WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer cell death

  1. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  2. Optical imaging of cancer and cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Bangwen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the work included in this PhD thesis was to explore the diverse application possibility of using NIR fluorescent probes with specific properties to visualize and characterize cancer and cell death. In this thesis, we mainly focus on optical imaging and its application, both at microscopic

  3. Optical imaging of cancer and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Bangwen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the work included in this PhD thesis was to explore the diverse application possibility of using NIR fluorescent probes with specific properties to visualize and characterize cancer and cell death. In this thesis, we mainly focus on optical imaging and its application, both at microscopic and macroscopic level. Because we believe optical imaging in particular represents a technology that has unique potential to exploit further our knowledge in preclinical research. First, we imaged...

  4. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  5. Death Pathways Triggered by Activated Ras in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Ras GTPases are best known for their ability to serve as molecular switches regulating cell growth, differentiation and survival. Gene mutations that result in expression of constitutively active forms of Ras proteins have been clearly linked to oncogenesis in animal models and humans. However, over the past two decades, evidence has gradually accumulated to support a paradoxical role for Ras proteins in the initiation of cell death pathways. The balance between the opposing functions of Ras in cell proliferation/survival versus cell death can be critical for determining the overall fate of the cancer cell. In this review we will survey the body of literature that points to the ability of activated Ras proteins to tip the scales toward cell death under conditions where cancer cells encounter adverse environmental conditions or are subjected to apoptotic stimuli. In some cases the consequences of Ras activation are mediated through interactions with known effectors and well defined apoptotic death pathways. However, in other cases it appears that Ras operates by triggering novel non-apoptotic death mechanisms that are just beginning to be characterized. Understanding the details of these pathways, and the various factors that go into changing the nature of Ras signaling from pro-survival to pro-death, could potentially set the stage for the development of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at manipulating the pro-death Ras effector pathways in cancers. PMID:21196257

  6. Cytokines in immunogenic cell death: Applications for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Anne; Limaye, Arati; Oyer, Jeremiah L; Igarashi, Robert; Kittipatarin, Christina; Copik, Alicja J; Khaled, Annette R

    2017-09-01

    Despite advances in treatments like chemotherapy and radiotherapy, metastatic cancer remains a leading cause of death for cancer patients. While many chemotherapeutic agents can efficiently eliminate cancer cells, long-term protection against cancer is not achieved and many patients experience cancer recurrence. Mobilizing and stimulating the immune system against tumor cells is one of the most effective ways to protect against cancers that recur and/or metastasize. Activated tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can seek out and destroy metastatic tumor cells and reduce tumor lesions. Natural Killer (NK) cells are a front-line defense against drug-resistant tumors and can provide tumoricidal activity to enhance tumor immune surveillance. Cytokines like IFN-γ or TNF play a crucial role in creating an immunogenic microenvironment and therefore are key players in the fight against metastatic cancer. To this end, a group of anthracyclines or treatments like photodynamic therapy (PDT) exert their effects on cancer cells in a manner that activates the immune system. This process, known as immunogenic cell death (ICD), is characterized by the release of membrane-bound and soluble factors that boost the function of immune cells. This review will explore different types of ICD inducers, some in clinical trials, to demonstrate that optimizing the cytokine response brought about by treatments with ICD-inducing agents is central to promoting anti-cancer immunity that provides long-lasting protection against disease recurrence and metastasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid induces pyroptosis cell death in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizato, Nathalia; Luzete, Beatriz Christina; Kiffer, Larissa Fernanda Melo Vasconcelos; Corrêa, Luís Henrique; de Oliveira Santos, Igor; Assumpção, José Antônio Fagundes; Ito, Marina Kiyomi; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2018-01-31

    The implication of inflammation in pathophysiology of several type of cancers has been under intense investigation. Omega-3 fatty acids can modulate inflammation and present anticancer effects, promoting cancer cell death. Pyroptosis is an inflammation related cell death and so far, the function of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in pyroptosis cell death has not been described. This study investigated the role of DHA in triggering pyroptosis activation in breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were supplemented with DHA and inflammation cell death was analyzed. DHA-treated breast cancer cells triggered increased caspase-1and gasdermin D activation, enhanced IL-1β secretion, translocated HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm, and membrane pore formation when compared to untreated cells, suggesting DHA induces pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells. Moreover, caspase-1 inhibitor (YVAD) could protect breast cancer cells from DHA-induced pyroptotic cell death. In addition, membrane pore formation showed to be a lysosomal damage and ROS formation-depended event in breast cancer cells. DHA triggered pyroptosis cell death in MDA-MB-231by activating several pyroptosis markers in these cells. This is the first study that shows the effect of DHA triggering pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells and it could improve the understanding of the omega-3 supplementation during breast cancer treatment.

  8. Cardiac Glycoside Glucoevatromonoside Induces Cancer Type-Specific Cell Death

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    Naira F. Z. Schneider

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides (CGs are natural compounds used traditionally to treat congestive heart diseases. Recent investigations repositioned CGs as potential anticancer agents. To discover novel cytotoxic CG scaffolds, we selected the cardenolide glucoevatromonoside (GEV out of 46 CGs for its low nanomolar anti-lung cancer activity. GEV presented reduced toxicity toward non-cancerous cell types (lung MRC-5 and PBMC and high-affinity binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunit, assessed by computational docking. GEV-induced cell death was caspase-independent, as investigated by a multiparametric approach, and culminates in severe morphological alterations in A549 cells, monitored by transmission electron microscopy, live cell imaging and flow cytometry. This non-canonical cell death was not preceded or accompanied by exacerbation of autophagy. In the presence of GEV, markers of autophagic flux (e.g. LC3I-II conversion were impacted, even in presence of bafilomycin A1. Cell death induction remained unaffected by calpain, cathepsin, parthanatos, or necroptosis inhibitors. Interestingly, GEV triggered caspase-dependent apoptosis in U937 acute myeloid leukemia cells, witnessing cancer-type specific cell death induction. Differential cell cycle modulation by this CG led to a G2/M arrest, cyclin B1 and p53 downregulation in A549, but not in U937 cells. We further extended the anti-cancer potential of GEV to 3D cell culture using clonogenic and spheroid formation assays and validated our findings in vivo by zebrafish xenografts. Altogether, GEV shows an interesting anticancer profile with the ability to exert cytotoxic effects via induction of different cell death modalities.

  9. Escaping Death: Mitochondrial Redox Homeostasis in Cancer Cells

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    Francesco Ciccarese

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are important signaling molecules that act through the oxidation of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Several hallmarks of cancer, including uncontrolled proliferation, angiogenesis, and genomic instability, are promoted by the increased ROS levels commonly found in tumor cells. To counteract excessive ROS accumulation, oxidative stress, and death, cancer cells tightly regulate ROS levels by enhancing scavenging enzymes, which are dependent on the reducing cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH. This review focuses on mitochondrial ROS homeostasis with a description of six pathways of NADPH production in mitochondria and a discussion of the possible strategies of pharmacological intervention to selectively eliminate cancer cells by increasing their ROS levels.

  10. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  11. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2009-10-06

    Background:Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines.Methods:MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting.Results:Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug.Conclusion:Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 6 October 2009; doi:10.1038\\/sj.bjc.6605308 www.bjcancer.com.

  12. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines. METHODS: MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug. CONCLUSION: Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  13. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment....... for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...

  14. Inhibition of telomerase recruitment and cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-11-15

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive.

  15. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells

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    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p < 0.0001. Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1, protein kinase B (Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2, MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK, and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40, which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  16. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chang, Wei-An; Tsai, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Ho, Ya-Wen; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2017-06-24

    Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak), and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK), and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40), which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  17. Colon cancer cell treatment with rose bengal generates a protective immune response via immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianzhong; Kunda, Nicholas; Qiao, Guilin; Calata, Jed F; Pardiwala, Krunal; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2017-02-02

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to manage patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies are desired; however, mechanisms to incite tumor-specific immune responses remain to be elucidated. Rose bengal (RB) is toxic at low concentrations to malignant cells and may induce damage-associated molecular patterns; therefore, we investigated its potential as an immunomodulator in colon cancer. Murine and human colon cancer lines were treated with RB (10% in saline/PV-10) for cell cycle, cell death, and apoptosis assays. Damage-associated molecular patterns were assessed with western blot, ELISA, and flow cytometry. In an immunocompetent murine model of colon cancer, we demonstrate that tumors regress upon RB treatment, and that RB induces cell death in colon cancer cells through G2/M growth arrest and predominantly necrosis. RB-treated colon cancer cells expressed distinct hallmarks of immunogenic cell death (ICD), including enhanced expression of calreticulin and heat-shock protein 90 on the cell surface, a decrease in intracellular ATP, and the release of HMGB1. To confirm the ICD phenotype, we vaccinated immunocompetent animals with syngeneic colon cancer cells treated with RB. RB-treated tumors served as a vaccine against subsequent challenge with the same CT26 colon cancer tumor cells, and vaccination with in vitro RB-treated cells resulted in slower tumor growth following inoculation with colon cancer cells, but not with syngeneic non-CT26 cancer cells, suggesting a specific antitumor immune response. In conclusion, RB serves as an inducer of ICD that contributes to enhanced specific antitumor immunity in colorectal cancer.

  18. Zanthoxylum fruit extract from Japanese pepper promotes autophagic cell death in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Reo; Kono, Toru; Bochimoto, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Oketani, Kaori; Sakamaki, Yuichi; Okubo, Naoto; Nakagawa, Koji; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-10-25

    Zanthoxylum fruit, obtained from the Japanese pepper plant (Zanthoxylum piperitum De Candolle), and its extract (Zanthoxylum fruit extract, ZFE) have multiple physiological activities (e.g., antiviral activity). However, the potential anticancer activity of ZFE has not been fully examined. In this study, we investigated the ability of ZFE to induce autophagic cell death (ACD). ZFE caused remarkable autophagy-like cytoplasmic vacuolization, inhibited cell proliferation, and ultimately induced cell death in the human cancer cell lines DLD-1, HepG2, and Caco-2, but not in A549, MCF-7, or WiDr cells. ZFE increased the level of LC3-II protein, a marker of autophagy. Knockdown of ATG5 using siRNA inhibited ZFE-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death. Moreover, in cancer cells that could be induced to undergo cell death by ZFE, the extract increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 attenuated both vacuolization and cell death. Based on morphology and expression of marker proteins, ZFE-induced cell death was neither apoptosis nor necrosis. Normal intestinal cells were not affected by ZFE. Taken together, our findings show that ZFE induces JNK-dependent ACD, which appears to be the main mechanism underlying its anticancer activity, suggesting a promising starting point for anticancer drug development.

  19. Early death during chemotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U N; Osterlind, K; Hirsch, F R

    1999-01-01

    Based on an increased frequency of early death (death within the first treatment cycle) in our two latest randomized trials of combination chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), we wanted to identify patients at risk of early non-toxic death (ENTD) and early toxic death (ETD). Data were...

  20. Abortive autophagy induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in cancer cells.

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    Sofie Claerhout

    Full Text Available Autophagic cell death or abortive autophagy has been proposed to eliminate damaged as well as cancer cells, but there remains a critical gap in our knowledge in how this process is regulated. The goal of this study was to identify modulators of the autophagic cell death pathway and elucidate their effects on cellular signaling and function. The result of our siRNA library screenings show that an intact coatomer complex I (COPI is obligatory for productive autophagy. Depletion of COPI complex members decreased cell survival and impaired productive autophagy which preceded endoplasmic reticulum stress. Further, abortive autophagy provoked by COPI depletion significantly altered growth factor signaling in multiple cancer cell lines. Finally, we show that COPI complex members are overexpressed in an array of cancer cell lines and several types of cancer tissues as compared to normal cell lines or tissues. In cancer tissues, overexpression of COPI members is associated with poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate that the coatomer complex is essential for productive autophagy and cellular survival, and thus inhibition of COPI members may promote cell death of cancer cells when apoptosis is compromised.

  1. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

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    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  2. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

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    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  3. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  4. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells.

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    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher, J Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound, Alternol, in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived nonmalignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, significant cell death was observed in all prostate cancer cell lines except DU145 but not in nonmalignant (RWPE-1 and BPH1) cells. Further analyses revealed that Alternol-induced cell death was an apoptotic response in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of apoptosis hallmarks such as caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Interestingly, Alternol-induced cell death was completely abolished by reactive oxygen species scavengers N-acetylcysteine and dihydrolipoic acid. We also demonstrated that the proapoptotic Bax protein was activated after Alternol treatment and was critical for Alternol-induced apoptosis. Animal xenograft experiments in nude mice showed that Alternol treatment largely suppressed tumor growth of PC-3 xenografts but not Bax-null DU-145 xenografts in vivo. These data suggest that Alternol might serve as a novel anticancer agent for patients with late-stage prostate cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Dual Effects of Resveratrol on Cell Death and Proliferation of Colon Cancer Cells.

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    San Hipólito-Luengo, Álvaro; Alcaide, Antonio; Ramos-González, Mariella; Cercas, Elena; Vallejo, Susana; Romero, Alejandra; Talero, Elena; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Motilva, Virginia; Peiró, Concepción

    2017-10-01

    Colorectal cancer remains a main cause of deaths worldwide, and novel agents are being searched to treat this disease. Polyphenols have emerged as promising therapeutic tools in cancer. Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydoxy-trans-stilbene) induces cell death in different tumor cell lines, and it also stimulates the proliferation of specific breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Here, we studied the impact of resveratrol over a 100-fold concentration range on cell death and proliferation of HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. After 96 h of treatment, a biphasic pattern was observed. At lower concentrations (1 and 10 μmol/l), resveratrol increased the cell number, as did the polyphenol quercetin. At 50 or 100 μmol/l, resveratrol reduced the cell number and increased the percentage of apoptotic or necrotic cells, thus indicating cytotoxicity. On HCT116 colon cancer cells, however, no proliferative properties of resveratrol were observed. Resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity on HT-29 cells was associated with NADPH oxidase activation and increased levels of histone γH2AX, a marker of DNA damage, paralleled by enhanced sirtuin 6 levels, likely as a repair mechanism. Overall, resveratrol may be an effective tool in anti-tumor chemotherapy. However, since under some conditions it may favor tumor cell growth, appropriate local concentrations must be achieved to minimize unwanted effects of resveratrol.

  6. Natural Compounds As Modulators of Non-apoptotic Cell Death in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guamán-Ortiz, Luis Miguel; Orellana, Maria Isabel Ramirez; Ratovitski, Edward A

    2017-04-01

    Cell death is an innate capability of cells to be removed from microenvironment, if and when they are damaged by multiple stresses. Cell death is often regulated by multiple molecular pathways and mechanism, including apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis. The molecular network underlying these processes is often intertwined and one pathway can dynamically shift to another one acquiring certain protein components, in particular upon treatment with various drugs. The strategy to treat human cancer ultimately relies on the ability of anticancer therapeutics to induce tumor-specific cell death, while leaving normal adjacent cells undamaged. However, tumor cells often develop the resistance to the drug-induced cell death, thus representing a great challenge for the anticancer approaches. Numerous compounds originated from the natural sources and biopharmaceutical industries are applied today in clinics showing advantageous results. However, some exhibit serious toxic side effects. Thus, novel effective therapeutic approaches in treating cancers are continued to be developed. Natural compounds with anticancer activity have gained a great interest among researchers and clinicians alike since they have shown more favorable safety and efficacy then the synthetic marketed drugs. Numerous studies in vitro and in vivo have found that several natural compounds display promising anticancer potentials. This review underlines certain information regarding the role of natural compounds from plants, microorganisms and sea life forms, which are able to induce non-apoptotic cell death in tumor cells, namely autophagy and necroptosis.

  7. Dehydroabietic Acid Derivative QC4 Induces Gastric Cancer Cell Death via Oncosis and Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luo, Dongjun; Ni, Qing; Ji, Anlai; Gu, Wen; Wu, Junhua; Jiang, Chunping

    2016-01-01

      Aim. QC4 is the derivative of rosin's main components dehydroabietic acid (DHA). We investigated the cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells and revealed the mechanisms beneath the induction of cell death...

  8. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

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    Mroz, Pawel, E-mail: pmroz@partners.org [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Yaroslavsky, Anastasia [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Boston University College of Engineering, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kharkwal, Gitika B [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Hamblin, Michael R. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT.

  9. Use of Telemorace Inhibition in Combination with Anti-Cancer Drugs to Induce Cell Death in Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cerone, Maria A

    2006-01-01

    .... Therefore targeting telomerase may represent a promising approach for cancer therapy. Inhibition of telomerase would result in telomere shortening and cell death due to dysfunctional telomeres...

  10. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noolu Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves, a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death

  11. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolu, Bindu; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Chauhan, Anitha; Nagalla, Balakrishna; Manchala, Raghunath; Ismail, Ayesha

    2013-01-09

    Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau's method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification of active component(s) from the leaf

  12. An Ursolic Acid Derived Small Molecule Triggers Cancer Cell Death through Hyperstimulation of Macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Li, Bin; Su, Xiaohui; Chen, Ge; Li, Yaqin; Yu, Linqian; Li, Li; Wei, Wanguo

    2017-08-10

    Macropinocytosis is a transient endocytosis that internalizes extracellular fluid and particles into vacuoles. Recent studies suggest that hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis can induce a novel nonapoptotic cell death, methuosis. In this report, we describe the identification of an ursolic acid derived small molecule (compound 17), which induces cancer cell death through hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis. 17 causes the accumulation of vacuoles derived from macropinosomes based on transmission electron microscopy, time-lapse microscopy, and labeling with extracellular fluid phase tracers. The vacuoles induced by 17 separate from other cytoplasmic compartments but acquire some characteristics of late endosomes and lysosomes. Inhibiting hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis with the specific inhibitor amiloride blocks cell death, implicating that 17 leads to cell death via macropinocytosis, which is coincident with methuosis. Our results uncovered a novel cell death pathway involved in the activity of 17, which may provide a basis for further development of natural-product-derived scaffolds for drugs that trigger cancer cell death by methuosis.

  13. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed) or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS), to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs) are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events. PMID:25955645

  14. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mfouo-Tynga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS, to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events.

  15. Downregulation of the mitochondrial phosphatase PTPMT1 is sufficient to promote cancer cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie M Niemi

    Full Text Available Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase localized to the Mitochondrion 1 (PTPMT1 is a dual specificity phosphatase exclusively localized to the mitochondria, and has recently been shown to be a critical component in the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway. The downregulation of PTPMT1 in pancreatic beta cells has been shown to increase cellular ATP levels and insulin production, however, the generalized role of PTPMT1 in cancer cells has not been characterized. Here we report that downregulation of PTPMT1 activity is sufficient to induce apoptosis of cancer cells. Additionally, the silencing of PTPMT1 decreases cardiolipin levels in cancer cells, while selectively increasing ATP levels in glycolytic media. Additionally, sublethal downregulation of PTPMT1 synergizes with low doses of paclitaxel to promote cancer cell death. Our data suggest that inhibition of PTPMT1 causes a metabolic crisis in cancer cells that induces cell death, and may be a mechanism by which cancer cells can be sensitized to currently available therapies.

  16. Calcium regulates cell death in cancer: Roles of the mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Alberto; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Previati, Maurizio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Until 1972, the term 'apoptosis' was used to differentiate the programmed cell death that naturally occurs in organismal development from the acute tissue death referred to as necrosis. Many studies on cell death and programmed cell death have been published and most are, at least to some degree, related to cancer. Some key proteins and molecular pathways implicated in cell death have been analyzed, whereas others are still being actively researched; therefore, an increasing number of cellular compartments and organelles are being implicated in cell death and cancer. Here, we discuss the mitochondria and subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria, the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which have been identified as critical hubs in the regulation of cell death and tumor growth. MAMs-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) release from the ER allows selective Ca 2+ uptake by the mitochondria. The perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis in cancer cells is correlated with sustained cell proliferation and the inhibition of cell death through the modulation of Ca 2+ signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Eclalbasaponin II induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in human ovarian cancer cells

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    Yoon Jin Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids echinocystic acid and its glycosides, isolated from several Eclipta prostrata, have been reported to possess various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-diabetic activity. However, the cytotoxicity of the triterpenoids in human cancer cells and their molecular mechanism of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we found that eclalbasaponin II with one glucose moiety has potent cytotoxicity in three ovarian cancer cells and two endometrial cancer cells compared to an aglycone echinocystic acid and eclalbasaponin I with two glucose moiety. Eclalbasaponin II treatment dose-dependently increased sub G1 population. Annexin V staining revealed that eclalbasaponin II induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. In addition, eclalbasaponin II-induced cell death was associated with characteristics of autophagy; an increase in acidic vesicular organelle content and elevation of the levels of LC3-II. Interestingly, autophagy inhibitor BaF1 suppressed the eclalbasaponin II-induced apoptosis. Moreover, eclalbasaponin II activated JNK and p38 signaling and inhibited the mTOR signaling. We further demonstrated that pre-treatment with a JNK and p38 inhibitor and mTOR activator attenuated the eclalbasaponin II-induced autophagy. This suggests that eclalbasaponin II induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death through the regulation of JNK, p38, and mTOR signaling in human ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Bovine seminal ribonuclease triggers Beclin1-mediated autophagic cell death in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Claudia; Gotte, Giovanni; Donnarumma, Federica; Picone, Delia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Among the large number of variants belonging to the pancreatic-type secretory ribonuclease (RNase) superfamily, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) is the proto-type and bovine seminal RNase (BS-RNase) represents the unique natively dimeric member. In the present manuscript, we evaluate the anti-tumoral property of these RNases in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and in nontumorigenic cells as normal control. We demonstrate that BS-RNase stimulates a strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect in cancer cells, while RNase A is largely ineffective. Notably, we reveal for the first time that BS-RNase triggers Beclin1-mediated autophagic cancer cell death, providing evidences that high proliferation rate of cancer cells may render them more susceptible to autophagy by BS-RNase treatment. Notably, to improve the autophagic response of cancer cells to BS-RNase we used two different strategies: the more basic (as compared to WT enzyme) G38K mutant of BS-RNase, known to interact more strongly than wt with the acidic membrane of cancer cells, or BS-RNase oligomerization (tetramerization or formation of larger oligomers). Both mutant BS-RNase and BS-RNase oligomers potentiated autophagic cell death as compared to WT native dimer of BS-RNase, while the various RNase A oligomers remained completely ineffective. Altogether, our results shed more light on the mechanisms lying at the basis of BS-RNase antiproliferative effect in cancer cells, and support its potential use to develop new anti-cancer strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Triptolide induces lysosomal-mediated programmed cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owa C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chie Owa, Michael E Messina Jr, Reginald HalabyDepartment of Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USABackground: Breast cancer is a major cause of death; in fact, it is the most common type, in order of the number of global deaths, of cancer in women worldwide. This research seeks to investigate how triptolide, an extract from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Accumulating evidence suggests a role for lysosomal proteases in the activation of apoptosis. However, there is also some controversy regarding the direct participation of lysosomal proteases in activation of key apoptosis-related caspases and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. In the present study, we demonstrate that triptolide induces an atypical, lysosomal-mediated apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells because they lack caspase-3.Methods: MCF-7 cell death was characterized via cellular morphology, chromatin condensation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric cell growth inhibition assay and the expression levels of proapoptotic proteins. Acridine orange and LysoTracker® staining were performed to visualize lysosomes. Lysosomal enzymatic activity was monitored using an acid phosphatase assay and western blotting of cathepsin B protein levels in the cytosolic fraction, which showed increased enzymatic activity in drug-treated cells.Results: These experiments suggest that triptolide-treated MCF-7 cells undergo atypical apoptosis and that, during the early stages, lysosomal enzymes leak into the cytosol, indicating lysosomal membrane permeability.Conclusion: Our results suggest that further studies are warranted to investigate triptolide's potential as an anticancer therapeutic agent.Keywords: triptolide, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, apoptosis, lysosomes, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP

  20. The role of individual caspases in cell death induction by taxanes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Michael; Balušíková, Kamila; Schmiedlová, Martina; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Šrámek, Jan; Stančíková, Jitka; Zanardi, Ilaria; Ojima, Iwao; Kovář, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In previous study we showed that caspase-2 plays the role of an apical caspase in cell death induction by taxanes in breast cancer cells. This study deals with the role of other caspases. We tested breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 (functional caspase-3) and MCF-7 (nonfunctional caspase-3). Using western blot analysis we demonstrated the activation of initiator caspase-8 and -9 as well as executioner caspase-6 and -7 in both tested cell lines after application of taxanes (paclitaxel, SB-T-1216) at death-inducing concentrations. Caspase-3 activation was also found in SK-BR-3 cells. Employing specific siRNAs after taxane application, suppression of caspase-3 expression significantly increased the number of surviving SK-BR-3 cells. Inhibition of caspase-7 expression also increased the number of surviving SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells. On the other hand, suppression of caspase-8 and caspase-9 expression had no significant effect on cell survival. However, caspase-9 seemed to be involved in the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-7. Caspase-3 and caspase-7 appeared to activate mutually. Furthermore, we observed a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (flow cytometric analysis) and cytochrome c release (confocal microscopy, western blot after cell fractionation) from mitochondria in SK-BR-3 cells. No such changes were observed in MCF-7 cells after taxane treatment. We conclude that the activation of apical caspase-2 results in the activation of caspase-3 and -7 without the involvement of mitochondria. Caspase-9 can be activated directly via caspase-2 or alternatively after cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Subsequently, caspase-9 activation can also lead to caspase-3 and -7 activations. Caspase-3 and caspase-7 activate mutually. It seems that there is also a parallel pathway involving mitochondria that can cooperate in taxane-induced cell death in breast cancer cells.

  1. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    injection of breast cancer cells in the mammary fat pad of nude mice). Opportunities for professional development included, among other seminars and...the Department of Pathology of the CaseWestern Reserve University in Cleveland collaborated to perform the experiment on the patient-derived mouse

  2. The roles of mitochondria in radiation-induced autophagic cell death in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongyan; Wang, Benli; Yu, Feifei; Chen, Qiao; Tian, Yuxi; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria as the critical powerhouse of eukaryotic cells play important roles in regulating cell survival or cell death. Under numerous stimuli, impaired mitochondria will generate massive reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in the regulation of vital signals and could even determine the fate of cancer cells. While the roles of mitochondria in radiation-induced autophagic cell death still need to be elucidated. Human cervical cancer cell line, Hela, was used, and the SOD2 silencing model (SOD2-Ri) was established by gene engineering. Cell viability was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays, MitoTracker Green staining was used to detect mitochondrial mass, Western blot was used to detect protein expression, and the level of ROS, autophagy, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Ionizing radiation (IR) could induce the increase of MAPLC3-II/MAPLC3-I ratio, Beclin1 expression, and ROS generation but decrease the MMP in a time-dependent manner. After SOD2 silencing, the IR-induced changes of ROS and the MMP were significantly enhanced. Moreover, both the radio sensitivity and autophagy increased in SOD2-Ri cells. Whereas, compared with SOD2-Ri, the opposite results were obtained by NAC, an antioxidant. After the treatment with the inhibitor of mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), the rate of autophagy, ROS, and the total cell death induced by IR increased. In addition, the decrease of MMP was more obvious. However, these results were reversed by cyclosporine A (CsA). IR could induce ROS generation and mitochondrial damage which lead to autophagic cell death in Hela cells.

  3. Role of p53 in Cell Death and Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakagawara, Akira

    2011-01-01

    p53 is a nuclear transcription factor with a pro-apoptotic function. Since over 50% of human cancers carry loss of function mutations in p53 gene, p53 has been considered to be one of the classical type tumor suppressors. Mutant p53 acts as the dominant-negative inhibitor toward wild-type p53. Indeed, mutant p53 has an oncogenic potential. In some cases, malignant cancer cells bearing p53 mutations display a chemo-resistant phenotype. In response to a variety of cellular stresses such as DNA damage, p53 is induced to accumulate in cell nucleus to exert its pro-apoptotic function. Activated p53 promotes cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair and/or apoptosis to prevent the propagation of cells with serious DNA damage through the transactivation of its target genes implicated in the induction of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Thus, the DNA-binding activity of p53 is tightly linked to its tumor suppressive function. In the present review article, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of p53 and also p53-mediated therapeutic strategies to cure malignant cancers. PMID:24212651

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy.

  5. Piperlongumine induces pancreatic cancer cell death by enhancing reactive oxygen species and DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Dhillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers with a nearly 95% mortality rate. The poor response of pancreatic cancer to currently available therapies and the extremely low survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients point to a critical need for alternative therapeutic strategies. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS-inducing agents has emerged as an innovative and effective strategy to treat various cancers. In this study, we investigated the potential of a known ROS inducer, piperlongumine (PPLGM, a bioactive agent found in long peppers, to induce pancreatic cancer cell death in cell culture and animal models. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cell cultures by elevating ROS levels and causing DNA damage. PPLGM-induced DNA damage and pancreatic cancer cell death was reversed by treating the cells with an exogenous antioxidant. Similar to the in vitro studies, PPLGM caused a reduction in tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Tumors from the PPLGM-treated animals showed decreased Ki-67 and increased 8-OHdG expression, suggesting PPLGM inhibited tumor cell proliferation and enhanced oxidative stress. Taken together, our results show that PPLGM is an effective inhibitor for in vitro and in vivo growth of pancreatic cancer cells, and that it works through a ROS-mediated DNA damage pathway. These findings suggest that PPLGM has the potential to be used for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Isoflavone: The Role of Multiple Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2011-01-01

    Soy isoflavones have been documented as dietary nutrients broadly classified as “natural agents” which plays important roles in reducing the incidence of hormone-related cancers in Asian countries, and have shown inhibitory effects on cancer development and progression in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the cancer preventive or therapeutic activity of soy isoflavones against cancers. Emerging experimental evidence shows that isoflavones could induce cancer cell death by regulating multiple cellular signaling pathways including Akt, NF-κB, MAPK, Wnt, androgen receptor (AR), p53 and Notch signaling, all of which have been found to be deregulated in cancer cells. Therefore, homeostatic regulation of these important cellular signaling pathways by isoflavones could be useful for the activation of cell death signaling, which could result in the induction of apoptosis of both pre-cancerous and/or cancerous cells without affecting normal cells. In this article, we have attempted to summarize the current state-of-our-knowledge regarding the induction of cancer cell death pathways by isoflavones, which is believed to be mediated through the regulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. The knowledge gained from this article will provide a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanism(s) by which soy isoflavones may exert their effects on the prevention of tumor progression and/or treatment of human malignancies, which would also aid in stimulating further in-depth mechanistic research and foster the initiation of novel clinical trials. PMID:22200028

  7. Modulating autophagy in cancer therapy: advancements and challenges for cancer cell death sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Punya; Kriel, Jurgen; Shubha Priya, Babu; Salundi, Basappa; Shivananju, Nanjunda Swamy; Loos, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Autophagy is a major protein degradation pathway capable of upholding cellular metabolism under nutrient limiting conditions, making it a valuable resource to highly proliferating tumour cells. Although the regulatory machinery of the autophagic pathway has been well characterized, accurate modulation of this pathway remains complex in the context of clinical translatability for improved cancer therapies. In particular, the dynamic relationship between the rate of protein degradation through autophagy, i.e. autophagic flux, and the susceptibility of tumours to undergo apoptosis remains largely unclear. Adding to inefficient clinical translation is the lack of measurement techniques that accurately depict autophagic flux. Paradoxically, both increased autophagic flux as well as autophagy inhibition have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to undergo cell death, indicating the highly context dependent nature of this pathway. In this article, we aim to disentangle the role of autophagy modulation in tumour suppression by assessing existing literature in the context of autophagic flux and cellular metabolism at the interface of mitochondrial function. We highlight the urgency to not only assess autophagic flux more accurately, but also to center autophagy manipulation within the unique and inherent metabolic properties of cancer cells. Lastly, we discuss the challenges faced when targeting autophagy in the clinical setting. In doing so, it is hoped that a better understanding of autophagy in cancer therapy is revealed in order to overcome tumour chemoresistance through more controlled autophagy modulation in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

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    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  9. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

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    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  10. The effect of hydroxybenzoate calcium compounds in inducing cell death in epithelial breast cancer cells

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    Nada M Merghani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxybenzoate (HB compounds have shown their significance in inducing apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and cancer cell lines, including HT-1080. The current study focuses on assessing the effects of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoate calcium (HBCa compounds on MCF-10A, MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 epithelial breast cell lines. The HBCa-treated cells were examined using annexin V, to measure apoptosis in the three epithelial breast cell lines, after 48 h of treatment. The results indicated that 0.5 and 2.5 mmol/L of HBCa induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of cell death in normal MCF-10A cells was found to be significantly less (p = 0.0003–0.0068, in comparison to the malignant cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7. HBCa compounds were also found to cause cell cycle arrest in the epithelial breast cells at G1/G0. Furthermore, HBCa compounds induced the upregulation of apoptotic proteins (p53, p21, Bax and caspase-3, as well as the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, which may suggest that apoptosis is induced via the intrinsic pathway.

  11. Discovery of Small Molecules That Induce Lysosomal Cell Death in Cancer Cell Lines Using an Image-Based Screening Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliero, Romina J; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Lelieveld, Daphne; Pratiwi, Riyona D; Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja; Martin, Nathaniel I; Klumperman, Judith; Egan, David A

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway is a caspase 3-independent cell death pathway that has been suggested as a possible target for cancer therapy, making the development of sensitive and specific high-throughput (HT) assays to identify LCD inducers highly desirable. In this study, we report a

  12. Rhabdastrellic acid-A induced autophagy-associated cell death through blocking Akt pathway in human cancer cells.

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    Dan-Dan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved protein degradation pathway. A defect in autophagy may contribute to tumorigenesis. Autophagy inducers could have a potential function in tumor prevention and treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results showed that Rhabdastrellic acid-A, an isomalabaricane triterpenoid isolated from the sponge Rhabdastrella globostellata, inhibited proliferation of human cancer cell lines Hep3B and A549 and induced caspase-independent cell death in both the cell lines. Further investigation showed that Rhabdastrellic acid-A induced autophagy of cancer cells determined by YFP-LC3 punctation and increased LC3-II. The pretreatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA inhibited Rhabdastrellic acid-A-induced cell death. Knockdown of autophagy-related gene Atg5 inhibited Rhabdastrellic acid-A-induced cell death in A549 cells. Also, phospho-Akt and its downstream targets significantly decreased after treatment with Rhabdastrellic acid-A in both cancer cell lines. Transfection of constitutive active Akt plasmid abrogated autophagy and cell death induced by Rhabdastrellic acid-A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that Rhabdastrellic acid-A could induce autophagy-associated cell death through blocking Akt pathway in cancer cells. It also provides the evidence that Rhabdastrellic acid-A deserves further investigation as a potential anticancer or cancer preventive agent.

  13. Methylene blue photodynamic therapy induces selective and massive cell death in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ancély F; Terra, Letícia F; Wailemann, Rosangela A M; Oliveira, Talita C; Gomes, Vinícius de Morais; Mineiro, Marcela Franco; Meotti, Flávia Carla; Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Baptista, Maurício S; Labriola, Leticia

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is the main cause of mortality among women. The disease presents high recurrence mainly due to incomplete efficacy of primary treatment in killing all cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an approach that causes tissue destruction by visible light in the presence of a photosensitizer (Ps) and oxygen, appears as a promising alternative therapy that could be used adjunct to chemotherapy and surgery for curing cancer. However, the efficacy of PDT to treat breast tumours as well as the molecular mechanisms that lead to cell death remain unclear. In this study, we assessed the cell-killing potential of PDT using methylene blue (MB-PDT) in three breast epithelial cell lines that represent non-malignant conditions and different molecular subtypes of breast tumours. Cells were incubated in the absence or presence of MB and irradiated or not at 640 nm with 4.5 J/cm 2 . We used a combination of imaging and biochemistry approaches to assess the involvement of classical autophagic and apoptotic pathways in mediating the cell-deletion induced by MB-PDT. The role of these pathways was investigated using specific inhibitors, activators and gene silencing. We observed that MB-PDT differentially induces massive cell death of tumour cells. Non-malignant cells were significantly more resistant to the therapy compared to malignant cells. Morphological and biochemical analysis of dying cells pointed to alternative mechanisms rather than classical apoptosis. MB-PDT-induced autophagy modulated cell viability depending on the cell model used. However, impairment of one of these pathways did not prevent the fatal destination of MB-PDT treated cells. Additionally, when using a physiological 3D culture model that recapitulates relevant features of normal and tumorous breast tissue morphology, we found that MB-PDT differential action in killing tumour cells was even higher than what was detected in 2D cultures. Finally, our observations underscore the potential of MB

  14. p73 engages A2B receptor signalling to prime cancer cells to chemotherapy-induced death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, J. S.; Schoonen, P. M.; Graczyk, D.; O'Prey, J.; Ryan, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour cells often acquire the ability to escape cell death, a key event leading to the development of cancer. In almost half of all human cancers, the capability to induce cell death is reduced by the mutation and inactivation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein that is a central regulator of

  15. Dehydroabietic Acid Derivative QC4 Induces Gastric Cancer Cell Death via Oncosis and Apoptosis

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    Dongjun Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. QC4 is the derivative of rosin’s main components dehydroabietic acid (DHA. We investigated the cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells and revealed the mechanisms beneath the induction of cell death. Methods. The cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells was evaluated by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. The underlying mechanisms were tested by administration of cell death related inhibitors and detection of apoptotic and oncosis related proteins. Cytomembrane integrity and organelles damage were confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH leakage assay, mitochondrial function test, and cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration detection. Results. QC4 inhibited cell proliferation dose- and time-dependently and destroyed cell membrane integrity, activated calpain-1 autolysis, and induced apoptotic protein cleavage in gastric cancer cells. The detection of decreased ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS accumulation, and cytosolic free Ca2+ elevation confirmed organelles damage in QC4-treated gastric cancer cells. Conclusions. DHA derivative QC4 induced the damage of cytomembrane and organelles which finally lead to oncosis and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, as a derivative of plant derived small molecule DHA, QC4 might become a promising agent in gastric cancer therapy.

  16. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-06

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  17. Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitors and Forced Oxidative Phosphorylation Synergize in Inducing Cancer Cell Death

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    Roberta Palorini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells generally rely mostly on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS for ATP production. In fact, they are particularly sensitive to glycolysis inhibition and glucose depletion. On the other hand mitochondrial dysfunctions, involved in the onset of the Warburg effect, are sometimes also associated with the resistance to apoptosis that characterizes cancer cells. Therefore, combined treatments targeting both glycolysis and mitochondria function, exploiting peculiar tumor features, might be lethal for cancer cells. In this study, we show that glucose deprivation and mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors synergize in inducing cancer cell death. In particular, our results reveal that low doses of Complex I inhibitors, ineffective on immortalized cells and in high glucose growth, become specifically cytotoxic on cancer cells deprived of glucose. Importantly, the cytotoxic effect of the inhibitors on cancer cells is strongly enhanced by forskolin, a PKA pathway activator, that we have previously shown to stimulate OXPHOS. Taken together, we demonstrate that induction in cancer cells of a switch from a glycolytic to a more respirative metabolism, obtained by glucose depletion or mitochondrial activity stimulation, strongly increases their sensitivity to low doses of mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors. Our findings might be a valuable approach to eradicate cancer cells.

  18. Mitochondrial complex I inhibitors and forced oxidative phosphorylation synergize in inducing cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palorini, Roberta; Simonetto, Tiziana; Cirulli, Claudia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells generally rely mostly on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for ATP production. In fact, they are particularly sensitive to glycolysis inhibition and glucose depletion. On the other hand mitochondrial dysfunctions, involved in the onset of the Warburg effect, are sometimes also associated with the resistance to apoptosis that characterizes cancer cells. Therefore, combined treatments targeting both glycolysis and mitochondria function, exploiting peculiar tumor features, might be lethal for cancer cells. In this study, we show that glucose deprivation and mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors synergize in inducing cancer cell death. In particular, our results reveal that low doses of Complex I inhibitors, ineffective on immortalized cells and in high glucose growth, become specifically cytotoxic on cancer cells deprived of glucose. Importantly, the cytotoxic effect of the inhibitors on cancer cells is strongly enhanced by forskolin, a PKA pathway activator, that we have previously shown to stimulate OXPHOS. Taken together, we demonstrate that induction in cancer cells of a switch from a glycolytic to a more respirative metabolism, obtained by glucose depletion or mitochondrial activity stimulation, strongly increases their sensitivity to low doses of mitochondrial Complex I inhibitors. Our findings might be a valuable approach to eradicate cancer cells.

  19. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  20. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, A.; Courtin, A.; Levalois, C.; Altmeyer-Morel, S.; Chevillard, S.; Lebeau, J. [CEA, DSV, iRCM, SREIT, Laboratoire de Cancerologie Experimentale, Fontenay-aux-Roses, F-92265 (France); Romeo, P.H. [CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, Laboratoire de recherche sur la Reparation et la Transcription dans les cellules Souches, Fontenay-aux-Roses, F-92265 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after {gamma}-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early {gamma}-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after {gamma}-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-{alpha} permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-{alpha}, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  1. Inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 expression induces CHOP-dependent cell death in human cancer cells.

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    Mélaine Minville-Walz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer cells present a sustained de novo fatty acid synthesis with an increase of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA production. This change in fatty acid metabolism is associated with overexpression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1, which catalyses the transformation of saturated fatty acids into monounsaturated fatty acids (e.g., oleic acid. Several reports demonstrated that inhibition of Scd1 led to the blocking of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. Nevertheless, mechanisms of cell death activation remain to be better understood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we demonstrated that Scd1 extinction by siRNA triggered abolition of de novo MUFA synthesis in cancer and non-cancer cells. Scd1 inhibition-activated cell death was only observed in cancer cells with induction of caspase 3 activity and PARP-cleavage. Exogenous supplementation with oleic acid did not reverse the Scd1 ablation-mediated cell death. In addition, Scd1 depletion induced unfolded protein response (UPR hallmarks such as Xbp1 mRNA splicing, phosphorylation of eIF2α and increase of CHOP expression. However, the chaperone GRP78 expression, another UPR hallmark, was not affected by Scd1 knockdown in these cancer cells indicating a peculiar UPR activation. Finally, we showed that CHOP induction participated to cell death activation by Scd1 extinction. Indeed, overexpression of dominant negative CHOP construct and extinction of CHOP partially restored viability in Scd1-depleted cancer cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that inhibition of de novo MUFA synthesis by Scd1 extinction could be a promising anti-cancer target by inducing cell death through UPR and CHOP activation.

  2. Apoptotic death of prostate cancer cells by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II antagonist.

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    Sumi Park

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I has attracted strong attention as a hormonal therapeutic tool, particularly for androgen-dependent prostate cancer patients. However, the androgen-independency of the cancer in advanced stages has spurred researchers to look for new medical treatments. In previous reports, we developed the GnRH-II antagonist Trp-1 to inhibit proliferation and stimulate the autophagic death of various prostate cancer cells, including androgen-independent cells. We further screened many GnRH-II antagonists to identify molecules with higher efficiency. Here, we investigated the effect of SN09-2 on the growth of PC3 prostate cancer cells. SN09-2 reduced the growth of prostate cancer cells but had no effect on cells derived from other tissues. Compared with Trp-1, SN09-2 conspicuously inhibited prostate cancer cell growth, even at low concentrations. SN09-2-induced PC3 cell growth inhibition was associated with decreased membrane potential in mitochondria where the antagonist was accumulated, and increased mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species. SN09-2 induced lactate dehydrogenase release into the media and annexin V-staining on the PC3 cell surface, suggesting that the antagonist stimulated prostate cancer cell death by activating apoptotic signaling pathways. Furthermore, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol and caspase-3 activation occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SN09-2 also inhibited the growth of PC3 cells xenotransplanted into nude mice. These results demonstrate that SN09-2 directly induces mitochondrial dysfunction and the consequent ROS generation, leading to not only growth inhibition but also apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.

  3. Raloxifene induces autophagy-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells via the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Eun; Kim, Yunha; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Sung-Bae; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Koh, Jae-Young; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that binds to the estrogen receptor (ER), and exhibits potent anti-tumor and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. However, the mechanism of raloxifene-induced cell death and autophagy is not well-established. So, we analyzed mechanism underlying death and autophagy induced by raloxifene in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment with raloxifene significantly induced death in MCF-7 cells. Raloxifene accumulated GFP-LC3 puncta and increased the level of autophagic marker proteins, such as LC3-II, BECN1, and ATG12-ATG5 conjugates, indicating activated autophagy. Raloxifene also increased autophagic flux indicators, the cleavage of GFP from GFP-LC3 and only red fluorescence-positive puncta in mRFP-GFP-LC3-expressing cells. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), suppressed the level of LC3-II and blocked the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Moreover, siRNA targeting BECN1 markedly reversed cell death and the level of LC3-II increased by raloxifene. Besides, raloxifene-induced cell death was not related to cleavage of caspases-7, -9, and PARP. These results indicate that raloxifene activates autophagy-dependent cell death but not apoptosis. Interestingly, raloxifene decreased the level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and activated the AMPK/ULK1 pathway. However it was not suppressed the AKT/mTOR pathway. Addition of ATP decreased the phosphorylation of AMPK as well as the accumulation of LC3-II, finally attenuating raloxifene-induced cell death. Our current study demonstrates that raloxifene induces autophagy via the activation of AMPK by sensing decreases in ATP, and that the overactivation of autophagy promotes cell death and thereby mediates the anti-cancer effects of raloxifene in breast cancer cells.

  4. Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death with Non-Thermal Plasma for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham G.

    Even with the recent advancements in cancer immunotherapy, treatments are still associated with debilitating side effects and unacceptable fail rates. Induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD) in tumors is a promising approach to cancer treatment that may overcome these deficiencies. Cells undergoing ICD pathways enhance the interactions between cancerous cells and immune cells of the patient, resulting in the generation of anti-cancer immunity. The goal of this therapy relies on the engagement and reestablishment of the patient's natural immune processes to target and eliminate cancerous cells systemically. The main objective of this research was to determine if non-thermal plasma could be used to elicit immunogenic cancer cell death for cancer immunotherapy. My hypothesis was that plasma induces immunogenic cancer cell death through oxidative stress pathways, followed by development of a specific anti-tumor immune response. This was tested by investigating the interactions between plasma and multiple cancerous cells in vitro and validating anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. Following plasma treatment, two surrogate ICD markers, secreted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and surface exposed calreticulin (ecto-CRT), were emitted from all three cancerous cell lines tested: A549 lung carcinoma cell line, CNE-1 radiation-resistant nasopharyngeal cell line and CT26 colorectal cancer cell line. When these cells were co-cultured with macrophages, cells of the innate immune system, the tumoricidal activity of macrophages was enhanced, thus demonstrating the immunostimulatory activity of cells undergoing ICD. The underlying mechanisms of plasma-induced ICD were also evaluated. When plasma is generated, four major components are produced: electromagnetic fields, ultraviolet radiation, and charged and neutral reactive species. Of these, we determined that plasma-generated charged and short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) were the major effectors of ICD. Following plasma

  5. Knockdown of MTDH sensitizes endometrial cancer cells to cell death induction by death receptor ligand TRAIL and HDAC inhibitor LBH589 co-treatment.

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    Xiangbing Meng

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular underpinnings of chemoresistance is vital to design therapies to restore chemosensitivity. In particular, metadherin (MTDH has been demonstrated to have a critical role in chemoresistance. Over-expression of MTDH correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer, neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer. MTDH is also highly expressed in advanced endometrial cancers, a disease for which new therapies are urgently needed. In this present study, we focused on the therapeutic benefit of MTDH depletion in endometrial cancer cells to restore sensitivity to cell death. Cells were treated with a combination of tumor necrosis factor-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, which promotes death of malignant cells of the human reproductive tract, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been shown to increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our data indicate that depletion of MTDH in endometrial cancer cells resulted in sensitization of cells that were previously resistant in response to combinatorial treatment with TRAIL and the HDAC inhibitor LBH589. MTDH knockdown reduced the proportion of cells in S and increased cell arrest in G2/M in cells treated with LBH589 alone or LBH589 in combination with TRAIL, suggesting that MTDH functions at the cell cycle checkpoint to accomplish resistance. Using microarray technology, we identified 57 downstream target genes of MTDH, including calbindin 1 and galectin-1, which may contribute to MTDH-mediated therapeutic resistance. On the other hand, in MTDH depleted cells, inhibition of PDK1 and AKT phosphorylation along with increased Bim expression and XIAP degradation correlated with enhanced sensitivity to cell death in response to TRAIL and LBH589. These findings indicate that targeting or depleting MTDH is a potentially novel avenue for reversing therapeutic resistance in patients with endometrial cancer.

  6. New steroidal aromatase inhibitors: Suppression of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell proliferation and induction of cell death

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    Roleira Fernanda MF

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase, the cytochrome P-450 enzyme (CYP19 responsible for estrogen biosynthesis, is an important target for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. In fact, the use of synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AI, which induce suppression of estrogen synthesis, has shown to be an effective alternative to the classical tamoxifen for the treatment of postmenopausal patients with ER-positive breast cancer. New AIs obtained, in our laboratory, by modification of the A and D-rings of the natural substrate of aromatase, compounds 3a and 4a, showed previously to efficiently suppress aromatase activity in placental microsomes. In the present study we have investigated the effects of these compounds on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and induction of cell death using the estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line stably transfected with the aromatase gene, MCF-7 aro cells. Results The new steroids inhibit hormone-dependent proliferation of MCF-7aro cells in a time and dose-dependent manner, causing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and inducing cell death with features of apoptosis and autophagic cell death. Conclusion Our in vitro studies showed that the two steroidal AIs, 3a and 4a, are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, it was also shown that the antiproliferative effects of these two steroids on MCF-7aro cells are mediated by disrupting cell cycle progression, through cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and induction of cell death, being the dominant mechanism autophagic cell death. Our results are important for the elucidation of the cellular effects of steroidal AIs on breast cancer.

  7. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

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    Anantha Koteswararao Kanugula

    Full Text Available Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  8. Inhibition of Autophagy Potentiates Atorvastatin-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro

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    Minyong Kang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Statins are cholesterol reduction agents that exhibit anti-cancer activity in several human cancers. Because autophagy is a crucial survival mechanism for cancer cells under stress conditions, cooperative inhibition of autophagy acts synergistically with other anti-cancer drugs. Thus, this study investigates whether combined treatment of atorvastatin and autophagy inhibitors results in enhancing the cytotoxic effects of atorvastatin, upon human bladder cancer cells, T24 and J82, in vitro. To measure cell viability, we performed the EZ-Cytox cell viability assay. We examined apoptosis by flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI and western blot using procaspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP antibodies. To examine autophagy activation, we evaluated the co-localization of LC3 and LysoTracker by immunocytochemistry, as well as the expression of LC3 and p62/sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1 by western blot. In addition, we assessed the survival and proliferation of T24 and J82 cells by a clonogenic assay. We found that atorvastatin reduced the cell viability of T24 and J82 cells via apoptotic cell death and induced autophagy activation, shown by the co-localization of LC3 and LysoTracker. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy significantly enhanced atorvastatin-induced apoptosis in T24 and J82 cells. In sum, inhibition of autophagy potentiates atorvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in human bladder cancer cells in vitro, providing a potential therapeutic approach to treat bladder cancer.

  9. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S

    2007-01-01

    both for their apoptosis-regulating capacity and also for their effect on the cell cycle progression. The PI3-K/Akt cell survival pathway is shown as regulator of cell metabolism and cell survival, but examples are also provided where aberrant activity of the pathway may contribute to the induction......The partial cross-utilization of molecules and pathways involved in opposing processes like cell survival, proliferation and cell death, assures that mutations within one signaling cascade will also affect the other opposite process at least to some extent, thus contributing to homeostatic...... regulatory circuits. This review highlights some of the connections between opposite-acting pathways. Thus, we discuss the role of cyclins in the apoptotic process, and in the regulation of cell proliferation. CDKs and their inhibitors like the INK4-family (p16(Ink4a), p15(Ink4b), p18(Ink4c), p19(Ink4d...

  10. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-10-31

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Menthol induces cell death via the TRPM8 channel in the human bladder cancer cell line T24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Wang, Xinghuan; Yang, Zhonghua; Wang, Bin; Li, Shilin

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence has shown that menthol has potent anticancer activity in various human cancers via the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8)-dependent pathway or in a TRPM8-independent manner. However, its effect on bladder cancer remains obscure. In the present investigation, we examined the expression of TRPM8 and the role of menthol in cells of the human bladder cancer cell line T24. RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were used to confirm the expression and location of TRPM8 in T24 cells. TRPM8 was highly expressed in T24 cells and located in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm. With the use of small interfering RNA to silence the expression of TRPM8, we found that menthol could increase the concentration of intracellular calcium and decrease cell viability via the TRPM8 channel in T24 cells. We also found that menthol could induce cell death through TRPM8 in T24 cells, rather than cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Moreover, the detection of mitochondrial membrane potential showed that menthol could induce mitochondrial membrane depolarization in T24 cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that menthol can induce mitochondrial membrane depolarization via the TRPM8 channel in cells of the human bladder cancer cell line T24, resulting in cell death. It would be helpful to explore the precise mechanism of action of menthol in bladder cancer with a view to its possible use as intravesical chemotherapy. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Non-chemotoxic induction of cancer cell death using magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we show that magnetic nanowires with weak magnetic fields and low frequencies can induce cell death via a mechanism that does not involve heat production. We incubated colon cancer cells with two concentrations (2.4 and 12 μg/mL) of nickel nanowires that were 35 nm in diameter and exposed the cells and nanowires to an alternating magnetic field (0.5 mT and 1 Hz or 1 kHz) for 10 or 30 minutes. This low-power field exerted a force on the magnetic nanowires, causing a mechanical disturbance to the cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanostructures were internalized into the cells within 1 hour of incubation. Cell viability studies showed that the magnetic field and the nanowires separately had minor deleterious effects on the cells; however, when combined, the magnetic field and nanowires caused the cell viability values to drop by up to 39%, depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the nanowires. Cell membrane leakage experiments indicated membrane leakage of 20%, suggesting that cell death mechanisms induced by the nanowires and magnetic field involve some cell membrane rupture. Results suggest that magnetic nanowires can kill cancer cells. The proposed process requires simple and low-cost equipment with exposure to only very weak magnetic fields for short time periods. © 2015 Contreras et al.

  13. Dynamin-related protein 1 is involved in micheliolide-induced breast cancer cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Y

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yongsheng Jia,1,2 Liyan Zhou,1,2 Chen Tian,3 Yehui Shi,1,2 Chen Wang,1,2 Zhongsheng Tong1,2 1Department of Breast Oncology, Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Ministry of Education, 2Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, 3Department of Hematology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 is a newly discovered therapeutic target for tumor initiation, migration, proliferation, and chemosensitivity. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting Drp1 and its related signaling pathway pave a new way to address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies. Micheliolide (MCL, a guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone, can selectively eradicate acute myeloid leukemia stem or progenitor cells. But the effect of MCL on the mitochondrial dynamics of cancer cells is still not well demonstrated. In this study, we show that MCL inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, accompanied by increased mitochondrial fission and upregulation of Drp1. The results obtained from overexpression experiments of wild or dominant-negative mutant type of Drp1 demonstrate that Drp1 is both necessary and sufficient to induce MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell death. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased, whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, cytochrome c release, and PARP cleavage were enhanced after overexpression of Drp1 wild type. On the other hand, overexpression of Drp1-K38A (a dominant-negative mutant of Drp1 rescued cells from increased apoptosis, confirming the role of MCL-induced Drp1 in the observed apoptosis. Finally, MCL-induced Drp1-mediated cell death could be reversed by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (the ROS scavenger in breast cancer cells. Taken together, the present study shows a novel role for Drp1 in MCL-induced breast cancer cell death, potentially

  14. Differential effects of procaspase-3 activating compounds in the induction of cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Diana C; Qin, Yan; Peterson, Quinn P; Thomas, Diana L; Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Morrison, Karen C; Lucas, Pamela W; Palmer, Amy E; Fan, Timothy M; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2012-05-07

    The evasion of apoptosis is a key characteristic of cancer, and thus strategies to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells hold considerable promise in personalized anticancer therapy. Structurally similar procaspase activating compounds PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 restore procaspase-3 activity through the chelation of inhibitory zinc ions in vitro, induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in culture, and reduce tumor burden in vivo. Ip or iv administrations of high doses of PAC-1 are transiently neurotoxic in vivo, while S-PAC-1 is safe even at very high doses and has been evaluated in a phase I clinical trial of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring lymphoma. Here we show that PAC-1 and S-PAC-1 have similar mechanisms of cell death induction at low concentrations (less than 50 μM), but at high concentrations PAC-1 displays unique cell death induction features. Cells treated with a high concentration of PAC-1 have a distinctive gene expression profile, unusual cellular and mitochondrial morphology, and an altered intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, indicative of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis. These studies suggest strategies for anticancer clinical development, specifically bolus dosing for PAC-1 and continuous rate infusion for S-PAC-1.

  15. Colon cancer stem cells dictate tumor growth and resist cell death by production of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todaro, Matilde; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Di Stefano, Anna B.; Cammareri, Patrizia; Vermeulen, Louis; Iovino, Flora; Tripodo, Claudio; Russo, Antonio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    A novel paradigm in tumor biology suggests that cancer growth is driven by stem-like cells within a tumor. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of such cells from colon carcinomas using the stem cell marker CD133 that accounts around 2% of the cells in human colon cancer. The

  16. Cancer-selective death of human breast cancer cells by leelamine is mediated by bax and bak activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Arlotti, Julie A; Eiseman, Julie; Shiva, Sruti S; Rigatti, Lora H; Singh, Shivendra V

    2017-02-01

    The present study is the first to report inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and suppression of self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells (bCSC) by a pine bark component (leelamine). Except for a few recent publications in melanoma, anticancer pharmacology of this interesting phytochemical is largely elusive. Leelamine (LLM) dose-dependently inhibited viability of MDA-MB-231 (triple-negative), MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive), and SUM159 (triple-negative) human breast cancer cells in association with apoptotic cell death induction. To the contrary, a normal mammary epithelial cell line derived from fibrocystic breast disease and spontaneously immortalized (MCF-10A) was fully resistant to LLM-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. LLM also inhibited self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells. Apoptosis induction by LLM in breast cancer cells was accompanied by a modest increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was not due to inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. Nevertheless, ectopic expression of manganese superoxide dismutase conferred partial protection against LLM-induced cell death but only at a lower yet pharmacologically relevant concentration. Exposure of breast cancer cells to LLM resulted in (a) induction and/or activation of multidomain proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bak, (b) caspase-9 activation, and (c) cytosolic release of cytochrome c. Bax and Bak deficiency in immortalized fibroblasts conferred significant protection against cell death by LLM. Intraperitoneal administration of LLM (7.5 mg/kg; 5 times/wk) suppressed the growth of orthotopic SUM159 xenografts in mice without any toxicity. In conclusion, the present study provides critical preclinical data to warrant further investigation of LLM. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Immediate in vivo target-specific cancer cell death after near infrared photoimmunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunaga Makoto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near infrared (NIR photoimmunotherapy (PIT is a new type of cancer treatment based on a monoclonal antibody (mAb-NIR phthalocyanine dye, (IR700 conjugate. In vitro cancer-specific cell death occurs during NIR light exposure in cells previously incubated with mAb-IR700 conjugates. However, documenting rapid cell death in vivo is more difficult. Methods A luciferase-transfected breast cancer cell (epidermal growth factor receptor+, MDA-MB-468luc cells was produced and used for both in vitro and in vivo experiments for monitoring the cell killing effect of PIT. After validation of cytotoxicity with NIR exposure up to 8 J/cm2in vitro, we employed an orthotopic breast cancer model of bilateral MDA-MB-468luc tumors in female athymic mice, which subsequently received a panitumumab-IR700 conjugate in vivo. One side was used as a control, while the other was treated with NIR light of dose ranging from 50 to 150 J/cm2. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI was performed before and after PIT. Results Dose-dependent cell killing and regrowth was successfully monitored by the BLI signal in vitro. Although tumor sizes were unchanged, BLI signals decreased by >95% immediately after PIT in vivo when light intensity was high (>100 J/cm2, however, in mice receiving lower intensity NIR (50 J/cm2, tumors recurred with gradually increasing BLI signal. Conclusion PIT induced massive cell death of targeted tumor cells immediately after exposure of NIR light that was demonstrated with BLI in vivo.

  18. Molecular Basis of Autophagic Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate into the vacuole via autophagic membranes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Genes Cells 2008;13:537–47. [PubMed...PARP) (Santa Cruz Biotechnology), anti-LC3 (MBL), and anti--actin (Oncogene Research Prod- ucts). Subsequently, blots were incubated with goat anti...apoL1 antibody, secondary goat anti-rabbit antibody conjugated with horseradish peroxidase, and ECL detection and imaging. RESULTS ApoL1 Is a BH3 Domain

  19. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher,J. Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound Alternol in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived non-malignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion a...

  20. [6]-Gingerol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Cell Death of Mutant p53-expressing Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Jung; Wen, Jing; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo

    2006-01-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a major phenolic compound derived from ginger, has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. While several molecular mechanisms have been described to underlie its effects on cells in vitro and in vivo, the underlying mechanisms by which [6]-gingerol exerts anti-tumorigenic effects are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the action of [6]-gingerol on two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, HPAC expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and BxPC-3 expressing mutated p53. We found that [6]-gingerol inhibited the cell growth through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in both cell lines. Western blot analyses indicated that [6]-gingerol decreased both Cyclin A and Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) expression. These events led to reduction in Rb phosphorylation followed by blocking of S phase entry. p53 expression was decreased by [6]-gingerol treatment in both cell lines suggesting that the induction of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip1, was p53-independent. [6]-Gingerol induced mostly apoptotic death in the mutant p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in wild type p53-expressing cells and this was related to the increased phosphorylation of AKT. These results suggest that [6]-gingerol can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing apoptotic cell death while it exerts cytostatic effect on wild type p53-expressing cells by inducing temporal growth arrest. PMID:17066513

  1. A unifying mechanism for cancer cell death through ion channel activation by HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Petter; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Trulsson, Maria; Ho C S, James; Dosnon, Marion; Westergren, Tomas; Chao, Yinxia; Rydström, Anna; Yang, Henry; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels and ion fluxes control many aspects of tissue homeostasis. During oncogenic transformation, critical ion channel functions may be perturbed but conserved tumor specific ion fluxes remain to be defined. Here we used the tumoricidal protein-lipid complex HAMLET as a probe to identify ion fluxes involved in tumor cell death. We show that HAMLET activates a non-selective cation current, which reached a magnitude of 2.74±0.88 nA within 1.43±0.13 min from HAMLET application. Rapid ion fluxes were essential for HAMLET-induced carcinoma cell death as inhibitors (amiloride, BaCl2), preventing the changes in free cellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations also prevented essential steps accompanying carcinoma cell death, including changes in morphology, uptake, global transcription, and MAP kinase activation. Through global transcriptional analysis and phosphorylation arrays, a strong ion flux dependent p38 MAPK response was detected and inhibition of p38 signaling delayed HAMLET-induced death. Healthy, differentiated cells were resistant to HAMLET challenge, which was accompanied by innate immunity rather than p38-activation. The results suggest, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for the initiation of HAMLET's broad and rapid lethal effect on tumor cells. These findings are particularly significant in view of HAMLET's documented therapeutic efficacy in human studies and animal models. The results also suggest that HAMLET offers a two-tiered therapeutic approach, killing cancer cells while stimulating an innate immune response in surrounding healthy tissues.

  2. Therapeutic strategies of drug repositioning targeting autophagy to induce cancer cell death: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Go J

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the researcher that discovered autophagy, which is an evolutionally conserved catabolic process which degrades cytoplasmic constituents and organelles in the lysosome. Autophagy plays a crucial role in both normal tissue homeostasis and tumor development and is necessary for cancer cells to adapt efficiently to an unfavorable tumor microenvironment characterized by hypo-nutrient conditions. This protein degradation process leads to amino acid recycling, which provides sufficient amino acid substrates for cellular survival and proliferation. Autophagy is constitutively activated in cancer cells due to the deregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which enables them to adapt to hypo-nutrient microenvironment and exhibit the robust proliferation at the pre-metastatic niche. That is why just the activation of autophagy with mTOR inhibitor often fails in vain. In contrast, disturbance of autophagy-lysosome flux leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and an unfolded protein response (UPR), which finally leads to increased apoptotic cell death in the tumor tissue. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy has a close relationship with programmed cell death, while uncontrolled autophagy itself often induces autophagic cell death in tumor cells. Autophagic cell death was originally defined as cell death accompanied by large-scale autophagic vacuolization of the cytoplasm. However, autophagy is a "double-edged sword" for cancer cells as it can either promote or suppress the survival and proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, several studies of drug re-positioning suggest that "conventional" agents used to treat diseases other than cancer can have antitumor therapeutic effects by activating/suppressing autophagy. Because of ever increasing failure rates and high cost associated with anticancer drug development, this therapeutic development strategy has attracted increasing

  3. Therapeutic strategies of drug repositioning targeting autophagy to induce cancer cell death: from pathophysiology to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go J. Yoshida

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the researcher that discovered autophagy, which is an evolutionally conserved catabolic process which degrades cytoplasmic constituents and organelles in the lysosome. Autophagy plays a crucial role in both normal tissue homeostasis and tumor development and is necessary for cancer cells to adapt efficiently to an unfavorable tumor microenvironment characterized by hypo-nutrient conditions. This protein degradation process leads to amino acid recycling, which provides sufficient amino acid substrates for cellular survival and proliferation. Autophagy is constitutively activated in cancer cells due to the deregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which enables them to adapt to hypo-nutrient microenvironment and exhibit the robust proliferation at the pre-metastatic niche. That is why just the activation of autophagy with mTOR inhibitor often fails in vain. In contrast, disturbance of autophagy–lysosome flux leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and an unfolded protein response (UPR, which finally leads to increased apoptotic cell death in the tumor tissue. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy has a close relationship with programmed cell death, while uncontrolled autophagy itself often induces autophagic cell death in tumor cells. Autophagic cell death was originally defined as cell death accompanied by large-scale autophagic vacuolization of the cytoplasm. However, autophagy is a “double-edged sword” for cancer cells as it can either promote or suppress the survival and proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, several studies of drug re-positioning suggest that “conventional” agents used to treat diseases other than cancer can have antitumor therapeutic effects by activating/suppressing autophagy. Because of ever increasing failure rates and high cost associated with anticancer drug development, this therapeutic development

  4. Melatonin enhances arsenic trioxide-induced cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Oh, Sang Taek; Hong, Sung-Eun; Choe, Tae-Boo; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min Ki; Kim, Hyun-A; Noh, Woo Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2016-02-15

    Melatonin is implicated in various physiological functions, including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism(s) of its anticancer activity is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of melatonin and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on cell death in human breast cancer cells. Melatonin enhanced the ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via changes in the protein levels of Survivin, Bcl-2, and Bax, thus affecting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Interestingly, we found that the cell death induced by co-treatment with melatonin and ATO was mediated by sustained upregulation of Redd1, which was associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combined treatment with melatonin and ATO induced the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase downstream from Redd1 expression. Rapamycin and S6K1 siRNA enhanced, while activation of mTORC1 by transfection with TSC2 siRNA suppressed the cell death induced by melatonin and ATO treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin enhances ATO-induced apoptotic cell death via sustained upregulation of Redd1 expression and inhibition of mTORC1 upstream of the activation of the p38/JNK pathways in human breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Circadian Rhythms and Breast Cancer: The Role of Per2 in Doxorubicin-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Megan I; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms form an integral physiological system allowing for the synchronisation of all metabolic processes to daily light/dark cycles, thereby optimising their efficacy. Circadian disruptions have been implicated in the onset and progression of various cancers, including those arising in the breast. Several links between the circadian protein Per2 and DNA damage responses exist. Aberrant Per2 expression results in potent downstream effects on both cell cycle and apoptotic targets, suggestive of a tumour suppressive role for Per2. Due to the severe dose limiting side effects associated with current chemotherapeutic strategies, including the use of doxorubicin, a need for more effective adjuvant therapies to increase cancer cell susceptibility has arisen. This study was therefore aimed at characterizing the role of Per2 in normal breast epithelia (MCF-12A) and in ER(-) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and also at determining the role of Per2 in doxorubicin-induced cell death. In both cell lines Per2 protein expression displayed a 24-hour circadian rhythm in both cell lines. Per2 was located predominantly in the cytoplasm, with nuclear localization observed with lower cytoplasmic fluorescent intensities. Our results show that Per2 silencing effectively sensitizes the chemoresistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin.

  6. Dead Cert: Measuring Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Scott, Adrian P; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-12-01

    Many cells in the body die at specific times to facilitate healthy development or because they have become old, damaged, or infected. Defects in cells that result in their inappropriate survival or untimely death can negatively impact development or contribute to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, AIDS, autoimmune disorders, and chronic infection. Cell death may also occur following exposure to environmental toxins or cytotoxic chemicals. Although this is often harmful, it can be beneficial in some cases, such as in the treatment of cancer. The ability to objectively measure cell death in a laboratory setting is therefore essential to understanding and investigating the causes and treatments of many human diseases and disorders. Often, it is sufficient to know the extent of cell death in a sample; however, the mechanism of death may also have implications for disease progression, treatment, and the outcomes of experimental investigations. There are a myriad of assays available for measuring the known forms of cell death, including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, necroptosis, anoikis, and pyroptosis. Here, we introduce a range of assays for measuring cell death in cultured cells, and we outline basic techniques for distinguishing healthy cells from apoptotic or necrotic cells-the two most common forms of cell death. We also provide personal insight into where these assays may be useful and how they may or may not be used to distinguish apoptotic cell death from other death modalities. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Akimoto

    Full Text Available The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069 in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01 without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug.

  8. Selenium Compounds, Apoptosis and Other Types of Cell Death: An Overview for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Palop

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential trace element involved in different physiological functions of the human body and plays a role in cancer prevention and treatment. Induction of apoptosis is considered an important cellular event that can account for the cancer preventive effects of Se. The mechanisms of Se-induced apoptosis are associated with the chemical forms of Se and their metabolism as well as the type of cancer studied. So, some selenocompounds, such as SeO2 involve the activation of caspase-3 while sodium selenite induces apoptosis in the absence of the activation of caspases. Modulation of mitochondrial functions has been reported to play a key role in the regulation of apoptosis and also to be one of the targets of Se compounds. Other mechanisms for apoptosis induction are the modulation of glutathione and reactive oxygen species levels, which may function as intracellular messengers to regulate signaling pathways, or the regulation of kinase, among others. Emerging evidence indicates the overlaps between the apoptosis and other types of cell death such as autophagy. In this review we report different processes of cell death induced by Se compounds in cancer treatment and prevention.

  9. Novel analogue of colchicine induces selective pro-death autophagy and necrosis in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Larocque

    Full Text Available Colchicine, a natural product of Colchicum autumnae currently used for gout treatment, is a tubulin targeting compound which inhibits microtubule formation by targeting fast dividing cells. This tubulin-targeting property has lead researchers to investigate the potential of colchicine and analogs as possible cancer therapies. One major study conducted on an analogue of allocolchicine, ZD 6126, was halted in phase 2 clinical trials due to severe cardio-toxicity associated with treatment. This study involves the development and testing of novel allocolchicine analogues that hold non-toxic anti-cancer properties. Currently we have synthesized and evaluated the anti-cancer activities of two analogues; N-acetyl-O-methylcolchinol (NSC 51046 or NCME, which is structurally similar to ZD 6126, and (S-3,8,9,10-tetramethoxyallocolchicine (Green 1, which is a novel derivative of allocolchicine that is isomeric in the A ring. NSC 51046 was found to be non-selective as it induced apoptosis in both BxPC-3 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells and in normal human fibroblasts. Interestingly, we found that Green 1 was able to modestly induce pro-death autophagy in these pancreatic cancer cells and E6-1 leukemia cells but not in normal human fibroblasts. Unlike colchicine and NSC 51046, Green 1 does not appear to affect tubulin polymerization indicating that it has a different molecular target. Green 1 also caused increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in mitochondria isolated from pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies revealed that Green 1 was well tolerated in mice. Our findings suggest that a small change in the structure of colchicine has apparently changed the mechanism of action and lead to improved selectivity. This may lead to better selective treatments in cancer therapy.

  10. Quantitative ultrasound evaluation of tumor cell death response in locally advanced breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Papanicolau, Naum; Falou, Omar; Zubovits, Judit; Dent, Rebecca; Verma, Sunil; Trudeau, Maureen; Boileau, Jean Francois; Spayne, Jacqueline; Iradji, Sara; Sofroni, Ervis; Lee, Justin; Lemon-Wong, Sharon; Yaffe, Martin; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-04-15

    Quantitative ultrasound techniques have been recently shown to be capable of detecting cell death through studies conducted on in vitro and in vivo models. This study investigates for the first time the potential of early detection of tumor cell death in response to clinical cancer therapy administration in patients using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic methods. Patients (n = 24) with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatments. Ultrasound data were collected before treatment onset and at 4 times during treatment (weeks 1, 4, and 8, and preoperatively). Quantitative ultrasound parameters were evaluated for clinically responsive and nonresponding patients. Results indicated that quantitative ultrasound parameters showed significant changes for patients who responded to treatment, and no similar alteration was observed in treatment-refractory patients. Such differences between clinically and pathologically determined responding and nonresponding patients were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after 4 weeks of chemotherapy. Responding patients showed changes in parameters related to cell death with, on average, an increase in mid-band fit and 0-MHz intercept of 9.1 ± 1.2 dBr and 8.9 ± 1.9 dBr, respectively, whereas spectral slope was invariant. Linear discriminant analysis revealed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83.3% for distinguishing nonresponding patients by the fourth week into a course of chemotherapy lasting several months. This study reports for the first time that quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic methods can be applied clinically to evaluate cancer treatment responses noninvasively. The results form a basis for monitoring chemotherapy effects and facilitating the personalization of cancer treatment.

  11. Targeting Death Receptor TRAIL-R2 by Chalcones for TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Jaworska, Dagmara; Kłósek, Małgorzata; Czuba, Zenon P.; Król, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in cancer cells without toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL binds to death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5) expressed on cancer cell surface and activates apoptotic pathways. Endogenous TRAIL plays an important role in immune surveillance and defense against cancer cells. However, as more tumor cells are reported to be resistant to TRAIL mediated death, it is important to search for and develop new strategies to overcome this resistance. Chalcones can sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of TRAIL in combination with four chalcones: chalcone, isobavachalcone, licochalcone A and xanthohumol on HeLa cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected using annexin V-FITC staining by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Death receptor expression was analyzed using flow cytometry. The decreased expression of death receptors in cancer cells may be the cause of TRAIL-resistance. Chalcones enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through increased expression of TRAIL-R2. Our study has indicated that chalcones augment the antitumor activity of TRAIL and confirm their cancer chemopreventive properties. PMID:23203129

  12. Loss of Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4 associates with the progression of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Annie NY

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4 is a novel tumour suppressor and originally identified as a neoplastic transformation inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression, prognostic significance and potential function of Pdcd4 in ovarian cancer. Results The expression of Pdcd4 was examined in 30 normal ovarian tissues, 16 borderline and 93 malignant ovarian tissues. A continuous down regulation of Pdcd4 expression in the sequence of normal, borderline and malignant tissues was observed. The expressions of Pdcd4 in both ovarian borderline tissues and carcinomas were significantly lower than the expression in normal ovarian tissues (p Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the loss of Pdcd4 was a common abnormality at molecular level in ovarian cancer and it might be a potential prognostic factor in ovarian cancer patients.

  13. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez Banderas, Aldo Isaac

    2016-10-24

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  14. Review of Cancer Immunotherapy: Application of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Programmed Death 1/Programmed Death-ligand 1 Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Tengfei Zhang; Ling Cao; Zhen Zhang; Dongli Yue; Yu Ping; Hong Li; Lan Huang; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy strategies based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells or antibodies against immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), achieved significant successes from bench to clinic in the past 2 years. CARs are artificial engineered receptors that can specifically target tumor cell surface antigen, activate T cell and further enhance T cell function, independent of major histocompatibility complex. CAR T ...

  15. Inhibition of never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase-4 reduces survivin expression and sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Jung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Se-Young; Shin, Dong Woon; Shim, Sangmi; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Ha, Ye Jin; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Young Sam; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-10-04

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. However, many tumors are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and resistance mechanisms are not fully understood. To identify novel regulatory molecules of TRAIL resistance, we screened a siRNA library targeting the human kinome, and NEK4 (NIMA-related kinase-4) was identified. Knockdown of NEK4 sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and in vivo xenografts to cell death. In contrast, over expression of NEK4 suppressed TRAIL-induced cell death in TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells. In addition, loss of NEK4 resulted in decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, but an increase in apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, NEK4 was highly upregulated in tumor tissues derived from patients with lung cancer and colon cancer. These results suggest that inhibition of NEK4 sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by regulation of survivin expression.

  16. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M D; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-26

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL.

  17. Adult stromal cells derived from human adipose tissue provoke pancreatic cancer cell death both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Cousin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate. ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available.

  18. miR-203 inhibits cell proliferation and promotes cisplatin induced cell death in tongue squamous cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiong; Lin, Yao [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Orthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510055 (China); Fan, Li [Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710032 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, 510055 (China); Kuang, Wei [Department of Stomatology, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, 111 Liuhua Road, Guangzhou, 510010 (China); Zheng, Liwei [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Wuhou District, Chengdu, 610041 (China); Wu, Jiahua [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Orthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510055 (China); Shang, Peng [Patient-specific Orthopedic Technology Research Center in GuangDong Research Centre for Neural Engineering, 1068 Xueyuan Boulevard, University Town of Shenzhen, Xili, Nanshan, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Wang, Qiaofeng [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710032 (China); Tan, Jiali, E-mail: jasminenov@163.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Orthodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510055 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of the head and neck cancer. Chemo resistance of OSCC has been identified as a substantial therapeutic hurdle. In this study, we analyzed the role of miR-203 in the OSCC and its effects on cisplatin-induced cell death in an OSCC cell line, Tca8113. There was a significant decrease of miR-203 expression in OSCC samples, compared with the adjacent normal, non-cancerous tissue. After 3 days cisplatin treatment, the survived Tca8113 cells had a lower expression of miR-203 than that in the untreated control group. In contrast, PIK3CA showed an inverse expression in cancer and cisplatin survived Tca8113 cells. Transfection of Tca8113 cells with miR-203 mimics greatly reduced PIK3CA expression and Akt activation. Furthermore, miR-203 repressed PIK3CA expression through targeting the 3′UTR. Restoration of miR-203 not only suppressed cell proliferation, but also sensitized cells to cisplatin induced cell apoptosis. This effect was absent in cells that were simultaneously treated with PIK3CA RNAi. In summary, these findings suggest miR-203 plays an important role in cisplatin resistance in OSCC, and furthermore delivery of miR-203 analogs may serve as an adjuvant therapy for OSCC. - Highlights: • Much lower miR-203 expression in cisplatin resistant Tca8113 cells is discovered. • Delivery of miR-203 can sensitize the Tca8113 cells to cisplatin induced cell death. • MiR-203 can downregulate PIK3CA through the 3′UTR. • The effects of miR-203 on cisplatin sensitivity is mainly through PIK3CA pathway.

  19. Functional oncogene signatures guide rationally designed combination therapies to synergistically induce breast cancer cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Stephen T.; Kratche, Zachary R.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Wilson, Robert C.; Haddad, Ramsi; Gray, Joe W.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    A critical first step in the personalized approach to cancer treatment is the identification of activated oncogenes that drive each tumor. The Identification of driver oncogenes on a patient-by-patient basis is complicated by the complexity of the cancer genome and the fact that a particular genetic alteration may serve as a driver event only in a subset of tumors that harbor it. In this study, we set out to identify the complete set of functional oncogenes in a small panel of breast cancer cell lines. The cell lines in this panel were chosen because they each contain a known receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) oncogene. To identify additional drivers, we integrated functional genetic screens with copy number and mutation analysis, and cancer genome knowledge databases. The resulting functional oncogene signatures were able to predict responsiveness of cell lines to targeted inhibitors. However, as single agents, these drugs had little effect on clonogenic potential. By contrast, treatment with drug combinations that targeted multiple oncogenes in the signatures, even at very low doses, resulted in the induction of apoptosis and striking synergistic effects on clonogenicity. In particular, targeting a driver oncogene that mediates AKT phosphorylation in combination with targeting the anti-apoptotic BCL2L1 protein had profound effects on cell viability. Importantly, because the synergistic induction of cell death was achieved using low levels of each individual drug, it suggests that a therapeutic strategy based on this approach could avoid the toxicities that have been associated with the combined use of multiple-targeted agents. PMID:27153554

  20. A novel cell type-specific role of p38alpha in the control of autophagy and cell death in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comes, F; Matrone, A; Lastella, P; Nico, B; Susca, F C; Bagnulo, R; Ingravallo, G; Modica, S; Lo Sasso, G; Moschetta, A; Guanti, G; Simone, C

    2007-04-01

    Cancer develops when molecular pathways that control the fine balance between proliferation, differentiation, autophagy and cell death undergo genetic deregulation. The prospects for further substantial advances in the management of colorectal cancer reside in a systematic genetic and functional dissection of these pathways in tumor cells. In an effort to evaluate the impact of p38 signaling on colorectal cancer cell fate, we treated HT29, Caco2, Hct116, LS174T and SW480 cell lines with the inhibitor SB202190 specific for p38alpha/beta kinases. We report that p38alpha is required for colorectal cancer cell homeostasis as the inhibition of its kinase function by pharmacological blockade or genetic inactivation causes cell cycle arrest, autophagy and cell death in a cell type-specific manner. Deficiency of p38alpha activity induces a tissue-restricted upregulation of the GABARAP gene, an essential component of autophagic vacuoles and autophagosomes, whereas simultaneous inhibition of autophagy significantly increases cell death by triggering apoptosis. These data identify p38alpha as a central mediator of colorectal cancer cell homeostasis and establish a rationale for the evaluation of the pharmacological manipulation of the p38alpha pathway in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  1. Active Component of Antrodia cinnamomea Mycelia Targeting Head and Neck Cancer Initiating Cells through Exaggerated Autophagic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is a highly lethal cancer. Previously, we identify head and neck cancer initiating cells (HN-CICs, which are highly tumorigenic and resistant to conventional therapy. Therefore, development of drug candidates that effectively target HN-CICs would benefit future head and neck cancer therapy. In this study, we first successfully screened for an active component, named YMGKI-1, from natural products of Antrodia cinnamomea Mycelia (ACM, which can target the stemness properties of HNSCC. Treatment of YMGKI-1 significantly downregulated the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity, one of the characteristics of CIC in HNSCC cells. Additionally, the tumorigenic properties of HNSCC cells were attenuated by YMGKI-1 treatment in vivo. Further, the stemness properties of HN-CICs, which are responsible for the malignancy of HNSCC, were also diminished by YMGKI-1 treatment. Strikingly, YMGKI-1 also effectively suppressed the cell viability of HN-CICs but not normal stem cells. Finally, YMGKI-1 induces the cell death of HN-CICs by dysregulating the exaggerated autophagic signaling pathways. Together, our results indicate that YMGKI-1 successfully lessens stemness properties and tumorigenicity of HN-CICs. These findings provide a new drug candidate from purified components of ACM as an alternative therapy for head and neck cancer in the future.

  2. Targeting interferon response genes sensitizes aromatase inhibitor resistant breast cancer cells to estrogen-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Joung; Lui, Asona; Ogony, Joshua; Jan, Rifat; Sims, Peter J; Lewis-Wambi, Joan

    2015-01-15

    Estrogen deprivation using aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is currently the standard of care for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Unfortunately, the majority of patients treated with AIs eventually develop resistance, inevitably resulting in patient relapse and, ultimately, death. The mechanism by which resistance occurs is still not completely known, however, recent studies suggest that impaired/defective interferon signaling might play a role. In the present study, we assessed the functional role of IFITM1 and PLSCR1; two well-known interferon response genes in AI resistance. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to assess mRNA and protein levels of IFITM1, PLSCR1, STAT1, STAT2, and IRF-7 in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C breast cancer cells and AI-sensitive MCF-7 and T47D cells. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was performed on tissue microarrays consisting of normal breast tissues, primary breast tumors, and AI-resistant recurrence tumors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantitate intracellular IFNα level. Neutralizing antibody was used to block type 1 interferon receptor IFNAR1 signaling. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown IFITM1, PLSCR1, STAT1, STAT2, IRF-7, and IFNα expression. We found that IFITM1 and PLSCR1 were constitutively overexpressed in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C breast cancer cells and AI-resistant tumors and that siRNA knockdown of IFITM1 significantly inhibited the ability of the resistant cells to proliferate, migrate, and invade. Interestingly, suppression of IFITM1 significantly enhanced estradiol-induced cell death in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C cells and markedly increased expression of p21, Bax, and Noxa in these cells. Significantly elevated level of IFNα was detected in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C cells compared to parental MCF-7 cells and suppression of IFNα dramatically reduced IFITM1, PLSCR1, p-STAT1, and p-STAT2 expression in the resistant cells. Lastly, neutralizing antibody

  3. Cancer cell death induced by the intracellular self-assembly of an enzyme-responsive supramolecular gelator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Fukuoka, Yuki; Morimoto, Yuka; Honjo, Takafumi; Koda, Daisuke; Goto, Masahiro; Maruyama, Tatsuo

    2015-01-21

    We report cancer cell death initiated by the intracellular molecular self-assembly of a peptide lipid, which was derived from a gelator precursor. The gelator precursor was designed to form nanofibers via molecular self-assembly, after cleavage by a cancer-related enzyme (matrix metalloproteinase-7, MMP-7), leading to hydrogelation. The gelator precursor exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity to five different cancer cell lines, while the precursor exhibited low cytotoxicity to normal cells. Cancer cells secrete excessive amounts of MMP-7, which converted the precursor into a supramolecular gelator prior to its uptake by the cells. Once inside the cells, the supramolecular gelator formed a gel via molecular self-assembly, exerting vital stress on the cancer cells. The present study thus describes a new drug where molecular self-assembly acts as the mechanism of cytotoxicity.

  4. Echinacoside induces apoptotic cancer cell death by inhibiting the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Liwei Dong,1 Hongge Wang,1 Jiajing Niu,1 Mingwei Zou,2 Nuoting Wu,1 Debin Yu,1 Ye Wang,1 Zhihua Zou11Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Inhibition of the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1 causes extensive oxidative DNA damages and apoptosis in cancer cells and hence may be used as an anticancer strategy. As natural products have been a rich source of medicinal chemicals, in the present study, we used the MTH1-catalyzed enzymatic reaction as a high-throughput in vitro screening assay to search for natural compounds capable of inhibiting MTH1. Echinacoside, a compound derived from the medicinal plants Cistanche and Echinacea, effectively inhibited the catalytic activity of MTH1 in an in vitro assay. Treatment of various human cancer cell lines with Echinacoside resulted in a significant increase in the cellular level of oxidized guanine (8-oxoguanine, while cellular reactive oxygen species level remained unchanged, indicating that Echinacoside also inhibited the activity of cellular MTH1. Consequently, Echinacoside treatment induced an immediate and dramatic increase in DNA damage markers and upregulation of the G1/S-CDK inhibitor p21, which were followed by marked apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in cancer but not in noncancer cells. Taken together, these studies identified a natural compound as an MTH1 inhibitor and suggest that natural products can be an important source of anticancer agents. Keywords: Echinacoside, MTH1, 8-oxoG, DNA damage, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest

  5. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  6. Capsaicin mediates cell death in bladder cancer T24 cells through reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Xing-Huan; Wang, Huai-Peng; Hu, Li-Quan; Zheng, Xin-Min; Li, Shi-Wen

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of capsaicin (CAP) on proliferation of bladder cancer T24 cells in vitro as well as on xenografts in nude mice in vivo. T24 cells were assessed for cell viability and apoptosis by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry analysis after incubation with different concentrations of CAP. To uncover the mechanism by which CAP affected the viability of T24 cells, intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential were assessed. To study the in vivo effects of CAP, T24 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice and CAP (5 mg/kg by wt) was subcutaneously injected into nude mice with bladder tumors. CAP decreased the viability of T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner without marked apoptosis. CAP induced ROS production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, thereby inducing cell death, not apoptosis, in T24 cells at a concentration of 100 microM or higher. Furthermore, these effects of CAP could be reversed by capsazepine, the antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel. In vivo experiment showed that CAP significantly slowed the growth of T24 bladder cancer xenografts as measured by size (661.80 +/- 62.03 vs 567.02 +/- 43.94 mm(3); P cell death in T24 cells through calcium entry-dependent ROS production and mitochondrial depolarization, and it may have a role in the management of bladder cancer. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  8. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  9. Non-canonical kinase signaling by the death ligand TRAIL in cancer cells : discord in the death receptor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azijli, K.; Weyhenmeyer, B.; Peters, G. J.; de Jong, S.; Kruyt, F. A. E.

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-based therapy is currently evaluated in clinical studies as a tumor cell selective pro-apoptotic approach. However, besides activating canonical caspase-dependent apoptosis by binding to TRAIL-specific death receptors, the TRAIL ligand

  10. Copper binding agents acting as copper ionophores lead to caspase inhibition and paraptotic cell death in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardito, Saverio; Bassanetti, Irene; Bignardi, Chiara; Elviri, Lisa; Tegoni, Matteo; Mucchino, Claudio; Bussolati, Ovidio; Franchi-Gazzola, Renata; Marchiò, Luciano

    2011-04-27

    We report a quantitative structure-activity relationship study of a new class of pyrazole-pyridine copper complexes that establishes a clear correlation between the ability to promote copper accumulation and cytotoxicity. Intracellular metal accumulation is maximized when ligand lipophilicity allows the complex to rapidly cross the membrane. Copper and ligand follow different uptake kinetics and reach different intracellular equilibrium concentrations. These results support a model in which the ligand acts as an ionophore for the metal ion, cycling between intra- and extracellular compartments as dissociated or complexed entities. When treating cancer cells with structurally unrelated disulfiram and pyrazole-pyridine copper complexes, as well as with inorganic copper, the same morphological and molecular changes were reproduced, indicating that copper overload is responsible for the cytotoxic effects. Copper-based treatments drive sensitive cancer cells toward paraptotic cell death, a process hallmarked by endoplasmic reticulum stress and massive vacuolization in the absence of apoptotic features. A lack of caspase activation, as observed in copper-treated dying cells, is a consequence of metal-mediated inhibition of caspase-3. Thus, copper acts simultaneously as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer and a caspase-3 inhibitor, forcing the cell into caspase-independent paraptotic death. The establishment of a mechanism of action common to different copper binding agents provides a rationale for the exploitation of copper toxicity as an anticancer tool.

  11. Programmed Cell Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Expression in Anal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Gujja, Swetha; Siegel, Eric R; Batra, Anu; Saeed, Anwaar; Lai, Keith; James, Jennifer D; Fogel, Bradley J; Williamson, Stephen

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in anal cancer. In a retrospective cohort analysis, subjects with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal were tested for PD-L1 expression, then followed for recurrence and survival. Crude recurrence rates (CRRs), crude mortality rates (CMRs), and crude event rates (CERs) were assessed for PD-L1-dependent differences using Poisson regression. All 3 types of crude rate were expressed as the number that occurred per hundred person-years (hPY) of follow-up. Samples from 41 subjects were evaluated for PD-L1 expression; 23 (56%) were positive. Subjects with PD-L1-expressing versus PD-L1-negative tumors respectively had CRRs of 30.8 versus 12.1 recurrences/hPY (P=0.082), CMRs of 16.7 versus 12.0 deaths/hPY (P=0.47), and CERs of 39.2 versus 16.9 events/hPY (P=0.069). PD-L1 positivity was associated with worse CRR and CER, and marginally worse CMR. The effect on progression-free and overall survival needs to be validated in a study with a larger sample size.

  12. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya [College of Pharmacy and Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, 48, Gaeshin-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb [College of Oriental Medicine, Kyungwon University, San 65, Bokjeong-dong, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggii 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Bae [College of Pharmacy and Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, 48, Gaeshin-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Heub [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505, Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-040 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min Jong, E-mail: bitsugar@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505, Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-040 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jin Tae, E-mail: jinthong@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, 48, Gaeshin-dong, Heungduk-gu, Cheongju, Chungbuk, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  13. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer.

  14. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmik Mirzayans

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis.

  15. Pinus radiata bark extract induces caspase-independent apoptosis-like cell death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Thamizhiniyan; Choi, Young-Woong; Mun, Sung-Phil; Kim, Young-Kyoon

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anticancer activity of Pinus radiata bark extract (PRE) against MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. First, we observed that PRE induces potent cytotoxic effects in MCF-7 cells. The cell death had features of cytoplasmic vacuolation, plasma membrane permeabilization, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, absence of executioner caspase activation, insensitivity to z-VAD-fmk (caspase inhibitor), increased accumulation of autophagic markers, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). Both the inhibition of early stage autophagy flux and lysosomal cathepsins did not improve cell viability. The antioxidant, n-acetylcysteine, and the iron chelator, deferoxamine, failed to restore the lysosomal integrity indicating that PRE-induced LMP is independent of oxidative stress. This was corroborated with the absence of enhanced ROS production in PRE-treated cells. Chelation of both intracellular calcium and zinc promotes PRE-induced LMP. Geranylgeranylacetone, an inducer of Hsp70 expression, also had no significant protective effect on PRE-induced LMP. Moreover, we found that PRE induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial membrane depolarization in MCF-7 cells. The ER stress inhibitor, 4-PBA, did not restore the mitochondrial membrane integrity, whereas cathepsin inhibitors demonstrated significant protective effects. Collectively, our results suggest that PRE induces an autophagic block, LMP, ER stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction in MCF-7 cells. However, further studies are clearly warranted to explore the exact mechanism behind the anticancer activity of PRE in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

  16. TRPV2 activation induces apoptotic cell death in human T24 bladder cancer cells: a potential therapeutic target for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Ueda, Takashi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ikegami, Yosuke; Saito, Masaki; Ishida, Yusuke; Ugawa, Shinya; Kohri, Kenjiro; Shimada, Shoichi

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the functional expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) channel protein in human urothelial carcinoma (UC) cells and to determine whether calcium influx into UC cells through TRPV2 is involved in apoptotic cell death. The expression of TRPV2 mRNA in bladder cancer cell lines (T24, a poorly differentiated UC cell line and RT4, a well-differentiated UC cell line) was analyzed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The calcium permeability of TRPV2 channels in T24 cells was investigated using a calcium imaging assay that used cannabidiol (CBD), a relatively selective TRPV2 agonist, and ruthenium red (RuR), a nonselective TRPV channel antagonist. The death of T24 or RT4 cells in the presence of CBD was evaluated using a cellular viability assay. Apoptosis of T24 cells caused by CBD was confirmed using an annexin-V assay and small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of TRPV2. TRPV2 mRNA was abundantly expressed in T24 cells. The expression level in UC cells was correlated with high-grade disease. The administration of CBD increased intracellular calcium concentrations in T24 cells. In addition, the viability of T24 cells progressively decreased with increasing concentrations of CBD, whereas RT4 cells were mostly unaffected. Cell death occurred via apoptosis caused by continuous influx of calcium through TRPV2. TRPV2 channels in UC cells are calcium-permeable and the regulation of calcium influx through these channels leads directly to the death of UC cells. TRPV2 channels in UC cells may be a potential new therapeutic target, especially in higher-grade UC cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  18. Effect of [10]-Gingerol on [Ca2+]i and Cell Death in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi Chen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of [10]-gingerol on cytosol free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i and viability is large unknown. This study examines the early signaling effects of [10]-gingerol on human colorectal cancer cells. It was found that this compound caused a slow and sustained rise of [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. [10]-Gingerol also induced a [Ca2+]i rise when extracellular Ca2+ was removed, but the magnitude was reduced by 38%. In a Ca2+-free medium, the [10]-gingerol-induced [Ca2+]i rise was partially abolished by depleting stored Ca2+ with thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor. The elevation of [10]-gingerol-caused [Ca2+]i in a Ca2+-containing medium was not affected by modulation of protein kinase C activity. The [10]-gingerol-induced Ca2+ influx was insensitive to L-type Ca2+ channel blockers. At concentrations of 10-100 mM, [10]-gingerol killed cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that [10]-gingerol induces [Ca2+]i rise by causing Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca2+ influx from non-L-type Ca2+ channels in SW480 cancer cells.

  19. Conserved features of cancer cells define their sensitivity to HAMLET-induced death; c-Myc and glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, P; Aits, S; Puthia, M K; Urbano, A; Northen, T; Powers, S; Bowen, B; Chao, Y; Reindl, W; Lee, D Y; Sullivan, N L; Zhang, J; Trulsson, M; Yang, H; Watson, J D; Svanborg, C

    2011-12-01

    HAMLET is the first member of a new family of tumoricidal protein-lipid complexes that kill cancer cells broadly, while sparing healthy, differentiated cells. Many and diverse tumor cell types are sensitive to the lethal effect, suggesting that HAMLET identifies and activates conserved death pathways in cancer cells. Here, we investigated the molecular basis for the difference in sensitivity between cancer cells and healthy cells. Using a combination of small-hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibition, proteomic and metabolomic technology, we identified the c-Myc oncogene as one essential determinant of HAMLET sensitivity. Increased c-Myc expression levels promoted sensitivity to HAMLET and shRNA knockdown of c-Myc suppressed the lethal response, suggesting that oncogenic transformation with c-Myc creates a HAMLET-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, HAMLET sensitivity was modified by the glycolytic state of tumor cells. Glucose deprivation sensitized tumor cells to HAMLET-induced cell death and in the shRNA screen, hexokinase 1 (HK1), 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α modified HAMLET sensitivity. HK1 was shown to bind HAMLET in a protein array containing ∼8000 targets, and HK activity decreased within 15 min of HAMLET treatment, before morphological signs of tumor cell death. In parallel, HAMLET triggered rapid metabolic paralysis in carcinoma cells. Tumor cells were also shown to contain large amounts of oleic acid and its derivatives already after 15 min. The results identify HAMLET as a novel anti-cancer agent that kills tumor cells by exploiting unifying features of cancer cells such as oncogene addiction or the Warburg effect.

  20. Conserved features of cancer cells define their sensitivity of HAMLET-induced death; c-Myc and glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Petter; Puthia, Manoj Kumar; Aits, Sonja; Urbano, Alexander; Northen, Trent; Powers, Scott; Bowen, Ben; Chao, Yinxia; Reindl, Wolfgang; Lee, Do Yup; Sullivan, Nancy Liu; Zhang, Jianping; Trulsson, Maria; Yang, Henry; Watson, James; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    HAMLET is the first member of a new family of tumoricidal protein-lipid complexes that kill cancer cells broadly, while sparing healthy, differentiated cells. Many and diverse tumor cell types are sensitive to the lethal effect, suggesting that HAMLET identifies and activates conserved death pathways in cancer cells. Here we investigated the molecular basis for the difference in sensitivity between cancer cells and healthy cells. Using a combination of small hairpin RNA inhibition, proteomic and metabolomic technology we identified the c-Myc oncogene as one essential determinant of HAMLET sensitivity. Increased c-Myc expression levels promoted the sensitivity to HAMLET and shRNA knockdown of c-Myc suppressed the lethal response, suggesting that oncogenic transformation with c-Myc creates a HAMLET-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, the HAMLET sensitivity was modified by the glycolytic state of the tumor cells. Glucose deprivation sensitized tumor cells to HAMLET-induced cell death and in the shRNA screen Hexokinase 1, PFKFB1 and HIF1α modified HAMLET sensitivity. Hexokinase 1 was shown to bind HAMLET in a protein array containing approximately 8000 targets and Hexokinase activity decreased within 15 minutes of HAMLET treatment, prior to morphological signs of tumor cell death. In parallel, HAMLET triggered rapid metabolic paralysis in carcinoma cells. The glycolytic machinery was modified and glycolysis was shifted towards the pentose phosphate pathway. Tumor cells were also shown to contain large amounts of oleic acid and its derivatives already after 15 minutes. The results identify HAMLET as a novel anti-cancer agent that kills tumor cells by exploiting unifying features of cancer cells such as oncogene-addiction or the Warburg effect. PMID:21643007

  1. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load.

  2. Effect of [10]-Gingerol on [Ca2+]i and Cell Death in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Yi Chen; Yi-Wen Li; Soong-Yu Kuo

    2009-01-01

    The effect of [10]-gingerol on cytosol free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and viability is large unknown. This study examines the early signaling effects of [10]-gingerol on human colorectal cancer cells. It was found that this compound caused a slow and sustained rise of [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. [10]-Gingerol also induced a [Ca2+]i rise when extracellular Ca2+ was removed, but the magnitude was reduced by 38%. In a Ca2+-free medium, the [10]-gingerol-induced [Ca2+]i rise w...

  3. Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression in Paired Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumor Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jong Ho; Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Choi, Yoon-La; Feng, Yu; Kim, Tae-Eun; Choi, Heyjoo; Georgsen, Jeanette Baehr; Dolled-Filhart, Marisa; Emancipator, Kenneth; Meldgaard, Peter; Sun, Jong-Mu; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Zhou, Wei; Hager, Henrik; Kim, Jhingook

    2017-11-01

    Programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression may predict response to anti-programmed death 1 (anti-PD-1) or anti-PD-L1 treatment. There is limited information on changes in PD-L1 expression over time in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eligible patients with NSCLC who received surgery or underwent biopsy at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea, and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, between February 2004 and April 2012 were included. PD-L1 expression in paired tumor tissue samples from the same patients at different dates and lesions was measured using a laboratory-developed prototype immunohistochemistry assay (22C3 antibody). PD-L1 positivity was defined as tumor cell membrane positivity in ≥ 1% of tumor cells (proportion score). Concordance of PD-L1 expression was analyzed by treating proportion score as categoric or continuous variables. Ninety-one patients were included in the analysis. The median interval between the 2 tumor collection dates was 20 months, with 91% of paired samples collected > 3 months apart. The concordance rate for PD-L1 classification between paired samples was 67% (95% confidence interval, 57%-77%). When treating the immunohistochemistry proportional score as a continuous variable, a significant correlation of PD-L1 expression was observed between the paired samples (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.61; P < .001). There are good correlations of PD-L1 expression from paired NSCLC samples. For patients whose PD-L1 status is negative, it may be valuable to obtain additional tissue samples for retesting PD-L1 expression when anti-PD-1 immunotherapy is considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cause-specific death after surgical resection for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Anders Standal; Lund, May Brit; Valberg, Morten; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Solberg, Steinar; Kongerud, Johny

    2018-01-01

    Surgical resection is the recommended treatment for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. However, it is believed that causes other than lung cancer can lead to death following surgical resection. Investigating the risk factors for overall mortality and analysing the specific causes of death may indicate the degree of influence of other causes of death. We assessed individual risk factors affecting overall and cause-specific mortality in a Cox proportional hazards model in a cohort of patients with resected Stage I/II non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 756) from 2007 to 2015 in a tertiary university centre. The follow-up period ranged from 3 days to 9.3 years. Median survival time was 7.3 years (95% confidence interval 6.0-7.9). A few patients died of cardiovascular disease (n = 19) and were included in the group 'other cause'. In a competing risk model, we evaluated the risk factors for specific causes of death in patients dying of lung cancer and dying of non-lung cancer specific conditions. The overall survival was 94%, 62% and 50% at 1, 5 and 7 years, respectively. At the end of the follow-up period, the risk of having died of, respectively, lung cancer or other causes was 36% and 24%. The cumulative incidence of death of lung cancer increased continuously during the study. Risk factors predicting death of all causes and death of non-small-cell lung cancer were increasing age, severely reduced lung function, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status ≥2, preoperative examination without positron emission tomography/computed tomography, histological tumour diagnosis other than adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and increasing disease stage. In patients dying of other causes, age, gender, body mass index, smoking and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status ≥2 affected the mortality rate. The probability of having died of lung cancer continued to increase beyond 5 years after the operation

  5. MAPK inhibitors, particularly the JNK inhibitor, increase cell death effects in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells via increased superoxide anion and glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2017-11-24

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induce apoptosis in cancer cells by regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The present study investigated the effects of MAPK inhibitors on cell growth and death as well as changes in ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. H2O2 inhibited growth and induced death of Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. All MAPK inhibitors appeared to enhance growth inhibition in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells and increased the percentage of Annexin V-FITC-positive cells in these cancer cells. Among the MAPK inhibitors, a JNK inhibitor significantly augmented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ΔΨm) in H2O2-treated Calu-6 and A549 lung cancer cells. Intracellular ROS levels were significantly increased in the H2O2-treated cells at 1 and 24 h. Only the JNK inhibitor increased ROS levels in the H2O2-treated cells at 1 h and all MAPK inhibitors raised superoxide anion levels in these cells at 24 h. In addition, H2O2 induced GSH depletion in Calu-6 and A549 cells and the JNK inhibitor significantly enhanced GSH depletion in H2O2‑treated cells. Each of the MAPK inhibitors altered ROS and GSH levels differently in the Calu-6 and A549 control cells. In conclusion, H2O2 induced growth inhibition and death in lung cancer cells through oxidative stress and depletion of GSH. The enhanced effect of MAPK inhibitors, especially the JNK inhibitor, on cell death in H2O2-treated lung cancer cells was correlated with increased O2•- levels and GSH depletion.

  6. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Tae-Boo [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seok-Il [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jae-Youn [Laboratory of Modulation of Radiobiological Responses, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Gyu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Han, E-mail: yhlee87@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  7. Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Eun Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  8. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  9. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-Hyung, E-mail: dhcho@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  10. The CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib synergizes with irinotecan to promote colorectal cancer cell death under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Lanlan; Zhao, Shuai; Dicker, David T; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-06-18

    Hypoxia is an inherent impediment to cancer therapy. Palbociclib, a highly selective inhibitor for CDK4/6, has been tested in numerous clinical trials and has been approved by the FDA. We previously reported that CDK inhibitors can destabilize HIF1α regardless of the presence of hypoxia and can sensitize tumor cells to TRAIL through dual blockade of CDK1 and GSK-3β. To translate this knowledge into a cancer therapeutic strategy, we investigated the therapeutic effects and molecular mechanisms of CDK inhibition against colon cancer cells under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that palbociclib sensitizes colon cancer cells to hypoxia-induced apoptotic resistance via deregulation of HIF-1α accumulation. In addition to inhibition of cell proliferation, we observed that palbociclib promotes colon cancer cell death regardless of the presence of hypoxia at a comparatively high concentration via regulating ERK/GSK-3β signaling and GSK-3β expression. Furthermore, palbociclib synergized with irinotecan in a variety of colon cancer cell lines with various molecular subtypes via deregulating irinotecan-induced Rb phosphorylation and reducing HIF-1α accumulation under normoxia or hypoxia. Collectively, our findings provide a novel combination therapy strategy against hypoxic colon cancer cells that may be further translated in the clinic.

  11. miR-145 induces caspase-dependent and -independent cell death in urothelial cancer cell lines with targeting of an expression signature present in Ta bladder tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Lamy, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Downregulation of miR-145 in a variety of cancers suggests a possible tumor suppressor function for this microRNA. Here, we show that miR-145 expression is reduced in bladder cancer and urothelial carcinoma in situ, compared with normal urothelium, using transcription profiling and in situ...... by the pharmacological inhibitor zVAD-fmk and ectopic expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, indicating the activation of an alternative caspase-independent death pathway. Microarray analysis of transcript levels in T24 cells, before the onset of cell death, showed destabilization of mRNAs enriched for miR-145 7mer target...... data indicate that reduction in miR-145 expression may provide bladder cancer cells with a selective advantage by inhibition of cell death otherwise triggered in malignant cells....

  12. Synergistic enhancement of breast cancer cell death using ultrasound-microbubbles in combination with cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Sheliza; Karshafian, Raffi

    2017-03-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP), an anti-cancer agent, can effectively treat several cancerous tumourstumors such as testicular, bladder, and ovarian cancers. CDDP binds to specific DNA bases causing 1,2-intrastrand cross-links, single strand and double strand breaks inducing apoptosis. However, the effectiveness of CDDP is limited in tumourtumors such as breast cancer due to drug resistance. In this study, the application of ultrasound-microbubble (USMB) in improving the therapeutic effect of CDDP in breast cancer cell line is investigated. Human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells in suspension (2×106 cells/mL concentration and 0.6 mL volume) were treated with CDDP (3 µM, 30 µM and 300 µM) and USMB at 0.5 MHz pulse centered frequency, 60 s insonation time, 16 µs pulse duration, 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency, and 1.7% v/v (volume concentration) of Definity microbubble agent. Following USMB treatment, cells were plated in 96-well plates for 24 and 48-hour incubation, after which cell viability was measured using MTT assay (VMTT). Cell viability decreased significantly with the combined treatment of CDDP and USMB compared to CDDP alone (pcisplatin synergistically enhances chemotherapeutic effectiveness in breast cancer cells. However, this enhanced effectiveness, in breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), is dependent on incubation time and cisplatin (CDDP) concentration.

  13. Antitumor effects of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, against gastric cancer cells via death receptor 5 up-regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Hirai

    Full Text Available Up-regulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylase, deacetylates p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity, leading to cell survival. SIRT1 overexpression has been reported to predict poor survival in some malignancies, including gastric cancer. However, the antitumor effect of SIRT1 inhibition remains elusive in gastric cancer. Here, we investigated the antitumor mechanisms of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, in seven human gastric cancer cell lines (four cell lines with wild-type TP53, two with mutant-type TP53, and one with null TP53. Interestingly, tenovin-6 induced apoptosis in all cell lines, not only those with wild-type TP53, but also mutant-type and null versions, accompanied by up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5. In the KatoIII cell line (TP53-null, DR5 silencing markedly attenuated tenovin-6-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the pivotal mechanism behind its antitumor effects is based on activation of the death receptor signal pathway. Although endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by sirtuin inhibitors was reported to induce DR5 up-regulation in other cancer cell lines, we could not find marked activation of its related molecules, such as ATF6, PERK, and CHOP, in gastric cancer cells treated with tenovin-6. Tenovin-6 in combination with docetaxel or SN-38 exerted a slight to moderate synergistic cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, tenovin-6 has potent antitumor activity against human gastric cancer cells via DR5 up-regulation. Our results should be helpful for the future clinical development of sirtuin inhibitors.

  14. Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Schich, Zahra; Mölder, Anna; Tassidis, Helena; Härkönen, Pirkko; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2015-03-01

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An increase in reactive oxygen species by deregulation of ARNT enhances chemotherapeutic drug-induced cancer cell death.

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    Jiunn-Min Shieh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unique characteristics of tumor microenvironments can be used as targets of cancer therapy. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT is an important mediator of tumor progression. However, the functional role of ARNT in chemotherapeutic drug-treated cancer remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we found that knockdown of ARNT in cancer cells reduced the proliferation rate and the transformation ability of those cells. Moreover, cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis was enhanced in ARNT-deficient cells. Expression of ARNT also decreased in the presence of cisplatin through proteasomal degradation pathway. However, ARNT level was maintained in cisplatin-treated drug-resistant cells, which prevented cell from apoptosis. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species (ROS dramatically increased when ARNT was knocked down in cancer cells, enhancing cisplatin-induced apoptosis. ROS promoted cell death was inhibited in cells treated with the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggested that the anticancer activity of cisplatin is attributable to its induction of the production of ROS by ARNT degradation. Targeting ARNT could be a potential strategy to eliminate drug resistance in cancer cells.

  16. Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (mdivi-1) enhances death receptor-mediated apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingnan; Hansen, Karyn; Edwards, Robert; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based strategy is a promising targeted therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of cancers including ovarian cancer. However, the inherent or acquired resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL limits the potential application of TRAIL-mediated therapy. In this study, we identified that mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (mdivi-1) is able to enhance the sensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells to death receptor ligands including TRAIL, FAS ligands, and TNF-α. Importantly, the combination of TRAIL and mdivi-1 has no apparent cytotoxic effect on non-transformed human cells, indicating a significant therapeutic window. We identified that caspase-8 and not the modulation of TRAIL receptors is required for the combination effect of TRAIL and mdivi-1. We further demonstrated that the enhanced efficacy of combination of mdivi-1 and death ligands is not dependent on the originally reported target of mdivi-1, Drp1, and is also not dependent on the two important pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak. Thus, our study presents a novel strategy in enhancing the apoptotic effect of death receptor ligands and provides a new effective TRAIL-based combination approach for treating human ovarian cancer. PMID:25446129

  17. Mislocalization of death receptors correlates with cellular resistance to their cognate ligands in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Rosado, Leslie A.; Zhang, Yaqin; Di, Xu; Zhang, Baolin

    2012-01-01

    Multiple clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate the potential antitumor activity of human TNF variants, Fas ligand (FasL), TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its agonistic antibodies. These drug products act through the death receptors (DRs) TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), Fas/CD95, DR4 (TRAIL-R1) and/or DR5 (TRAIL-R2), respectively. Therefore, characterization of the level and localization of DR expression in cancer cells is important for DR-targeted therapy. In this study, we examined the subcellular distribution of the four DRs in a panel of 10 human breast cancer cell lines by western blots and flow cytometry and 50 human breast tumors by immunohistochemistry. Despite their total protein expressions, the DRs were found to be absent on the surface of some cell lines. Consistent with this result, all four DRs were found to be mostly expressed in the cytoplasm and/or the nucleus of primary breast tumors (n=50). We further determined the growth inhibition activity (GI50) of the death ligands, recombinant human TNFα, FasL and TRAIL, and found a correlation with the subcellular localization of the corresponding DRs. These results demonstrate an aberrant expression of the death receptors in breast cancer cells, and suggest that the lack of surface DRs appears to be predictive of tumor resistance to DR-targeted therapies. PMID:22909995

  18. Radiosensitive effect of curcumin on thyroid cancer cell death induced by radioiodine-131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseinimehr Seyed Jalal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural product widely consumed by humans. It has many biological properties. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitive effect of curcumin on thyroid cancer cells against cellular toxicity induced by 131-I. Human thyroid cancer and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2 were treated with 131-I and/or curcumin at different concentrations (5, 10 and 25 μg/ml for 48 h. The cell proliferation was measured by determination of the surviving cells by using MTT assay. Our results showed that curcumin increased the killing effect of 131-I on thyroid cancer cells, while it exerted no toxicity on HFFF2 cells. This result shows a promising effect of curcumin on the enhancement of therapeutic effects of 131-I in patients

  19. A Review on Novel Breast Cancer Therapies: Photodynamic Therapy and Plant Derived Agent Induced Cell Death Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This review article presents an extensive examination of risk factors for breast cancer, treatment strategies with special attention to photodynamic therapy and natural product based treatments. Breast cancer remains the most commonly occurring cancer in women worldwide and the detection, treatment, and prevention are prominent concerns in public health. Background information on current developments in treatment helps to update the approach towards risk assessment. Breast cancer risk is linked to many factors such as hereditary, reproductive and lifestyle factors. Minimally invasive Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used in the management of various cancers; it uses a light sensitive drug (a photosensitizer, PS) and a light of visible wavelength, to destroy targeted cancer cells. State of the art analyses has been carried out to investigate advancement in the search for the cure and control of cancer progression using natural products. Traditional medicinal plants have been used as lead compounds for drug discovery in modern medicine. Both PDT and plant derived drugs induce cell death via different mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and even the regulation of various cell signalling pathways.

  20. Ethanolic extract of Descurainia sophia seeds sensitizes A549 human lung cancer cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity by upregulating death receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Shik; Lim, Chae Jun; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kim, No Soo

    2016-04-02

    Our previous genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5) are markedly upregulated by the ethanolic extract of D. sohia seeds (EEDS) in A549 TRAIL-refractory cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the EEDS-mediated upregulation of TRAIL death receptors was associated with increased TRAIL-mediated toxicity in A549 cells in vitro. Cell proliferation and viability were determined by an automatic cell counter. Gene silencing was performed by introducing small interfering RNA into cells. Expression changes of cellular proteins were determined by western blot analysis. Apoptotic cell death was monitored by western blot analysis. Analysis of variance followed by the post-hoc Dunnett's test was used to compare the data. EEDS treatment increased both mRNA and protein levels of DR4 and DR5 in the TRAIL refractory A549 cells. Co-treatment of A549 cells with sub-lethal dose of EEDS and recombinant TRAIL increased the apoptotic cell death. Upregulation of DR5 by EEDS was mediated by an endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced transcription factor, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and knockdown of CHOP expression inhibited EEDS-induced DR5 upregulation and abolished the EEDS-associated increase in TRAIL toxicity in A549 cells. EEDS can sensitize A549 cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity by upregulation of TRAIL death receptors. Our findings suggested that EEDS is a good initial herbal source for the development of an anticancer supplement for anticancer therapeutics associated with TRAIL.

  1. Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitors and Forced Oxidative Phosphorylation Synergize in Inducing Cancer Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Palorini; Tiziana Simonetto; Claudia Cirulli; Ferdinando Chiaradonna

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells generally rely mostly on glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for ATP production. In fact, they are particularly sensitive to glycolysis inhibition and glucose depletion. On the other hand mitochondrial dysfunctions, involved in the onset of the Warburg effect, are sometimes also associated with the resistance to apoptosis that characterizes cancer cells. Therefore, combined treatments targeting both glycolysis and mitochondria function, exploiting peculiar t...

  2. Diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes activate cell death in human cancer cell lines but not normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina Sansone

    Full Text Available Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD, 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1 and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP. The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms.

  3. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Geisen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1. Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  6. Fulvic acid promotes extracellular anti-cancer mediators from RAW 264.7 cells, causing to cancer cell death in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Kang, Chang-Hee; Lee, Seungheon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Jeong, Yong Kee; Kim, Gi-Young

    2016-07-01

    Fulvic acid (FA) is known to promote electrochemical balance as a donor or a receptor possessing many biomedical functions. Nevertheless, the effect of FA on the anti-cancer activity has not been elucidated. In the current study, we first isolated FA from humus and investigated whether FA regulates immune-stimulating functions, such as production of nitric oxide (NO), in RAW 264.7 cells. Our data showed that FA slightly enhances cell viability in a dose-dependent manner and secretion of NO from RAW 264.7 cells. It upregulated the protein and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthesis (iNOS). In addition, FA enhanced the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in RAW 264.7 cells; the NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) effectively attenuated the expression of FA-stimulated iNOS, suggesting that FA stimulates NF-κB to promote iNOS and NO production. Finally, FA-stimulated culture media (FA-CM) from RAW 264.7 cells were collected and MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cells were cultured in this media. The FA-CM augmented MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cell apoptosis; however, an NO inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (NMMA) slightly inhibited the FA-CM-mediated MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by low levels of NO. In the present study, we found that FA induces the generation of NO and iNOS in RAW 264.7 cells by inducing NF-κB activation; however, NO did not significantly stimulate MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cell apoptosis in the current study. In addition, FA-CM enhanced cell death in various human cancer cells such as Hep3B, LNCaP, and HL60. Taken together, FA most likely stimulates immune-modulating molecules such as NO and induces cancer cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. TSA-induced cell death in prostate cancer cell lines is caspase-2 dependent and involves the PIDDosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghiyev, Agshin F; Guseva, Natalya V; Glover, Rebecca A; Rokhlin, Oskar W; Cohen, Michael B

    2006-09-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) has previously been found to induce caspase activity in the human prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and LNCaP. TSA treatment resulted in the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria in DU145, and activation of caspase-9 in both cell lines. We concluded that TSA mediated its effect via the mitochondrial pathway. The aim of the current study was to determine how TSA initiated the caspase cascade. The results revealed that caspase-2 plays an important role in TSA-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase-2 by siRNA or expression of caspase-2dn substantially decreased caspase activity after TSA treatment in both cell lines, siRNA caspase-2 also inhibited TSA-induced cell death. Caspase-2 acts upstream of caspase-8 and -9 and mediates mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments show that caspase-2 formed protein complexes with RADD/RAIDD and PIDD. Together, these data indicate that caspase-2 initiates caspase cascade after TSA treatment and involves the formation of the PIDDosome.

  8. Synthetic tambjamine analogues induce mitochondrial swelling and lysosomal dysfunction leading to autophagy blockade and necrotic cell death in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Ananda M; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Quesada, Roberto; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    Current pharmacological treatments for lung cancer show very poor clinical outcomes, therefore, the development of novel anticancer agents with innovative mechanisms of action is urgently needed. Cancer cells have a reversed pH gradient compared to normal cells, which favours cancer progression by promoting proliferation, metabolic adaptation and evasion of apoptosis. In this regard, the use of ionophores to modulate intracellular pH appears as a promising new therapeutic strategy. Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence supporting ionophores as novel antitumour drugs. Despite this, little is known about the implications of pH deregulation and homeostasis imbalance triggered by ionophores at the cellular level. In this work, we deeply analyse for the first time the anticancer effects of tambjamine analogues, a group of highly effective anion selective ionophores, at the cellular and molecular levels. First, their effects on cell viability were determined in several lung cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer stem cells, demonstrating their potent cytotoxic effects. Then, we have characterized the induced lysosomal deacidification, as well as, the massive cytoplasmic vacuolization observed after treatment with these compounds, which is consistent with mitochondrial swelling. Finally, the activation of several proteins involved in stress response, autophagy and apoptosis was also detected, although they were not significantly responsible for the cell death induced. Altogether, these evidences suggest that tambjamine analogues provoke an imbalance in cellular ion homeostasis that triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and lysosomal deacidification leading to a potent cytotoxic effect through necrosis in lung cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Tran, William T; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231) xenografts treated with chemotherapy. Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor-bearing mice (n = 20) before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC). The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r(2) = 0.40). At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively) 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r(2) = 0.74). The Gaussian form factor model-based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz). The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC) increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantification of Ultrasonic Scattering Properties of In Vivo Tumor Cell Death in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Tadayyon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Quantitative ultrasound parameters based on form factor models were investigated as potential biomarkers of cell death in breast tumor (MDA-231 xenografts treated with chemotherapy. METHODS: Ultrasound backscatter radiofrequency data were acquired from MDA-231 breast cancer tumor–bearing mice (n = 20 before and after the administration of chemotherapy drugs at two ultrasound frequencies: 7 MHz and 20 MHz. Radiofrequency spectral analysis involved estimating the backscatter coefficient from regions of interest in the center of the tumor, to which form factor models were fitted, resulting in estimates of average scatterer diameter and average acoustic concentration (AAC. RESULTS: The ∆AAC parameter extracted from the spherical Gaussian model was found to be the most effective cell death biomarker (at the lower frequency range, r2 = 0.40. At both frequencies, AAC in the treated tumors increased significantly (P = .026 and .035 at low and high frequencies, respectively 24 hours after treatment compared with control tumors. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis of the low-frequency data revealed that a multiparameter quantitative ultrasound model was strongly correlated to cell death determined histologically posttreatment (r2 = 0.74. CONCLUSION: The Gaussian form factor model–based scattering parameters can potentially be used to track the extent of cell death at clinically relevant frequencies (7 MHz. The 20-MHz results agreed with previous findings in which parameters related to the backscatter intensity (i.e., AAC increased with cell death. The findings suggested that, in addition to the backscatter coefficient parameter ∆AAC, biological features including tumor heterogeneity and initial tumor volume were important factors in the prediction of cell death response.

  11. Severe, but not mild heat-shock treatment induces immunogenic cell death in cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adkins, I.; Sadílková, L.; Hradilová, N.; Tomala, Jakub; Kovář, Marek; Spíšek, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku e1311433. ISSN 2162-4011 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Antitumor immunity * calreticulin * cancer immunotherapy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  12. Induction of cancer cell death by proton beam in tumor hypoxic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Hur, T. R.; Lee, K. B.; Jeong, M. H.; Park, J. W. [Kyungbook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Proton beam induced apoptosis significantly in Lewis lung carcinoma cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but slightly in leukemia Molt-4 cells. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for death rate relative to gamma ray were ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 in LLC or HepG2 but 0.7 in Molt-4 cells at 72h after irradiation. The typical apoptosis was observed by nuclear DNA staining with DAPI. By FACS analysis after stained with PI, sub-G1 cell fraction was significantly increased but G2/M phase was not altered by proton beam irradiation measured at 24 h after irradiation. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced cleavage of PARP-1 and procaspases (-3 and -9) and increased the level of p53 and p21. decreased pro-lamin B. Acitivity of caspases was significantly increased after proton beam irradiation. Furthermore, ROS were significantly increased and N-acetyl cystein (NAC) pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced in proton beam-irradiated cells. In conclusion, single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP induced apoptosis of solid tumor cells via increased ROS, active caspase -3,-9 and p53, p2.

  13. Oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca2+-CaMKII-ROS signaling loop to induce cell death in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Huang, Lihong; Yue, Jianbo

    2017-06-01

    High intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress that results in numerous pathologies, including cell death. Transient potential receptor melastatin-2 (TRPM2), a Ca 2+ -permeable cation channel, is mainly activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) in response to oxidative stress. Here we studied the role and mechanisms of TRPM2-mediated Ca 2+ influx on oxidative stress-induced cell death in cancer cells. We found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-Ca 2+ -CaMKII cascade to inhibit early autophagy induction, which ultimately led to cell death in TRPM2 expressing cancer cells. On the other hand, TRPM2 knockdown switched cells from cell death to autophagy for survival in response to oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that oxidative stress activated the TRPM2-CaMKII cascade to further induce intracellular ROS production, which led to mitochondria fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data demonstrated that oxidative stress activates the TRPM2-Ca 2+ -CaMKII-ROS signal loop to inhibit autophagy and induce cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of programmed death-ligand 1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells in pediatric cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzner, Robbie G; Simon, Jason S; Grosso, Joseph F; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce R; Santi, Mariarita; Merchant, Melinda S; Geoerger, Birgit; Hezam, Imene; Marty, Virginie; Vielh, Phillippe; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H; Mackall, Crystal L; Maris, John M

    2017-10-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling in the tumor microenvironment dampens immune responses to cancer, and blocking this axis induces antitumor effects in several malignancies. Clinical studies of PD-1 blockade are only now being initiated in pediatric patients, and little is known regarding programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in common childhood cancers. The authors characterized PD-L1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells (TAICs) (lymphocytes and macrophages) in common pediatric cancers. Whole slide sections and tissue microarrays were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 expression and for the presence of TAICs. TAICs were also screened for PD-L1 expression. Thirty-nine of 451 evaluable tumors (9%) expressed PD-L1 in at least 1% of tumor cells. The highest frequency histotypes comprised Burkitt lymphoma (80%; 8 of 10 tumors), glioblastoma multiforme (36%; 5 of 14 tumors), and neuroblastoma (14%; 17 of 118 tumors). PD-L1 staining was associated with inferior survival among patients with neuroblastoma (P = .004). Seventy-four percent of tumors contained lymphocytes and/or macrophages. Macrophages were significantly more likely to be identified in PD-L1-positive versus PD-L1-negative tumors (P cancers exhibit PD-L1 expression, whereas a much larger fraction demonstrates infiltration with tumor-associated lymphocytes. PD-L1 expression may be a biomarker for poor outcome in neuroblastoma. Further preclinical and clinical investigation will define the predictive nature of PD-L1 expression in childhood cancers both at diagnosis and after exposure to chemoradiotherapy. Cancer 2017;123:3807-3815. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. Pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death in cancer patients treated with programmed cell death-1 inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Cui,1–3,* Jun-Xun Ma,1,* Fei-Xue Wang,1,* Jing Zhang,1 Hai-Tao Tao,1 Yi Hu1 1First Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Graduate Administration, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 3Health Bureau of the 75709 Army, Central Theater of the Chinese PLA, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: We conducted a meta-analysis of published clinical trials to determine the relationship between the risks of pneumonitis and pneumonitis-related death and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 inhibitor treatment in patients with cancer.Materials and methods: We examined clinical trials from the Medline and Google Scholar databases. Data from original studies and review articles were also cross-referenced and evaluated. Randomized Phase II and Phase III trials of pembrolizumab and nivolumab treatment in patients with cancer were eligible for the analysis. Information about the participants, all-grade and high-grade pneumonitis, and pneumonitis-related death was extracted from each study and analyzed.Results: After the exclusion of ineligible studies, 12 clinical trials were included in the analysis. The odds ratio (OR for all-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.51–8.37; P<0.00001, and the OR for high-grade pneumonitis after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 3.83 (95% CI: 1.54–9.48; P=0.004. The OR for pneumonitis-related death after PD-1 inhibitor treatment was 2.47 (95% CI: 0.41–14.81; P=0.32. Moreover, the OR for all-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 3.54 (95% CI: 1.52–8.23; P=0.003, and that for high-grade pneumonitis after nivolumab/ipilimumab combination therapy versus nivolumab monotherapy was 2.35 (95% CI: 0.45–12.13; P=0.31. Treated cancer appeared to have no effect on the risk of pneumonitis.Conclusion: Our data showed that PD-1 inhibitors were associated with increased risks of all

  16. Cancer: brain-regulated biphasic stress response induces cell growth or cell death to adapt to psychological stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charles; Bhatia, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    According to Indian Vedic philosophy, a human being contains 3 major bodies: (1) the matter body--brain, organs, and senses; (2) the mental body--mind, individual consciousness, intellect, and ego; and (3) the soul or causal body--universal consciousness. The third, which is located in the heart according to all spiritual traditions and recent scientific literature, can be seen as the information body that contains all memories. The mental body, which can interface with the matter and information bodies, can be seen as a field of immaterial energy that can carry, regulate, and strengthen all information (eg, thoughts or emotions) both positively and negatively. This body of information may store ancestral and/or autobiographical memories: unconscious memories from inner traumas--inner information (Ii) or samskaras in Vedic philosophy--and conscious memories from outer traumas--outer information (Io). These conscious and unconscious memories can be seen as potential psychological stressors. Resonance between Ii and Io may induce active conflicts if resistance occurs in the mental body; this conflict may cause specific metabolic activity in the brain and a stress response in the physical body, which permits adjustment to psychological stressors. The brainregulated stress response may be biphasic: cell death or growth induced by adrenergic molecular pathways during the conflict's unresolved phase and reversion to cell growth or death induced by cholinergic molecular pathways during the conflict's resolved phase. Case studies and data mining from PubMed suggest that this concept complies with the principles of holistic medicine and the scientific literature supporting its benefits. We suggest that the evolution of cancer can be seen as a biphasic stress response regulated by the brain to adapt to psychological stressors, which produce imbalance among the physical, mental, and information bodies.

  17. Inhibition of BMP and of TGFβ receptors downregulates expression of XIAP and TAK1 leading to lung cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augeri, Dave J; Langenfeld, Elaine; Castle, Monica; Gilleran, John A; Langenfeld, John

    2016-04-06

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are embryonic proteins that are part of the transforming growth factor (TGFβ) superfamily, which are aberrantly expressed in many carcinomas. Inhibition of BMP receptors with small molecule inhibitors decreases growth and induces death of lung cancer cells, which involves the downregulation of Id1 and Id3 by a Smad dependent mechanism. Developmentally, BMP and TGFβ signaling utilizes Smad-1/5 independent mechanisms to stabilize the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and activate TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which are known to be potent inhibitors of apoptosis. The role of BMP signaling in regulating XIAP and TAK1 in cancer cells is poorly understood. Furthermore, the interaction between the BMP and TGFβ signaling cascades in regulating the activation of TAK1 in cancer cells has not been elucidated. Feedback regulation between the BMP and TGFβ signaling pathways and their regulation of XIAP, TAK1, and Id1 were examined in lung cancer cells utilizing siRNA and inhibitors targeting BMP type I receptors, inhibitors of BMP and TGFβ type I receptors, and an inhibitor of BMP and TGFβ type I and type II receptors. We show that upon inhibition of BMP signaling in lung cancer cells, the TGFβ signaling cascade is activated. Both the BMP and TGFβ pathways activate TAK1, which then increases the expression of Id1. Inhibition of TGFβ signaling increased Id1 expression except when BMP signaling is suppressed, which then causes a dose-related decrease in the expression of Id1. Inhibition of both BMP and TGFβ signaling enhances the downregulation of TAK1. Our data also suggests that the blockade of the BMP type II receptor enhances the downregulation XIAP, which is important in decreasing the activity of TAK1. Knockdown studies demonstrate that both XIAP and TAK1 regulate the survival of lung cancer cells. This paper highlights that targeting the BMP and TGFβ type I and type II receptors causes a

  18. STI571 reduces TRAIL-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells: c-Abl activation by the death receptor leads to stress kinase-dependent cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Duen-Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to achieve better cancer therapies, we elucidated the combination cancer therapy of STI571 (an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and clinically used for chronic myelogenous leukemia and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, a developing antitumor agent in leukemia, colon, and prostate cancer cells. Methods Colon cancer (HCT116, SW480, prostate cancer (PC3, LNCaP and leukemia (K562 cells were treated with STI571 and TRAIL. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay and sub-G1 appearance. Protein expression and kinase phosphorylation were determined by Western blotting. c-Abl and p73 activities were inhibited by target-specific small interfering (siRNA. In vitro kinase assay of c-Abl was conducted using CRK as a substrate. Results We found that STI571 exerts opposite effects on the antitumor activity of TRAIL. It enhanced cytotoxicity in TRAIL-treated K562 leukemia cells and reduced TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 and SW480 colon cancer cells, while having no effect on PC3 and LNCaP cells. In colon and prostate cancer cells, TRAIL caused c-Abl cleavage to the active form via a caspase pathway. Interestingly, JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors effectively blocked TRAIL-induced toxicity in the colon, but not in prostate cancer cells. Next, we found that STI571 could attenuate TRAIL-induced c-Abl, JNK and p38 activation in HCT116 cells. In addition, siRNA targeting knockdown of c-Abl and p73 also reduced TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity, rendering HCT116 cells less responsive to stress kinase activation, and masking the cytoprotective effect of STI571. Conclusions All together we demonstrate a novel mediator role of p73 in activating the stress kinases p38 and JNK in the classical apoptotic pathway of TRAIL. TRAIL via caspase-dependent action can sequentially activate c-Abl, p73, and stress kinases, which contribute to apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Through the inhibition of c-Abl-mediated apoptotic p73 signaling, STI571 reduces

  19. A nontoxic concentration of cisplatin induces autophagy in cervical cancer: selective cancer cell death with autophagy inhibition as an adjuvant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisching, Gina; Loos, Benjamin; Botha, Matthys; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-03-01

    Increasing resistance to cisplatin as well as the severity of the adverse effects limit the use of this drug, particularly at high doses. Evidence has implicated the importance of autophagy in cancer resistance as well as the fact that various chemotherapy agents induce autophagy in cancer cells. We therefore aimed to first assess the role of autophagy in cisplatin treatment and second to assess whether a nontoxic concentration of cisplatin, together with autophagy inhibition, is able to maintain its cancer-specific cytotoxic action. Three human cervical cell lines were used: a noncancerous ectocervical epithelial cell line (Ect1/E6E7) and 2 cancerous cervical cell lines (HeLa and CaSki). Autophagy was monitored through the presence of the classical protein markers LC-3 II and p62 under basal and treatment conditions, and inhibited using bafilomycin and autophagy protein 5 (ATG5) siRNA under treatment conditions. Cell death was analyzed through examination of the apoptotic markers PARP and caspase-3 through Western blotting, as well as the Caspase-Glo assay to confirm caspase-3/7 activity. Cervical biopsies were analyzed for the presence of LC-3 using Western blotting and immunofluorescence to determine if a correlation between autophagic levels and the progression of the disease exists. Cervical cancer cells exhibit increased basal autophagic levels in comparison to the noncancerous counterparts. Cisplatin treatment enhanced autophagic activity in all 3 cell lines. Inhibition of this autophagic response together with cisplatin treatment leads to significant increases in cancer cell death. Expression profiles of LC-3 in normal, premalignant (low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion), and cancerous cervical tissue revealed that autophagy is significantly up-regulated in HSILs and carcinoma cervical tissue, which emphasized the role of autophagy in the progression of the disease. The inhibition of autophagy improves the cytotoxicity of a nontoxic

  20. TRAIL-induced apoptosis and expression of death receptor TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 in bladder cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenon P Czuba

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L is a member of TNF superfamily able to induce programmed death in cancer cells with no toxicity against normal tissues. TRAIL mediate apoptosis follows binding to the two death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4 and/or TRAIL-R2 (DR5. In this study we investigated the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of TRAIL on bladder cancer cells and the expression of death receptor TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 on the surface of these cancer cells. Three human bladder transitional cancer cell (TCC lines - SW780, 647V and T24 were tested for TRAIL sensitivity. The bladder cancer cells were incubated with human soluble recombinant TRAIL. Cytotoxicity was measured by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide and LDH (lactate dyhydrogenase assays. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide and by fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33342/annexin V-FITC/Ethidium Homodimer. The cell surface expression of TRAIL death receptors on bladder cancer were determined using flow cytometry with phycoerythrin-conjugated monoclonal anti-human TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. Our investigations confirmed that SW780 cells were sensitive to TRAIL, and two other bladder cancer cell lines, 647V and T24, were resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis. We therefore examined the expression of TRAIL death receptors on bladder cancer cell surfaces. We showed decreased expression of TRAIL-R2 receptor in TRAIL-resistant bladder cancer cells and increased expression of this death receptor in TRAIL-sensitive SW780 cells. The expression of TRAILR1 receptor was similar in all bladder cancer cell lines. TRAIL is one of the promising candidates for cancer therapeutics. However, some cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. It is therefore important to overcome this resistance for the clinical use of TRAIL in cancer therapy. TRAIL death receptors are attractive therapeutic targets in

  1. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  2. Constitutively active ErbB2 regulates cisplatin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells via pro- and antiapoptotic mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurðsson, Haraldur H; Olesen, Christina Wilkens; Dybboe, Rie

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Despite the frequent expression of N-terminally truncated ErbB2 (ΔNErbB2/p95HER2) in breast cancer and its association with Herceptin resistance and poor prognosis, it remains poorly understood how ΔNErbB2 affects chemotherapy-induced cell death. Previously it was shown that ΔNErbB2...

  3. Programmed death ligand-1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velcheti, Vamsidhar; Schalper, Kurt A; Carvajal, Daniel E; Anagnostou, Valsamo K; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Sznol, Mario; Herbst, Roy S; Gettinger, Scott N; Chen, Lieping; Rimm, David L

    2014-01-01

    ...) with its receptor, PD-1, resulted in promising activity in early phase clinical trials. In this study, we used various antibodies and in situ mRNA hybridization to measure PD-L1 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC...

  4. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization is an Early Event in Sigma-2 Receptor Ligand Mediated Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornick John R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Results Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282 localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco. Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Conclusions Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a

  5. Targeted inhibition of heat shock protein 90 disrupts multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, thus inducing cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death in human urinary bladder cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkoulis Panagiotis K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geldanamycin (GA can be considered a relatively new component with a promising mode of action against human malignancies. It specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone. Methods In this study, we have investigated the effects of geldanamycin on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent oncogenic signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cells. In order to assess the biological outcome of Hsp90 inhibition on RT4 (grade I and T24 (grade III human urinary bladder cancer cell lines, we applied MTT assay, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative (sq RT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, immunofluorescence and scratch-wound assay. Results We have herein demonstrated that, upon geldanamycin treatment, bladder cancer cells are prominently arrested in the G1 phase of cell cycle and eventually undergo programmed cell death via combined activation of apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, geldanamycin administration proved to induce prominent downregulation of several Hsp90 protein clients and downstream effectors, such as membrane receptors (IGF-IR and c-Met, protein kinases (Akt, IKKα, IKKβ and Erk1/2 and transcription factors (FOXOs and NF-κΒ, therefore resulting in the impairment of proliferative -oncogenic- signaling and reduction of cell motility. Conclusions In toto, we have evinced the dose-dependent and cell line-specific actions of geldanamycin on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of critical Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling -oncogenic- integrity.

  6. Targeted inhibition of heat shock protein 90 disrupts multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, thus inducing cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death in human urinary bladder cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Geldanamycin (GA) can be considered a relatively new component with a promising mode of action against human malignancies. It specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone. Methods In this study, we have investigated the effects of geldanamycin on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent oncogenic signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cells. In order to assess the biological outcome of Hsp90 inhibition on RT4 (grade I) and T24 (grade III) human urinary bladder cancer cell lines, we applied MTT assay, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative (sq) RT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), immunofluorescence and scratch-wound assay. Results We have herein demonstrated that, upon geldanamycin treatment, bladder cancer cells are prominently arrested in the G1 phase of cell cycle and eventually undergo programmed cell death via combined activation of apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, geldanamycin administration proved to induce prominent downregulation of several Hsp90 protein clients and downstream effectors, such as membrane receptors (IGF-IR and c-Met), protein kinases (Akt, IKKα, IKKβ and Erk1/2) and transcription factors (FOXOs and NF-κΒ), therefore resulting in the impairment of proliferative -oncogenic- signaling and reduction of cell motility. Conclusions In toto, we have evinced the dose-dependent and cell line-specific actions of geldanamycin on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of critical Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling -oncogenic- integrity. PMID:23394616

  7. Carnitine sensitizes TRAIL-resistant cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death through the up-regulation of Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Joo-Oh; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, So Jung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Lee, Seung Jin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Inki; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-11-09

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family with apoptosis-inducing activity. Given that TRAIL selectively induces cell death in various tumors but has little or no toxicity to normal cells, TRAIL agonists have been considered as promising anti-cancer therapeutic agents. However, the resistance of many primary tumors and cancer cells to TRAIL poses a challenge. In our present study, we found that carnitine, a metabolite that transfers long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for beta-oxidation and modulates protein kinase C activity, sensitizes TRAIL-resistant cancer cells to TRAIL. Combination of carnitine and TRAIL was found to synergistically induce apoptotic cell death through caspase activation, which was blocked by a pan caspase inhibitor, but not by an inhibitor of autophagy or an inhibitor of necrosis. The combination of carnitine and TRAIL reversed the resistance to TRAIL in lung cancer cells, colon carcinoma cells, and breast carcinoma cells. We further demonstrate that carnitine, either alone or in combination with TRAIL, enhances the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein, Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax). The down-regulation of Bax expression by small interfering RNA reduced caspase activation when cells were treated with TRAIL, and experiments with cells from Bax knockout mice confirmed this result. Taken together, our current results suggest that carnitine can reverse the resistance of cancer cells to TRAIL by up-regulating Bax expression. Thus, a combined delivery of carnitine and TRAIL may represent a new therapeutic strategy to treat TRAIL-resistant cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel strategies for targeting leukemia stem cells: sounding the death knell for blood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Gonzalez, Antonieta; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Pakravan, Katayoon; Guzman, Monica L; Babashah, Sadegh

    2017-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), are characterized by high self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacities. CSCs are thought to play indispensable roles in the initiation, progression and metastasis of many types of cancer. Leukemias are thought to be initiated and maintained by a specific sub-type of CSC, the leukemia stem cell (LSC). An important feature of LSCs is their resistance to standard therapy, which may lead to relapse. Increasing efforts are aimed at developing novel therapeutic strategies that selectively target LSCs, while sparing their normal counterparts and, thus, minimizing adverse treatment-associated side-effects. These LSC targeting therapies aim to eradicate LSCs through affecting mechanisms that control their survival, self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation and cell cycle progression. Some LSC targeting therapies have already been proven successful in pre-clinical studies and they are now being tested in clinical studies, mainly in combination with conventional treatment regimens. A growing body of evidence indicates that the selective targeting of LSCs represents a promising approach to improve disease outcome. Beyond doubt, the CSC hypothesis has added a new dimension to the area of anticancer research, thereby paving the way for shaping a new trend in cancer therapy.

  9. Non-thermal plasma with 2-deoxy-D-glucose synergistically induces cell death by targeting glycolysis in blood cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Neha; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Tae Gyu; Baik, Ku Youn; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the selective and efficient anti-cancer effects of plasma (at a low dose) when cell metabolic modifiers are also included. 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, was used with effective doses of non-thermal plasma, synergistically attenuating cell metabolic viability and inducing caspase-dependent and independent cell death. The combination treatment decreased the intracellular ATP and lactate production in various types of blood cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that 2-DG enhances the efficacy and selectivity of plasma and induces the synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth by targeting glycolysis and apoptosis. Specifically, this treatment strategy demonstrated an enhanced growth inhibitory effect of plasma in the presence of a metabolic modifier that was selective against cancer cells, not non-malignant cells. This is the first study to report the advantage of combining plasma with 2-DG to eradicate blood cancer cells. Finally, we conclude that 2-DG with non-thermal plasma may be used as a combination treatment against blood cancer cells.

  10. Green tea polyphenols induce cell death in breast cancer MCF-7 cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Min; Ou, Shi-Yi; Huang, Hui-Hua

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) in treatment or prevention of breast cancer, the cytotoxic effects of GTPs on five human cell lines (MCF-7, A549, Hela, PC3, and HepG2 cells) were determined and the antitumor mechanisms of GTPs in MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The results showed that GTPs exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against the detected cancer cell lines, particularly the MCF-7 cells. Studies on the mechanisms revealed that the main modes of cell death induced by GTPs were cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed that GTPs mediated cell cycle arrest at both G1/M and G2/M transitions. GTP dose dependently led to apoptosis of MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathways, as evidenced by induction of chromatin condensation, reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), improvement in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of DNA fragmentation, and activations of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the present paper.

  11. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is an important functional target of the microRNA miR-21 in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa; Christoffersen, Nanna R; Jacobsen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cancer-related processes. The miR-21 microRNA is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers and has been causally linked to cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. Inhibition of mir-21 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells causes reduced cell gro...... and demonstrated that PDCD4 is a functionally important target for miR-21 in breast cancer cells.......MicroRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cancer-related processes. The miR-21 microRNA is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers and has been causally linked to cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. Inhibition of mir-21 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells causes reduced cell...... growth. Using array expression analysis of MCF-7 cells depleted of miR-21, we have identified mRNA targets of mir-21 and have shown a link between miR-21 and the p53 tumor suppressor protein. We furthermore found that the tumor suppressor protein Programmed Cell Death 4 (PDCD4) is regulated by miR-21...

  12. Variation in causes of death in patients with non-small cell lung cancer according to stage and time since diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, M. L. G.; van Erning, F. N.; De Ruysscher, D. K.; Coebergh, J. W. W.; Groen, H. J. M.

    Background: Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years of diagnosis, and considerable excess mortality remains even after 5 years. We investigated the death rate and the distribution of causes of death for NSCLC patients by age and stage at diagnosis during

  13. CERT depletion predicts chemotherapy benefit and mediates cytotoxic and polyploid‐specific cancer cell death through autophagy induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alvin J. X.; Roylance, Rebecca; Sander, Jil

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) has been implicated in multidrug resistance and the silencing of the ceramide transporter, CERT, promotes sensitization to diverse cytotoxics. An improved understanding of mechanisms governing multidrug sensitization might provide insight into pathways contributing...... and predictor of outcome in adjuvant chemotherapy‐treated patients with primary breast cancer. These data suggest that the induction of LAMP2‐dependent autophagic flux through CERT targeting may provide a rational approach to enhance multidrug sensitization and potentiate the death of polyploid cells following...

  14. Early apoptosis and cell death induced by ATX-S10Na (II)-mediated photodynamic therapy are Bax- and p53-dependent in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunaga, Makoto; Tsubota, Akihito; Nariai, Kohichi; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Sumi, Makoto; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Fujise, Kiyotaka

    2007-02-07

    To investigate the roles of Bax and p53 proteins in photosensitivity of human colon cancer cells by using lysosome-localizing photosensitizer, ATX-S10Na (II). HCT116 human colon cancer cells and Bax-null or p53-null isogenic derivatives were irradiated with a diode laser. Early apoptosis and cell death in response to photodynamic therapy were determined by MTT assays, annexin V assays, transmission electron microscopy assays, caspase assays and western blotting. Induction of early apoptosis and cell death was Bax- and p53-dependent. Bax and p53 were required for caspase-dependent apoptosis. The levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L), were decreased in Bax- and p53-independent manner. Our results indicate that early apoptosis and cell death of human colon cancer cells induced by photodynamic therapy with lysosome-localizing photosensitizer ATX-S10Na (II) are mediated by p53-Bax network and low levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) proteins. Our results might help in formulating new therapeutic approaches in photodynamic therapy.

  15. Programmed cell death: Superman meets Dr Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Pascal; Silke, John

    2003-12-01

    This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell death (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell death, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  16. A Cyclin D2-derived peptide acts on specific cell cycle phases by activating ERK1/2 to cause the death of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Lilian C; Araujo, Christiane B; Iwai, Leo K; Ferro, Emer S; Forti, Fabio L

    2017-01-16

    Protein degradation by the proteasome generates functional intracellular peptides. Pep5, a peptide derived from Cyclin D2, induces cell death in tumor cell lines and reduces the volume of rat C6 glioblastoma tumors in vivo. Here, we chose the human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to evaluate the mechanism of cell death induced by pep5 in different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescently labeled pep5, monitored by real time confocal microscopy, entered the MDA-MB-231 cells 3min after application and localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. Pep5-induced cell death was increased when the MDA-MB-231 cell population was arrested at the G1/S transition or in S phase compared to asynchronous cells. Pep5 induced permanent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in MDA-MB-231 cells synchronized in G1/S or S phase. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry identified CLIC1 and Plectin as the only two proteins that interacted with pep5 in both asynchronous and synchronized MDA-MB-231 cells. These interactions could explain the long-lasting ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the cytoskeleton perturbations in the MDA-MB-231 cells, in which the stress fibers' integrity is affected by pep5 treatments. These data suggest that pep5 has potential therapeutic properties for treating specific types of cancers, such as breast cancer cells. Pep5, a natural intracellular peptide formed by the degradation of Cyclin D2 through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, induces cell death when reintroduced into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which express low levels of Cyclin D2, specifically in G1/S arrested cells or in cells that are passing through S phase. Under these conditions, pep5 is able to interact with different intracellular proteins, primarily cytoskeleton and proteasome components, which can lead to cellular apoptosis. Together, our data suggest that pep5 is an intracellular peptide with therapeutic potential for treating specific types of tumors with low

  17. A Combined Chemical and Magneto-Mechanical Induction of Cancer Cell Death by the Use of Functionalized Magnetic Iron Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez Banderas, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Cancer prevails as one of the most devastating diseases being at the top of death causes for adults despite continuous development and innovation in cancer therapy. Nanotechnology may be used to achieve therapeutic dosing, establish sustained-release drug profiles, and increase the half-life of drugs. In this context, magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown a good biocompatibility and cellular internalization with a low cytotoxic effect. In this thesis, I induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of iron NWs functionalized with Doxorubicin (DOX) with mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. Two different agents, APTES and BSA, were separately used for coating NWs permitting further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal reflection analysis, BSA formulations demonstrate to have a higher internalization degree and a broader distribution within the cells in comparison to APTES formulations. Both groups of functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by the free DOX (~95% at the same concentration) and non-functionalized NWs formulations (~10% at the same NWs concentration). A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a low frequency magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with the two formulations that is again comparable (~70% at the highest concentration). Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of both groups of coated NWs without the drug increased notoriously when the field is applied (~25% at the highest concentration tested). Here, a novel bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto

  18. Carnitine-acyltransferase system inhibition, cancer cell death, and prevention of myc-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilli, Annalisa; Calienni, Maria; Margarucci, Sabrina; D'Apolito, Maria; Petillo, Orsolina; Rocchi, Laura; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Nicolai, Raffaella; Koverech, Aleardo; Calvani, Menotti; Peluso, Gianfranco; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2013-04-03

    The metabolic alterations of cancer cells represent an opportunity for developing selective antineoplastic treatments. We investigated the therapeutic potential of ST1326, an inhibitor of carnitine-palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A), the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid (FA) import into mitochondria. ST1326 was tested on in vitro and in vivo models of Burkitt's lymphoma, in which c-myc, which drives cellular demand for FA metabolism, is highly overexpressed. We performed assays to evaluate the effect of ST1326 on proliferation, FA oxidation, and FA mitochondrial channeling in Raji cells. The therapeutic efficacy of ST1326 was tested by treating Eµ-myc mice (control: n = 29; treatment: n = 24 per group), an established model of c-myc-mediated lymphomagenesis. Experiments were performed on spleen-derived c-myc-overexpressing B cells to clarify the role of c-myc in conferring sensitivity to ST1326. Survival was evaluated with Kaplan-Meier analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. ST1326 blocked both long- and short-chain FA oxidation and showed a strong cytotoxic effect on Burkitt's lymphoma cells (on Raji cells at 72 hours: half maximal inhibitory concentration = 8.6 μM). ST1326 treatment induced massive cytoplasmic lipid accumulation, impairment of proper mitochondrial FA channeling, and reduced availability of cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A, a fundamental substrate for de novo lipogenesis. Moreover, treatment with ST1326 in Eµ-myc transgenic mice prevented tumor formation (P = .01), by selectively impairing the growth of spleen-derived primary B cells overexpressing c-myc (wild-type cells + ST1326 vs. Eµ-myc cells + ST1326: 99.75% vs. 57.5%, difference = 42.25, 95% confidence interval of difference = 14% to 70%; P = .01). Our data indicate that it is possible to tackle c-myc-driven tumorigenesis by altering lipid metabolism and exploiting the neoplastic cell addiction to FA oxidation.

  19. Gallbladder Cancer Incidence and Death Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Conference Stay Informed Gallbladder Cancer Incidence and Death Rates Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Quick ... a late stage with a poor outcome, often death. The journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention published ...

  20. Homotypic cell cannibalism, a cell-death process regulated by the nuclear protein 1, opposes to metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Carla E; Sandí, María José; Hamidi, Tewfik; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Turrini, Olivier; Bartholin, Laurent; Loncle, Céline; Secq, Véronique; Garcia, Stéphane; Lomberk, Gwen; Kroemer, Guido; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely deadly disease for which all treatments available have failed to improve life expectancy significantly. This may be explained by the high metastatic potential of PDAC cells, which results from their dedifferentiation towards a mesenchymal phenotype. Some PDAC present cell-in-cell structures whose origin and significance are currently unknown. We show here that cell-in-cells form after homotypic cell cannibalism (HoCC). We found PDAC patients whose tumours display HoCC develop less metastasis than those without. In vitro, HoCC was promoted by inactivation of the nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), and was enhanced by treatment with transforming growth factor β. HoCC ends with death of PDAC cells, consistent with a metastasis suppressor role for this phenomenon. Hence, our data indicates a protective role for HoCC in PDAC and identifies Nupr1 as a molecular regulator of this process. PMID:22821859

  1. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of nanotechnology for improved pharmacokinetics and activity of immunogenic cell death inducers used in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Martyna; Gubernator, Jerzy

    2017-09-01

    Immunogenic cell death inducers (ICD inducers) are a diverse group of therapeutic molecules capable of eliciting an adaptive immune response against the antigens present on the surface of dying cancer cells. Most of these molecules suffer from low bioavailability, high toxicity and poor pharmacokinetics which limit their application. It is believed that nanotechnology, in particular nano-sized nanocarriers, can address most of the issues that limit the use of ICD inducers. Area covered: The mechanism of action of ICD inducers and their limitations is discussed. In addition, we cover the novel possibilities arising from the use of nanotechnology to improve delivery of ICD inducers to the target tissue as well as the restrictions of modern nanotechnology. Expert opinion: At present, nanocarrier formulations suffer from low bioavailability, poor pharmacokinetics and stability issues. Nonetheless, there is a tremendous future for combinatorial immune-pharmacological treatments of human tumors based on nanocarrier delivery of ICD inducers.

  3. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cause of Death in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier, Maria G; Hansen, Merete K; Lauritsen, Jakob; Mortensen, Mette S; Bandak, Mikkel; Agerbaek, Mads; Holm, Niels V; Dalton, Susanne O; Andersen, Klaus K; Johansen, Christoffer; Daugaard, Gedske

    2016-12-01

    Patients given systemic treatment for testicular germ cell cancer (GCC) are at increased risk for a second malignant neoplasm (SMN). Previous studies on SMN and causes of death lacked information on the exact treatment applied or were based on patients receiving former treatment options. To evaluate the treatment-specific risks for SMN and death in a nationwide population-based cohort of patients with GCC treated with current standard regimens. This study examined a Danish nationwide cohort of 5190 men with GCC who entered the Danish Testicular Cancer database between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 2007. Treatment results were compared with a randomly sampled, age-stratified, population-based control group. Cases of gonadal and extragonadal primary were included in the nationwide cohort. The treatments were surveillance only; retroperitoneal radiotherapy (RT); bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP); or more than 1 line of treatment (MTOL). Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for SMN and death calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model were compared with those of age-matched controls. The study population comprised 2804 patients with seminoma and 2386 with nonseminoma. The median follow-up was 14.4 years (interquartile range, 8.6-20.5 years). The 20-year cumulative incidence of SMN with death as a competing risk was 7.8% (surveillance), 7.6% (BEP), 13.5% (RT), 9.2% (MTOL), and 7.0% (controls). We found no increased risk for SMN after surveillance, while the HRs were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.4-2.0), 1.8 (95% CI, 1.5-2.3), and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.5-5.5), respectively, after BEP, RT, and MTOL. Mortality owing to non-GCC causes was decreased after surveillance, but increased by 1.3 times after BEP and RT and by 2.6 times after MTOL. Excess mortality due to SMN was found after BEP (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.2), RT (HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5-2.9), and MTOL (HR, 5.8; 95% CI, 3.6-9.6). We found no increased risk for SMN or death among patients undergoing surveillance only

  4. The Amaryllidaceae Isocarbostyril Narciclasine Induces Apoptosis By Activation of the Death Receptor and/or Mitochondrial Pathways in Cancer Cells But Not in Normal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Dumont

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Our study has shown that the Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces marked apoptosismediated cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts by triggering the activation of the initiator caspases of the death receptor pathway (caspase-8 and caspase-10 at least in human MCF-7 breast and PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells. The formation of the Fas and death receptor 4 (DR4 death-inducing signaling complex was clearly evidenced in MCF-7 and PC-3 cancer cells. Caspase-8 was found to interact with Fas and DR4 receptors on narciclasine treatment. However, narciclasine-induced downstream apoptotic pathways in MCF-7 cells diverged from those in PC-3 cells, where caspase-8 directly activated effector caspases such as caspase-3 in the absence of any further release of mitochondrial proapoptotic effectors. In contrast, in MCF-7 cells, the apoptotic process was found to require an amplification step that is mitochondria-dependent, with Bid processing, release of cytochrome c, caspase-9 activation. It is postulated that the high selectivity of narciclasine to cancer cells might be linked, at least in part, to this activation of the death receptor pathway. Normal human fibroblasts appear approximately 250-fold less sensitive to narciclasine, which does not induce apoptosis in these cells probably due to the absence of death receptor pathway activation.

  5. Programmed cell death in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, John

    2015-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Araguspongine C Induces Autophagic Death in Breast Cancer Cells through Suppression of c-Met and HER2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Akl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases are key regulators of cellular growth and proliferation. Dysregulations of receptor tyrosine kinases in cancer cells may promote tumorigenesis by multiple mechanisms including enhanced cell survival and inhibition of cell death. Araguspongines represent a group of macrocyclic oxaquinolizidine alkaloids isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia species. This study evaluated the anticancer activity of the known oxaquinolizidine alkaloids araguspongines A, C, K and L, and xestospongin B against breast cancer cells. Araguspongine C inhibited the proliferation of multiple breast cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, araguspongine C-induced autophagic cell death in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells was characterized by vacuole formation and upregulation of autophagy markers including LC3A/B, Atg3, Atg7, and Atg16L. Araguspongine C-induced autophagy was associated with suppression of c-Met and HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Further in-silico docking studies and cell-free Z-LYTE assays indicated the potential of direct interaction between araguspongine C and the receptor tyrosine kinases c-Met and HER2 at their kinase domains. Remarkably, araguspongine C treatment resulted in the suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade in breast cancer cells undergoing autophagy. Induction of autophagic death in BT-474 cells was also associated with decreased levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor upon treatment with effective concentration of araguspongine C. In conclusion, results of this study are the first to reveal the potential of araguspongine C as an inhibitor to receptor tyrosine kinases resulting in the induction of autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells.

  7. Trichostatin A (TSA) sensitizes the human prostatic cancer cell line DU145 to death receptor ligands treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghiyev, Agshin F; Guseva, Natalya V; Sturm, Mary T; Rokhlin, Oskar W; Cohen, Michael B

    2005-04-01

    The human prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145 has previously been found to be resistant to treatment with TNF-family ligands. However, TRAIL, TNF-alpha and anti-Fas antibodies (Ab) treatment in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) converted the phenotype of DU145 from resistant to sensitive. TSA induced 15% cell death but simultaneous treatment with TRAIL, TNF-alpha and anti-Fas Ab resulted in 55%, 70% and 40% cell death, respectively. Simultaneous treatment did not increase the level of TSA-induced histone acetylation, but induced the release of acetylated histones from chromatin into the cytosol. This release was caspase dependent since it was abrogated by Z-VAD-fmk. In addition, treatment with TSA induced caspase-9 activation and resulted in the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria. To further investigate the role of caspase-9 in TSA-mediated apoptosis we used two different approaches: (1) cells were pretreated with the caspase-9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-fmk, and (2) cells were transfected with a dominant-negative form of caspase-9. Both approaches gave similar results: cells became resistant to treatment with TSA. These data indicate that TSA mediates its effect via the mitochondrial pathway. This was confirmed by examining DU145 overexpressing Bcl-2. These transfectants were resistant to TSA treatment. Taken together, our data shows that only simultaneous treatment with TNF-family ligands and TSA in DU145 resulted in caspase activity sufficient to induce apoptosis. The combination of TSA and TNF-family ligands could potentially be the basis for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  8. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  9. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Kyu An

    Full Text Available Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML, C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3 puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy.

  10. A Fucus vesiculosus extract inhibits estrogen receptor activation and induces cell death in female cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqing; Riby, Jacques E; Conde, Lucia; Grizzle, William E; Cui, Xiangqin; Skibola, Christine F

    2016-05-28

    We previously reported the anti-estrogenic activity of the brown seaweed, Fucus vesiculosus. The present study aimed to further investigate its anti-estrogenic modes of action and to assess other potentially biologically relevant anti-tumorigenic effects in estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent and -independent female cancer cell lines. The CALUX® assay was used to determine the effect of a F. vesiculosus extract (FVE) on activation of the ER. Aromatase enzymatic activity was measured to determine the potential effect of FVE on estradiol (E2) biosynthesis. Transcriptional activity profiling of 248 genes involved in cancer, immunity, hormonal regulation, protein phosphorylation, transcription, metabolism, and cellular structure was conducted using the NanoString nCounter® analysis system in FVE-treated breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. The effects of FVE on cell viability, morphology, membrane integrity, mitochondrial toxicity, induction of apoptotic and autophagic markers, and cell signaling were also analyzed. In co-treatments with 12.5 pM (EC50) E2, FVE (2 %) reduced ER activation by 50 %, exhibiting potent ER antagonistic effects. FVE inhibited aromatase activity in an in vitro assay (IC50 2.0 %). ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell lines showed significantly decreased viability that correlated with increasing FVE concentrations and altered morphological features suggestive of apoptosis and autophagy. Expression of genes that were significantly altered by FVE (p < 0.05) revealed predominantly apoptotic, autophagic and kinase signaling pathways. FVE also effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, resulting in reduced mTORC1 activities to stimulate autophagy in cells. Concentration-dependent cleavage of PARP and induction of caspase-3 and -7 activities were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells supporting a role for FVE in the promotion of apoptosis. Our study provides new insights into the anti-estrogenic activity of F. vesiculosus

  11. Caspase-mediated apoptosis and caspase-independent cell death induced by irofulven in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huiyun; Salinas, Richard A; Leal, Belinda Z; Kosakowska-Cholody, Teresa; Michejda, Christopher J; Waters, Stephen J; Herman, Terence S; Woynarowski, Jan M; Woynarowska, Barbara A

    2004-11-01

    Irofulven (hydroxymethylacylfulvene) is a novel antitumor drug, which acts by alkylating cellular macromolecular targets. The drug is a potent inducer of apoptosis in various types of tumor cells, whereas it is nonapoptotic in normal cells. This study defined molecular responses to irofulven involving mitochondrial dysfunction and leading to death of prostate tumor LNCaP-Pro5 cells. Irofulven caused early (2-5 hours) translocation of the proapoptotic Bax from cytosol to mitochondria followed by the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release at 4 to 12 hours. These effects preceded caspase activation and during the first 6 hours were not affected by caspase inhibitors. Processing of caspase-9 initiated the caspase cascade at approximately 6 hours and progressed over time. The activation of the caspase cascade provided a positive feedback loop that enhanced Bcl-2-independent translocation and cytochrome c release. General and specific caspase inhibitors abrogated irofulven-induced apoptotic DNA fragmentation with the following order of potency: pan-caspase > or = caspase-9 > caspase-8/6 > caspase-2 > caspase-3/7 > caspase-1/4. Abrogation of caspase-mediated DNA fragmentation failed to salvage irofulven-treated cells from growth inhibition and loss of viability, demonstrating a substantial contribution of a caspase-independent cell death. Monobromobimane, an inhibitor of alternative caspase-independent apoptotic pathway that is mediated by mitochondrial permeability transition, antagonized both apoptosis, measured as phosphatidylserine externalization, and cytotoxicity of irofulven. Collectively, the results indicate that irofulven-induced signaling is integrated at the level of mitochondrial dysfunction. The induction of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent death pathways is consistent with pleiotropic effects of irofulven, which include targeting of cellular DNA and proteins.

  12. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-08-14

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing.Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment.

  13. The sesquiterpene lactone polymatin B from Smallanthus sonchifolius induces different cell death mechanisms in three cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ford, Christian; Ulloa, Jerónimo L; Catalán, César A N; Grau, Alfredo; Martino, Virginia S; Muschietti, Liliana V; Merfort, Irmgard

    2015-09-01

    A 8β-angeloyloxy-9α-hydroxy-14-oxo-acanthospermolide and five known melampolide sesquiterpene lactones (uvedalin, enhydrin, polymatin B, sonchifolin, and fluctuanin) were isolated from the leaves of Smallanthus sonchifolius. The compounds were identified by 1D-, 2D-NMR, HRMS, IR and UV analyses. In vitro cytotoxicity assays (MTT) showed that these sesquiterpene lactones display poor cytotoxic effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy human subjects, whereas a strong cytotoxicity was observed in leukemia and pancreas cancer cells. For the mechanism of action of polymatin B, oxidative stress seems to be involved. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation mainly induced different effects: apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells, necroptosis in CEM-ADR5000 cells through induction of RIP1K, neither apoptosis nor necroptosis in MIA-PaCa-2 cells. Additionally, cells also died partly by necrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Autophagy-associated Cell Death in Lung Cancer through miR-486-mediated Inhibition of Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yujun; Wang, Yizhong; Yao, Anran; Xu, Zhen; Dou, Huan; Shen, Sunan; Hou, Yayi; Wang, Tingting

    2017-09-18

    Low frequency magnetic fields (LF-MFs) can affect cell proliferation in a cell-type and intensity-dependent way. Previous study has reported the anti-tumor effect of LF-MFs in lung cancers. Our previous study also optimized the intensity and duration of LF-MFs to effectively inhibit the proliferation of lung cancer cells. However, the anti-tumor mechanism of LF-MFs remains unclear, which limit the clinical application of LF-MFs in anti-tumor therapy. Here, in a well-established Lewis Lung Cancer (LLC) mouse model, we found that LF-MFs inhibit tumor growth and induce an autophagic cell death in lung cancer. We also found that LF-MFs could up-regulate the expression level of miR-486, which was involved in LF-MFs activated cell autophagy. Furthermore, we found B-cell adaptor for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (BCAP) is a direct target of miR-486. miR-486 inhibit AKT/mTOR signaling through inhibiting expression of BCAP. Moreover, a decreased expression of miR-486 and an increased expression of BCAP were found in tumor tissues of lung cancer patients. Taken together, this study proved that LF-MFs can inhibit lung cancers through miR-486 induced autophagic cell death, which suggest a clinical application of LF-MFs in cancer treatment.

  15. High-content cell death imaging using quantum dot-based TIRF microscopy for the determination of anticancer activity against breast cancer stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Jieun; Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2017-01-01

    We report a two color monitoring of drug-induced cell deaths using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) as a novel method to determine anticancer activity. Instead of cancer cells, breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) were directly tested in the present assay to determine the effective concentration (EC50 ) values of camptothecin and cisplatin. Phosphatidylserine and HMGB1 protein were concurrently detected to observe apoptotic and necrotic cell death induced by anticancer drugs using quantum dot (Qdot)-antibody conjugates. Only 50-to-100 breast CSCs were consumed at each cell chamber due to the high sensitivity of Qdot-based TIRF. The high sensitivity of Qdot-based TIRF, that enables the consumption of a small number of cells, is advantageous for cost-effective large-scale drug screening. In addition, unlike MTT assay, this approach can provide a more uniform range of EC50 values because the average values of single breast CSCs fluorescence intensities are observed to acquire EC50 values as a function of dose. This research successfully demonstrated the possibility that Qdot-based TIRF can be widely used as an improved alternative to MTT assay for the determination of anticancer drug efficacies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The flavonoid TL-2-8 induces cell death and immature mitophagy in breast cancer cells via abrogating the function of the AHA1/Hsp90 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Juan; Jiang, Xiao-Xiao; Guo, Yi-Zhen; Sun, Fang-Hui; Kou, Xin-Hui; Bao, Yong; Zhang, Zhu-Qing; Lin, Zhao-Hu; Ding, Ting-Bo; Jiang, Lan; Lei, Xin-Sheng; Yang, Yong-Hua

    2017-10-01

    The flavonoid quercetin exhibits significant anticancer activities with few side effects. In the current study, we characterized TL-2-8, a quercetin derivative, as a novel anticancer agent in vitro and in vivo. Cell proliferation and viability were assessed using Cell Counting Kit-8 and CellTiter-Blue assay, respectively. Cell death was examined using PI staining or a TUNEL assay. Mitophagy was determined by measuring autophagic flux and by confocal imaging. Protein expression was examined by Western blotting. We found that TL-2-8 selectively inhibited the proliferation and decreased the viability of various cancer cells (the anti-proliferation IC50 values in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells at 72 h were 8.28, 8.56, and 9.58 μmol/L, respectively), and it displayed only slight cytotoxicity against normal MCF-10A and HEK-293 cells. In MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells, TL-2-8 treatment induced the degradation of multiple Hsp90 client proteins without inducing Hsp70. TL-2-8 (3, 6, 12 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the expression of AHA1, an activator of Hsp90 ATPase, and decreased Hsp90-AHA1 complex formation, leading to decreased Hsp90 chaperone function and reduced polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) signaling. Consequently, impaired mitophagy was induced via the downregulation of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). The in vivo anticancer effects of TL-2-8 were evaluated in an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model, which was treated with TL-2-8 (25, 50, 100 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po). Administration of TL-2-8 resulted in tumor growth inhibition rates of 37.9%, 58.9% and 70.9%, respectively, whereas quercetin treatment (100 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) produced only a lower tumor growth inhibition rate (49.5%). Furthermore, TL-2-8 treatment significantly extended the lifespan of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell xenografts. Our results demonstrate that TL-2-8 induces significant cell death and immature mitophagy in breast

  17. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death induced by Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts in A431 skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace Nirmala, J; Evangeline Celsia, S; Swaminathan, Akila; Narendhirakannan, R T; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2017-10-05

    Vitis vinifera. L is one of the most widely consumed fruits in the world and are rich in antioxidant abundant polyphenols. The present study was carried out to assess the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts in an in vitro model using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cell lines. Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts were incubated with A431 cells to evaluate the antiproliferative, apoptotic effects and the morphological apoptotic changes induced by the extracts. Mitochondrial membrane potential was also measured after incubating the cells with extracts. At the inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ), grape seed extract (111.11 µg/mL) and grape peel extract (319.14 µg/mL) were incubated for 24 h with A431 cells. Vitis vinifera peel and seed extracts were able to impart cytotoxic effects, induced apoptosis and apoptotic morphological changes in A431 cells significantly (p peel and seed phytochemicals can selectively target cancer cells and the phytochemicals that are occluded can serve as potential anticancer agents providing better efficacy in killing cancer cells.

  18. Environmental causes of cancer death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, E.R.; Meier, F.A.

    1982-12-01

    People increasingly look to the forensic autopsy as a way of determining whether a particular cancer death was environmentally caused. The forensic pathologist must be diligent pursuing evidence that links potential environmental causes to cancer but must also educate the public providing reassurance that most cancers are not due to industrial pollution. Cigarette smoking and various life-style factors appear to account for more cancers than do man-made environmental contaminants. Assessing the possibility that a cancer death is due to a specific environmental agent requires extensive information. First, one must obtain an accurate history of lifetime occupational and environmental exposures. Second, one must analyze this information in view of epidemiologic data on the cancer risks associated with each exposure. Finally, one should seek to document through the autopsy that exposure to a potentially harmful agent actually occurred. The carefully done forensic autopsy can alert the public to dangerous conditions and can provide individuals a basis for recovery in court for damages due to harmful exposures.

  19. Cancer drug pan-resistance: pumps, cancer stem cells, quiescence, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, blocked cell death pathways, persisters or what?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Although chemotherapy of tumours has scored successes, drug resistance remains the major cause of death of cancer patients. Initial treatment often leaves residual disease, from which the tumour regrows. Eventually, most tumours become resistant to all available chemotherapy. I call this

  20. The chalcone 2'-hydroxy-4',5'-dimethoxychalcone activates death receptor 5 pathway and leads to apoptosis in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Su, Ling; Cao, Congmei; Xu, Linyan; Zhong, Diansheng; Xu, Lijia; Liu, Xiangguo

    2013-06-01

    Natural chalcones have been proved to inhibit cancer cells with therapeutic potential, but the underlying molecular mechanism is still largely unexplored. Here, we identified a novel chalcone, 2'-hydroxy-4',5'-dimethoxychalcone (HDMC) and demonstrated that HDMC induced apoptosis in various nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Further study showed that HDMC elevated cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, thus inducing expressions of ATF4 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Then, death receptor 5 (DR5) was upregulated through ATF4-CHOP axis and eventually resulted in apoptosis. We also found that downregulation of c-FLIPL contributed to HDMC-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, HDMC induces apoptosis in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells via activation of DR5 signaling pathway, and ROS-mediated ATF4-CHOP axis is involved in the process. Our results further supported the potential for HDMC to be developed as a new antitumor agent for cancer therapy or chemoprevention. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Alpha-tocopheryl succinate inhibits autophagic survival of prostate cancer cells induced by vitamin K3 and ascorbate to trigger cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tomasetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The redox-silent vitamin E analog α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS was found to synergistically cooperate with vitamin K3 (VK3 plus ascorbic acid (AA in the induction of cancer cell-selective apoptosis via a caspase-independent pathway. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism(s underlying cell death induced in prostate cancer cells by α-TOS, VK3 and AA, and the potential use of targeted drug combination in the treatment of prostate cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The generation of ROS, cellular response to oxidative stress, and autophagy were investigated in PC3 prostate cancer cells by using drugs at sub-toxic doses. We evaluated whether PARP1-mediated apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF release plays a role in apoptosis induced by the combination of the agents. Next, the effect of the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA on tumor growth was examined in nude mice. VK3 plus AA induced early ROS formation associated with induction of autophagy in response to oxidative stress, which was reduced by α-TOS, preventing the formation of autophagosomes. α-TOS induced mitochondrial destabilization leading to the release of AIF. Translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus, a result of the combinatorial treatment, was mediated by PARP1 activation. The inhibition of AIF as well as of PARP1 efficiently attenuated apoptosis triggered by the drug combination. Using a mouse model of prostate cancer, the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA was more efficient in tumor suppression than when the drugs were given separately, without deleterious side effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: α-TOS, a mitochondria-targeting apoptotic agent, switches at sub-apoptotic doses from autophagy-dependent survival of cancer cells to their demise by promoting the induction of apoptosis. Given the grim prognosis for cancer patients, this finding is of potential clinical relevance.

  2. Immunogenic cell death of human ovarian cancer cells induced by cytosolic poly(I:C) leads to myeloid cell maturation and activates NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Kirsten; tho Pesch, Carola; Gehrke, Nadine; Riemann, Soheila; Dassler, Juliane; Coch, Christoph; Landsberg, Jennifer; Wimmenauer, Vera; Pölcher, Martin; Rudlowski, Christian; Tüting, Thomas; Kuhn, Walther; Hartmann, Gunther; Barchet, Winfried

    2011-10-01

    Owing to high rates of tumor relapse, ovarian cancer remains a fatal disease for which new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Accumulating evidence indicates that immune stimulation may delay or even prevent disease recurrence in ovarian cancer. In order to elicit proinflammatory signals that induce or amplify antitumor immune reactivity, we mimicked viral infection in ascites-derived ovarian cancer cells. By transfection or electroporation we targeted the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I:C) intracellularly in order to activate melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA-5), a sensor of viral RNA in the cytosol of somatic cells. Cancer cells reacted with enhanced expression of HLA-class I, release of CXCL10, IL-6, and type I IFN as well as tumor cell apoptosis. Monocytes and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) engulfed MDA-5-activated cancer cells, and subsequently upregulated HLA-class I/II and costimulatory molecules, and secreted CXCL10 and IFN-α. Further, this proinflammatory milieu promoted cytolytic activity and IFN-γ secretion of NK cells. Thus, our data suggest that the engagement of MDA-5 in a whole tumor cell vaccine is a promising approach for the immunotherapy of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Inhibitory effect of snake venom toxin on NF-κB activity prevents human cervical cancer cell growth via increase of death receptor 3 and 5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Mi Hee; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Ji Young; Seo, Hyen Ok; Han, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Joo Hee; Lee, Won Hyoung; Song, Ho Sueb; Lee, Ji In; Lee, Ung Soo; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-02-01

    We previously found that snake venom toxin inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity in several cancer cells. NF-κB is implicated in cancer cell growth and chemoresistance. In our present study, we investigated whether snake venom toxin (SVT) inhibits NF-κB, thereby preventing human cervical cancer cell growth (Ca Ski and C33A). SVT (0-12 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death. These inhibitory effects were associated with the inhibition of NF-κB activity. However, SVT dose dependently increased the expression of death receptors (DRs): DR3, DR5 and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins. Exploration of NF-κB inhibitor (Phenylarsine oxide, 0.1 μM) synergistically further increased SVT-induced DR3 and DR5 expressions accompanied with further inhibition of cancer cells growth. Moreover, deletion of DR3 and DR5 by small interfering RNA significantly abolished SVT-induced cell growth inhibitory effects, as well as NF-κB inactivation. Using TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand resistance cancer cells (A549 and MCF-7), we also found that SVT enhanced the susceptibility of chemoresistance of these cancer cells through down-regulation of NF-κB, but up-regulation of DR3 and DR5. In vivo study also showed that SVT (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth accompanied with inactivation of NF-κB. Thus, our present study indicates that SVT could be applicable as an anticancer agent for cervical cancer, or as an adjuvant agent for chemoresistant cancer cells.

  4. The Akt-inhibitor Erufosine induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells and increases the short term effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eibl Hans-Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer and associated with neoplastic transformation, malignant progression, and enhanced resistance to classical chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, it is a promising target for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, the cytotoxic action of the Akt inhibitor Erufosine (ErPC3 was analyzed in prostate cancer cells and compared to the cytotoxicity of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, the efficacy of combined treatment with Akt inhibitors and ionizing radiation in prostate cancer cells was examined. Materials and methods Prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, and LNCaP were treated with ErPC3 (1-100 µM, LY294002 (25-100 µM, irradiated (0-10 Gy, or subjected to combined treatments. Cell viability was determined by the WST-1 assay. Apoptosis induction was analyzed by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide in a hypotonic citrate buffer, and by Western blotting using antibodies against caspase-3 and its substrate PARP. Akt activity and regulation of the expression of Bcl-2 family members and key downstream effectors involved in apoptosis regulation were examined by Western blot analysis. Results The Akt inhibitor ErPC3 exerted anti-neoplastic effects in prostate cancer cells, however with different potency. The anti-neoplastic action of ErPC3 was associated with reduced phosphoserine 473-Akt levels and induction of apoptosis. PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells were also sensitive to treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. However, the ErPC3-sensitive PC3-cells were less susceptible to LY294002 than the ErPC3-refractory LNCaP cells. Although both cell lines were largely resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis, both cell lines showed higher levels of apoptotic cell death when ErPC3 was combined with radiotherapy. Conclusions Our data suggest that constitutive Akt activation and survival are

  5. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquet Éric R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT

  6. Artesunate induces necrotic cell death in schwannoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, R W; Lin, F; Ercolano, E; Vincent, J H; Hu, B; Hanemann, C O; Luo, S

    2014-10-16

    Established as a potent anti-malaria medicine, artemisinin-based drugs have been suggested to have anti-tumour activity in some cancers. Although the mechanism is poorly understood, it has been suggested that artemisinin induces apoptotic cell death. Here, we show that the artemisinin analogue artesunate (ART) effectively induces cell death in RT4 schwannoma cells and human primary schwannoma cells. Interestingly, our data indicate for first time that the cell death induced by ART is largely dependent on necroptosis. ART appears to inhibit autophagy, which may also contribute to the cell death. Our data in human schwannoma cells show that ART can be combined with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) to potentiate the cell death. Thus, this study suggests that artemisinin-based drugs may be used in certain tumours where cells are necroptosis competent, and the drugs may act in synergy with apoptosis inducers or autophagy inhibitors to enhance their anti-tumour activity.

  7. Causes of death and competing risk analysis of the associated factors for non-small cell lung cancer using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shenhai; Tian, Jintao; Song, Xiaoping; Wu, Bingqun; Liu, Limin

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the probability of death (POD) from any causes by time after diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the factors associated with survival for NSCLC patients. A total of 202,914 patients with NSCLC from 2004 to 2013 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The overall survival (OS) and lung cancer-specific survival (LCSS) were calculated and POD from any causes at different time periods after diagnosis was explored. The predictive factors for OS, LCSS and survival from non-lung cancer deaths were investigated using multivariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk regression analysis. The 5- and 10-year OS were 20.4% and 11.5%, accordingly that for LCSS were 25.5% and 18.4%, respectively. Lung cancer contributed 88.3% (n = 128,402) of the deaths. The POD from lung cancer decreased with time after diagnosis. In multivariate analysis, advanced age and advanced stage of NSCLC were associated with decreased OS and LCSS. Comparing to no surgery, any kind of resection conferred lower risk of death from lung cancer and higher risk of dying from non-lung cancer conditions except lobectomy or bilobectomy, which was associated with lower risk of death from both lung cancer and non-lung cancer conditions. Most of the patients with NSCLC died from lung cancer. Rational surveillance and treatment policies should be made for them. Early stage and lobectomy or bilobectomy were associated with improved OS and LCSS. It is reasonable to focus on early detection and optimal surgical treatment for NSCLC.

  8. Dose-dependent ATP depletion and cancer cell death following calcium electroporation, relative effect of calcium concentration and electric field strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy. METHODS: In three human cell lines--H69 (small-cell lung cancer), SW780 (bladder cancer), and U937 (leukaemia), viability...... was observed with fluorescence confocal microscopy of quinacrine-labelled U937 cells. RESULTS: Both H69 and SW780 cells showed dose-dependent (calcium concentration and electric field) decrease in intracellular ATP (p...-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials....

  9. The Brassica epithionitrile 1-cyano-2,3-epithiopropane triggers cell death in human liver cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Franziska S; Herz, Corinna; Schlotz, Nina; Kupke, Franziska; Bartolomé Rodríguez, María M; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Lamy, Evelyn

    2015-11-01

    Glucosinolates are secondary metabolites present in Brassica vegetables. Alkenyl glucosinolates are enzymatically degraded forming nitriles or isothiocyanates, but in the presence of epithiospecifier protein, epithionitriles are released. However, studies on the occurrence of epithionitriles in Brassica food and knowledge about their biological effects are scarce. Epithionitrile formation from glucosinolates of seven Brassica vegetables was analyzed using GC-MS and HPLC-DAD. Bioactivity of synthetic and plant-derived 1-cyano-2,3-epithiopropane (CETP) - the predominant epithionitrile in Brassica vegetables - in three human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines and primary murine hepatocytes was also evaluated. The majority of the Brassica vegetables were producers of nitriles or epithionitriles as hydrolysis products and not of isothiocyanates. For example, Brussels sprouts and savoy cabbage contained up to 0.8 μmol CETP/g vegetable. Using formazan dye assays, concentrations of 380-1500 nM CETP were observed to inhibit the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity of human HCC cells without impairment of cell growth. At 100-fold higher CETP concentrations, cell death was observed. Presence of plant matrix increased CETP-based toxicity. These in vitro data provide no indication that epithionitriles will severely affect human health by Brassica consumption. In contrast to isothiocyanates, no evidence of selective toxicity against HCC cells was found. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dexamethasone enhances programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) expression during T cell activation: an insight into the optimum application of glucocorticoids in anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Kailin; Gu, Bingxin; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Xianghua

    2015-06-26

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is a key cell-surface receptor of CD28 superfamily that triggers inhibitory pathways to attenuate T-cell responses and promote T-cell tolerance. As a crucial role in tumor immunity, PD-1 has been a focus of studies in anti-cancer therapy. It has been approved that tumors could exploit PD-1-dependent immune suppression for immune evasion. Considering the wide use of glucocorticoids (GCs) in anti-cancer therapy and their immunosuppressive effects, we explored whether GCs could influence the expression of PD-1. In our study, we used dexamethasone (DEX) as a model glucocorticoid and demonstrated that DEX could enhance PD-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The effects were completely inhibited by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone (RU486), indicating that the effect of DEX on PD-1 is mediated through GR. We further found the sensitivity to DEX-induced upregulation of PD-1 expression had a significant difference between different T cell subsets, with memory T cells more susceptible to this effect. We also showed that DEX could suppress T cell functions via inhibition of cytokines production such as IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and induction of apoptosis of T cells. Our findings suggest a novel way by which DEX suppress the function of activated T lymphocytes by enhancing expression of PD-1 and provide an insight into the optimum clinical application of GCs.

  11. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  12. Walsuronoid B induces mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction leading to apoptotic rather than autophagic cell death via ROS/p53 signaling pathways in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ya-di; Zhang, Chao; Lei, Jian-Li; Yu, Pei; Xia, Yuan-Zheng; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Lei; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2017-10-15

    Walsuronoid B is a limonoid compound extracted from Walsura robusta. Previous studies have shown that limonoid compounds possess anti-cancer potential, although the molecular mechanism of this activity remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that walsuronoid B inhibited cell proliferation in several human cancer lines. Liver cancer cells (HepG2 and Bel-7402) were chosen for their high sensitivity to walsuronoid B. Walsuronoid B induced cell death through G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis and induced the accumulation of autophagosomes through the suppression of mTOR signaling, which serves as a cell survival mechanism and prevents cell death. We further examined the molecular mechanisms and found that walsuronoid B-induced dysfunction of the mitochondria and lysosomes rather than the endoplasmic reticulum contributed to its cell death effect. Walsuronoid B enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and superoxide anion radical, resulting in elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, ROS induced by walsuronoid B upregulated p53 levels; conversely, p53 stimulated ROS. These results suggested that ROS and p53 reciprocally promoted each other's production and cooperated to induce liver cancer cell death. We found that the induction of ROS and p53 significantly triggered G2/M phase arrest and mitochondrial and lysosomal apoptosis. Finally, walsuronoid B suppressed tumor growth in vivo with few side effects. In summary, our findings demonstrated that walsuronoid B caused G2/M phase arrest and induced mitochondrial and lysosomal apoptosis through the ROS/p53 signaling pathway in human liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oncogenic K-Ras Turns Death Receptors Into Metastasis-Promoting Receptors in Human and Mouse Colorectal Cancer Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogwater, Frederik J. H.; Nijkamp, Maarten W.; Smakman, Niels; Steller, Ernst J. A.; Emmink, Benjamin L.; Westendorp, B. Florien; Raats, Danielle A. E.; Sprick, Martin R.; Schaefer, Uta; van Houdt, Winan J.; de Bruijn, Menno T.; Schackmann, Ron C. J.; Derksen, Patrick W. B.; Medema, Jan-Paul; Walczak, Henning; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Kranenburg, Onno

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Death receptors expressed on tumor cells can prevent metastasis formation by inducing apoptosis, but they also can promote migration and invasion. The determinants of death receptor signaling output are poorly defined. Here we investigated the role of oncogenic K-Ras in

  14. Variation in causes of death in patients with non-small cell lung cancer according to stage and time since diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen-Heijnen, M L G; van Erning, F N; De Ruysscher, D K; Coebergh, J W W; Groen, H J M

    2015-05-01

    Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years of diagnosis, and considerable excess mortality remains even after 5 years. We investigated the death rate and the distribution of causes of death for NSCLC patients by age and stage at diagnosis during long-term follow-up. All 72 021 patients aged 45-89 years diagnosed with stage I-III NSCLC between 1989 and 2008 in the Netherlands and who died up till 2011 were derived from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and linked with the database of Statistics Netherlands for underlying causes of death. Mortality ratios and proportional distribution of causes of death were calculated during 5 time periods after diagnosis of NSCLC (up to 15 years). Median follow-up was 9.6 years (range: 0-23 years). Lung cancer was the predominant cause of death in the first 6 years after diagnosis (being 80%-85% and ∼90% up to 3 years for localized and locally advanced disease, respectively, and ∼60%-75% and ∼75%-85% during years 4-6 for both stage groups, respectively). Thereafter, lung cancer as cause of death proportionally decreased with time since diagnosis, but remained over 30%. Hence, cardiovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) became more important causes of death, especially for patients aged >60 years at diagnosis (up to 34% for cardiovascular diseases and up to 19% for COPD). With time, the relative contribution of cardiovascular and COPD causes of death increased, although the absolute contribution of lung cancer remained high in non-metastatic NSCLC. Therefore, managing morbidity of these diseases remains relevant. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Zafar [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Shukla, Yogeshwer, E-mail: yogeshwer_shukla@hotmail.com [Proteomics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  16. Inhibition of class I histone deacetylases in non-small cell lung cancer by honokiol leads to suppression of cancer cell growth and induction of cell death in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2013-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 80% of all types of lung cancer. Here, we report the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia grandiflora, on NSCLC cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment of NSCLC cells (A549, H1299, H460 and H226) with honokiol (20, 40 and 60 µM) inhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, reduced the levels of class I HDAC proteins and enhanced histone acetyltransferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. These effects of honokiol were associated with a significant reduction in the viability of NSCLC cells. Concomitant treatment of cells with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, prevented honokiol-induced degradation of class I HDACs, suggesting that honokiol reduced the levels of HDACs in NSCLC cells through proteasomal degradation. Valproic acid, an inhibitor of HDACs, exhibited a similar pattern of reduced viability and induction of death of NSCLC cells. Treatment of A549 and H1299 cells with honokiol resulted in an increase in G 1 phase arrest, and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D1, D2 and cyclin dependent kinases. Further, administration of honokiol by oral gavage significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous A549 and H1299 tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice, which was associated with the induction of apoptotic cell death and marked inhibition of class I HDACs proteins and HDAC activity in the tumor xenograft tissues. Together, our study provides new insights into the role of class I HDACs in the chemotherapeutic effects of honokiol on lung cancer cells.

  17. A Novel Combination RNAi toward Warburg Effect by Replacement with miR-145 and Silencing of PTBP1 Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Takai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to control. We explored the use of a novel RNA-interference method for a driver oncogene regulating cancer specific energy metabolism by the combination treatment with a small interfering RNA (siRNA and a microRNA. After transfection of T24 and 253JB-V cells with miR-145 and/or siR-PTBP1, we examined the effects of cell growth and gene expression by performing the trypan blue dye exclusion test, Western blot, Hoechst 33342 staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and electron microscopy. The anti-cancer effects of xenograft model mice with miR-145 and/or siR-PTBP1 were then assessed. The combination treatment induced the deeper and longer growth inhibition and reduced the levels of both mRNA and protein expression of c-Myc and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1 more than each single treatment. Notably, the combination treatment not only impaired the cancer specific energy metabolism by inhibiting c-Myc/PTBP1/PKMs axis but also inactivated MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways examined in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the combination treatment induced apoptosis or autophagy; but, in some cells, apoptotic cell death was accompanied by autophagy, because the condensation of chromatin and many autophagosomes were coexistent. This combination treatment could be a novel RNA-interference strategy through the systemic silencing of the Warburg effect-promoting driver oncogene PTBP1 in bladder cancer cells.

  18. Centella asiatica modulates cancer cachexia associated inflammatory cytokines and cell death in leukaemic THP-1 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Dhaneshree Bestinee; Chuturgoon, Anil Amichund; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Guruprasad, Kanive Parashiva; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Sewram, Vikash

    2017-08-01

    Cancer cachexia is associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Centella asiatica (C. asiatica) possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour potential. We investigated the modulation of antioxidants, cytokines and cell death by C. asiatica ethanolic leaf extract (C LE ) in leukaemic THP-1 cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's). Cytotoxcity of C LE was determined at 24 and 72 h (h). Oxidant scavenging activity of C LE was evaluated using the 2, 2-diphenyl-1 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Glutathione (GSH) levels, caspase (-8, -9, -3/7) activities and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels (Luminometry) were then assayed. The levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and IL-10 were also assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. C LE decreased PBMC viability between 33.25-74.55% (24 h: 0.2-0.8 mg/ml C LE and 72 h: 0.4-0.8 mg/ml C LE ) and THP-1 viability by 28.404% (72 h: 0.8 mg/ml C LE ) (p < 0.0001). Oxidant scavenging activity was increased by C LE (0.05-0.8 mg/ml) (p < 0.0001). PBMC TNF-α and IL-10 levels were decreased by C LE (0.05-0.8 mg/ml) (p < 0.0001). However, PBMC IL-6 and IL-1β concentrations were increased at 0.05-0.2 mg/ml C LE but decreased at 0.4 mg/ml C LE (p < 0.0001). In THP-1 cells, C LE (0.2-0.8 mg/ml) decreased IL-1β and IL-6 whereas increased IL-10 levels (p < 0.0001). In both cell lines, C LE (0.05-0.2 mg/ml, 24 and 72 h) increased GSH concentrations (p < 0.0001). At 24 h, caspase (-9, -3/7) activities was increased by C LE (0.05-0.8 mg/ml) in PBMC's whereas decreased by C LE (0.2-0.4 mg/ml) in THP-1 cells (p < 0.0001). At 72 h, C LE (0.05-0.8 mg/ml) decreased caspase (-9, -3/7) activities and ATP levels in both cell lines (p < 0.0001). In PBMC's and THP-1 cells, C LE proved to effectively modulate antioxidant activity, inflammatory cytokines and cell death. In THP-1 cells, C LE decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels

  19. Aspirin Use and Colorectal Cancer Survival According to Tumor CD274 (Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand 1) Expression Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Cao, Yin; Qian, Zhi Rong; Masugi, Yohei; Nowak, Jonathan A; Yang, Juhong; Song, Mingyang; Mima, Kosuke; Kosumi, Keisuke; Liu, Li; Shi, Yan; da Silva, Annacarolina; Gu, Mancang; Li, Wanwan; Keum, NaNa; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Giannakis, Marios; Rodig, Scott J; Freeman, Gordon J; Nevo, Daniel; Wang, Molin; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Nishihara, Reiko; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-06-01

    Purpose Blockade of the programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, PD-1) immune checkpoint pathway can improve clinical outcomes in various malignancies. Evidence suggests that aspirin (a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) not only prolongs colorectal cancer survival, but can also activate T cell-mediated antitumor immunity and synergize with immunotherapy through inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. We hypothesized that the survival benefit associated with aspirin might be stronger in colorectal carcinoma with a lower CD274 (PDCD1 ligand 1, PD-L1) expression level that resulted in lower signaling of the immune checkpoint pathway. Patients and Methods Using data from 617 patients with rectal and colon cancer in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, we examined the association of postdiagnosis aspirin use with patient survival in strata of tumor CD274 expression status measured by immunohistochemistry. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to control for potential confounders, including disease stage, microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylator phenotype, long interspersed nucleotide element-1 methylation, cyclooxygenase-2 (PTGS2), and CDX2 expression, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations. Results The association of postdiagnosis aspirin use with colorectal cancer-specific survival differed by CD274 expression status ( Pinteraction < .001); compared with aspirin nonusers; multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for regular aspirin users were 0.16 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.41) in patients with low CD274 and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.67) in patients with high CD274. This differential association seemed consistent in patients with microsatellite-stable or PIK3CA wild-type disease and in strata of PTGS2 expression, CDX2 expression, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, or prediagnosis aspirin use status. Conclusion The association of aspirin use with colorectal cancer survival is stronger in patients with

  20. Death Concerns Among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited death-related concerns among newly diagnosed individuals, and to determine if age, gender, marital status, stage of disease, type of treatment, presence of co-morbid conditions, and Veteran status were related to extent of death concerns. A mixed method approach was used to examine death concerns in 73 individuals newly diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer. Seven categories related to death were identified: psychological preparation; time left; impact; behavioral preparation; acceptance; cancer death experiences; and post-death. Stage of disease and Veteran status were factors that were related to increased numbers of death-related content. Findings demonstrate that death concerns are varied, primarily negative, and are relevant to the person facing a new lung cancer diagnosis, thus highlighting the importance for health care providers to assess, discuss, and listen for death concerns in the acute care setting. PMID:21170169

  1. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cause of Death in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Hansen, Merete K; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    radiotherapy (RT); bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP); or more than 1 line of treatment (MTOL). Main Outcomes and Measures: Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for SMN and death calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model were compared with those of age-matched controls. Results: The study...... population comprised 2804 patients with seminoma and 2386 with nonseminoma. The median follow-up was 14.4 years (interquartile range, 8.6-20.5 years). The 20-year cumulative incidence of SMN with death as a competing risk was 7.8% (surveillance), 7.6% (BEP), 13.5% (RT), 9.2% (MTOL), and 7.0% (controls). We...... found no increased risk for SMN after surveillance, while the HRs were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.4-2.0), 1.8 (95% CI, 1.5-2.3), and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.5-5.5), respectively, after BEP, RT, and MTOL. Mortality owing to non-GCC causes was decreased after surveillance, but increased by 1.3 times after BEP and RT and by 2...

  2. Cell Death and Cell Death Responses in Liver Disease: Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets. PMID:25046161

  3. A novel chalcone derivative, LQFM064, induces breast cancer cells death via p53, p21, KIT and PDGFRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Bruna Lannuce Silva; da Silva, Artur Christian Garcia; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Cortez, Alane Pereira; Luzin, Rangel Magalhães; Lião, Luciano Morais; de Souza Gil, Eric; Sanz, Gérman; Vaz, Boniek G; Sabino, José R; Menegatti, Ricardo; Valadares, Marize Campos

    2017-09-30

    This study shows the design, synthesis and antitumoral potential evaluation of a novel chalcone-like compound, (E)-3- (3, 5-di-ter-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-1- (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) prop-2-en-1-one [LQFM064) (4)], against human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells. Some toxicological parameters were also investigated. LQFM064) (4) exhibited cytotoxic activity against MCF7 cells (IC50=21μM), in a concentration dependent-manner, and triggered significant changes in cell morphology and biochemical/molecular parameters, which are suggestive of an apoptosis inductor. LQFM064) (4) (21μM) induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase with increased p53 and p21 expressions. It was also shown that the compound (4) did not interfere directly in p53/MDM2 complexation of MCF7 cells. In these cells, externalization of phosphatidylserine, cytochrome c release, increased expression of caspases-7, -8 and -9, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS overgeneration were also detected following LQFM064 (4) treatment. Further analysis revealed the activation of both apoptotic pathways via modulation of the proteins involved in the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways with an increase in TNF-R1, Fas-L and Bax levels and a reduction in Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, KIT proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase, insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) were downregulated, while glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) expressions were increased by LQFM064 (4)-triggered cytotoxic effects in MCF7 cells. Moreover, it can be inferred that compound (4) has a moderate acute oral systemic toxicity hazard, since its estimated LD50 was 452.50mg/kg, which classifies it as UN GHS Category 4 (300mg/kg>LD50<2000mg/kg). Furthermore, LQFM064 (4) showed a reduced potential myelotoxicity (IC50=150μM for mouse bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors). In conclusion, LQFM064 (4) was capable of inducing breast cancer cells

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Cell Death in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Repressing mTOR via AMPK Activation and PI3K/Akt Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer properties and mechanism of action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs have been demonstrated in several cancers; however, the mechanism in lung cancer remains unclear. Here, we show that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, a ω3-PUFA, induced apoptosis and autophagy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. DHA-induced cell death was accompanied by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation and inactivated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling. Knocking down AMPK and overexpressing Akt increased mTOR activity and attenuated DHA-induced cell death, suggesting that DHA induces cell death via AMPK- and Akt-regulated mTOR inactivation. This was confirmed in Fat-1 transgenic mice, which produce ω3-PUFAs. Lewis lung cancer (LLC tumor cells implanted into Fat-1 mice showed slower growth, lower phospho-Akt levels, and higher levels of apoptosis and autophagy than cells implanted into wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that DHA-induced apoptosis and autophagy in NSCLC cells are associated with AMPK activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition, which in turn lead to suppression of mTOR; thus ω3-PUFAs may be utilized as potential therapeutic agents for NSCLC treatment.

  5. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    fixed, mounted using SlowFade with 4¶,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI; Invitro - gen), and examined under a 60 lens on an Olympus BX61 motorized...unfavorable neuroblastoma growth: potentiation by irradiation. Int J Cancer 2003;106:723–8. 16. Levine B, Klionsky DJ. Development by self- digestion ...disease through cellular self- digestion . Nature 2008;451:1069–75. 18. Kabeya Y, Mizushima N, Ueno T, et al. LC3, a mammalian homologue of yeast Apg8p, is

  6. Glutathione Efflux and Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutathione (GSH) depletion is a central signaling event that regulates the activation of cell death pathways. GSH depletion is often taken as a marker of oxidative stress and thus, as a consequence of its antioxidant properties scavenging reactive species of both oxygen and nitrogen (ROS/RNS). Recent Advances: There is increasing evidence demonstrating that GSH loss is an active phenomenon regulating the redox signaling events modulating cell death activation and progression. Critical Issues: In this work, we review the role of GSH depletion by its efflux, as an important event regulating alterations in the cellular redox balance during cell death independent from oxidative stress and ROS/RNS formation. We discuss the mechanisms involved in GSH efflux during cell death progression and the redox signaling events by which GSH depletion regulates the activation of the cell death machinery. Future Directions: The evidence summarized here clearly places GSH transport as a central mechanism mediating redox signaling during cell death progression. Future studies should be directed toward identifying the molecular identity of GSH transporters mediating GSH extrusion during cell death, and addressing the lack of sensitive approaches to quantify GSH efflux. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1694–1713. PMID:22656858

  7. Systems biology modeling reveals a possible mechanism of the tumor cell death upon oncogene inactivation in EGFR addicted cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ping Zhou

    Full Text Available Despite many evidences supporting the concept of "oncogene addiction" and many hypotheses rationalizing it, there is still a lack of detailed understanding to the precise molecular mechanism underlying oncogene addiction. In this account, we developed a mathematic model of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR associated signaling network, which involves EGFR-driving proliferation/pro-survival signaling pathways Ras/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K/AKT, and pro-apoptotic signaling pathway apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1/p38. In the setting of sustained EGFR activation, the simulation results show a persistent high level of proliferation/pro-survival effectors phospho-ERK and phospho-AKT, and a basal level of pro-apoptotic effector phospho-p38. The potential of p38 activation (apoptotic potential due to the elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS is largely suppressed by the negative crosstalk between PI3K/AKT and ASK1/p38 pathways. Upon acute EGFR inactivation, the survival signals decay rapidly, followed by a fast increase of the apoptotic signal due to the release of apoptotic potential. Overall, our systems biology modeling together with experimental validations reveals that inhibition of survival signals and concomitant release of apoptotic potential jointly contribute to the tumor cell death following the inhibition of addicted oncogene in EGFR addicted cancers.

  8. Recombinant FIP-gat, a Fungal Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma atrum, Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Kong, Ying-Yu; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Lu, Yu-Jia; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-04-06

    FIP-gat, an immunomodulatory protein isolated from Ganoderma atrum, is a new member of the FIP family. Little is known, however, about its expressional properties and antitumor activities. It was availably expressed in Escherichia coli with a total yield of 29.75 mg/L. The migration of recombinant FIP-gat (rFIP-gat) on SDS-PAGE corresponded to the predicted molecular mass, and the band was correctly detected by a specific antibody. To characterize the direct effects of rFIP-gat on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with different concentrations of rFIP-gat in vitro; the results showed that this protein could reduce cell viability dose-dependently with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 9.96 μg/mL and agglutinate the MDA-MB-231 cells at a concentration as low as 5 μg/mL. Furthermore, FIP-gat at a concentration of 10 μg/mL can induce significant growth inhibition and cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells. Notably, FIP-gat treatment triggers significant cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition and pronounced increase in apoptotic cell population. Molecular assays based on microarray and real-time PCR further revealed the potential mechanisms encompassing growth arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy underlying the phenotypic effects.

  9. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuenong; Wei, Han; Liu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qianying [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Wei, Anhua [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Shi, Du; Yang, Xian [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ruan, Jinlan, E-mail: jinlan8152@163.com [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: • We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. • Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. • RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. • We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death.

  10. The peptide derived from the Ig-like domain of human herpesvirus 8 K1 protein induces death in hematological cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniluk Urszula

    2012-08-01

    -3 peptide can selectively induce the death of malignant hematological cell lines by Fas- and/or TNFRI-dependent mechanisms, suggesting the K1-derived peptide or peptidomimetic may have promising therapeutic potential for the treatment of hematological cancers.

  11. Delivery of carboplatin by carbon-based nanocontainers mediates increased cancer cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, M.; Haase, D.; Hampel, S.; Oswald, S.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Klingeler, R.; Schulze, R.; Ritschel, M.; Leonhardt, A.; Fuessel, S.; Büchner, B.; Kraemer, K.; Wirth, M. P.

    2010-08-01

    Since the activity of several conventional anticancer drugs is restricted by resistance mechanisms and dose-limiting side-effects, the design of nanocarriers seems to be an efficient and promising approach for drug delivery. Their chemical and mechanical stability and their possible multifunctionality render tubular nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), promising delivery agents for anticancer drugs. The goal of the present study was to investigate CNTs and CNFs in order to deliver carboplatin in vitro. No significant intrinsic toxicity of unloaded materials was found, confirming their biocompatibility. Carboplatin was loaded onto CNTs and CNFs, revealing a loading yield of 0.20 mg (CNT-CP) and 0.13 mg (CNF-CP) platinum per milligram of material. The platinum release depended on the carrier material. Whereas CNF-CP marginally released the drug, CNT-CP functioned as a drug depot, constantly releasing up to 68% within 14 days. The cytotoxicity of CNT-CP and CNF-CP in urological tumour cell lines was dependent on the drug release. CNT-CP was identified to be more effective than CNF-CP concerning the impairment of proliferation and clonogenic survival of tumour cells. Moreover, carboplatin, which was delivered by CNT-CP, exhibited a higher anticancer activity than free carboplatin.

  12. Delivery of carboplatin by carbon-based nanocontainers mediates increased cancer cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlt, M; Fuessel, S; Kraemer, K; Wirth, M P [Department for Urology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Haase, D; Hampel, S; Oswald, S; Bachmatiuk, A; Klingeler, R; Ritschel, M; Leonhardt, A; Buechner, B [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Schulze, R, E-mail: kai.kraemer@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Bioanalytical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Bergstrasse 66, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-08-20

    Since the activity of several conventional anticancer drugs is restricted by resistance mechanisms and dose-limiting side-effects, the design of nanocarriers seems to be an efficient and promising approach for drug delivery. Their chemical and mechanical stability and their possible multifunctionality render tubular nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), promising delivery agents for anticancer drugs. The goal of the present study was to investigate CNTs and CNFs in order to deliver carboplatin in vitro. No significant intrinsic toxicity of unloaded materials was found, confirming their biocompatibility. Carboplatin was loaded onto CNTs and CNFs, revealing a loading yield of 0.20 mg (CNT-CP) and 0.13 mg (CNF-CP) platinum per milligram of material. The platinum release depended on the carrier material. Whereas CNF-CP marginally released the drug, CNT-CP functioned as a drug depot, constantly releasing up to 68% within 14 days. The cytotoxicity of CNT-CP and CNF-CP in urological tumour cell lines was dependent on the drug release. CNT-CP was identified to be more effective than CNF-CP concerning the impairment of proliferation and clonogenic survival of tumour cells. Moreover, carboplatin, which was delivered by CNT-CP, exhibited a higher anticancer activity than free carboplatin.

  13. Deaths from non-melanoma skin cancer in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girschik, J; Fritschi, Lin; Threlfall, T; Slevin, T

    2008-10-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is common, slow growing, and rarely metastasizes. However, there are still nearly 400 deaths from NMSC in Australia annually. We aimed to investigate the accuracy of NMSC death coding and to describe the characteristics of these deaths and the potential for prevention. Histology reports for all deaths coded as NMSC (ICD-10 C44.0-C44.9) by the Western Australian Cancer Registry for the years 1996-2005 were reviewed for type of cancer, body site (primary tumor and metastases), and level of available documentation. Of 368 deaths recorded as being due to NMSC only 3 were found to be miscoded. An additional 53 deaths contained inadequate information to confirm NMSC as the cause of death. Of the confirmed cases, 219 were due to squamous cell carcinoma, 53 to Merkel cell carcinomas, and 40 to other skin cancers. Cases were mainly males and were elderly. Most of the primary squamous and Merkel cell carcinomas were in areas of maximum sun exposure (face, ears, and hands, and scalp in males). Misclassification of NMSC deaths in WA was minimal. The majority of NMSC deaths were due to squamous cell carcinomas; had primary sites associated with significant sun exposure; and occurred in older men.

  14. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... (8-OHdG), and apoptosis based on 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay were evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, namely, H1155, ...

  15. Chaetocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and leads to death receptor 5-dependent apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianfang; Guo, Sen; Liu, Xiangguo; Su, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities are associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) initiation and progression. Epigenetic drugs are being studied and in clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis by the epigenetic agents remains unclear. SUV39H1 is an important methyl-transferase for lysine 9 on histone H3 and usually related to gene transcriptional suppression, and chaetocin acts as the inhibitor of SUV39H1. We demonstrated here that chaetocin effectively suppressed the growth of multiple lung cancer cells through inducing apoptosis in a death receptor 5 (DR5)-dependent manner. Chaetocin treatment activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which gave rise to the up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP. Furthermore, ATF3 and CHOP contributed to the induction of DR5 and subsequent apoptosis. When SUV39H1 was silenced with siRNA, the expression of ATF3, CHOP and DR5 was elevated. Thereafter, knockdown of SUV39H1 induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells. In summary, chaetocin pharmacologically inhibits the activity of SUV39H1 which provokes ER stress and results in up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP, leading to DR5-dependent apoptosis eventually. These findings provide a novel interpretation on the anti-neoplastic activity of epigenetic drugs as a new therapeutic approach in NSCLC.

  16. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  17. The progression of cell death affects the rejection of allogeneic tumors in immune-competent mice – implications for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alfredo Chaurio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of dead and dying cells are produced during cancer therapy and allograft rejection. Depending on the death pathway and stimuli involved, dying cells exhibit diverse features resulting in defined physiological consequences for the host. It is not fully understood how dying and dead cells modulate the immune response of the host. To address this problem, different death stimuli were studied in B16F10 melanoma cells by inducible transgene expression of the pro-apoptotic active forms of caspase-3 (revCasp-3, Bid (tBid, and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-necrosis inducing toxin (CpnTCTD. The immune outcome elicited for each death stimulus was assessed by evaluating the allograft rejection of melanoma tumors implanted subcutaneously in BALB/c mice immunized with dying cells. Expression of all proteins efficiently killed cells in vitro (>90% and displayed distinctive morphological and physiological features as assessed by multiparametric flow cytometry analysis. BALB/c mice immunized with allogeneic dying melanoma cells expressing revCasp-3 or CpnTCTD showed strong rejection of the allogeneic challenge. In contrast, mice immunized with cells dying either after expression of tBid or irradiation with UVB did not, suggesting an immunologically silent cell death. Surprisingly, immunogenic cell death induced by expression of revCasp-3 or CpnTCTD correlated with elevated intracellular ROS levels at the time-point of immunization. Conversely, early mitochondrial dysfunction induced by tBid expression or UVB irradiation accounted for the absence of intracellular ROS accumulation at the time point of immunization. Although ROS inhibition in vitro was not sufficient to abrogate the immunogenicity in our allo-immunization model, we suggest that the time-point of ROS generation and intracellular accumulation may be an important factor for its role as DAMP in the development of allogeneic responses.

  18. M867, a novel selective inhibitor of caspase-3 enhances cell death and extends tumor growth delay in irradiated lung cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Woon Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Radioresistance of lung cancer cells results in unacceptable rate of loco-regional failure. Although radiation is known to induce apoptosis, our recent study showed that knockdown of pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax resulted in an increase in autophagic cell death and lung cancer radiosensitivity in vitro. To further explore the potential of apoptosis inhibition as a way to sensitize lung cancer for therapy, we tested M867, a novel chemical and reversible caspase-3 inhibitor, in combination with ionizing radiation in vivo and in vitro. METHODS AND FINDINGS: M867 reduced clonogenic survival in H460 lung cancer cells (DER = 1.27, p = 0.007 compared to the vehicle-treated treated cells. We found that administration of M867 with ionizing radiation in an in vivo mouse hind limb lung cancer model was well tolerated, and produced a significant tumor growth delay compared to radiation alone. A dramatic decrease in tumor vasculature was observed with M867 and radiation using von Willebrand factor staining. In addition, Ki67 index showed >5-fold reduction of tumor proliferation in the combination therapy group, despite the reduced levels of apoptosis observed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining. Radiosensitizing effect of M867 through inhibiting caspases was validated using caspase-3/-7 double-knockout (DKO mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF cell model. Consistent with our previous study, autophagy contributed to the mechanism of increased cell death, following inhibition of apoptosis. In addition, matrigel assay showed a decrease in in vitro endothelial tubule formation during the M867/radiation combination treatment. CONCLUSIONS: M867 enhances the cytotoxic effects of radiation on lung cancer and its vasculature both in vitro and in vivo. M867 has the potential to prolong tumor growth delay by inhibiting tumor proliferation

  19. Decursin was Accelerated Human Lung Cancer Cell Death Caused by Proton Beam Irradiation via Blocking the p42/44 MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Ra, Se Jin; Kim, Kye Ryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Decursin, which is one of the extract of Angelica gigas Nakai root, has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine as a tonic and for treatment of anemia and other common diseases. There are some reports about the pharmacological properties of decursin showing anti-bacterial and anti-amnestic effect, depression of cardiac contraction, antitumor and anti-angiogenic activity. Cell death induced by proton beam is identified as apoptosis. The study investigated that genes involved in apoptosis are checked by RT-PCR and used LET instead of SPBP of proton beam. Apoptosis is the tight regulated by multi-protein action in physiological cell death program. Proton therapy is an attractive approach for the treatment of deep-seated tumor. Recently, many researchers tried to new therapeutic strategy, combination of proton therapy and chemotherapy, in order to increase therapeutic effect. In this study, we investigate whether decursin can accelerate effect of human lung cell apoptosis in proton irradiated cancer cells

  20. AKT inhibitors promote cell death in cervical cancer through disruption of mTOR signaling and glucose uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Rashmi

    Full Text Available PI3K/AKT pathway alterations are associated with incomplete response to chemoradiation in human cervical cancer. This study was performed to test for mutations in the PI3K pathway and to evaluate the effects of AKT inhibitors on glucose uptake and cell viability.Mutational analysis of DNA from 140 pretreatment tumor biopsies and 8 human cervical cancer cell lines was performed. C33A cells (PIK3CAR88Q and PTENR233* were treated with increasing concentrations of two allosteric AKT inhibitors (SC-66 and MK-2206 with or without the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG. Cell viability and activation status of the AKT/mTOR pathway were determined in response to the treatment. Glucose uptake was evaluated by incubation with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG. Cell migration was assessed by scratch assay.Activating PIK3CA (E545K, E542K and inactivating PTEN (R233* mutations were identified in human cervical cancer. SC-66 effectively inhibited AKT, mTOR and mTOR substrates in C33A cells. SC-66 inhibited glucose uptake via reduced delivery of Glut1 and Glut4 to the cell membrane. SC-66 (1 µg/ml-56% and MK-2206 (30 µM-49% treatment decreased cell viability through a non-apoptotic mechanism. Decreases in cell viability were enhanced when AKT inhibitors were combined with 2-DG. The scratch assay showed a substantial reduction in cell migration upon SC-66 treatment.The mutational spectrum of the PI3K/AKT pathway in cervical cancer is complex. AKT inhibitors effectively block mTORC1/2, decrease glucose uptake, glycolysis, and decrease cell viability in vitro. These results suggest that AKT inhibitors may improve response to chemoradiation in cervical cancer.

  1. Suppression of PC-1/PrLZ sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by attenuating DNA damage repair and inducing autophagic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Zeng-Fu; Wei, Qiang; Yu, Lan; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Hongtao; Song, Man; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jianguang; Wang, Jian; Li, Shanhu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is promising and effective for treating prostate cancer but the addition of a tumor cell radiosensitizer would improve therapeutic outcomes. PC-1/PrLZ, a TPD52 protein family member is frequently upregulated in advanced prostate cancer cells and may be a biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of PC-1/PrLZ for increasing radioresistance in human prostate cancer cell lines. Growth curves and survival assays after g-ray irradiation con...

  2. Dose-dependent ATP depletion and cancer cell death following calcium electroporation, relative effect of calcium concentration and electric field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania; Frandsen, Stine Krog; Vernier, P Thomas; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation, a method for increasing the permeability of membranes to ions and small molecules, is used in the clinic with chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment (electrochemotherapy). Electroporation with calcium causes ATP (adenosine triphosphate) depletion and cancer cell death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy. In three human cell lines--H69 (small-cell lung cancer), SW780 (bladder cancer), and U937 (leukaemia), viability was determined after treatment with 1, 3, or 5 mM calcium and eight 99 μs pulses with 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 or 1.6 kV/cm. Fitting analysis was applied to quantify the cell-killing efficacy in presence of calcium. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was measured in H69 and SW780 cells. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was observed with fluorescence confocal microscopy of quinacrine-labelled U937 cells. Both H69 and SW780 cells showed dose-dependent (calcium concentration and electric field) decrease in intracellular ATP (pcalcium (lower EC50 for higher calcium concentrations). Quinacrine fluorescence intensity of calcium-electroporated U937 cells was one third lower than in controls (pCalcium electroporation dose-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field. This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials.

  3. Expression of Peroxisome Proferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ in Human Transitional Bladder Cancer and its Role in Inducing Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Fei Guan

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the expression and role of the thiazolidinedione (TZD-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, in human bladder cancers. In situ hybridization shows that PPARγ mRNA is highly expressed in all human transitional epithelial cell cancers (TCCa's studied (n=11. PPARγ was also expressed in five TCCa cell lines as determined by RNase protection assays and immunoblot. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα, a 9-cis-retinoic acid stimulated (9-cis-RA heterodimeric partner of PPARγ, was also co-expressed in all TCCa tissues and cell lines. Treatment of the T24 bladder cancer cells with the TZD PPARγ agonist troglitazone, dramatically inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation and induced cell death. Addition of the RXRα ligands, 9-cis-RA or LG100268, sensitized T24 bladder cancer cells to the lethal effect of troglitazone and two other PPARγ activators, ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15dPGJ2. Troglitazone treatment increased expression of two cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21wAF1/CIP1 and p16INK4, reduced cyclin D1 expression, consistent with G1 arrest. Troglitazone also induced an endogenous PPARγ target gene in T24 cells, adipocyte-type fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP, the expression of which correlates with bladder cancer differentiation. In situ hybridization shows that A-FABP expression is localized to normal uroepithelial cells as well as some TCCa's. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPARγ is expressed in human TCCa where it may play a role in regulating TCCa differentiation and survival, thereby providing a potential target for therapy of uroepithelial cancers.

  4. Alterations in Cell Cycle and Induction of Apoptotic Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells Treated with α-Mangostin Extracted from Mangosteen Pericarp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Kurose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of molecularly targeted drugs has greatly advanced cancer therapy, despite these drugs being associated with some serious problems. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the anticancer effects of natural products. α-Mangostin, a xanthone isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen fruit, has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines and to exhibit antitumor activity in a mouse mammary cancer model. In this study, we investigated the influence of α-mangostin on apoptosis and cell cycle in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 (carrying a p53 mutation, and HER2, ER, and PgR negative in order to elucidate its anticancer mechanisms. In α-mangostin-treated cells, induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was observed. On cell-cycle analysis, G1-phase arrest, increased p21cip1 expression and decreases in cyclins, cdc(s, CDKs and PCNA were observed. In conclusion, α-mangostin may be useful as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer carrying a p53 mutation and having HER2- and hormone receptor-negative subtypes.

  5. Mechanisms of drug sensitization to TRA-8, an agonistic death receptor 5 antibody, involve modulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amm, Hope M; Zhou, Tong; Steg, Adam D; Kuo, Huichien; Li, Yufeng; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2011-04-01

    TRA-8, a monoclonal antibody to death receptor 5 induces apoptosis in various cancer cells; however, the degree of sensitivity varies from highly sensitive to resistant. We have previously shown that resistance to TRA-8 can be reversed by using chemotherapeutic agents, but the mechanism underlying this sensitization was not fully understood. Here, we examined the combination of TRA-8 with doxorubicin or bortezomib in breast cancer cells. In TRA-8-resistant BT-474 and T47D cells, both chemotherapy agents synergistically sensitized cells to TRA-8 cytotoxicity with enhanced activation of apoptosis shown by cleavage of caspases and PARP, reduced Bid, increased proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, and increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Doxorubicin or bortezomib combined with TRA-8 also reduced Bcl-XL and X-linked inhibitors of apoptosis (XIAP) in treated cells. Furthermore, targeting these proteins with pharmacologic modulators, AT-101, BH3I-2' and AT-406, produced sensitization to TRA-8. TRA-8 combined with AT-101 or BH3I-2', inhibitors of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, produced synergistic cytotoxicity against ZR-75-1, BT-474, and T47D cells. The IAP-targeting compound, AT-406, was synergistic with TRA-8 in BT-474 cells, and to a lesser extent T47D cells. Activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway was a common mechanism associated with sensitization of TRA-8-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Collectively, these studies show that the Bcl-2 and IAP families of proteins are involved in TRA-8 and chemotherapy resistance via their modulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Targeting these proteins with novel agents sensitized TRA-8-resistant breast cancer cells, suggesting this approach may represent a potent therapeutic strategy in the treatment of breast cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  6. Non-apoptotic Cell Death in Malignant Tumor Cells and Natural Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Zhang, Ruonan; Wu, Fan; Zhai, Lijuan; Wang, Kaifeng; Xiao, Mang; Xie, Tian; Sui, Xinbing

    2018-01-30

    Traditional cancer therapy is mainly targeting on enhancing cell apoptosis, however, it is well established that many cancer cells are chemo-resistant and defective in apoptosis induction. Therefore, it may have important therapeutic implications to exploit some novel natural compounds based on non-apoptotic programmed cell death. Currently, accumulating evidence shows that the compounds from nature source can induce non-apoptotic programmed cell death in cancer cells, and therefore these natural compounds have gained a great promise for the future anticancer therapeutics. In this review, we will concentrate our efforts on the latest developments regarding major forms of non-apoptotic programmed cell death--autophagic cell death, necroptosis, ferroptosis, pyroptosis, glutamoptosis and exosome-associated cell death. Our increased understanding of the role of natural compounds in regulating non-apoptotic programmed cell death will hopefully provide prospective strategies for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The chemoadjuvant potential of grape seed procyanidins on p53-related cell death in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chen, Su-Feng; Liu, Chia-Lin; Nieh, Shin

    2012-04-01

    To clarify the efficacy of grape seed procyanidin (GSP) on antiproliferative effects related to p53 functional status of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for its chemoadjuvant potential. We used GSP to investigate SCC-25 cells with wild-type p53 gene and OEC-M1 cells with mutant p53 gene for the assessment of antiproliferative effects including cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion potential, and alterations of associated oncoproteins involved in cellular and molecular events. The findings suggest that GSP on OEC-M1 cells leads to cell cycle arrest by increasing the expression of p21(Cip1) /p27(Kip1) protein without functioning mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, whereas GSP on SCC-25 cells inhibits cell proliferation via both G1-phase arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as a result of alterations of Bcl-2. GSP also inhibits the migration and invasion of both cells, which are associated with the suppression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9. Antiproliferative effectiveness of GSP is closely associated with the p53 status of OSCC cells. GSP displays chemoadjuvant potential via cell cycle blockage and apoptotic induction. Our findings clearly suggest that GSP may play a role as a novel chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for OSCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Luffa echinata Roxb. Induces Human Colon Cancer Cell (HT-29 Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The antiproliferative properties and cell death mechanism induced by the extract of the fruits of Luffa echinata Roxb. (LER were investigated. The methanolic extract of LER inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (HT-29 in both dose-dependent and time-dependent manners and caused a significant increase in the population of apoptotic cells. In addition, obvious shrinkage and destruction of the monolayer were observed in LER-treated cells, but not in untreated cells. Analysis of the cell cycle after treatment of HT-29 cells with various concentrations indicated that LER extracts inhibited the cellular proliferation of HT-29 cells via G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle. The Reactive oxygen species (ROS level determination revealed that LER extracts induced apoptotic cell death via ROS generation. In addition, LER treatment led to a rapid drop in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP as a decrease in fluorescence. The transcripts of several apoptosis-related genes were investigated by RT-PCR analysis. The caspase-3 transcripts of HT-29 cells significantly accumulated and the level of Bcl-XL mRNA was decreased after treatment with LER extract. Furthermore, the ratio of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis genes (Bax and Bcl-2 was sharply increased from 1.6 to 54.1. These experiments suggest that LER has anticancer properties via inducing the apoptosis in colon cancer cells, which provided the impetus for further studies on the therapeutic potential of LER against human colon carcinoma.

  9. Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    tumor associated macrophages 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC...AXL/MerTK family, is expressed in myeloid lineage cells in which it acts to suppress proinflammatory cytokines following ingestion of apoptotic...expression of the proto- oncogene Mer in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia . Clin Cancer Res. 2006;12(9):2662–2669. 19. Keating AK, et al

  10. The Small Molecule AU14022 Promotes Colorectal Cancer Cell Death via p53-mediated G2/M-phase Arrest and Mitochondria-mediated Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hwani; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Jae Sung; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Ahn, Jiyeon

    2017-10-14

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays critical roles in cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death, with its activation capable of sensitizing cancer cells to radiotherapy or chemotherapy. To identify small molecules that induce apoptosis via increased p53 transcriptional activity, we used a novel in-house library containing 96 small-molecule compounds. Using a cell-based screening method with a p53-responsive luciferase-reporter assay system involving benzoxazole derivatives, we found that AU14022 administration significantly increased p53 transcriptional activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with AU14022 increased p53 protein expression, p53 Ser15 phosphorylation, p53-mediated expression of downstream target genes, and apoptosis in p53-wild-type HCT116 human colon cancer cells, but not in p53-knockout HCT116 cells. Additionally, p53-wild-type HCT116 cells treated with AU14022 exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including modulated expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 family proteins and cytochrome c release. Combination treatment with AU14022 and ionizing radiation (IR) synergistically induced apoptosis as compared with IR or AU14022 treatment alone, with further investigation demonstrating that cell cycle progression was significantly arrested at the G2/M phase following AU14022 treatment. Furthermore, in a mouse p53-wild-type HCT116 colon cancer xenograft model, combined treatment with AU14022 and IR inhibited tumor growth more effectively than radiation alone. Therefore, AU14022 treatment induced apoptosis through p53-mediated cell cycle arrest involving mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to enhanced radiosensitivity in colon cancer cells. These results provide a basis for further assessments of AU14022 as a promising anticancer agent. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel Indole-based Tambjamine-Analogues Induce Apoptotic Lung Cancer Cell Death through p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Villanueva, Alberto; Martínez-García, David; Rodilla, Ananda M; Ramos, Ricard; Fardilha, Margarida; Moya, Juan; Quesada, Roberto; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    Lung cancer has become the leading killer cancer worldwide, due to late diagnosis and lack of efficient anticancer drugs. We have recently described novel natural-derived tambjamine analogues that are potent anion transporters capable of disrupting cellular ion balance, inducing acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of cellular plasma membranes. Although these tambjamine analogues were able to compromise cell survival, their molecular mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Herein we characterize the molecular cell responses induced by highly active indole-based tambjamine analogues treatment in lung cancer cells. Expression changes produced after compounds treatment comprised genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle, growth factors and its receptors, protein kinases and topoisomerases, among others. Dysregulation of BCL2 and BIRC5/survivin genes suggested the apoptotic pathway as the induced molecular cell death mechanism. In fact, activation of several proapoptotic markers (caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP) and reversion of the cytotoxic effect upon treatment with an apoptosis inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) were observed. Moreover, members of the Bcl-2 protein family suffered changes after tambjamine analogues treatment, with a concomitant protein decrease towards the prosurvival members. Besides this, it was observed cellular accumulation of ROS upon compound treatment and an activation of the stress-kinase p38 MAPK route that, when inhibited, reverted the cytotoxic effect of the tambjamine analogues. Finally, a significant therapeutic effect of these compounds was observed in subcutaneous and orthotopic lung cancer mice models. Taken together, these results shed light on the mechanism of action of novel cytotoxic anionophores and demonstrate the therapeutic effects against lung cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(7); 1224-35. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Amino acid containing thapsigargin analogues deplete androgen receptor protein via synthesis inhibition and induce the death of prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griend, Donald J Vander; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    -penetrant sequiterpene-lactone that once inside cells inhibits (IC(50), approximately 10 nmol/L) critically important housekeeping SERCA 2b calcium pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using a series of five genetically diverse androgen ablation refractory human prostate cancer lines (LNCaP, LAPC-4, VCaP, MDA-PCa-2b...

  13. Sphingolipid metabolism and programmed cell death in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, Stefanka Diankova

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death is genetically determined. When the regulation of the process is disrupted it can have severe or lethal consequences for the organism. In mammals, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with abnormalities in programmed cell death. Development of an animal embryo

  14. Cardiorespiratory fitness and death from cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Poor cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is associated with death from cancer. If follow-up time is short, this association may be confounded by subclinical disease already present at the time of CRF assessment. This study investigates the association between CRF and death from cancer...... using a bicycle ergometer test and analysed in multivariable Cox models including conventional risk factors, social class and self-reported physical activity. Death from cancer and all-cause mortality was assessed using Danish national registers. Follow-up was 100% complete. RESULTS: In total, 5131 men...

  15. Hawaii natural compounds are promising to reduce ovarian cancer deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei-Zhang, David J; Li, Chunshun; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-07-02

    The low survival rate of patients with ovarian cancer largely results from the advanced ovarian tumors as well as tumor resistance to chemotherapy, leading to metastasis and recurrence. However, it is missing as to an effective therapeutic approach that focuses on these aspects to prolong progression-free survival and to decrease mortality in ovarian cancer patients. Here, based on our cancer drug discovery studies, we provide prospective insights into the development of a future line of drugs to effectively reduce ovarian cancer deaths. Pathways that increase the probability of cancer, such as the defective Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, may render cancer cells more sensitive to new drug targeting.

  16. Water extract of Galla Rhois with steaming process enhances apoptotic cell death in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hui Yim

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Compared with GRE, AGRE is more potent in its ability to induce apoptosis in HCT116 cells; therefore, we suggest that the steaming process may be useful as a feasible method for improving the anticancer effect of GRE.

  17. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial–mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, Himanshi, E-mail: narangh@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Amit [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bhat, Nagesh [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Pandey, Badri N.; Ghosh, Anu [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Biological effectiveness of proton and gamma irradiation is compared in A549 cells. • Proton irradiation is two times more cytotoxic than gamma irradiation. • It alters ten times more number of early genes, as observed by microarray study. • It does not enhance cell migration, invasion and adhesion, unlike gamma irradiation. • It was more effective in reducing the percentage of cancer stem cell like cells. - Abstract: Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and “stemness” in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3 MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44{sup +}, a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  18. 3-BrPA eliminates human bladder cancer cells with highly oncogenic signatures via engagement of specific death programs and perturbation of multiple signaling and metabolic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantakou, Eumorphia G; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E; Velentzas, Athanassios D; Basogianni, Aggeliki-Stefania; Paronis, Efthimios; Balafas, Evangelos; Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Anastasiadou, Ema; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J

    2015-07-22

    Urinary bladder cancer is one of the most fatal and expensive diseases of industrialized world. Despite the strenuous efforts, no seminal advances have been achieved for its clinical management. Given the importance of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cell survival and growth, we have herein employed 3-BrPA, a halogenated derivative of pyruvate and historically considered inhibitor of glycolysis, to eliminate bladder cancer cells with highly oncogenic molecular signatures. Bladder cancer cells were exposed to 3-BrPA in the absence or presence of several specific inhibitors. Cell viability was determined by MTT and flow-cytometry assays; cell death, signaling activity and metabolic integrity by Western blotting and immunofluorescence; mutant-gene profiling by DNA sequencing; and gene expression by RT-sqPCR. 3-BrPA could activate dose-dependent apoptosis (type 1 PCD) and regulated necrosis (type 3 PCD) of T24 (grade III; H-Ras(G12V); p53(ΔY126)), but not RT4 (grade I), cells, with PARP, MLKL, Drp1 and Nec-7-targeted components critically orchestrating necrotic death. However, similarly to RIPK1 and CypD, p53 presented with non-essential contribution to 3-BrPA-induced cellular collapse, while reactivation of mutant p53 with PRIMA-1 resulted in strong synergism of the two agents. Given the reduced expression of MPC components (likely imposing mitochondrial dysfunction) in T24 cells, the suppression of constitutive autophagy (required by cells carrying oncogenic Ras; also, type 2 PCD) and derangement of glucose-homeostasis determinants by 3-BrPA critically contribute to drug-directed depletion of ATP cellular stores. This bioenergetic crisis is translated to severe dysregulation of Akt/FoxO/GSK-3, mTOR/S6, AMPK and MAPK (p44/42, p38 and SAPK/JNK) signaling pathways in 3-BrPA-treated T24 cells. Sensitivity to 3-BrPA (and tolerance to glucose deprivation) does not rely on B-Raf(V600E) or K-Ras(G13D) mutant oncogenic proteins, but partly depends on aberrant signaling

  19. Lung cancer death rates fall, helping drive decrease in overall cancer death rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, covering the period 1975–2010, showed death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, dropping at a faster pace than in previous years.

  20. Activation of NAG-1 via JNK signaling revealed an isochaihulactone-triggered cell death in human LNCaP prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Sung-Ying

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We explored the mechanisms of cell death induced by isochaihulactone treatment in LNCaP cells. Methods LNCaP cells were treated with isochaihulactone and growth inhibition was assessed. Cell cycle profiles after isochaihulactone treatment were determined by flow cytometry. Expression levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins, caspase 9, caspase 3, and PARP were determined after isochaihulactone treatment. Signaling pathway was verified by inhibitors pre-treatment. Expression levels of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1 and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene 1 (NAG-1 were determined to investigate their role in LNCaP cell death. NAG-1 expression was knocked down by si-NAG-1 siRNA transfection. Rate of cell death and proliferation were obtained by MTT assay. Results Isochaihulactone caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in LNCaP cells, which was correlated with an increase of p53 and p21 levels and downregulation of the checkpoint proteins cdc25c, cyclin B1, and cdc2. Bcl-2 phosphorylation and caspase activation were also observed. Isochaihulactone induced phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, and JNK inhibitor partially reduced isochaihulactone-induced cell death. Isochaihulactone also induced the expressions of EGR-1 and NAG-1. Expression of NAG-1 was reduced by JNK inhibitor, and knocking down of NAG-1 inhibited isochaihulactone-induced cell death. Conclusions Isochaihulactone apparently induces G2/M cell cycle arrest via downregulation of cyclin B1 and cdc2, and induces cellular death by upregulation of NAG-1 via JNK activation in LNCaP cells.

  1. Wortmannin induces MCF-7 breast cancer cell death via the apoptotic pathway, involving chromatin condensation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and membrane blebbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akter R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rozina Akter,1 Md. Zakir Hossain,2 Maurice G Kleve,3 Michael A Gealt31Applied Biosciences Emphasis, Department of Applied Science, 2Graduate Institute of Technology, 3Department of Biology, College of Science and of Mathematics, University Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USABackground: Apoptosis can be used as a reliable marker for evaluating potential chemotherapeutic agents. Because wortmannin is a microbial steroidal metabolite, it specifically inhibits the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase pathway, and could be used as a promising apoptosis-based therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the biomolecular mechanisms involved in wortmannin-induced cell death of breast cancer-derived MCF-7 cells.Methods and results: Our experimental results demonstrate that wortmannin has strong apoptotic effects through a combination of different actions, including reduction of cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, inhibition of proliferation, and enhanced generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that wortmannin induces MCF-7 cell death via a programmed pathway showing chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species, and membrane blebbing, which are characteristics typical of apoptosis.Keywords: wortmannin, human breast adenocarcinoma, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, flow cytometry

  2. Identification of CETP as a molecular target for estrogen positive breast cancer cell death by cholesterol depleting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Luke; Sagar, Sunil; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth; Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol and its metabolites act as steroid hormone precursors, which promote estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) progression. Development of cholesterol targeting anticancer drugs has been hindered due to the lack of knowledge of viable molecular targets. Till now, Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) has been envisaged as a feasible molecular target in atherosclerosis, but for the first time, we show that CETP contributes to BC cell survival when challenged with cholesterol depleting agents. We show that MCF-7 CETP knockout BC cells pose less resistance towards cytotoxic compounds (Tamoxifen and Acetyl Plumbagin (AP)), and were more susceptible to intrinsic apoptosis. Analysis of differentially expressed genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), in vivo tumor inhibition, and in vitro phenotypic responses to AP revealed a unique CETP-centric cholesterol pathway involved in sensitizing ER+ BC cells to intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of cell line, tissue and patient data available in publicly available databases linked elevated CETP expression to cancer, cancer relapse and overall poor survival. Overall, our findings highlight CETP as a pharmacologically relevant and unexploited cellular target in BC. The work also highlights AP as a promising chemical entity for preclinical investigations as a cholesterol depleting anticancer therapeutic agent.

  3. Characterization of HJ-PI01 as a novel Pim-2 inhibitor that induces apoptosis and autophagic cell death in triple-negative human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Qian; Yin, Yi-Qiong; Liu, Jie; Wang, Gui-Hua; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Ling-Juan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Pim-2 is a short-lived serine/threonine kinase, which plays a key role in metastasis of breast cancer through persistent activation of STAT3. Although the crystal structure of Pim-2 has been reported, but thus far no specific Pim-2-targeted compounds have been reported. In this study, we identified a novel Pim-2 inhibitor, HJ-PI01, by in silico analysis and experimental validation. The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, chemical synthesis, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to design and discover the new Pim-2 inhibitor HJ-PI01. The anti-tumor effects of HJ-PI01 were evaluated in human breast MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-436, MCF-7 cells in vitro and in MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, which were treated with HJ-PI01 (40 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ig) with or without lienal polypeptide (50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ip) for 10 d. The apoptosis/autophage-inducing mechanisms of HJ-PI01 were elucidated using Western blots, immunoblots, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Based on the PrePPI network, the potential partners interacting with Pim-2 in regulating apoptosis (160 protein pairs) and autophagy (47 protein pairs) were identified. Based on the structural characteristics of Pim-2, a total of 15 compounds (HJ-PI01 to HJ-P015) were synthesized, which showed moderate or remarkable anti-proliferative potency in the human breast cancer cell lines tested. The most effective compound HJ-PI01 exerted a robust inhibition on MDA-MB-231 cells compared with chlorpromazine and the pan-Pim inhibitor PI003. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation revealed that HJ-PI01 had a good binding score with Pim-2. Moreover, HJ-PI01 (300 nmol/L) induced death receptor-dependent and mitochondrial apoptosis as well as autophagic death in MDA-MB-231 cells. In MDA-MB-231 xenograft mice, administration of HJ-PI01 remarkably inhibited the tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. Co-administration of HJ-PI01 with lienal

  4. TAK1 control of cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaly, S R; Ninomiya-Tsuji, J; Morioka, S

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death, a physiologic process for removing cells, is critically important in normal development and for elimination of damaged cells. Conversely, unattended cell death contributes to a variety of human disease pathogenesis. Thus, precise understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying control of cell death is important and relevant to public health. Recent studies emphasize that transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a central regulator of cell death and is ...

  5. ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase promotes tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated cancer cell survival via sialylation of the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) death receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdbrooks, Andrew T; Britain, Colleen M; Bellis, Susan L

    2018-02-02

    Activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) death receptor by TNF induces either cell survival or cell death. However, the mechanisms mediating these distinct outcomes remain poorly understood. In this study, we report that the ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase, an enzyme up-regulated in numerous cancers, sialylates TNFR1 and thereby protects tumor cells from TNF-induced apoptosis. Using pancreatic and ovarian cancer cells with ST6Gal-I knockdown or overexpression, we determined that α2-6 sialylation of TNFR1 had no effect on early TNF-induced signaling events, including the rapid activation of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Akt (occurring within 15 min). However, upon extended TNF treatment (6-24 h), cells with high ST6Gal-I levels exhibited resistance to TNF-induced apoptosis, as indicated by morphological evidence of cell death and decreased activation of caspases 8 and 3. Correspondingly, at these later time points, high ST6Gal-I expressers displayed sustained activation of the survival molecules Akt and NF-κB. Additionally, extended TNF treatment resulted in the selective enrichment of clonal variants with high ST6Gal-I expression, further substantiating a role for ST6Gal-I in cell survival. Given that TNFR1 internalization is known to be essential for apoptosis induction, whereas survival signaling is initiated by TNFR1 at the plasma membrane, we examined TNFR1 localization. The α2-6 sialylation of TNFR1 was found to inhibit TNF-induced TNFR1 internalization. Thus, by restraining TNFR1 at the cell surface via sialylation, ST6Gal-I acts as a functional switch to divert signaling toward survival. These collective findings point to a novel glycosylation-dependent mechanism that regulates the cellular response to TNF and may promote cancer cell survival within TNF-rich tumor microenvironments. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. TNF-α exerts cytotoxic effects on multidrug resistant breast cancer MCF-7/MX cells via a non-apoptotic death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandadi, Morteza; Behravan, Javad; Abnous, Khalil; Ehtesham Gharaee, Melika; Mosaffa, Fatemeh

    2017-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cytokine involved in the various physiopathological processes such as autoimmune disorders and inflammation related diseases. Some multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cell lines including MCF-7/MX are more vulnerable to cytotoxic effects of TNF-α than their parental lines. In this study, breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and its MDR derivative MCF-7/MX were exposed to TNF-α afterward various downstream signaling mediators of TNF-α were analyzed. Although, treatment of MCF-7 cells with TNF-α activated NF-kB and caused RIP1 ubiquitination, TNF-α exposure led to JNK and RIP1 phosphorylation in MCF-7/MX cells. In both cell lines TNF-α did not activate the caspase cascade. Moreover, AnexinV/PI analysis showed that cytotoxic effects of TNF-α on MCF-7/MX is mediated via apoptosis independent mechanisms and inhibition of RIP1 kinase activity using necrostatin-1 revealed that kinase activity of RIP1 plays role in the production of ROS, activation of JNK and cellular death following exposure of MCF-7/MX cells to TNF-α. Overall, it seems that RIP1 ubiquitination and NF-kB activation are prosurvival signaling mediators protecting MCF-7 cells against cytotoxic effects of TNF-α while TNF-α drives MCF-7/MX cells to non-apoptotic cellular death via kinase activity of RIP1, activation of JNK and ROS production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Suppression of PC-1/PrLZ sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by attenuating DNA damage repair and inducing autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zeng-Fu; Wei, Qiang; Yu, Lan; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Hongtao; Song, Man; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jianguang; Wang, Jian; Li, Shanhu

    2016-09-20

    Radiotherapy is promising and effective for treating prostate cancer but the addition of a tumor cell radiosensitizer would improve therapeutic outcomes. PC-1/PrLZ, a TPD52 protein family member is frequently upregulated in advanced prostate cancer cells and may be a biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of PC-1/PrLZ for increasing radioresistance in human prostate cancer cell lines. Growth curves and survival assays after g-ray irradiation confirmed that depletion of endogenous PC-1/PrLZ significantly increased prostate cancer cell radiosensitivity. Irradiation (IR) increased PC-1/PrLZ expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and increased radiosensitivity in PC-1/PrLZ-suppressed cells was partially due to decreased DNA double strand break (DBS) repair which was measured with comet and gH2AX foci assays. Furthermore, depletion of PC-1/PrLZ impaired the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, which has been reported to be correlate with radioresistance in cancer cells. PC-1/PrLZ-deficient cells exhibited higher level of autophagy when compared with control cells. Thus, specific inhibition of PC-1/PrLZ might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for radiosensitizing prostate cancer cells.

  8. Lipid peroxidation in cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschler, Michael M; Stockwell, Brent R

    2017-01-15

    Disruption of redox homeostasis is a key phenotype of many pathological conditions. Though multiple oxidizing compounds such as hydrogen peroxide are widely recognized as mediators and inducers of oxidative stress, increasingly, attention is focused on the role of lipid hydroperoxides as critical mediators of death and disease. As the main component of cellular membranes, lipids have an indispensible role in maintaining the structural integrity of cells. Excessive oxidation of lipids alters the physical properties of cellular membranes and can cause covalent modification of proteins and nucleic acids. This review discusses the synthesis, toxicity, degradation, and detection of lipid peroxides in biological systems. Additionally, the role of lipid peroxidation is highlighted in cell death and disease, and strategies to control the accumulation of lipid peroxides are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct CPT-induced deaths in lung cancer cells caused by clathrin-mediated internalization of CP micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Ru-You; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Su-Hwei; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-02-01

    We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of poly(ε-caprolactone) (18.7 mol%), which self-assembled in water into a rod-like micelle to encapsulate hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) in the core (micelle/CPT) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. As a result of the recognition of the micelle by CD44, the micelle/CPT entered CRL-5802 cells efficiently and released CPT efficaciously, resulting in higher tumor suppression than commercial CPT-11. In this study, H1299 cells were found to have a higher CD44 expression than CRL-5802 cells. However, the lower CD44-expressing CRL-5802 cells had a higher percentage of cell death and higher cellular uptake of the micelle/CPT than the higher CD44-expressing H1299 cells. Examination of the internalization pathway of the micelle/CPT in the presence of different endocytic chemical inhibitors showed that the CRL-5802 cells involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was not found in the H1299 cells. Analysis of the cell cycle of the two cell lines exposed to the micelle/CPT revealed that the CRL-5802 cells arrested mainly in the S phase and the H1299 cells arrested mainly in the G2-M phase. A consistent result was also found in the evaluation of γ-H2AX expression, which was about three-fold higher in the CRL-5802 cells than in the H1299 cells. A near-infrared dye, IR780, was encapsulated into the micelle to observe the in vivo biodistribution of the micelle/IR780 in tumor-bearing mice. The CRL-5802 tumor showed a higher fluorescence intensity than the H1299 tumor at any tracing time after 1 h. Thus we tentatively concluded that CRL-5802 cells utilized the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway and arrested in the S phase on exposure to the micelle/CPT; all are possible reasons for the better therapeutic outcome in CRL-5802 cells than in H1299 cells.We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of

  10. Anti-cancer fatty-acid derivative induces autophagic cell death through modulation of PKM isoform expression profile mediated by bcr-abl in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Haruka; Taniguchi, Kohei; Kumazaki, Minami; Yamada, Nami; Ito, Yuko; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Uno, Bunji; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Minami, Yosuke; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2015-04-28

    The fusion gene bcr-abl develops chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and stimulates PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, leading to impaired autophagy. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling also plays an important role in cell metabolism. The Warburg effect is a well-recognized hallmark of cancer energy metabolism, and is regulated by the mTOR/c-Myc/hnRNP/PKM signaling cascade. To develop a new strategy for the treatment of CML, we investigated the associations among bcr-abl, the cascade related to cancer energy metabolism, and autophagy induced by a fatty-acid derivative that we had previously reported as being an autophagy inducer. Here we report that a fatty-acid derivative, AIC-47, induced transcriptional repression of the bcr-abl gene and modulated the expression profile of PKM isoforms, resulting in autophagic cell death. We show that c-Myc functioned as a transcriptional activator of bcr-abl, and regulated the hnRNP/PKM cascade. AIC-47, acting through the PPARγ/β-catenin pathway, induced down-regulation of c-Myc, leading to the disruption of the bcr-abl/mTOR/hnRNP signaling pathway, and switching of the expression of PKM2 to PKM1. This switching caused autophagic cell death through an increase in the ROS level. Our findings suggest that AIC-47 induced autophagic cell death through the PPARγ/β-catenin/bcr-abl/mTOR/hnRNP/PKM cascade. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer-specific mortality, cure fraction, and noncancer causes of death among diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients in the immunochemotherapy era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, Nadia; Mariotto, Angela B; Besson, Caroline; Suneja, Gita; Robien, Kim; Younes, Naji; Engels, Eric A

    2017-09-01

    Survival after the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been increasing since 2002 because of improved therapies; however, long-term outcomes for these patients in the modern treatment era are still unknown. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, this study first assessed factors associated with DLBCL-specific mortality during 2002-2012. An epidemiologic risk profile, based on clinical and demographic characteristics, was used to stratify DLBCL cases into low-, medium-, and high-risk groups. The proportions of DLBCL cases that might be considered cured in these 3 risk groups was estimated. Risks of death due to various noncancer causes among DLBCL cases versus the general population were also calculated with standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Overall, 8274 deaths were recorded among 18,047 DLBCL cases; 76% of the total deaths were attributed to DLBCL, and 24% were attributed to noncancer causes. The 10-year survival rates for the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups were 80%, 60%, and 36%, respectively. The estimated cure proportions for the low-, medium-, and high-risk groups were 73%, 49%, and 27%, respectively; however, these cure estimates were uncertain because of the need to extrapolate the survival curves beyond the follow-up time. Mortality risks calculated with SMRs were elevated for conditions including vascular diseases (SMR, 1.3), infections (SMR, 3.1), gastrointestinal diseases (SMR, 2.5), and blood diseases (SMR, 4.6). These mortality risks were especially high within the initial 5 years after the diagnosis and declined after 5 years. Some DLBCL patients may be cured of their cancer, but they continue to experience excess mortality from lymphoma and other noncancer causes. Cancer 2017;123:3326-34. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Cell Death in C. elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jennifer Zuckerman; Shaham, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is a common and important feature of animal development, and cell death defects underlie many human disease states. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has proven fertile ground for uncovering molecular and cellular processes controlling programmed cell death. A core pathway consisting of the conserved proteins EGL-1/BH3-only, CED-9/BCL2, CED-4/APAF1, and CED-3/caspase promotes most cell death in the nematode, and a conserved set of proteins ensures the engulfment and degradation of dying cells. Multiple regulatory pathways control cell death onset in C. elegans, and many reveal similarities with tumor formation pathways in mammals, supporting the idea that cell death plays key roles in malignant progression. Nonetheless, a number of observations suggest that our understanding of developmental cell death in C. elegans is incomplete. The interaction between dying and engulfing cells seems to be more complex than originally appreciated, and it appears that key aspects of cell death initiation are not fully understood. It has also become apparent that the conserved apoptotic pathway is dispensable for the demise of the C. elegans linker cell, leading to the discovery of a previously unexplored gene program promoting cell death. Here, we review studies that formed the foundation of cell death research in C. elegans and describe new observations that expand, and in some cases remodel, this edifice. We raise the possibility that, in some cells, more than one death program may be needed to ensure cell death fidelity. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  14. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Wan; Kwon, Su-Jin; Park, Do-Sim; Cha, Byong-Ki; Oh, Seon-Hee; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeong, Eun-Taik; Kim, Hak-Ryul

    2015-01-01

    Pemetrexed, a multitarget antifolate used to treat malignant mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been shown to stimulate autophagy. In this study, we determined whether autophagy could be induced by pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we determined whether inhibition of autophagy drives apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Malignant mesothelioma MSTO-211H and A549 NSCLC cells were treated with pemetrexed and simvastatin alone and in combination to evaluate their effect on autophagy and apoptosis. Cotreatment with pemetrexed and simvastatin induced greater caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy than either drug alone in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), ATG5 siRNA, bafilomycin A, and E64D/pepstatin A enhanced the apoptotic potential of pemetrexed and simvastatin, whereas rapamycin and LY294002 attenuated their induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Our data indicate that pemetrexed and simvastatin cotreatment augmented apoptosis and autophagy in malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC cells. Inhibition of pemetrexed and simvastatin-induced autophagy was shown to enhance apoptosis, suggesting that this could be a novel therapeutic strategy against malignant mesothelioma and NSCLC. PMID:26334320

  15. Intermolecular G-quadruplex induces Hyaluronic Acid-DNA superpolymers causing cancer cell swelling, blebbing and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Nathan; Model, Michael; Worden, Matt; Hegmann, Torsten; Basu, Soumitra

    2018-02-05

    Over the past decade, nanomedicine has gained considerable traction through its relevance, for example in "smart" delivery, thus creating platforms for novel treatments. Here we report a natural polymer-DNA conjugate that undergoes self-assembly in a K+ dependent fashion to form a G-quadruplex (GQ) and generate superpolymeric structures. We derivatized the naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan polymer hyaluronic acid (HA) with short G-rich DNA (HASH-DNA) that can form intermolecular non-canonical GQ structure. Gel mobility shift assay and Circular Dichroism measurements confirmed HASH conjugation to DNA and K+ dependent GQ formation respectively. TEM and SEM results indicated that the addition of K+ to the HASH-DNA conjugate led to the formation of micron range structures, while control samples remained unordered and as nebulous globular form. Confocal microscopy of a fluorescently labeled form of the superpolymer verified increased cellular uptake. The HASH-DNA conjugates showed toxicity in HeLa cells while a scrambled DNA (Mut) conjugate HASH-Mut showed no cytotoxicity, presumably due to non-formation of the superpolymeric structure. To understand the mechanism of cell death and if the superpolymeric structure is responsible for it, we monitored the cell size and observed an average of 23% increase in size compared to 4.5% in control cells at 4.5 hours. We believe that cellular stress is generated presumably by the intracellular assembly of this large superpolymeric nanostructures causing cell blebbing with no exit option. This approach provides a new strategy of cellular delivery of a targeted naturally occurring polymer and a novel way to induce superpolymeric structure formation that acts as a therapeutic.

  16. Crude aqueous extracts of Pluchea indica (L.) Less. inhibit proliferation and migration of cancer cells through induction of p53-dependent cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pluchea indica (L.) Less. (Asteraceae) is a perennial shrub plant with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant medicinal properties. However, the anti-cancer properties of its aqueous extracts have not been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-proliferation, anti-migration, and pro-apoptotic properties of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root on human malignant glioma cancer cells and human cervical cancer cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods GBM8401 human glioma cells and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells were treated with various concentrations of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root and cancer cell proliferation and viability were measured by cell growth curves, trypan blue exclusions, and the tetrazolium reduction assay. Effects of the crude aqueous extracts on focus formation, migration, and apoptosis of cancer cells were studied as well. The molecular mechanism that contributed to the anti-cancer activities of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root was also examined using Western blotting analysis. Results Crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root suppressed proliferation, viability, and migration of GBM8401 and HeLa cells. Treatment with crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root for 48 hours resulted in a significant 75% and 70% inhibition on proliferation and viability of GBM8401 and HeLa cancer cells, respectively. Crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root inhibited focus formation and promoted apoptosis of HeLa cells. It was found that phosphorylated-p53 and p21 were induced in GBM8401 and HeLa cells treated with crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root. Expression of phosphorylated-AKT was decreased in HeLa cells treated with crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root. Conclusion The in vitro anti-cancer effects of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root indicate that it has sufficient potential to warrant further examination and development as a new anti-cancer

  17. Cell death in the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Murray; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Cell death is important for both development and tissue homeostasis in the adult. As such, it is tightly controlled and deregulation is associated with diverse pathologies; for example, regulated cell death is involved in vessel remodelling during development or following injury, but deregulated death is implicated in pathologies such as atherosclerosis, aneurysm formation, ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathies and infarction. We describe the mechanisms of cell death and its role in the normal physiology and various pathologies of the cardiovascular system. PMID:16547202

  18. Inhibiting heat shock protein 90 and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway impairs metabolic homeostasis and leads to cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belalcazar, Astrid; Shaib, Walid L; Farren, Matthew R; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhengjia; Yang, Lily; Lesinski, Gregory B; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra

    2017-12-15

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway play crucial roles in the homeostasis of pancreatic cancer cells. This study combined for the first time the HSP90 inhibitor ganetespib (Gan) and the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Carf) to target key mechanisms of homeostasis in pancreatic cancer. It was hypothesized that Gan plus Carf would elicit potent antitumor activity by modulating complementary homeostatic processes. In vitro and in vivo effects of this combination on mechanisms of cell growth and viability were evaluated with human pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA PaCa-2 and HPAC). Combined treatment with Gan and Carf significantly decreased cell viability. The mechanism varied by cell line and involved G 2 -M cell-cycle arrest accompanied by a consistent reduction in key cell-cycle regulatory proteins and concomitant upregulation of p27. Further studies revealed increased autophagy markers, including the upregulation of autophagy related 7 and light chain 3 cleavage, and evidence of apoptosis (increased Bax expression and processing of caspase 3). Immunoblot analyses confirmed the modulation of other pathways that influence cell viability, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and nuclear factor κB. Finally, the treatment of athymic mice bearing HPAC tumors with Gan and Carf significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo. An immunoblot analysis of freshly isolated tumors from animals at the end of the study confirmed in vivo modulation of key signaling pathways. The results reveal Gan plus Carf to be a promising combination with synergistic antiproliferative, apoptotic, and pro-autophagy effects in preclinical studies of pancreatic cancer and will further the exploration of the utility of this treatment combination in clinical trials. Cancer 2017;123:4924-33. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    weight compounds, including boswellic acids, in frankincense essential oil fraactions. Human pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to Fractions III and IV (containing higher molecular weight compounds) treatment with suppressed cell viability and increased cell death. Essential oil activated the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, induced a rapid and transient activation of Akt and Erk1/2, and suppressed levels of cyclin D1 cdk4 expression in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, Boswellia sacra essential oil Fraction IV exhibited anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities against pancreatic tumors in the heterotopic xenograft mouse model. Conclusion All fractions of frankincense essential oil from Boswellia sacra are capable of suppressing viability and inducing apoptosis of a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Potency of essential oil-suppressed tumor cell viability may be associated with the greater abundance of high molecular weight compounds in Fractions III and IV. Although chemical component(s) responsible for tumor cell cytotoxicity remains undefined, crude essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins might be a useful alternative therapeutic agent for treating patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. PMID:23237355

  20. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiao; Suhail, Mahmoud M; Yang, Qing; Cao, Amy; Fung, Kar-Ming; Postier, Russell G; Woolley, Cole; Young, Gary; Zhang, Jingzhe; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2012-12-13

    acids, in frankincense essential oil fraactions. Human pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to Fractions III and IV (containing higher molecular weight compounds) treatment with suppressed cell viability and increased cell death. Essential oil activated the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, induced a rapid and transient activation of Akt and Erk1/2, and suppressed levels of cyclin D1 cdk4 expression in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, Boswellia sacra essential oil Fraction IV exhibited anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities against pancreatic tumors in the heterotopic xenograft mouse model. All fractions of frankincense essential oil from Boswellia sacra are capable of suppressing viability and inducing apoptosis of a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Potency of essential oil-suppressed tumor cell viability may be associated with the greater abundance of high molecular weight compounds in Fractions III and IV. Although chemical component(s) responsible for tumor cell cytotoxicity remains undefined, crude essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins might be a useful alternative therapeutic agent for treating patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis.

  1. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Xiao

    2012-12-01

    abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, in frankincense essential oil fraactions. Human pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to Fractions III and IV (containing higher molecular weight compounds treatment with suppressed cell viability and increased cell death. Essential oil activated the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, induced a rapid and transient activation of Akt and Erk1/2, and suppressed levels of cyclin D1 cdk4 expression in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, Boswellia sacra essential oil Fraction IV exhibited anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities against pancreatic tumors in the heterotopic xenograft mouse model. Conclusion All fractions of frankincense essential oil from Boswellia sacra are capable of suppressing viability and inducing apoptosis of a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Potency of essential oil-suppressed tumor cell viability may be associated with the greater abundance of high molecular weight compounds in Fractions III and IV. Although chemical component(s responsible for tumor cell cytotoxicity remains undefined, crude essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins might be a useful alternative therapeutic agent for treating patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis.

  2. Programmed Cell Death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death has been studied for decades in mammalian cells, but simpler organisms, including prokaryotes, plants, and fungi, also undergo regulated forms of cell death. We highlight the usefulness of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model organism for the study of programmed cell death. In N. crassa, cell death can be triggered genetically due to hyphal fusion between individuals with different allelic specificities at het loci, in a process called “heterokaryon incompatibility.” Chemical induction of cell death can also be achieved upon exposure to death-inducing agents like staurosporine, phytosphingosine, or hydrogen peroxide. A summary of the recent advances made by our and other groups on the discovery of the mechanisms and mediators underlying the process of cell death in N. crassa is presented.

  3. Treatment-related death in patients with small-cell lung cancer in phase III trials over the last two decades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Ochi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Treatment-related death (TRD remains a serious problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC, despite recent improvements in supportive care. However, few studies have formally assessed time trends in the proportion of TRD over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and pattern of TRD over time. METHODS: We examined phase 3 trials conducted between 1990 and 2010 to address the role of systemic treatment for SCLC. The time trend was assessed using linear regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 97 trials including nearly 25,000 enrolled patients were analyzed. The overall TRD proportion was 2.95%. Regarding the time trend, while it was not statistically significant, it tended to decrease, with a 0.138% decrease per year and 2.76% decrease per two decades. The most common cause of death was febrile neutropenia without any significant time trend in its incidence over the years examined (p = 0.139. However, deaths due to febrile neutropenia as well as all causes in patients treated with non-platinum chemotherapy increased significantly (p = 0.033. CONCLUSIONS: The overall TRD rate has been low, but not negligible, in phase III trials for SCLC over the past two decades.

  4. 7-(O)-Carboxymethyl daidzein conjugated to N-t-Boc-hexylenediamine: A Novel Compound Capable of Inducing Cell Death in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jamie M.; Alvero, Ayesha B.; Kohen, Fortune; Mor, Gil

    2009-01-01

    One of the major difficulties in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the high rate of recurrent disease. This is thought to be due to the survival of a population of chemo-resistant cells within the tumor, the ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs), that are able to regenerate the tumor following chemotherapy. Therefore, the identification of a compund that can target the OCSCs is one of the main steps in improving overall survival of ovarian cancer patients. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of N-t-boc-Daidzein, a novel daidzain derivative, on OCSCs. The efficacy of this compound was evaluated in OCSC and mature ovarian cancer cell (mOCC) lines isolated from malignant ovarian cancer asicites. Cells were treated with increasing concentrations of N-t-boc-Daidzein (0.003–10 μM) and cell growth was monitored by “real time in vitro micro-imaging” using the IncuCyte system. Cell viability was measured using the CellTiter 96 Assay. Apoptosis was determined by Caspase-Glo 3/7, 8, and 9 assays. The components of the apoptotic cascade were characterized by Western blot analysis. N-t-boc-Daidzein was able to significantly inhibit cell growth and decrease cell viability of OCSC as well as mOCC cells in a dose and time dependent maner. This effect was due to the induction of apoptosis, which is characterized by caspase activation, XIAP and AKT degradation, and mitochondrial depolarization. This study describes a novel compound that can target the OCSCs. These findings may provide vital aide in improving overall survival in patients with EOC. PMID:19738422

  5. Anticancer metal drugs and immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenzi, Alessio; Pirker, Christine; Keppler, Bernhard K; Berger, Walter

    2016-12-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics, but also innovative precision anticancer compounds, are commonly perceived to target primarily the cancer cell compartment. However, recently it was discovered that some of these compounds can also exert immunomodulatory activities which might be exploited to synergistically enhance their anticancer effects. One specific phenomenon of the interplay between chemotherapy and the anticancer immune response is the so-called "immunogenic cell death" (ICD). ICD was discovered based on a vaccination effect exerted by cancer cells dying from pretreatment with certain chemotherapeutics, termed ICD inducers, in syngeneic transplantation mouse models. Interestingly, only a minority of drugs is able to trigger ICD without a clear-cut relation to chemical structures or their primary modes-of-action. Nevertheless, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are clearly linked to ICD. With regard to metal drugs, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin is considered a bona fide ICD inducer. Taken into account that several experimental metal compounds are efficient ROS and ER stress mediators, presence of potent ICD inducers within the plethora of novel metal complexes seems feasible and has occasionally been reported. In the light of recent successes in cancer immunotherapy, here we review existing literature regarding anticancer metal drugs and ICD induction. We recommend a more profound investigation of the immunogenic features of experimental anticancer metal drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MAPK/JNK1 activation protects cells against cadmium-induced autophagic cell death via differential regulation of catalase and heme oxygenase-1 in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Keum-Young; Kim, Sang-Hun; Jung, Ki-Tae; Lee, Hyun-Young; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2017-10-01

    Antioxidant enzymes are related to oral diseases. We investigated the roles of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase in cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress and the underlying molecular mechanism in oral cancer cells. Exposing YD8 cells to Cd reduced the expression levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase 1/2 and induced the expression of HO-1 as well as autophagy and apoptosis, which were reversed by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Cd-exposed YD10B cells exhibited milder effects than YD8 cells, indicating that Cd sensitivity is associated with antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. Autophagy inhibition via pharmacologic and genetic modulations enhanced Cd-induced HO-1 expression, caspase-3 cleavage, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ho-1 knockdown increased autophagy and apoptosis. Hemin treatment partially suppressed Cd-induced ROS production and apoptosis, but enhanced autophagy and CHOP expression, indicating that autophagy induction is associated with cellular stress. Catalase inhibition by pharmacological and genetic modulations increased Cd-induced ROS production, autophagy, and apoptosis, but suppressed HO-1, indicating that catalase is required for HO-1 induction. p38 inhibition upregulated Cd-induced phospho-JNK and catalase, but suppressed HO-1, autophagy, apoptosis. JNK suppression exhibited contrary results, enhancing the expression of phospho-p38. Co-suppression of p38 and JNK1 failed to upregulate catalase and procaspase-3, which were upregulated by JNK1 overexpression. Overall, the balance between the responses of p38 and JNK activation to Cd appears to have an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis via the regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy induction. In addition, the upregulation of catalase by JNK1 activation can play a critical role in cell protection against Cd-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multifaceted Interpretation of Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatano, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Kenji; Hirata, Akihiro; Hara, Akira; Tomita, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, despite recent advances in clinical oncology. Accumulating evidence sheds light on the existence of cancer stem cells and their role in conferring therapeutic resistance. Cancer stem cells are a minor fraction of cancer cells, which enable tumor heterogeneity and initiate tumor formation. In addition, these cells are resistant to various cytotoxic factors. Therefore, elimination of cancer stem cells is difficult but...

  8. Quinovic acid glycosides purified fraction from Uncaria tomentosa induces cell death by apoptosis in the T24 human bladder cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Fabrícia; Kaiser, Samuel; Rockenbach, Liliana; Figueiró, Fabrício; Bergamin, Letícia Scussel; da Cunha, Fernanda Monte; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Ortega, George González; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in the genitourinary tract and remains a therapeutic challenge. In the search for new treatments, researchers have attempted to find compounds with low toxicity. With this goal in mind, Uncaria tomentosa is noteworthy because the bark and root of this species are widely used in traditional medicine and in adjuvant therapy for the treatment of numerous diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of one purified bioactive fraction of U.tomentosa bark on cell proliferation in two human bladder cancer cell lines, T24 and RT4. Quinovic acid glycosides purified fraction (QAPF) of U.tomentosa decreased the growth and viability of both T24 and RT4 cell lines. In T24 cells, QAPF induced apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and NF-κB. Further study showed that this fraction does not induce cell cycle arrest and does not alter PTEN and ERK levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that QAPF of U.tomentosa has a potent inhibitory effect on the growth of human bladder cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis through modulation of NF-κB, and we suggest that QAPF may become a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of this cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 1,1-Bis(3'-indolyl-1-(p-substituted phenylmethanes induce autophagic cell death in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadalapaka Gayathri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel series of methylene-substituted DIMs (C-DIMs, namely 1,1-bis(3'-indolyl-1-(p-substituted phenylmethanes containing t-butyl (DIM-C-pPhtBu and phenyl (DIM-C-pPhC6H5 groups inhibit proliferation of invasive estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 1-5 uM. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the pathways of C-DIM-induced cell death. Methods The effects of the C-DIMs on apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic cell death were determined using caspase inhibitors, measurement of lactate dehydrogenase release, and several markers of autophagy including Beclin and light chain associated protein 3 expression (LC3. Results The C-DIM compounds did not induce apoptosis and only DIM-C-pPhCF3 exhibited necrotic effects. However, treatment of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cells with C-DIMs resulted in accumulation of LC3-II compared to LC3-I protein, a characteristic marker of autophagy, and transient transfection of green fluorescent protein-LC3 also revealed that treatment with C-DIMs induced a redistribution of LC3 to autophagosomes after C-DIM treatment. In addition, the autofluorescent drug monodansylcadaverine (MDC, a specific autophagolysosome marker, accumulated in vacuoles after C-DIM treatment, and western blot analysis of lysates from cells treated with C-DIMs showed that the Beclin 1/Bcl-2 protein ratio increased. Conclusion The results suggest that C-DIM compounds may represent a new mechanism-based agent for treating drug-resistant ER-negative breast tumors through induction of autophagy.

  10. Frankincense derived heavy terpene cocktail boosting breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231 death in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruck Lukmanul Hakkim

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Extracting anti-cancer active principle cocktail by simple Soxhlet method is cost effective and less time consuming. Our in vitro anti-cancer data forms the rationale for us to test heavy terpene complex in breast cancer xenograft model in vivo. Furthermore, fractionation and developing frankincense heavy terpene based breast cancer drug is the major goal of our laboratory.

  11. The 2-oxoglutarate analog 3-oxoglutarate decreases normoxic hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in cancer cells, induces cell death, and reduces tumor xenograft growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koivunen P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peppi Koivunen,1 Stuart M Fell,2,3 Wenyun Lu,4 Joshua D Rabinowitz,4 Andrew L Kung,5,6 Susanne Schlisio,2,7 1Biocenter Oulu, Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Department of Chemistry and Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 5Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 6Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 7Department of Microbiology and Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. HIF-1α is also a major mediator of tumor physiology, and its abundance is correlated with therapeutic resistance in a broad range of cancers. Accumulation of HIF-1α under hypoxia is mainly controlled by the oxygen-sensing HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (EGLNs, also known as PHDs. Here, we identified a high level of normoxic HIF-1α protein in various cancer cell lines. EGLNs require oxygen and 2-oxoglutarate for enzymatic activity. We tested the ability of several cell-permeable 2-oxoglutarate analogs to regulate the abundance of HIF-1α protein. We identified 3-oxoglutarate as a potent regulator of HIF-1α in normoxic conditions. In contrast to 2-oxoglutarate, 3-oxoglutarate decreased the abundance of HIF-1α protein in several cancer cell lines in normoxia and diminished HIF-1α levels independent of EGLN enzymatic activity. Furthermore, we observed that 3-oxoglutarate was detrimental to cancer cell survival. We show that esterified 3-oxoglutarate, in combination with the cancer chemotherapeutic drug vincristine, induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data

  12. The potential utility of acetyltanshinone IIA in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancer: Induction of cancer cell death by targeting apoptotic and metabolic signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerram, Mounia; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Yousef, Bashir Alsiddig; Hamdi, Aida Mejda; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed; Yuan, Zi-Qiao; Luo, Hou-Wei; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2015-09-08

    Increased lipogenesis and protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression and is under intense investigation as a potential antineoplastic target. Acetyltanshinone IIA (ATA) is a compound that was obtained from chemical modifications of tanshinone IIA (TIIA), a potent anticancer agent extracted from the dried roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. A previous investigation indicated that ATA is more effective in inhibiting the growth of breast cancer especially cells with HER2 overexpression. However, the molecular mechanism(s) mediating this cytotoxic effect on HER2-positive breast cancer remained undefined. Studies described here report that ATA induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in the HER2-positive MDA-MB-453, SK-BR-3, and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the ATA-induced apoptosis effect is associated with remarkably down-regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) EGFR/HER2 and inhibition of their downstream pro-survival signaling pathways. Interestingly, ATA was found to trigger oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses and to activate AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) leading to inactivation of key enzymes involved in lipid and protein biogenesis. Intraperitoneal administration of ATA significantly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-453 xenografts in athymic mice without causing weight loss and any other side effects. Additionally, transwell migration, invasion, and wound healing assays revealed that ATA could suppress tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that ATA may have broad utility in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancers.

  13. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  14. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. Jie Huang, Fa-jiu Li, Shi Chen, Yi Shi, Xiao-jiang Wang, Chuan-hai Wang, Qing- ..... method for the determination of green and black tea polyphenols in biomatrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with coulometric array detection.

  16. Induction of cancer cell death by apoptosis and slow release of 5-fluoracil from metal-organic frameworks Cu-BTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Flávia Raquel Santos; de Araújo, Larissa C C; Rodrigues, Maria do D; da Silva, Teresinha G; Pereira, Valéria R A; Militão, Gardênia C G; Fontes, Danilo A F; Rolim-Neto, Pedro J; da Silva, Fausthon F; Nascimento, Silene C

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the mechanism associated with cytotoxic activity displayed by the drug 5-fluorouracil incorporated in Cu-BTC MOF and its slow delivery from the Cu-BTC MOF. Structural characterization encompasses elemental analysis (CHNS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG), Fournier transform infrared (FIT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to verify the process of association between the drug 5-FU and Cu-BTC MOF. Flow cytometry was done to indicate that apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the cell death. The release profile of the drug 5-FU from Cu-BTC MOF for 48 hours was obeisant. Also, the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by the peritonitis testing and the production of nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured. The chemical characterization of the material indicated the presence of drug associated with the coordination network in a proportion of 0.82 g 5-FU per 1.0 g of Cu-BTC MOF. The cytotoxic tests were carried out against four cell lines: NCI-H292, MCF-7, HT29 and HL60. The Cu-BTC MOF associated drug was extremely cytotoxic against the human breast cancer adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line and against human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL60), cancer cells were killed by apoptosis mechanisms. The drug demonstrated a slow release profile where 82% of the drug was released in 48 hours. The results indicated that the drug incorporated in Cu-BTC MOF decreased significantly the number of leukocytes in the peritoneal cavity of rodents as well as reduced levels of cytokines and nitric oxide production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Isoliquiritigenin pretreatment attenuates cisplatin induced proximal tubular cells (LLC-PK1) death and enhances the toxicity induced by this drug in bladder cancer T24 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Moreno-Londoño, Angela; Bello-Alvarez, Claudia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-11-01

    Cisplatin is an effective antineoplastic agent widely used in the treatment of solid tumors, however, it induces nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased antioxidant system defense in kidney. Isoliquiritigenin (IsoLQ) is a chalcone, which is characterized by its antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. Herein, we investigated the protective effect of IsoLQ on LLC-PK1 proximal tubular cells against cisplatin-induced death and its effect on the antineoplastic activity of cisplatin on bladder cancer T24 cell line. It was found that pretreatment with IsoLQ attenuates cisplatin-induced cell death, ROS production, and activation of caspase-3. IsoLQ also induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression that may be associated with nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. The protective effect of IsoLQ was abrogated by tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO inhibitor. Further, bilirubin and carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 also showed a protective effect against cisplatin-induced cell death. In addition, IsoLQ induced in a dose-dependent way, death of T24 cells and exacerbated cisplatin-induced cell death. These results suggest that IsoLQ has a protective effect on cisplatin-induced toxicity in LLC-PK1 cells, in part through induction of HO-1, without interfering with the antineoplastic activity of this agent in T24 cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  19. In Vitro Cell Death Determination for Drug Discovery: A Landscape Review of Real Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoite Méry

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays a crucial role for a myriad of physiological processes, and several human diseases such as cancer are characterized by its deregulation. There are many methods available for both quantifying and qualifying the accurate process of cell death which occurs. Choosing the right assay tool is essential to generate meaningful data, provide sufficient information for clinical applications, and understand cell death processes. In vitro cell death assays are important steps in the search for new therapies against cancer as the ultimate goal remains the elaboration of drugs that interfere with specific cell death mechanisms. However, choosing a cell viability or cytotoxicity assay among the many available options is a daunting task. Indeed, cell death can be approached by several viewpoints and require a more holistic approach. This review provides an overview of cell death assays usually used in vitro for assessing cell death so as to elaborate new potential chemotherapeutics and discusses considerations for using each assay.

  20. Use of the 22C3 anti-programmed death ligand 1 antibody to determine programmed death ligand 1 expression in cytology samples obtained from non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Marius; Juco, Jonathan; Huang, Lingkang; Hofman, Veronique; Khambata-Ford, Shirin; Hofman, Paul

    2018-02-07

    Pembrolizumab monotherapy is a standard-of-care treatment for the first- and second-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer with programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) tumor proportion score (TPS) values ≥ 50% and ≥ 1%, respectively. PD-L1 testing with the PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) 22C3 pharmDx companion assay has been validated on tumor tissue with the Dako Autostainer Link 48 (ASL48). 22C3 anti-PD-L1 antibody-based laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) compatible with other autostainers and cytology samples are essential to support pembrolizumab treatment decisions across institutions globally. ASL48 and BenchMark Ultra LDTs were optimized for the evaluation of cytology samples through comparisons with cell lines with known PD-L1 expression levels (strong, moderate, and negative). The PD-L1 TPS was then evaluated for 70 paired biopsy and cytology samples (bronchial washes, n = 40; pleural effusions, n = 30) with these LDTs. Biopsy and cytology LDT TPS values were also compared with a subset of biopsy samples (n = 37) evaluated with the PD-L1 IHC 22C3 pharmDx assay on the ASL48. Intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.884 to 0.898 were observed for biopsy samples versus cytology samples with the ASL48 and BenchMark Ultra LDTs. Concordance was high, regardless of the TPS cut point (<1% vs ≥ 1% and <50% vs ≥ 50%), sample type (pleural effusion vs bronchial wash), or tumor histology (adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma). Concordance was high for each LDT versus the PD-L1 IHC 22C3 pharmDx assay. ALS48 and BenchMark Ultra 22C3 antibody concentrate-based LDTs have been validated for PD-L1 testing in cytology samples, and they will support reliable, high-quality PD-L1 testing across regions globally. Cancer Cytopathol 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist Therapy with Imidazoquinoline Enhances Cancer Cell Death and Increases Lymphocytic Infiltration and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Established Tumors of a Renal Cell Carcinoma Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Kauffman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Imidazoquinolines are synthetic toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonists and potent dendritic cell activators with established anticancer activity. Here we test the hypothesis that imidazoquinoline has in vivo efficacy within established renal cell carcinoma (RCC tumors. Immunocompetent mice bearing syngeneic RCC xenografts were treated with imidazoquinoline or placebo at two separate time points. Harvested tumors were assayed by TUNEL/caspase-3/Ki67 immunostains to evaluate cell death/apoptosis/proliferation, and CD3/B220/CD45 immunostains to evaluate T-cell lymphocyte/B-cell lymphocyte/pan-leukocyte tumor infiltration. ELISA measurement of tumor and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, was performed. A single imidazoquinoline dose significantly decreased RCC tumor growth by 50% and repeat dosing compounded the effect, without observed weight loss or other toxicity. Tumor immunostaining revealed significant increases in cell death and apoptosis without changes in cell proliferation, supporting induction of apoptosis as the primary mechanism of tumor growth suppression. Imidazoquinoline treatment also significantly enhanced peritumoral aggregation and intratumoral infiltration by T-cell lymphocytes, while increasing intratumoral (but not serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, imidazoquinoline treatment enhances T-cell lymphocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production within established mouse RCC tumors, while suppressing tumor growth via induction of cancer cell apoptosis. These findings support a therapeutic role for imidazoquinoline in RCC.

  2. Induction of apoptotic cell death by putrescine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takao, Koichi; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hegardt, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    for their growth. The induction of cell death was correlated with a dramatic increase in cellular putrescine levels. Analysis using flow cytometry revealed perturbed cell cycle kinetics, with a large accumulation of cells with sub-G1 amounts of DNA, which is a typical sign of apoptosis. Another strong indication...... homeostasis may negatively affect cell proliferation and eventually lead to cell death by apoptosis if putrescine levels become too high....

  3. N-Desmethyldauricine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Apoptosis-Defective Cells via Ca(2+) Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Betty Y K; Mok, Simon W F; Chen, Juan; Michelangeli, Francesco; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Han, Yu; Qu, Yuan Q; Qiu, Alena C L; Xu, Su-Wei; Xue, Wei-Wei; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Jia Y; Javed, Masood-Ul-Hassan; Coghi, Paolo; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent K W

    2017-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy remains a significant problem in oncology. Mechanisms regulating programmed cell death, including apoptosis, autophagy or necrosis, in the treatment of cancers have been extensively investigated over the last few decades. Autophagy is now emerging as an important pathway in regulating cell death or survival in cancer therapy. Recent studies demonstrated variety of natural small-molecules could induce autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, therefore, discovery of novel autophagic enhancers from natural products could be a promising strategy for treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancer. By computational virtual docking analysis, biochemical assays, and advanced live-cell imaging techniques, we have identified N-desmethyldauricine (LP-4), isolated from rhizoma of Menispermum dauricum DC as a novel inducer of autophagy. LP-4 was shown to induce autophagy via the Ulk-1-PERK and Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)-AMPK-mTOR signaling cascades, via mobilizing calcium release through inhibition of SERCA, and importantly, lead to autophagic cell death in a panel of cancer cells, apoptosis-defective and apoptosis-resistant cells. Taken together, this study provides detailed insights into the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel autophagic compound that targeting the apoptosis resistant cancer cells, and new implication on drug discovery from natural products for drug resistant cancer therapy.

  4. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  5. Necrosis, and then stress induced necrosis-like cell death, but not apoptosis, should be the preferred cell death mode for chemotherapy: clearance of a few misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ju; Lou, Xiaomin; Jin, Longyu; Zhou, Rongjia; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Cell death overarches carcinogenesis and is a center of cancer researches, especially therapy studies. There have been many nomenclatures on cell death, but only three cell death modes are genuine, i.e. apoptosis, necrosis and stress-induced cell death (SICD). Like apoptosis, SICD is programmed. Like necrosis, SICD is a pathological event and may trigger regeneration and scar formation. Therefore, SICD has subtypes of stress-induced apoptosis-like cell death (SIaLCD) and stress-induced necrosis-like cell death (SInLCD). Whereas apoptosis removes redundant but healthy cells, SICD removes useful but ill or damaged cells. Many studies on cell death involve cancer tissues that resemble parasites in the host patients, which is a complicated system as it involves immune clearance of the alien cancer cells by the host. Cancer resembles an evolutionarily lower-level organism having a weaker apoptosis potential and poorer DNA repair mechanisms. Hence, targeting apoptosis for cancer therapy, i.e. killing via SIaLCD, will be less efficacious and more toxic. On the other hand, necrosis of cancer cells releases cellular debris and components to stimulate immune function, thus counteracting therapy-caused immune suppression and making necrosis better than SIaLCD for chemo drug development.

  6. Phosphatidylinositol Ether Lipid Analogues Induce AMP-Activated Protein Kinase–Dependent Death in LKB1-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmott, Regan M.; Gills, Joell J.; Hollingshead, Melinda; Powers, Margaret C.; Chen, Zhiping; Kemp, Bruce; Kozikowski, Alan; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function of the tumor suppressor LKB1 occurs in 30% to 50% of lung adenocarcinomas. Because LKB1 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which can negatively regulate mTOR, AMPK activation might be desirable for cancer therapy. However, no known compounds activate AMPK independently of LKB1 in vivo, and the usefulness of activating AMPK in LKB1-mutant cancers is unknown. Here, we show that lipid-based Akt inhibitors, phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogues (PIA), activate AMPK independently of LKB1. PIAs activated AMPK in LKB1-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with similar concentration dependence as that required to inhibit Akt. However, AMPK activation was independent of Akt inhibition. AMPK activation was a major mechanism of mTOR inhibition. To assess whether another kinase capable of activating AMPK, CaMKKβ, contributed to PIA-induced AMPK activation, we used an inhibitor of CaMKK, STO-609. STO-609 inhibited PIA-induced AMPK activation in LKB1-mutant NSCLC cells, and delayed AMPK activation in wild-type LKB1 NSCLC cells. In addition, AMPK activation was not observed in NSCLC cells with mutant CaMKKβ, suggesting that CaMKKβ contributes to PIA-induced AMPK activation in cells. AMPK activation promoted PIA-induced cytotoxicity because PIAs were less cytotoxic in AMPKα−/− murine embryonic fibroblasts or LKB1-mutant NSCLC cells transfected with mutant AMPK. This mechanism was also relevant in vivo. Treatment of LKB1-mutant NSCLC xenografts with PIA decreased tumor volume by ∼50% and activated AMPK. These studies show that PIAs recapitulate the activity of two tumor suppressors (PTEN and LKB1) that converge on mTOR. Moreover, they suggest that PIAs might have utility in the treatment of LKB1-mutant lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:18199555

  7. Combining the antimesothelin immunotoxin SS1P with the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 induces cell death in SS1P-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollevoet, Kevin; Antignani, Antonella; Fitzgerald, David J; Pastan, Ira

    2014-01-01

    SS1P is an antimesothelin recombinant immunotoxin (RIT). Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines are resistant to SS1P, despite high mesothelin expression. The aim of this study is to examine whether combining SS1P and BH3-mimetic ABT-737 induces cell death in a panel of PDAC cell lines. ABT-737 binds and neutralizes several antiapoptotic BCL2 family proteins, but has a low affinity for the short-lived MCL1 and BCL2A1. SS1P inhibits protein synthesis, which has shown to downregulate MCL1. PDAC cell lines KLM-1, BxPc-3, and Panc 3.014 were resistant to SS1P or ABT-737 alone. Combining both compounds led to a significant increase in cell death. After 48 hours of treatment, cell death was observed in 92% of KLM-1, 55% of BxPc-3, and 23% of Panc 3.014 cells. Panc 3.014 had the highest number of mesothelin-binding sites (92×10(3)), followed by KLM-1 (58×10(3)) and BxPc-3 (3×10(3)). ABT-737 had no effect on SS1P internalization, but enhanced SS1P-induced protein synthesis inhibition significantly in KLM-1, to a lesser extent in BxPc-3, and very little in Panc 3.014. SS1P alone or in combination with ABT-737 downregulated MCL1 in KLM-1 and BxPc-3, but not in Panc 3.014. Similar observations were made for BCL2A1, which had the highest levels in Panc 3.014. Compared with KLM-1, Panc 3.014, and BxPc-3 also had lower proapoptotic BAK and a trend toward higher MCL1. Proapoptotic BAX was similar in KLM-1 and BxPc-3, but lower in Panc 3.014. In conclusion, combining SS1P with ABT-737 overcomes SS1P-resistance in PDAC, although to a variable extent. The efficacy of the combination is mainly associated with the RIT-associated inhibition of protein synthesis and the ability to downregulate MCL1 and BCL2A1, while levels of other key apoptotic proteins may also be important. Our data support the combination of an RIT and a BH3-mimetic, and identify factors that potentially limit the efficacy of such therapeutic approach.

  8. Role of DAPK in neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2014-02-01

    Neuronal cell death happens as a result of the normal physiological process that occurs during development, or as part of the pathological process that occurs during disease. Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is an intracellular protein that mediates cell death by its serine/threonine kinase activity, and transmits apoptotic cell death signals in various cells, including neurons. DAPK is elevated in injured neurons in acute models of injury such as ischemia and seizure. The absence of DAPK has been shown to protect neurons from a wide variety of acute toxic insults. Moreover, DAPK also regulates neuronal cell death during central nervous system development. Neurons are initially overproduced in the developing nervous system, following which approximately one-half of the original cell population dies. This "naturally-occurring" or "programmed" cell death is essential for the construction of the developing nervous system. In this review, we focus on the role of DAPK in neuronal cell death after neuronal injury. The participation of DAPK in developmental neuronal death is also explained.

  9. Clinical significance of programmed cell death-ligand 1 expression and the immune microenvironment at the invasive front of colorectal cancers with high microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korehisa, Shotaro; Oki, Eiji; Iimori, Makoto; Nakaji, Yu; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Saeki, Hiroshi; Okano, Shinji; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-10-16

    Immunotherapy is reportedly effective in colorectal cancers (CRCs) with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H); however, the specific cell types that respond to immune checkpoint therapy are unclear. Herein, we aimed to examine the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and related proteins in MSI-H and microsatellite-stable (MSS) CRCs to investigate the immune microenvironment at the tumor's invasive front. The MSI status was retrospectively assessed in 499 patients undergoing surgical resection of primary CRC; of these, 48 were classified as MSI-H. Propensity score matching was performed, and tissues from 36 and 37 patients with MSI-H and MSS CRCs, respectively, were immunohistochemically evaluated for PD-L1, PD-1, CD8, and CD68. PD-L1 expression was evaluated separately for tumor cells (PD-L1 [T]) and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells in the stroma (PD-L1 [I]). PD-L1 (T) was positive in only 5.4% and 36.1% of MSS and MSI-H CRCs, while PD-L1 (I) was positive in 27% and 72.2% of these CRCs, respectively. The PD-L1 (T) and PD-L1 (I) expression levels in MSI-H CRCs significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymphatic invasion, and vascular invasion (Pfront than in the central tumor in MSI-H CRCs (Pfront of MSI-H CRCs. In conclusion, PD-L1-positive tumor cells and M2-type tumor-associated macrophages may contribute to tumor invasion and immune escape at the invasive front. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 UICC.

  10. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle with multiple functions. The synthesis of transmembrane proteins and proteins that are to be secreted occurs in this organelle. Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress. The cellular response involves the activation of sensors that transduce signaling cascades with the aim of restoring homeostasis. This is known as the unfolded protein response, which also intersects with the integrated stress response that reduces protein synthesis through inactivation of the initiation factor eIF2α. Central to the unfolded protein response are the sensors PERK, IRE1 and ATF6, as well as other signaling nodes such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK) and the downstream transcription factors XBP1, ATF4 and CHOP. These proteins aim to restore homeostasis, but they can also induce cell death, which has been shown to occur by necroptosis and, more commonly, through the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bim, Noxa and Puma) that leads to mitochondrial apoptosis. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proteotoxic stress have been shown to induce TRAIL receptors and activation of caspase-8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a common feature in the pathology of numerous diseases because it plays a role in neurodegeneration, stroke, cancer, metabolic diseases and inflammation. Understanding how cells react to endoplasmic reticulum stress can accelerate discovery of drugs against these diseases. © 2015 FEBS.

  11. Improving the efficacy of hormone therapy in breast cancer: The role of cholesterol metabolism in SERM-mediated autophagy, cell differentiation and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leignadier, Julie; Dalenc, Florence; Poirot, Marc; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine

    2017-11-15

    Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most common female cancers in the world, with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BC the most frequent subtype. Tamoxifen (Tam) is an effective drug that competitively binds to the ER and is routinely used for the treatment of ER-positive BC. However, a number of ER-positive BC do not respond to Tam treatment and acquired resistance is often observed, constituting a major challenge for extending patient life expectancy. The mechanisms responsible for these treatment failures remain unclear, indicating the requirement for other targets and better predictors for patient response to Tam. One of Tam's off-targets of interest is the microsomal antiestrogen binding site (AEBS), a multiproteic complex made up of the cholesterol-5,6-epoxide hydrolase (ChEH) enzymes that are involved in the late stages of cholesterol biosynthesis. Tam and other selective ER modulators stimulate oxidative stress and inhibit the ChEH subunits at pharmacological doses, triggering the production and accumulation of cholesterol-5,6-epoxide metabolites responsible for BC cell differentiation and death. However, inhibition of the cholesterogenic activity of the AEBS subunits also induces the accumulation of sterol precursors, which triggers a survival autophagy to impair Tam's efficacy. Altogether, these studies have highlighted the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the pharmacology of Tam that has provided new clues on how to improve its therapeutic efficacy in both BC and other cancers as well as offering a new rationale for developing more efficient drugs for BC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genomic profiling of microRNAs in bladder cancer: miR-129 is associated with poor outcome and promotes cell death in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrskjøt, Lars; Ostenfeld, Marie S; Bramsen, Jesper B

    2009-01-01

    on miR-129 that exerted significant growth inhibition and induced cell death upon transfection with a miR-129 precursor in bladder carcinoma cell lines T24 and SW780 cells. Microarray analysis of T24 cells after transfection showed significant miR-129 target down-regulation (P = 0.0002) and pathway...... analysis indicated that targets were involved in cell death processes. By analyzing gene expression data from clinical tumor samples, we identified significant expression changes of target mRNA molecules related to the miRNA expression. Using luciferase assays, we documented a direct link between miR-129...

  13. Deaths from Colon Cancer Up Among Younger White Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167665.html Deaths From Colon Cancer Up Among Younger White Americans Uptick has researchers ... Darrell Gray, of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center. Because colon cancer is still rare among younger adults, this ...

  14. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-02-09

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer.

  15. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  16. Activation of ALDH1A1 in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells that over-express CYP2J2 protects against paclitaxel-dependent cell death mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sarah E; Chen, Yongjuan; Petrovic, Nenad; Zhang, Jian; Bourget, Kirsi; Mackenzie, Peter I; Murray, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 2J2 (CYP2J2) expression is elevated in breast and other tumours, and is known to be protective against cytotoxic agents that may be used in cancer chemotherapy. This study evaluated the mechanisms by which MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells that stably expressed CYP2J2 (MDA-2J2 cells) were protected against killing by the anti-cancer agent paclitaxel. Compared to control cells caspase-3/7 activation by paclitaxel was lower in MDA-2J2 cells, while cell proliferation and colony formation following paclitaxel treatment were increased. Basal lipid peroxidation was lower in MDA-2J2 cells than in control cells, and the paclitaxel-mediated increase in peroxidation was attenuated. The mitochondrial complex III inhibitor antimycin A modulated basal and paclitaxel-activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in control cells; paclitaxel-activated ROS production was also modulated by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium. Paclitaxel increased the formation of protein adducts by the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal that is produced by lipid peroxidation; adduct formation was attenuated in MDA-2J2 cells. ALDH1A1 expression and activity was strongly upregulated in MDA-2J2 cells that was attributed to CYP2J2-derived 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET); the 8,9- and 11,12-EET regioisomers did not activate ALDH1A1 expression. Silencing of ALDH1A1 restored the sensitivity of MDA-2J2 cells to paclitaxel, as indicated by a more pronounced decrease in proliferation, and greater increases in caspase activity and formation of ROS to levels comparable with control cells. Similar findings were observed with doxorubicin, sorafenib and staurosporine, that also promoted ROS-mediated cell death that was attenuated in MDA-2J2 cells and reversed by ALDH1A1 gene silencing. These findings implicate ALDH1A1 as an important gene that is activated in MDA-MB-468-derived cells that contain high levels of CYP2J2. ALDH1A1 modulates the production of ROS by anti-cancer

  17. Inhibition of clathrin by pitstop 2 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint and induces cell death in dividing HeLa cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Charlotte M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During metaphase clathrin stabilises the mitotic spindle kinetochore(K-fibres. Many anti-mitotic compounds target microtubule dynamics. Pitstop 2™ is the first small molecule inhibitor of clathrin terminal domain and inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We investigated its effects on a second function for clathrin in mitosis. Results Pitstop 2 did not impair clathrin recruitment to the spindle but disrupted its function once stationed there. Pitstop 2 trapped HeLa cells in metaphase through loss of mitotic spindle integrity and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, phenocopying clathrin depletion and aurora A kinase inhibition. Conclusions Pitstop 2 is therefore a new tool for investigating clathrin spindle dynamics. Pitstop 2 reduced viability in dividing HeLa cells, without affecting dividing non-cancerous NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that clathrin is a possible novel anti-mitotic drug target.

  18. Mitochondria can Power Cells to Life and Death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    apoptosis. Failed apoptosis may give rise to cancer, whereas excessive cell death may result in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease and many others. (Table 2). A number of agents, including those of viral origin, have been found to inhibit the process of apoptosis (Table 3).

  19. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development

    OpenAIRE

    L?pez-Fern?ndez, Mar?a Paula; Maldonado,Sara

    2013-01-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucle...

  20. Seriniquinone, a selective anticancer agent, induces cell death by autophagocytosis, targeting the cancer-protective protein dermcidin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lynnie Trzoss; Takashi Fukuda; Letícia V. Costa-Lotufo; Paula Jimenez; James J. La Clair; William Fenical

    2014-01-01

    .... A new natural product, seriniquinone, isolated from a marine bacterium of the genus Serinicoccus, demonstrated potent activity over a select set of tumor cell lines with particular selectivity toward...

  1. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...... mechanisms that lead to lysosomal membrane permeabilization....

  2. Herceptin conjugates linked by EDC boost direct tumor cell death via programmed tumor cell necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiemiao Hu

    Full Text Available Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2 positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment.

  3. Herceptin Conjugates Linked by EDC Boost Direct Tumor Cell Death via Programmed Tumor Cell Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Dennis; Esteva, Francisco J.; Liu, Bolin; Chandra, Joya; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride), are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment. PMID:21853100

  4. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Maltese

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed ‘methuosis’, from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication. It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  5. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, William A; Overmeyer, Jean H

    2015-01-01

    Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed "methuosis," from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication). It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  6. Proteasome inhibitors prevent bi-directional HER2/estrogen-receptor cross-talk leading to cell death in endocrine and lapatinib-resistant HER2+/ER+ breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Sonja; Schmidt, Marcus; Roβwag, Sven; Thiede, Gitta; Schad, Arno; Sleeman, Jonathan P

    2017-09-22

    Amplification and/or overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) oncogene occurs in about 13-15% of invasive breast cancer and triggers breast cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastatic progression. Around half of all breast cancers with HER2 overexpression co-express hormone receptors (HR) such as those for estrogen and progesterone. Aberrant signaling through HER2 and other members of the HER-family mediates endocrine-resistance in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positive breast cancer. On the other hand, ERα co-expression has been shown to attenuate the efficiency of anti-HER2 therapies. These findings indicate that HER2 and ERα synergize to escape from both anti-ERα and anti-HER2-targeted therapies. Rationally designed clinical trials that combine endocrine therapy with anti-HER2 agents to interfere with HER2/ERα cross-talk have been conducted. However, the outcome of these trials suggests that novel therapeutic approaches are needed to further improve inhibition of HER2 and other HER-family members in conjunction with a more efficient ERα blockade. Here, we demonstrate that carfilzomib and bortezomib stabilize the HER2-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase BDP1 leading to decreased HER2 autophosphorylation, reduced HER2 activity and subsequently attenuated activation of the PI3K/Akt-pathway, together with blockade of ERα expression. We further observed that proteasome inhibitors (PIs) reverse autophosphorylation and thereby inhibit the activity of constitutively active mutant HER2. We also demonstrate that PIs cause cell death in lapatinib and endocrine-resistant HER2+/ER+ breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that PIs might have the potential to improve the management of HER2+/ER+ breast cancer patients by efficiently disrupting the bi-directional HER2/ERα cross-talk.

  7. Predicting death from surgery for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dowd, Emma L; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Baldwin, David R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current British guidelines advocate the use of risk prediction scores such as Thoracoscore to estimate mortality prior to radical surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A recent publication used the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) to produce a score to predict 90day mortality...... (NLCA score). The aim of this study is to validate the NLCA score, and compare its performance with Thoracoscore. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed an internal validation using 2858 surgical patients from NLCA and an external validation using 3191 surgical patients from the Danish Lung Cancer Registry...... by procedure type, age and performance status. CONCLUSIONS: Neither score performs well enough to be advocated for individual risk stratification prior to lung cancer surgery. It may be that additional physiological parameters are required; however this is a further project. In the interim we propose the use...

  8. Pulsating electromagnetic field stimulation prevents cell death of puromycin treated U937 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba-Zwoinska, J; Wojcik, K; Bereta, M; Ziomber, A; Pierzchalski, P; Rokita, E; Marcinkiewicz, J; Zaraska, W; Thor, P

    2010-04-01

    Aim of study was to verify whether pulsating electromagnetic field (PEMF) can affect cancer cells proliferation and death. U937 human lymphoid cell line at densities starting from 1 x 10(6) cells/ml to 0.0625 x 10(6) cells/ml, were exposed to a pulsating magnetic field 50 Hz, 45+/-5 mT three times for 3 h per each stimulation with 24 h intervals. Proliferation has been studied by counting number of cells stimulated and non-stimulated by PEMF during four days of cultivation. Viability of cells was analyzed by APC labeled Annexin V and 7-AAD (7-amino-actinomycin D) dye binding and flow cytometry. Growing densities of cells increase cell death in cultures of U937 cells. PEMF exposition decreased amount of cells only in higher densities. Measurement of Annexin V binding and 7-AAD dye incorporation has shown that density-induced cell death corresponds with decrease of proliferation activity. PEMF potentiated density-induced death both apoptosis and necrosis. The strongest influence of PEMF has been found for 1 x 10(6)cells/ml and 0.5 x 10(6) cells/ml density. To eliminate density effect on cell death, for further studies density 0.25 x 10(6) cells/ml was chosen. Puromycin, a telomerase inhibitor, was used as a cell death inducer at concentration 100 microg/ml. Combined interaction of three doses of puromycin and three fold PEMF interaction resulted in a reduced of apoptosis by 24,7% and necrosis by 13%. PEMF protects U937 cells against puromycin- induced cell death. PEMF effects on the human lymphoid cell line depends upon cell density. Increased density induced cells death and on the other hand prevented cells death induced by puromycin.

  9. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  10. The accuracy of liver cancer as the underlying cause of death on death certificates.

    OpenAIRE

    Percy, C.; Ries, L G; Van Holten, V D

    1990-01-01

    Studies of liver cancer mortality are subject to confusion attributable to the changes in categories by which liver cancer is identified in successive revisions of the International Classification of Diseases. To determine the effects of these changes, diagnoses of 2,388 cases of primary liver cancer in the years 1973-80 were compared to the underlying causes of death recorded on the death certificates, using data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result...

  11. Demystifying MST family kinases in cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Maria K; Bonni, Azad

    2008-06-01

    The MST family of protein kinases plays a critical role in the regulation of cell death in diverse organisms including mammals. The intracellular signaling pathways that regulate MST-driven cell death in mammalian cells are the subject of intense investigation. Stress stimuli including oxidative stress and DNA damaging agents trigger the activity of MST in cells. Although the mechanisms by which oxidative stress and DNA damage trigger MST activation remain to be identified, MST activity can be regulated by caspase-induced cleavage as well as interactions with other proteins in cells. Once activated upon oxidative stress, MST induces cell death via phosphorylation and activation of the transcription factor FOXO3 or the histone protein H2B. This review focuses on the currently known upstream activating mechanisms for MST, and explores the downstream signaling pathways that mediate MST's principal function in cell death. Elucidation of MST functions and their regulatory mechanisms in cell death have important implications for our understanding of cellular homeostasis as well as the pathogenesis of diverse diseases.

  12. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome-destab...... multidrug resistance. Their cancer selectivity is associated with transformation-associated reduction in ASM expression and subsequent failure to maintain sphingomyelin hydrolysis during drug exposure. Taken together, these data identify ASM as an attractive target for cancer therapy....

  13. Molecular mechanisms of cell death: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2018

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Abrams, John M.; Adam, Dieter; Agostinis, Patrizia; Alnemri, Emad S.; Altucci, Lucia; Amelio, Ivano; Andrews, David W.; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Antonov, Alexey V.; Arama, Eli; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Barlev, Nickolai A.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Bernassola, Francesca; Bertrand, Mathieu J. M.; Bianchi, Katiuscia; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Blomgren, Klas; Borner, Christoph; Boya, Patricia; Brenner, Catherine; Campanella, Michelangelo; Candi, Eleonora; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Cecconi, Francesco; Chan, Francis K.-M.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Cheng, Emily H.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Cidlowski, John A.; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M.; Conrad, Marcus; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Czabotar, Peter E.; D'Angiolella, Vincenzo; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; de Laurenzi, Vincenzo; de Maria, Ruggero; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Deshmukh, Mohanish; Di Daniele, Nicola; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Dixit, Vishva M.; Dixon, Scott J.; Duckett, Colin S.; Dynlacht, Brian D.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Elrod, John W.; Fimia, Gian Maria; Fulda, Simone; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Garg, Abhishek D.; Garrido, Carmen; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Golstein, Pierre; Gottlieb, Eyal; Green, Douglas R.; Greene, Lloyd A.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Gross, Atan; Hajnoczky, Gyorgy; Hardwick, J. Marie; Harris, Isaac S.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Hetz, Claudio; Ichijo, Hidenori; Jäättelä, Marja; Joseph, Bertrand; Jost, Philipp J.; Juin, Philippe P.; Kaiser, William J.; Karin, Michael; Kaufmann, Thomas; Kepp, Oliver; Kimchi, Adi; Kitsis, Richard N.; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Knight, Richard A.; Kumar, Sharad; Lee, Sam W.; Lemasters, John J.; Levine, Beth; Linkermann, Andreas; Lipton, Stuart A.; Lockshin, Richard A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W.; Luedde, Tom; Lugli, Enrico; MacFarlane, Marion; Madeo, Frank; Malewicz, Michal; Malorni, Walter; Manic, Gwenola; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Seamus J.; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Medema, Jan Paul; Mehlen, Patrick; Meier, Pascal; Melino, Sonia; Miao, Edward A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Moll, Ute M.; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Nagata, Shigekazu; Nuñez, Gabriel; Oberst, Andrew; Oren, Moshe; Overholtzer, Michael; Pagano, Michele; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Pasparakis, Manolis; Penninger, Josef M.; Pereira, David M.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Peter, Marcus E.; Piacentini, Mauro; Pinton, Paolo; Prehn, Jochen H. M.; Puthalakath, Hamsa; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Rehm, Markus; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Rubinsztein, David C.; Rudel, Thomas; Ryan, Kevin M.; Sayan, Emre; Scorrano, Luca; Shao, Feng; Shi, Yufang; Silke, John; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Sistigu, Antonella; Stockwell, Brent R.; Strasser, Andreas; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Tait, Stephen W. G.; Tang, Daolin; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Thorburn, Andrew; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Turk, Boris; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Villunger, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W.; Vousden, Karen H.; Vucic, Domagoj; Wagner, Erwin F.; Walczak, Henning; Wallach, David; Wang, Ying; Wells, James A.; Wood, Will; Yuan, Junying; Zakeri, Zahra; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Zitvogel, Laurence; Melino, Gerry; Kroemer, Guido

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) has formulated guidelines for the definition and interpretation of cell death from morphological, biochemical, and functional perspectives. Since the field continues to expand and novel mechanisms that orchestrate multiple cell

  14. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Brannelly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection.

  15. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek D Garg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this clinically relevant phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation.

  16. The Apoptosome: Heart and Soul of the Cell Death Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul M. Chinnaiyan

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biologic process by which metazoan cells orchestrate their own self-demise. Genetic analyses of the nematode C elegans identified three core components of the suicide apparatus which include CED-3, CED-4, and CED-9. An analogous set of core constituents exists in mammalian cells and includes caspase-9, Apaf-1, and bcl-2/xL, respectively. CED-3 and CED-4, along with their mammalian counterparts, function to kill cells, whereas CED-9 and its mammalian equivalents protect cells from death. These central components biochemically intermingle in a ternary complex recently dubbed the “apoptosome.” The C elegans protein EGL-1 and its mammalian counterparts, pro-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family, induce cell death by disrupting apoptosome interactions. Thus, EGL-1 may represent a primordial signal integrator for the apoptosome. Various biochemical processes including oligomerization, adenosine triphosphate ATP/dATP binding, and cytochrome c interaction play a role in regulating the ternary death complex. Recent studies suggest that cell death receptors, such as CD95, may amplify their suicide signal by activating the apoptosome. These mutual associations by core components of the suicide apparatus provide a molecular framework in which diverse death signals likely interface. Understanding the apoptosome and its cellular connections will facilitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for cancer and other disease states in which apoptosis plays a pivotal role.

  17. High mannose-binding antiviral lectin PFL from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 promotes cell death of gastric cancer cell MKN28 via interaction with α2-integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Sato

    Full Text Available Novel anti-HIV lectin family which shows a strict binding specificity for high mannose glycans has been found in lower organisms. The bacterial orthologue has been identified in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 and the gene coding a putative lectin was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by one step gel filtration. Glycan array screening of the recombinant lectin, termed PFL, has revealed that PFL preferentially recognizes high mannose glycans with α1-3 Man that was highly exposed at the D2 position. In contrast, masking of this α1-3 Man with α1-2 Man dramatically impaired lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Reducing terminal disaccharide, GlcNAc-GlcNAc of high mannose glycans was also essential for PFL-binding. PFL showed a potent anti-influenza virus activity by inhibiting the virus entry into cells at doses of low nanomolar concentration. At micromolar concentration or higher, PFL showed a cytotoxicity accompanying loss of the cell adhesion against human gastric cancer MKN28 cells. The cell surface molecule to which PFL bound was co-precipitated with biotin-labeled PFL and identified as integrin α2 by peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Intriguingly, upon treatment with exogenous PFL, integrin α2 on the cell surface underwent rapid internalization to the cytoplasm and accumulated to perinuclear region, together with the bound PFL. The resulting loss of cell adherence would trigger a signaling pathway that induced anoikis-like cell death. These events were effectively inhibited by pretreatment of PFL with mannnan, indicating the involvement of high mannose glycans on PFL-induced cell death that was triggered by PFL-integrin α2 interactions.

  18. Plasma levels of soluble programmed death ligand-1 may be associated with overall survival in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients receiving thoracic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Jianhua; Xi, Qingsong; Zhao, Xueqi; Ji, Minghua; Hu, Guangyuan

    2017-02-01

    Immune-checkpoint signaling plays an important role in immunosuppression of tumors. We aimed to investigate the association of soluble programmed death-ligand 1 (sPD-L1) level in plasma with overall survival (OS) in locally advanced or inoperable nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy (TRT). We used ELISA to evaluate the sPD-L1 levels at diagnosis and during TRT in 126 clinically inoperable NSCLC patients. OS rates were followed up and recorded. SPSS software and GraphPad Prism 5 were used for statistics. In this study, the average sPD-L1 levels at baseline, week 2, and week 4 during TRT and post-TRT were 107.2, 51.3, 65.4, and 111.1 pg/mL, respectively. Levels of sPD-L1 at week 2 and week 4 were significantly less than at baseline, with both P values < 0.001. Using 96.5 pg/mL as the cutoff, patients with lower baseline sPD-L1 level had longer OS than those with higher sPD-L1 level (27.8 months vs 15.5 months, P = 0.005). Using multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with longer OS: female, adenocarcinoma, higher TRT dose, and lower baseline sPD-L1 level. Patients with both characteristics of lower baseline sPD-L1 level and higher TRT dose (BED10 ≥84 Gy) had the longest OS. To conclude, the lower baseline sPD-L1 level was significantly associated with longer OS in NSCLC patients treated with TRT, which may serve as an independent biomarker and needs further clinical study.

  19. Child and youth cancer: profile of deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joisy Aparecida Marchi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at characterizing the deaths caused by malignant neoplasias in children and adolescents living in the state of Paraná, Brazil between 2001 and 2010. It is a quantitative, descriptive, transversal study, based on secondary data, obtained through the data processing department of the Sistema Único de Saúde from July to December, 2012. The following variables were analyzed: gender, age, race and city of residence. As a measure of association, odds ratio was used, confirmed by the χ2. The leukemia, central nervous system neoplasias and lymphomas, female gender and white race were highlight topics. Teens had about three times greater chance of dying of cancer compared to children. The child and youth neoplasia deserves special attention on the condition of vulnerability of this group, and further studies are needed to assess the association with possible risk factors.

  20. Synthesis, structural characterization and cell death-inducing effect of novel palladium(II) and platinum(II) saccharinate complexes with 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine and 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridine on cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Ferda; Aztopal, Nazlihan; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Guney, Emel; Buyukgungor, Orhan; Ulukaya, Engin

    2013-11-01

    Four palladium(II) and platinum(II) saccharinate (sac) complexes with 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine (2-hmpy) and 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)pyridine (2-hepy), namely trans-[Pd(2-hmpy)2(sac)2]·H2O (1), trans-[Pt(2-hmpy)2(sac)2]·3H2O (2), trans-[Pd(2-hepy)2(sac)2] (3) and trans-[Pt(2-hepy)2(sac)2] (4), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis, IR and NMR. Single crystal X-ray analysis reveals that the metal(II) ions in each complex are coordinated by two sac and two 2-hmpy or 2-hepy ligands with a trans arrangement. Anticancer effects of 1-4 were tested against four different cancer cell lines (A549 and PC3 for lung cancer, C6 for glioblastoma, and Hep3B for liver cancer). Cytotoxicity was first screened by the MTT assay and the results were further confirmed by the ATP assay. The mode of cell death was determined by both histological and biochemical methods. Among the metal complexes, complex 2 resulted in relatively stronger anti-growth effect in a dose-dependent manner (3.13-200μM), compared to the others, by inducing apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How Kidney Cell Death Induces Renal Necroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Kumar, Santhosh V; Lech, Maciej; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The nephrons of the kidney are independent functional units harboring cells of a low turnover during homeostasis. As such, physiological renal cell death is a rather rare event and dead cells are flushed away rapidly with the urinary flow. Renal cell necrosis occurs in acute kidney injuries such as thrombotic microangiopathies, necrotizing glomerulonephritis, or tubular necrosis. All of these are associated with intense intrarenal inflammation, which contributes to further renal cell loss, an autoamplifying process referred to as necroinflammation. But how does renal cell necrosis trigger inflammation? Here, we discuss the role of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), mitochondrial (mito)-DAMPs, and alarmins, as well as their respective pattern recognition receptors. The capacity of DAMPs and alarmins to trigger cytokine and chemokine release initiates the recruitment of leukocytes into the kidney that further amplify necroinflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils often undergo neutrophil extracellular trap formation associated with neutrophil death or necroptosis, which implies a release of histones, which act not only as DAMPs but also elicit direct cytotoxic effects on renal cells, namely endothelial cells. Proinflammatory macrophages and eventually cytotoxic T cells further drive kidney cell death and inflammation. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms of necroinflammation may help to identify the best therapeutic targets to limit nephron loss in kidney injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Amarante-Mendes

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  3. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  4. Plasma membrane changes during programmed cell deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Xin; Gueydan, Cyril; Han, Jiahuai

    2018-01-01

    Ruptured and intact plasma membranes are classically considered as hallmarks of necrotic and apoptotic cell death, respectively. As such, apoptosis is usually considered a non-inflammatory process while necrosis triggers inflammation. Recent studies on necroptosis and pyroptosis, two types of programmed necrosis, revealed that plasma membrane rupture is mediated by MLKL channels during necroptosis but depends on non-selective gasdermin D (GSDMD) pores during pyroptosis. Importantly, the morphology of dying cells executed by MLKL channels can be distinguished from that executed by GSDMD pores. Interestingly, it was found recently that secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells, a previously believed non-regulated form of cell lysis that occurs after apoptosis, can be programmed and executed by plasma membrane pore formation like that of pyroptosis. In addition, pyroptosis is associated with pyroptotic bodies, which have some similarities to apoptotic bodies. Therefore, different cell death programs induce distinctive reshuffling processes of the plasma membrane. Given the fact that the nature of released intracellular contents plays a crucial role in dying/dead cell-induced immunogenicity, not only membrane rupture or integrity but also the nature of plasma membrane breakdown would determine the fate of a cell as well as its ability to elicit an immune response. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the field of apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis, with an emphasis on the mechanisms underlying plasma membrane changes observed on dying cells and their implication in cell death-elicited immunogenicity.

  5. Big Gap in Cancer Deaths Between Rich, Poor Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166791.html Big Gap in Cancer Deaths Between Rich, Poor Countries Poorer nations need ... looked specifically at the deaths rates for the five most common forms of the ... breast cancers. Next, the researchers rated the countries according to ...

  6. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack......, and these inducible PCD forms are intensively studied due their experimental tractability. In general, evidence exists for plant cell death pathways which have similarities to the apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic forms described in yeast and metazoans. Recent research aiming to understand these pathways...

  7. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson B. Guimarães-Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described type of neutrophil death occurring with the release to the extracellular milieu of a lattice composed of DNA associated with histones and granular and cytoplasmic proteins. These webs, initially named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, ensnare and kill microorganisms. Similarly, other cell types, such as eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages, can also dye by this mechanism; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs. Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses.

  8. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells and the Ontogeny of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Craig D.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world today and is poised to claim approximately 1 billion lives during the 21st century. A major challenge in treating this and other cancers is the intrinsic resistance to conventional therapies demonstrated by the stem/progenitor cell that is responsible for the sustained growth, survival, and invasion of the tumor. Identifying these stem cells in lung cancer and defining the biologic processes necessary for their existence is paramou...

  10. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.; Franklin-Tong, V.E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the

  12. Did death certificates and a death review process agree on lung cancer cause of death in the National Lung Screening Trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Pamela M; Doria-Rose, Vincent Paul; Gareen, Ilana F; Brewer, Brenda; Clingan, Kathy; Keating, Kristen; Rosenbaum, Jennifer; Rozjabek, Heather M; Rathmell, Joshua; Sicks, JoRean; Miller, Anthony B

    2016-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials frequently use death review committees to assign a cause of death rather than relying on cause of death information from death certificates. The National Lung Screening Trial, a randomized controlled trial of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography versus chest X-ray for heavy and/or long-term smokers ages 55-74 years at enrollment, used a committee blinded to arm assignment for a subset of deaths to determine whether cause of death was due to lung cancer. Deaths were selected for review using a pre-determined computerized algorithm. The algorithm, which considered cancers diagnosed during the trial, causes and significant conditions listed on the death certificate, and the underlying cause of death derived from death certificate information by trained nosologists, selected deaths that were most likely to represent a death due to lung cancer (either directly or indirectly) and deaths that might have been erroneously assigned lung cancer as the cause of death. The algorithm also selected deaths that might be due to adverse events of diagnostic evaluation for lung cancer. Using the review cause of death as the gold standard and lung cancer cause of death as the outcome of interest (dichotomized as lung cancer versus not lung cancer), we calculated performance measures of the death certificate cause of death. We also recalculated the trial primary endpoint using the death certificate cause of death. In all, 1642 deaths were reviewed and assigned a cause of death (42% of the 3877 National Lung Screening Trial deaths). Sensitivity of death certificate cause of death was 91%; specificity, 97%; positive predictive value, 98%; and negative predictive value, 89%. About 40% of the deaths reclassified to lung cancer cause of death had a death certificate cause of death of a neoplasm other than lung. Using the death certificate cause of death, the lung cancer mortality reduction was 18% (95% confidence interval: 4.2-25.0), as

  13. A POX on Renal Cancer Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proline oxidase, or POX, is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing the amino acid proline. POX contributes to the regulation of cell death that occurs when cellular systems malfunction, a process called apoptosis. Previous studies have determined that levels of POX are reduced in several types of human cancer. Likewise, many cancer cells become resistant to apoptosis, suggesting a link between POX and cancer cell survival.

  14. "(Not) all (dead) things share the same breath": identification of cell death mechanisms in anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rello-Varona, Santiago; Herrero-Martín, David; López-Alemany, Roser; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Tirado, Oscar M

    2015-03-15

    During the last decades, the knowledge of cell death mechanisms involved in anticancer therapy has grown exponentially. However, in many studies, cell death is still described in an incomplete manner. The frequent use of indirect proliferation assays, unspecific probes, or bulk analyses leads too often to misunderstandings regarding cell death events. There is a trend to focus on molecular or genetic regulations of cell demise without a proper characterization of the phenotype that is the object of this study. Sometimes, cancer researchers can feel overwhelmed or confused when faced with such a corpus of detailed insights, nomenclature rules, and debates about the accuracy of a particular probe or assay. On the basis of the information available, we propose a simple guide to distinguish forms of cell death in experimental settings using cancer cell lines. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. A good death from the perspective of palliative cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastbom, Lisa; Milberg, Anna; Karlsson, Marit

    2017-03-01

    Although previous research has indicated some recurrent themes and similarities between what patients from different cultures regard as a good death, the concept is complex and there is lack of studies from the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of a good death in dying cancer patients in Sweden. Interviews were conducted with 66 adult patients with cancer in the palliative phase who were recruited from home care and hospital care. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Participants viewed death as a process. A good death was associated with living with the prospect of imminent death, preparing for death and dying comfortably, e.g., dying quickly, with independence, with minimised suffering and with social relations intact. Some were comforted by their belief that death is predetermined. Others felt uneasy as they considered death an end to existence. Past experiences of the death of others influenced participants' views of a good death. Healthcare staff caring for palliative patients should consider asking them to describe what they consider a good death in order to identify goals for care. Exploring patients' personal experience of death and dying can help address their fears as death approaches.

  16. Mitochondria: Regulators of Cell Death and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Granville

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 5 years has seen an intense surge in research devoted toward understanding the critical role of mitochondria in the regulation of cell death. Apoptosis can be initiated by a wide array of stimuli, inducing multiple signaling pathways that, for the most part, converge at the mitochondrion. Although classically considered the powerhouses of the cell, it is now understood that mitochondria are also “gatekeepers” that ultimately determine the fate of the cell. The mitochondrial decision as to whether a cell lives or dies is complex, involving protein-protein interactions, ionic changes, reactive oxygen species, and other mechanisms that require further elucidation. Once the death process is initiated, mitochondria undergo conformational changes, resulting in the release of cytochrome c (cyt c, caspases, endonucleases, and other factors leading to the onset and execution of apoptosis. The present review attempts to outline the complex milieu of events regulating the mitochondrial commitment to and processes involved in the implementation of the executioner phase of apoptotic cell death.

  17. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Death by over-eating: The Gaucher disease associated gene GBA1, identified in a screen for mediators of autophagic cell death, is necessary for developmental cell death in Drosophila midgut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schejter, Eyal; Bialik, Shani; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Kimchi, Adi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is critical for homeostasis and cell survival during stress, but can also lead to cell death, a little understood process that has been shown to contribute to developmental cell death in lower model organisms, and to human cancer cell death. We recently reported1 on our thorough molecular and morphologic characterization of an autophagic cell death system involving resveratrol treatment of lung carcinoma cells. To gain mechanistic insight into this death program, we performed a signalome-wide RNAi screen for genes whose functions are necessary for resveratrol-induced death. The screen identified GBA1, the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, as an important mediator of autophagic cell death. Here we further show the physiological relevance of GBA1 to developmental cell death in midgut regression during Drosophila metamorphosis. We observed a delay in midgut cell death in two independent Gba1a RNAi lines, indicating the critical importance of Gba1a for midgut development. Interestingly, loss-of-function GBA1 mutations lead to Gaucher Disease and are a significant risk factor for Parkinson Disease, which have been associated with defective autophagy. Thus GBA1 is a conserved element critical for maintaining proper levels of autophagy, with high levels leading to autophagic cell death. PMID:28933588

  19. A systematic review of economic evaluations of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and Programmed Death-1 inhibitors in metastatic renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Panagiotis

    2018-02-16

    The therapeutic categories of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and Programmed Death-1 inhibitors have transformed the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer. Nevertheless, this comes at an increased cost, in tandem with similar fiscal pressures in the broader oncology sector, which may jeopardize the sustainability of health systems. Areas covered To this direction, the economic evaluation of these agents is essential for rational and efficient resource allocation. The aim of this study is to glean, assess and present an outline of the available cost-effectiveness studies of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cell cancer. Expert Commentary We concluded that the results of economic evaluation are pertinent, apart from the product under evaluation, to the country setting as well.

  20. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  1. Modulating cell-to-cell variability and sensitivity to death ligands by co-drugging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2013-06-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) holds promise as an anti-cancer therapeutic but efficiently induces apoptosis in only a subset of tumor cell lines. Moreover, even in clonal populations of responsive lines, only a fraction of cells dies in response to TRAIL and individual cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability in the timing of cell death. Fractional killing in these cell populations appears to arise not from genetic differences among cells but rather from differences in gene expression states, fluctuations in protein levels and the extent to which TRAIL-induced death or survival pathways become activated. In this study, we ask how cell-to-cell variability manifests in cell types with different sensitivities to TRAIL, as well as how it changes when cells are exposed to combinations of drugs. We show that individual cells that survive treatment with TRAIL can regenerate the sensitivity and death-time distribution of the parental population, demonstrating that fractional killing is a stable property of cell populations. We also show that cell-to-cell variability in the timing and probability of apoptosis in response to treatment can be tuned using combinations of drugs that together increase apoptotic sensitivity compared to treatment with one drug alone. In the case of TRAIL, modulation of cell-to-cell variability by co-drugging appears to involve a reduction in the threshold for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization.

  2. The combined risks of reduced or increased function variants in cell death pathway genes differentially influence cervical cancer risk and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection among black Africans and the Mixed Ancestry population of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Hazra, Annapurna; Dandara, Collet

    2015-10-12

    Cervical cancer is one of the most important cancers worldwide with a high incident and mortality rate and is caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). Among sexually active women who get infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), a small fraction progresses to cervical cancer disease pointing to possible roles of additional risk factors in development of the disease which include host genetic factors and other infections such as HSV-2. Since cellular apoptosis plays a role in controlling the spread of virus-infections in cells, gene variants altering the function of proteins involved in cell death pathways might be associated with the clearing of virus infections. Activity altering polymorphisms in FasR (-1377G > A and -670A > G), FasL (-844 T > C) and CASP8 (-652 6 N ins/del) genes have been shown to alter the mechanism of apoptosis by modifying the level of expression of their correspondent proteins. In the present study, we set out to investigate the combined risks of CASP8, FasR, and FasL polymorphisms in cervical cancer, pre-cancerous lesions, HPV infection and HSV-2 infection. Participants were 442 South African women of black African and mixed-ancestry origin with invasive cervical cancer and 278 control women matched by age, ethnicity and domicile status. FasR and FasL polymorphisms were genotyped by TaqMan and CASP8 polymorphism by PCR-RFLP. The results were analysed with R using haplo.stats software version 1.5.2. CASP8 -652 6 N del + FasR-670A was associated with a reduced risk (P = 0.019, Combined Polymorphism Score (CPS) = -2.34) and CASP8 -652 6 N ins + FasR-1377G was associated with a marginal increased risk (P = 0.047, CPS = 1.99) of cervical cancer among black Africans. When compared within the control group, CASP8 -652 6 N ins + FasR-1377A showed a reduced risk (P = 0.023, CPS = -2.28) of HSV-2 infection in both black African and mixed-ancestry population. Our results show that the combined risks of

  3. Synergistic interaction of the cannabinoid and death receptor systems - a potential target for future cancer therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keresztes, Attila; Streicher, John M

    2017-10-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been shown to interact with other receptors, including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRS) members, to induce cancer cell death. When cannabinoids and death-inducing ligands (including TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) are administered together, they have been shown to synergize and demonstrate enhanced antitumor activity in vitro. Certain cannabinoid ligands have been shown to sensitize cancer cells and synergistically interact with members of the TNFRS, thus suggesting that the combination of cannabinoids with death receptor (DR) ligands induces additive or synergistic tumor cell death. This review summarizes recent findings on the interaction of the cannabinoid and DR systems and suggests possible clinical co-application of cannabinoids and DR ligands in the treatment of various malignancies. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell Death in Chondrocytes, Osteoblasts, and Osteocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihisa Komori

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell death in skeletal component cells, including chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, plays roles in skeletal development, maintenance, and repair as well as in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis are important steps for endochondral ossification. Although the inactivation of P53 and RB is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcomas, the deletion of p53 and inactivation of Rb are insufficient to enhance chondrocyte proliferation, indicating the presence of multiple inhibitory mechanisms against sarcomagenesis in chondrocytes. The inflammatory processes induced by mechanical injury and chondrocyte death through the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs are involved in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. The overexpression of BCLXL increases bone volume with a normal structure and maintains bone during aging by inhibiting osteoblast apoptosis. p53 inhibits osteoblast proliferation and enhances osteoblast apoptosis, thereby reducing bone formation, but also exerts positive effects on osteoblast differentiation through the Akt–FoxOs pathway. Apoptotic osteocytes release ATP, which induces the receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (Rankl expression and osteoclastogenesis, from pannexin 1 channels. Osteocyte death ultimately results in necrosis; DAMPs are released to the bone surface and promote the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which induce Rankl expression, and osteoclastogenesis is further enhanced.

  6. Determinative developmental cell lineages are robust to cell deaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Rong Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available All forms of life are confronted with environmental and genetic perturbations, making phenotypic robustness an important characteristic of life. Although development has long been viewed as a key component of phenotypic robustness, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report that the determinative developmental cell lineages of two protostomes and one deuterostome are structured such that the resulting cellular compositions of the organisms are only modestly affected by cell deaths. Several features of the cell lineages, including their shallowness, topology, early ontogenic appearances of rare cells, and non-clonality of most cell types, underlie the robustness. Simple simulations of cell lineage evolution demonstrate the possibility that the observed robustness arose as an adaptation in the face of random cell deaths in development. These results reveal general organizing principles of determinative developmental cell lineages and a conceptually new mechanism of phenotypic robustness, both of which have important implications for development and evolution.

  7. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  8. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hengwen [Department of Radiation, Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital (Guangdong Academy of Medical Science), Guangzhou, 510080, Guangdong (China); Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Yajie [Department of Pathology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Gao, Dongsheng [Department of Oncology, Guangdong Medical College Affiliated Pengpai Memorial Hospital, Hai Feng, 516400, Gungdong (China); Zhao, Shenting, E-mail: zhaoshenting@126.com [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China)

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  9. Programmed cell death and apoptosis in aging and life span regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Tower, John

    2009-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for programmed cell death (PCD) pathways in aging phenotypes across species. PCD is critical to the homeostasis of tissues maintained by cell division, for example, the blood and the lining of the gut. During aging, accumulated cellular damage and non-optimal systemic signaling can cause too little cell death (hyperproliferation and cancer), or too much cell death (tissue atrophy and ectopic cell death), thereby limiting tissue function and life span. For these reasons PCD pathways are promising targets for interventions in aging and aging-related diseases: reactivation of PCD may be beneficial in clearing cancerous and senescent cells, whereas inhibiting PCD may help prevent muscle atrophy and nervous system degeneration.

  10. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Ligands Protect Tumor Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Alves da Silva-Junior

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation generates oxidized phospholipids that activate platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR associated with pro-tumorigenic effects. Here, we investigated the involvement of PAFR in tumor cell survival after irradiation. Cervical cancer samples presented higher levels of PAF-receptor gene (PTAFR when compared with normal cervical tissue. In cervical cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy (RT, the expression of PTAFR was significantly increased. Cervical cancer-derived cell lines (C33, SiHa, and HeLa and squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC90 and SCC78 express higher levels of PAFR mRNA and protein than immortalized keratinocytes. Gamma radiation increased PAFR expression and induced PAFR ligands and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in these tumor cells. The blocking of PAFR with the antagonist CV3938 before irradiation inhibited PGE2 and increased tumor cells death. Similarly, human carcinoma cells transfected with PAFR (KBP were more resistant to radiation compared to those lacking the receptor (KBM. PGE2 production by irradiated KBP cells was also inhibited by CV3988. These results show that irradiation of carcinoma cells generates PAFR ligands that protect tumor cells from death and suggests that the combination of RT with a PAFR antagonist could be a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

  11. Inhibition of the autophagy flux by gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazim, Uddin Md; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a primary anticancer agent and a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that selectively induces apoptosis in various tumor cells, but not in normal cells. Gingerol is a major ginger component with anti-inflammatory and anti‑tumorigenic activities. Autophagy flux is the complete process of autophagy, in which the autophagosomes are lysed by lysosomes. The role of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is controversial. A549 adenocarcinoma cells are TRAIL-resistant. In the present study, we showed that treatment with TRAIL slightly induced cell death, but gingerol treatment enhanced the TRAIL-induced cell death in human lung cancer cells. The combination of gingerol and TRAIL increased accumulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II and p62, confirming the inhibited autophagy flux. Collectively, our results suggest that gingerol sensitizes human lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the autophagy flux.

  12. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoma Small cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Secondhand smoke and lung cancer Normal lungs and alveoli Respiratory system Smoking hazards Bronchoscope References Horn L, Eisenberg R, ...

  13. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  14. Programmed cell death in plants and caspase-like activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, Gwénael Martial Daniel Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves an important balance between cell growth, cell division and cell death. In animals, programmed cell death (PCD) plays a key role by forming and deleting structures, controlling cell numbers and eliminating abnormal damaged cells. Caspases were

  15. Autophagic cell death: Loch Ness monster or endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Han-Ming; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The concept of autophagic cell death was first established based on observations of increased autophagic markers in dying cells. The major limitation of such a morphology-based definition of autophagic cell death is that it fails to establish the functional role of autophagy in the cell death process, and thus contributes to the confusion in the literature regarding the role of autophagy in cell death and cell survival. Here we propose to define autophagic cell death as a modality of non-apoptotic or necrotic programmed cell death in which autophagy serves as a cell death mechanism, upon meeting the following set of criteria: (i) cell death occurs without the involvement of apoptosis; (ii) there is an increase of autophagic flux, and not just an increase of the autophagic markers, in the dying cells; and (iii) suppression of autophagy via both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic approaches is able to rescue or prevent cell death. In light of this new definition, we will discuss some of the common problems and difficulties in the study of autophagic cell death and also revisit some well-reported cases of autophagic cell death, aiming to achieve a better understanding of whether autophagy is a real killer, an accomplice or just an innocent bystander in the course of cell death. At present, the physiological relevance of autophagic cell death is mainly observed in lower eukaryotes and invertebrates such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Drosophila melanogaster. We believe that such a clear definition of autophagic cell death will help us study and understand the physiological or pathological relevance of autophagic cell death in mammals.

  16. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alzaharna

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death.

  17. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  18. Melting Behaviour of Cell Death Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sherry; Sot, Jesus; Goni, Felix; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2009-05-01

    Sphingomyelin is a major lipid constituent of mammalian cell plasma membranes. It is converted into ceramide during programmed cell death. It is hypothesized that this conversion induces a structural change in membranes that is responsible for downstream signaling. To characterize these structural changes, deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to create a concentration-temperature phase diagram of palmitoyl sphingomyelin:ceramide multilamellar vesicles in excess water between 0-40 mol% ceramide and 25-80^oC. The two lipids are fully miscible at high temperatures and at 40 mol% ceramide. A variety of solid-liquid coexistence phase behavior is observed at lower concentrations. With increasing ceramide content, a gel phase is observed at progressively higher temperatures, implying that at physiological temperature, ceramide may increase the gel phase propensity of cell membranes.

  19. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antioxidant gene therapy against neuronal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Annadurai, Anandhan; Wang, Fang; Skotak, Maciej; Chandra, Namas; Li, Ming; Pappa, Aglaia; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Razo, Luz Maria Del; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common hallmark of neuronal cell death associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, as well as brain stroke/ischemia and traumatic brain injury. Increased accumulation of reactive species of both oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) has been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, energy impairment, alterations in metal homeostasis and accumulation of aggregated proteins observed in neurodegenerative disorders, which lead to the activation/modulation of cell death mechanisms that include apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic pathways. Thus, the design of novel antioxidant strategies to selectively target oxidative stress and redox imbalance might represent important therapeutic approaches against neurological disorders. This work reviews the evidence demonstrating the ability of genetically encoded antioxidant systems to selectively counteract neuronal cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases and ischemic brain damage. Because gene therapy approaches to treat inherited and acquired disorders offer many unique advantages over conventional therapeutic approaches, we discussed basic research/clinical evidence and the potential of virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for antioxidant gene therapy. PMID:24333264

  1. Cell death mechanisms of plant-derived anticancer drugs: beyond apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Hmadi, Raed; Kareh, Mike; Tohme, Rita; Darwiche, Nadine

    2015-12-01

    Despite remarkable progress in the discovery and development of novel cancer therapeutics, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the world. For many years, compounds derived from plants have been at the forefront as an important source of anticancer therapies and have played a vital role in the prevention and treatment of cancer because of their availability, and relatively low toxicity when compared with chemotherapy. More than 3000 plant species have been reported to treat cancer and about thirty plant-derived compounds have been isolated so far and have been tested in cancer clinical trials. The mechanisms of action of plant-derived anticancer drugs are numerous and most of them induce apoptotic cell death that may be intrinsic or extrinsic, and caspase and/or p53-dependent or independent mechanisms. Alternative modes of cell death by plant-derived anticancer drugs are emerging and include mainly autophagy, necrosis-like programmed cell death, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence leading to cell death. Considering that the non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms of plant-derived anticancer drugs are less reviewed than the apoptotic ones, this paper attempts to focus on such alternative cell death pathways for some representative anticancer plant natural compounds in clinical development. In particular, emphasis will be on some promising polyphenolics such as resveratrol, curcumin, and genistein; alkaloids namely berberine, noscapine, and colchicine; terpenoids such as parthenolide, triptolide, and betulinic acid; and the organosulfur compound sulforaphane. The understanding of non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms induced by these drugs would provide insights into the possibility of exploiting novel molecular pathways and targets of plant-derived compounds for future cancer therapeutics.

  2. 28 TOWARDS REDUCING CANCER DEATH: AN EXPLORATORY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    association between HPV and cancers of the anogenital region (56.6%). The type of practice did not significantly influence Physicians knowledge on basic cancer facts (P values > 0.05). More Physicians in full academic practice had good knowledge about human papilloma virus compared to those in combined practice ...

  3. Response to anti-programmed cell death protein-1 antibodies in men treated for platinum refractory germ cell cancer relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschäbitz, Stefanie; Lasitschka, Felix; Hadaschik, Boris; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Jentsch-Ullrich, Kathleen; Grüner, Marcus; Jäger, Dirk; Grüllich, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Treatment options for patients with platinum refractory metastatic germ cell tumours (GCT) relapsing after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation are limited and survival is poor. Antibodies directed against programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) are currently assessed within clinical trials. We present updated data on our experience with checkpoint inhibitors as a compassionate use off-label treatment attempt for highly-pretreated patients with GCT and provide an overview of the current literature on PD-L1 expression in this rare tumour entity. We analysed all patients with platinum refractory GCT treated with checkpoint inhibitors at our institutions between 2015 and 2017. Data were retrieved retrospectively from the patient charts. Seven patients were treated with nivolumab or pembrolizumab. Four patients received single-dose treatment and died shortly afterwards due to tumour progression; the remaining three patients received treatment for at least 6 months. No significant treatment toxicity was observed. Long-term tumour response was achieved in two of the three patients, both of them highly positive for PD-L1 staining. We consider checkpoint inhibition to be efficient in carefully selected patients with platinum refractory GCT. However, predictive markers associated with tumour response are not yet known and larger prospective clinical trials are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Autophagy Contributes to the Death/Survival Balance in Cancer PhotoDynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Dini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an important cellular program with a “double face” role, since it promotes either cell survival or cell death, also in cancer therapies. Its survival role occurs by recycling cell components during starvation or removing stressed organelles; when damage becomes extensive, autophagy provides another programmed cell death pathway, known as Autophagic Cell Death (ACD. The induction of autophagy is a common outcome in PhotoDynamic Therapy (PDT, a two-step process involving the irradiation of photosensitizer (PS-loaded cancer cells. Upon tissue oxygen interaction, PS provokes immediate and direct Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS-induced damage to Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER, mitochondria, plasma membrane, and/or lysosomes. The main biological effects carried out in cancer PDT are direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells, vasculature damage and induction of inflammatory reactions stimulating immunological responses. The question about the role of autophagy in PDT and its putative immunological impact is hotly controversial and largely studied in recent times. This review deals with the induction of autophagy in PDT protocols and its dual role, also considering its interrelationship with apoptosis, the preferential cell death program triggered in the photodynamic process.

  5. Paclitaxel inhibits the hyper-activation of spleen cells by lipopolysaccharide and induces cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2016-12-30

    Paclitaxel was isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, and used as an anticancer agent. Paclitaxel prevents cancer cell division by inhibiting spindle fiber function, inducing cell death. A recent study demonstrated that paclitaxel binds to myeloid differentiation protein-2 of Toll-like receptor 4 and prevents the signal transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Paclitaxel converts immune cells hypo-responsive to LPS. In this study, we investigated whether paclitaxel can inhibit the phenotype and function of immune cells. To accomplish this, we used spleen cells, a major type of immune cell, LPS, a representative inflammatory agent and a mitogen for B lymphocytes. LPS profoundly increased the activation and cytokine production of spleen cells. However, paclitaxel significantly inhibited LPS-induced hyper-activation of spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that paclitaxel induced cell death of LPS-treated spleen cells. These results suggest that paclitaxel can inhibit the hyper-immune response of LPS in spleen cells via a variety of mechanisms. These findings suggest that paclitaxel can be used as a modulating agent for diseases induced by hyper-activation of B lymphocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that paclitaxel inhibits the function of spleen cells activated by LPS, and further induces cell death.

  6. Type of cell death induced by alpha-trifluoromethyl acyloins in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideo, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Ken; Shimada, Jun; Kawase, Masami; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that alpha-trifluoromethyl acyloins (TFs) induced various types of cell death, depending on the target cancer cell line. We investigated here what type of cell death is induced by a-trifluoromethyl acyloins in two human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-4). TFs produced few TUNEL-positive cells. TFs induced annexin V/PI-double positive HSC-2 cells and annexin V-positive/PI-negative HSC-4 cells, respectively, but failed to activate caspase-3, capase-8 and caspase-9 in both HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells. On the other hand, TFs induced the formation of acidic organelles (detected by acridine orange staining) in both HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells. When HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells that had been transfected with expression vector encording the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) gene fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were treated with TFs, LC3-GFP fusion protein was accumulated as granular dots in autophagosomes. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, partially inhibited the cytotoxicity of TFs, the formation of acidic organelles and LC3 accumulation in the autophagosome. These data suggest that alpha-trifluoromethyl acyloins may induce autophagic cell death in HSC-2 and HSC-4 cells following the early stage of necrosis or apoptosis, respectively.

  7. Classification of cancer-related death certificates using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Luke; Zuccon, Guido; Nguyen, Anthony; Bergheim, Anton; Grayson, Narelle

    2013-01-01

    Cancer monitoring and prevention relies on the critical aspect of timely notification of cancer cases. However, the abstraction and classification of cancer from the free-text of pathology reports and other relevant documents, such as death certificates, exist as complex and time-consuming activities. In this paper, approaches for the automatic detection of notifiable cancer cases as the cause of death from free-text death certificates supplied to Cancer Registries are investigated. A number of machine learning classifiers were studied. Features were extracted using natural language techniques and the Medtex toolkit. The numerous features encompassed stemmed words, bi-grams, and concepts from the SNOMED CT medical terminology. The baseline consisted of a keyword spotter using keywords extracted from the long description of ICD-10 cancer related codes. Death certificates with notifiable cancer listed as the cause of death can be effectively identified with the methods studied in this paper. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier achieved best performance with an overall Fmeasure of 0.9866 when evaluated on a set of 5,000 freetext death certificates using the token stem feature set. The SNOMED CT concept plus token stem feature set reached the lowest variance (0.0032) and false negative rate (0.0297) while achieving an F-measure of 0.9864. The SVM classifier accounts for the first 18 of the top 40 evaluated runs, and entails the most robust classifier with a variance of 0.001141, half the variance of the other classifiers. The selection of features significantly produced the most influences on the performance of the classifiers, although the type of classifier employed also affects performance. In contrast, the feature weighting schema created a negligible effect on performance. Specifically, it is found that stemmed tokens with or without SNOMED CT concepts create the most effective feature when combined with an SVM classifier.

  8. Classification of Cancer-related Death Certificates using Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Butt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCancer monitoring and prevention relies on the critical aspect of timely notification of cancer cases. However, the abstraction and classification of cancer from the free-text of pathology reports and other relevant documents, such as death certificates, exist as complex and time-consuming activities.AimsIn this paper, approaches for the automatic detection of notifiable cancer cases as the cause of death from free-text death certificates supplied to Cancer Registries are investigated.Method A number of machine learning classifiers were studied. Features were extracted using natural language techniques and the Medtex toolkit. The numerous features encompassed stemmed words, bi-grams, and concepts from the SNOMED CT medical terminology. The baseline consisted of a keyword spotter using keywords extracted from the long description of ICD-10 cancer related codes.ResultsDeath certificates with notifiable cancer listed as the cause of death can be effectively identified with the methods studied in this paper. A Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier achieved best performance with an overall F-measure of 0.9866 when evaluated on a set of 5,000 free-text death certificates using the token stem feature set. The SNOMED CT concept plus token stem feature set reached the lowest variance (0.0032 and false negative rate (0.0297 while achieving an F-measure of 0.9864. The SVM classifier accounts for the first 18 of the top 40 evaluated runs, and entails the most robust classifier with a variance of 0.001141, half the variance of the other classifiers.ConclusionThe selection of features significantly produced the most influences on the performance of the classifiers, although the type of classifier employed also affects performance. In contrast, the feature weighting schema created a negligible effect on performance. Specifically, it is found that stemmed tokens with or without SNOMED CT concepts create the most effective feature when combined with

  9. Clinical signs of impending death in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; dos Santos, Renata; Chisholm, Gary; Bansal, Swati; Silva, Thiago Buosi; Kilgore, Kelly; Crovador, Camila Souza; Yu, Xiaoying; Swartz, Michael D; Perez-Cruz, Pedro Emilio; Leite, Raphael de Almeida; Nascimento, Maria Salete de Angelis; Reddy, Suresh; Seriaco, Fabiola; Yennu, Sriram; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Dev, Rony; Hall, Stacy; Fajardo, Julieta; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The physical signs of impending death have not been well characterized in cancer patients. A better understanding of these signs may improve the ability of clinicians to diagnose impending death. We examined the frequency and onset of 10 bedside physical signs and their diagnostic performance for impending death. We systematically documented 10 physical signs every 12 hours from admission to death or discharge in 357 consecutive patients with advanced cancer admitted to two acute palliative care units. We examined the frequency and median onset of each sign from death backward and calculated their likelihood ratios (LRs) associated with death within 3 days. In total, 203 of 357 patients (52 of 151 in the U.S., 151 of 206 in Brazil) died. Decreased level of consciousness, Palliative Performance Scale ≤20%, and dysphagia of liquids appeared at high frequency and >3 days before death and had low specificity (signs had high specificity (>95%) and positive LRs for death within 3 days, including pulselessness of radial artery (positive LR: 15.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.7-17.4), respiration with mandibular movement (positive LR: 10; 95% CI: 9.1-10.9), decreased urine output (positive LR: 15.2; 95% CI: 13.4-17.1), Cheyne-Stokes breathing (positive LR: 12.4; 95% CI: 10.8-13.9), and death rattle (positive LR: 9; 95% CI: 8.1-9.8). We identified highly specific physical signs associated with death within 3 days among cancer patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  10. Two-Photon Photosensitizer-Polymer Conjugates for Combined Cancer Cell Death Induction and Two-Photon Fluorescence Imaging: Structure/Photodynamic Therapy Efficiency Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepraga, Cristina; Marotte, Sophie; Ben Daoud, Edna; Favier, Arnaud; Lanoë, Pierre-Henri; Monnereau, Cyrille; Baldeck, Patrice; Andraud, Chantal; Marvel, Jacqueline; Charreyre, Marie-Thérèse; Leverrier, Yann

    2017-11-10

    One of the challenges of photodynamic therapy is to increase the penetration depth of light irradiation in the tumor tissues. Although two-photon excitation strategies have been developed, the two-photon absorption cross sections of clinically used photosensitizers are generally low (below 300 GM). Besides, photosensitizers with high cross section values are often non-water-soluble. In this research work, a whole family of photosensitizer-polymer conjugates was synthesized via the covalent binding of a photosensitizer with a relatively high cross section along a biocompatible copolymer chain. The resulting photosensitizer-polymer conjugates were water-soluble and could be imaged in cellulo by two-photon microscopy thanks to their high two-photon absorption cross sections (up to 2600 GM in water, in the NIR range). In order to explore the structure/photodynamic activity relationship of such macromolecular photosensitizers, the influence of the polymer size, photosensitizer density, and presence of charges along the polymer backbone was investigated (neutral, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic conjugates were compared). The macromolecular photosensitizers were not cytotoxic in the absence of light irradiation. Their kinetics of cellular uptake in the B16-F10 melanoma cell line were followed by flow cytometry over 24 h. The efficiency of cell death upon photoactivation was found to be highly correlated to the cellular uptake in turn correlated to the global charge of the macromolecular photosensitizer which appeared as the determining structural parameter.

  11. Public Perceptions of Celebrity Cancer Deaths: How Identification and Emotions Shape Cancer Stigma and Behavioral Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Jessica Gall

    2017-11-01

    Celebrity cancer deaths can focus public attention on the disease like few events can. However, not all celebrities or their families are open about the exact cause of death. Anecdotal reports suggest that some do not reveal the exact cause of death due to fears of stigma associated with the specific type of cancer. However, empirical evidence regarding whether or how the cause of death actually impacts public perceptions and behaviors is lacking. A three (cause of death: nonspecified cancer, liver cancer, or lung cancer) by two (celebrity obituary: David Bowie or Alan Rickman) fully factorial between-subjects online experiment (N = 390) tested a proposed model of effects on identification, discrete emotional reactions, stigma-related perceptions, and behavioral intentions. Results suggest that specific causes of death do not have a direct impact on stigma but they can alter identification and emotional reactions, such as compassion and anxiety, which subsequently shape stigma-related perceptions and behavioral intentions.

  12. Death Receptor-Mediated Cell Death and Proinflammatory Signaling in Nonalcoholic SteatohepatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hirsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is becoming a public health problem worldwide. A subset of patients develop an inflammatory disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, characterized by steatosis, hepatocellular death, macrophage and neutrophil accumulation, and varying stages of fibrosis. Hepatocyte cell death triggers the cellular inflammatory response, therefore reducing cell death may be salutary in the steatohepatitis disease process. Recently, a better understanding of hepatocyte apoptosis in NASH has been obtained and new information regarding other cell death modes such as necroptosis and pyroptosis has been reported. Hepatocyte lipotoxicity is often triggered by death receptors. In addition to causing apoptosis, death receptors have been shown to mediate proinflammatory signaling, suggesting that apoptosis in this context is not an immunologically silent process. Here, we review recent developments in our understanding of hepatocyte cell death by death receptors and its mechanistic link to inflammation in NASH. We emphasize how proapoptotic signaling by death receptors may induce the release of proinflammatory extracellular vesicles, thereby recruiting and activating macrophages and promoting the steatohepatitis process. Potential therapeutic strategies are discussed based on this evolving information. Keywords: Apoptosis, Caspase Inhibitor, Cell Death, Death Receptors, Exosomes, Extracellular Vesicles, Fibrosis, Inflammation, Inflammasome, Microvesicles, Necroptosis, Pyroptosis

  13. Mitochondrion: A Common Organelle for Distinct Cell Deaths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Figueiredo-Pereira, C; Oudot, C; Vieira, H L A; Brenner, C

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are deeply involved in cell fate decisions via their multiple roles in metabolism, cell growth, and cell death. In healthy cells, these functions are highly regulated to provide sufficient energy for cell function, maintain cell homeostasis, and avoid undesirable cell death. This is achieved by an orchestrated cooperation of cellular and molecular mechanisms such as mitochondrial mass control (mitophagy vs biogenesis), oxidative phosphorylation, redox and calcium homeostasis, and the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic proteins. In the 1990s, mitochondria have been demonstrated to directly control some forms of regulated cell death as well indirectly through energetic metabolism modulation. However, a large body of literature revealed that distinct cell death modalities can coexist in vivo as well as that mitochondria can be dispensable for certain forms of cell death. Likewise, unexpected interconnections between cell death pathways can lead to an amplification of lethality, as well as a defeat of cell death resistance mechanisms. This revealed a complexity of the control of cell fate and a crucial need to reevaluate the role of mitochondria. Here, we will review the various cell death pathways such as apoptosis and mitochondrial permeability transition-driven necrosis and discuss how mitochondrial proteins and mitophagy regulate them. Finally, the role of mitochondrial proteins in the triggering of cell death and mitophagy in pathological models, such as cardiac and brain pathologies, will be highlighted. This may help to define efficient cytoprotective therapeutic strategies based on the targeting of mitochondria. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  15. Alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage, formation of topoisomerase I- and II-DNA complexes and cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Orta, Manuel Luis; Pastor, Nuria; Austin, Caroline A; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2013-09-12

    The alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone are part of the chemical structure of a variety of naturally occurring compounds (e.g., cardenolides, bufadienolides, acetogenins, coumarins, and food-flavoring furanones), some of which have shown anticancer activity and/or DNA damaging effects. Here we report that 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage (assessed by the comet assay and the gamma-H2AX focus assay) and the formation of topoisomerase I- and topoisomerase II-DNA complexes in cells (visualized and quantified in situ by the TARDIS assay). Cells mutated in BRCA2 (deficient in homologous recombination repair) were significantly hypersensitive to the cytotoxic activity of 2-pyrone, therefore suggesting that BRCA2 plays an important role in the repair of DNA damage induced by this lactone. Both lactones were cytotoxic in A549 lung cancer cells at lower concentrations than in MRC5 non-malignant lung fibroblasts. The possible involvement of 2-furanone and 2-pyrone in the anticancer and DNA-damaging activities of compounds containing these lactones is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Missing memories of death: Dissociative amnesia in the bereaved the day after a cancer death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Mayumi; Onishi, Hideki; Toyama, Hiroaki; Tsutsumi, Chizuko; Endo, Chieko; Tanahashi, Iori; Takahashi, Takao; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2015-12-01

    The death of a loved one is one of the most stressful events of life, and such stress affects the physical and psychological well-being of the bereaved. Dissociative amnesia is characterized by an inability to recall important autobiographical information. Dissociative amnesia in the bereaved who have lost a loved one to cancer has not been previously reported. We discuss herein the case of a patient who developed dissociative amnesia the day after the death of here beloved husband. A 38-year-old woman was referred for psychiatric consultation because of restlessness and abnormal behavior. Her 44-year-old husband had died of pancreatic cancer the day before the consultation. On the day of the death, she looked upset and began to hyperventilate. The next day, she behaved as if the deceased were still alive, which embarrassed her family. At her initial psychiatric consultation, she talked and behaved as if her husband was still alive and in the hospital. Her psychiatric features fulfilled the DSM-V criteria for dissociative amnesia. The death of her husband had been very traumatic for her and was considered to have been one of the causes of this dissociation. This report adds to the list of psychiatric symptoms in the bereaved who have lost a loved one to cancer. In an oncology setting, we should consider the impact of death, the concomitant defense mechanisms, and the background of the families.

  17. A critical role for ethylene in hydrogen peroxide release during programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Camptothecin, a topo isomerase-I inhibitor used in cancer therapy, induces apoptosis in animal cells. In tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells, camptothecin induces cell death that is accompanied by the characteristic nuclear morphological changes such as chromatin condensation and

  18. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andrew J.; Hailey, Dale W.; Stawicki, Tamara M.; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Ou, Henry C.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analogue of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  19. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  20. Cell death induction by the BH3 mimetic GX15-070 in thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Viehof, Jan; Jastrow, Holger; Becher-Boveleth, Nina; Fuhrer, Dagmar; Mann, Klaus

    2015-07-22

    The evasion of cell death is one of the hallmarks of cancer, contributing to both tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Dedifferentiated and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas that do not take up radioiodine are resistant to conventional anticancer treatments and patients with these tumors are difficult to treat. BH3 mimetics are a new class of drugs that target anti-apoptotic proteins of the BCL-2 family and promote cell death. The purpose of this study was to analyze the molecular effects of the BH3 mimetic GX15-070 on thyroid carcinoma cell lines and to characterize cell death induced by GX15-070. A total of 17 cell lines derived from follicular, papillary, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas were treated with GX15-070. Cell viability was measured with MTT assay while cell cycle phase distribution and subG1 peaks were determined after propidium iodide staining. We assessed cell death via the caspase 3/7 activity, caspase cleavage products, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) liberation assays, and a LC3 analysis by western blot. Ultrastructural changes were analysed by electron microscopy of GX15-070-treated cells. After GX15-070 treatment, the number of viable cells was decreased in all cell lines examined, with IC50 values ranging from 48nM to 3.25 μM. We observed biochemical markers of autophagic cell death and necrosis like LC3 conversion and LDH release after the GX15-070 treatment. Electron microscopy revealed several common characteristic ultrastructural changes like swelling of mitochondria, dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, membrane blebbing and formation of vacuoles. GX15-070 treatment induced DNA fragmentation detected by subG1-peak induction and an arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Caspase activation after GX15-070 incubation was detected but had no effect on viability of cells. With these experiments we demonstrated the efficacy of the BH3 mimetic drug GX15-070 acting against dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma cells of various histological

  1. Playing the DISC : Turning on TRAIL death receptor-mediated apoptosis in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennarun, Bodvael; Meijer, Annemieke; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Kruyt, Frank; de Jong, Steven

    Formation of the pro-apoptotic death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) can be initiated in cancer cells via binding of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to its two pro-apoptotic receptors, TRAIL receptor 1 (TRAIL-R1) and TRAIL-R2. Primary components of the DISC are

  2. Child and youth cancer: profile of deaths

    OpenAIRE

    Joisy Aparecida Marchi; Julia Wakiuchi; Catarina Aparecida Sales; Thais Aidar de Freitas Mathias; Carlos Alexandre Molena Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing the deaths caused by malignant neoplasias in children and adolescents living in the state of Paraná, Brazil between 2001 and 2010. It is a quantitative, descriptive, transversal study, based on secondary data, obtained through the data processing department of the Sistema Único de Saúde from July to December, 2012. The following variables were analyzed: gender, age, race and city of residence. As a measure of association, odds ratio was used, confirmed by...

  3. [Validity of death certificates for cancer in Mallorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáffaro Rovira, M; Garau Llinás, I; Cabeza Irigoyen, E; Franch Sureda, P; Obrador Adrover, A

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the quality and completeness of the information of death certificates (CMD) for cancer in Mallorca during 1989. Likewise we studied the possible bias introduced by the excluded cases for lack of clinical information (DCO cases). We compared the information of the death certificates with the clinical records and data of the Population-based Cancer Registry. A global concordance of 77.2% was obtained out of 1,173 certificates. This concordance varied according to sex (males: 79.8%, women: 73.1%; p 70 years: 74.2%; p < 0.05). The best notified sites were: breast, lung, and leukemias and the worst, unknown and poorly defined sites, bones and soft tissue tumours. We detected that the death certificates carry a subnotification of at least 5% in cancer deaths. Even so, they result a valid source of information for the Population-based Cancer Registry. The cases excluded for lack of clinical documentation present a more advanced age and a greater proportion of hepatic cancers and unknown and poorly defined sites.

  4. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells: Research and Clinical Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norashikin Zakaria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, accounting for 1.8 million new cases and 1.6 million deaths in 2012. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, which is one of two types of lung cancer, accounts for 85–90% of all lung cancers. Despite advances in therapy, lung cancer still remains a leading cause of death. Cancer relapse and dissemination after treatment indicates the existence of a niche of cancer cells that are not fully eradicated by current therapies. These chemoresistant populations of cancer cells are called cancer stem cells (CSCs because they possess the self-renewal and differentiation capabilities similar to those of normal stem cells. Targeting the niche of CSCs in combination with chemotherapy might provide a promising strategy to eradicate these cells. Thus, understanding the characteristics of CSCs has become a focus of studies of NSCLC therapies.

  5. Topological defects in epithelia govern cell death and extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Thuan Beng; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Nier, Vincent; Kocgozlu, Leyla; Thampi, Sumesh; Toyama, Yusuke; Marcq, Philippe; Lim, Chwee Teck; Yeomans, Julia M.; Ladoux, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial tissues (epithelia) remove excess cells through extrusion, preventing the accumulation of unnecessary or pathological cells. The extrusion process can be triggered by apoptotic signalling, oncogenic transformation and overcrowding of cells. Despite the important linkage of cell extrusion to developmental, homeostatic and pathological processes such as cancer metastasis, its underlying mechanism and connections to the intrinsic mechanics of the epithelium are largely unexplored. We approach this problem by modelling the epithelium as an active nematic liquid crystal (that has a long range directional order), and comparing numerical simulations to strain rate and stress measurements within monolayers of MDCK (Madin Darby canine kidney) cells. Here we show that apoptotic cell extrusion is provoked by singularities in cell alignments in the form of comet-shaped topological defects. We find a universal correlation between extrusion sites and positions of nematic defects in the cell orientation field in different epithelium types. The results confirm the active nematic nature of epithelia, and demonstrate that defect-induced isotropic stresses are the primary precursors of mechanotransductive responses in cells, including YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription factor activity, caspase-3-mediated cell death, and extrusions. Importantly, the defect-driven extrusion mechanism depends on intercellular junctions, because the weakening of cell-cell interactions in an α-catenin knockdown monolayer reduces the defect size and increases both the number of defects and extrusion rates, as is also predicted by our model. We further demonstrate the ability to control extrusion hotspots by geometrically inducing defects through microcontact printing of patterned monolayers. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanism for apoptotic cell extrusion: spontaneously formed topological defects in epithelia govern cell fate. This will be important in predicting

  6. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  7. The nuclear receptor NR4A1 induces a form of cell death dependent on autophagy in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Bouzas-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The control of cell death is a biological process essential for proper development, and for preventing devastating pathologies like cancer and neurodegeneration. On the other hand, autophagy regulation is essential for protein and organelle degradation, and its dysfunction is associated with overlapping pathologies like cancer and neurodegeneration, but also for microbial infection and aging. In the present report we show that two evolutionarily unrelated receptors--Neurokinin 1 Receptor (NK(1R, a G-protein coupled receptor, and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R, a tyrosine kinase receptor--both induce non-apoptotic cell death with autophagic features and requiring the activity of the autophagic core machinery proteins PI3K-III, Beclin-1 and Atg7. Remarkably, this form of cell death occurs in apoptosis-competent cells. The signal transduction pathways engaged by these receptors both converged on the activation of the nuclear receptor NR4A1, which has previously been shown to play a critical role in some paradigms of apoptosis and in NK(1R-induced cell death. The activity of NR4A1 was necessary for IGF1R-induced cell death, as well as for a canonical model of cell death by autophagy induced by the presence of a pan-caspase inhibitor, suggesting that NR4A1 is a general modulator of this kind of cell death. During cell death by autophagy, NR4A1 was transcriptionally competent, even though a fraction of it was present in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, NR4A1 interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 but not with Beclin-1 complex. Therefore the mechanism to promote cell death by autophagy might involve regulation of gene expression, as well as protein interactions. Understanding the molecular basis of autophagy and cell death mediation by NR4A1, should provide novel insights and targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Signalome-wide RNAi screen identifies GBA1 as a positive mediator of autophagic cell death

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    Dasari, Santosh K; Bialik, Shani; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H; Kimchi, Adi

    2017-01-01

    Activating alternative cell death pathways, including autophagic cell death, is a promising direction to overcome the apoptosis resistance observed in various cancers. Yet, whether autophagy acts as a death mechanism by over consumption of intracellular components is still controversial and remains undefined at the ultrastructural and the mechanistic levels. Here we identified conditions under which resveratrol-treated A549 lung cancer cells die by a mechanism that fulfills the previous definition of autophagic cell death. The cells displayed a strong and sustained induction of autophagic flux, cell death was prevented by knocking down autophagic genes and death occurred in the absence of apoptotic or necroptotic pathway activation. Detailed ultrastructural characterization revealed additional critical events, including a continuous increase over time in the number of autophagic vacuoles, in particular autolysosomes, occupying most of the cytoplasm at terminal stages. This was followed by loss of organelles, disruption of intracellular membranes including the swelling of perinuclear space and, occasionally, a unique type of nuclear shedding. A signalome-wide shRNA-based viability screen was applied to identify positive mediators of this type of autophagic cell death. One top hit was GBA1, the Gaucher disease-associated gene, which encodes glucocerebrosidase, an enzyme that metabolizes glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Interestingly, glucocerebrosidase expression levels and activity were elevated, concomitantly with increased intracellular ceramide levels, both of which correlated in time with the appearance of the unique death characteristics. Transfection with siGBA1 attenuated the increase in glucocerebrosidase activity and the intracellular ceramide levels. Most importantly, GBA1 knockdown prevented the strong increase in LC3 lipidation, and many of the ultrastructural changes characteristic of this type of autophagic cell death, including a significant

  9. Cystine uptake through the cystine/glutamate antiporter xCT triggers glioblastoma cell death under glucose deprivation.

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    Goji, Takeo; Takahara, Kazuhiko; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2017-12-01

    Oncogenic signaling in cancer cells alters glucose uptake and utilization to supply sufficient energy and biosynthetic intermediates for survival and sustained proliferation. Oncogenic signaling also prevents oxidative stress and cell death caused by increased production of reactive oxygen species. However, elevated glucose metabolism in cancer cells, especially in glioblastoma, results in the cells becoming sensitive to glucose deprivation ( i.e. in high glucose dependence), which rapidly induces cell death. However, the precise mechanism of this type of cell death remains unknown. Here, we report that glucose deprivation alone does not trigger glioblastoma cell death. We found that, for cell death to occur in glucose-deprived glioblastoma cells, cystine and glutamine also need to be present in culture media. We observed that cystine uptake through the cystine/glutamate antiporter xCT under glucose deprivation rapidly induces NADPH depletion, reactive oxygen species accumulation, and cell death. We conclude that although cystine uptake is crucial for production of antioxidant glutathione in cancer cells its transport through xCT also induces oxidative stress and cell death in glucose-deprived glioblastoma cells. Combining inhibitors targeting cancer-specific glucose metabolism with cystine and glutamine treatment may offer a therapeutic approach for glioblastoma tumors exhibiting high xCT expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Morphodynamics of a growing microbial colony driven by cell death

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    Ghosh, Pushpita; Levine, Herbert

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial cells can often self-organize into multicellular structures with complex spatiotemporal morphology. In this work, we study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a growing microbial colony in the presence of cell death. We present an individual-based model of nonmotile bacterial cells which grow and proliferate by consuming diffusing nutrients on a semisolid two-dimensional surface. The colony spreads by growth forces and sliding motility of cells and undergoes cell death followed by subsequent disintegration of the dead cells in the medium. We model cell death by considering two possible situations: In one of the cases, cell death occurs in response to the limitation of local nutrients, while the other case corresponds to an active death process, known as apoptotic or programmed cell death. We demonstrate how the colony morphology is influenced by the presence of cell death. Our results show that cell death facilitates transitions from roughly circular to highly branched structures at the periphery of an expanding colony. Interestingly, our results also reveal that for the colonies which are growing in higher initial nutrient concentrations, cell death occurs much earlier compared to the colonies which are growing in lower initial nutrient concentrations. This work provides new insights into the branched patterning of growing bacterial colonies as a consequence of complex interplay among the biochemical and mechanical effects.

  11. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation.

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    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-05-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies.

  12. Grape seed extract targets mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress leading to cytoprotective autophagy and apoptotic death in human head and neck cancer cells.

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    Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Deep, Gagan; Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major killer worldwide and innovative measures are urgently warranted to lower the morbidity and mortality caused by this malignancy. Aberrant redox and metabolic status in HNSCC cells offer a unique opportunity to specifically target cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of grape seed extract (GSE) to target the redox and bioenergetic alterations in HNSCC cells. GSE treatment decreased the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity, increased the mitochondrial superoxide levels and depleted the levels of cellular antioxidant (glutathione), thus resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in human HNSCC Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Polyethylene glycol-SOD addition reversed the GSE-mediated apoptosis without restoring complex III activity. Along with redox changes, GSE inhibited the extracellular acidification rate (representing glycolysis) and oxygen consumption rate (indicating oxidative phosphorylation) leading to metabolic stress in HNSCC cells. Molecular studies revealed that GSE activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and suppressed Akt/mTOR/4E-BP1/S6K signaling in both Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Interestingly, GSE increased the autophagic load specifically in FaDu cells, and autophagy inhibition significantly augmented the apoptosis in these cells. Consistent with in vitro results, in vivo analyses also showed that GSE feeding in nude mice activated AMPK and induced-autophagy in FaDu xenograft tumor tissues. Overall, these findings are innovative as we for the first time showed that GSE targets ETC complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress, thereby, causing autophagy and apoptotic death in HNSCC cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Conserved metabolic energy production pathways govern Eiger/TNF-induced nonapoptotic cell death.

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    Kanda, Hiroshi; Igaki, Tatsushi; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Masayuki

    2011-11-22

    Caspase-independent cell death is known to be important in physiological and pathological conditions, but its molecular regulation is not well-understood. Eiger is the sole fly ortholog of TNF. The ectopic expression of Eiger in the developing eye primordium caused JNK-dependent but caspase-independent cell death. To understand the molecular basis of this Eiger-induced nonapoptotic cell death, we performed a large-scale genetic screen in Drosophila for suppressors of the Eiger-induced cell death phenotype. We found that molecules that regulate metabolic energy production are central to this form of cell death: it was dramatically suppressed by decreased levels of molecules that regulate cytosolic glycolysis, mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the electron transport chain. Importantly, reducing the expression of energy production-related genes did not affect the cell death triggered by proapoptotic genes, such as reaper, hid, or debcl, indicating that the energy production-related genes have a specific role in Eiger-induced nonapoptotic cell death. We also found that energy production-related genes regulate the Eiger-induced cell death downstream of JNK. In addition, Eiger induced the production of reactive oxygen species in a manner dependent on energy production-related genes. Furthermore, we showed that this cell death machinery is involved in Eiger's physiological function, because decreasing the energy production-related genes suppressed Eiger-dependent tumor suppression, an intrinsic mechanism for removing tumorigenic mutant clones from epithelia by inducing cell death. This result suggests a link between sensitivity to cell death and metabolic activity in cancer.

  14. GSK-3: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development.