjuvant therapy include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells throughout ...

  8. Therapeutic analysis of high-dose-rate "1"9"2Ir vaginal cuff brachytherapy for endometrial cancer using a cylindrical target volume model and varied cancer cell distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hualin; Donnelly, Eric D.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Qi, Yujin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCBT) in the treatment of endometrial cancer in a cylindrical target volume with either a varied or a constant cancer cell distributions using the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) technique was used to calculate the 3D dose distribution of HDR VCBT over a variety of cylinder diameters and treatment lengths. A treatment planning system (TPS) was used to make plans for the various cylinder diameters, treatment lengths, and prescriptions using the clinical protocol. The dwell times obtained from the TPS were fed into MC. The LQ model was used to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of two brachytherapy regimens prescribed either at 0.5 cm depth (5.5 Gy × 4 fractions) or at the vaginal mucosal surface (8.8 Gy × 4 fractions) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. An experimentally determined endometrial cancer cell distribution, which showed a varied and resembled a half-Gaussian distribution, was used in radiobiology modeling. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to cancer cells was calculated for each treatment scenario. The therapeutic ratio (TR) was defined by comparing VCBT with a uniform dose radiotherapy plan in term of normal cell survival at the same level of cancer cell killing. Calculations of clinical impact were run twice assuming two different types of cancer cell density distributions in the cylindrical target volume: (1) a half-Gaussian or (2) a uniform distribution. Results: EUDs were weakly dependent on cylinder size, treatment length, and the prescription depth, but strongly dependent on the cancer cell distribution. TRs were strongly dependent on the cylinder size, treatment length, types of the cancer cell distributions, and the sensitivity of normal tissue. With a half-Gaussian distribution of cancer cells which populated at the vaginal mucosa the most, the EUDs were between 6.9 Gy × 4 and 7.8 Gy × 4, the TRs were in the range from (5.0)"4 to (13.4)"4 for

  9. Anti-proliferative effect of biogenic gold nanoparticles against breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. S., Uma Suganya; Govindaraju, K.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Prabhu, D.; Arulvasu, C.; Stalin Dhas, T.; Karthick, V.; Changmai, Niranjan

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is a major complication in women and numerous approaches are being developed to overcome this problem. In conventional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy the post side effects cause an unsuitable effect in treatment of cancer. Hence, it is essential to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of this disease. In the present investigation, a possible route for green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using leaf extract of Mimosa pudica and its anticancer efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer cell lines is studied. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be effective in killing cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7) which were studied using various anticancer assays (MTT assay, cell morphology determination, cell cycle analysis, comet assay, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and DAPI staining). Cell morphological analysis showed the changes occurred in cancer cells during the treatment with AuNPs. Cell cycle analysis revealed apoptosis in G0/G1 to S phase. Similarly in Comet assay, there was an increase in tail length in treated cells in comparison with the control. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay showed prompt fluorescence in treated cells indicating the translocation of phosphatidylserine from the inner membrane. PI and DAPI staining showed the DNA damage in treated cells.

  10. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.; Sougrat, Rachid; Zaher, Amir Omar; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 μg/mL) of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz) for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods. © 2015 Contreras et al.

  11. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 μg/mL) of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz) for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods. © 2015 Contreras et al.

  12. Complex interactions of caffeine and its structural analogs with ultraviolet light in cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, G.L.; Little, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    We measured the clonogenic survival response of cultured mouse 10 Tsup(1/2) cells exposed to UV light and caffeine post-treatment. When 0.5 and 1 mM caffeine were present for 24 h immediately following UV, the D 0 values of the biphasic survival curves suggest that one subpopulation was sensitized and one subpopulation was protected from killing by UV light. A cloned survivor from the radioprotected subpopulation responded to UV plus caffeine in identical manner as the parent cells. When the caffeine exposure was prolonged to 48 h, only the radiosensitizing effect was observed. Two demethylated analogs of caffeine were also tested. The response of 10 Tsup(1/2) cells to 1 mM theophylline present for 24 h after UV irradiation was approximately the same as that for the same treatment with 1 mM caffeine. However, prolonging the theophylline exposure to 48 h failed to produce the same kind of potentiation of cell killing as that observed for caffeine. Xanthine by itself was a toxic to 10 Tsup(1/2) cells as caffeine, but had no synergistic effect as caffeine when given to UV-irradiated cells for 24 or 48 h. It is therefore unlikely that all the effects of caffeine on UV-irradiated cells are mediated by its demethylated metabolites. (orig.)

  13. Gold nanorods coupled with upconverting nanophosphors for targeted thermal ablation and imaging of bladder cancer cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Suehyun K.; Su, Lih-Jen; Flaig, Thomas W.; Park, Wounjhang

    2016-09-01

    NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconverting nanophosphors (UCNPs) are robust and stable nanoparticles that absorb near-infrared (NIR) photons and emit green and red visible photons through energy transfer upconversion. This mechanism provides UCNPs several advantages as a bioimaging agent over traditional fluorescence imaging agent in that NIR excitation allows high-contrast imaging without autofluorescence and that they can be used for deep-tissue imaging. However, additional surface modification of UCNPs is necessary for them to be biocompatible. We use an amphiphilic polymer (poly(maleic anhydride-alt-octadecene) (PMAO) and a hetero-functional polyethylene glycol with amine and thiol ends (NH2-PEG-SH)) to make the UCNPs water-soluble. This reaction yields a carboxylic group that allows functionalization with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (aEGFR), which provides specific binding of UCNPs to EGFR-expressing bladder cancer cells. Additionally, the thiol ends of the PEGylated UCNPs are able to bind with gold nanorods (AuNRs) to create UCNP-AuNR complexes. The localized surface plasmon of the AuNR then allow localized heating of HTB9 bladder cancer cells, enabling in situ cell killing upon detection by UCNP fluorescence. Here, we report a successful synthesis, surface modification and conjugation of aEGFR functionalized UCNP-AuNR complexes and in vitro imaging and thermal ablation studies using them. Synthesis and surface modification of UCNP-AuNR complexes are confirmed by electron microscopy. Then, a combination of brightfield, NIR confocal fluorescence, and darkfield microscopy on the UCNP-AuNR treated bladder cancer cells revealed successful cancer targeting and imaging capabilities of the complex. Finally, cell viability assay showed that NIR irradiation of UCNP-AuNR conjugated cells resulted highly selective cell killing.

  14. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells. (author)

  15. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Ando, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells. (author)

  16. Environmental and genetic interactions in human cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, M.C.

    Humans, depending upon their genetic make-up, differ in their susceptibility to the cancer-causing effects of extrinsic agents. Clinical and laboratory studies on the hereditary disorder, ataxia telangiectasia (AT) show that persons afflicted with this are cancer-prone and unusually sensitive to conventional radiotherapy. Their skin cells, when cultured, are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation, being defective in the enzymatic repair of radiation-induced damange to the genetic material, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). This molecular finding implicates DNA damage and its imperfect repair as an early step in the induction of human cancer by radiation and other carcinogens. The parents of AT patients are clincally normal but their cultured cells are often moderately radiosensitive. The increased radiosensitivity of cultured cells offers a means of identifying a presumed cancer-prone subpopulation that should avoid undue exposure to certain carcinogens. The radioresponse of cells from patients with other cancer-associated genetic disorders and persons suspected of being genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer has also been measured. Increased cell killing by γ-rays appears in the complex genetic disease, tuberous sclerosis. Cells from cancer-stricken members of a leukemia-prone family are also radiosensitive, as are cells from one patient with radiation-associated breast cancer. These radiobiological data, taken together, strongly suggest that genetic factors can interact with extrinsic agents and thereby play a greater causative role in the development of common cancers in man than previously thought. (L.L.)

  17. Effects of Lactobacillus strains on cancer cell proliferation and oxidative stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S S; Kim, Y; Han, K S; You, S; Oh, S; Kim, S H

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess in vitro, whether heat-killed (HK) lactic acid bacteria cells and fractionations of HK cells could suppress the viability of human cancer cells and inhibit the cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress. Among the strains, the HK cells of Lactobacillus acidophilus 606 and Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 exhibited the most profound inhibitory activity in all of the tested cell lines. HK cells of L. acidophilus 606 were determined to be less toxic to healthy human embryo fibroblasts (hEF cells) than were HK cells of L. casei ATCC 393. The soluble polysaccharides from L. acidophilus 606 evidenced the most effective anticancer activity, but inhibited hEF cell growth by only 20%. The soluble polysaccharides from L. acidophilus 606 were partly observed to induce apoptosis in the HT-29 cells by DNA fragmentation and propidium iodine staining. Both the HK cells of L. acidophilus 606 and the soluble polysaccharide components of this strain also exhibited potent antioxidative activity. Our findings suggest that the soluble polysaccharide fraction from L. acidophilus 606 may constitute a novel anticancer agent, which manifests a high degree of selectivity for human cancer cells and antioxidative agent in the food industry. These soluble polysaccharide components from Lactobacillus may be applied to various foods, and used as adjuncts for cancer therapy and prevention.

  18. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousparou, Christina A; Yiacoumi, Efthymia; Deonarain, Mahendra P; Epenetos, Agamemnon A

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp) and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21). This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model) with differing p21 or p53 status. Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology

  19. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousparou Christina A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. Methods The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21. This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model with differing p21 or p53 status. Results Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Conclusions Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology.

  20. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  1. TNF-Induced Target Cell Killing by CTL Activated through Cross-Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Wohlleber

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses can escape cytotoxic T cell (CTL immunity by avoiding presentation of viral components via endogenous MHC class I antigen presentation in infected cells. Cross-priming of viral antigens circumvents such immune escape by allowing noninfected dendritic cells to activate virus-specific CTLs, but they remain ineffective against infected cells in which immune escape is functional. Here, we show that cross-presentation of antigen released from adenovirus-infected hepatocytes by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated cross-primed effector CTLs to release tumor necrosis factor (TNF, which killed virus-infected hepatocytes through caspase activation. TNF receptor signaling specifically eliminated infected hepatocytes that showed impaired anti-apoptotic defense. Thus, CTL immune surveillance against infection relies on two similarly important but distinct effector functions that are both MHC restricted, requiring either direct antigen recognition on target cells and canonical CTL effector function or cross-presentation and a noncanonical effector function mediated by TNF.

  2. TNF-induced target cell killing by CTL activated through cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleber, Dirk; Kashkar, Hamid; Gärtner, Katja; Frings, Marianne K; Odenthal, Margarete; Hegenbarth, Silke; Börner, Carolin; Arnold, Bernd; Hämmerling, Günter; Nieswandt, Bernd; van Rooijen, Nico; Limmer, Andreas; Cederbrant, Karin; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Pasparakis, Manolis; Protzer, Ulrike; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Krönke, Martin; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-09-27

    Viruses can escape cytotoxic T cell (CTL) immunity by avoiding presentation of viral components via endogenous MHC class I antigen presentation in infected cells. Cross-priming of viral antigens circumvents such immune escape by allowing noninfected dendritic cells to activate virus-specific CTLs, but they remain ineffective against infected cells in which immune escape is functional. Here, we show that cross-presentation of antigen released from adenovirus-infected hepatocytes by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated cross-primed effector CTLs to release tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which killed virus-infected hepatocytes through caspase activation. TNF receptor signaling specifically eliminated infected hepatocytes that showed impaired anti-apoptotic defense. Thus, CTL immune surveillance against infection relies on two similarly important but distinct effector functions that are both MHC restricted, requiring either direct antigen recognition on target cells and canonical CTL effector function or cross-presentation and a noncanonical effector function mediated by TNF. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial targeting of human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase protects against cell killing by chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Xu, Yi; Cooper, Ryan J; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Pollok, Karen E; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-04-15

    DNA repair capacity of eukaryotic cells has been studied extensively in recent years. Mammalian cells have been engineered to overexpress recombinant nuclear DNA repair proteins from ectopic genes to assess the impact of increased DNA repair capacity on genome stability. This approach has been used in this study to specifically target O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) to the mitochondria and examine its impact on cell survival after exposure to DNA alkylating agents. Survival of human hematopoietic cell lines and primary hematopoietic CD34(+) committed progenitor cells was monitored because the baseline repair capacity for alkylation-induced DNA damage is typically low due to insufficient expression of MGMT. Increased DNA repair capacity was observed when K562 cells were transfected with nuclear-targeted MGMT (nucl-MGMT) or mitochondrial-targeted MGMT (mito-MGMT). Furthermore, overexpression of mito-MGMT provided greater resistance to cell killing by 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) than overexpression of nucl-MGMT. Simultaneous overexpression of mito-MGMT and nucl-MGMT did not enhance the resistance provided by mito-MGMT alone. Overexpression of either mito-MGMT or nucl-MGMT also conferred a similar level of resistance to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and temozolomide (TMZ) but simultaneous overexpression in both cellular compartments was neither additive nor synergistic. When human CD34(+) cells were infected with oncoretroviral vectors that targeted O(6)-benzylguanine (6BG)-resistant MGMT (MGMT(P140K)) to the nucleus or the mitochondria, committed progenitors derived from infected cells were resistant to 6BG/BCNU or 6BG/TMZ. These studies indicate that mitochondrial or nuclear targeting of MGMT protects hematopoietic cells against cell killing by BCNU, TMZ, and MMS, which is consistent with the possibility that mitochondrial DNA damage and nuclear DNA damage contribute equally to alkylating agent-induced cell killing during chemotherapy.

  4. Combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kitabayashi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ando, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combination of chemotherapy and heavy-ion particle therapy for pancreas and esophageal cancer. We measured surviving fractions in four culture pancreas and esophageal cancer cells. The cell killing of heavy-ion irradiation is more effective compared to that of X ray irradiation. Gemcitabine induced radiosensitization for pancreas cancer cells and also taxotel for esophageal cancer. (author)

  5. DISE: A Seed-Dependent RNAi Off-Target Effect That Kills Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzbach, William; Gao, Quan Q; Patel, Monal; Haluck-Kangas, Ashley; Murmann, Andrea E; Peter, Marcus E

    2018-01-01

    Off-target effects (OTEs) represent a significant caveat for RNAi caused by substantial complementarity between siRNAs and unintended mRNAs. We now discuss the existence of three types of seed-dependent OTEs (sOTEs). Type I involves unintended targeting through the guide strand seed of an siRNA. Type II is caused by the activity of the seed on the designated siRNA passenger strand when loaded into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Both type I and II sOTEs will elicit unpredictable cellular responses. By contrast, in sOTE type III the guide strand seed preferentially targets essential survival genes resulting in death induced by survival gene elimination (DISE). In this Opinion article, we discuss DISE as a consequence of RNAi that may preferentially affect cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate soft corals-derived sinuleptolide-induced antiproliferation and DNA damage in oral cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang YT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Yung-Ting Chang,1,2,* Chiung-Yao Huang,3,* Jen-Yang Tang,4,5 Chih-Chuang Liaw,1,3 Ruei-Nian Li,6 Jing-Ru Liu,6 Jyh-Horng Sheu,1,3,7,8 Hsueh-Wei Chang6,9–12 1Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 6Department of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 7Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 8Frontier Center for Ocean Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 9Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 10Cancer Center, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital; Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 11Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 12Research Center for Natural Products and Drug Development, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We previously reported that the soft coral-derived bioactive substance, sinuleptolide, can inhibit the proliferation of oral cancer cells in association with oxidative stress. The functional role of oxidative stress in the cell-killing effect of sinuleptolide on oral cancer cells was not investigated as yet. To address this question, we introduced the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine [NAC] in a pretreatment to evaluate the sinuleptolide-induced changes to cell viability, morphology, intracellular

  7. GSH-targeted nanosponges increase doxorubicin-induced toxicity "in vitro" and "in vivo" in cancer cells with high antioxidant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Martina; Ullio, Chiara; Argenziano, Monica; Dianzani, Chiara; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Ferretti, Carlo; Zara, Gian Paolo; Gigliotti, Casimiro L; Ciamporcero, Eric S; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Corti, Denise; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2016-08-01

    Several reports indicate that chemo-resistant cancer cells become highly adapted to intrinsic oxidative stress by up-regulating their antioxidant systems, which causes an increase of intracellular GSH content. Doxorubicin is one of the most widely used drugs for tumor treatment, able to kill cancer cells through several mechanisms. However, doxorubicin use is limited by its toxicity and cancer resistance. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies able to reduce doses and to overcome chemo-resistance are needed. A new class of glutathione-responsive cyclodextrin nanosponges (GSH-NS), is able to release anticancer drugs preferentially in cells having high GSH content. Doxorubicin-loaded GSH-NS, in the cancer cells with high GSH content, inhibited clonogenic growth, cell viability, topoisomerase II activity and induced DNA damage with higher effectiveness than free drug. Moreover, GSH-NS reduced the development of human tumor in xenograft models more than free drug. These characteristics indicate that GSH-NS can be a suitable drug delivery carrier for future applications in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanoparticle-neural stem cells for targeted ovarian cancer treatment: optimization of silica nanoparticles for efficient drug loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Z.; Berlin, J.; Abidi, W.

    2018-02-01

    One of the drugs used to treat ovarian cancer is cisplatin. However, cisplatin kills normal surrounding tissue in addition to cancer cells. To improve tumor targeting efficiency, our lab uses neural stem cells (NSCs), which migrate directly to ovarian tumors. If free cisplatin is loaded into NSCs for targeted drug delivery, it will kill the NSCs. To prevent the drug cisplatin from killing both the NSCs and normal surrounding tissue, our lab synthesizes silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) that act as a protective carrier. The big picture here is to maximize efficiency of tumor targeting using NSCs and minimize toxicity to these NSCs using SiNPs. The goal of this project is to optimize the stability of SiNPs, which is important for efficient drug loading. To do this, the concentration of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), one of the main components of SiNPs, was varied. We hypothesized that more TEOS equates to more stable SiNPs because TEOS contributes carbon to SiNPs, and thus a tightly-packed chemical structure results in a stable particle. Then, the stability of the SiNPs were checked in cell media and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Lastly, the SiNPs were analyzed for their porosity using the transmission electron microscope (TEM). TEM imaging showed white spots in the 200-800 μL TEOS batches and no white spots in the 1000-1800 μL TEOS batches. The white spots were pores, which indicate instability. We concluded that the ultimate factor that determines the stability of SiNPs (100 nm) is the concentration of organic substance.

  9. The E3 ligase Cbl-b and TAM receptors regulate cancer metastasis via natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Magdalena; Choidas, Axel; Wallner, Stephanie; Pranjic, Blanka; Uribesalgo, Iris; Loeser, Stefanie; Jamieson, Amanda M; Langdon, Wallace Y; Ikeda, Fumiyo; Fededa, Juan Pablo; Cronin, Shane J; Nitsch, Roberto; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Eickhoff, Jan; Menninger, Sascha; Unger, Anke; Torka, Robert; Gruber, Thomas; Hinterleitner, Reinhard; Baier, Gottfried; Wolf, Dominik; Ullrich, Axel; Klebl, Bert M; Penninger, Josef M

    2014-03-27

    Tumour metastasis is the primary cause of mortality in cancer patients and remains the key challenge for cancer therapy. New therapeutic approaches to block inhibitory pathways of the immune system have renewed hopes for the utility of such therapies. Here we show that genetic deletion of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b (casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b) or targeted inactivation of its E3 ligase activity licenses natural killer (NK) cells to spontaneously reject metastatic tumours. The TAM tyrosine kinase receptors Tyro3, Axl and Mer (also known as Mertk) were identified as ubiquitylation substrates for Cbl-b. Treatment of wild-type NK cells with a newly developed small molecule TAM kinase inhibitor conferred therapeutic potential, efficiently enhancing anti-metastatic NK cell activity in vivo. Oral or intraperitoneal administration using this TAM inhibitor markedly reduced murine mammary cancer and melanoma metastases dependent on NK cells. We further report that the anticoagulant warfarin exerts anti-metastatic activity in mice via Cbl-b/TAM receptors in NK cells, providing a molecular explanation for a 50-year-old puzzle in cancer biology. This novel TAM/Cbl-b inhibitory pathway shows that it might be possible to develop a 'pill' that awakens the innate immune system to kill cancer metastases.

  10. Reactivation of neutron killed mammalian cells by gamma irradiation: The observations, possible mechanism and implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, J.; Harrison, W.; Einspenner, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have observed that combinations of neutron plus gamma ray exposure can significantly increase the colony forming ability of monkey and human cell cultures over the neutron dose alone. The 'reactivation' of neutron killed mammalian cells by gamma rays is analogous to observations made in lower eukaryotic organisms and fits the pattern termed 'T repair' previously postulated for yeast and protozoans. (orig.)

  11. Suppression of AKT phosphorylation restores rapamycin-based synthetic lethality in SMAD4-defective pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gendre, Onica; Sookdeo, Ayisha; Duliepre, Stephie-Anne; Utter, Matthew; Frias, Maria; Foster, David A

    2013-05-01

    mTOR has been implicated in survival signals for many human cancers. Rapamycin and TGF-β synergistically induce G1 cell-cycle arrest in several cell lines with intact TGF-β signaling pathway, which protects cells from the apoptotic effects of rapamycin during S-phase of the cell cycle. Thus, rapamycin is cytostatic in the presence of serum/TGF-β and cytotoxic in the absence of serum. However, if TGF-β signaling is defective, rapamycin induced apoptosis in both the presence and absence of serum/TGF-β in colon and breast cancer cell lines. Because genetic dysregulation of TGF-β signaling is commonly observed in pancreatic cancers-with defects in the Smad4 gene being most prevalent, we hypothesized that pancreatic cancers would display a synthetic lethality to rapamycin in the presence of serum/TGF-β. We report here that Smad4-deficient pancreatic cancer cells are killed by rapamycin in the absence of serum; however, in the presence of serum, we did not observe the predicted synthetic lethality with rapamycin. Rapamycin also induced elevated phosphorylation of the survival kinase Akt at Ser473. Suppression of rapamycin-induced Akt phosphorylation restored rapamycin sensitivity in Smad4-null, but not Smad4 wild-type pancreatic cancer cells. This study shows that the synthetic lethality to rapamycin in pancreatic cancers with defective TGF-β signaling is masked by rapamycin-induced increases in Akt phosphorylation. The implication is that a combination of approaches that suppress both Akt phosphorylation and mTOR could be effective in targeting pancreatic cancers with defective TGF-β signaling. ©2013 AACR.

  12. Targeting and killing of glioblastoma with activated T cells armed with bispecific antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitron, Ian M; Thakur, Archana; Norkina, Oxana; Barger, Geoffrey R; Lum, Lawrence G; Mittal, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Since most glioblastomas express both wild-type EGFR and EGFRvIII as well as HER2/neu, they are excellent targets for activated T cells (ATC) armed with bispecific antibodies (BiAbs) that target EGFR and HER2. ATC were generated from PBMC activated for 14 days with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody in the presence of interleukin-2 and armed with chemically heteroconjugated anti-CD3×anti-HER2/neu (HER2Bi) and/or anti-CD3×anti-EGFR (EGFRBi). HER2Bi- and/or EGFRBi-armed ATC were examined for in vitro cytotoxicity using MTT and 51 Cr-release assays against malignant glioma lines (U87MG, U118MG, and U251MG) and primary glioblastoma lines. EGFRBi-armed ATC killed up to 85% of U87, U118, and U251 targets at effector:target ratios (E:T) ranging from 1:1 to 25:1. Engagement of tumor by EGFRBi-armed ATC induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine secretion by armed ATC. HER2Bi-armed ATC exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against U118 and U251, but did not kill HER2-negative U87 cells. HER2Bi- or EGFRBi-armed ATC exhibited 50—80% cytotoxicity against four primary glioblastoma lines as well as a temozolomide (TMZ)-resistant variant of U251. Both CD133– and CD133+ subpopulations were killed by armed ATC. Targeting both HER2Bi and EGFRBi simultaneously showed enhanced efficacy than arming with a single BiAb. Armed ATC maintained effectiveness after irradiation and in the presence of TMZ at a therapeutic concentration and were capable of killing multiple targets. High-grade gliomas are suitable for specific targeting by armed ATC. These data, together with additional animal studies, may provide the preclinical support for the use of armed ATC as a valuable addition to current treatment regimens

  13. Photoacoustically-guided photothermal killing of mosquitoes targeted by nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephen R; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Totten, Daniel C; Beneš, Helen; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2014-07-01

    In biomedical applications, nanoparticles have demonstrated the potential to eradicate abnormal cells in small localized pathological zones associated with cancer or infections. Here, we introduce a method for nanotechnology-based photothermal (PT) killing of whole organisms considered harmful to humans or the environment. We demonstrate that laser-induced thermal, and accompanying nano- and microbubble phenomena, can injure or kill C. elegans and mosquitoes fed carbon nanotubes, gold nanospheres, gold nanoshells, or magnetic nanoparticles at laser energies that are safe for humans. In addition, a photoacoustic (PA) effect was used to control nanoparticle delivery. Through the integration of this technique with molecular targeting, nanoparticle clustering, magnetic capturing and spectral sharpening of PA and PT plasmonic resonances, our laser-based PA-PT nano-theranostic platform can be applied to detection and the physical destruction of small organisms and carriers of pathogens, such as malaria vectors, spiders, bed bugs, fleas, ants, locusts, grasshoppers, phytophagous mites, or other arthropod pests, irrespective of their resistance to conventional treatments. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. GMP-compliant, large-scale expanded allogeneic natural killer cells have potent cytolytic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae Lim

    Full Text Available Ex vivo-expanded, allogeneic natural killer (NK cells can be used for the treatment of various types of cancer. In allogeneic NK cell therapy, NK cells from healthy donors must be expanded in order to obtain a sufficient number of highly purified, activated NK cells. In the present study, we established a simplified and efficient method for the large-scale expansion and activation of NK cells from healthy donors under good manufacturing practice (GMP conditions. After a single step of magnetic depletion of CD3(+ T cells, the depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were stimulated and expanded with irradiated autologous PBMCs in the presence of OKT3 and IL-2 for 14 days, resulting in a highly pure population of CD3(-CD16(+CD56(+ NK cells which is desired for allogeneic purpose. Compared with freshly isolated NK cells, these expanded NK cells showed robust cytokine production and potent cytolytic activity against various cancer cell lines. Of note, expanded NK cells selectively killed cancer cells without demonstrating cytotoxicity against allogeneic non-tumor cells in coculture assays. The anti-tumor activity of expanded human NK cells was examined in SCID mice injected with human lymphoma cells. In this model, expanded NK cells efficiently controlled lymphoma progression. In conclusion, allogeneic NK cells were efficiently expanded in a GMP-compliant facility and demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Effects of caffeine on X-irradiated synchronous, asynchronous and plateau phase mouse ascites cells: the importance of progression through the cell cycle for caffeine enhancement of killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliakis, G.; Nuesse, M.

    1983-01-01

    Caffeine potentiated the killing effect of X-rays on exponentially growing cells giving rise to exponential curves (D 0 =(0.8+-0.05)Gy) at 4mM and 14 hours treatment. Irradiated plateau phase cells were less sensitive. Exponentially growing cells also became less sensitive to the effects of caffeine when they were incubated in the conditioned medium of plateau phase cells(C-medium) in which cell growth was considerably inhibited. Low caffeine concentrations(2mM) enhanced X-ray induced killing of cells irradiated in G 1 -,G 1 /S- or S-phase, but more effectively G 2 -phase cells. High caffeine concentrations (6mM) enhanced killing of cells in all phases of the cell cycle. Incubation of synchronized populations in C-medium during treatment with caffeine (2mM and 6mM) resulted in less potentiation than in cells treated in fresh medium. The expression of X-ray induced potentially lethal damage caused by 6mM caffeine in cells irradiated in various phases resulted in an exponential survival curve with a mean lethal dose of (0.8+-0.05)Gy, but the time of caffeine treatment necessary to reach this curve was different for cells irradiated in different phases. PLD repair, measured as loss of sensitivity to 6mM caffeine (4 hours treatment) was of 1-2 hours duration. (author)

  16. Dual-Mode Imaging-Guided Synergistic Chemo- and Magnetohyperthermia Therapy in a Versatile Nanoplatform To Eliminate Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinglong; Zhou, Huige; Liu, Jiaming; Liu, Jing; Li, Wanqi; Wang, Yuqing; Hu, Fan; Huo, Qing; Li, Jiayang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Chunying

    2017-07-19

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified as a new target for therapy in diverse cancers. Traditional therapies usually kill the bulk of cancer cells, but are often unable to effectively eliminate CSCs, which may lead to drug resistance and cancer relapse. Herein, we propose a novel strategy: fabricating multifunctional magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @PPr@HA hybrid nanoparticles and loading it with the Notch signaling pathway inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-l-alanyl)]-S-phenylglycinet-butylester (DAPT) to eliminate CSCs. Hyaluronic acid ligands greatly enhance the accumulation of the hybrid nanoparticles in the tumor site and in the CSCs. Both hyaluronase in the tumor microenvironment and the magnetic hyperthermia effect of the inner magnetic core can accelerate the release of DAPT. This controlled release of DAPT in the tumor site further enhances the ability of the combination of chemo- and magnetohyperthermia therapy to eliminate cancer stem cells. With the help of polypyrrole-mediated photoacoustic and Fe 3 O 4 -mediated magnetic resonance imaging, the drug release can be precisely monitored in vivo. This versatile nanoplatform enables effective elimination of the cancer stem cells and monitoring of the drugs.

  17. In vitro radiobiological evaluation of selective killing effects of 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine.HCl in the thermal neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihashi, M.; Ueda, M.; Hayashibe, K.; Hatta, S.; Tsuji, M.; Mishima, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.

    1985-01-01

    In order to clarify the specific affinity of 10 B 1 -p-boronophenylalanine.HCl ( 10 B 1 -BPA) to melanoma cells, the killing effects of 10 B 1 -BPA in the thermal neutron capture treatment on both cultured melanotic and amelanotic melanoma cells were compared with those on non-melanoma cells, such as Alexander cells, HeLa cells and normal human fibroblasts. Cells in the plateau phase cultured in the usual medium for 4-7 days were incubated with the medium containing 50 μg/ml 10 B 1 -BPA for 20 hours until 2 hours before thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation, the number of colonies consisting of more than 50 cells was counted to obtain the dose-survival curves. The melanotic cells pre-incubated with 10 B 1 -BPA had more enhanced killing sensitivity to thermal neutron irradiation than amelanotic melanoma cells pre-incubated similarly with 10 B 1 -BPA. 10 B 1 -BPA pre-incubation had no enhanced killing effects on Alexander cells, but had slightly enhanced killing effects on HeLa cells. These results indicate that 10 B 1 -BPA could be incorporated by a specific uptake mechanism of melanoma cells and accumulated within melanotic melanoma cells and that 10 B 1 -BPA at present could be the best chemical for the thermal neutron capture therapy of human malignant melanoma. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Tumour volume response, initial cell kill and cellular repopulation in B16 melanoma treated with cyclophosphamide and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, T. C.; Peacock, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between tumour volume response and cell kill in B16 melanoma following treatment in vivo with cyclophosphamide (CY) and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) was investigated. Tumour volume response, expressed as growth delay, was estimated from measurements of tumour dimensions. Depression of in vitro colony-forming ability of cells from treated tumours was used as the measure of tumour cell kill. The relationship between these parameters was clearly different for the two agents studied. CY produced more growth delay (7.5 days) per decade of tumour cell kill than CCNU (2 to 3.5 days). The possibility that this was due to a technical artefact was rejected in favour of an alternative explanation that different rates of cellular repopulation in tumours treated with CY and CCNU might be responsible. Cellular repopulation was measured directly, by performing cell-survival assays at various times after treatment with doses of CY and CCNU which produced about 3 decades of cell kill. The rate of repopulation by clonogenic cells was much slower after treatment with CY than with CCNU, and this appears to account for the longer duration of the growth delay obtained with CY. PMID:921888

  19. Ruxolitinib synergizes with DMF to kill via BIM+BAD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and via reduced SOD2/TRX expression and ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallai, Mehrad; Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; McGuire, William P; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2016-04-05

    We determined whether the myelofibrosis drug ruxolitinib, an inhibitor of Janus kinases 1/2 (JAK1 and JAK2), could interact with the multiple sclerosis drug dimethyl-fumarate (DMF) to kill tumor cells; studies used the in vivo active form of the drug, mono-methyl fumarate (MMF). Ruxolitinib interacted with MMF to kill brain, breast, lung and ovarian cancer cells, and enhanced the lethality of standard of care therapies such as paclitaxel and temozolomide. MMF also interacted with other FDA approved drugs to kill tumor cells including Celebrex® and Gilenya®. The combination of [ruxolitinib + MMF] inactivated ERK1/2, AKT, STAT3 and STAT5; reduced expression of MCL-1, BCL-XL, SOD2 and TRX; increased BIM expression; decreased BAD S112 S136 phosphorylation; and enhanced pro-caspase 3 cleavage. Expression of activated forms of STAT3, MEK1 or AKT each significantly reduced drug combination lethality; prevented BAD S112 S136 dephosphorylation and decreased BIM expression; and preserved TRX, SOD2, MCL-1 and BCL-XL expression. The drug combination increased the levels of reactive oxygen species in cells, and over-expression of TRX or SOD2 prevented drug combination tumor cell killing. Over-expression of BCL-XL or knock down of BAX, BIM, BAD or apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) protected tumor cells. The drug combination increased AIF : HSP70 co-localization in the cytosol but this event did not prevent AIF : eIF3A association in the nucleus.

  20. MR-only Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Maspero, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a local approach that involves the use of ionising radiation by exploiting its cell-killing effect to cure cancer. This effect, however, is not specific to damage only cancerous cells and spare healthy cells. Therefore, developments in radiotherapy aimed at reducing treatment uncertainties such that therapeutic radiation dose may be delivered to a malignant tumour while decreasing the dose received by healthy tissues. The recent advances in imaging techniques impacted and radi...

  1. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana; Todaro, Matilde; Di Franco, Simone; MacCalli, Cristina; Garofalo, Cinzia; Sottile, Rosa; Palmieri, Camillo; Tirinato, Luca; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N.; La Rocca, Rosanna; Mandelboim, Ofer; Stassi, Giorgio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Parmiani, Giorgio; Moretta, Alessandro; Dieli, Francesco; Kã rre, Klas; Carbone, Ennio

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutrophils kill the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis using trogocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Frances; Ng, Shek Hang; Brown, Taylor M.; Boatman, Grace; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2018-01-01

    T. vaginalis, a human-infective parasite, causes the most common nonviral sexually transmitted infection (STI) worldwide and contributes to adverse inflammatory disorders. The immune response to T. vaginalis is poorly understood. Neutrophils (polymorphonuclear cells [PMNs]) are the major immune cell present at the T. vaginalis–host interface and are thought to clear T. vaginalis. However, the mechanism of PMN clearance of T. vaginalis has not been characterized. We demonstrate that human PMNs rapidly kill T. vaginalis in a dose-dependent, contact-dependent, and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-independent manner. In contrast to phagocytosis, we observed that PMN killing of T. vaginalis involves taking “bites” of T. vaginalis prior to parasite death, using trogocytosis to achieve pathogen killing. Both trogocytosis and parasite killing are dependent on the presence of PMN serine proteases and human serum factors. Our analyses provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a mammalian phagocyte using trogocytosis for pathogen clearance and reveal a novel mechanism used by PMNs to kill a large, highly motile target. PMID:29408891

  4. STK33 kinase inhibitor BRD-8899 has no effect on KRAS-dependent cancer cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tuoping; Masson, Kristina; Jaffe, Jacob D; Silkworth, Whitney; Ross, Nathan T; Scherer, Christina A; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Carr, Steven A; Stern, Andrew M; Schreiber, Stuart L; Golub, Todd R

    2012-02-21

    Approximately 30% of human cancers harbor oncogenic gain-of-function mutations in KRAS. Despite interest in KRAS as a therapeutic target, direct blockade of KRAS function with small molecules has yet to be demonstrated. Based on experiments that lower mRNA levels of protein kinases, KRAS-dependent cancer cells were proposed to have a unique requirement for the serine/threonine kinase STK33. Thus, it was suggested that small-molecule inhibitors of STK33 might have therapeutic benefit in these cancers. Here, we describe the development of selective, low nanomolar inhibitors of STK33's kinase activity. The most potent and selective of these, BRD8899, failed to kill KRAS-dependent cells. While several explanations for this result exist, our data are most consistent with the view that inhibition of STK33's kinase activity does not represent a promising anti-KRAS therapeutic strategy.

  5. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishaq, M., E-mail: ishaqmusarat@gmail.com [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Bazaka, K. [Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ostrikov, K. [Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  6. Targeting tissue factor on tumour cells and angiogenic vascular endothelial cells by factor VII-targeted verteporfin photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in vitro and in vivo in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Rao, Benqiang; Chen, Shimin; Duanmu, Jinzhong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a ligand-targeted photodynamic therapy (tPDT) by conjugating factor VII (fVII) protein with photosensitiser verteporfin in order to overcome the poor selectivity and enhance the effect of non-targeted PDT (ntPDT) for cancer. fVII is a natural ligand for receptor tissue factor (TF) with high affinity and specificity. The reason for targeting receptor TF for the development of tPDT is that TF is a common but specific target on angiogenic tumour vascular endothelial cells (VEC) and many types of tumour cells, including solid tumours and leukaemia. Murine factor VII protein (mfVII) containing a mutation (Lys341Ala) was covalently conjugated via a cross linker EDC with Veterporfin (VP) that was extracted from liposomal Visudyne, and then free VP was separated by Sephadex G50 spin columns. fVII-tPDT using mfVII-VP conjugate, compared to ntPDT, was tested in vitro for the killing of breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated VEC and in vivo for inhibiting the tumour growth of breast tumours in a mouse xenograft model. We showed that: (i) fVII protein could be conjugated with VP without affecting its binding activity; (ii) fVII-tPDT could selectively kill TF-expressing breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated angiogenic HUVECs but had no side effects on non-TF expressing unstimulated HUVEC, CHO-K1 and 293 cells; (iii) fVII targeting enhanced the effect of VP PDT by three to four fold; (iii) fVII-tPDT induced significantly stronger levels of apoptosis and necrosis than ntPDT; and (iv) fVII-tPDT had a significantly stronger effect on inhibiting breast tumour growth in mice than ntPDT. We conclude that the fVII-targeted VP PDT that we report here is a novel and effective therapeutic with improved selectivity for the treatment of breast cancer. Since TF is expressed on many types of cancer cells including leukaemic cells and selectively on angiogenic tumour VECs, fVII-tPDT could have broad therapeutic applications for other solid cancers

  7. Cancer cells mimic in vivo spatial-temporal cell-cycle phase distribution and chemosensitivity in 3-dimensional Gelfoam® histoculture but not 2-dimensional culture as visualized with real-time FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Uehara, Fuminaru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Ming; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The phase of the cell cycle can determine whether a cancer cell can respond to a given drug. We previously reported monitoring of real-time cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor, intravitally in live mice, using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI). Approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G0/G1 phase. Longitudinal real-time imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, had little effect on quiescent cancer cells, which are the vast majority of an established tumor. Moreover, resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after cessation of chemotherapy. These results suggested why most drugs currently in clinical use, which target cancer cells in S/G2/M, are mostly ineffective on solid tumors. In the present report, we used FUCCI imaging and Gelfoam® collagen-sponge-gel histoculture, to demonstrate in real time, that the cell-cycle phase distribution of cancer cells in Gelfoam® and in vivo tumors is highly similar, whereby only the surface cells proliferate and interior cells are quiescent in G0/G1. This is in contrast to 2D culture where most cancer cells cycle. Similarly, the cancer cells responded similarly to toxic chemotherapy in Gelfoam® culture as in vivo, and very differently than cancer cells in 2D culture which were much more chemosensitive. Gelfoam® culture of FUCCI-expressing cancer cells offers the opportunity to image the cell cycle of cancer cells continuously and to screen for novel effective therapies to target quiescent cells, which are the majority in a tumor and which would have a strong probability to be effective in vivo.

  8. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  9. Metformin decreases the dose of chemotherapy for prolonging tumor remission in mouse xenografts involving multiple cancer cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Metformin, the first-line drug for treating diabetes, selectively kills the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) in genetically distinct types of breast cancer cell lines. In mouse xenografts, injection of metformin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin near the tumor is more effective than either drug alone in blocking tumor growth and preventing relapse. Here, we show that metformin is equally effective when given orally together with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and doxorubicin, indicating that metformin works together with a variety of standard chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, metformin has comparable effects on tumor regression and preventing relapse when combined with a four-fold reduced dose of doxorubicin that is not effective as a monotherapy. Finally, the combination of metformin and doxorubicin prevents relapse in xenografts generated with prostate and lung cancer cell lines. These observations provide further evidence for the CSC hypothesis for cancer relapse, an experimental rationale for using metformin as part of combinatorial therapy in a variety of clinical settings, and for reducing the chemotherapy dose in cancer patients.

  10. Novel inhibitors induce large conformational changes of GAB1 pleckstrin homology domain and kill breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Grb2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1 integrates signals from different signaling pathways and is over-expressed in many cancers, therefore representing a new therapeutic target. In the present study, we aim to target the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of GAB1 for cancer treatment. Using homology models we derived, high-throughput virtual screening of five million compounds resulted in five hits which exhibited strong binding affinities to GAB1 PH domain. Our prediction of ligand binding affinities is also in agreement with the experimental KD values. Furthermore, molecular dynamics studies showed that GAB1 PH domain underwent large conformational changes upon ligand binding. Moreover, these hits inhibited the phosphorylation of GAB1 and demonstrated potent, tumor-specific cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cell lines. This effort represents the discovery of first-in-class GAB1 PH domain inhibitors with potential for targeted breast cancer therapy and provides novel insights into structure-based approaches to targeting this protein.

  11. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25232058

  12. In vitro studies: The role of immunological cells in Indonesian thin tail sheep in the killing of the liver fluke, Fasciola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E Estuningsih

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that Indonesian Thin Tail (ET sheep exhibit high resistance to challenge with Fasciola gigantica when compared with Merino sheep, and this resistance is expressed in early infection. In order to study the role of the immune system in this resistance to ET sheep, in vitro studies were undertaken in the laboratory. In vitro study to confirm the ability of immune cells from ET sheep in the killing of F. gigantica larvae has been done by incubating immune cells and F. gigantica larvae together with immune sera or normal sera. The viability of the larvae was observed over a period 3 days incubation by observing their motility. The results showed that the cells isolated from F. gigantica- challenged ET sheep in the presence of immune sera from ET were able to kill 70% of the larvae. In contrast, cells from infected Merino were unable to kill a significant number of F. gigantica using the same sera source. It seems that the cytotoxicity was dependent on the presence of immune sera and ET peritoneal cells, suggesting the potential role of an antibody-dependent cell cytotoxic (ADCC mechanism in the resistant ET sheep.

  13. Heat-induced alterations in the cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampinga, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Hyperthermia may kill eukaryotic cells and may also enhance the radiosensitivity of those cells that survive the heat treatment. Clinically, the possible use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant in the radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer needs the understanding of mechanisms that underlay heat-induced cell death and radiosensitization. By in vitro heating of established human (HeLaS3) and rodent (Ehrlich Ascites Tumor and LM fibroblast) cell lines, both killing and radiosensitization were investigated. (author). 1067 refs.; 76 figs.; 19 tabs

  14. Induction of apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition by paclitaxel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... contribution of different forms of cell death to cancer development and treatment requires ... Killing malignant cells is the number one goal of almost all forms of cancer therapy in use today. In ..... Adoptive Immunotherapy in the Treatment of hASIPa-Overexpressed. Breast Cancer. Oncol. Res. 17: 59-68.

  15. Possible role for plasmalogens in protecting animal cells against photosensitized killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoeller, R.A.; Morand, O.H.; Raetz, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells incorporate 12-(1'-pyrene) dodecanoic acid (P12) into membrane lipids. Exposure of P12-labeled cells to long wavelength ultraviolet light causes cell killing, presumably because excitation of the pyrene moiety (a photosensitizer) leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Cytotoxicity is dependent upon the concentration of P12 used to label the cells, and time of UV exposure, and the presence of oxygen during irradiation. CHO mutant cells deficient in plasmalogen biosynthesis and peroxisome assembly are several orders of magnitude more sensitive to P12/UV treatment than wild-type cells, permitting direct selection of one wild-type cell in 1 X 10(4) mutant cells. A major factor responsible for the P12/UV hypersensitivity of these mutants appears to be the absence of plasmalogens. Supplementation of the mutants with 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glycerol restores plasmalogen levels and nearly normal resistance to P12/UV treatment, whereas the biogenesis of peroxisomes is not restored. The P12/UV hypersensitivity of the plasmalogen-deficient mutants, together with the selective, P12/UV-induced decomposition of plasmalogens in wild-type cells, documented in the accompanying manuscript, suggest that the vinyl ether linkage of plasmalogens plays a direct role in protecting animal cell membranes against certain oxidative stresses

  16. Combined inhibition of glycolysis, the pentose cycle, and thioredoxin metabolism selectively increases cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human breast and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of glycolysis using 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG, 20 mM, 24–48 h combined with inhibition of the pentose cycle using dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, 300 µM, 24–48 h increased clonogenic cell killing in both human prostate (PC-3 and DU145 and human breast (MDA-MB231 cancer cells via a mechanism involving thiol-mediated oxidative stress. Surprisingly, when 2DG+DHEA treatment was combined with an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH synthesis (l-buthionine sulfoximine; BSO, 1 mM that depleted GSH>90% of control, no further increase in cell killing was observed during 48 h exposures. In contrast, when an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR activity (Auranofin; Au, 1 µM, was combined with 2DG+DHEA or DHEA-alone for 24 h, clonogenic cell killing was significantly increased in all three human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, enhanced clonogenic cell killing seen with the combination of DHEA+Au was nearly completely inhibited using the thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 20 mM. Redox Western blot analysis of PC-3 cells also supported the conclusion that thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1 oxidation was enhanced by treatment DHEA+Au and inhibited by NAC. Importantly, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC were not as sensitive to 2DG, DHEA, and Au combinations as their cancer cell counterparts (MDA-MB-231. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that inhibition of glycolysis and pentose cycle activity, combined with inhibition of Trx metabolism, may provide a promising strategy for selectively sensitizing human cancer cells to oxidative stress-induced cell killing.

  17. Nanostructured Surfaces to Target and Kill Circulating Tumor Cells While Repelling Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematogenous metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location via the bloodstream, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Selectin proteins hold promise in delivering drug-containing nanocarriers to circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the bloodstream, due to their rapid, force-dependent binding kinetics. However, it is challenging to deliver such nanocarriers while avoiding toxic effects on healthy blood cells, as many possess ligands that adhesively interact with selectins. Herein, we describe a nanostructured surface to capture flowing cancer cells, while preventing human neutrophil adhesion. Microtube surfaces with immobilized halloysite nanotubes (HNTs and E-selectin functionalized liposomal doxorubicin (ES-PEG L-DXR significantly increased the number of breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells captured from flow, yet also significantly reduced the number of captured neutrophils. Neutrophils firmly adhered and projected pseudopods on surfaces coated only with liposomes, while neutrophils adherent to HNT-liposome surfaces maintained a round morphology. Perfusion of both MCF7 cells and neutrophils resulted in primarily cancer cell adhesion to the HNT-liposome surface, and induced significant cancer cell death. This work demonstrates that nanostructured surfaces consisting of HNTs and ES-PEG L-DXR can increase CTC recruitment for chemotherapeutic delivery, while also preventing healthy cell adhesion and uptake of therapeutic intended for CTCs.

  18. Targeting Homologous Recombination by Pharmacological Inhibitors Enhances the Killing Response of Glioblastoma Cells Treated with Alkylating Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berte, Nancy; Piée-Staffa, Andrea; Piecha, Nadine; Wang, Mengwan; Borgmann, Kerstin; Kaina, Bernd; Nikolova, Teodora

    2016-11-01

    Malignant gliomas exhibit a high level of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance and have a dismal prognosis. First- and second-line therapeutics for glioblastomas are alkylating agents, including the chloroethylating nitrosoureas (CNU) lomustine, nimustine, fotemustine, and carmustine. These agents target the tumor DNA, forming O 6 -chloroethylguanine adducts and secondary DNA interstrand cross-links (ICL). These cross-links are supposed to be converted into DNA double-strand breaks, which trigger cell death pathways. Here, we show that lomustine (CCNU) with moderately toxic doses induces ICLs in glioblastoma cells, inhibits DNA replication fork movement, and provokes the formation of DSBs and chromosomal aberrations. Since homologous recombination (HR) is involved in the repair of DSBs formed in response to CNUs, we elucidated whether pharmacologic inhibitors of HR might have impact on these endpoints and enhance the killing effect. We show that the Rad51 inhibitors RI-1 and B02 greatly ameliorate DSBs, chromosomal changes, and the level of apoptosis and necrosis. We also show that an inhibitor of MRE11, mirin, which blocks the formation of the MRN complex and thus the recognition of DSBs, has a sensitizing effect on these endpoints as well. In a glioma xenograft model, the Rad51 inhibitor RI-1 clearly enhanced the effect of CCNU on tumor growth. The data suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of HR, for example by RI-1, is a reasonable strategy for enhancing the anticancer effect of CNUs. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2665-78. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells Modified with Tumor-Associated Antigen Gene Demonstrates Enhanced Antitumor Effect Against Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunotherapy using dendritic cell (DC vaccine has the potential to overcome the bottleneck of cancer therapy. METHODS: We engineered Lewis lung cancer cells (LLCs and bone marrow–derived DCs to express tumor-associated antigen (TAA ovalbumin (OVA via lentiviral vector plasmid encoding OVA gene. We then tested the antitumor effect of modified DCs both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that in vitro modified DCs could dramatically enhance T-cell proliferation (P < .01 and killing of LLCs than control groups (P < .05. Moreover, modified DCs could reduce tumor size and prolong the survival of LLC tumor-bearing mice than control groups (P < .01 and P < .01, respectively. Mechanistically, modified DCs demonstrated enhanced homing to T-cell–rich compartments and triggered more naive T cells to become cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which exhibited significant infiltration into the tumors. Interestingly, modified DCs also markedly reduced tumor cells harboring stem cell markers in mice (P < .05, suggesting the potential role on cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that DCs bioengineered with TAA could enhance antitumor effect and therefore represent a novel anticancer strategy that is worth further exploration.

  20. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in "Pocket" liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC(8,9)PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them "Pocket" liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0-5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5-8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  1. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sine J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Sine,1,* Cordula Urban,2,* Derek Thayer,1 Heather Charron,2 Niksa Valim,2 Darrell B Tata,3 Rachel Schiff,4 Robert Blumenthal,1 Amit Joshi,2 Anu Puri1 1Membrane Structure and Function Section, Basic Research Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute – Frederick, Frederick, MD, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3US Food and Drug Administration, CDRH/OSEL/Division of Physics, White Oak Campus, MD, USA; 4Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC. We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH (Ex/Em410/670 nm together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads

  2. The Potent Humanin Analogue (HNG) Protects Germ Cells and Leucocytes While Enhancing Chemotherapy-Induced Suppression of Cancer Metastases in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, YanHe; Swerdloff, Ronald; Wan, Junxiang; Xiao, Jialin; French, Samuel; Atienza, Vince; Canela, Victor; Bruhn, Kevin W; Stone, Brian; Jia, Yue; Cohen, Pinchas; Wang, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Humanin is a peptide that is cytoprotective against stresses in many cell types. We investigated whether a potent humanin analogue S14G-humanin (HNG) would protect against chemotherapy-induced damage to normal cells without interfering with the chemotherapy-induced suppression of cancer cells. Young adult male mice were inoculated iv with murine melanoma cells. After 1 week, cancer-bearing mice were randomized to receive either: no treatment, daily ip injection of HNG, a single ip injection of cyclophosphamide (CP), or CP+HNG and killed at the end of 3 weeks. HNG rescued the CP-induced suppression of leucocytes and protected germ cell from CP-induced apoptosis. Lung metastases were suppressed by HNG or CP alone, and further suppressed by CP+HNG treatment. Plasma IGF-1 levels were suppressed by HNG with or without CP treatment. To investigate whether HNG maintains its protective effects on spermatogonial stem cells, sperm output, and peripheral leucocytes after repeated doses of CP, normal adult male mice received: no treatment, daily sc injection of HNG, 6 ip injections of CP at 5-day intervals, and the same regimens of CP+HNG and killed at the end of 4 weeks of treatment. Cauda epididymal sperm counts were elevated by HNG and suppressed by CP. HNG rescued the CP-induced suppression of spermatogonial stem cells, sperm count and peripheral leucocytes. We conclude that HNG 1) protects CP-induced loss of male germ cells and leucocytes, 2) enhances CP-induced suppression of cancer metastases, and 3) acts as a caloric-restriction mimetic by suppressing IGF-1 levels. Our findings suggest that humanin analogues may be promising adjuvants to chemotherapy.

  3. Cordycepin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells are independent of the estrogen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sunga; Lim, Mi-Hee; Kim, Ki Mo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Song, Won O.; Kim, Tae Woong

    2011-01-01

    Cordycepin (3-deoxyadenosine), found in Cordyceps spp., has been known to have many therapeutic effects including immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-aging effects. Moreover, anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of cordycepin have been reported, but the mechanism causing cancer cell death is poorly characterized. The present study was designed to investigate whether the mechanisms of cordycepin-induced cell death were associated with estrogen receptor in breast cancer cells. Exposure of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to cordycepin resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of cell growth and reduction in cell viability. The cordycepin-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with several specific features of the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL, and biochemical assays. Cordycepin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, triggering cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases-9 and -3. Interestingly, MCF-7 cells showed autophagy-associated cell death, as observed by the detection of an autophagosome-specific protein and large membranous vacuole ultrastructure morphology in the cytoplasm. Cordycepin-induced autophagic cell death has applications in treating MCF-7 cells with apoptotic defects, irrespective of the ER response. Although autophagy has a survival function in tumorigenesis of some cancer cells, autophagy may be important for cordycepin-induced MCF-7 cell death. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that cordycepin effectively kills MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines in culture. Hence, further studies should be conducted to determine whether cordycepin will be a clinically useful, ER-independent, chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. -- Highlights: ► We studied the mechanism which cordycepin-induced cell death association with estrogen receptor (ER) in

  4. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Deepak [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sandur, Santosh K., E-mail: sskumar@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology & Health Sciences Division, Modular Laboratories, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-09-09

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  5. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R.S.; Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. - Highlights: • DIMC enhances radiosensitivity of cancer cells by inducing cell death. • DIMC with radiation disrupted the cellular redox and targeted cancer stem cells. • DNA repair is hampered when cells are treated with DIMC. • DIMC inhibited thioredoxin reductase in cancer cells.

  6. Doxorubicin-loaded magnetic nanoparticle clusters for chemo-photothermal treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weibing; Zheng, Xinmin [Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Shen, Shun [School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, No. 826 Zhangheng Road, Shanghai, 201203 (China); Wang, Xinghuan, E-mail: xinghuanwang9@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China)

    2015-10-16

    In addition to the conventional cancer treatment such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgical management, nanomedicine-based approaches have attracted widespread attention in recent years. In this paper, a promising nanocarrier, magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) as porous materials which provided enough room on the surface, was developed for loading chemotherapeutic agent of doxorubicin (DOX). Moreover, MNCs are a good near-infrared (NIR) photothermal mediator. Thus, MNCs have great potential both in photothermal therapy (PTT) and drug delivery for chemo-photothermal therapy of cancer. We firstly explored the destruction of prostate cancer in vitro by the combination of PTT and chemotherapy using DOX@MNCs. Upon NIR irradiation at 808 nm, more cancer cells were killed when PC3 cells incubated with DOX@MNCs, owing to both MNCs-mediated photothermal ablation and cytotoxicity of light-triggered DOX release. Compared with PTT or chemotherapy alone, the chemo-photothermal therapy by DOX@MNCs showed a synergistically higher therapeutic efficacy. - Highlights: • MNCs have great potential both in photothermal therapy and drug delivery. • DOX@MNCs were used for chemo-photothermal therapy of prostate cancer cells. • DOX@MNCs showed a synergistically higher therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Salinomycin on Cell Survival, Colony Growth, Migration, and Invasion of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 and LNM35: Involvement of NAG-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholoud Arafat

    Full Text Available A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop more potent and less toxic drugs that will decrease the tumor growth and improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Salinomycin is a polyether antibiotic used to kill gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria, protozoans such as plasmodium falciparum, and the parasites responsible for the poultry disease coccidiosis. This old agent is now a serious anti-cancer drug candidate that selectively inhibits the growth of cancer stem cells. We investigated the impact of salinomycin on survival, colony growth, migration and invasion of the differentiated human non-small cell lung cancer lines LNM35 and A549. Salinomycin caused concentration- and time-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35 and A549 cells through a caspase 3/7-associated cell death pathway. Similarly, salinomycin (2.5-5 µM for 7 days significantly decreased the growth of LNM35 and A549 colonies in soft agar. Metastasis is the main cause of death related to lung cancer. In this context, salinomycin induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We also demonstrated for the first time that salinomycin induced a marked increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein NAG-1 leading to the inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion but not cell survival. These findings identify salinomycin as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  8. Photothermal-triggered control of sub-cellular drug accumulation using doxorubicin-loaded single-walled carbon nanotubes for the effective killing of human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yunok; Jin, Jun-O.; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are often the subject of investigation as effective photothermal therapy (PTT) agents owing to their unique strong optical absorption. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded SWNTs (SWNTs-DOX) can be used as an efficient therapeutic agent for combined near infrared (NIR) cancer photothermal and chemotherapy. However, SWNTs-DOX-mediated induction of cancer cell death has not been fully investigated, particularly the reaction of DOX inside cancer cells by PTT. In this study, we examined how the SWNTs-DOX promoted effective MDA-MB-231 cell death compared to DOX and PTT alone. We successfully synthesized the SWNTs-DOX. The SWNTs-DOX exhibited a slow DOX release, which was accelerated by NIR irradiation. Furthermore, DOX released from the SWNTs-DOX accumulated inside the cells at high concentration and effectively localized into the MDA-MB-231 cell nucleus. A combination of SWNTs-DOX and PTT promoted an effective MDA-MB-231 cell death by mitochondrial disruption and ROS generation. Thus, SWNTs-DOX can be utilized as an excellent anticancer agent for early breast cancer treatment.

  9. N-acetyl cysteine protects against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage but not against cell killing in yeast and mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reliene, Ramune [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pollard, Julianne M. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sobol, Zhanna; Trouiller, Benedicte [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gatti, Richard A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Schiestl, Robert H., E-mail: rschiestl@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA strand breaks leading to cell death or deleterious genome rearrangements. In the present study, we examined the role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a clinically proven safe agent, for it's ability to protect against {gamma}-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and/or DNA deletions in yeast and mammals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA deletions were scored by reversion to histidine prototrophy. Human lymphoblastoid cells were examined for the frequency of {gamma}-H2AX foci formation, indicative of DNA double strand break formation. DNA strand breaks were also measured in mouse peripheral blood by the alkaline comet assay. In yeast, NAC reduced the frequency of IR-induced DNA deletions. However, NAC did not protect against cell death. NAC also reduced {gamma}-H2AX foci formation in human lymphoblastoid cells but had no protective effect in the colony survival assay. NAC administration via drinking water fully protected against DNA strand breaks in mice whole-body irradiated with 1 Gy but not with 4 Gy. NAC treatment in the absence of irradiation was not genotoxic. These data suggest that, given the safety and efficacy of NAC in humans, NAC may be useful in radiation therapy to prevent radiation-mediated genotoxicity, but does not interfere with efficient cancer cell killing.

  10. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Gerdts, Ethan A; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T; Murad, John P; Park, Anthony K; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Yang, Xin; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E; Wu, Anna M; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with "on-target off-tumor" activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies.

  11. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J.; Gerdts, Ethan A.; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T.; Murad, John P.; Park, Anthony K.; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E.; Brown, Christine E.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with “on-target off-tumor” activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies. PMID:29308300

  12. Killing defect of natural killer cells with the absence of natural killer cytotoxic factors in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, A.; Kawai, H.; Yamada, S.; Kato, M.; Yanagisawa, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1987-01-01

    A killing defect of natural killer (NK) cells in the absence of NK cytotoxic factors (NKCF) was first demonstrated in a child with Hodgkin's disease. The patient lacked detectable NK cell activity in every phase of the disease as measured by a four-hour 51 Cr-release assay using K562 cells as a target. The percent lysis at a 40:1 effector:target ratio by the patient's lymphocytes was persistently below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 46.2% +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SD). NK cell activity was not detectable at effector:target ratios of 10:1 to 80:1 and by prolongation of the incubation time, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by lymphocyte stimulation with polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid, interferon (IFN)-alpha, or interleukin 2 (IL 2). The numbers of Leu-7+ cells and Leu-11+ cells were normal as counted by flow cytometry. A single cell-in-agarose assay demonstrated normal numbers of target binding cells (TBCs), and they showed the morphology of large granular lymphocytes. However, there were no TBCs with dead targets. These results indicated that the patient's lymphocytes contained normal numbers of NK cells that were capable of recognizing and binding to a target but were incapable of killing the bound target cell. The patient's lymphocytes were then studied for their release of NKCF upon interaction with K562 cells. The patient's cells did not release NKCF, and the NK cell defect was not restored or improved by stimulation of the cells with IFN or IL 2. It is suggested that the deficient release of NKCF may have been related to the killing defect of the NK cells in this patient

  13. Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musk, S.R. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (England))

    1991-03-01

    The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

  14. Electroporation driven delivery of both an IL-12 expressing plasmid and cisplatin synergizes to inhibit B16 melanoma tumor growth through an NK cell mediated tumor killing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2012-11-01

    Combined therapy using chemotherapeutic drugs and immunotherapeutics offers some promise for treating patients with cancer. In this study, we evaluated whether cisplatin delivered by intratumoral (IT)-electroporation (EP) might enhance antitumor activity against established B16 melanoma and whether further addition of intramuscular (IM)-EP of IL-12 cDNA to IT-EP of cisplatin might augment antitumor therapeutic activity, with a focus on the underlining antitumor mechanism(s). When tumor (7 mm)-bearing animals were treated locally with cisplatin by IT-EP, they showed tumor growth inhibition significantly more than those without IT-EP. Moreover, IL-12 cDNA delivered by IM-EP was also able to inhibit tumor growth significantly more than control vector delivery. This tumor growth inhibition was mediated by NK cells, but not CD4+ T or CD8+ T cells, as determined by immune cell subset depletion and IFN-γ induction. Moreover, concurrent therapy using IT-EP of cisplatin plus IM-EP of IL-12 cDNA displayed antitumor therapeutic synergy. This therapeutic synergy appeared to be mediated by increased sensitivity of cisplatin-treated tumors to NK cell-mediated tumor killing. Taken together, these data support that cisplatin delivery by IT-EP plus IL-12 gene delivery by IM-EP are more effective at inducing antitumor therapeutic responses through increased sensitivity of cisplatin-treated tumors to NK cell-mediated tumor killing. This combined approach might have some implication for treating melanoma in patients.

  15. Effective and persistent antitumor activity of HER2-directed CAR-T cells against gastric cancer cells in vitro and xenotransplanted tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanjing; Tong, Chuan; Wang, Yao; Gao, Yunhe; Dai, Hanren; Guo, Yelei; Zhao, Xudong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Zizheng; Han, Weidong; Chen, Lin

    2017-03-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) proteins are overexpressed in a high proportion of gastric cancer (GC) cases and affect the maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations, which are used as targets for the clinical treatment of patients with HER2-positive GC. Despite improvements in survival, numerous HER2-positive patients fail treatment with trastuzumab, highlighting the need for more effective therapies. In this study, we generated a novel type of genetically modified human T cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), and targeting the GC cell antigen HER2, which harbors the CD137 and CD3ζ moieties. Our findings show that the expanded CAR-T cells, expressing an increased central memory phenotype, were activated by the specific recognition of HER2 antigens in an MHC-independent manner, and effectively killed patient-derived HER2-positive GC cells. In HER2-positive xenograft tumors, CAR-T cells exhibited considerably enhanced tumor inhibition ability, long-term survival, and homing to targets, compared with those of non-transduced T cells. The sphere-forming ability and in vivo tumorigenicity of patient-derived gastric cancer stem-like cells, expressing HER2 and the CD44 protein, were also inhibited. Our results support the future development and clinical application of this adoptive immunotherapy in patients with HER2-positive advanced GC.

  16. The Dietary Flavonoid Fisetin Causes Cell Cycle Arrest, Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis, and Enhanced Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew L; Murphy, Kaylee; Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Hoskin, David W

    2016-08-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonoid found in a number of fruits and vegetables, has diverse biological activities, including cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of fisetin on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. TNBC has a poorer prognosis than other types of breast cancer and treatment options for this disease are limited. Fisetin inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 TNBC cells, as well as their ability to form colonies, without substantially affecting the growth of non-malignant cells. In addition, fisetin inhibited the growth of estrogen receptor-bearing MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. Fisetin inhibited TNBC cell division and induced apoptosis, which was associated with mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-8, as well as the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis by fisetin was confirmed by reduced killing of TNBC cells in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and BOC-D-FMK. Decreased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 in fisetin-treated TNBC cells at G2/M phase of the cell cycle suggested that fisetin-induced apoptosis was the result of Aurora B kinase inhibition. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide metabolite of cyclophosphamide on TNBC cells was increased in the presence of fisetin. These findings suggest that further investigation of fisetin is warranted for possible use in the management of TNBC. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1913-1925, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cell-killing efficiency and number of platinum atoms binding to DNA, RNA and protein molecules of HeLa cells treated with combinations of hyperthermia and carboplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaboshi, M.; Kawai, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, J.; Sumino, T.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia on the cell killing efficiency of Pt atoms binding to DNA, RNA and protein molecules of HeLa cells treated with cis-diamine(1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylato)platinum(II) (CBDCA) was examined. HeLa S-3 cells were treated with 195m Pt-radiolabeled CBDCA for 60 minutes at various temperatures, and the relationship between the lethal effect and the number of Pt atoms binding to DNA, RNA and proteins was examined. The mean lethal concentration (D 0 ) of carboplatin for a 60 min-treatment at 0, 25, 37, 40, 42 and 44 deg C was 671.2, 201.5, 67.3, 33.4, 20.2 and 15.6 μM, respectively. By using identically treated cells, the number of Pt-atoms combined with DNA, RNA and protein molecules were determined in the subcellular fractions. Thus, the D 0 's given as the drug concentrations were replaced with the number of Pt-atoms combined in each fraction. Then, the cell-killing efficiency of the Pt atom was expressed as the reciprocal of the number of Pt-atoms combined and was calculated for each molecule. The efficiency for DNA molecules was 0.699, 1.42, 2.65, 4.84, 7.74 and 8.28x10 4 nucleotides, respectively, for the conditions described above. From 0 to 44 deg C, the cell-killing efficiency of Pt atoms increased by a factor of 11.9. (author)

  18. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  19. Cisplatin combined with hyperthermia kills HepG2 cells in intraoperative blood salvage but preserves the function of erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-ting; Tang, Li-hui; Liu, Yun-qing; Wang, Yin; Wang, Lie-ju; Zhang, Feng-jiang; Yan, Min

    2015-05-01

    The safe use of intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) in cancer surgery remains controversial. Here, we investigated the killing effect of cisplatin combined with hyperthermia on human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells and erythrocytes from IBS in vitro. HepG2 cells were mixed with concentrated erythrocytes and pretreated with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) alone at 37 °C for 60 min and cisplatin (25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia at 42 °C for 60 min. After pretreatment, the cell viability, colony formation and DNA metabolism in HepG2 and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentration, free hemoglobin (Hb) level, osmotic fragility, membrane phosphatidylserine externalization, and blood gas variables in erythrocytes were determined. Pretreatment with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability, and completely inhibited colony formation and DNA metabolism when the HepG2 cell concentration was 5×10(4) ml(-1) in the erythrocyte (P2,3-DPG level, phosphatidylserine externalization, and extra-erythrocytic free Hb were significantly altered by hyperthermia plus high concentrations of cisplatin (100 and 200 μg/ml) (P0.05). In conclusion, pretreatment with cisplatin (50 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min effectively eliminated HepG2 cells from IBS but did not significantly affect erythrocytes in vitro.

  20. Oncolytic Viruses in Head and Neck Cancer: A New Ray of Hope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and gene therapy. All the treatment modalities currently employed are associated with potential adverse effects. Hence, there is an urgent need of a treatment modality that targets cancer cell and has minimal side-effects. One such upcoming approach is the use of viruses to kill cancer cells.

  1. Ferritin-iron increases killing of Chinese hamster ovary cells by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.M.; Stevens, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Stationary-phase Chinese hamster ovary cells were cultured in medium containing ferritin (∼19% iron by weight) added at concentrations ranging from 0 to 128 μg/ml. One set of cultures was unirradiated, another set exposed to 4.0 Gy of X-ray. Clonogenic cell survival was assessed in each set of cultures. In the absence of added ferritin, 4.0 Gy killed approximately 50% of the cells. In the absence of radiation, ferritin was not toxic at less than 48 μg/ml; above 48 μg/ml, toxicity increased with concentration. Apoferritin was not toxic at any concentration tested (up to 1000 μg/ml). Although 32 μg/ml ferritin, reflecting only a 3-6 fold increase in iron concentration over normal serum, was not toxic, it reduced survival of X-irradiated cells by an additional 75%. These results indicate that a sublethal concentration of ferritin can be a potent radiosensitizer. (Author)

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells of the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (A549) Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Noor Hanis Abu; Zakaria, Norashikin; Satar, Nazilah Abdul; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The failure of current treatments to completely eradicate cancer cells often leads to cancer recurrence and dissemination. Studies have suggested that tumor growth and spread are driven by a minority of cancer cells that exhibit characteristics similar to those of normal stem cells, thus these cells are called cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are believed to play an important role in initiating and promoting cancer. CSCs are resistant to currently available cancer therapies, and understanding the mechanisms that control the growth of CSCs might have great implications for cancer therapy. Cancer cells are consist of heterogeneous population of cells, thus methods of identification, isolation, and characterisation of CSCs are fundamental to obtain a pure CSC populations. Therefore, this chapter describes in detail a method for isolating and characterizing a pure population of CSCs from heterogeneous population of cancer cells and CSCs based on specific cell surface markers.

  3. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation.

  4. Anti-tumor effects of 125I radioactive particles implantation on transplantated tumor model of human breast cancer cells in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhongdi; Liang Chunlin; Zhang Guoli; Jing Yue; Zhang Yucheng; Gai Baodong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effects of 125 I radioactive particles implantation on transplantated tumor model of human breast cancer cells in nude mice and clarify their anti-tumor mechanisms. Methods 120 nude mice transplantated with human breast cancer cells MCF-7 were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=40): 125 I radioactive particles implanted group, non-radioactive particles implanted group and non-particles implanted group. The articles were implanted into mice according to Pairs system principle. The expressions of Fas mRNA and protein and the activaties of caspase-3 and caspase-8 enzyme were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The changes of cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. Results: Compared with non-radioactive particles implanted group and non-particles implanted group, the size of cancer tissues in 125 I radioactive particles implanted group was reduced significantly (P 0 /G 1 phase was significantly increased (P 125 I radioactive particles into transplantated tumor model of human breast cancer cells can kill tumor cells, inhibit the growth cycle of tumor cells and induce the apoptosis of tumor cells in nude mice. (authors)

  5. The antidiabetic drug ciglitazone induces high grade bladder cancer cells apoptosis through the up-regulation of TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Plissonnier

    Full Text Available Ciglitazone belongs to the thiazolidinediones class of antidiabetic drug family and is a high-affinity ligand for the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ. Apart from its antidiabetic activity, this molecule shows antineoplastic effectiveness in numerous cancer cell lines.Using RT4 (derived from a well differentiated grade I papillary tumor and T24 (derived from an undifferentiated grade III carcinoma bladder cancer cells, we investigated the potential of ciglitazone to induce apoptotic cell death and characterized the molecular mechanisms involved. In RT4 cells, the drug induced G2/M cell cycle arrest characterized by an overexpression of p53, p21(waf1/CIP1 and p27(Kip1 in concomitance with a decrease of cyclin B1. On the contrary, in T24 cells, it triggered apoptosis via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis occurred at high concentrations through PPARγ activation-independent pathways. We show that in vivo treatment of nude mice by ciglitazone inhibits high grade bladder cancer xenograft development. We identified a novel mechanism by which ciglitazone kills cancer cells. Ciglitazone up-regulated soluble and membrane-bound TRAIL and let TRAIL-resistant T24 cells to respond to TRAIL through caspase activation, death receptor signalling pathway and Bid cleavage. We provided evidence that TRAIL-induced apoptosis is partially driven by ciglitazone-mediated down-regulation of c-FLIP and survivin protein levels through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism.Therefore, ciglitazone could be clinically relevant as chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for the treatment of TRAIL-refractory high grade urothelial cancers.

  6. Anti-proliferative effect of biogenic gold nanoparticles against breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma Suganya, K.S.; Govindaraju, K.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Prabhu, D.; Arulvasu, C.; Stalin Dhas, T.; Karthick, V.; Changmai, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biosynthesis of stable and well dispersed predominantly spherical gold nanoparticles of size around ∼12.5 nm. • Anticancer assessment of gold nanoparticles on MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines. • AuNPs were found non toxic to normal HMEC cells. • Flow cytometry results revealed significant arrest in cell proliferation in early G0/G1 to S phase. - Abstract: Breast cancer is a major complication in women and numerous approaches are being developed to overcome this problem. In conventional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy the post side effects cause an unsuitable effect in treatment of cancer. Hence, it is essential to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of this disease. In the present investigation, a possible route for green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using leaf extract of Mimosa pudica and its anticancer efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer cell lines is studied. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be effective in killing cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7) which were studied using various anticancer assays (MTT assay, cell morphology determination, cell cycle analysis, comet assay, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and DAPI staining). Cell morphological analysis showed the changes occurred in cancer cells during the treatment with AuNPs. Cell cycle analysis revealed apoptosis in G_0/G_1 to S phase. Similarly in Comet assay, there was an increase in tail length in treated cells in comparison with the control. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay showed prompt fluorescence in treated cells indicating the translocation of phosphatidylserine from the inner membrane. PI and DAPI staining showed the DNA damage in treated cells.

  7. Anti-proliferative effect of biogenic gold nanoparticles against breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uma Suganya, K.S. [Centre for Ocean Research, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Govindaraju, K., E-mail: govindtu@gmail.com [Centre for Ocean Research, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Ganesh Kumar, V. [Centre for Ocean Research, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Prabhu, D.; Arulvasu, C. [Department of Zoology, University of Madras, Guindy campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Stalin Dhas, T.; Karthick, V.; Changmai, Niranjan [Centre for Ocean Research, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Biosynthesis of stable and well dispersed predominantly spherical gold nanoparticles of size around ∼12.5 nm. • Anticancer assessment of gold nanoparticles on MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines. • AuNPs were found non toxic to normal HMEC cells. • Flow cytometry results revealed significant arrest in cell proliferation in early G0/G1 to S phase. - Abstract: Breast cancer is a major complication in women and numerous approaches are being developed to overcome this problem. In conventional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy the post side effects cause an unsuitable effect in treatment of cancer. Hence, it is essential to develop a novel strategy for the treatment of this disease. In the present investigation, a possible route for green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using leaf extract of Mimosa pudica and its anticancer efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer cell lines is studied. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be effective in killing cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 & MCF-7) which were studied using various anticancer assays (MTT assay, cell morphology determination, cell cycle analysis, comet assay, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and DAPI staining). Cell morphological analysis showed the changes occurred in cancer cells during the treatment with AuNPs. Cell cycle analysis revealed apoptosis in G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} to S phase. Similarly in Comet assay, there was an increase in tail length in treated cells in comparison with the control. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay showed prompt fluorescence in treated cells indicating the translocation of phosphatidylserine from the inner membrane. PI and DAPI staining showed the DNA damage in treated cells.

  8. In Silico Oncology: Quantification of the In Vivo Antitumor Efficacy of Cisplatin-Based Doublet Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) through a Multiscale Mechanistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokotroni, Eleni; Dionysiou, Dimitra; Veith, Christian; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Franz, Astrid; Grgic, Aleksandar; Bohle, Rainer M.; Stamatakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The 5-year survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients can be as low as 1% in advanced stages. For patients with resectable disease, the successful choice of preoperative chemotherapy is critical to eliminate micrometastasis and improve operability. In silico experimentations can suggest the optimal treatment protocol for each patient based on their own multiscale data. A determinant for reliable predictions is the a priori estimation of the drugs’ cytotoxic efficacy on cancer cells for a given treatment. In the present work a mechanistic model of cancer response to treatment is applied for the estimation of a plausible value range of the cell killing efficacy of various cisplatin-based doublet regimens. Among others, the model incorporates the cancer related mechanism of uncontrolled proliferation, population heterogeneity, hypoxia and treatment resistance. The methodology is based on the provision of tumor volumetric data at two time points, before and after or during treatment. It takes into account the effect of tumor microenvironment and cell repopulation on treatment outcome. A thorough sensitivity analysis based on one-factor-at-a-time and latin hypercube sampling/partial rank correlation coefficient approaches has established the volume growth rate and the growth fraction at diagnosis as key features for more accurate estimates. The methodology is applied on the retrospective data of thirteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine, vinorelbine or docetaxel in the neoadjuvant context. The selection of model input values has been guided by a comprehensive literature survey on cancer-specific proliferation kinetics. The latin hypercube sampling has been recruited to compensate for patient-specific uncertainties. Concluding, the present work provides a quantitative framework for the estimation of the in-vivo cell-killing ability of various chemotherapies. Correlation studies of such estimates with

  9. Recent Advances in Targeting CD8 T-Cell Immunity for More Effective Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Durgeau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in cancer treatment have emerged from new immunotherapies targeting T-cell inhibitory receptors, including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen (CTLA-4 and programmed cell death (PD-1. In this context, anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated survival benefits in numerous cancers, including melanoma and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. PD-1-expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes appear to play a major role in the response to these immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL eliminate malignant cells through recognition by the T-cell receptor (TCR of specific antigenic peptides presented on the surface of cancer cells by major histocompatibility complex class I/beta-2-microglobulin complexes, and through killing of target cells, mainly by releasing the content of secretory lysosomes containing perforin and granzyme B. T-cell adhesion molecules and, in particular, lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 and CD103 integrins, and their cognate ligands, respectively, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and E-cadherin, on target cells, are involved in strengthening the interaction between CTL and tumor cells. Tumor-specific CTL have been isolated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of patients with varied cancers. TCRβ-chain gene usage indicated that CTL identified in vitro selectively expanded in vivo at the tumor site compared to autologous PBL. Moreover, functional studies indicated that these CTL mediate human leukocyte antigen class I-restricted cytotoxic activity toward autologous tumor cells. Several of them recognize truly tumor-specific antigens encoded by mutated genes, also known as neoantigens, which likely play a key role in antitumor CD8 T-cell immunity. Accordingly, it has been shown that the presence of T lymphocytes directed toward tumor neoantigens is associated with patient response to immunotherapies, including ICI, adoptive cell transfer

  10. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-12-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  11. Differences of response of human bladder cancer cells to photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Hypericum perforantum L extract and Photofrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseyo, Unyime; Kim, Albert; Stavropoulos, Nikos E.; Skalkos, Dimitris; Nseyo, Unwana U.; Chung, Theodore D.

    2005-04-01

    Refractory carcinoma in situ and resistant multifocal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the human urinary bladder respond modestly to PHOTOFRIN (PII) PDT. Hypericum perforatum L., (St. John"s wort /Epirus" Vasalmo, Greece), a medicinal plant used for many human ailments, is under investigation as a new photosensitizer. We have reported on the antiproliferative activity of the lipophilic extract of the Hypericum perforatum L. (HP) against cultured T-24, and NBT-11 bladder cancer cells. We investigated response of the polar methanolic fraction (PMF) of the HP extract versus PHOTOFRIN in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of human bladder cancer cells, RT-4 and T-24.The PMF was extracted from the dry herb with methanol, followed by liquid extraction with petroleum ether. RT-4/T-24, were plated (105 cells/well) and placed in the incubator (370 C, 5%CO) for 24 hours prior to addition of drugs. PII 2ug/ml, or PMF 60ug /ml was added and incubation continued. After 24 hours, the cells were treated with laser light (630nm) with 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules. The cells were then washed and reincubated for another 24 hours. After this incubation cell survival was assessed by the MTT assay. PMF-PDT induced percent cell kill of 0%, 0%, 0%, 29% and 75%, in RT-4 cells (primary noninvasive urinary bladder TCC) versus 5%, 9%, 13%, 69% and 86%, in T-24 cells(metastatic TTC) at 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules respectively. PII-PDT induced cell kill of 0 %, 0% ,0%,0% and 9 %, in RT-4 cells versus 0%,10%,0%,21% and 77%, in T-24 cells at 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules respectively.RT-24 cells were relatively more resistant than T-24 cells to PMF and PII-PDT. Understanding mechanisms of such differential responses might prove useful

  12. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  13. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumol Bhummaphan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As cancer stem cells (CSCs contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent growth and survival of the cancer cells. Importantly, gigantol significantly reduced the ability of the cancer cells to form tumor spheroids, a critical hallmark of CSCs. Concomitantly, the treatment of the compound was shown to reduce well-known lung CSCs markers, including CD133 and ALDH1A1. Moreover, we revealed that gigantol decreased stemness in the cancer cells by suppressing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt signal which in turn decreased the cellular levels of pluripotency and self-renewal factors Oct4 and Nanog. In conclusion, gigantol possesses CSCs suppressing activity which may facilitate the development of this compound for therapeutic approaches by targeting CSCs.

  14. Graphene Oxide–Silver Nanocomposite Enhances Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Potential of Salinomycin in Human Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells (OvCSCs: A Novel Approach for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jung Choi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of graphene to target and eliminate cancer stem cells (CSCs is an alternative approach to conventional chemotherapy. We show the biomolecule-mediated synthesis of reduced graphene oxide–silver nanoparticle nanocomposites (rGO–Ag using R-phycoerythrin (RPE; the resulting RPE–rGO–Ag was evaluated in human ovarian cancer cells and ovarian cancer stem cells (OvCSCs. The synthesized RPE–rGO–Ag nanocomposite (referred to as rGO–Ag was characterized using various analytical techniques. rGO–Ag showed significant toxicity towards both ovarian cancer cells and OvCSCs. After 3 weeks of incubating OvCSCs with rGO–Ag, the number of A2780 and ALDH+CD133+ colonies was significantly reduced. rGO–Ag was toxic to OvCSCs and reduced cell viability by mediating the generation of reactive oxygen species, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, and enhanced expression of apoptotic genes, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and possibly triggering apoptosis. rGO–Ag showed significant cytotoxic potential towards highly tumorigenic ALDH+CD133+ cells. The combination of rGO–Ag and salinomycin induced 5-fold higher levels of apoptosis than each treatment alone. A combination of rGO–Ag and salinomycin at very low concentrations may be suitable for selectively killing OvCSCs and sensitizing tumor cells. rGO–Ag may be a novel nano-therapeutic molecule for specific targeting of highly tumorigenic ALDH+CD133+ cells and eliminating CSCs. This study highlights the potential for targeted therapy of tumor-initiating cells.

  15. Lysosomes as Oxidative Targets for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielschneider, Rebecca F; Henson, Elizabeth S; Gibson, Spencer B

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound vesicles that contain hydrolases for the degradation and recycling of essential nutrients to maintain homeostasis within cells. Cancer cells have increased lysosomal function to proliferate, metabolize, and adapt to stressful environments. This has made cancer cells susceptible to lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). There are many factors that mediate LMP such as Bcl-2 family member, p53; sphingosine; and oxidative stress which are often altered in cancer. Upon lysosomal disruption, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increase leading to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and reactive iron. Cathepsins are also released causing degradation of macromolecules and cellular structures. This ultimately kills the cancer cell through different types of cell death (apoptosis, autosis, or ferroptosis). In this review, we will explore the contributions lysosomes play in inducing cell death, how this is regulated by ROS in cancer, and how lysosomotropic agents might be utilized to treat cancers.

  16. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J.R.; McLaren, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosom mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell:target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-l and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon. (author)

  17. Enhanced CAR T cell therapy: A novel approach for head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songlin; Zhu, Zhao

    2018-05-05

    Head and neck cancer that presents in locally advanced stages often results in a bad prognosis with an increased recurrence rate even after curative resections. Radiation therapy is then applied, with multiple side effects, as adjuvant regional therapy. Because of the high rate of recurrence and mortality, new therapies are needed for patients suffering from head and neck malignant tumors.CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T cell therapy, which was first devised about 25 years ago, causes the killing or apoptosis of target tumor cells through inducing the secretion of cytokines and granzymes by T cells (Cheadle et al., 2014). CARs are comprised of three canonical domains for antigen recognition, T cell activation, and co-stimulation, and are synthetic receptors that reprogram immune cells for therapeutic treatment of multiple tumors (Sadelain, 2017). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Cordycepin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells are independent of the estrogen receptor

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    Choi, Sunga [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301747 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Gangwon-do, 200701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Mo [Diabetic Complications Research Center, Division of Traditional Korean Medicine (TKM) Integrated Research, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM), 305811, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 301747 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Gangwon-do, 200701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Cordycepin (3-deoxyadenosine), found in Cordyceps spp., has been known to have many therapeutic effects including immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-aging effects. Moreover, anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of cordycepin have been reported, but the mechanism causing cancer cell death is poorly characterized. The present study was designed to investigate whether the mechanisms of cordycepin-induced cell death were associated with estrogen receptor in breast cancer cells. Exposure of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to cordycepin resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of cell growth and reduction in cell viability. The cordycepin-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with several specific features of the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL, and biochemical assays. Cordycepin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, triggering cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases-9 and -3. Interestingly, MCF-7 cells showed autophagy-associated cell death, as observed by the detection of an autophagosome-specific protein and large membranous vacuole ultrastructure morphology in the cytoplasm. Cordycepin-induced autophagic cell death has applications in treating MCF-7 cells with apoptotic defects, irrespective of the ER response. Although autophagy has a survival function in tumorigenesis of some cancer cells, autophagy may be important for cordycepin-induced MCF-7 cell death. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that cordycepin effectively kills MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines in culture. Hence, further studies should be conducted to determine whether cordycepin will be a clinically useful, ER-independent, chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the mechanism which cordycepin-induced cell death association with

  19. Acadesine kills chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells through PKC-dependent induction of autophagic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Robert

    Full Text Available CML is an hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by the t(9;22 (q34;q11 translocation encoding the oncoprotein p210BCR-ABL. The effect of acadesine (AICAR, 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside a compound with known antileukemic effect on B cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (B-CLL was investigated in different CML cell lines. Acadesine triggered loss of cell metabolism in K562, LAMA-84 and JURL-MK1 and was also effective in killing imatinib-resistant K562 cells and Ba/F3 cells carrying the T315I-BCR-ABL mutation. The anti-leukemic effect of acadesine did not involve apoptosis but required rather induction of autophagic cell death. AMPK knock-down by Sh-RNA failed to prevent the effect of acadesine, indicating an AMPK-independent mechanism. The effect of acadesine was abrogated by GF109203X and Ro-32-0432, both inhibitor of classical and new PKCs and accordingly, acadesine triggered relocation and activation of several PKC isoforms in K562 cells. In addition, this compound exhibited a potent anti-leukemic effect in clonogenic assays of CML cells in methyl cellulose and in a xenograft model of K562 cells in nude mice. In conclusion, our work identifies an original and unexpected mechanism by which acadesine triggers autophagic cell death through PKC activation. Therefore, in addition to its promising effects in B-CLL, acadesine might also be beneficial for Imatinib-resistant CML patients.

  20. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. ► Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. ► Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. ► Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. ► This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called “cancer stem cells”, within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the “stemness” of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  1. Are cancer cells really softer than normal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Charlotte; Goud, Bruno; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-05-01

    Solid tumours are often first diagnosed by palpation, suggesting that the tumour is more rigid than its surrounding environment. Paradoxically, individual cancer cells appear to be softer than their healthy counterparts. In this review, we first list the physiological reasons indicating that cancer cells may be more deformable than normal cells. Next, we describe the biophysical tools that have been developed in recent years to characterise and model cancer cell mechanics. By reviewing the experimental studies that compared the mechanics of individual normal and cancer cells, we argue that cancer cells can indeed be considered as softer than normal cells. We then focus on the intracellular elements that could be responsible for the softening of cancer cells. Finally, we ask whether the mechanical differences between normal and cancer cells can be used as diagnostic or prognostic markers of cancer progression. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Pharmacological targeting of valosin containing protein (VCP) induces DNA damage and selectively kills canine lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Rico, Charlène; Tsoi, Mayra; Vivancos, Mélanie; Filimon, Sabin; Paquet, Marilène; Boerboom, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Valosin containing protein (VCP) is a critical mediator of protein homeostasis and may represent a valuable therapeutic target for several forms of cancer. Overexpression of VCP occurs in many cancers, and often in a manner correlating with malignancy and poor outcome. Here, we analyzed VCP expression in canine lymphoma and assessed its potential as a therapeutic target for this disease. VCP expression in canine lymphomas was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The canine lymphoma cell lines CLBL-1, 17–71 and CL-1 were treated with the VCP inhibitor Eeyarestatin 1 (EER-1) at varying concentrations and times and were assessed for viability by trypan blue exclusion, apoptosis by TUNEL and caspase activity assays, and proliferation by propidium iodide incorporation and FACS. The mechanism of EER-1 action was determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses of Lys48 ubiquitin and markers of ER stress (DDIT3), autophagy (SQSTM1, MAP1LC3A) and DNA damage (γH2AFX). TRP53/ATM-dependent signaling pathway activity was assessed by immunoblotting for TRP53 and phospho-TRP53 and real-time RT-PCR measurement of Cdkn1a mRNA. VCP expression levels in canine B cell lymphomas were found to increase with grade. EER-1 treatment killed canine lymphoma cells preferentially over control peripheral blood mononuclear cells. EER-1 treatment of CLBL-1 cells was found to both induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G1. Unexpectedly, EER-1 did not appear to act either by inducing ER stress or inhibiting the aggresome-autophagy pathway. Rather, a rapid and dramatic increase in γH2AFX expression was noted, indicating that EER-1 may act by promoting DNA damage accumulation. Increased TRP53 phosphorylation and Cdkn1a mRNA levels indicated an activation of the TRP53/ATM DNA damage response pathway in response to EER-1, likely contributing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These results correlate VCP expression with malignancy in canine B cell

  3. Imaging lysosomal highly reactive oxygen species and lighting up cancer cells and tumors enabled by a Si-rhodamine-based near-infrared fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Jing; Liu, Chenlu; Yu, Pengcheng; Sun, Minjia; Yan, Xiaohan; Guo, Jian-Ping; Guo, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Lysosomes have recently been regarded as the attractive pharmacological targets for selectively killing of cancer cells via lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway that is closely associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the details on the ROS-induced LCD of cancer cells are still poorly understood, partially due to the absence of a lysosome-targetable, robust, and biocompatible imaging tool for ROS. In this work, we brought forward a Si-rhodamine-based fluorescent probe, named PSiR, which could selectively and sensitively image the pathologically more relavent highly reactive oxygen species (hROS: HClO, HO, and ONOO - ) in lysosomes of cancer cells. Compared with many of the existing hROS fluorescent probes, its superiorities are mainly embodied in the high stability against autoxidation and photoxidation, near-infrared exitation and emission, fast fluorescence off-on response, and specific lysosomal localization. Its practicality has been demonstrated by the real-time imaging of hROS generation in lysosomes of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells stimulated by anticancer drug β-lapachone. Moreover, the probe was sensitive enough for basal hROS in cancer cells, allowing its further imaging applications to discriminate not only cancer cells from normal cells, but also tumors from healthy tissues. Overall, our results strongly indicated that PSiR is a very promising imaging tool for the studies of ROS-related LCD of cancer cells, screening of new anticancer drugs, and early diagnosis of cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The yield of DNA double strand breaks determined after exclusion of those forming from heat-labile lesions predicts tumor cell radiosensitivity to killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanlei; Li, Fanghua; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-09-01

    The radiosensitivity to killing of tumor cells and in-field normal tissue are key determinants of radiotherapy response. In vitro radiosensitivity of tumor- and normal-tissue-derived cells often predicts radiation response, but high determination cost in time and resources compromise utility as routine response-predictor. Efforts to use induction or repair of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs) as surrogate-predictors of cell radiosensitivity to killing have met with limited success. Here, we re-visit this issue encouraged by our recent observations that ionizing radiation (IR) induces not only promptly-forming DSBs (prDSBs), but also DSBs developing after irradiation from the conversion to breaks of thermally-labile sugar-lesions (tlDSBs). We employ pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis and flow-cytometry protocols to measure total DSBs (tDSB=prDSB+tlDSBs) and prDSBs, as well as γH2AX and parameters of chromatin structure. We report a fully unexpected and in many ways unprecedented correlation between yield of prDSBs and radiosensitivity to killing in a battery of ten tumor cell lines that is not matched by yields of tDSBs or γH2AX, and cannot be explained by simple parameters of chromatin structure. We propose the introduction of prDSBs-yield as a novel and powerful surrogate-predictor of cell radiosensitivity to killing with potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Induced Radiation Sensitization Effects on Human Cancer Cells after Photon and Hadron Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariungerel Gerelchuluun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which has been widely utilized throughout the cancer research field. SAHA-induced radiosensitization in normal human fibroblasts AG1522 and lung carcinoma cells A549 were evaluated with a combination of γ-rays, proton, and carbon ion exposure. Growth delay was observed in both cell lines during SAHA treatment; 2 μM SAHA treatment decreased clonogenicity and induced cell cycle block in G1 phase but 0.2 μM SAHA treatment did not show either of them. Low LET (Linear Energy Transfer irradiated A549 cells showed radiosensitization effects on cell killing in cycling and G1 phase with 0.2 or 2 μM SAHA pretreatment. In contrast, minimal sensitization was observed in normal human cells after low and high LET radiation exposure. The potentially lethal damage repair was not affected by SAHA treatment. SAHA treatment reduced the rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance and suppressed RAD51 and RPA (Replication Protein A focus formation. Suppression of DNA double strand break repair by SAHA did not result in the differences of SAHA-induced radiosensitization between human cancer cells and normal cells. In conclusion, our results suggest SAHA treatment will sensitize cancer cells to low and high LET radiation with minimum effects to normal cells.

  6. Combination of palladium nanoparticles and tubastatin-A potentiates apoptosis in human breast cancer cells: a novel therapeutic approach for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan YG

    2017-09-01

    that there was a strong synergistic interaction between TUB-A and PdNPs in increasing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. These data provide an important preclinical basis for future clinical trials on this drug combination. This combinatorial treatment increased therapeutic potentials, thereby demonstrating a relevant targeted therapy for breast cancer. Furthermore, we have provided the first evidence for the combinatorial effect and mechanism of toxicity of TUB-A and PdNPs in human breast cancer cells. The novelties of the study were identification of a combination therapy that consists of suitable therapeutic molecules that kill cancer cells and also exploration of two different possible mechanisms involved to reduce chemoresistance in cancer cells. Keywords: tubastatin A, palladium nanoparticles, cell viability, oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, caspases, apoptosis

  7. How Can We Treat Cancer Disease Not Cancer Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Won; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Woo-Young; Seo, Ji Hae; Lee, Ho-Young

    2017-01-01

    Since molecular biology studies began, resear