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Sample records for cancer cell cycle

  1. CGGBP1 regulates cell cycle in cancer cells

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    Uhrbom Lene

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CGGBP1 is a CGG-triplet repeat binding protein, which affects transcription from CGG-triplet-rich promoters such as the FMR1 gene and the ribosomal RNA gene clusters. Earlier, we reported some previously unknown functions of CGGBP1 in gene expression during heat shock stress response. Recently we had found CGGBP1 to be a cell cycle regulatory midbody protein required for normal cytokinetic abscission in normal human fibroblasts, which have all the cell cycle regulatory mechanisms intact. Results In this study we explored the role of CGGBP1 in the cell cycle in various cancer cell lines. CGGBP1 depletion by RNA interference in tumor-derived cells caused an increase in the cell population at G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase. CGGBP1 depletion also increased the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes CDKN1A and GAS1, associated with reductions in histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation in their promoters. By combining RNA interference and genetic mutations, we found that the role of CGGBP1 in cell cycle involves multiple mechanisms, as single deficiencies of CDKN1A, GAS1 as well as TP53, INK4A or ARF failed to rescue the G0/G1 arrest caused by CGGBP1 depletion. Conclusions Our results show that CGGBP1 expression is important for cell cycle progression through multiple parallel mechanisms including the regulation of CDKN1A and GAS1 levels.

  2. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  3. Duplication of the genome in normal and cancer cell cycles.

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    Bandura, Jennifer L; Calvi, Brian R

    2002-01-01

    It is critical to discover the mechanisms of normal cell cycle regulation if we are to fully understand what goes awry in cancer cells. The normal eukaryotic cell tightly regulates the activity of origins of DNA replication so that the genome is duplicated exactly once per cell cycle. Over the last ten years much has been learned concerning the cell cycle regulation of origin activity. It is now clear that the proteins and cell cycle mechanisms that control origin activity are largely conserved from yeast to humans. Despite this conservation, the composition of origins of DNA replication in higher eukaryotes remains ill defined. A DNA consensus for predicting origins has yet to emerge, and it is of some debate whether primary DNA sequence determines where replication initiates. In this review we outline what is known about origin structure and the mechanism of once per cell cycle DNA replication with an emphasis on recent advances in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible relevance of these regulatory pathways for cancer biology and therapy.

  4. Effect of lycopene on cell viability and cell cycle progression in human cancer cell lines

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    Teodoro Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lycopene, a major carotenoid component of tomato, has a potential anticancer activity in many types of cancer. Epidemiological and clinical trials rarely provide evidence for mechanisms of the compound’s action, and studies on its effect on cancer of different cell origins are now being done. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of lycopene on cell cycle and cell viability in eight human cancer cell lines. Methods Human cell lines were treated with lycopene (1–5 μM for 48 and 96 h. Cell viability was monitored using the method of MTT. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptotic cells were identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick labeling (TUNEL and by DAPI. Results Our data showed a significant decrease in the number of viable cells in three cancer cells lines (HT-29, T84 and MCF-7 after 48 h treatment with lycopene, and changes in the fraction of cells retained in different cell cycle phases. Lycopene promoted also cell cycle arrest followed by decreased cell viability in majority of cell lines after 96 h, as compared to controls. Furthermore, an increase in apoptosis was observed in four cell lines (T-84, HT-29, MCF-7 and DU145 when cells were treated with lycopene. Conclusions Our findings show the capacity of lycopene to inhibit cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle in different phases and increase apoptosis, mainly in breast, colon and prostate lines after 96 h. These observations suggest that lycopene may alter cell cycle regulatory proteins depending on the type of cancer and the dose of lycopene administration. Taken together, these data indicated that the antiproliferative effect of lycopene was cellular type, time and dose-dependent.

  5. Characterization and functional analysis of a slow-cycling subpopulation in colorectal cancer enriched by cell cycle inducer combined chemotherapy.

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    Wu, Feng-Hua; Mu, Lei; Li, Xiao-Lan; Hu, Yi-Bing; Liu, Hui; Han, Lin-Tao; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2017-10-03

    The concept of cancer stem cells has been proposed in various malignancies including colorectal cancer. Recent studies show direct evidence for quiescence slow-cycling cells playing a role in cancer stem cells. There exists an urgent need to isolate and better characterize these slow-cycling cells. In this study, we developed a new model to enrich slow-cycling tumor cells using cell-cycle inducer combined with cell cycle-dependent chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo . Our results show that Short-term exposure of colorectal cancer cells to chemotherapy combined with cell-cycle inducer enriches for a cell-cycle quiescent tumor cell population. Specifically, these slow-cycling tumor cells exhibit increased chemotherapy resistance in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo . Notably, these cells are stem-cell like and participate in metastatic dormancy. Further exploration indicates that slow-cycling colorectal cancer cells in our model are less sensitive to cytokine-induced-killer cell mediated cytotoxic killing in vivo and in vitro . Collectively, our cell cycle inducer combined chemotherapy exposure model enriches for a slow-cycling, dormant, chemo-resistant tumor cell sub-population that are resistant to cytokine induced killer cell based immunotherapy. Studying unique signaling pathways in dormant tumor cells enriched by cell cycle inducer combined chemotherapy treatment is expected to identify novel therapeutic targets for preventing tumor recurrence.

  6. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

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    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  7. Carrageenan delays cell cycle progression in human cancer cells in vitro demonstrated by FUCCI imaging.

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    Prasedya, Eka Sunarwidhi; Miyake, Masao; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hazama, Akihiro

    2016-08-04

    Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide that exists in red seaweeds recently shown to have anticancer properties. Previous findings show various effects of carrageenan suppressing tumor cell growth. One of the hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation, a consequence of loss of normal cell-cycle control, that underlies tumor growth. Recently there is an increasing interest in potential anticancer agents that affect cell cycle in cancer cells. Thus, in this study we investigated the effects of carrageenan on the tumor cell cycle. Using human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) cells as and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), the cytotoxic effects of kappa carrageenan (k-CO) and lambda carrageenan (λ-CO) at the concentrations of 250-2500 μg/mL were observed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay while cell death rates were determined using staining with calcein-AM/propidium iodide. Cell-cycle profile and progression were demonstrated with HeLa cells expressing FUCCI (fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator) probes (HeLa-FUCCI). Carrageenan had no significant effect on HUVEC (normal cells). In contrast both forms of carrageenan were cytotoxic towards HeLa cells (cancer cells). Furthermore, according to cell-cycle analysis with FUCCI cells, the cell cycle of HeLa cells was delayed in specific phases due to different carrageenan treatments. Considering these results, it could be suggested that carrageenan affects the cell-cycle of HeLa cells not only by arresting the cell cycle in specific phases but also by delaying the time needed for the cell to progress through the cell cycle. Additionally, different types of carrageenans have different effects on cell cycle progression. This effect of carrageenan towards cancer cells could possibly be developed into a tumor cell-specific anticancer agent.

  8. Comparative cell cycle transcriptomics reveals synchronization of developmental transcription factor networks in cancer cells

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    Johard, Helena; Mahdessian, Diana; Fedr, Radek; Marks, Carolyn; Medalová, Jiřina; Souček, Karel; Lundberg, Emma; Linnarsson, Sten; Bryja, Vítězslav; Sekyrova, Petra; Altun, Mikael; Andäng, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The cell cycle coordinates core functions such as replication and cell division. However, cell-cycle-regulated transcription in the control of non-core functions, such as cell identity maintenance through specific transcription factors (TFs) and signalling pathways remains unclear. Here, we provide a resource consisting of mapped transcriptomes in unsynchronized HeLa and U2OS cancer cells sorted for cell cycle phase by Fucci reporter expression. We developed a novel algorithm for data analysis that enables efficient visualization and data comparisons and identified cell cycle synchronization of Notch signalling and TFs associated with development. Furthermore, the cell cycle synchronizes with the circadian clock, providing a possible link between developmental transcriptional networks and the cell cycle. In conclusion we find that cell cycle synchronized transcriptional patterns are temporally compartmentalized and more complex than previously anticipated, involving genes, which control cell identity and development. PMID:29228002

  9. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

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    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  10. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lintao; Peng, Yanyan; Shi, Kaikai; Wang, Haixiao; Lu, Jianlei; Li, Yanli; Ma, Changyan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have revealed that osthole, an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, a traditional Chinese medicine, possesses anticancer activity. However, its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435. We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation ...

  11. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Cell Cycle Effects for Gemcitabine and Trabectedin Combinations in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

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    Miao, Xin; Koch, Gilbert; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Straubinger, Robert M.; Jusko, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Combinations of gemcitabine and trabectedin exert modest synergistic cytotoxic effects on two pancreatic cancer cell lines. Here, systems pharmacodynamic (PD) models that integrate cellular response data and extend a prototype model framework were developed to characterize dynamic changes in cell cycle phases of cancer cell subpopulations in response to gemcitabine and trabectedin as single agents and in combination. Extensive experimental data were obtained for two pancreatic cancer cell lines (MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3), including cell proliferation rates over 0–120 h of drug exposure, and the fraction of cells in different cell cycle phases or apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that gemcitabine induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, and trabectedin induced transient cell cycle arrest in S phase that progressed to G2/M phase. Over time, cells in the control group accumulated in G0/G1 phase. Systems cell cycle models were developed based on observed mechanisms and were used to characterize both cell proliferation and cell numbers in the sub G1, G0/G1, S, and G2/M phases in the control and drug-treated groups. The proposed mathematical models captured well both single and joint effects of gemcitabine and trabectedin. Interaction parameters were applied to quantify unexplainable drug-drug interaction effects on cell cycle arrest in S phase and in inducing apoptosis. The developed models were able to identify and quantify the different underlying interactions between gemcitabine and trabectedin, and captured well our large datasets in the dimensions of time, drug concentrations, and cellular subpopulations. PMID:27895579

  12. Parthenolide Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Human 5637 Bladder Cancer Cells In Vitro

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    Guang Cheng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Parthenolide, the principal component of sesquiterpene lactones present in medical plants such as feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium, has been reported to have anti-tumor activity. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of parthenolide against bladder cancer and its mechanism of action. Treatment of bladder cancer cells with parthenolide resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability. Parthenolide induced apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase degradation. Treatment with parthenolide led to G1 phase cell cycle arrest in 5637 cells by modulation of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase 2. Parthenolide also inhibited the invasive ability of bladder cancer cells. These findings suggest that parthenolide could be a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of bladder cancer.

  13. [Induction of cell cycle arrest in bladder cancer RT4 cells by capsaicin].

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    Li, Qin; Wang, Xing-huan; Yang, Zhong-hua; Wang, Huai-peng; Yang, Zhi-wei; Li, Shi-wen; Zheng, Xin-min

    2010-05-11

    To study the effects of capsaicin on the growth of bladder cancer RT4 cell and its potential mechanism. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and flow cytometry were employed to observe the effects of capsaicin (50, 100, 150, 200, 250 micromol/L) on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis. Capsaicin (0 micromol/L) was used as a control. The effects of mRNA and protein of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V 1 (TRPV1) on RT4 cells were tested by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence respectively. And the expressions of cell cycle protein P53, P21, CDK2 were detected by Western blot after the treatment of capsaicin. 100 micromol/L capsaicin significantly decreased the viability of RT4 cell [82.0% +/- 6.2% vs 100.0% +/- 12.4% (control), P = 0.036] while the cell viability was 7.8% +/- 2.9% at 250 micromol/L (P = 0.000). It was in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, capsaicin induced the cell cycle arrest of bladder cancer RT4 cells G(0)/G(1) phase in a dose-dependent way. The cell proportion of G(0)/G(1) phase in the control was 37.4% +/- 5.6%, however, it was 72.4% +/- 5.3% at 250 micromol/L (P = 0.000). It was showed that TRPV1 mRNA and protein were expressed in RT4 cells. After a 48-hour treatment with capsaicin, the expressions of P53 and P21 were up-regulated in contrary to the expression of CDK2. Capsaicin induces the cell cycle arrest of bladder cancer RT4 cells G(0)/G(1) phase and growth inhibition via TRPV1 receptor by modulating the expression of P53, P21 and CDK2.

  14. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

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    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  15. Paris Saponin I Sensitizes Gastric Cancer Cell Lines to Cisplatin via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis

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    Song, Shuichuan; Du, Leiwen; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Xinhai; Li, Jinhui; Xu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background Dose-related toxicity is the major restriction of cisplatin and cisplatin-combination chemotherapy, and is a challenge for advanced gastric cancer treatment. We explored the possibility of using Paris saponin I as an agent to sensitize gastric cancer cells to cisplatin, and examined the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods Growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis were detected using flow cytometry and Annexin V/PI staining. The P21waf1/cip1, Bcl-2...

  16. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

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    Wang, Lintao; Peng, Yanyan; Shi, Kaikai; Wang, Haixiao; Lu, Jianlei; Li, Yanli; Ma, Changyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have revealed that osthole, an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, a traditional Chinese medicine, possesses anticancer activity. However, its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435. We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of MDA-MB 435 cells, The mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic pathway was involved in apoptosis induced by osthole, as indicated by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 followed by PARP degradation. The mechanism underlying its effect on the induction of G1 phase arrest was due to the up-regulation of p53 and p21 and down-regulation of Cdk2 and cyclin D1 expression. Were observed taken together, these findings suggest that the anticancer efficacy of osthole is mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and osthole may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25859268

  17. Human amniotic epithelial cells inhibit growth of epithelial ovarian cancer cells via TGF‑β1-mediated cell cycle arrest.

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    Bu, Shixia; Zhang, Qiuwan; Wang, Qian; Lai, Dongmei

    2017-11-01

    It is reported that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) endow intrinsic antitumor effects on certain kinds of cancer. This research was designed to evaluate whether hAECs endowed potential anticancer properties on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vivo and in vitro, which has not been reported before. In this study, we established a xenografted BALB/c nude mouse model by subcutaneously co-injecting ovarian cancer cell line, SK-OV-3, and hAECs for 28 days. In ex vivo experiments, CCK‑8 cell viability assay, real-time PCR, cell counting assay, cell cycle analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay were used to detect the effects of hAEC‑secreted factors on the proliferation and cell cycle progression of EOC cells. A cytokine array was conducted to detect anticancer-related cytokines released from hAECs. Human recombinant TGF‑β1 and TGF‑β1 antibody were used to treat EOC cells and analyzed whether TGF‑β1 contributed to the cell cycle arrest. Results from in vivo and ex vivo experiments showed that hAEC-secreted factors and rhTGF‑β1 decreased proliferation of EOC cells and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which could be partially reversed by excess TGF‑β1 antibody. These data indicate that hAECs endow potential anticancer properties on epithelial ovarian cancer in vivo and in vitro which is partially mediated by hAEC‑secreted TGF‑β1-induced cell cycle arrest. This study suggests a potential application of hAEC‑based therapy against epithelial ovarian cancer.

  18. Magnolol causes alterations in the cell cycle in androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro by affecting expression of key cell cycle regulatory proteins.

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    McKeown, Brendan T; McDougall, Luke; Catalli, Adriana; Hurta, Robert A R

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in the Western world, affects many men worldwide. This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on the behavior of 2 androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, in vitro. Magnolol, in a 24-h exposure at 40 and 80 μM, was found to be cytotoxic to cells. Magnolol also affected cell cycle progression of DU145 and PC3 cells, resulting in alterations to the cell cycle and subsequently decreasing the proportion of cells entering the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Magnolol inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins including cyclins A, B1, D1, and E, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. Protein expression levels of pRBp107 decreased and pRBp130 protein expression levels increased in response to magnolol exposure, whereas p16(INK4a), p21, and p27 protein expression levels were apparently unchanged post 24-h exposure. Magnolol exposure at 6 h did increase p27 protein expression levels. This study has demonstrated that magnolol can alter the behavior of androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggests that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  19. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

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    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  20. American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) extract affects human prostate cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest by modulating expression of cell cycle regulators.

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    Déziel, Bob; MacPhee, James; Patel, Kunal; Catalli, Adriana; Kulka, Marianna; Neto, Catherine; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Hurta, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, and its prevalence is expected to increase appreciably in the coming decades. As such, more research is necessary to understand the etiology, progression and possible preventative measures to delay or to stop the development of this disease. Recently, there has been interest in examining the effects of whole extracts from commonly harvested crops on the behaviour and progression of cancer. Here, we describe the effects of whole cranberry extract (WCE) on the behaviour of DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Following treatment of DU145 human prostate cancer cells with 10, 25 and 50 μg ml⁻¹ of WCE, respectively for 6 h, WCE significantly decreased the cellular viability of DU145 cells. WCE also decreased the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and increased the proportion of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle following treatment of cells with 25 and 50 μg ml⁻¹ treatment of WCE for 6 h. These alterations in cell cycle were associated with changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins and other cell cycle associated proteins. WCE decreased the expression of CDK4, cyclin A, cyclin B1, cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and increased the expression of p27. Changes in p16(INK4a) and pRBp107 protein expression levels also were evident, however, the changes noted in p16(INK4a) and pRBp107 protein expression levels were not statistically significant. These findings demonstrate that phytochemical extracts from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) can affect the behaviour of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and further support the potential health benefits associated with cranberries.

  1. Amygdalin delays cell cycle progression and blocks growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Juengel, Eva; Borgmann, Hendrik; Nelson, Karen; Thomas, Christian; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-15

    Despite impressive survival benefits from new agents to treat metastasized prostate cancer (PCa), progressive drug resistance hinders long-term response and restricts the efficacy of subsequent therapy. Due to reported antitumor activity of amygdalin and growing popularity for complementary and alternative medicine the potential of this natural, widely used substance to exert antineoplastic effects on prostate cancer cells has been assessed. LNCaP (castration-sensitive), DU-145 and PC3 cells (castration-resistant) were exposed to different concentrations of amygdalin for 24h or 2weeks. Cell growth was measured by the MTT test, clonal formation by the clonogenic assay. Flow cytometry served to investigate apoptosis and cell cycle phases. Cell cycle regulating proteins and the mTOR-akt signaling axis were analyzed by western blotting. Amygdalin dose-dependently diminished tumor cell growth with maximum effects at 10mg/ml. Apoptosis of PC3 and LNCaP but not of DU-145 cells was reduced, whereas colony formation was suppressed in all cell lines. A decrease in the number of G2/M- and S-phase cells along with an elevated number of G0/G1-phase cells was recorded. The cell cycle proteins cdk 1, cdk 2 and cdk 4 as well as cyclin A, cyclin B and cyclin D3 were modulated by amygdalin after both 24h and 2weeks. Distinct effects on p19 and p27 expression and on Akt, Rictor and Raptor activation became evident only after 2weeks. Amygdalin exhibits significant antitumor activity in both castration-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa cell lines and merits further evaluation for therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thymol inhibits bladder cancer cell proliferation via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

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    Li, Yi; Wen, Jia-Ming; Du, Chuan-Jun; Hu, Su-Min; Chen, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhang, Nan; Gao, Feng; Li, Shao-Jiang; Mao, Xia-Wa; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ding, Ke-Feng

    2017-09-16

    Thymol is a phenolic compound with various pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of thymol on bladder cancer cell growth is still elusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of thymol in bladder cancer cells and its underlying mechanism. Thymol inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner. We also observed cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase after the treatment of thymol. Moreover, thymol could induce apoptosis in bladder cancer cells via the intrinsic pathway along with caspase-3/9 activation, release of cytochrome c and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. The activation of JNK and p38 was also critical for thymol-induced apoptosis since it was abrogated by the treatment of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) but not ERK inhibitor (SCH772984). Furthermore, the generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species) was detected after the treatment of thymol. ROS scavenger NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) could block the thymol-triggered apoptosis and activation of MAPKs. These findings offer a novel therapeutic approach for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

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    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting of cytosolic phospholipase A2α impedes cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mu; Xie, Chanlu; Kiang, Mei-Yee; Teng, Ying; Harman, David; Tiffen, Jessamy; Wang, Qian; Sved, Paul; Bao, Shisan; Witting, Paul; Holst, Jeff; Dong, Qihan

    2015-10-27

    Cell cycle re-entry of quiescent cancer cells has been proposed to be involved in cancer progression and recurrence. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes membrane glycerophospholipids to release arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are implicated in cancer cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of cPLA2α in cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells. When PC-3 and LNCaP cells were rendered to a quiescent state, the active form of cPLA2α with a phosphorylation at Ser505 was lower compared to their proliferating state. Conversely, the phospho-cPLA2α levels were resurgent during the induction of cell cycle re-entry. Pharmacological inhibition of cPLA2α with Efipladib upon induction of cell cycle re-entry inhibited the re-entry process, as manifested by refrained DNA synthesis, persistent high proportion of cells in G0/G1 and low percentage of cells in S and G2/M phases, together with a stagnant recovery of Ki-67 expression. Simultaneously, Efipladib prohibited the emergence of Skp2 while maintained p27 at a high level in the nuclear compartment during cell cycle re-entry. Inhibition of cPLA2α also prevented an accumulation of cyclin D1/CDK4, cyclin E/CDK2, phospho-pRb, pre-replicative complex proteins CDC6, MCM7, ORC6 and DNA synthesis-related protein PCNA during induction of cell cycle re-entry. Moreover, a pre-treatment of the prostate cancer cells with Efipladib during induction of cell cycle re-entry subsequently compromised their tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Hence, cPLA2α plays an important role in cell cycle re-entry by quiescent prostate cancer cells.

  5. Licochalcone B Arrests Cell Cycle Progression and Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lina; Ma, Jun; Han, Jichun; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gao, Caixia; Li, Defang; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent patent of licochalcone B (LCB) as an antiinflammatory agent has been developed. Emerging evidence shows that LCB may be a promising alternative compound with anti-cancer activities. However, the anticancer mechanism of LCB in MCF-7 cells has not been fully investigated. We aimed to unearth the anti-cancer effect and mechanism of LCB in MCF-7 cells. Cell proliferation activity and cell-cycle progression were determined by sulforhodamine B assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA and protein levels of cell cycle-related proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins were examined by RT-qPCR and western blot, respectively. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was measured by flow cytometry after JC-1 staining. We found that LCB inhibited MCF-7 cells proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, LCB-treatment led to S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells, which could be elucidated by the decreased mRNA and protein levels of Cyclin A, Cdk2 and Cdc25 A, and the increased protein level of p21. LCB also induced such apoptosis morphology as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, LCB led to the loss of MMP, resulting in the release of cytochrome C. The above apoptotic events were supported by the fact that LCB upregulated the mRNA and protein levels of Caspase 3, Caspase 9 and Bax, and downregulated the mRNA and protein level of Bcl-2, which was triggered by the increased p53 protein level in LCB-treated MCF-7 cells. These findings suggested that LCB could be a promising agent for treatment of human breast cancer.

  6. A Critical Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) on Cancer Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Marnie; Baker, Kristi; Postovit, Lynne M; Field, Catherine J

    2017-08-17

    Globally, there were 14.1 million new cancer diagnoses and 8.2 million cancer deaths in 2012. For many cancers, conventional therapies are limited in their successes and an improved understanding of disease progression is needed in conjunction with exploration of alternative therapies. The long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been shown to enhance many cellular responses that reduce cancer cell viability and decrease proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. A small number of studies suggest that DHA improves chemotherapy outcomes in cancer patients. It is readily incorporated into cancer cell membranes and, as a result there has been considerable research regarding cell membrane initiated events. For example, DHA has been shown to mediate the induction of apoptosis/reduction of proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, there is limited research into the effect of DHA on cell cycle regulation in cancer cells and the mechanism(s) by which DHA acts are not fully understood. The purpose of the current review is to provide a critical examination of the literature investigating the ability of DHA to stall progression during different cell cycle phases in cancer cells, as well as the consequences that these changes may have on tumour growth, independently and in conjunction with chemotherapy.

  7. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from...... existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2......, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls....

  8. Cell cycle effects and induction of premitotic apoptosis by irofulven in synchronized cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woynarowski, Jan M; Woynarowska, Barbara A; Trevino, Alex V; Salinas, Richard; Herman, Terence S; Waters, Stephen J; Macdonald, John R

    2004-11-01

    Unlike postmitotic cell death, direct premitotic apoptosis diminishes the risk of clonal selection and allows for the elimination of slowly growing cancer cells. This study characterized the ability to induce premitotic apoptosis by irofulven (hydroxymethylacylfulvene), a novel alkylating drug which targets cellular DNA and proteins. Irofulven effects were examined in HeLa-derived BH2 cancer cells with conditional overexpression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2. Cells were synchronized in either early S or in G(1). Following 12 h exposure to irofulven, cells that were originally in early S accumulated in late S or remained in early S phase (at 0.5 and 2.5 muM drug, respectively). Drug treatment of cells in the G(1) cohort prevented their entry into the S phase. Significant apoptosis was detected based on the appearance of sub-G(1) particles and cells with DNA strand breaks in both G(1) and S cohorts. Apoptotic cells were mostly recruited from the G(1)/S border ("G(1)" cohort) and from the S phase ("early S" cohort). All the cell cycle and apoptotic effects were only marginally affected by Bcl-2 overexpression. Similar results were obtained with irofulven-treated synchronized cultures of leukemic CEM cells. Collectively, these observations indicate that irofulven-treated cells become committed to death early. Neither active DNA replication nor traverse through mitosis are necessary for irofulven-induced cell death. The ability to promote direct premitotic apoptosis is likely to play a role in the consistently potent apoptotic effects of irofulven and its ability to cause tumor regression in vivo.

  9. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wai Kuan; Ho, Yen Fong; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2015-10-01

    Xanthohumol, a major prenylated chalcone found in female hop plant, Humulus lupulus, was reported to have various chemopreventive and anti-cancer properties. However, its apoptotic effect on human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of xanthohumol on apoptosis in A549 human NSCLC cells. A549 cell proliferation was determined by sulforhodamine B assay. Morphological changes of the cells were studied via phase contrast and fluorescent microscopy. Induction of apoptosis was assessed by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (Annexin V-FITC/PI) staining, DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay mitochondrial membrane potential assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity studies. Xanthohumol was found to decrease cell proliferation in A549 cells but had relatively low cytotoxicity on normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Typical cellular and nuclear apoptotic features were also observed in A549 cells treated with xanthohumol. Onset of apoptosis in A549 cells was further confirmed by externalization of phosphatidylserine, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA fragmentation in the cells after treatment. Xanthohumol induced accumulation of cells in sub G1 and S phase based on cell cycle analysis and also increased the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9. This work suggests that xanthohumol as an apoptosis inducer, may be a potent therapeutic compound for NSCLC.

  10. Berberine promotes antiproliferative effects of epirubicin in T24 bladder cancer cells by enhancing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yumin; Chen, Qibiao; Chen, Bo; Zhan, Xiongyu; Qin, Xiaoping; Huang, Jun; Lv, Xiuxiu

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed to observe the effect of berberine (Ber) on epirubicin (EPI)-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in T24 bladder cancer cells. The cancer cells were exposed to EPI, with or without different concentrations of Ber. The viability of the cancer cells was measured by cell counting Kit-8, the apoptosis was determined by Hoechst 33258 staining and the expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bcl-2, Bax, and P53 proteins were detected by Western blot assay. In addition, cell cycle arrest and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also measured. We found that Ber enhanced the inhibitory effect of EPI on the viability of T24 cells and promoted EPI-induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and apoptosis in T24 cells. EPI increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, Bax, P53, and P21 proteins, all of which were enhanced by treatment with Ber. In contrast, Ber exposure further decreased the expression of Bcl-2 in EPI-treated T24 cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that Ber significantly increased ROS production in EPI-treated T24 cells. These data indicate that Ber enhances the antiproliferative effects of EPI in bladder cancer cells by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.
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  11. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Miaoxian [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chung, Hau Yin, E-mail: anthonychung@cuhk.edu.hk [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Yaolan [Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Pharmacodynamic Constituents of TCM and New Drug Research, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  12. Role of natural phenolic compounds in cancer chemoprevention via regulation of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Samineh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Natural phenolic compounds have been considered as one of the interesting secondary metabolites for their chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects in cancer for a long time. These are a large and diverse family of phytochemicals classified into several subgroups such as simple phenols, lignans, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, coumarins, etc. The antioxidant potential of phenolic compounds is almost bolded in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Due to the concerns on the diverse effects of antioxidants in cancer, differentiation and clarification of their anti-neoplastic mechanisms are necessary. An important mechanism for phenolic compounds is related to their direct effect on the cell cycle progression, which has not been discussed in detail so far. This study aims to criticize the evidence on regulatory mechanisms of phenolic compounds in the cell cycle. Recent studies indicate that phenolic compounds from several subgroups significantly inhibit the proliferation of different cancer cells. The structural diversity of these compounds influences various components involved in cell cycle regulation. Forming active metabolites and sensitizing cancerous cells to chemotherapeutic medicines are additional values of these compounds. In the recent years, many studies on neoplastic cell cultures have been carried out to investigate the mechanisms of action of these compounds but dissimilarity of in vitro systems in comparison with human body in terms of metabolism and bioavailability is a major concern. Therefore, further studies are still needed.

  13. Fasting Cycles Retard Growth of Tumors and Sensitize a Range of Cancer Cell Types to Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Safdie, Fernando M.; Bianchi, Giovanna; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pistoia, Vito; Wei, Min; Hwang, Saewon; Merlino, Annalisa; Emionite, Laura; de Cabo, Rafael; Longo, Valter D.

    2013-01-01

    Short-term starvation (or fasting) protects normal cells, mice, and potentially humans from the harmful side effects of a variety of chemotherapy drugs. Here, we show that treatment with starvation conditions sensitized yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the oncogene-like RAS2val19 to oxidative stress and 15 of 17 mammalian cancer cell lines to chemotherapeutic agents. Cycles of starvation were as effective as chemotherapeutic agents in delaying progression of different tumors and increased the effectiveness of these drugs against melanoma, glioma, and breast cancer cells. In mouse models of neuroblastoma, fasting cycles plus chemotherapy drugs—but not either treatment alone—resulted in long-term cancer-free survival. In 4T1 breast cancer cells, short-term starvation resulted in increased phosphorylation of the stress-sensitizing Akt and S6 kinases, increased oxidative stress, caspase-3 cleavage, DNA damage, and apoptosis. These studies suggest that multiple cycles of fasting promote differential stress sensitization in a wide range of tumors and could potentially replace or augment the efficacy of certain chemotherapy drugs in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:22323820

  14. Fasting cycles retard growth of tumors and sensitize a range of cancer cell types to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Safdie, Fernando M; Bianchi, Giovanna; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pistoia, Vito; Wei, Min; Hwang, Saewon; Merlino, Annalisa; Emionite, Laura; de Cabo, Rafael; Longo, Valter D

    2012-03-07

    Short-term starvation (or fasting) protects normal cells, mice, and potentially humans from the harmful side effects of a variety of chemotherapy drugs. Here, we show that treatment with starvation conditions sensitized yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the oncogene-like RAS2(val19) to oxidative stress and 15 of 17 mammalian cancer cell lines to chemotherapeutic agents. Cycles of starvation were as effective as chemotherapeutic agents in delaying progression of different tumors and increased the effectiveness of these drugs against melanoma, glioma, and breast cancer cells. In mouse models of neuroblastoma, fasting cycles plus chemotherapy drugs--but not either treatment alone--resulted in long-term cancer-free survival. In 4T1 breast cancer cells, short-term starvation resulted in increased phosphorylation of the stress-sensitizing Akt and S6 kinases, increased oxidative stress, caspase-3 cleavage, DNA damage, and apoptosis. These studies suggest that multiple cycles of fasting promote differential stress sensitization in a wide range of tumors and could potentially replace or augment the efficacy of certain chemotherapy drugs in the treatment of various cancers.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Geisen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1. Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  17. δ-Catenin promotes prostate cancer cell growth and progression by altering cell cycle and survival gene profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background δ-Catenin is a unique member of β-catenin/armadillo domain superfamily proteins and its primary expression is restricted to the brain. However, δ-catenin is upregulated in human prostatic adenocarcinomas, although the effects of δ-catenin overexpression in prostate cancer are unclear. We hypothesized that δ-catenin plays a direct role in prostate cancer progression by altering gene profiles of cell cycle regulation and cell survival. Results We employed gene transfection and small interfering RNA to demonstrate that increased δ-catenin expression promoted, whereas its knockdown suppressed prostate cancer cell viability. δ-Catenin promoted prostate cancer cell colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. Deletion of either the amino-terminal or carboxyl-terminal sequences outside the armadillo domains abolished the tumor promoting effects of δ-catenin. Quantitative RT2 Profiler™ PCR Arrays demonstrated gene alterations involved in cell cycle and survival regulation. δ-Catenin overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 and cdc34, increased phosphorylated histone-H3, and promoted the entry of mitosis. In addition, δ-catenin overexpression resulted in increased expression of cell survival genes Bcl-2 and survivin while reducing the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Conclusion Taken together, our studies suggest that at least one consequence of an increased expression of δ-catenin in human prostate cancer is the alteration of cell cycle and survival gene profiles, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  18. Amygdalin, from Apricot Kernels, Induces Apoptosis and Causes Cell Cycle Arrest in Cancer Cells: An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Asif, Jawaria; Asif, Muhammad; Saleem, Uzma

    2018-01-05

    Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glycoside which is described as a naturally occurring anti-cancer agent. In 1830s, French chemists Robiquet and Boutron-Charlard isolated amygdalin from bitter almonds. Apoptosis is an important mechanism in cancer treatment by amygdalin. Amygdalin can probably stimulate apoptotic process in cancerous cells by increasing activity of Bax (pro-apoptotic protein) and caspase-3 and decreasing expression of Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic protein). Amygdalin promotes arrest of cell cycle in G0/G1 phase followed by decreasing number of S and G2/M phase cells. So, amygdalin enhances deceleration of cell cycle by blocking cell proliferation and growth. The current review highlights that amygdalin has potential to be used as an anticancer agent in cancer therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S

    2007-01-01

    both for their apoptosis-regulating capacity and also for their effect on the cell cycle progression. The PI3-K/Akt cell survival pathway is shown as regulator of cell metabolism and cell survival, but examples are also provided where aberrant activity of the pathway may contribute to the induction......The partial cross-utilization of molecules and pathways involved in opposing processes like cell survival, proliferation and cell death, assures that mutations within one signaling cascade will also affect the other opposite process at least to some extent, thus contributing to homeostatic...... regulatory circuits. This review highlights some of the connections between opposite-acting pathways. Thus, we discuss the role of cyclins in the apoptotic process, and in the regulation of cell proliferation. CDKs and their inhibitors like the INK4-family (p16(Ink4a), p15(Ink4b), p18(Ink4c), p19(Ink4d...

  20. Trichosanthes kirilowii fruits inhibit non-small cell lung cancer cell growth through mitotic cell-cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lulu; Zhu, Xiaowen; Gong, Chenyuan; Luo, Yinbin; Wang, Lixin; Zhou, Wuxiong; Zhu, Shiguo; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80% of lung cancer cases and the reported overall 5-year survival rate is less than 5%. Natural medicines have attracted much attention due to their lower toxicity and fewer side effects. Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim (TKM) fruits are commonly used in cancer treatment in combination with other Chinese medicinal herbs. However, little is known about their biological functions and mechanisms in NSCLC cells. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of TKM fruits in NSCLC cells using cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and anchorage independent assays and a Xenograft NSCLC tumor model, and explored the possible biological mechanism by flow cytometric analysis, cDNA microarray and real-time PCR. Results showed that TKM fruits significantly suppressed NSCLC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumorigenicity and tumor growth, and significantly extended the survival time of NSCLC-bearing mice. Flow cytometric analysis showed that TKM fruits significantly induced G2-M arrest, necrosis and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that TKM fruits regulated the differential expression of 544 genes, and the differential expression of selected genes was also confirmed. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that 18 of first 20 biological processes were involved in cell cycle and mitosis. These results indicate that TKM fruits have certain inhibitory effect on NSCLC cells through cell-cycle and mitosis arrest, and suggest that TKM fruits may be an important resource for developing new antitumor drugs, and a potent natural product for treating patients with NSCLC.

  1. Pim-3 contributes to radioresistance through regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage repair in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang-Yuan; Wang, Zhen [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Bei [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Ying-Jian, E-mail: yjzhang111@aliyun.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Ying-Yi, E-mail: liyingyi@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-04-22

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemoradiotherapy is a major clinical problem in pancreatic cancer treatment. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of cellular resistance and identifying novel targets are essential for improving treatment efficacy for pancreatic cancer patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant role for Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer survival against gemcitabine-induced genotoxic stress. Here, we observed that radiation treatment enhanced Pim-3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Stable overexpression of Pim-3 in pancreatic cancer cells significantly protected cells against radiation treatment by attenuating G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and DNA damage response. Silencing of Pim-3 expression significantly elevated the phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX, a marker of DNA double strand breaks, and decreased the activation of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase, along with its downstream targets, eventually enhancing the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Hence, we demonstrated a novel function for Pim-3 in human pancreatic cancer cell survival against radiation. Targeting Pim-3 may be a promising way to improve treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • This is first study to demonstrate that Pim-3 is endogenously induced by ionizing radiation in pancreatic cancer cells, and Pim-3 overexpression enhanced radioresistance of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. • This is first study to provide evidence that radioresistance induced by Pim-3 is mainly attributed to Pim-3 induces activation of ATM, which subsequently activates checkpoint 1, leading to amplification of DNA repair through cell cycle arrest and DNA repair pathways. • This is first study to indicate that targeting Pim-3 may be a promising strategy to provide better treatment efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in human pancreatic

  2. Notch3 overexpression causes arrest of cell cycle progression by inducing Cdh1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Fa; Dou, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Yuan-Ke; Lin, Hao-Yu; Bai, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Xi-Xun; Wei, Xiao-Long; Li, Yao-Chen; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation, genomic instability and cancer are closely related to the abnormal activation of the cell cycle. Therefore, blocking the cell cycle of cancer cells has become one of the key goals for treating malignancies. Unfortunately, the factors affecting cell cycle progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we have explored the effects of Notch3 on the cell cycle in breast cancer cell lines by 3 methods: overexpressing the intra-cellular domain of Notch3 (N3ICD), knocking-down Notch3 by RNA interference, and using X-ray radiation exposure. The results revealed that overexpression of Notch3 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, and inhibited the proliferation and colony-formation rate in the breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, overexpressing N3ICD upregulated Cdh1 expression and resulted in p27(Kip) accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation. Conversely, silencing of Notch3 in the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, caused a decrease in expression levels of Cdh1 and p27(Kip) at both the protein and mRNA levels, while the expression of Skp2 only increased at the protein level. Correspondingly, there was an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and an elevated proliferative ability and colony-formation rate, which may be caused by alterations of the Cdh1/Skp2/p27 axis. These results were also supported by exposing MDA-MB-231 cells or MCF-7 treated with siN3 to X-irradiation at various doses. Overall, our data showed that overexpression of N3ICD upregulated the expression of Cdh1 and caused p27(Kip) accumulation by accelerating Skp2 degradation, which in turn led to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, in the context of proliferating breast cancer cell lines. These findings help to illuminate the precision therapy targeted to cell cycle progression, required for cancer treatment.

  3. Cucurbitacin B Causes Increased Radiation Sensitivity of Human Breast Cancer Cells via G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwit Duangmano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To explore the effects of cucurbitacin B on the radiation survival of human breast cancer cells and to elucidate the cellular mechanism of radiosensitization if any. Materials and Methods. Human breast carcinoma cell lines were treated with cucurbitacin B before irradiation with 0–10 Gy of C137s gamma rays. The effect of cucurbitacin B on cell-survival following irradiation was evaluated by colony-forming assay. Cell cycle distributions were investigated using flow cytometry. Real-time PCR and western blots were performed to investigate the expression of cell cycle checkpoints. Results. Cucurbitacin B inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Only MDA-MB-231 and MCF7:5C cells but not SKBR-3 cells were radiosensitized by cucurbitacin B. Flow cytometric analysis for DNA content indicated that cucurbitacin B resulted in G2/M arrest in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7:5C but not SKBR-3 cells. Moreover, Real-time PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated upregulated p21 expression before irradiation, a likely cause of the cell cycle arrest. Conclusion. Taken together, these findings suggest that cucurbitacin B causes radiosensitization of some breast cancer cells, and that cucurbitacin B induced G2/M arrest is an important mechanism. Therefore, combinations of cucurbitacin B with radiotherapy may be appropriate for experimental breast cancer treatment.

  4. Induction of cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells by cis-stilbene derivatives related to VIOXX.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangjun, S.; de Jong, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/331376326; Nijmeijer, S.; Mutarapat, T.; Ruchirawat, S.; van den Berg, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08660466X; van Duursen, M.B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181957701

    2009-01-01

    In our present study, 12 new cis-stilbene derivatives (CRI-1-CRI-13) related to VIOXX((R)) were synthesized and studied for their inhibitory effects on cell cycle progression and anti-estrogenicity in human adenoma breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Based on the different substituents in the cis-stilbene

  5. Palbociclib (PD 0332991) : targeting the cell cycle machinery in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Andrea; Farolfi, Alberto; Bravaccini, Sara; Schirone, Alessio; Amadori, Dino

    2014-02-01

    The cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6)-retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway, governing the cell cycle restriction point, is frequently altered in breast cancer and is a potentially relevant target for anticancer therapy. Palbociclib (PD 0332991) , a potent and selective inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, inhibits proliferation of several Rb-positive cancer cell lines and xenograft models. The basic features and abnormalities of the cell cycle in breast cancer are described, along with their involvement in estrogen signaling and endocrine resistance. The pharmacological features of palbociclib, its activity in preclinical models of breast cancer and the potential determinants of response are then illustrated, and its clinical development in breast cancer described. A literature search on the topic was conducted through PubMed and the proceedings of the main cancer congresses of recent years. The combination of palbociclib with endocrine agents is a very promising treatment and Phase III clinical trials are ongoing to confirm its efficacy. Further, potentially useful combinations are those with drugs targeting mitogenic signaling pathways, such as HER2- and PI3K-inhibitors. Combination with chemotherapy seems more problematic, as antagonism has been reported in preclinical models. The identification of predictive factors, already explored in preclinical studies, must be further refined and validated in clinical trials.

  6. Cancer cell metabolism and mitochondria: Nutrient plasticity for TCA cycle fueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Cyril; Feron, Olivier

    2017-08-01

    Warburg's hypothesis that cancer cells take up a lot of glucose in the presence of ambient oxygen but convert pyruvate into lactate due to impaired mitochondrial function led to the misconception that cancer cells rely on glycolysis as their major source of energy. Most recent 13C-based metabolomic studies, including in cancer patients, indicate that cancer cells may also fully oxidize glucose. In addition to glucose-derived pyruvate, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids supply substrates to the TCA cycle to sustain mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we discuss how the metabolic flexibility afforded by these multiple mitochondrial inputs allows cancer cells to adapt according to the availability of the different fuels and the microenvironmental conditions such as hypoxia and acidosis. In particular, we focused on the role of the TCA cycle in interconnecting numerous metabolic routes in order to highlight metabolic vulnerabilities that represent attractive targets for a new generation of anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Knockdown of IARS2 suppressed growth of gastric cancer cells by regulating the phosphorylation of cell cycle-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zheng; Wang, Xingyu; Yan, Qiang; Zhang, Shangxin; Li, Yongxiang

    2017-10-25

    The purpose of the article is to investigate the role of IARS2 in proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of gastric cancer (GC) cells in vitro. The IARS2-shRNA lentiviral vector was established and used to infect the GC cell line AGS. qRT-PCR and Western blot were employed to determine the efficiency of IARS2 knockdown. The effects of IARS2 knockdown on cell proliferation, cell clone formation, and cell cycle were assessed by MTT assay, colony formation assay, and flow cytometer analysis, respectively. Finally, a PathScan Antibody Array Kit was used to detect the expression levels of cell cycle-related proteins after IARS2 knockdown in AGS cells to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Compared with negative control group, IARS2 was significantly knocked down by transfection with lentivirus encoding shRNA of IARS2 in AGS cells. IARS2 knockdown significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation ability and induced cycle arrest at G2/M phase of AGS cells. IARS2 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of phosphorylation of (p-Smad2), p-SAPK/JUK, cleavage-Caspase-7, and p-TAK1, but increased the expression levels of p-53 and cleavage-PARP in AGS cells compared to shCtrl group. We demonstrated that IARS2 knockdown inhibits proliferation, suppresses colony formation, and causes cell cycle arrest in AGS cells. We also found that IARS2 regulates key molecules of cell apoptosis-related signaling pathway.

  8. Jaceosidin inhibits proliferation of human bladder cancer T24 cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jaceosidin, isolated from Artemesia argyi, has been shown to possess promising anticancer potential against various cancer cells. However, its effect against bladder cancer cells remained unknown. In this study, for the first time, we investigated the effects of jaceosidin on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis in bladder cancer T24 cells by using MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. The results revealed that jaceosidin decreased the cell viability of bladder cancer T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that jaceosidin significantly triggered apoptosis in T24 cells and arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase in a time-dependent manner. Further characterization showed that jaceosidin-induced apoptosis is associated with dissipation in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 in jaceosidin-treated T24 cells. These in vitro results suggested that jaceosidin should be further examined for in vivo activity and molecular mechanism in human bladder cancer.

  9. Immunohistochemical study of the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at different stages of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; von der Maase, Hans; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2002-01-01

    ; group 1, 23 patients with recurrent stage Ta (non-invasive) tumors; group 2, 22 patients presenting at their first admission with T2-4 (muscle invasive) tumors; group 3, 24 patients who experienced disease progression from Ta or T1 (invasive in connective tissue) to a higher stage......PURPOSE: The cell cycle is known to be deregulated in cancer. We therefore analyzed the expression of the cell cycle related proteins p21, p27, p16, Rb, and L-myc by immunohistochemical staining of bladder tumors.METHODS: The tissue material consisted of bladder tumors from three groups of patients....... By immunohistochemical staining the protein expression was compared to allelic deletions of the corresponding genes. The allelic deletions were detected by PCR-based microsatellite analyses.RESULTS: We detected a significant reduction in the expression levels of the cell cycle related proteins p21(waf1) ( P=0.002), p27...

  10. Sulforaphane enhances irradiation effects in terms of perturbed cell cycle progression and increased DNA damage in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Naumann

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN, an herbal isothiocyanate enriched in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower, has gained popularity for its antitumor effects in cell lines such as pancreatic cancer. Antiproliferative as well as radiosensitizing properties were reported for head and neck cancer but little is known about its effects in pancreatic cancer cells in combination with irradiation (RT.In four established pancreatic cancer cell lines we investigated clonogenic survival, analyzed cell cycle distribution and compared DNA damage via flow cytometry and western blot after treatment with SFN and RT.Both SFN and RT show a strong and dose dependent survival reduction in clonogenic assays, an induction of a G2/M cell cycle arrest and an increase in γH2AX protein level indicating DNA damage. Effects were more pronounced in combined treatment and both cell cycle perturbation and DNA damage persisted for a longer period than after SFN or RT alone. Moreover, SFN induced a loss of DNA repair proteins Ku 70, Ku 80 and XRCC4.Our results suggest that combination of SFN and RT exerts a more distinct DNA damage and growth inhibition than each treatment alone. SFN seems to be a viable option to improve treatment efficacy of chemoradiation with hopefully higher rates of secondary resectability after neoadjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Silencing of mutant p53 by siRNA induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hai-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is the most frequently mutated tumor-suppressor gene in human cancers. It has been reported that mutations in p53 result not only in the loss of its ability as a tumor suppressor, but also in the gain of novel cancer-related functions that contribute to oncogenesis. The present study evaluated the potential of silencing of mutant p53 by small interfering RNA in the treatment of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Methods We used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay to assess cell viability and flow cytometry to detect cell cycle alterations and apoptosis. The related molecular mechanisms were assessed by western blotting. We also used the MTT assay and flow cytometry to investigate if silencing of mutant p53 by knockdown with small interfering (siRNA would change the sensitivity to cisplatin treatment. Results Using 5637 and T24 human bladder cancer cell lines characterized by mutations in p53, we found that silencing of the mutant p53 by RNA interference induced evident inhibition of cell proliferation and viability, which was related to the induction of G2 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, our study also showed that the p53-targeting siRNA cooperated with cisplatin in the inhibition of bladder cancer cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that RNA interference targeting mutant p53 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  12. Differential effects of doxorubicin treatment on cell cycle arrest and Skp2 expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Ortal; Shapira, Ma'anit; Hershko, Dan D

    2007-11-01

    Overexpression of Skp2, the ubiquitin ligase subunit that targets p27 for degradation, is often observed in cancers, and is associated with aggressive tumor proliferation and poor prognosis. As there is no drug at present that specifically targets Skp2, studies were undertaken to examine the effects of commonly used drugs on Skp2 regulation. Doxorubicin is among the most effective antitumor agents used for the management of breast cancer, but its effect on Skp2 expression is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of doxorubicin on Skp2 expression regulation in breast cancer cell lines. The expression of Skp2 mRNA and the protein levels of Skp2, p27, p21 and cyclin B were examined in doxorubicin-treated MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The effect of doxorubicin on the cell cycle profile was assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Doxorubicin decreased Skp2 mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 cells, but had the opposite effect in MDA-MB-231 cells. p27 levels were slightly decreased, whereas p53 and p21 levels were significantly upregulated in doxorubicin-treated MCF-7 cells. In contrast, p27 levels were unaffected by doxorubicin treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells, but cyclin B levels were markedly increased. Doxorubicin arrested MCF-7 cells at G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, whereas MDA-MB-231 cells were arrested at G2/M only. The differential effects of doxorubicin on Skp2 expression in breast cancer cells depend upon the specific cell cycle checkpoints activated by the drug. These changes induced by doxorubicin, however, do not significantly affect p27 expression in these cell lines, suggesting that the potential of a given drug to alter p27 expression through Skp2 modulation might depend on its specific action on cell cycle arrest.

  13. Cell cycle genes and ovarian cancer susceptibility: a tagSNP analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunningham, J M; Vierkant, R A; Sellers, T A

    2009-01-01

    of ovarian cancer in at least one genetic model. Seven SNPs were then assessed in four additional studies with 1689 cases and 3398 controls. Association between risk of ovarian cancer and ABL1 rs2855192 found in the original population [odds ratio, OR(BB vs AA) 2.81 (1.29-6.09), P=0.01] was also observed......BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of the cell cycle is a hallmark of many cancers including ovarian cancer, a leading cause of gynaecologic cancer mortality worldwide. METHODS: We examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n=288) from 39 cell cycle regulation genes, including cyclins, cyclin......-dependent kinases (CDKs) and CDK inhibitors, in a two-stage study. White, non-Hispanic cases (n=829) and ovarian cancer-free controls (n=941) were genotyped using an Illumina assay. RESULTS: Eleven variants in nine genes (ABL1, CCNB2, CDKN1A, CCND3, E2F2, CDK2, E2F3, CDC2, and CDK7) were associated with risk...

  14. Andrographolide inhibits prostate cancer by targeting cell cycle regulators, CXCR3 and CXCR7 chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Hina; Kapur, Neeraj; Singh, Rajesh; Sonpavde, Guru; Lillard, James W; Singh, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Despite state of the art cancer diagnostics and therapies offered in clinic, prostate cancer (PCa) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hence, more robust therapeutic/preventive regimes are required to combat this lethal disease. In the current study, we have tested the efficacy of Andrographolide (AG), a bioactive diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata, against PCa. This natural agent selectively affects PCa cell viability in a dose and time-dependent manner, without affecting primary prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, AG showed differential effect on cell cycle phases in LNCaP, C4-2b and PC3 cells compared to retinoblastoma protein (RB(-/-)) and CDKN2A lacking DU-145 cells. G2/M transition was blocked in LNCaP, C4-2b and PC3 after AG treatment whereas DU-145 cells failed to transit G1/S phase. This difference was primarily due to differential activation of cell cycle regulators in these cell lines. Levels of cyclin A2 after AG treatment increased in all PCa cells line. Cyclin B1 levels increased in LNCaP and PC3, decreased in C4-2b and showed no difference in DU-145 cells after AG treatment. AG decreased cyclin E2 levels only in PC3 and DU-145 cells. It also altered Rb, H3, Wee1 and CDC2 phosphorylation in PCa cells. Intriguingly, AG reduced cell viability and the ability of PCa cells to migrate via modulating CXCL11 and CXCR3 and CXCR7 expression. The significant impact of AG on cellular and molecular processes involved in PCa progression suggests its potential use as a therapeutic and/or preventive agent for PCa.

  15. Yang-Dan-Tang, Identified from 15 Chinese Herbal Formulae, Inhibits Human Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation via Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Chun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has long been one of the most deadly forms of cancer. The majority of lung cancers are of the non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC type. Here we used the non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line A549 to screen 15 different traditional Chinese herbal medicine (CHM formulae to explore the possible mechanisms of alternative medicine in lung cancer therapy. We identified three formulae (Formulae 3, 5, and 14 that substantially decreased the survival of A549 cells but did not affect MRC5 normal lung tissue cells. Formula 14, Yang-Dan-Tang, a modified decoction of Ramulus Cinnamomi Cassiae, was chosen for further characterization. Flow cytometry analysis showed that treatment of Formula 14 induced cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2 phase without causing significant cell death. These results were also confirmed by Western blot analysis, with decreased expression of G1/S and G2/M promoting cell cycle machinery including cyclin D3, cyclin B1, CDK4, and CDK6. This study provides further insight into the possible working mechanism of Yang-Dan-Tang in patients.

  16. Oxymatrine inhibits proliferation of human bladder cancer T24 cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Qingyong; Zhao, Qingli; Xu, Liuyu; Huang, Shengliang; Huang, Shiming; Wei, Xuebin

    2017-06-01

    Oxymatrine has been shown to exert an antitumor effect on several types of cancer cells. However, the role of oxymatrine in bladder cancer has not yet been evaluated. The present study was designed to investigate the potential anti-proliferative effect of oxymatrine on bladder cancer T24 cells and the possible mechanisms involved. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to determine cell growth, and the cell morphology was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, wrights' staining and electron microscopy. The caspase-3 and survivin mRNA and protein levels were assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The expression of tumor protein p53 (p53), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Oxymatrine inhibited the proliferation of the T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Oxymatrine also induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cells, in association with the upregulation of caspase-3 and Bax, and the downregulation of survivin, Bcl-2 and p53 expression. Overall, oxymatrine inhibits the proliferation of human bladder cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via mechanisms that involve p53-Bax signaling and the downregulation of survivin expression.

  17. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Mario Cesari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ, an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1 arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2 causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis pathways, (3 detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4 induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5 stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6 inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7 inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  18. Crude Garlic Extract Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis of Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagul, Mukta; Kakumanu, Srikanth; Wilson, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Garlic and its lipid-based extracts have played an important medicinal role in humans for centuries that includes antimicrobial, hypoglycemic, and lipid-lowering properties. The present study was to investigate the effects of crude garlic extract (CGE) on the proliferation of human breast, prostate, hepatic, and colon cancer cell lines and mouse macrophageal cells, not previously studied. The human cancer cell lines, such as hepatic (Hep-G2), colon (Caco-2), prostate (PC-3), and breast (MCF-7), were propagated at 37°C; air/CO2 (95:5 v/v) using the ATCC-formulated RPMI-1640 Medium and 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), while the mouse macrophage cell line (TIB-71) was propagated at 37°C; air/CO2 (95:5 v/v) using the ATCC-formulated DMEM and 10% FBS. All cells were plated at a density of ∼5000 cells/well. After overnight incubation, the cells were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/mL of CGE an additional 72 h. Inhibition of cell proliferation of 80-90% was observed for Hep-G2, MCF-7, TIB-71, and PC-3 cells, but only 40-55% for the Caco-2 cells when treated with 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/mL. In a coculture study of Caco-2 and TIB-71 cells, inhibition of cell proliferation of 90% was observed for Caco-2 cells compared to the 40-55% when cultured separately. CGE also induced cell cycle arrest and had a fourfold increase in caspase activity (apoptosis) in PC-3 cells when treated at a dose of 0.5 or 1 μg/mL. This investigation of CGE clearly highlights the fact that the lipid bioactive compounds in CGE have the potential as promising anticancer agents.

  19. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    .05) in these genes. The genotypes of each polymorphism were tested for association with survival by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: A nominally statistically significant association between genotype and ovarian cancer survival was observed for polymorphisms in CCND2 and CCNE1. The per-allele hazard ratios (95......PURPOSE: Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could......) and survival among women with invasive ovarian cancer participating in a multicenter case-control study from United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. DNAs from up to 1,499 women were genotyped for 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that tagged the known common variants (minor allele frequency > or = 0...

  20. [6]-Gingerol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Cell Death of Mutant p53-expressing Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yon Jung; Wen, Jing; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo

    2006-01-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a major phenolic compound derived from ginger, has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. While several molecular mechanisms have been described to underlie its effects on cells in vitro and in vivo, the underlying mechanisms by which [6]-gingerol exerts anti-tumorigenic effects are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the action of [6]-gingerol on two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, HPAC expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and BxPC-3 expressing mutated p53. We found that [6]-gingerol inhibited the cell growth through cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in both cell lines. Western blot analyses indicated that [6]-gingerol decreased both Cyclin A and Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) expression. These events led to reduction in Rb phosphorylation followed by blocking of S phase entry. p53 expression was decreased by [6]-gingerol treatment in both cell lines suggesting that the induction of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip1, was p53-independent. [6]-Gingerol induced mostly apoptotic death in the mutant p53-expressing cells, while no signs of early apoptosis were detected in wild type p53-expressing cells and this was related to the increased phosphorylation of AKT. These results suggest that [6]-gingerol can circumvent the resistance of mutant p53-expressing cells towards chemotherapy by inducing apoptotic cell death while it exerts cytostatic effect on wild type p53-expressing cells by inducing temporal growth arrest. PMID:17066513

  1. Apigenin promotes apoptosis, inhibits invasion and induces cell cycle arrest of T24 human bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Apigenin (4’,5,7-trihydroxyflavone) was recently shown effective in inhibiting several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of apigenin in the human bladder cancer cell line T24 for the first time. Methods T24 cells were treated with varying concentrations and time of apigenin. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell motility and invasiveness were assayed by Matrigel migration and invasion assay. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to detect cell apoptosis, cell cycle and signaling pathway. Results The results demonstrated that apigenin suppressed proliferation and inhibited the migration and invasion potential of T24 bladder cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was associated with induced G2/M Phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of action is like to involve PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins. Apigenin increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage, indicating that apigenin induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. Conclusions These findings suggest that apigenin may be an effective way for treating human bladder cancer. PMID:23724790

  2. Apigenin promotes apoptosis, inhibits invasion and induces cell cycle arrest of T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Mao, Yeqing; Chen, Hong; Lin, Yiwei; Hu, Zhenghui; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xin; Xu, Xianglai; Qin, Jie; Xie, Liping

    2013-06-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) was recently shown effective in inhibiting several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of apigenin in the human bladder cancer cell line T24 for the first time. T24 cells were treated with varying concentrations and time of apigenin. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell motility and invasiveness were assayed by Matrigel migration and invasion assay. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to detect cell apoptosis, cell cycle and signaling pathway. The results demonstrated that apigenin suppressed proliferation and inhibited the migration and invasion potential of T24 bladder cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was associated with induced G2/M Phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of action is like to involve PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins. Apigenin increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage, indicating that apigenin induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. These findings suggest that apigenin may be an effective way for treating human bladder cancer.

  3. Cellular Effect of Curcumin and Citral Combination on Breast Cancer Cells: Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pinaki B; Thakkar, Vasudev R; Patel, Jagdish S

    2015-09-01

    The unmanageable side effects caused by current chemotherapy regimens to treat cancer are an unresolved problem. Although many phytonutrients are useful as chemoprevention without side effects, their effects are slower and smaller than conventional chemotherapy. In the present work, we examined the cumulative effect of two phytonutrients, curcumin and citral, on breast cancer cell lines and compared their effect with the known chemotherapy regimen of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil. Using cultured breast cancer and normal epithelial cells, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of curcumin and citral was evaluated in vitro. The synergistic effect of curcumin and citral was calculated by a combination index study using the method by Chou and Talalay. Cell death pathways and mechanisms were analyzed by measuring intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic protein levels. Curcumin and citral caused dose and time dependent cell death and showed a synergistic effect at effective concentration EC50 and above concentrations in breast cancer cells without disturbing normal breast epithelial cells. With combination curcumin and citral treatment, apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in breast cancer cells were observed. Curcumin and citral generated ROS and activated p53 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 mediated apoptotic pathways. The results of this study suggest that curcumin and citral in combination may be a useful therapeutic intervention for breast cancer.

  4. Purified Brominated Indole Derivatives from Dicathais orbita Induce Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Esmaeelian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dicathais orbita is a large Australian marine gastropod known to produce bioactive compounds with anticancer properties. In this research, we used bioassay guided fractionation from the egg mass extract of D. orbita using flash column chromatography and identified fractions containing tyrindoleninone and 6-bromoisatin as the most active against colon cancer cells HT29 and Caco-2. Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LCMS and 1H NMR were used to characterize the purity and chemical composition of the isolated compounds. An MTT assay was used to determine effects on cell viability. Necrosis and apoptosis induction using caspase/LDH assay and flow cytometry (PI/Annexin-V and cell cycle analysis were also investigated. Our results show that semi-purified 6-bromoisatin had the highest anti-cancer activity by inhibiting cell viability (IC50 = ~100 µM and increasing caspase 3/7 activity in both of the cell lines at low concentration. The fraction containing 6-bromoisatin induced 77.6% apoptosis and arrested 25.7% of the cells in G2/M phase of cell cycle in HT29 cells. Tyrindoleninone was less potent but significantly decreased the viability of HT29 cells at IC50 = 390 µM and induced apoptosis at 195 µM by increasing caspase 3/7 activity in these cells. This research will facilitate the development of these molluscan natural products as novel complementary medicines for colorectal cancer.

  5. The cancer-germline antigen SSX2 causes cell cycle arrest and DNA damage in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2011-01-01

    , we show that SSX2 is involved in regulation of cancer cell growth. We found that ectopic expression of SSX2 in melanoma and colon cancer cells strongly reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis in vitro. Importantly, in a xenograft mouse model, the growth of tumors derived from SSX2 overexpressing...... dependent. The growth reduction was similar in isogenic colon cancer cells with and without p53, indicating that SSX2 is able to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, even in absence of functional p53. Our results show that SSX2 acts as an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation, possibly through replicative...... stress, and therefore have important implications for the use of SSX2 as a target for cancer therapy....

  6. Metformin Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Cycle Arrest by Upregulating MicroRNA34a in Renal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Halei; Qiu, Jing; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Le; Yang, Fan; Tang, Dahai; Zhang, Kebin

    2017-01-03

    BACKGROUND Metformin is a widely used biguanide drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been revaluated as a potential anti-cancer drug with promising activity in various tumors. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the suppression of cancer cells by metformin remain not well understood. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this study, human renal cell carcinoma cell line ACHN was used to investigate the anti-proliferation effect of metformin. A cell counting kit-8 assay was used to detect the cell viability. The cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression of cyclin D1 and p27KIP1 was detected by Western blot. The underlying mechanism involving miRNA34a was further investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and transfection with miRNA inhibitor specific for miRNA34a in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. RESULTS Metformin could significantly inhibit the proliferation of ACHN cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the results showed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest and delayed entry into S phase in ACHN cells. It was shown that metformin downregulates the expression of cyclin D1 and increases the p27KIP1 level. Furthermore, metformin increased ACHN cell death. Lastly, miRNA34a was found to be upregulated by metformin in ACHN, 769-P, and A498 cells. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that inhibition of miRNA34a could partially attenuate the suppressive effect of metformin on renal cancer cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The study data revealed that metformin induced cell growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest partially by upregulating miRNA34a in renal cancer cells.

  7. Apoptosis and cell cycle

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    Petrović Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, is used to eliminate individual cells surrounded by normal cell population. It is a controlled way of cell death in which the cell actively participates by conducting precise, gene-regulated program of self-destruction, that is, cell 'suicide.' Active synthesis of macromolecules is necessary during this process. Death of individual cells is necessary to maintain a balance in living systems, so the process of apoptosis is continuously present in the body, which allows normal development, tissue homeostasis, and many other physiological processes. The molecular mechanisms that regulate apoptosis are functionally linked to other cellular mechanisms, such as control of the cell cycle, cell proliferation and differentiation, genomic stability and cellular metabolism. Damage to the DNA molecule, caused both spontaneously and under the influence of various chemical and physical agents, leads to the cell cycle arrest and activation of mechanisms that repair the damage. Depending on the type and extent of the damage, the cell either continues progression through the cell cycle, or activates the mechanisms that lead to apoptosis. Disturbances in the regulation of apoptosis and cell cycle present the molecular and biological basis of many diseases. Because of the importance of these processes during the development and progression of tumors, their use as biological markers is one of the main strategies in the formation of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Piperine inhibits the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Dong-yun; Zeng, Long-hui; Pan, Hao; Xu, Li-hui; Wang, Yao; Liu, Kun-peng; He, Xian-hui

    2013-10-01

    Piperine, an alkaloid from black and long peppers (Piper nigrum Linn & Piper longum Linn), has been reported to exhibit antitumor activities in vitro and in vivo. To further understand the antitumor mechanism of piperine, we investigated the growth inhibitory effects of piperine on human prostate cancer DU145, PC-3 and LNCaP cells. Piperine treatment resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the proliferation of these cell lines. Cell cycle arrest at G₀/G₁ was induced and cyclin D1 and cyclin A were downregulated upon piperine treatment. Notably, the level of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) was increased dose-dependently by piperine treatment in both LNCaP and DU145 but not in PC-3 cells, in line with more robust cell cycle arrest in the former two cell lines than the latter one. Although piperine induced low levels of apoptosis, it promoted autophagy as evidenced by the increased level of LC3B-II and the formation of LC3B puncta in LNCaP and PC-3 cells. The piperine-induced autophagic flux was further confirmed by assaying LC3-II accumulation and LC3B puncta formation in the presence of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy inhibitor. Taken together, these results indicated that piperine exhibited anti-proliferative effect in human prostate cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and autophagy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Influence of three central venous catheter biomedical materials on proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of xuanwei lung cancer-05 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yujie; Zhou, Lan; Huang, Yunchao; Jin, Qilin; Liu, Xin; Chen, Ying; Rao, Zhongming; Chen, Xiaobo; Yang, Kaiyun

    2012-09-01

    To explore the influence of three central venous catheter biomedical materials (polyurethane, silicone, and polyvinyl chloride) on the proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of Xuanwei Lung Cancer-05 (XWLC-05) cells so as to provide the basis for clinical choice of central venous catheter. XWLC-05 cells were cultured and subcultured, and the cells at passage 3 were cultured with polyurethane, silicone, and polyvinyl chloride (1.0 cm x 1.0 cm in size), and only cells served as a control. At 24, 48, and 72 hours after cultured, MTT assay was used to detect the cellular proliferation and flow cytometry to detect the cell cycle and apoptosis. At 72 hours after cultured, inverted microscope was used to observe the cell growth. Inverted microscope showed the cells grew well in control group, polyurethane group, and silicone group. In polyvinyl chloride group, the cells decreased, necrosed, and dissolved; residual adherent cells had morphologic deformity and decreased transmittance. At 24 and 48 hours, no significant difference in proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle was found among 4 groups (P > 0.05). At 72 hours, the proliferations of XWLC-05 cells in three material groups were significantly inhibited when compared with control group (P 0.05). Compared with the control group, three material groups had significant impact on the rate of apoptosis and cell cycle: polyvinyl chloride group was the most remarkable, followed by silicone group, polyurethane group was minimum (P < 0.05). Polyvinyl chloride can significantly impact the proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of XWLC-05 cells; polyurethane has better biocompatibility than polyvinyl chloride and silicone.

  10. Genetic variation in cell cycle regulatory gene AURKA and association with intrinsic breast cancer subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Bensen, Jeannette T; Poole, Charles; Troester, Melissa A; Gammon, Marilie D; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F

    2015-12-01

    AURKA is a putative low-penetrance tumor susceptibility gene due to its prominent role in cell cycle regulation and centrosomal function. Germline variation in AURKA was evaluated for association with breast cancer and intrinsic breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (Cau). Tag and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on AURKA were genotyped in 1946 cases and 1747 controls. In race-stratified analyses adjusted for age and African ancestry, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate SNP associations with breast cancer. In a race-combined analysis with similar adjustment, these associations were also examined by intrinsic breast cancer subtype. Using dominant models, most AURKA SNPs demonstrated no association with breast cancer in the race-stratified analyses. Among AA, rs6092309 showed an inverse association with breast cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53-0.90). In the race-combined analyses, rs6099128 had reduced ORs for luminal A (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60-0.95) and basal-like breast cancer (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.37-0.80). Rs6092309 showed a similar pattern of association with each subtype. Three SNPs (rs6014711, rs911162, rs1047972) had positive associations with basal-like breast cancer, and ORs reduced or close to 1.00 for other subtypes. Our results suggest inverse associations between some AURKA SNPs and overall breast cancer in AA. We found differential associations by specific subtypes and by race. Replication of these findings in larger AA populations would allow more powerful race-stratified subtype analyses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqcena, M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hosny, C; Alhamed, A; Chatterjee, A; Foster, D A

    2015-05-14

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands, wherein glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the 'conditionally essential' amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. Although Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras-driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation--causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint.

  12. Tetramethoxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, suppresses proliferation, blocks cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zihao; Liu, Mingming; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Meiqin; Yang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor functions of a synthetic chalcone derivative 4,3',4',5'- tetramethoxychalcone (TMOC) in ovarian cancer cells. We found that TMOC inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of cisplatin sensitive cell line A2780 and resistant cell line A2780/CDDP, as well as ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of A2780 cells with TMOC resulted in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and the up-regulation of p16, p21 and p27 proteins. We demonstrated that TMOC might induce cell apoptosis through suppressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but enhancing the expression of Bax and the cleavage of PARP-1. Treatment of TMOC also reduced the invasion and migration of A2780 cells. Finally, we found that TMOC inhibited the constitutive activation of STAT3 signaling pathway and induced the expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN regardless of the p53 status in cell lines. These data suggest that TMOC may be developed as a potential chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including ovarian cancer.

  13. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest by protecting RB-E2F-1 complex in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

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    Morris Robert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate phytochemical present predominantly in cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprout and broccoli, is considered a promising chemo-preventive agent against cancer. In-vitro exposure to SFN appears to result in the induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in a variety of tumor types. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the inhibition of cell cycle progression by SFN are poorly understood in epithelial ovarian cancer cells (EOC. The aim of this study is to understand the signaling mechanisms through which SFN influences the cell growth and proliferation in EOC. Results SFN at concentrations of 5 - 20 μM induced a dose-dependent suppression of growth in cell lines MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3 with an IC50 of ~8 μM after a 3 day exposure. Combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel, resulted in additive growth suppression. SFN at ~8 μM decreased growth by 40% and 20% on day 1 in MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3, respectively. Cells treated with cytotoxic concentrations of SFN have reduced cell migration and increased apoptotic cell death via an increase in Bak/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of procaspase-9 and poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP. Gene expression profile analysis of cell cycle regulated proteins demonstrated increased levels of tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB and decreased levels of E2F-1 transcription factor. SFN treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest through down modulation of RB phosphorylation and by protecting the RB-E2F-1 complex. Conclusions SFN induces growth arrest and apoptosis in EOC cells. Inhibition of retinoblastoma (RB phosphorylation and reduction in levels of free E2F-1 appear to play an important role in EOC growth arrest.

  14. Multi-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect cell cycle gene copy number aberrations in young breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Bai, Jingchao; Hao, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Yunhui; Zhang, Xiaobei; Yuan, Weiping; Hu, Linping; Cheng, Tao; Zetterberg, Anders; Lee, Mong-Hong; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease of cell cycle, and the dysfunction of cell cycle checkpoints plays a vital role in the occurrence and development of breast cancer. We employed multi-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) to investigate gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) of 4 genes (Rb1, CHEK2, c-Myc, CCND1) that are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, in order to analyze the impact of gene aberrations on prognosis in the young breast cancer patients. Gene copy number aberrations of these 4 genes were more frequently observed in young breast cancer patients when compared with the older group. Further, these CNAs were more frequently seen in Luminal B type, Her2 overexpression, and tiple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) type in young breast cancer patients. The variations of CCND1, Rb1, and CHEK2 were significantly correlated with poor survival in the young breast cancer patient group, while the amplification of c-Myc was not obviously correlated with poor survival in young breast cancer patients. Thus, gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) of cell cycle-regulated genes can serve as an important tool for prognosis in young breast cancer patients.

  15. Natural compounds' activity against cancer stem-like or fast-cycling melanoma cells.

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    Malgorzata Sztiller-Sikorska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence supports the concept that melanoma is highly heterogeneous and sustained by a small subpopulation of melanoma stem-like cells. Those cells are considered as responsible for tumor resistance to therapies. Moreover, melanoma cells are characterized by their high phenotypic plasticity. Consequently, both melanoma stem-like cells and their more differentiated progeny must be eradicated to achieve durable cure. By reevaluating compounds in heterogeneous melanoma populations, it might be possible to select compounds with activity not only against fast-cycling cells but also against cancer stem-like cells. Natural compounds were the focus of the present study. METHODS: We analyzed 120 compounds from The Natural Products Set II to identify compounds active against melanoma populations grown in an anchorage-independent manner and enriched with cells exerting self-renewing capacity. Cell viability, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, gene expression, clonogenic survival and label-retention were analyzed. FINDINGS: Several compounds efficiently eradicated cells with clonogenic capacity and nanaomycin A, streptonigrin and toyocamycin were effective at 0.1 µM. Other anti-clonogenic but not highly cytotoxic compounds such as bryostatin 1, siomycin A, illudin M, michellamine B and pentoxifylline markedly reduced the frequency of ABCB5 (ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 5-positive cells. On the contrary, treatment with maytansine and colchicine selected for cells expressing this transporter. Maytansine, streptonigrin, toyocamycin and colchicine, even if highly cytotoxic, left a small subpopulation of slow-dividing cells unaffected. Compounds selected in the present study differentially altered the expression of melanocyte/melanoma specific microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF and proto-oncogene c-MYC. CONCLUSION: Selected anti-clonogenic compounds might be further investigated as potential adjuvants

  16. Natural compounds' activity against cancer stem-like or fast-cycling melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztiller-Sikorska, Malgorzata; Koprowska, Kamila; Majchrzak, Kinga; Hartman, Mariusz; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the concept that melanoma is highly heterogeneous and sustained by a small subpopulation of melanoma stem-like cells. Those cells are considered as responsible for tumor resistance to therapies. Moreover, melanoma cells are characterized by their high phenotypic plasticity. Consequently, both melanoma stem-like cells and their more differentiated progeny must be eradicated to achieve durable cure. By reevaluating compounds in heterogeneous melanoma populations, it might be possible to select compounds with activity not only against fast-cycling cells but also against cancer stem-like cells. Natural compounds were the focus of the present study. We analyzed 120 compounds from The Natural Products Set II to identify compounds active against melanoma populations grown in an anchorage-independent manner and enriched with cells exerting self-renewing capacity. Cell viability, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, gene expression, clonogenic survival and label-retention were analyzed. Several compounds efficiently eradicated cells with clonogenic capacity and nanaomycin A, streptonigrin and toyocamycin were effective at 0.1 µM. Other anti-clonogenic but not highly cytotoxic compounds such as bryostatin 1, siomycin A, illudin M, michellamine B and pentoxifylline markedly reduced the frequency of ABCB5 (ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B, member 5)-positive cells. On the contrary, treatment with maytansine and colchicine selected for cells expressing this transporter. Maytansine, streptonigrin, toyocamycin and colchicine, even if highly cytotoxic, left a small subpopulation of slow-dividing cells unaffected. Compounds selected in the present study differentially altered the expression of melanocyte/melanoma specific microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and proto-oncogene c-MYC. Selected anti-clonogenic compounds might be further investigated as potential adjuvants targeting melanoma stem-like cells in the combined anti

  17. Differential effects of Viscum album extract IscadorQu on cell cycle progression and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsma, Marjan; Grommé, Monique; Ummelen, Monique; Dignef, Wendy; Tusenius, Karel Jan; Ramaekers, Frans C S

    2004-12-01

    Extracts from European mistletoe or Viscum album L. have been reported to exert cytotoxic and immunomodulatory effects in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of this anti-tumoral activity is however, largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IscadorQu, an aqueous fermented extract from the European mistletoe grown on oaks, induces tumor regression by cell cycle inhibition and/or interference with apoptotic signaling pathways in cancer cells. Also a possible effect on angiogenesis, which is a prerequisite for tumor growth in vivo, is studied in endothelial cell cultures. Furthermore, we examined which apoptotic signaling route is activated by staining cells for specific pro-apoptotic proteins. To characterize these properties, 6 different human cancer cell lines, one epidermis derived cell line and 2 endothelial cell cultures were incubated with different concentrations of IscadorQu. Cell cycle kinetics parameters were measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse labeling and tubulin staining. Apoptotic responses were detected by M30 CytoDeath or Annexin V/propidium iodide assays. Characterization of the apoptotic pathway was performed by staining cells for active caspase 3, active caspase 8, cytochrome C and chloromethyl-X-rosamine. The results of this study show that sensitivity to IscadorQu treatment varies strongly between different cell lines. In sensitive cell lines, including tumor and endothelial cell cultures, IscadorQu caused early cell cycle inhibition followed by apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis was induced by activating the mitochondrial but not the death receptor-dependent pathway.

  18. Flavonoids from Gynostemma pentaphyllum Exhibit Differential Induction of Cell Cycle Arrest in H460 and A549 Cancer Cells

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    Ko-Chung Tsui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids, containing mainly kaempferol rhamnohexoside derivatives, were extracted from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (G. pentaphyllum and their potential growth inhibition effects against H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells was explored and compared to that on A549 cells. The extracted flavonoids were found to exhibit antiproliferation effects against H460 cells (IC50 = 50.2 μg/mL, although the IC50 of H460 is 2.5-fold that of A549 cells (IC50 = 19.8 μg/mL. Further investigation revealed that H460 cells are more susceptible to kaempferol than A549, whereas A549 cell growth is better inhibited by kaempferol rhamnohexoside derivatives as compared with H460. In addition, flavonoids from G. pentaphyllum induced cell cycle arrest at both S and G2/M phases with concurrent modulated expression of the cellular proteins cyclin A, B, p53 and p21 in A549 cells, but not H460. On the contrary, apoptosis and concomitant alteration in balance of BCL-2 and BAX expression as well as activation of caspase-3 were equally affected between both cells by flavonoid treatment. These observations strongly suggest the growth inhibition discrepancy between H460 and A549 following flavonoid treatment can be attributed to the lack of cell cycle arrest in H460 cells and the differences between H460 and A549 cells may serve as contrasting models for further mechanistic investigations.

  19. Demethylation and alterations in the expression level of the cell cycle-related genes as possible mechanisms in arsenic trioxide-induced cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddaskho, Farima; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Ghadami, Mohsen; Tavakkoly-Bazzaz, Javad; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been used clinically as an anti-tumor agent. Its mechanisms are mostly considered to be the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of its anti-cancer action through cell cycle arrest are poorly known. Furthermore, As2O3 has been shown to be a potential DNA methylation inhibitor, inducing DNA hypomethylation. We hypothesize that As2O3 may affect the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes by interfering with DNA methylation patterns. To explore this, we examined promoter methylation status of 24 cell cycle genes in breast cancer cell lines and in a normal breast tissue sample by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction enzyme-based methods. Gene expression level and cell cycle distribution were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometric analyses, respectively. Our methylation analysis indicates that only promoters of RBL1 (p107), RASSF1A, and cyclin D2 were aberrantly methylated in studied breast cancer cell lines. As2O3 induced CpG island demethylation in promoter regions of these genes and restores their expression correlated with DNA methyltransferase inhibition. As2O3 also induced alterations in messenger RNA expression of several cell cycle-related genes independent of demethylation. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the cell cycle arrest induced by As2O3 varied depending on cell lines, MCF-7 at G1 phase and both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells at G2/M phase. These changes at transcriptional level of the cell cycle genes by the molecular mechanisms dependent and independent of demethylation are likely to represent the mechanisms of cell cycle redistribution in breast cancer cells, in response to As2O3 treatment.

  20. Cell-cycle protein expression in a population-based study of ovarian and endometrial cancers

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    Ashley S. Felix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors is implicated in the carcinogenesis of many cancers, including ovarian and endometrial cancers. We examined associations between CDK inhibitor expression, cancer risk factors, tumor characteristics, and survival outcomes among ovarian and endometrial cancer patients enrolled in a population-based case control study. Expression (negative vs. positive of three CDK inhibitors (p16, p21, p27 and ki67 was examined with immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for associations between biomarkers, risk factors, and tumor characteristics. Survival outcomes were available for ovarian cancer patients and examined using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards regression. Among ovarian cancer patients (n=175, positive p21 expression was associated with endometrioid tumors (OR=12.22, 95% CI=1.45-102.78 and higher overall survival (log-rank p=0.002. In Cox models adjusted for stage, grade, and histology, the association between p21 expression and overall survival was borderline significant (hazard ratio=0.65, 95% CI=0.42-1.05. Among endometrial cancer patients (n=289, positive p21 expression was inversely associated with age (OR ≥ 65 years of age=0.25, 95% CI=0.07-0.84 and current smoking status (OR: 0.33, 95% CI 0.15, 0.72 compared to negative expression. Our study showed heterogeneity in expression of cell-cycle proteins associated with risk factors and tumor characteristics of gynecologic cancers. Future studies to assess these markers of etiological classification and behavior may be warranted.

  1. Immunohistochemical study of the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at different stages of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; von der Maase, Hans; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The cell cycle is known to be deregulated in cancer. We therefore analyzed the expression of the cell cycle related proteins p21, p27, p16, Rb, and L-myc by immunohistochemical staining of bladder tumors.METHODS: The tissue material consisted of bladder tumors from three groups of patients....... By immunohistochemical staining the protein expression was compared to allelic deletions of the corresponding genes. The allelic deletions were detected by PCR-based microsatellite analyses.RESULTS: We detected a significant reduction in the expression levels of the cell cycle related proteins p21(waf1) ( P=0.002), p27......(kip1) ( P=0.03), Rb ( P=0.00002), and L-myc ( P=0.00000007) in muscle invasive tumors compared to noninvasive tumors. Tumors presenting as muscle invasive at first diagnosis had significantly lower levels of p16/CDKN2A ( P=0.01) when compared to muscle invasive tumors that followed Ta or T1 precursor...

  2. Spheroid cancer stem cells display reprogrammed metabolism and obtain energy by actively running the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Takahashi, Juri; Eguchi, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-31

    The Warburg effect is a metabolic hallmark of cancer cells; cancer cells, unlike normal cells, exclusively activate glycolysis, even in the presence of enough oxygen. On the other hand, intratumoral heterogeneity is currently of interest in cancer research, including that involving cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the present study, we attempted to gain an understanding of metabolism in CSCs that is distinct from that in non-CSCs. After forming spheroids from the OVTOKO (ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma) and SiHa (cervical squamous cell carcinoma) cell lines, the metabolites of these cells were compared with the metabolites of cancer cells that were cultured in adherent plates. A principle components analysis clearly divided their metabolic features. Amino acids that participate in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle reactions, such as serine and glutamine, were significantly increased in the spheroids. Indeed, spheroids from each cell line contained more total adenylates than did their corresponding cells in adherent cultures. This study demonstrated that cancer metabolism is not limited to aerobic glycolysis (i.e. the Warburg effect), but is flexible and context-dependent. In addition, activation of TCA cycles was suggested to be a metabolic feature of CSCs that was distinct from non-CSCs. The amino acid metabolic pathways discussed here are already considered as targets for cancer therapy, and they are additionally proposed as potential targets for CSC treatment.

  3. Cancer Preventive Efficacy of Marine Carotenoid Fucoxanthin: Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis

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    Thamaraiselvan Rengarajan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological investigations have shown that overcoming the risk of cancer is related to the consumption of green vegetables and fruits. Many compounds from different origins, such as terrestrial plants and marine and microbial sources, have been reported to have therapeutic effects of which marine sources are the most important because the diversity of marine life is more varied than other sources. Fucoxanthin is one important compound with a marine origin and belongs to the group of carotenoids; it can be found in marine brown seaweeds, macroalgae, and diatoms, all of which have remarkable biological properties. Numerous studies have shown that fucoxanthin has considerable medicinal potential and promising applications in human health. In this review, we summarize the anticancer effects of fucoxanthin through several different mechanisms including anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and anti-angiogenesis, and its possible role in the treatment of cancer.

  4. Secretion modification region-derived peptide blocks exosome release and mediates cell cycle arrest in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Bo; Gonzalez, Ruben R; Lillard, James; Bond, Vincent C

    2017-02-14

    Discovery and development of a novel anticancer PEG-SMR-Clu peptide to prevent breast cancer metastasis. How breast cancer cells and primary mammary epithelial cells interact and communicate with each other to promote tumorigenesis and how to prevent tumor metastasis has long been a concern of researchers. Cancer cells secrete exosomes containing proteins and RNA. These factors can influence tumor development by directly targeting cancer cells and tumor stroma. In this study, we determined the effects of a peptide as an inhibitor of exosome secretion on breast tumors. We developed a peptide derived from the Secretion Modification Region (SMR) of HIV-1 Nef protein that was modified with PEG on the N-terminus and with a Clusterin (Clu)-binding peptide on the C-terminus. Attachment of PEG to the SMR peptide, termed PEGylation, offers improved water solubility and stability as well as reduced clearance through the kidneys, leading to a longer circulation time. The 12-mer Clu-binding peptide plays multiple roles in tumor development and metastasis. The Clu peptide can be detected by antibody in vivo, thus it has the potential to be used to monitor tumor status and treatment efficacy in animal studies and eventually in cancer patients. PEG-SMRwt-Clu and PEG-SMRwt peptides inhibited the growth of both of MCF-7 (estrogen responsive, ER+) and MDA-MD-231 (estrogen non-responsive, ER-) human breast cancer cells in a dose and time-dependent manner, without inducing cytotoxic effects. The SMRwt peptide, combined with paclitaxel, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but did not promote apoptosis. PEG-SMRwt-Clu peptide treatment blocked exosome release from both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. This effect was blocked by knockdown of the chaperone protein mortalin by either antibody or siRNA. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells were treated with PEG-SMR-Clu peptide alone and in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin. Cell proliferation and viabilty

  5. Rosiglitazone induces autophagy in H295R and cell cycle deregulation in SW13 adrenocortical cancer cells

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    Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); Amendola, Donatella; Bucci, Barbara [Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); Masuelli, Laura [Department of Experimental Medicine, ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Marchese, Rodolfo [Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); Misiti, Silvia [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy); De Venanzi, Agostino; Poggi, Maurizio; Toscano, Vincenzo [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Stigliano, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.stigliano@uniroma1.it [Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology ' Sapienza' University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa, 1035-00189 Rome (Italy); Research Center S. Pietro Hospital, Via Cassia, 600-00189 Rome (Italy)

    2011-06-10

    Thiazolidinediones, specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) ligands, used in type-2 diabetes therapy, show favourable effects in several cancer cells. In this study we demonstrate that the growth of H295R and SW13 adrenocortical cancer cells is inhibited by rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinediones member, even though the mechanisms underlying this effect appeared to be cell-specific. Treatment with GW9662, a selective PPAR-{gamma}-inhibitor, showed that rosiglitazone acts through both PPAR-{gamma}-dependent and -independent mechanisms in H295R, while in SW13 cells the effect seems to be independent of PPAR-{gamma}. H295R cells treated with rosiglitazone undergo an autophagic process, leading to morphological changes detectable by electron microscopy and an increased expression of specific proteins such as AMPK{alpha} and beclin-1. The autophagy seems to be independent of PPAR-{gamma} activation and could be related to an increase in oxidative stress mediated by reactive oxygen species production with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, triggered by rosiglitazone. In SW13 cells, flow cytometry analysis showed an arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with a decrease of cyclin E and cdk2 activity, following the administration of rosiglitazone. Our data show the potential role of rosiglitazone in the therapeutic approach to adrenocortical carcinoma and indicate the molecular mechanisms at the base of its antiproliferative effects, which appear to be manifold and cell-specific in adrenocortical cancer lines.

  6. Evaluation of cell cycle arrest in estrogen responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells: pitfalls of the MTS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Eileen M; Alling, Nikki; Jackson, Elise A; Yagoub, Daniel; Haass, Nikolas K; Allen, John D; Martinello-Wilks, Rosetta

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine resistance is a major problem with anti-estrogen treatments and how to overcome resistance is a major concern in the clinic. Reliable measurement of cell viability, proliferation, growth inhibition and death is important in screening for drug treatment efficacy in vitro. This report describes and compares commonly used proliferation assays for induced estrogen-responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cell cycle arrest including: determination of cell number by direct counting of viable cells; or fluorescence SYBR®Green (SYBR) DNA labeling; determination of mitochondrial metabolic activity by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay; assessment of newly synthesized DNA using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) nucleoside analog binding and Alexa Fluor® azide visualization by fluorescence microscopy; cell-cycle phase measurement by flow cytometry. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with ICI 182780 (Faslodex), FTY720, serum deprivation or induction of the tumor suppressor p14ARF showed inhibition of cell proliferation determined by the Trypan Blue exclusion assay and SYBR DNA labeling assay. In contrast, the effects of treatment with ICI 182780 or p14ARF-induction were not confirmed using the MTS assay. Cell cycle inhibition by ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction was further confirmed by flow cytometric analysis and EdU-DNA incorporation. To explore this discrepancy further, we showed that ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction increased MCF-7 cell mitochondrial activity by MTS assay in individual cells compared to control cells thereby providing a misleading proliferation readout. Interrogation of p14ARF-induction on MCF-7 metabolic activity using TMRE assays and high content image analysis showed that increased mitochondrial activity was concomitant with increased mitochondrial biomass with no loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, or cell death. We conclude that, whilst p14ARF and ICI 182780 stop cell cycle progression, the

  7. Lithium inhibits proliferation of human esophageal cancer cell line Eca-109 by inducing a G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Sheng; Wang, Cui-Lian; Wen, Ji-Fang; Wang, Yong-Jin; Hu, Yong-Bin; Ren, Hong-Zheng

    2008-07-07

    To investigate the effect of lithium on proliferation of esophageal cancer (EC) cells and its preliminary mechanisms. Eca-109 cells were treated with lithium chloride, a highly selective inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta), at different concentrations (2-30 mmol/L) and time points (0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h). Cell proliferative ability was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell cycle distribution was examined by flow cytometry. Expressions of p-GSK-3beta, beta-catenin, cyclin B1, cdc2 and cyclin D1 protein were detected by Western blotting, and the subcellular localization of beta-catenin was determined by immunofluorescence. The mRNA level of cyclin B1 was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Lithium could inhibit the proliferation of Eca-109 cells. Lithium at a concentration of 20 mmol/L lithium for 24 h produced obvious changes in the distribution of cell cycle, and increased the number of cells in G(2)/M phase (Pgroup). Western blotting showed that lithium inhibited GSK-3beta by Ser-9 phosphorylation and stabilized free beta-catenin in the cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence further confirmed that free beta-catenin actively translocated to the nucleus. Moreover, lithium slightly elevated cyclin D1 protein expression, whereas lowered the cyclin B1 expression after 24 h lithium exposure and no obvious change was observed for cdc2 protein. Lithium can inhibit the proliferation of human esophageal cancer cell line Eca-109 by inducing a G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, which is mainly mediated through the inhibition of lithium-sensitive molecule, GSK-3beta, and reduction of cyclin B1 expression.

  8. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansems, Marleen; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Looman, Maaike W G; Smid, Marcel; de Graaf, Annemarie M A; de Weerd, Vanja; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prognostic marker in ESR1 (ERα gene)-positive breast cancer patients. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism on how DC-SCRIPT inhibits breast cancer cell growth. DC-SCRIPT mRNA levels from 190 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors were related to global gene expression, followed by gene ontology and pathway analysis. The effect of DC-SCRIPT on breast cancer cell growth and cell cycle arrest was investigated using novel DC-SCRIPT-inducible MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Genome-wide expression profiling of DC-SCRIPT-expressing MCF7 cells was performed to investigate the effect of DC-SCRIPT on cell cycle-related gene expression. Findings were validated by real-time PCR in a cohort of 1,132 ESR1-positive breast cancer patients. In the primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression negatively correlated with several cell cycle gene ontologies and pathways. DC-SCRIPT expression strongly reduced breast cancer cell growth in vitro, breast tumor growth in vivo, and induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, in the presence of DC-SCRIPT, multiple cell cycles related genes were differentially expressed including the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B. Moreover, in 1,132 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression also correlated with CDKN2B expression. Collectively, these data show that DC-SCRIPT acts as a novel regulator of CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ESR1-positive breast cancer cells.

  9. Extra-virgin olive oil phenols block cell cycle progression and modulate chemotherapeutic toxicity in bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Andrea; Mosca, Luciana; Puca, Rosa; Mangino, Giorgio; Rossi, Alessandro; Lendaro, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that the daily consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), a common dietary habit of the Mediterranean area, lowers the incidence of certain types of cancer, in particular bladder neoplasm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of polyphenols extracted from EVOO on bladder cancer (BCa), and to clarify the biological mechanisms that trigger cell death. Furthermore, we also evaluated the ability of low doses of extra-virgin olive oil extract (EVOOE) to modulate the in vitro activity of paclitaxel or mitomycin, two antineoplastic drugs used in the management of different types of cancer. Our results showed that EVOOE significantly inhibited the proliferation and clonogenic ability of T24 and 5637 BCa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis after EVOOE treatment showed a marked growth arrest prior to mitosis in the G2/M phase for both cell lines, with the subsequent induction of apoptosis only in the T24 cells. Notably, simultaneous treatment of mitomycin C and EVOOE reduced the drug cytotoxicity due to inhibition of ROS production. Conversely, the co-treatment of T24 cells with paclitaxel and the polyphenol extract strongly increased the apoptotic cell death at each tested concentration compared to paclitaxel alone. Our results support the epidemiological evidence indicating that olive oil consumption exerts health benefits and may represent a starting point for the development of new anticancer strategies. PMID:27748855

  10. Regulation of DNA synthesis and the cell cycle in human prostate cancer cells and lymphocytes by ovine uterine serpin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uterine serpins are members of the serine proteinase inhibitor superfamily. Like some other serpins, these proteins do not appear to be functional proteinase inhibitors. The most studied member of the group, ovine uterine serpin (OvUS, inhibits proliferation of several cell types including activated lymphocytes, bovine preimplantation embryos, and cell lines for lymphoma, canine primary osteosarcoma and human prostate cancer (PC-3 cells. The goal for the present study was to evaluate the mechanism by which OvUS inhibits cell proliferation. In particular, it was tested whether inhibition of DNA synthesis in PC-3 cells involves cytotoxic actions of OvUS or the induction of apoptosis. The effect of OvUS in the production of the autocrine and angiogenic cytokine interleukin (IL-8 by PC-3 cells was also determined. Finally, it was tested whether OvUS blocks specific steps in the cell cycle using both PC-3 cells and lymphocytes. Results Recombinant OvUS blocked proliferation of PC-3 cells at concentrations as low as 8 μg/ml as determined by measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation or ATP content per well. Treatment of PC-3 cells with OvUS did not cause cytotoxicity or apoptosis or alter interleukin-8 secretion into medium. Results from flow cytometry experiments showed that OvUS blocked the entry of PC-3 cells into S phase and the exit from G2/M phase. In addition, OvUS blocked entry of lymphocytes into S phase following activation of proliferation with phytohemagglutinin. Conclusion Results indicate that OvUS acts to block cell proliferation through disruption of the cell cycle dynamics rather than induction of cytotoxicity or apoptosis. The finding that OvUS can regulate cell proliferation makes this one of only a few serpins that function to inhibit cell growth.

  11. Proanthocyanidins from the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Induce Cell Cycle Alterations in DU145 Human Prostate Cancer Cells in Vitro by Affecting the Expression of Cell Cycle-Associated Proteins

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    Joseph Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. There are genetic and environmental factors that can potentially impact the development and progression of many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. As a consequence of environmental factors, such as diet having a potential effect on the development of prostate cancer, considerable interest in the possible health benefits associated with the inclusion and consumption of certain foods in the diet exists. Context and purpose of this study: This study describes the effects of a proanthocyanidinenriched fraction (PACs isolated from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon on the behaviour of androgen-refractory (insensitive DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: Following treatment of DU145 human prostate cancer cells with 25 µg/mL of PACs for six hours, PACs significantly decreased the cellular viability of DU145 cells. PACs treatment (25 µg/mL for 6 hours of DU145 cells increased the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and decreased the proportion of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These alterations were associated with changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins and other cell cycle associated proteins. PACs increased the expression of cyclin E, cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4, and decreased the expression of cyclin A and cyclin B1. The protein expression level of p27 increased, and the protein expression levels of p16INK4a, p21, and pRBp107 decreased in response to PACs treatment. The protein expression level of pRBp130 was unchanged in Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2014; 4(2:130- 146 Page 131 of 146 response to PACs treatment. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that proanthocyanidins from the American cranberry can affect the behaviour of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and further support the potential health benefits associated with cranberries.

  12. Ethanol extract of Kilkyung-baeksan, a traditional herbal formula, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in human lung cancer cell lines

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    Jinhee Kim

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: EE-KKBS exerted its cytostatic activity through regulating G1 cell cycle checkpoint in lung cancer cells, and this activity is mainly mediated by one of its component herbs, seeds of Croton tiglium. Collectively, our data suggest that EE-KKBS could be a novel candidate for adjuvant therapy for lung cancer.

  13. Colorectal cancer cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in cell cycle-related mRNAs that promote proliferation of endothelial cells

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    Kim Yoon-Keun

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various cancer cells, including those of colorectal cancer (CRC, release microvesicles (exosomes into surrounding tissues and peripheral circulation. These microvesicles can mediate communication between cells and affect various tumor-related processes in their target cells. Results We present potential roles of CRC cell-derived microvesicles in tumor progression via a global comparative microvesicular and cellular transcriptomic analysis of human SW480 CRC cells. We first identified 11,327 microvesicular mRNAs involved in tumorigenesis-related processes that reflect the physiology of donor CRC cells. We then found 241 mRNAs enriched in the microvesicles above donor cell levels, of which 27 were involved in cell cycle-related processes. Network analysis revealed that most of the cell cycle-related microvesicle-enriched mRNAs were associated with M-phase activities. The integration of two mRNA datasets showed that these M-phase-related mRNAs were differentially regulated across CRC patients, suggesting their potential roles in tumor progression. Finally, we experimentally verified the network-driven hypothesis by showing a significant increase in proliferation of endothelial cells treated with the microvesicles. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that CRC cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in cell cycle-related mRNAs that promote proliferation of endothelial cells, suggesting that microvesicles of cancer cells can be involved in tumor growth and metastasis by facilitating angiogenesis-related processes. This information will help elucidate the pathophysiological functions of tumor-derived microvesicles, and aid in the development of cancer diagnostics, including colorectal cancer.

  14. Cell-cycle-dependent drug-resistant quiescent cancer cells induce tumor angiogenesis after chemotherapy as visualized by real-time FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-04

    We previously demonstrated that quiescent cancer cells in a tumor are resistant to conventional chemotherapy as visualized with a fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). We also showed that proliferating cancer cells exist in a tumor only near nascent vessels or on the tumor surface as visualized with FUCCI and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumor vessels. In the present study, we show the relationship between cell-cycle phase and chemotherapy-induced tumor angiogenesis using in vivo FUCCI real-time imaging of the cell cycle and nestin-driven GFP to detect nascent blood vessels. We observed that chemotherapy-treated tumors, consisting of mostly of quiescent cancer cells after treatment, had much more and deeper tumor vessels than untreated tumors. These newly-vascularized cancer cells regrew rapidly after chemotherapy. In contrast, formerly quiescent cancer cells decoyed to S/G2 phase by a telomerase-dependent adenovirus did not induce tumor angiogenesis. The present results further demonstrate the importance of the cancer-cell position in the cell cycle in order that chemotherapy be effective and not have the opposite effect of stimulating tumor angiogenesis and progression.

  15. Arsenic trioxide causes redistribution of cell cycle, caspase activation, and GADD expression in human colonic, breast, and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinquan; Ding, Xianzhong; Adrian, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide is valuable for treatment of promyelocytic leukemia, but less attention has been paid to its therapeutic potential for other cancers. In this study, the effects of arsenic trioxide were tested in human pancreatic (AsPC-1), colonic (HT-29), and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. In all three cancer cell lines, arsenic trioxide inhibited proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation and cell counting. Coincident with inhibition of growth, arsenic trioxide induced marked morphologic changes, including reduced cytoplasmic volume, membrane blebbing, and nuclear condensation consistent with apoptosis. Propidium iodide DNA staining at 24 hours revealed cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and an increase in the S phase, while at 72 hr there was G2/M phase arrest with a marked increase in the sub-G0/G1, apoptotic cell population. The DNA fragmentation induced by arsenic trioxide was confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay in all cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed activation of caspase -3, -7, and -9 by arsenic trioxide. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by demonstrating cleavage of its downstream target, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Expression of the antiapoptosis protein, Bcl-2, was time-dependently decreased. In contrast, arsenic trioxide markedly enhanced the expression of the p21 protein, GADD45 and GADD153, in a time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that arsenic trioxide has potential as a therapeutic agent for these cancers.

  16. Structural Properties of Polyphenols Causing Cell Cycle Arrest at G1 Phase in HCT116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

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    Yoongho Lim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant-derived polyphenols are being tested as chemopreventive agents; some polyphenols arrest the cell cycle at G1 phase, whereas others inhibit cell cycle proliferation at G2/M phase. Therefore, polyphenols have been proposed to inhibit cell cycle progression at different phases via distinct mechanisms. Indeed, our previous studies showed that small structural differences in polyphenols cause large differences in their biological activities; however, the details of the structural properties causing G1 cell cycle arrest remain unknown. In this study, we prepared 27 polyphenols, including eight different scaffolds, to gain insight into the structural conditions that arrest the cell cycle at G1 phase in a quantitative structure–activity relationship study. We used cell cycle profiles to determine the biophores responsible for G1 cell cycle arrest and believe that the biophores identified in this study will help design polyphenols that cause G1 cell cycle arrest.

  17. Fucoidan Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Urinary Bladder Cancer T24 Cells by Blocking Cell Cycle Progression and Inducing Apoptosis

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    Hye Young Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although fucoidan has been shown to exert anticancer activity against several types of cancer cell lines, no reports have explored fucoidan-affected cell growth in human urinary bladder cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of fucoidan in human bladder cancer T24 cells. Our results indicated that fucoidan decreased the viability of T24 cells through the induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis. Fucoidan-induced G1 arrest is associated with the enhanced expression of the Cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and dephosphorylation of the pRB along with enhanced binding of p21 to Cdk4/6 as well as pRB to the transcription factor E2Fs. Further investigations showed the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, proving mitochondrial dysfunction upon fucoidan treatment with a corresponding increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio. Fucoidan-triggered apoptosis was also accompanied by the up-regulation of Fas and truncated Bid as well as the sequential activation of caspase-8. Furthermore, a significant increased activation of caspase-9/-3 was detected in response to fucoidan treatment with the decreased expression of IAPs and degradation of PARP, whereas a pan-caspase inhibitor significantly suppressed apoptosis and rescued the cell viability reduction. In conclusion, these observations suggest that fucoidan attenuates G1-S phase cell cycle progression and serves as an important mediator of crosstalk between caspase-dependent intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in T24 cells.

  18. Fucoidan inhibits the proliferation of human urinary bladder cancer T24 cells by blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Young; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Wun Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2014-05-09

    Although fucoidan has been shown to exert anticancer activity against several types of cancer cell lines, no reports have explored fucoidan-affected cell growth in human urinary bladder cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of fucoidan in human bladder cancer T24 cells. Our results indicated that fucoidan decreased the viability of T24 cells through the induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis. Fucoidan-induced G1 arrest is associated with the enhanced expression of the Cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and dephosphorylation of the pRB along with enhanced binding of p21 to Cdk4/6 as well as pRB to the transcription factor E2Fs. Further investigations showed the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, proving mitochondrial dysfunction upon fucoidan treatment with a corresponding increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio. Fucoidan-triggered apoptosis was also accompanied by the up-regulation of Fas and truncated Bid as well as the sequential activation of caspase-8. Furthermore, a significant increased activation of caspase-9/-3 was detected in response to fucoidan treatment with the decreased expression of IAPs and degradation of PARP, whereas a pan-caspase inhibitor significantly suppressed apoptosis and rescued the cell viability reduction. In conclusion, these observations suggest that fucoidan attenuates G1-S phase cell cycle progression and serves as an important mediator of crosstalk between caspase-dependent intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in T24 cells.

  19. Low-dose methotrexate enhances cycling of highly anaplastic cancer cells.

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    Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Ilaria; Rovida, Elisabetta; Olivotto, Massimo; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2017-02-01

    We previously showed that cellular RedOx state governs the G1-S transition of AH130 hepatoma, a tumor spontaneously reprogrammed to the embryonic stem cell stage. This transition is impaired when the mithocondrial electron transport system is blocked by specific inhibitors (antimycin A) or the respiratory chain is saturated by adding to the cells high concentrations of pyruvate. The antimycin A or pyruvate block is removed by the addition of adequate concentrations of folate (F). This suggests that the G1-S transition of AH130 cells depends on a respiration-linked step of DNA synthesis related to folate metabolism. In the study reported here, we characterized the effects of methotrexate (MTX), an inhibitor of dihydofolate-reductase, on the G1-S transition of hepatoma cells, in the absence or the presence of exogenously added F, dihydrofolate (FH2) or tetrahydrofolate (FH4). MTX, at 1 μM or higher concentrations, inhibited G1-S transition. This inhibition was completely removed by exogenous folates. Surprisingly, 10 nM MTX stimulated G1-S transition. The addition of F, but not FH2 or FH4, significantly increased this effect. Furthermore, 10 nM MTX removed the block of the G1-S transition operated by antimycin A or pyruvate, an effect which was enhanced in the presence of F. Finally, the stimulatory effect of 10 nM MTX was inhibited in the presence of serine. Our findings indicated that, under certain conditions, MTX may stimulate, rather than inhibiting, the cycling of cancer cells exhibiting a stem cell-like phenotype, such as AH130 cells. This may impact the therapeutic use of MTX and of folates as supportive care.

  20. Cell-cycle fate-monitoring distinguishes individual chemosensitive and chemoresistant cancer cells in drug-treated heterogeneous populations demonstrated by real-time FUCCI imaging.

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    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mako; Toneri, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Murakami, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Essentially every population of cancer cells within a tumor is heterogeneous, especially with regard to chemosensitivity and resistance. In the present study, we utilized the fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) imaging system to investigate the correlation between cell-cycle behavior and apoptosis after treatment of cancer cells with chemotherapeutic drugs. HeLa cells expressing FUCCI were treated with doxorubicin (DOX) (5 μM) or cisplatinum (CDDP) (5 μM) for 3 h. Cell-cycle progression and apoptosis were monitored by time-lapse FUCCI imaging for 72 h. Time-lapse FUCCI imaging demonstrated that both DOX and CDDP could induce cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M in almost all the cells, but a subpopulation of the cells could escape the block and undergo mitosis. The subpopulation which went through mitosis subsequently underwent apoptosis, while the cells arrested in S/G2/M survived. The present results demonstrate that chemoresistant cells can be readily identified in a heterogeneous population of cancer cells by S/G2/M arrest, which can serve in future studies as a visible target for novel agents that kill cell-cycle-arrested cells.

  1. p53 dependent apoptosis and cell cycle delay induced by heteroleptic complexes in human cervical cancer cells.

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    Sharma, Gunjan; Rana, Nishant Kumar; Singh, Priya; Dubey, Pradeep; Pandey, Daya Shankar; Koch, Biplob

    2017-04-01

    We previously reported synthesis of novel arene ruthenium (Ru) complexes and evaluated their antitumor activity in murine lymphoma (DL) cells. In this present study we further investigated the mechanism of action of two ruthenium complexes [complex 1 (η6-arene)RuCl(2-pcdpm)] and complex 2 (η6-arene)RuCl(4-mtdpm)] in cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Our studies demonstrate that anticancer property of these two complexes was due to induction of apoptosis through p53 mediated pathway as well as arrest of cells in G2/M phase of cell cycle. It is worth to note that the complexes did not cause any substantial cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Further in comprehensive studies, apoptosis inducing property of both complexes were established in accordance with array of morphological changes ranging from membrane blebbing to formation of apoptotic bodies and followed by DNA fragmentation assay. Furthermore, Flow cytometry by Annexin V/PI staining delineate that complex 1 and 2 have strident impact to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. The complex 1 and 2 treated cells show increased level of intracellular ROS generation which was preceded by p53 activation. Apoptosis induced by 1 and 2 was preceded by mitochondrial aggregations which were monitored by mitotracker. In addition flow cytometry analysis showed that both complexes also effectively arrest cells at G2/M phase of cell cycle. Western blot, RT-PCR as well as Real Time analysis were used to further confirm that the complexes induced apoptosis in p53 dependent pathway. Thus, our promising results can contribute to the rational design of novel potential anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Cadmium Modifies the Cell Cycle and Apoptotic Profiles of Human Breast Cancer Cells Treated with 5-Fluorouracil

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    Roberto Madeddu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Industrialisation, the proximity of factories to cities, and human work activities have led to a disproportionate use of substances containing heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd, which may have deleterious effects on human health. Carcinogenic effects of Cd and its relationship with breast cancer, among other tumours, have been reported. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a fluoropyrimidine anticancer drug used to treat solid tumours of the colon, breast, stomach, liver, and pancreas. The purpose of this work was to study the effects of Cd on cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene and protein expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with 5-FU. Cd altered the cell cycle profile, and its effects were greater when used either alone or in combination with 5-FU compared with 5-FU alone. Cd significantly suppressed apoptosis of MCF-7 cells pre-treated with 5-FU. Regarding gene and protein expression, bcl2 expression was mainly upregulated by all treatments involving Cd. The expression of caspase 8 and caspase 9 was decreased by most of the treatments and at all times evaluated. C-myc expression was increased by all treatments involving Cd, especially 5-FU plus Cd at the half time of treatment. Cd plus 5-FU decreased cyclin D1 and increased cyclin A1 expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that exposure to Cd blocks the anticancer effects of 5-FU in MCF-7 cells. These results could have important clinical implications in patients treated with 5-FU-based therapies and who are exposed to high levels of Cd.

  3. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines

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    Govindarajan Kunde R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Methods Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780. Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa. Results Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE, is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry

  4. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Siew Hong; Lee, Serene G P; Lin, Chin Y; Thomsen, Jane S; Fu, Pan Y; Murthy, Karuturi R K; Li, Haixia; Govindarajan, Kunde R; Nick, Lin C H; Bourque, Guillaume; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lufkin, Thomas; Liu, Edison T; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2011-05-16

    The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen) and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780). Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa). Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE), is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry points for estrogen regulation. The findings

  5. Protein expression patterns of cell cycle regulators in operable breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagouri, Flora; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Kouvatseas, George; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Gavressea, Theofani; Valavanis, Christos; Trihia, Helen; Bobos, Mattheos; Lazaridis, Georgios; Koutras, Angelos; Pentheroudakis, George; Skarlos, Pantelis; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Arnogiannaki, Niki; Chrisafi, Sofia; Christodoulou, Christos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Kosmidis, Paris; Karanikiotis, Charisios; Zografos, George; Papadimitriou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic role of elaborate molecular clusters encompassing cyclin D1, cyclin E1, p21, p27 and p53 in the context of various breast cancer subtypes. Cyclin E1, cyclin D1, p53, p21 and p27 were evaluated with immunohistochemistry in 1077 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from breast cancer patients who had been treated within clinical trials. Jaccard distances were computed for the markers and the resulted matrix was used for conducting unsupervised hierarchical clustering, in order to identify distinct groups correlating with prognosis. Luminal B and triple-negative (TNBC) tumors presented with the highest and lowest levels of cyclin D1 expression, respectively. By contrast, TNBC frequently expressed Cyclin E1, whereas ER-positive tumors did not. Absence of Cyclin D1 predicted for worse OS, while absence of Cyclin E1 for poorer DFS. The expression patterns of all examined proteins yielded 3 distinct clusters; (1) Cyclin D1 and/or E1 positive with moderate p21 expression; (2) Cyclin D1 and/or E1, and p27 positive, p53 protein negative; and, (3) Cyclin D1 or E1 positive, p53 positive, p21 and p27 negative or moderately positive. The 5-year DFS rates for clusters 1, 2 and 3 were 70.0%, 79.1%, 67.4% and OS 88.4%, 90.4%, 78.9%, respectively. It seems that the expression of cell cycle regulators in the absence of p53 protein is associated with favorable prognosis in operable breast cancer.

  6. Alterations in Cell Cycle and Induction of Apoptotic Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells Treated with α-Mangostin Extracted from Mangosteen Pericarp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Kurose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of molecularly targeted drugs has greatly advanced cancer therapy, despite these drugs being associated with some serious problems. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the anticancer effects of natural products. α-Mangostin, a xanthone isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen fruit, has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines and to exhibit antitumor activity in a mouse mammary cancer model. In this study, we investigated the influence of α-mangostin on apoptosis and cell cycle in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 (carrying a p53 mutation, and HER2, ER, and PgR negative in order to elucidate its anticancer mechanisms. In α-mangostin-treated cells, induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was observed. On cell-cycle analysis, G1-phase arrest, increased p21cip1 expression and decreases in cyclins, cdc(s, CDKs and PCNA were observed. In conclusion, α-mangostin may be useful as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer carrying a p53 mutation and having HER2- and hormone receptor-negative subtypes.

  7. Targeted inhibition of heat shock protein 90 disrupts multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, thus inducing cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death in human urinary bladder cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkoulis Panagiotis K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geldanamycin (GA can be considered a relatively new component with a promising mode of action against human malignancies. It specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone. Methods In this study, we have investigated the effects of geldanamycin on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent oncogenic signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cells. In order to assess the biological outcome of Hsp90 inhibition on RT4 (grade I and T24 (grade III human urinary bladder cancer cell lines, we applied MTT assay, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative (sq RT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, immunofluorescence and scratch-wound assay. Results We have herein demonstrated that, upon geldanamycin treatment, bladder cancer cells are prominently arrested in the G1 phase of cell cycle and eventually undergo programmed cell death via combined activation of apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, geldanamycin administration proved to induce prominent downregulation of several Hsp90 protein clients and downstream effectors, such as membrane receptors (IGF-IR and c-Met, protein kinases (Akt, IKKα, IKKβ and Erk1/2 and transcription factors (FOXOs and NF-κΒ, therefore resulting in the impairment of proliferative -oncogenic- signaling and reduction of cell motility. Conclusions In toto, we have evinced the dose-dependent and cell line-specific actions of geldanamycin on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of critical Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling -oncogenic- integrity.

  8. Targeted inhibition of heat shock protein 90 disrupts multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, thus inducing cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death in human urinary bladder cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Geldanamycin (GA) can be considered a relatively new component with a promising mode of action against human malignancies. It specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone. Methods In this study, we have investigated the effects of geldanamycin on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent oncogenic signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cells. In order to assess the biological outcome of Hsp90 inhibition on RT4 (grade I) and T24 (grade III) human urinary bladder cancer cell lines, we applied MTT assay, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative (sq) RT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), immunofluorescence and scratch-wound assay. Results We have herein demonstrated that, upon geldanamycin treatment, bladder cancer cells are prominently arrested in the G1 phase of cell cycle and eventually undergo programmed cell death via combined activation of apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, geldanamycin administration proved to induce prominent downregulation of several Hsp90 protein clients and downstream effectors, such as membrane receptors (IGF-IR and c-Met), protein kinases (Akt, IKKα, IKKβ and Erk1/2) and transcription factors (FOXOs and NF-κΒ), therefore resulting in the impairment of proliferative -oncogenic- signaling and reduction of cell motility. Conclusions In toto, we have evinced the dose-dependent and cell line-specific actions of geldanamycin on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of critical Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling -oncogenic- integrity. PMID:23394616

  9. Anacyclus Pyrethrum Extract Exerts Anticancer Activities on the Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Line (HCT) by Targeting Apoptosis, Metastasis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Mansoori, Behzad; Baradaran, Pooneh Chokhachi; Baradaran, Sepideh Chokhachi; Baradaran, Behzad

    2017-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. There are a number of medicinal plants triggering apoptosis response in cancer cells, thus have a therapeutic potential. On the other hand, due to traditional uses and availability of Anacyclus pyrethrum extract, we decided to evaluate the efficacy of this medicinal herb on human colorectal cancer cell line (HCT). In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of Anacyclus pyrethrum extract were assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and trypan blue viability dye. Then, flow cytometry assay was exploited to measure cell death and apoptosis stage. The scratch test was exploited to assess the effect of Anacyclus pyrethrum on the migration of cancer cells. The expression levels of Caspase 3, Bcl-2, MMP1, and Vimentin genes were quantified by real-time PCR. Finally, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. MTT assay showed that Anacyclus pyrethrum extract significantly inhibited the cell growth. According to the flow cytometry assay result, the herbal extract was able to induce apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. Our findings also demonstrated that the plant extract substantially increases the caspase 3 mRNA expression, while decreases Bcl-2, MMP1, and Vimentin. Cell cycle arrest occurred in G1 stage, due to the results of flow cytometry. These results indicate that Anacyclus pyrethrum extract can successfully induce apoptosis in HCT cells. Therefore, it could be used as a novel therapeutic candidate for colorectal cancer treatment.

  10. [miR-449b and miR-34c on inducing down-regulation of cell cycle-related proteins and cycle arrests in SKOV3-ipl cell, an ovarian cancer cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li ping; Li, Na; He, Xiang jun; Zhang, Qi

    2011-02-18

    To investigate the effects of miR-449 and miR-34 on cell growth, cell cycle and target gene expression based on these miRNA different expressions in ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and SKOV3-ipl both with mutation of p53. The expressions of miR-449a/b and miR-34b,c in SKOV3 and SKOV3-ipl were detected by RT-PCR. miR-449a,b and miR-34b,c were ectopically expressed by transfection of SKOV3-ipl. The cell growth rate was assayed by MTS method. The changes of cell cycle were measured by FCM. The changes of expression of cell cycle related proteins were detected by Western blot. Ectopic expression of miR-449b and miR-34c resulted in lowered adhesion activities by 28%-34%, and in cell cycle arrests with increased cell number of 15.62% and 15.71% in G1 and with decreased cell number of 15.96% and 16.56% in S. Cell cycle related proteins CDK6 and CDC25A were down-regulated. The decreases of CDK6 and CDC25A by miR-449b were 39% and 22% respecyively; 49% and 32% by miR-34c respectively. The more decreases were seen in co-action by miR-449b and miR-34c with decreases of 69% in CDK6, 86% in CDC25A, and 59% in CyclinA. miR-449b and miR-34c resulted in cell cycle arrests and down-regulation of CDK6, CDC25A and CyclinA in high malignant ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3-ipl.

  11. Ursolic acid derivative FZU-03,010 inhibits STAT3 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in renal and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Hongxiu; Nie, Mingxiu; Tian, Yanlei; Chen, Xu; Chen, Ceshi; Chen, Haijun; Liu, Rong

    2017-04-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) are malignancies without effective therapeutics currently. Ursolic acid (UA) has been previously reported to have anti-cancer effects in multiple solid tumors. In order to develop more potent anti-cancer reagents, FZU-03,010 based on the chemical structure of UA were synthesized. The results demonstrated that, compared with UA, FZU-03,010 could suppress renal cancer cell 786-0 and TNBC cell HCC1806 cell viability more potently.  Furthermore, FZU-03,010 could induce G1 cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis more efficiently than UA. FZU-03,010 could also inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation, induce the expression of cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27) and promote cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that the UA derivative FZU-03,010 is more potent in inhibiting cancer cell survival, and FZU-03,010 has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic for renal cell cancers and TNBCs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Prolaris Cell Cycle Progression Test for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaink, Alexis; Li, Chunmei; Wells, David; Holubowich, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is very common and many localized tumours are non-aggressive. Determining which cancers are aggressive is important for choosing the most appropriate treatment (e.g., surgery, radiation, active surveillance). Current clinical risk stratification is reliable in forecasting the prognosis of groups of men with similar clinical and pathologic characteristics, but there is residual uncertainty at the individual level. The Prolaris cell cycle progression (CCP) test, a genomic test that estimates how fast tumour cells are proliferating, could potentially be used to improve the accuracy of individual risk assessment. This health technology assessment sought to determine the clinical utility, economic impact, and patients' perceptions of the value of the CCP test in low- and intermediate-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the clinical and economic evidence of the CCP test in low-and intermediate-risk, localized prostate cancer. Medical and health economic databases were searched from 2010 to June or July 2016. The critical appraisal of the clinical evidence included risk of bias and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. We also analyzed the potential budget impact of adding the CCP test into current practice, from the perspective the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Finally, we conducted qualitative interviews with men with prostate cancer, on the factors that influenced their treatment decision-making. Results For the review of clinical effectiveness, we screened 3,021 citations, and two before–after studies met our inclusion criteria. In one study, the results of the CCP test appeared to change the treatment plan (from initial to final plan) in 64.9% of cases overall (GRADE rating of the quality of evidence: Very low). In the other study, the CCP test changed the treatment received in nearly half of cases overall, compared

  13. A metabolic link between the urea cycle and cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Erez, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations in citrullinemia type I, an inborn error of metabolism, led us to explore the benefits of somatic ASS1 silencing in cancer. We found that downregulation of ASS1 results in preferential utilization of its substrate, aspartate, for pyrimidine synthesis to support cell proliferation. Reducing aspartate availability for pyrimidine synthesis restricted cancerous proliferation.

  14. Guttiferone K impedes cell cycle re-entry of quiescent prostate cancer cells via stabilization of FBXW7 and subsequent c-MYC degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Z; Yao, M; Li, Y; Xie, C; Holst, J; Liu, T; Cai, S; Lao, Y; Tan, H; Xu, H-X; Dong, Q

    2016-06-02

    Cell cycle re-entry by quiescent cancer cells is an important mechanism for cancer progression. While high levels of c-MYC expression are sufficient for cell cycle re-entry, the modality to block c-MYC expression, and subsequent cell cycle re-entry, is limited. Using reversible quiescence rendered by serum withdrawal or contact inhibition in PTEN(null)/p53(WT) (LNCaP) or PTEN(null)/p53(mut) (PC-3) prostate cancer cells, we have identified a compound that is able to impede cell cycle re-entry through c-MYC. Guttiferone K (GUTK) blocked resumption of DNA synthesis and preserved the cell cycle phase characteristics of quiescent cells after release from the quiescence. In vehicle-treated cells, there was a rapid increase in c-MYC protein levels upon release from the quiescence. However, this increase was inhibited in the presence of GUTK with an associated acceleration in c-MYC protein degradation. The inhibitory effect of GUTK on cell cycle re-entry was significantly reduced in cells overexpressing c-MYC. The protein level of FBXW7, a subunit of E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for degradation of c-MYC, was reduced upon the release from the quiescence. In contrast, GUTK stabilized FBXW7 protein levels during release from the quiescence. The critical role of FBXW7 was confirmed using siRNA knockdown, which impaired the inhibitory effect of GUTK on c-MYC protein levels and cell cycle re-entry. Administration of GUTK, either in vitro prior to transplantation or in vivo, suppressed the growth of quiescent prostate cancer cell xenografts. Furthermore, elevation of FBXW7 protein levels and reduction of c-MYC protein levels were found in the xenografts of GUTK-treated compared with vehicle-treated mice. Hence, we have identified a compound that is capable of impeding cell cycle re-entry by quiescent PTEN(null)/p53(WT) and PTEN(null)/p53(mut) prostate cancer cells likely by promoting c-MYC protein degradation through stabilization of FBXW7. Its usage as a clinical modality to

  15. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin induces downregulation of critical Hsp90 protein clients and results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human urinary bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoulis, Panagiotis K; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Margaritis, Lukas H; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E

    2010-09-09

    17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic, specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone that maintains the structural and functional integrity of various protein clients involved in cellular signaling. In this study, we have investigated the effect of 17-AAG on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. We have used MTT-based assays, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and scratch-wound assay in RT4, RT112 and T24 human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. We have demonstrated that, upon 17-AAG treatment, bladder cancer cells are arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 17-AAG administration was shown to induce a pronounced downregulation of multiple Hsp90 protein clients and other downstream effectors, such as IGF-IR, Akt, IKK-α, IKK-β, FOXO1, ERK1/2 and c-Met, resulting in sequestration-mediated inactivation of NF-κB, reduced cell proliferation and decline of cell motility. In total, we have clearly evinced a dose-dependent and cell type-specific effect of 17-AAG on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of multiple Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling integrity.

  16. Heterogeneous cell-cycle behavior in response to UVB irradiation by a population of single cancer cells visualized by time-lapse FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Kimura, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mako; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzed the heterogeneous cell-cycle dependence and fate of single cancer cells in a population treated with UVB using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle (FUCCI) imaging system. HeLa cells expressing FUCCI were irradiated by 100 or 200 J/m(2) UVB. Modulation of the cell-cycle and apoptosis were observed by time-lapse confocal microscopy imaging every 30 min for 72 h. Correlation between cell survival and factors including cell-cycle phase at the time of the irradiation of UVB, mitosis and the G1/S transition were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method along with the log rank test. Time-lapse FUCCI imaging of HeLa cells demonstrated that UVB irradiation induced cell-cycle arrest in S/G2/M phase in the majority of the cells. The cells irradiated by 100 or 200 J/m(2) UVB during G0/G1 phase had a higher survival rate than the cells irradiated during S/G2/M phase. A minority of cells could escape S/G2/M arrest and undergo mitosis which significantly correlated with decreased survival of the cells. In contrast, G1/S transition significantly correlated with increased survival of the cells after UVB irradiation. UVB at 200 J/m(2) resulted in a greater number of apoptotic cells.

  17. Oridonin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gallbladder cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bao, Runfa; Shu, Yijun; Wu, Xiangsong; Weng, Hao; Ding, Qian; Cao, Yang; Li, Maolan; Mu, Jiasheng; Wu, Wenguang; Ding, Qichen; Tan, Zhujun; Liu, Tianyu; Jiang, Lin; Hu, Yunping; Gu, Jianfeng; Liu, Yingbin

    2014-01-01

    .... The main objective of the paper was to investigate the inhibitory effects of oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens, on gallbladder cancer both in vitro and in vivo and to explore...

  18. Induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CD133+/CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells by flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soner, Burak Cem; Aktug, Huseyin; Acikgoz, Eda; Duzagac, Fahriye; Guven, Ummu; Ayla, Sule; Cal, Cag; Oktem, Gulperi

    2014-11-01

    Flavopiridol is a flavone that inhibits several cyclin‑dependent kinases and exhibits potent growth‑inhibitory activity, apoptosis and G1‑phase arrest in a number of human tumor cell lines. Flavopiridol is currently undergoing investigation in human clinical trials. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Therefore, cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133)(+high)/CD44(+high) prostate CSCs were isolated from the DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. The cells were treated with flavopiridol in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner to determine the inhibitory effect. Cell viability and proliferation were analyzed and the efficiency of flavopiridol was assessed using the sphere‑forming assay. Flavopiridol was applied to monolayer cultures of CD133(high)/CD44(high) human prostate CSCs at the following final concentrations: 100, 300, 500 and 1000 nM . The cultures were incubated for 24, 48 and 72 h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of the drug was determined as 500 nM for monolayer cells. Dead cells were analyzed prior and subsequent to exposure to increasing flavopiridol doses. Annexin‑V and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the evaluation of apoptotic pathways. According to the results, flavopiridol treatment caused significant growth inhibition at 500 and 1000 nM when compared to the control at 24 h. G(0)/G(1) analysis showed a statistically significant difference between 100 and 500 nM (PFlavopiridol also significantly influenced the cells in the G(2)/M phase, particularly at high‑dose treatments. Flavopiridol induced growth inhibition and apoptosis at the IC(50) dose (500 nM), resulting in a significant increase in immunofluorescence staining of caspase‑3, caspase‑8 and p53. In conclusion, the present results indicated that flavopiridol could be a useful therapeutic agent for prostate CSCs by inhibiting

  19. Green tea polyphenols induce cell death in breast cancer MCF-7 cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Min; Ou, Shi-Yi; Huang, Hui-Hua

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) in treatment or prevention of breast cancer, the cytotoxic effects of GTPs on five human cell lines (MCF-7, A549, Hela, PC3, and HepG2 cells) were determined and the antitumor mechanisms of GTPs in MCF-7 cells were analyzed. The results showed that GTPs exhibited a broad spectrum of inhibition against the detected cancer cell lines, particularly the MCF-7 cells. Studies on the mechanisms revealed that the main modes of cell death induced by GTPs were cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed that GTPs mediated cell cycle arrest at both G1/M and G2/M transitions. GTP dose dependently led to apoptosis of MCF-7 cells via the mitochondrial pathways, as evidenced by induction of chromatin condensation, reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), improvement in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), induction of DNA fragmentation, and activations of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in the present paper.

  20. Comparison of cell cycle components, apoptosis and cytoskeleton-related molecules and therapeutic effects of flavopiridol and geldanamycin on the mouse fibroblast, lung cancer and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktug, Huseyin; Acikgoz, Eda; Uysal, Aysegul; Oltulu, Fatih; Oktem, Gulperi; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Demir, Kenan; Yavasoglu, Altug; Bozok Cetintas, Vildan

    2016-09-01

    Similarities and differences in the cell cycle components, apoptosis and cytoskeleton-related molecules among mouse skin fibroblast cells (MSFs), mouse squamous cell lung carcinomas (SqCLCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are important determinants of the behaviour and differentiation capacity of these cells. To reveal apoptotic pathways and to examine the distribution and the role of cell cycle-cell skeleton comparatively would necessitate tumour biology and stem cell biology to be assessed together in terms of oncogenesis and embryogenesis. The primary objectives of this study are to investigate the effects of flavopiridol, a cell cycle inhibitor, and geldanamycin, a heat shock protein inhibitor on mouse somatic, tumour and embryonic stem cells, by specifically focusing on alterations in cytoskeletal proteins, cell polarity and motility as well as cell cycle regulators. To meet these objectives, expression of several genes, cell cycle analysis and immunofluorescence staining of intracellular cytoskeletal molecules were performed in untreated and flavopiridol- or geldanamycin-treated cell lines. Cytotoxicity assays showed that SqCLCs are more sensitive to flavopiridol than MSFs and mESCs. Keratin-9 and keratin-2 expressions increased dramatically whereas cell cycle regulatory genes decreased significantly in the flavopiridol-treated MSFs. Flavopiridol-treated SqCLCs displayed a slight increase in several cell cytoskeleton regulatory genes as well as cell cycle regulatory genes. However, gene expression profiles of mESCs were not affected after flavopiridol treatment except the Cdc2a. Cytotoxic concentrations of geldanamycin were close to each other for all cell lines. Cdkn1a was the most increased gene in the geldanamycin-treated MSFs. However, expression levels of cell cytoskeleton-associated genes were increased dramatically in the geldanamycin-treated SqCLCs. Our results revealing differences in molecular mechanisms between embryogenesis and

  1. Cell-Cycle Position of Single MYC-Driven Cancer Cells Dictates Their Susceptibility to a Chemotherapeutic Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryl, Tatsiana; Kuchen, Erika E; Bell, Emma; Shao, Chunxuan; Flórez, Andrés F; Mönke, Gregor; Gogolin, Sina; Friedrich, Mona; Lamprecht, Florian; Westermann, Frank; Höfer, Thomas

    2017-09-27

    While many tumors initially respond to chemotherapy, regrowth of surviving cells compromises treatment efficacy in the long term. The cell-biological basis of this regrowth is not understood. Here, we characterize the response of individual, patient-derived neuroblastoma cells driven by the prominent oncogene MYC to the first-line chemotherapy, doxorubicin. Combining live-cell imaging, cell-cycle-resolved transcriptomics, and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that a cell's treatment response is dictated by its expression level of MYC and its cell-cycle position prior to treatment. All low-MYC cells enter therapy-induced senescence. High-MYC cells, by contrast, disable their cell-cycle checkpoints, forcing renewed proliferation despite treatment-induced DNA damage. After treatment, the viability of high-MYC cells depends on their cell-cycle position during treatment: newborn cells promptly halt in G1 phase, repair DNA damage, and form re-growing clones; all other cells show protracted DNA repair and ultimately die. These findings demonstrate that fast-proliferating tumor cells may resist cytotoxic treatment non-genetically, by arresting within a favorable window of the cell cycle. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PFK15, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of PFKFB3, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Inhibits Invasion in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    Full Text Available PFKFB3 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase synthesizes fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6P2, which is an allosteric activator of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1, the rate-limiting enzyme of glycolysis. Overexpression of the PFKFB3 enzyme leads to high glycolytic metabolism, which is required for cancer cells to survive in the harsh tumor microenvironment. The objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor activity of PFK15 (1-(4-pyridinyl-3-(2-quinolinyl-2-propen-1-one, a small molecule inhibitor of PFKFB3, against gastric cancer and to explore its potential mechanisms. The effects of PFK15 on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle progression in gastric cancer cells were evaluated by cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays, flow cytometry, and western blotting. In addition, the invasion inhibition effects of PFK15 were measured by transwell invasion assay and western blot analysis, and a xenograft tumor model was used to verify the therapeutic effect of PFK15 in vivo. Results showed that PFK15 inhibited the proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase by blocking the Cyclin-CDKs/Rb/E2F signaling pathway, and induced apoptosis through mitochondria in gastric cancer cells. Tumor volume and weight were also significantly reduced upon intraperitoneal injection with PFK15 at 25 mg/kg. In addition, PFK15 inhibited the invasion of gastric cancer cells by downregulating focal adhesion kinase (FAK expression and upregulating E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our findings indicate that PFK15 is a promising anticancer drug for treating gastric cancer.

  3. Carfilzomib induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in human endometrial cancer cells via upregulation of p21Waf1/Cip1and p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ke; Zhen, Shuai; Wang, Ruili; Luo, Wenjuan

    2016-12-01

    Carfilzomib is a second-generation tetrapeptide epoxyketone proteasome inhibitor used in current clinical therapy of hematologic malignancies. The mechanism of proteasome inhibition in endometrial cancer is not very clear. Carfilzomib inhibition of type I endometrial carcinoma cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase was investigated in our study. HEC-1-A and Ishikawa endometrial carcinoma cell lines and three tumor cell lines were treated by different concentrations of carfilzomib. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to detect cell viability. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle. Western blot was used to detect proteins involved in cell cycle progression. Carfilzomib impaired viability of myelogenous leukemia cell line K562, cervical cancer cell line HeLa, hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMCC-7721, and endometrial carcinoma cell lines HEC-1-A and Ishikawa. The cell cycle was arrested at the G2/M phase in carfilzomib-treated HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cells, while it was arrested at both S and G2/M phases in carfilzomib-treated Ishikawa cells. Carfilzomib treatment significantly induced p21 Waf1/ Cip1 and p27, while substantially reduced cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1. This study showed that carfilzomib inhibited endometrial cancer proliferation by upregulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 Waf1/Cip1 and p27 Kip1 , and reducing cyclin-dependent kinase 1 to arrest the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells is associated with an abrogation of cisplatin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Navin; Engel, Florian; Kalayda, Ganna V; Mannewitz, Mareike; Cinatl, Jindrich; Rothweiler, Florian; Michaelis, Martin; Saafan, Hisham; Ritter, Christoph A; Jaehde, Ulrich; Frötschl, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in cancer is limited by the occurrence of innate and acquired drug resistance. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying acquired cisplatin resistance, we have compared the adenocarcinoma-derived non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant sub-line A549rCDDP2000 with regard to cisplatin resistance mechanisms including cellular platinum accumulation, DNA-adduct formation, cell cycle alterations, apoptosis induction and activation of key players of DNA damage response. In A549rCDDP2000 cells, a cisplatin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was lacking and apoptosis was reduced compared to A549 cells, although equitoxic cisplatin concentrations resulted in comparable platinum-DNA adduct levels. These differences were accompanied by changes in the expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response. In A549 cells, cisplatin exposure led to a significantly higher expression of genes coding for proteins mediating G2/M arrest and apoptosis (mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2), xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC), stress inducible protein (SIP) and p21) compared to resistant cells. This was underlined by significantly higher protein levels of phosphorylated Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (pAtm) and p53 in A549 cells compared to their respective untreated control. The results were compiled in a preliminary model of resistance-associated signaling alterations. In conclusion, these findings suggest that acquired resistance of NSCLC cells against cisplatin is the consequence of altered signaling leading to reduced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  5. Cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells is associated with an abrogation of cisplatin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest.

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    Navin Sarin

    Full Text Available The efficacy of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in cancer is limited by the occurrence of innate and acquired drug resistance. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying acquired cisplatin resistance, we have compared the adenocarcinoma-derived non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant sub-line A549rCDDP2000 with regard to cisplatin resistance mechanisms including cellular platinum accumulation, DNA-adduct formation, cell cycle alterations, apoptosis induction and activation of key players of DNA damage response. In A549rCDDP2000 cells, a cisplatin-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was lacking and apoptosis was reduced compared to A549 cells, although equitoxic cisplatin concentrations resulted in comparable platinum-DNA adduct levels. These differences were accompanied by changes in the expression of proteins involved in DNA damage response. In A549 cells, cisplatin exposure led to a significantly higher expression of genes coding for proteins mediating G2/M arrest and apoptosis (mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2, xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC, stress inducible protein (SIP and p21 compared to resistant cells. This was underlined by significantly higher protein levels of phosphorylated Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (pAtm and p53 in A549 cells compared to their respective untreated control. The results were compiled in a preliminary model of resistance-associated signaling alterations. In conclusion, these findings suggest that acquired resistance of NSCLC cells against cisplatin is the consequence of altered signaling leading to reduced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  6. Cancer cells mimic in vivo spatial-temporal cell-cycle phase distribution and chemosensitivity in 3-dimensional Gelfoam® histoculture but not 2-dimensional culture as visualized with real-time FUCCI imaging.

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    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Uehara, Fuminaru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Ming; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The phase of the cell cycle can determine whether a cancer cell can respond to a given drug. We previously reported monitoring of real-time cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor, intravitally in live mice, using a fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI). Approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G0/G1 phase. Longitudinal real-time imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, had little effect on quiescent cancer cells, which are the vast majority of an established tumor. Moreover, resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after cessation of chemotherapy. These results suggested why most drugs currently in clinical use, which target cancer cells in S/G2/M, are mostly ineffective on solid tumors. In the present report, we used FUCCI imaging and Gelfoam® collagen-sponge-gel histoculture, to demonstrate in real time, that the cell-cycle phase distribution of cancer cells in Gelfoam® and in vivo tumors is highly similar, whereby only the surface cells proliferate and interior cells are quiescent in G0/G1. This is in contrast to 2D culture where most cancer cells cycle. Similarly, the cancer cells responded similarly to toxic chemotherapy in Gelfoam® culture as in vivo, and very differently than cancer cells in 2D culture which were much more chemosensitive. Gelfoam® culture of FUCCI-expressing cancer cells offers the opportunity to image the cell cycle of cancer cells continuously and to screen for novel effective therapies to target quiescent cells, which are the majority in a tumor and which would have a strong probability to be effective in vivo.

  7. DNA Amplification by Breakage/Fusion/Bridge Cycles Initiated by Spontaneous Telomere Loss in a Human Cancer Cell Line

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    Anthony W.l. Lo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of genomic instability is an important step in generatingthe multiple genetic changes required for cancer. One consequence of genomic instability is the overexpression of oncogenes due to gene amplification. One mechanism for gene amplification is the breakagelfusionlbridge (B/F/Bcyclethatinvolvesthe repeated fusion and breakage of chromosomes following the loss of a telomere. B/F/B cycles have been associated with low-copy gene amplification in human cancer cells, and have been proposed to be an initiating event in high-copy gene amplification. We have found that spontaneous telomere loss on a marker chromosome 16 in a human tumor cell line results in sister chromatid fusion and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. The high rate of anaphase bridges involving chromosome 16 demonstrates that this instability results from B/F/B cycles. The amplification of subtelomeric DNA on the marker chromosome provides conclusive evidence that B/F/B cycles initiated by spontaneous telomere loss are a mechanism for gene amplification in human cancer cells.

  8. Expression of cell cycle regulating factor mRNA in small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    and CDK6 when in vitro and in vivo data were compared. Two of the cell lines that express the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein had no sign of a deregulated Rb pathway but further studies at the protein level are necessary to demonstrate whether these two cell lines should have a normal Rb pathway or whether...... they will join the majority of cell lines with deregulated Rb pathway....

  9. Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer

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    Hatoh Shinji

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer. Methods We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors. Conclusion The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

  10. Modelling of the cancer cell cycle as a tool for rational drug development: A systems pharmacology approach to cyclotherapy.

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    Robert C Jackson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic of cancer is intimately linked to a dysregulation of the cell cycle and signalling pathways. It has been argued that selectivity of treatments could exploit loss of checkpoint function in cancer cells, a concept termed "cyclotherapy". Quantitative approaches that describe these dysregulations can provide guidance in the design of novel or existing cancer therapies. We describe and illustrate this strategy via a mathematical model of the cell cycle that includes descriptions of the G1-S checkpoint and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, the EGF signalling pathway and apoptosis. We incorporated sites of action of four drugs (palbociclib, gemcitabine, paclitaxel and actinomycin D to illustrate potential applications of this approach. We show how drug effects on multiple cell populations can be simulated, facilitating simultaneous prediction of effects on normal and transformed cells. The consequences of aberrant signalling pathways or of altered expression of pro- or anti-apoptotic proteins can thus be compared. We suggest that this approach, particularly if used in conjunction with pharmacokinetic modelling, could be used to predict effects of specific oncogene expression patterns on drug response. The strategy could be used to search for synthetic lethality and optimise combination protocol designs.

  11. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking achieved efficient cell cycle synchronization and altered the expression of p27, p53, bcl-2 in canine breast cancer cells.

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    Tong, Jinjin; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yingxue; Sun, Sichao; Li, Qing; Bao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Cell synchronization is an approach to obtain cell populations of the same stage, which is a prerequisite to studying the regulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking (TdR) are two important practices in studying cell cycle synchronization. However, their effects on canine cancer cells as well as the regulatory mechanisms by these two methods are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the optimum conditions of serum starvation and TdR and their effects on cell cycle synchronization. We further explored the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the cell cycle synchronization by investigating the expression of three key genes (p27, p53 and bcl-2). Serum starvation resulted in a reversible cell cycle arrest and synchronously progress through G0/G1. The highest percentage of CHMm cells (87.47%) in G0/G1 stage was obtained after 42 h incubation with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). TdR double blocking could arrest 98.9% of CHMm cells in G1/S phase (0 h of release), and could arrest 93.74% of CHMm cells in S phase after 4h of release. We also found that the p27, p53, bcl-2 genes were most highly expressed in G0/G1 phase. Our current work revealed that serum starvation and TdR methods could achieve sufficient synchronization of CHMm cells. Moreover, the expression of p27, p53 and bcl-2 genes was related to cyclical movements and apoptosis. Our results will provide a new insight into cell cycle regulation and reprogramming of canine cancer cells induced by serum starvation and TdR blocking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MicroRNA 543 suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation, blocks cell cycle and induces cell apoptosis via direct targeting of ERK/MAPK

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    Chen P

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Po Chen,1 Wentao Xu,2 Yi Luo,1 Yi Zhang,3 Yi He,1 Shuo Yang,1 Zhijun Yuan1 1Department of Medical Oncology, Hunan Cancer Hospital, Changsha, 2Clinical Medical College of An Hui Medical University, Hefei, 3Department of Breast Surgery, Hunan Cancer Hospital, Changsha, China Background: Breast cancer affects millions of people with a high mortality rate throughout the world; microRNA 543 (miR-543 has been reported to suppress progression in some kinds of cancers, but has not been reported in breast cancer. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the function of miR-543 in breast cancer cells.Methods: Two cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, were selected to be the research objects; the miR-543 overexpression and knockdown models were established in the study by transforming miR-543 mimics and miR-543 inhibitor. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, Western blot, clone formation and cell flow cytometer assay were used to test the miR-543’s function. Dual-luciferase assay was used for the detection of miR-543 and ERK2 targeting relationship.Results: The results showed that the cell proliferation and cell cycle were inhibited, and the capability of cell apoptosis was upregulated when miR-543 was overexpressed; we found that there was a target relationship between ERK2 and miR-543. Furthermore, downstream factors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2 pathway, including RSK2 and MSK1, were decreased in miR-543 overexpression model.Conclusion: This study provides series evidences to support that breast cancer progression was inhibited by miR-543 via direct targeting of ERK2 in MAPK/ERK signal pathway, which may provide a molecular basis for better treatment for patients. Keywords: microRNA 543, breast cancer, ERK2, apoptosis, cell cycle, proliferation

  13. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

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    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  14. The investigational Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induces defects in cell viability and cell-cycle progression in malignant bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Singh, Kamini; Mir, Maria C; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel; Dreicer, Robert; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Zhongfa; Teh, Bin T; Almasan, Alexandru; Hansel, Donna E

    2013-04-01

    Despite more than 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer in the United States annually, patients with advanced disease have a poor prognosis due to limited treatment modalities. We evaluated Aurora kinase A, identified as an upregulated candidate molecule in bladder cancer, as a potential therapeutic target. Gene expression in human bladder cancer samples was evaluated using RNA microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Effects of the Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 (Millennium) on cell dynamics in malignant T24 and UM-UC-3 and papilloma-derived RT4 bladder cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. A set of 13 genes involved in the mitotic spindle checkpoint, including Aurora kinases A and B, were upregulated in human urothelial carcinoma compared with normal urothelium. The Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induced cell-cycle arrest, aneuploidy, mitotic spindle failure, and apoptosis in the human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and UM-UC-3. MLN8237 also arrested tumor growth when administered orally over 4 weeks in a mouse bladder cancer xenograft model. Finally, in vitro sequential administration of MLN8237 with either paclitaxel or gemcitabine resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in T24 cells. Mitotic spindle checkpoint dysfunction is a common characteristic of human urothelial carcinoma and can be exploited with pharmacologic Aurora A inhibition. Given our demonstration of the ability of the Aurora A inhibitor MLN8237 to inhibit growth of bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo, we conclude that Aurora kinase inhibitors warrant further therapeutic investigation in bladder cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  15. The investigational Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induces defects in cell viability and cell cycle progression in malignant bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Singh, Kamini; Mir, Maria C.; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel; Dreicer, Robert; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Zhongfa; Teh, Bin T.; Almasan, Alexandru; Hansel, Donna E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite over 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer in the United States annually, patients with advanced disease have a poor prognosis due to limited treatment modalities. We evaluated Aurora kinase A, identified as an upregulated candidate molecule in bladder cancer, as a potential therapeutic target. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Gene expression in human bladder cancer samples was evaluated using RNA microarray and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR. Effects of the Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 (Millennium) on cell dynamics in malignant T24 and UM-UC-3 and papilloma-derived RT4 bladder cells were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. RESULTS A set of 13 genes involved in the mitotic spindle checkpoint, including Aurora kinases A and B, were upregulated in human urothelial carcinoma compared to normal urothelium. The Aurora kinase A inhibitor MLN8237 induced cell cycle arrest, aneuploidy, mitotic spindle failure, and apoptosis in the human bladder cancer cell lines T24 and UM-UC-3. MLN8237 also arrested tumor growth when administered orally over 4 weeks in a mouse bladder cancer xenograft model. Finally, in vitro sequential administration of MLN8237 with either paclitaxel or gemcitabine resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in T24 cells. CONCLUSIONS Mitotic spindle checkpoint dysfunction is a common characteristic of human urothelial carcinoma, and can be exploited with pharmacologic Aurora A inhibition. Given our demonstration of the ability of the Aurora A inhibitor MLN8237 to inhibit growth of bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo, we conclude that Aurora kinase inhibitors warrant further therapeutic investigation in bladder cancer. PMID:23403633

  16. A Distinct Slow-Cycling Cancer Stem-like Subpopulation of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells is maintained in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, Jennifer L., E-mail: jennifer.dembinski@rr-research.no; Krauss, Stefan [Cellular and Genetic Therapy, Department of Microbiology, Cancer Stem Cell Innovation Center (CAST), Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-11-29

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst prognosis of any major malignancy, with <5% of patients surviving five years. This can be contributed to the often late diagnosis, lack of sufficient treatment and metastatic spread. Heterogeneity within tumors is increasingly becoming a focus in cancer research, as novel therapies are required to target the most aggressive subpopulations of cells that are frequently termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the current study, we describe the identification of a slow-cycling cancer stem-like population of cells in vivo in BxPC-3 and Panc03.27 xenografts. A distinct slow-cycling label-retaining population of cells (DiI+/SCC) was found both at the edge of tumors, and in small circumscribed areas within the tumors. DiI+/SCC in these areas display an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) fingerprint, including an upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N-cadherin and a loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. DiI+/SCC also displayed a critical re-localization of beta-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus. Additionally, the DiI+/SCC population was found to express the developmental signaling molecule sonic hedgehog. This study represents a novel step in defining the biological activities of a tumorigenic subpopulation within the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment in vivo. Understanding the interactions and functions of a CSC population within the context of the tumor microenvironment is critical to design targeted therapeutics.

  17. Expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle and signaling pathways are independent of TP53 status in urinary bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Glenda N; Evangelista, Adriane F; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Búfalo, Michelle C; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Passos, Geraldo A S; Salvadori, Daisy M F

    2011-08-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the Western world. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common subtype, accounting for about 90% of all bladder cancers. The TP53 gene plays an essential role in the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis and therefore contributes to cellular transformation and malignancy; however, little is known about the differential gene expression patterns in human tumors that present with the wild-type or mutated TP53 gene. Therefore, because gene profiling can provide new insights into the molecular biology of bladder cancer, the present study aimed to compare the molecular profiles of bladder cancer cell lines with different TP53 alleles, including the wild type (RT4) and two mutants (5637, with mutations in codons 280 and 72; and T24, a TP53 allele encoding an in-frame deletion of tyrosine 126). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and gene networks were constructed based on data generated by cDNA microarrays using mRNA from the three cell lines. Differentially expressed genes related to the cell cycle, cell division, cell death, and cell proliferation were observed in the three cell lines. However, the cDNA microarray data did not cluster cell lines based on their TP53 allele. The gene profiles of the RT4 cells were more similar to those of T24 than to those of the 5637 cells. While the deregulation of both the cell cycle and the apoptotic pathways was particularly related to TCC, these alterations were not associated with the TP53 status.

  18. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks.

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    Prasanna Vidyasekar

    Full Text Available Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated and 2542 (downregulated genes (>2 fold in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated and 444 (downregulated genes (>2 fold under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2.

  19. Viscum Album Var Hot Water Extract Mediates Anti-cancer Effects through G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in SK-Hep1 Human Hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dela Cruz, Joseph Flores; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lumbera, Wenchie Marie Lara; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2015-01-01

    Viscum album var (VAV) also known as mistletoe, has long been categorized as a traditional herbal medicine in Asia. In addition to its immunomodulating activities, mistletoe has also been used in the treatment of chronic hepatic disorders in China and Korea. There are numerous reports showing that VAV possesses anti-cancer effects, however influence on human hepatocarcinoma has never been elucidated. In the present study, hot water extracts of VAV was evaluated for its potential anti-cancer effect in vitro. SK-Hep1 cells were treated with VAV (50-400 ug/ml) for both 24 and 48 hours then cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the proportion of SK-Hep1 in the different stages of cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted to measure expression of cell cycle arrest related genes and proteins respectively. VAV dose dependently inhibited the proliferation of SK-Hep1 cells without any cytotoxicity with normal Chang liver cell (CCL-13). Flow cytometry analysis showed that VAV extract inhibited the cell cycle of SK-Hep1 cells via G1 phase arrest. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis both revealed that cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclin D1 gene expression were significantly down regulated while p21 was upregulated dose dependently by VAV treatment. Combined down regulation of Cdk2, Cyclin D1 and up regulation of p21 can result in cell death. These results indicate that VAV showed evidence of anti-cancer activity through G1 phase cell cycle arrest in SK-Hep1 cells.

  20. miR-6734 Up-Regulates p21 Gene Expression and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells.

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    Moo Rim Kang

    Full Text Available Recently, microRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression in terms of both gene silencing and gene activation. Here, we investigated the effects of miR-6734, which has a sequence homology with a specific region of p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21 promoter, on cancer cell growth and the mechanisms involved in this effect. miR-6734 up-regulated p21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis using biotin-labeled miR-6734 confirmed the association of miR-6734 with p21 promoter. Moreover, miR-6734 inhibited cancer cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells, which was abolished by knockdown of p21. The phosphorylation of Rb and the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP were suppressed by miR-6734 transfection in HCT-116 cells and these effects were also reversed by p21 knockdown. In addition, miR-6734 transfection caused prolonged induction of p21 gene and modification of histones in p21 promoter, which are typical aspects of a phenomenon referred to as RNA activation (RNAa. Collectively, our results demonstrated that miR-6734 inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells by up-regulating p21 gene expression and subsequent induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting its role as an important endogenous regulator of cancer cell proliferation and survival.

  1. DNA damage enhanced by the attenuation of SLD5 delays cell cycle restoration in normal cells but not in cancer cells.

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    Zhi-Yuan Gong

    Full Text Available SLD5 is a member of the GINS complex composed of PSF1, PSF2, PSF3 and SLD5, playing a critical role in the formation of the DNA replication fork with CDC45 in yeast. Previously, we had isolated a PSF1 orthologue from a murine hematopoietic stem cell DNA library and were then able to identify orthologues of all the other GINS members by the yeast two hybrid approach using PSF1 as the bait. These GINS orthologues may also function in DNA replication in mammalian cells because they form tetrameric complexes as observed in yeast, and gene deletion mutants of both PSF1 and SLD5 result in a lack of epiblast proliferation and early embryonic lethality. However, we found that PSF1 is also involved in chromosomal segregation in M phase, consistent with recent suggestions that homologues of genes associated with DNA replication in lower organisms also regulate cellular events other than DNA replication in mammalian cells. Here we analyzed the function of SLD5 other than DNA replication and found that it is active in DNA damage and repair. Attenuation of SLD5 expression results in marked DNA damage in both normal cells and cancer cells, suggesting that it protects against DNA damage. Attenuation of SLD5 delays the DNA repair response and cell cycle restoration in normal cells but not in cancer cells. These findings suggest that SLD5 might represent a therapeutic target molecule acting at the level of tumor stromal cells rather than the cancerous cells themselves, because development of the tumor microenvironment could be delayed or disrupted by the suppression of its expression in the normal cell types within the tumor.

  2. Curcumin blocks small cell lung cancer cells migration, invasion, angiogenesis, cell cycle and neoplasia through Janus kinase-STAT3 signalling pathway.

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    Cheng-Liang Yang

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, has been shown to protect against carcinogenesis and prevent tumor development. However, little is known about its anti-tumor mechanism in small cell lung cancer (SCLC. In this study, we found that curcumin can inhibit SCLC cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration, invasion and angiogenesis through suppression of the STAT3. SCLC cells were treated with curcumin (15 µmol/L and the results showed that curcumin was effective in inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation to downregulate of an array of STAT3 downstream targets ,which contributed to suppression of cell proliferation, loss of colony formation, depression of cell migration and invasion. Curcumin also suppressed the expression of proliferative proteins (Survivin, Bcl-X(L and Cyclin B1, and invasive proteins (VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-7 and ICAM-1. Knockdown of STAT3 expression by siRNA was able to induce anti-invasive effects in vitro. In contrast, activation of STAT3 upstream of interleukin 6 (IL-6 leads to the increased cell proliferation ,cell survival, angiogenesis, invasion, migration and tumor growth. Our findings illustrate the biologic significance of IL-6/JAK/STAT3 signaling in SCLC progression and provide novel evidence that the pathway may be a new potential target for therapy of SCLC. It was concluded that curcumin is a potent agent in the inhibition of STAT3 with favorable pharmacological activity,and curcumin may have translational potential as an effective cancer therapeutic or preventive agent for SCLC.

  3. Curcumin blocks small cell lung cancer cells migration, invasion, angiogenesis, cell cycle and neoplasia through Janus kinase-STAT3 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Liang; Liu, Yong-Yu; Ma, Ye-Gang; Xue, Yi-Xue; Liu, De-Gui; Ren, Yi; Liu, Xiao-Bai; Li, Yao; Li, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, has been shown to protect against carcinogenesis and prevent tumor development. However, little is known about its anti-tumor mechanism in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In this study, we found that curcumin can inhibit SCLC cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration, invasion and angiogenesis through suppression of the STAT3. SCLC cells were treated with curcumin (15 µmol/L) and the results showed that curcumin was effective in inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation to downregulate of an array of STAT3 downstream targets ,which contributed to suppression of cell proliferation, loss of colony formation, depression of cell migration and invasion. Curcumin also suppressed the expression of proliferative proteins (Survivin, Bcl-X(L) and Cyclin B1), and invasive proteins (VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-7 and ICAM-1). Knockdown of STAT3 expression by siRNA was able to induce anti-invasive effects in vitro. In contrast, activation of STAT3 upstream of interleukin 6 (IL-6) leads to the increased cell proliferation ,cell survival, angiogenesis, invasion, migration and tumor growth. Our findings illustrate the biologic significance of IL-6/JAK/STAT3 signaling in SCLC progression and provide novel evidence that the pathway may be a new potential target for therapy of SCLC. It was concluded that curcumin is a potent agent in the inhibition of STAT3 with favorable pharmacological activity,and curcumin may have translational potential as an effective cancer therapeutic or preventive agent for SCLC.

  4. Cell cycle kinetics, apoptosis rates, DNA damage and TP53 gene expression in bladder cancer cells treated with allyl isothiocyanate (mustard essential oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, André Luiz Ventura; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; de Camargo, Elaine Aparecida; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2014-04-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is present in plants of the cruciferous family and is abundant in mustard seed. Due to its high bioavailability in urine after ingestion, AITC has been considered a promising antineoplastic agent against bladder cancer. Because TP53 mutations are the most common alterations in bladder cancer cells and are frequently detected in in situ carcinomas, in this study, we investigated whether the AITC effects in bladder cancer cells are dependent on the TP53 status. Two bladder transitional carcinoma cell lines were used: RT4, with wild-type TP53; and T24, mutated TP53 gene. AITC was tested at concentrations of 0.005, 0.0625, 0.0725, 0.0825, 0.0925, 0.125 and 0.25 μM in cytotoxicity, cell and clonogenic survival assays, comet and micronucleus assays and for its effects on cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometry and on TP53 gene expression. The data showed increased primary DNA damage in both cell lines; however, lower concentrations of AITC were able to induce genotoxicity in the mutant cells for the TP53 gene. Furthermore, the results demonstrated increased apoptosis and necrosis rates in the wild-type cells, but not in mutated TP53 cells, and cell cycle arrest in the G2 phase for mutated cells after AITC treatment. No significant differences were detected in TP53 gene expression in the two cell lines. In conclusion, AITC caused cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis rates and varying genotoxicity dependent on the TP53 status. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that those differences could reflect other intrinsic genetic alterations in the examined cell lines, which may also carry mutations in genes other than TP53. Therefore, further studies using other molecular targets need to be performed to better understand the mechanisms by which AITC may exert its antineoplastic properties against tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin induces downregulation of critical Hsp90 protein clients and results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human urinary bladder cancer cells

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    Karkoulis Panagiotis K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic, specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone that maintains the structural and functional integrity of various protein clients involved in cellular signaling. In this study, we have investigated the effect of 17-AAG on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. Methods We have used MTT-based assays, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and scratch-wound assay in RT4, RT112 and T24 human urinary bladder cancer cell lines. Results We have demonstrated that, upon 17-AAG treatment, bladder cancer cells are arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 17-AAG administration was shown to induce a pronounced downregulation of multiple Hsp90 protein clients and other downstream effectors, such as IGF-IR, Akt, IKK-α, IKK-β, FOXO1, ERK1/2 and c-Met, resulting in sequestration-mediated inactivation of NF-κB, reduced cell proliferation and decline of cell motility. Conclusions In total, we have clearly evinced a dose-dependent and cell type-specific effect of 17-AAG on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of multiple Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling integrity.

  6. Tubeimoside-1 upregulates p21 expression and induces apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in human bladder cancer T24 cells

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    Azhar Rasul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1 is a triterpenoid saponin with potent anticancer properties. In this study, for the first, we examined the anti-proliferative effects of TBMS1 in human bladder cancer T24 cells and its ability to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrated that TBMS1 decreased the cell viability of bladder cancer T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that TBMS1 significantly triggered apoptosis in T24 cells and arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner. Further characterization demonstrated that TBMS1-induced apoptosis is associated with dissipation in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and up-regulation of Bax and p21 in TBMS1-treated T24 cells. These in vitro results suggested that TBMS1 is an effective anti-bladder cancer natural compound that worth further mechanistic and therapeutic studies in human bladder cancer.

  7. Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase (MELK: A Novel Regulator in Cell Cycle Control, Embryonic Development, and Cancer

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    Pengfei Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK functions as a modulator of intracellular signaling and affects various cellular and biological processes, including cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, spliceosome assembly, gene expression, embryonic development, hematopoiesis, and oncogenesis. In these cellular processes, MELK functions by binding to numerous proteins. In general, the effects of multiple protein interactions with MELK are oncogenic in nature, and the overexpression of MELK in kinds of cancer provides some evidence that it may be involved in tumorigenic process. In this review, our current knowledge of MELK function and recent discoveries in MELK signaling pathway were discussed. The regulation of MELK in cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target were also described.

  8. Iodine-131 treatment of thyroid cancer cells leads to suppression of cell proliferation followed by induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by regulation of B-cell translocation gene 2-mediated JNK/NF-κB pathways

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    Zhao, L.M.; Pang, A.X., E-mail: zhaoliming515@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi (China); Department of Urology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi (China)

    2017-10-01

    Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) is widely used for the treatment of thyroid-related diseases. This study aimed to investigate the expression of p53 and BTG2 genes following {sup 131}I therapy in thyroid cancer cell line SW579 and the possible underlying mechanism. SW579 human thyroid squamous carcinoma cells were cultured and treated with {sup 131}I. They were then assessed for {sup 131}I uptake, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, p53 expression, and BTG2 gene expression. SW579 cells were transfected with BTG2 siRNA, p53 siRNA and siNC and were then examined for the same aforementioned parameters. When treated with a JNK inhibitor of SP600125 and {sup 131}I or with a NF-kB inhibitor of BMS-345541 and {sup 131}I, non-transfected SW579 cells were assessed in JNK/NFkB pathways. It was observed that {sup 131}I significantly inhibited cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Both BTG2 and p53 expression were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. An increase in cell viability by up-regulation in Bcl2 gene, a decrease in apoptosis by enhanced CDK2 gene expression and a decrease in cell cycle arrest at G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase were also observed in SW579 cell lines transfected with silenced BTG2 gene. When treated with SP600125 and {sup 131}I, the non transfected SW579 cell lines significantly inhibited JNK pathway, NF-kB pathway and the expression of BTG2. However, when treated with BMS-345541 and {sup 131}I, only the NF-kB pathway was suppressed. {sup 131}I suppressed cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis, and promoted cell cycle arrest of thyroid cancer cells by up-regulating B-cell translocation gene 2-mediated activation of JNK/NF--κB pathways. (author)

  9. ROLE OF PI3K-AKT-mTOR AND Wnt SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN G1-S TRANSITION OF CELL CYCLE IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAKSHMIPATHI eVADLAKONDA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K–Akt pathway together with one of its downstream targets, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is a highly deregulated pathway in cancers. There is a reciprocal relation between the Akt phosphorylation and mTOR complexes. Akt phosphorylated at T308 activates mTORC1 by inhibition of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1/2, where as mTORC2 is recognized as the kinase that phosphorylates Akt at S473. Recent developments in the research on regulatory mechanisms of autophagy places mTORC1 mediated inhibition of autophagy at the central position in activation of proliferation and survival pathways in cells. Autophagy is a negative regulator of Wnt signaling pathway and the downstream effectors of Wnt signaling pathway, cyclin D1 and the c-Myc, are the key players in initiation of cell cycle and regulation of the G1-S transition in cancer cells. Production of reaction oxygen species (ROS, a common feature of a cancer cell metabolism, activates several downstream targets like the transcription factors FoxO, which play key roles in promoting the progression of cell cycle. A model is presented on the role of PI3K -Akt - mTOR and Wnt pathways in regulation of the progression of cell cycle through Go-G1-and S phases.

  10. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

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    María Ll Valero

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  11. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, María Ll; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Stühmer, Walter; Viana, Félix; Pardo, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  12. Proteomic analysis of ovarian cancer cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) reveals mechanisms of cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Mariana Lopes; Palma, Camila de Souza; Thomé, Carolina Hassibe; Lanfredi, Guilherme Pauperio; Poersch, Aline; Faça, Vitor Marcel

    2017-01-16

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-orchestrated process that culminates with loss of epithelial phenotype and gain of a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. EMT enhances cancer cell invasiveness and drug resistance, favoring metastasis. Dysregulation of transcription factors, signaling pathways, miRNAs and growth factors including EGF, TGF-beta and HGF can trigger EMT. In ovarian cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior. Here, the ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line Caov-3 was induced to EMT with EGF in order to identify specific mechanisms controlled by this process. Caov-3 cells induced to EMT were thoroughly validated and a combination of subcellular proteome enrichment, GEL-LC-MS/MS and SILAC strategy allowed consistent proteome identification and quantitation. Protein network analysis of differentially expressed proteins highlighted regulation of metabolism and cell cycle. Activation of relevant signaling pathways, such as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/Erk MAPK, in response to EGF-induced EMT was validated. Also, EMT did not affected the proliferation rate of Caov-3 cells, but led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase regulated by increased levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, independently of p53. Furthermore, a decrease in G1 and G2 checkpoint proteins was observed, supporting the involvement of EGF-induced EMT in cell cycle control. Cancer is a complex multistep process characterized by accumulation of several hallmarks including epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which promotes cellular and microenvironmental changes resulting in invasion and migration to distant sites, favoring metastasis. EMT can be triggered by different extracellular stimuli, including growth factors such as EGF. In ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior, increasing mortality rate caused by metastasis. Our proteomic data, together

  13. Myricetin and methyl eugenol combination enhances the anticancer activity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction of cis-platin against HeLa cervical cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jin-Ling; Shi, Song; Shen, Yan-Li; Wang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Drug combination therapies are common practice in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of myricetin (MYR), methyl eugenol (MEG) and cisplatin (CP) both separately as well as in combination against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. To demonstrate whether MYR and MEG enhance the anticancer activity of CP against cervical cancer cells, we treated HeLa cells with MYR and MEG alone or in combination with cisplatin and evaluated cell growth and apoptosis using MTT (3 (4, 5 dimethyl thiazol 2yl) 2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, LDH release assay, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that, as compared to single drug treatment, the combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in greater effect in inhibiting cancer cell growth and inducing apoptosis. Cell apoptosis induction, Caspase-3 activity, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential loss were systematically studied to reveal the mechanisms of synergy between MYR, MEG and CP. Combination of MYR or MEG with CP resulted in more potent apoptosis induction as revealed by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258 and AO-ETBR staining. The combination treatment also increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase dramatically as compared to single drug treatment. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss (ΛΨm) as well as Caspase-3 activity was much higher in combination treatment as compared to single drug treatment. Findings of this investigation suggest that MYR and MEG combined with cisplatin is a potential clinical chemotherapeutic approach in human cervical cancer.

  14. Nitric oxide-donating aspirin induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in human cancer cells by regulating phase transition proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Williams, Jennie L

    2012-07-01

    NO-aspirin (NO-ASA), consisting of aspirin and a nitric oxide-releasing group, is safer than aspirin and effective in colon cancer prevention. Here, we examined the mechanism of action of NO-ASA by focusing primarily on its effects on the cell cycle. NO-ASA reduced the growth of several cell lines from colon, pancreas, skin, cervix and breast cancer much more potently than aspirin, with 24-h IC(50) values of 133-268 µM, while those of ASA were >1,000 µM. NO-ASA elevated the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, generating a state of oxidative stress. In all cell lines examined, NO-ASA induced cell cycle arrest in the G(2)/M phase transition accompanied by altered expression of G(2)/M transition-related proteins. In SW480 colon cancer cells NO-ASA modulated proteins controlling this transition. Thus, it markedly increased the levels of cyclin B1, decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and Cdc25C, and increased the Thr14/Tyr15-phosphorylation of Cdk1 while leaving unchanged its protein levels. These changes, including the G2/M arrest, were prevented by pretreating the cells with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, indicating that redox signaling is likely responsible for the cell cycle changes, a conclusion consistent with the known redox regulation of these proteins. Collectively, these results confirm the profound cytokinetic effect of NO-ASA and provide strong evidence that it regulates cell cycle transitions through its ability to induce oxidative stress, which activates redox signaling in the target cell.

  15. Preferential cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticle towards cervical cancer cells induced by ROS-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest for cancer therapy

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    Sirelkhatim, Amna, E-mail: amnasirelkhatim@yahoo.co.uk; Mahmud, Shahrom [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Institute of Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology (INOR), School of Physics (Malaysia); Seeni, Azman [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Cluster of Integrative Medicine (Malaysia); Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd [Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), School of Chemical Sciences (Malaysia)

    2016-08-15

    The present study aimed to synthesize multifunctional ZnO-NP samples, namely ZnO-20, ZnO-40, and ZnO-80 nm, using different approaches, to be used as efficient anticancer agents. Systematic characterizations revealed their particle sizes and demonstrated nanostructures of nanorods (ZnO-80 nm) and nanogranules (ZnO-20 and ZnO-40 nm). They exhibited significant (p < 0.05) toxicity to HeLa cancer cells. HeLa cell viabilities at 1 mM dose reduced to 37, 32, 15 %, by ZnO-80, ZnO-40, and ZnO-20 nm, respectively, at 48 h. However, the same dose exerted different effects of 79.6, 76, and 75 % on L929 normal cells at 48 h. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) showed a considerable ROS yields on HeLa cells by all samples with a pronounced percentage (50 %) displayed by ZnO-20 nm. Moreover, ROS-mediated apoptosis induction and blocked cell cycle progression in the S, G2/M, and G0/G1 phases significantly (p < 0.05). Apoptosis induction was further confirmed by DNA fragmentation and Hoechst–PI costained images viewed under fluorescence microscope. Additionally, morphological changes of HeLa cells visualized under light microscope showed assortment of cell death involved shrinkage, vacuolization and apoptotic bodies’ formation. Most importantly, results exposed the impact of size and morphology of ZnO samples on their toxicity to Hela cells mediated mainly by ROS production. ZnO-20 nm in disk form with its nanogranule shape and smallest particle size was the most toxic sample, followed by ZnO-40 nm and then ZnO-80 nm. An additional proposed mechanism contributed in the cell death herein was ZnO decomposition producing zinc ions (Zn{sup 2+}) into the acidic cancer microenvironment due to the smaller sizes of ZnO-NPs. This mechanism has been adopted in the literatures as a size-dependent phenomenon. The emerged findings were suggested to provide new platforms in the development of therapeutics as selective agents to the fatal cervical cancer, and to

  16. The role of cell cycle progression for the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by palladium(II)-saccharinate complexes of terpyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, Omer; Cevatemre, Buse; Hatipoglu, Ibrahim; Arda, Nazli; Ulukaya, Engin; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Acilan, Ceyda

    2017-03-15

    Palladium complexes are potent and less toxic molecules in comparison to other metal based agents. Here, we characterized two palladium(II) saccharinate complexes with terpyridine for their cell cycle specificity. Cells were arrested at G1, G1/S boundary or mitosis using mimosine, double-Thymidine block, aphidicolin, nocodazole or colcemid, and evaluated based on morphology and flow cytometry. Synchronized cells were treated with the Pd(II) complexes, and viability was measured via MTT assay. While treatment of arrested cells with the Pd(II) complexes resulted in no significant change in cell death in HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231 cells, HeLa cells were more sensitive in S/G1. The main form of cell death was found to be apoptosis. Pd(II) complexes appear to be cell-cycle non-specific, while cell line dependent differences may be observed. Cells die through apoptosis regardless of the cell cycle stage, which makes these complexes more promising as anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phyllanthus spp. induces selective growth inhibition of PC-3 and MeWo human cancer cells through modulation of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis.

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    Yin-Quan Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phyllanthus is a traditional medicinal plant that has been used in the treatment of many diseases including hepatitis and diabetes. The main aim of the present work was to investigate the potential cytotoxic effects of aqueous and methanolic extracts of four Phyllanthus species (P.amarus, P.niruri, P.urinaria and P.watsonii against skin melanoma and prostate cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phyllanthus plant appears to possess cytotoxic properties with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50 values of 150-300 µg/ml for aqueous extract and 50-150 µg/ml for methanolic extract that were determined using the MTS reduction assay. In comparison, the plant extracts did not show any significant cytotoxicity on normal human skin (CCD-1127Sk and prostate (RWPE-1 cells. The extracts appeared to act by causing the formation of a clear "ladder" fragmentation of apoptotic DNA on agarose gel, displayed TUNEL-positive cells with an elevation of caspase-3 and -7 activities. The Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH level was lower than 15% in Phyllanthus treated-cancer cells. These indicate that Phyllanthus extracts have the ability to induce apoptosis with minimal necrotic effects. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that Phyllanthus induced a Go/G1-phase arrest on PC-3 cells and a S-phase arrest on MeWo cells and these were accompanied by accumulation of cells in the Sub-G1 (apoptosis phase. The cytotoxic properties may be due to the presence of polyphenol compounds such as ellagitannins, gallotannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids found both in the water and methanol extract of the plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Phyllanthus plant exerts its growth inhibition effect in a selective manner towards cancer cells through the modulation of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis via caspases activation in melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Hence, Phyllanthus may be sourced for the development of a potent apoptosis-inducing anticancer

  18. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

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    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  19. Arctigenin anti-tumor activity in bladder cancer T24 cell line through induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shucai; Ma, Jing; Xiao, Jianbing; Lv, Xiaohong; Li, Xinlei; Yang, Huike; Liu, Ying; Feng, Sijia; Zhang, Yafang

    2012-08-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common neoplasm in the urinary system. This study assesses arctigenin anti-tumor activity in human bladder cancer T24 cells in vitro and the underlying molecular events. The flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell-cycle distribution and apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect changes in protein expression. The data showed that arctigenin treatment reduced viability of bladder cancer T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with arctigenin (10, 20, 40, 80, and 100 μmol/L) for 24 hr and 48 hr. Arctigenin treatment clearly arrested tumor cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Apoptosis was detected by hoechst stain and flow cytometry after Annexin-V-FITC/PI double staining. Early and late apoptotic cells were accounted for 2.32-7.01% and 3.07-7.35%, respectively. At the molecular level, arctigenin treatment decreased cyclin D1 expression, whereas CDK4 and CDK6 expression levels were unaffected. Moreover, arctigenin selectively altered the phosphorylation of members of the MAPK superfamily, decreasing phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and activated phosphorylation of p38 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that arctigenin may inhibit cell viability and induce apoptosis by direct activation of the mitochondrial pathway, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway may play an important role in the anti-tumor effect of arctigenin. The data from the current study demonstrate the usefulness of arctigenin in bladder cancer T24 cells, which should further be evaluated in vivo before translation into clinical trials for the chemoprevention of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The neem limonoids azadirachtin and nimbolide induce cell cycle arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarsini, R Vidya; Murugan, R Senthil; Sripriya, P; Karunagaran, D; Nagini, S

    2010-06-01

    Limonoids from the neem tree (Azadirachta indica) have attracted considerable research attention in recent years owing to their potent antioxidant and anti-proliferative effects. The present study was designed to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which azadirachtin and nimbolide exert cytotoxic effects in the human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line. Both azadirachtin and nimbolide significantly suppressed the viability of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase accompanied by p53-dependent p21 accumulation and down-regulation of the cell cycle regulatory proteins cyclin B, cyclin D1 and PCNA. Characteristic changes in nuclear morphology, presence of a subdiploid peak and annexin-V staining pointed to apoptosis as the mode of cell death. Increased generation of reactive oxygen species with decline in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and release of cytochrome c confirmed that the neem limonoids transduced the apoptotic signal via the mitochondrial pathway. Altered expression of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and over-expression of caspases and survivin provide compelling evidence that azadirachtin and nimbolide induce a shift of balance toward a pro-apoptotic phenotype. Antioxidants such as azadirachtin and nimbolide that can simultaneously arrest the cell cycle and target multiple molecules involved in mitochondrial apoptosis offer immense potential as anti-cancer therapeutic drugs.

  1. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes the proliferation of serous ovarian cancer cells through the regulation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jun-jun [Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, 419 Fangxie Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine-Related Diseases, 413 Zhaozhou Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Wang, Yan [Cancer Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 270 Dong' an Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 130 Dong' an Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ding, Jing-xin; Jin, Hong-yan [Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, 419 Fangxie Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine-Related Diseases, 413 Zhaozhou Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yang, Gong, E-mail: yanggong@fudan.edu.cn [Cancer Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 270 Dong' an Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 130 Dong' an Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Hua, Ke-qin, E-mail: huakeqin@126.com [Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, 419 Fangxie Road, Shanghai 200011 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine-Related Diseases, 413 Zhaozhou Road, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2015-05-01

    HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) is a well-known long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) whose dysregulation correlates with poor prognosis and malignant progression in many forms of cancer. Here, we investigate the expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function of HOTAIR in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Clinically, we found that HOTAIR levels were overexpressed in SOC tissues compared with normal controls and that HOTAIR overexpression was correlated with an advanced FIGO stage and a high histological grade. Multivariate analysis revealed that HOTAIR is an independent prognostic factor for predicting overall survival in SOC patients. We demonstrated that HOTAIR silencing inhibited A2780 and OVCA429 SOC cell proliferation in vitro and that the anti-proliferative effects of HOTAIR silencing also occurred in vivo. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the growth inhibitory effects by HOTAIR silencing revealed that its knockdown resulted in the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through certain cell cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins. Together, these results highlight a critical role of HOTAIR in SOC cell proliferation and contribute to a better understanding of the importance of dysregulated lncRNAs in SOC progression. - Highlights: • HOTAIR overexpression correlates with an aggressive tumour phenotype and a poor prognosis in SOC. • HOTAIR promotes SOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. • The proliferative role of HOTAIR is associated with regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis.

  2. Genetic variants in the cell cycle control pathways contribute to early onset colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Etzel, Carol J; Amos, Christopher I; Zhang, Qing; Viscofsky, Nancy; Lindor, Noralane M; Lynch, Patrick M; Frazier, Marsha L

    2009-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome of familial malignancies resulting from germ line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Our goal was to take a pathway-based approach to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in cell cycle-related genes on age of onset for Lynch syndrome using a tree model. We evaluated polymorphisms in a panel of cell cycle-related genes (AURKA, CDKN2A, TP53, E2F2, CCND1, TP73, MDM2, IGF1, and CDKN2B) in 220 MMR gene mutation carriers from 129 families. We applied a novel statistical approach, tree modeling (Classification and Regression Tree), to the analysis of data on patients with Lynch syndrome to identify individuals with a higher probability of developing colorectal cancer at an early age and explore the gene-gene interactions between polymorphisms in cell cycle genes. We found that the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 variant genotype, AURKA wild-type genotype, and CCND1 variant genotype had the youngest age of onset, with a 45-year median onset age, while the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 wild-type genotype, and AURKA variant genotype had the latest median age of onset, which was 70 years. Furthermore, we found evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction between E2F2 and AURKA genes related to CRC age of onset. Polymorphisms in these cell cycle-related genes work together to modify the age at the onset of CRC in patients with Lynch syndrome. These studies provide an important part of the foundation for development of a model for stratifying age of onset risk among those with Lynch syndrome.

  3. Capsaicin Suppresses Cell Proliferation, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and ROS Production in Bladder Cancer Cells through FOXO3a-Mediated Pathways

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    Kaiyu Qian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin (CAP, a highly selective agonist for transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, has been widely reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-inflammation and anticancer activities. Currently, several therapeutic approaches for bladder cancer (BCa are available, but accompanied by unfavorable outcomes. Previous studies reported a potential clinical effect of CAP to prevent BCa tumorigenesis. However, its underlying molecular mechanism still remains unknown. Our transcriptome analysis suggested a close link among calcium signaling pathway, cell cycle regulation, ROS metabolism and FOXO signaling pathway in BCa. In this study, several experiments were performed to investigate the effects of CAP on BCa cells (5637 and T24 and NOD/SCID mice. Our results showed that CAP could suppress BCa tumorigenesis by inhibiting its proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, CAP induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and ROS production. Importantly, our studies revealed a strong increase of FOXO3a after treatment with CAP. Furthermore, we observed no significant alteration of apoptosis by CAP, whereas Catalase and SOD2 were considerably upregulated, which could clear ROS and protect against cell death. Thus, our results suggested that CAP could inhibit viability and tumorigenesis of BCa possibly via FOXO3a-mediated pathways.

  4. A Drosophila XPD model links cell cycle coordination with neuro-development and suggests links to cancer

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    Karin Stettler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available XPD functions in transcription, DNA repair and in cell cycle control. Mutations in human XPD (also known as ERCC2 mainly cause three clinical phenotypes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS and trichothiodystrophy (TTD, and only XP patients have a high predisposition to developing cancer. Hence, we developed a fly model to obtain novel insights into the defects caused by individual hypomorphic alleles identified in human XP-D patients. This model revealed that the mutations that displayed the greatest in vivo UV sensitivity in Drosophila did not correlate with those that led to tumor formation in humans. Immunoprecipitations followed by targeted quantitative MS/MS analysis showed how different xpd mutations affected the formation or stability of different transcription factor IIH (TFIIH subcomplexes. The XP mutants most clearly linked to high cancer risk, Xpd R683W and R601L, showed a reduced interaction with the core TFIIH and also an abnormal interaction with the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK complex. Interestingly, these two XP alleles additionally displayed high levels of chromatin loss and free centrosomes during the rapid nuclear division phase of the Drosophila embryo. Finally, the xpd mutations showing defects in the coordination of cell cycle timing during the Drosophila embryonic divisions correlated with those human mutations that cause the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and developmental growth defects observed in XP/CS and TTD patients.

  5. The Dietary Flavonoid Fisetin Causes Cell Cycle Arrest, Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis, and Enhanced Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

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    Smith, Matthew L; Murphy, Kaylee; Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Hoskin, David W

    2016-08-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonoid found in a number of fruits and vegetables, has diverse biological activities, including cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of fisetin on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. TNBC has a poorer prognosis than other types of breast cancer and treatment options for this disease are limited. Fisetin inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 TNBC cells, as well as their ability to form colonies, without substantially affecting the growth of non-malignant cells. In addition, fisetin inhibited the growth of estrogen receptor-bearing MCF-7 breast cancer cells and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. Fisetin inhibited TNBC cell division and induced apoptosis, which was associated with mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-8, as well as the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis by fisetin was confirmed by reduced killing of TNBC cells in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and BOC-D-FMK. Decreased phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 in fisetin-treated TNBC cells at G2/M phase of the cell cycle suggested that fisetin-induced apoptosis was the result of Aurora B kinase inhibition. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide metabolite of cyclophosphamide on TNBC cells was increased in the presence of fisetin. These findings suggest that further investigation of fisetin is warranted for possible use in the management of TNBC. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1913-1925, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Capilliposide Isolated from Lysimachia capillipes Hemsl. Induces ROS Generation, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

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    Zheng-hua Fei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several data has reported that capilliposide, extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine, Lysimachia capillipes Hemsl. (LC could exhibit inhibitory effect on cell proliferation in various cancers. The current study investigated the antitumor efficacy of Capilliposide and elucidated its potential molecular mechanism involved in vivo and vitro. Our results indicated that LC capilliposide inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. LC capilliposide induced cell cycle arrest at the S stage and enhanced apoptosis in NSCLC cells. Treatment with LC capilliposide increased the intracellular level of ROS, which activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Blockage of ROS by NAC highly reversed the effect of LC capilliposide on apoptosis. Xenograft tumor growth was significantly lower in the LC-treated group compared with the untreated control group (P<0.05. The results also show that LC treatment does not produce any overt signs of acute toxicity in vivo. These findings demonstrate that LC capilliposide could exert an anti-tumor effect on NSCLC through mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway and the activation of ROS is involved.

  7. Essential role of cell cycle regulatory genes p21 and p27 expression in inhibition of breast cancer cells by arsenic trioxide.

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    Wang, Xi; Gao, Ping; Long, Min; Lin, Fang; Wei, Jun-Xia; Ren, Ji-Hong; Yan, Lin; He, Ting; Han, Yuan; Zhang, Hui-Zhong

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3), a component of traditional Chinese medicine, has been used successfully for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and As2O3 is of potential therapeutic value for the treatment of other promyelocytic malignancies and some solid tumors including breast cancer. However, the precise molecular mechanisms through which As2O3 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in solid tumors have not been clearly understood. The goal of our study is to gain insight into the general biological processes and molecular functions that are altered by As2O3 treatment in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and to identify the key signaling processes that are involved in the regulation of these physiological effects. In the present study, MCF-7 cells were treated with 5 μM As2O3, and the differential gene expression was then analyzed by DNA microarray. The results showed that As2O3 treatment changed the expression level of several genes that involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. Notably, As2O3 treatment increased the mRNA and protein levels of the cell cycle inhibitory proteins, p21 and p27. Interestingly, knocking down p21 or p27 individually did not alter As2O3-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest; however, the simultaneous down-regulation of both p21 and p27 resulted in attenuating of G1, G2/M arrest and reduction in apoptosis, thus indicating that p21 and p27 as the primary molecular targets of As2O3 against breast cancer. Overall, our results provide new insights into As2O3-related signaling activities, which may facilitate the development of As2O3-based anticancer strategies and/or combination therapies against solid tumors.

  8. Eco-Friendly Formulated Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles: Induction of Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the MCF-7 Cancer Cell Line

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    Amin Boroumand Moghaddam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Green products have strong potential in the discovery and development of unique drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs have been observed to have powerful cytotoxicity against cells that cause breast cancer. The present study aims to examine the cell cycle profile, status of cell death, and pathways of apoptosis in breast cancer cells (MCF-7 treated with biosynthesized ZnO NPs. The anti-proliferative activity of ZnO NPs was determined using MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis and the mode of cell death were evaluated using a flow cytometry instrument. Quantitative real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR was employed to investigate the expression of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. ZnO NPs were cytotoxic to the MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% growth inhibition concentration (IC50 of ZnO NPs at 24 h was 121 µg/mL. Cell cycle analysis revealed that ZnO NPs induced sub-G1 phase (apoptosis, with values of 1.87% at 0 μg/mL (control, 71.49% at IC25, 98.91% at IC50, and 99.44% at IC75. Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI flow cytometry analysis confirmed that ZnO NPs induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. The pro-apoptotic genes p53, p21, Bax, and JNK were upregulated, whereas anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2, AKT1, and ERK1/2 were downregulated in a dose-dependent manner. The arrest and apoptosis of MCF-7 cells were induced by ZnO NPs through several signalling pathways.

  9. Expression of (NES-hTERT in cancer cells delays cell cycle progression and increases sensitivity to genotoxic stress.

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    Olga A Kovalenko

    Full Text Available Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase associated with cellular immortality through telomere maintenance. This enzyme is activated in 90% of human cancers, and inhibitors of telomerase are currently in clinical trials to counteract tumor growth. Many aspects of telomerase biology have been investigated for therapy, particularly inhibition of the enzyme, but little was done regarding its subcellular shuttling. We have recently shown that mutations in the nuclear export signal of hTERT, the catalytic component of telomerase, led to a mutant ((NES-hTERT that failed to immortalize cells despite nuclear localization and catalytic activity. Expression of (NES-hTERT in primary fibroblast resulted in telomere-based premature senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we show that expression of (NES-hTERT in LNCaP, SQ20B and HeLa cells rapidly and significantly decreases their proliferation rate and ability to form colonies in soft agar while not interfering with endogenous telomerase activity. The cancer cells showed increased DNA damage at telomeric and extra-telomeric sites, and became sensitive to ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide exposures. Our data show that expression of (NES-hTERT efficiently counteracts cancer cell growth in vitro in at least two different ways, and suggest manipulation with the NES of hTERT or its subcellular shuttling as a new strategy for cancer treatment.

  10. Amarogentin secoiridoid inhibits in vivo cancer cell growth in xenograft mice model and induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells (SNU-16) through G2/M cell cycle arrest and PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Ling; Xiang, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Feng; Ye, Wan-Li; Wu, Dong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Fang; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of amarogentin in SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells as well as in nude mice xenograft model. The effects of this compound on cell apoptosis, cell cycle phase distribution and PI3K/Akt and m-TOR signalling pathways were also studied in detail. MTT assay was used to study the effect of amarogentin on SNU-16 cell viability while clonogenic assay indicated the effect of the compound on colony formation tendency of these cells. Phase contrast microscopy revealed the effect on cellular morphology while flow cytometry was engaged to study the effects on cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. SNU-16 cancer cells were subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice to investigate the in vivo antitumor effects of amarogentin. Amarogentin induced potent, dose-dependent as well as time-dependent cytotoxic effects on the growth of SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells. Amarogentin also inhibited the colony forming capability of these tumor cells and its treatment led to morphological alterations in these cells in which the cells became withered and rounded, detached from one another and adopted irregular shapes while floating freely in the culture medium. In comparison to untreated control cells, the amarogentin treated cells with 10, 50 and 75 μM exhibited 32.5, 45.2 and 57.1 % apoptotic cells, respectively. Amarogentin induced potent and dose-dependent G2/M cell cycle arrest in these cells and led to downregulation of m-TOR, p-PI3K, PI3K, p-Akt and Akt and upregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expressions. The tumor tissues obtained from the amarogentin-treated mice were much smaller than the tumor tissues derived from the control group. Amarogentin exerts potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects in SNU-16 cell model as well as in nude mice xenograft model. These antitumor effects were found to be mediated through apoptosis induction, G2/M cell cycle arrest and downregulation of PI3K/Akt/m-TOR signalling pathways.

  11. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  12. Lunasin, a novel seed peptide, sensitizes human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells to aspirin-arrested cell cycle and induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; de Lumen, Ben O

    2010-07-30

    Breast cancer is one of the most common tumors in women of Western countries. The high aggressiveness and therapeutic resistance of estrogen-independent breast tumors have motivated the development of new strategies for prevention and/or treatment. Combinations of two or more chemopreventive agents are currently being used to achieve greater inhibitory effects on breast cancer cells. This study reveals that both aspirin and lunasin inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, human estrogen-independent breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation. These compounds arrest the cell cycle in the S- and G1-phases, respectively, acting synergistically to induce apoptosis. To begin elucidating the mechanism(s) of action of these compounds, different molecular targets involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis and signal transduction have been evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) array. The cell growth inhibitory effect of a lunasin/aspirin combination is achieved, at least partially, by modulating the expression of genes encoding G1 and S-phase regulatory proteins. Lunasin/aspirin therapy exerts its potent pro-apoptotic effect is at least partially achieved through modulating the extrinsic-apoptosis dependent pathway. Synergistic down-regulatory effects were observed for ERBB2, AKT1, PIK3R1, FOS and JUN signaling genes, whose amplification has been reported as being responsible for breast cancer cell growth and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, our results suggest that a combination of these two compounds is a promising strategy to prevent/treat breast cancer. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-11-01

    Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine-suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xenograft athymic nude mice. Solanine regulates the protein levels of cell cycle proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and P21 in vivo and in vitro. Also, in cultured DU145 cell, solanine significantly inhibits cell growth. Moreover, the administration of NAC, an active oxygen scavenger, markedly reduces solanine-induced cell death. Blockade of P38 MAPK kinase cannot suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS), but can suppress solanine-induced cell apoptosis. Also, inhibition of ROS by NAC inactivates P38 pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine may be through blocking the expression of cell cycle proteins and inducing apoptosis via ROS and activation of P38 pathway. These findings indicate an attractive therapeutic potential of solanine for suppression of prostate cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Metformin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest Mediated by Oxidative Stress, AMPK and FOXO3a in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Eveline A. I. F.; Puukila, Stephanie; Eichler, Rosangela; Sampaio, Sandra C.; Forsyth, Heidi L.; Lees, Simon J.; Barbosa, Aneli M.; Dekker, Robert F. H.; Fortes, Zuleica B.; Khaper, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the anti-diabetic drug, metformin, can exhibit direct antitumoral effects, or can indirectly decrease tumor proliferation by improving insulin sensitivity. Despite these recent advances, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in decreasing tumor formation are not well understood. In this study, we examined the antiproliferative role and mechanism of action of metformin in MCF-7 cancer cells treated with 10 mM of metformin for 24, 48, and 72 hours. Using BrdU and the MTT assay, it was found that metformin demonstrated an antiproliferative effect in MCF-7 cells that occurred in a time- and concentration- dependent manner. Flow cytometry was used to analyze markers of cell cycle, apoptosis, necrosis and oxidative stress. Exposure to metformin induced cell cycle arrest in G0-G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis and necrosis, which were associated with increased oxidative stress. Gene and protein expression were determined in MCF-7 cells by real time RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In MCF-7 cells metformin decreased the activation of IRβ, Akt and ERK1/2, increased p-AMPK, FOXO3a, p27, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K and Bcl-2 protein expression. Co-treatment with metformin and H2O2 increased oxidative stress which was associated with reduced cell number. In the presence of metformin, treating with SOD and catalase improved cell viability. Treatment with metformin resulted in an increase in p-p38 MAPK, catalase, MnSOD and Cu/Zn SOD protein expression. These results show that metformin has an antiproliferative effect associated with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which is mediated by oxidative stress, as well as AMPK and FOXO3a activation. Our study further reinforces the potential benefit of metformin in cancer treatment and provides novel mechanistic insight into its antiproliferative role. PMID:24858012

  15. Metformin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest mediated by oxidative stress, AMPK and FOXO3a in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

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    Eveline A I F Queiroz

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the anti-diabetic drug, metformin, can exhibit direct antitumoral effects, or can indirectly decrease tumor proliferation by improving insulin sensitivity. Despite these recent advances, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in decreasing tumor formation are not well understood. In this study, we examined the antiproliferative role and mechanism of action of metformin in MCF-7 cancer cells treated with 10 mM of metformin for 24, 48, and 72 hours. Using BrdU and the MTT assay, it was found that metformin demonstrated an antiproliferative effect in MCF-7 cells that occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry was used to analyze markers of cell cycle, apoptosis, necrosis and oxidative stress. Exposure to metformin induced cell cycle arrest in G0-G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis and necrosis, which were associated with increased oxidative stress. Gene and protein expression were determined in MCF-7 cells by real time RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In MCF-7 cells metformin decreased the activation of IRβ, Akt and ERK1/2, increased p-AMPK, FOXO3a, p27, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K and Bcl-2 protein expression. Co-treatment with metformin and H2O2 increased oxidative stress which was associated with reduced cell number. In the presence of metformin, treating with SOD and catalase improved cell viability. Treatment with metformin resulted in an increase in p-p38 MAPK, catalase, MnSOD and Cu/Zn SOD protein expression. These results show that metformin has an antiproliferative effect associated with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which is mediated by oxidative stress, as well as AMPK and FOXO3a activation. Our study further reinforces the potential benefit of metformin in cancer treatment and provides novel mechanistic insight into its antiproliferative role.

  16. Metformin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest mediated by oxidative stress, AMPK and FOXO3a in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Eveline A I F; Puukila, Stephanie; Eichler, Rosangela; Sampaio, Sandra C; Forsyth, Heidi L; Lees, Simon J; Barbosa, Aneli M; Dekker, Robert F H; Fortes, Zuleica B; Khaper, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the anti-diabetic drug, metformin, can exhibit direct antitumoral effects, or can indirectly decrease tumor proliferation by improving insulin sensitivity. Despite these recent advances, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in decreasing tumor formation are not well understood. In this study, we examined the antiproliferative role and mechanism of action of metformin in MCF-7 cancer cells treated with 10 mM of metformin for 24, 48, and 72 hours. Using BrdU and the MTT assay, it was found that metformin demonstrated an antiproliferative effect in MCF-7 cells that occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry was used to analyze markers of cell cycle, apoptosis, necrosis and oxidative stress. Exposure to metformin induced cell cycle arrest in G0-G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis and necrosis, which were associated with increased oxidative stress. Gene and protein expression were determined in MCF-7 cells by real time RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In MCF-7 cells metformin decreased the activation of IRβ, Akt and ERK1/2, increased p-AMPK, FOXO3a, p27, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K and Bcl-2 protein expression. Co-treatment with metformin and H2O2 increased oxidative stress which was associated with reduced cell number. In the presence of metformin, treating with SOD and catalase improved cell viability. Treatment with metformin resulted in an increase in p-p38 MAPK, catalase, MnSOD and Cu/Zn SOD protein expression. These results show that metformin has an antiproliferative effect associated with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which is mediated by oxidative stress, as well as AMPK and FOXO3a activation. Our study further reinforces the potential benefit of metformin in cancer treatment and provides novel mechanistic insight into its antiproliferative role.

  17. Induction of G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrests by the dietary compound 3,3'-diindolylmethane in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

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    Choi Hyun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM, an indole derivative produced in the stomach after the consumption of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, has been demonstrated to exert anti-cancer effects in both in vivo and in vitro models. We have previously determined that DIM (0 – 30 μmol/L inhibited the growth of HT-29 human colon cancer cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DIM on cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells. Methods HT-29 cells were cultured with various concentrations of DIM (0 – 30 μmol/L and the DNA was stained with propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometric analysis. [3H]Thymidine incorporation assays, Western blot analyses, immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assays for cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK and cell division cycle (CDC2 were conducted. Results The percentages of cells in the G1 and G2/M phases were dose-dependently increased and the percentages of cells in S phase were reduced within 12 h in DIM-treated cells. DIM also reduced DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. DIM markedly reduced CDK2 activity and the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma proteins (Rb and E2F-1, and also increased the levels of hypophosphorylated Rb. DIM reduced the protein levels of cyclin A, D1, and CDK4. DIM also increased the protein levels of CDK inhibitors, p21CIP1/WAF1 and p27KIPI. In addition, DIM reduced the activity of CDC2 and the levels of CDC25C phosphatase and cyclin B1. Conclusion Here, we have demonstrated that DIM induces G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells, and this effect may be mediated by reduced CDK activity.

  18. Eriodictyol-induced anti-cancer and apoptotic effects in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells are associated with cell cycle arrest and modulation of apoptosis-related proteins

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    Fang Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the anti-cancer effects of eriodictyol in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep-G2 and normal liver hepatocyte cell line (AML12 along with evaluating its mode of action. Sulforhodamine B assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of the compound while as fluorescence microscopy was involved to demonstrate the effect of eriodictyol on cellular apoptosis. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the effect of eriodictyol on cell cycle while Western blot analysis revealed the effect on apoptosis-related protein expressions. Results indicate that eriodictyol-induced selective and concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect on Hep-G2 cancer cells while AML12 normal liver cells were very less susceptible to its effect. Eriodictyol-induced apoptosis related morphological changes including chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation. It also induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in these cells. Eriodictyol led to up-regulation of Bax and PARP and down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein.

  19. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Combination of HDAC inhibitor TSA and silibinin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by targeting survivin and cyclinB1/Cdk1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

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    Feng, Wan; Cai, Dawei; Zhang, Bin; Lou, Guochun; Zou, Xiaoping

    2015-08-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are involved in diverse biological processes and therefore emerge as potential targets for pancreatic cancer. Silibinin, an active component of silymarin, is known to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer in vivo and in vitro. Herein, we examined the cytotoxic effects of TSA in combination with silibinin and investigated the possible mechanism in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc1 and Capan2). Our study found that combination treatment of HDAC inhibitor and silibinin exerted additive growth inhibitory effect on pancreatic cancer cell. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that combination therapy induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Panc1and Capan2 cells. The induction of apoptosis was further confirmed by evaluating the activation of caspases. Moreover, treatment with TSA and silibinin resulted in a profound reduction in the expression of cyclinA2, cyclinB1/Cdk1 and survivin. Taken together, our study might indicate that the novel combination of HDAC inhibitor and silibinin could offer therapeutic potential against pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. [Effect of felyanning granule in antagonizing Lewis lung cancer cell proliferation through cell cycle G1/S checkpoint dominating signaling intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhan; Wang, Ju-yong; Xu, Zhen-ye

    2009-11-01

    To observe the effect of Feiyanning Granule (FYN) on tumor growth and cell cycle distribution in mice with Lewis lung cancer, as well as its influence on G1/S cell cycle checkpoint dominating signaling RB-E2F1 bio-axis. Modeled C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 6 groups: the model group (A), the DDP treated group (B) peritoneally injected with cisplatin 0.1 mg on d1, d3 and d5 after modeling, and the 4 FYN treated groups (C-F), administered via gastrogavage with FYN Decoction, and FYN Granule in small-, median- and high- dose respectively for 14 days. The tumour inhibiting rate, tumour weight, and body weight of mice were observed after treatment; cell cycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry (FCM), RB-E2F1mRNA expressions in tumour tissue were analyzed by RT-PCR, and their protein expressions by Western blot. Tumour weight in the 5 treated groups was lower than that in the model group (P weight in group E was significantly higher than that in group A and B (P checkpoint dominating signaling, so as to achieve the effect of antagonizing lung cancer cell proliferation.

  2. The SMRT coregulator enhances growth of estrogen receptor-α-positive breast cancer cells by promotion of cell cycle progression and inhibition of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Julia K; Karmakar, Sudipan; Gu, Guowei; Chaubal, Vaishali; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Smith, Carolyn L

    2014-09-01

    The SMRT coregulator functions as a dual coactivator and corepressor for estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in a gene-specific manner, and in several studies its elevated expression correlates with poor outcome for breast cancer patients. A specific role of SMRT in breast cancer progression has not been elucidated, but SMRT knock-down limits estradiol-dependent growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In this study, small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches were used to determine the effects of SMRT depletion on growth of ERα-positive MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells, as well as the ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer line. Depletion of SMRT inhibited growth of ERα-positive cells grown in monolayer but had no effect on growth of the ERα-negative cells. Reduced SMRT levels also negatively impacted the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as assessed by soft agar colony formation assays. The observed growth inhibitions were due to a loss of estradiol-induced progression through the G1/S transition of the cell cycle and increased apoptosis in SMRT-depleted compared with control cells. Gene expression analyses indicated that SMRT inhibits apoptosis by a coordinated regulation of genes involved in apoptosis. Functioning as a dual coactivator for anti-apoptotic genes and corepressor for pro-apoptotic genes, SMRT can limit apoptosis. Together these data indicate that SMRT promotes breast cancer progression through multiple pathways leading to increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis.

  3. Annona muricata leaves induce G₁ cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway in human HCT-116 and HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Karimian, Hamed; Rouhollahi, Elham; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2014-10-28

    Annona muricata known as "the cancer killer" has been widely used in the traditional medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anticancer properties of ethyl acetate extract of Annona muricata leaves (EEAM) on HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of EEAM on the cell proliferation of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells was analyzed by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium) assay. High content screening system (HCS) was applied to investigate the cell membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), nuclear condensation and cytochrome c translocation from mitochondria to cytosol. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and activation of caspase-3/7, -8 and -9 were measured while treatment. Flow cytometric analysis was used to determine the cell cycle distribution and phosphatidylserine externalization. The protein expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was determined using immunofluorescence analysis. In addition, the potential of EEAM to suppress the migration and invasion of colon cancer cells was also examined. EEAM exerted significant cytotoxic effects on HCT-116 and HT-29 cells as determined by MTT and LDH assays. After 24 h treatment, EEAM exhibited the IC₅₀ value of 11.43 ± 1.87 µg/ml and 8.98 ± 1.24 µg/ml against HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and phosphatidylserine externalization confirming the induction of apoptosis. EEAM treatment caused excessive accumulation of ROS followed by disruption of MMP, cytochrome c leakage and activation of the initiator and executioner caspases in both colon cancer cells. Immunofluorescence analysis depicted the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 proteins while treated with EEAM. Furthermore, EEAM conspicuously blocked the migration and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. These

  4. Effect on growth and cell cycle kinetics of estradiol and tamoxifen on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells grown in vitro and in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Bronzert, D; Vindeløv, L L

    1989-01-01

    The effects of estradiol and tamoxifen (TAM) on the estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 grown in vitro and in nude mice were compared. The effect on growth was determined by cell number in vitro and by tumor growth curves in nude mice. The effects on the cell cycle kinetics were...... determined by repeated flow cytometric DNA analyses in vitro and in vivo and by the technique of labeled mitosis in nude mouse-grown tumors. Under in vitro conditions, estradiol induced a pronounced increase in S-phase fraction and cell number. TAM inhibited growth of MCF-7 cells with a concomitant increase...... cytometric DNA analysis and percentage of labeled mitosis investigations revealed no significant differences in the proliferation kinetics of TAM-treated and control tumors. Calculating the cell loss factor demonstrated an increase from 69% in control tumors to 107% in TAM-treated tumors. These experiments...

  5. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21Cip1/Waf1, downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  6. Novel All Trans-Retinoic Acid Derivatives: Cytotoxicity, Inhibition of Cell Cycle Progression and Induction of Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtesam Saad Al-Sheddi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the pharmacological potential of ATRA (all trans-retinoic acid, a series of retinamides and a 1-(retinoyl-1,3-dicyclohexylurea compound were prepared by reacting ATRA with long chain alkyl or alkenyl fatty amines by using a 4-demethylaminopyridine (DMAP-catalyzed N,N¢-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC coupling. The successful synthesis of the target compounds was demonstrated using a range of spectroscopic techniques. The cytotoxicity of the compounds was measured along with their ability to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cell lines MCF-7 (breast cancer and HepG2 (liver cancer and normal human cell line HEK293 (embryonic kidney. The results of cytotoxicity and flow cytometry data showed that the compounds had a moderate to strong effect against MCF-7 and HepG2 cells and were less toxic to HEK293 cells. N-oleyl-retinamide was found to be the most potent anticancer agent and was more effective against MCF-7 cells than HepG2 cells.

  7. Fucoidan induces G1 arrest of the cell cycle in EJ human bladder cancer cells through down-regulation of pRB phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Young Park

    Full Text Available AbstractFucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide found in marine algae and brown seaweeds, has been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of human cancer cells. This study was conducted in cultured human bladder cancer EJ cells to elucidate the possible mechanisms by which fucoidan exerts its anti-proliferative activity, which until now has remained poorly understood. Fucoidan treatment of EJ cells resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and induced apoptotic cell death. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that fucoidan led to G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. It was associated with down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent-kinases (Cdks in a concentration-dependent manner, without any change in Cdk inhibitors, such as p21 and p27. Furthermore, dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB by this compound was associated with enhanced binding of pRB with the transcription factors E2F-1 and E2F-4. Overall, our results demonstrate that fucoidan possesses anticancer activity potential against bladder cancer cells by inhibiting pRB phosphorylation.

  8. 1-(2-Hydroxy-5-methylphenyl-3-phenyl-1,3-propanedione Induces G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Autophagy in HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Heng Tsai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The natural agent, 1-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl-3-phenyl-1,3-propanedione (HMDB, has been reported to have growth inhibitory effects on several human cancer cells. However, the role of HMDB in cervical cancer remains unclear. Herein, we found that HMDB dose- and time-dependently inhibited growth of HeLa cervical cancer cells, accompanied with G1 cell cycle arrest. HMDB decreased protein expression of cyclins D1/D3/E and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs 2/4/6 and reciprocally increased mRNA and protein levels of CDK inhibitors (p15, p16, p21, and p27, thereby leading to the accumulation of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb protein. HMDB also triggered the accumulation of acidic vesicles and formation of microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3, followed by increased expression of LC3 and Beclin-1 and decreased expression of p62, suggesting that HMDB triggered autophagy in HeLa cells. Meanwhile, suppression of the expression of survivin and Bcl-2 implied that HMDB-induced autophagy is tightly linked to apoptosis. Exploring the action mechanism, HMDB induced autophagy via the modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and mTOR signaling pathway rather than the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. These results suggest that HMDB inhibits HeLa cell growth by eliciting a G1 arrest through modulation of G1 cell cycle regulators and by concomitantly inducing autophagy through the mediation of AMPK-mTOR and Akt-mTOR pathways, and may be a promising antitumor agent against cervical cancer.

  9. [Jaridonin, a new diterpenoid from Isodon rubescens, induces cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer cells through activating ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y C; Su, N; Zhao, N M; Li, Q Y; Zhang, M; Zhao, H W; Liu, H M; Qin, Y H

    2016-04-01

    To study the effects of Jaridonin, a novel diterpenoid from isodon rubescens, on the cell cycle of human gastric cancer cells and its molecular mechanism of action. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution and expression of ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) after Jaridonin treatment. Western blot was performed to detect the expression of cell cycle-related proteins. The results of flow cytometry showed that the percentages of MGC-803 cells in G(2)/M phase at 6 hours after 0, 10, 20 μmol/L Jaridonin-treatment were (10.8±2.2)%, (18.2±2.5)%, (27.3±3.2)%, respectively; those at 12 hours after Jaridonin-treatment were (12.0±1.5)%, (24.1±2.0)% and (39.7±5.2)%, respectively, indicating a G2/M phase arrest of MGC-803 cells was resulted in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The expressions of ATM, Chk1, Chk2, phosphorylated Cdc2 and CDK2 were up-regulated in the MGC-803 cells after Jaridonin treatment, while the levels of Cdc2 and CDK2 were decreased. KU-55933, an inhibitor of ATM, reversed the expression of relevant proteins and G(2)/M phase arrest induced by Jaridonin. Jaridonin can significantly induce G(2)/M arrest in gastric cancer MGC-803 cells. Its mechanism may be related to the activation of ATM and Chk1/2, and inactivation of Cdc2 and CDK2 phosphorylation.

  10. Two new isoquinoline alkaloids from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cancer U87 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan; Guo, Ya-Ru; Wu, Rui-Ling; Qi, Wei-Yan; Xu, Han-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Two new isoquinoline alkaloids 1-2 and seven known compounds 3-9 were isolated from the ethanol extract of centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L. Koch. The structures were elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic analyses including 1D and 2D NMR, and HRESIMS. Compounds 1-2 exhibited good cytotoxicity with IC50 values ranging from 1.19 to 31.28μM against six human cancer cell lines and low cytotoxicity against human normal liver L-02 cell lines, suggesting that compounds 1-2 had high specific cytotoxicity on human cancer cell lines. Further analyses showed that compounds 1-2 inhibited U87 cells proliferation by arresting cell cycle progress at G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptosis through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), activation of caspase 9/3 and down-regulation of the Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio. The results suggest that compounds 1-2 induce apoptosis in U87 cells through the mitochondria apoptosis pathway, and they deserve further research as potential anti-glioma cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Six versus fewer planned cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Antonio; Chiodini, Paolo; Sun, Jong-Mu

    2014-01-01

    -analysis. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, proportion of patients with an objective response, and toxicity. Statistical analyses were by intention-to-treat, stratified by trial. Overall survival and progression-free survival were compared by log-rank test......BACKGROUND: Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. However, the optimum number of treatment cycles remains controversial. Therefore, we did a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data to compare....... The proportion of patients with an objective response was compared with a Mantel-Haenszel test. Prespecified analyses explored effect variations by trial and patient characteristics. FINDINGS: Five eligible trials were identified; individual patient data could be collected from four of these trials, which...

  12. Acetonitrile extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza Radix exhibits growth-inhibitory effects on prostate cancer cells through the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June; Choi, Bu Young; Keum, Young-Sam

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the effects of the acetonitrile or water extracts from 400 selected traditional medicinal plants on the growth of PC-3 cells were investigated, and it was demonstrated that an acetonitrile extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza Radix exhibited the most marked cytotoxic effects on PC-3 cells. It was observed that the acetonitrile extract of S. miltiorrhiza Radix induced marked cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in PC-3 cells through the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. It was also demonstrated that oral administration of the acetonitrile extract of S. miltiorrhiza Radix decreased the incidence and growth of PC-3 tumor xenografts in nude mice. The results of the present study suggest that the acetonitrile extract of S. miltiorrhiza Radix exhibits marked inhibitory effects on the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  13. A Cyclin D2-derived peptide acts on specific cell cycle phases by activating ERK1/2 to cause the death of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Lilian C; Araujo, Christiane B; Iwai, Leo K; Ferro, Emer S; Forti, Fabio L

    2017-01-16

    Protein degradation by the proteasome generates functional intracellular peptides. Pep5, a peptide derived from Cyclin D2, induces cell death in tumor cell lines and reduces the volume of rat C6 glioblastoma tumors in vivo. Here, we chose the human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to evaluate the mechanism of cell death induced by pep5 in different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescently labeled pep5, monitored by real time confocal microscopy, entered the MDA-MB-231 cells 3min after application and localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. Pep5-induced cell death was increased when the MDA-MB-231 cell population was arrested at the G1/S transition or in S phase compared to asynchronous cells. Pep5 induced permanent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in MDA-MB-231 cells synchronized in G1/S or S phase. Affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry identified CLIC1 and Plectin as the only two proteins that interacted with pep5 in both asynchronous and synchronized MDA-MB-231 cells. These interactions could explain the long-lasting ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the cytoskeleton perturbations in the MDA-MB-231 cells, in which the stress fibers' integrity is affected by pep5 treatments. These data suggest that pep5 has potential therapeutic properties for treating specific types of cancers, such as breast cancer cells. Pep5, a natural intracellular peptide formed by the degradation of Cyclin D2 through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, induces cell death when reintroduced into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which express low levels of Cyclin D2, specifically in G1/S arrested cells or in cells that are passing through S phase. Under these conditions, pep5 is able to interact with different intracellular proteins, primarily cytoskeleton and proteasome components, which can lead to cellular apoptosis. Together, our data suggest that pep5 is an intracellular peptide with therapeutic potential for treating specific types of tumors with low

  14. In Vitro Antiproliferative Effect of Arthrocnemum indicum Extracts on Caco-2 Cancer Cells through Cell Cycle Control and Related Phenol LC-TOF-MS Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondher Boulaaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determinate phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of the halophyte Arthrocnemum indicum shoot extracts. Moreover, the anticancer effect of this plant on human colon cancer cells and the likely underlying mechanisms were also investigated, and the major phenols were identified by LC-ESI-TOF-MS. Results showed that shoot extracts had an antiproliferative effect of about 55% as compared to the control and were characterised by substantial total polyphenol content (19 mg GAE/g DW and high antioxidant activity (IC50=40 μg/mL for DPPH test. DAPI staining revealed that these extracts decrease DNA synthesis and reduce the proliferation of Caco-2 cells which were stopped at the G2/M phase. The changes in the cell-cycle-associated proteins (cyclin B1, p38, Erk1/2, Chk1, and Chk2 correlate with the changes in cell cycle distribution. Eight phenolic compounds were also identified. In conclusion, A. indicum showed interesting antioxidant capacities associated with a significant antiproliferative effect explained by a cell cycle blocking at the G2/M phase. Taken together, these data suggest that A. indicum could be a promising candidate species as a source of anticancer molecules.

  15. Characterization of the N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C)–Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neave, Antje S.; Sarup, Sussi; Seidelin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    of cellular proliferation, NI3C caused an accumulation of HCT-116 cells in the G2/M phase, in contrast to I3C, which led to an accumulation of the colon cells in G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, NI3C delays the G1-S phase transition of synchronized HCT-116 cells. The indole-mediated cell-cycle arrest may be related......Recent results have shown that indole-3-carbinol (I3C) inhibits the cellular growth of human cancer cell lines. In some cruciferous vegetables, another indole, N-methoxyindole-3-carbinol (NI3C), is found beside I3C. Knowledge about the biological effects of NI3C is limited. The aim of the present...... study was to show the effect of NI3C on cell growth of two human colon cancer cell lines, DLD-1 and HCT-116. For the first time it is shown that NI3C inhibits cellular growth of DLD-1 and HCT-116 and that NI3C is a more potent inhibitor of cell proliferation than I3C. In addition to the inhibition...

  16. Depletion of intrinsic expression of Interleukin-8 in prostate cancer cells causes cell cycle arrest, spontaneous apoptosis and increases the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokeshwar Bal L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of all cancers is characterized by increased-cell proliferation and decreased-apoptosis. The androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC is the terminal stage of the disease. Many chemokines and cytokines are suspects to cause this increased tumor cell survival that ultimately leads to resistance to therapy and demise of the host. The AIPC cells, but not androgen-responsive cells, constitutively express abundant amount of the pro-inflammatory chemokine, Interleukin-8 (IL-8. The mechanism of IL-8 mediated survival and therapeutic resistance in AIPC cells is unclear at present. The purpose of this report is to show the pervasive role of IL-8 in malignant progression of androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC and to provide a potential new therapeutic avenue, using RNA interference. Results The functional consequence of IL-8 depletion in AIPC cells was investigated by RNA interference in two IL-8 secreting AIPC cell lines, PC-3 and DU145. The non-IL-8 secreting LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells served as controls. Cells were transfected with RISC-free siRNA (control or validated-pool of IL-8 siRNA. Transfection with 50 nM IL-8 siRNA caused >95% depletion of IL-8 mRNA and >92% decrease in IL-8 protein. This reduction in IL-8 led to cell cycle arrest at G1/S boundary and decreases in cell cycle-regulated proteins: Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B1 (both decreased >50% and inhibition of ERK1/2 activity by >50%. Further, the spontaneous apoptosis was increased by >43% in IL-8 depleted cells, evidenced by increases in caspase-9 activation and cleaved-PARP. IL-8 depletion caused significant decreases in anti-apoptotic proteins, BCL-2, BCL-xL due to decrease in both mRNA and post-translational stability, and increased levels of pro-apoptotic BAX and BAD proteins. More significantly, depletion of intracellular IL-8 increased the cytotoxic activity of multiple chemotherapeutic drugs. Specifically, the cytotoxicity of Docetaxel

  17. Cell cycle control in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasova, Dana; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Proper control of the cell cycle is mandatory during homeostasis and disease. The balance of p53 and MDM2 integrates numerous signalling pathways to regulate the cell cycle, which is executed by multiple proteins including the cyclins, cyclin kinases and cyclin kinase inhibitors. Mutations or environmental factors that affect cell cycle control can lead to inappropriate hyperplasia or cancer as well as to cell loss and tissue atrophy. Normal kidney function is maintained largely by post-mitotic quiescent cells in the G0 phase with a low turnover. Early cell cycle activation during kidney injury contributes to cell death via mitotic catastrophe, i.e. death via mitosis, e.g. of cell with significant DNA damage. At later stages, cell cycle entry supports tissue regeneration and functional reconstitution via cell hypertrophy and/or cell proliferation. It is of note that so-called proliferation markers such as Ki67, PCNA or BrdU identify only cell cycle entry without telling whether this results in cell hypertrophy, cell division or mitotic catastrophe. With this in mind, some established concepts on kidney injury and regeneration are to be re-evaluated. Here, we discuss the components and functional roles of p53/MDM2-mediated cell cycle regulation in kidney homeostasis and disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. The cranberry flavonoids PAC DP-9 and quercetin aglycone induce cytotoxicity and cell cycle arrest and increase cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Han, Alex; Chen, Eva; Singh, Rakesh K; Chichester, Clinton O; Moore, Richard G; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2015-05-01

    Cranberry flavonoids (flavonols and flavan-3-ols), in addition to their antioxidant properties, have been shown to possess potential in vitro activity against several cancers. However, the difficulty of isolating cranberry compounds has largely limited anticancer research to crude fractions without well-defined compound composition. In this study, individual cranberry flavonoids were isolated to the highest purity achieved so far using gravity and high performance column chromatography and LC-MS characterization. MTS assay indicated differential cell viability reduction of SKOV-3 and OVCAR-8 ovarian cancer cells treated with individual cranberry flavonoids. Treatment with quercetin aglycone and PAC DP-9, which exhibited the strongest activity, induced apoptosis, led to caspase-3 activation and PARP deactivation, and increased sensitivity to cisplatin. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and western blot study revealed reduced expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PAC DP-9 treated SKOV-3 cells. In addition, quercetin aglycone and PAC DP-9 deactivated MAPK-ERK pathway, induced downregulation of cyclin D1, DNA-PK, phospho-histone H3 and upregulation of p21, and arrested cell cycle progression. Overall, this study demonstrates promising in vitro cytotoxic and anti-proliferative properties of two newly characterized cranberry flavonoids, quercetin aglycone and PAC DP-9, against ovarian cancer cells.

  19. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    critical role in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, and reactive oxygen species generation. The proteomic study showed substantial differences in response to PLB treatment between PC-3 and DU145 cells. PLB treatment significantly modulated the expression of critical proteins that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, and EMT signaling pathways in PC-3 cells but not in DU145 cells. Consistently, our Western blotting analysis validated the bioinformatic and proteomic data and confirmed the modulating effects of PLB on important proteins that regulated cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and EMT in PC-3 and DU145 cells. The data from the Western blot assay could not display significant differences between PC-3 and DU145 cells. These findings indicate that PLB elicits different proteomic responses in PC-3 and DU145 cells involving proteins and pathways that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidation/oxidation homeostasis. This is the first systematic study with integrated computational, proteomic, and functional analyses revealing the networks of signaling pathways and differential proteomic responses to PLB treatment in prostate cancer cells. Quantitative proteomic analysis using SILAC represents an efficient and highly sensitive approach to identify the target networks of anticancer drugs like PLB, and the data may be used to discriminate the molecular and clinical subtypes, and to identify new therapeutic targets and biomarkers, for prostate cancer. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of quantitative proteomic analysis in the identification of new targets and biomarkers for prostate cancer.Keywords: EMT, proteomics, SILAC

  20. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human colon cancer HCT116 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Afaq, Farrukh; Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-03-01

    Because of unsatisfactory treatment options for colon cancer, there is a need to develop novel preventive approaches for this malignancy. One such strategy is through chemoprevention by the use of non-toxic dietary substances and botanical products. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, possesses strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties of delphinidin in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. We found that treatment of cells with delphinidin (30-240 microM; 48 h) resulted in (i) decrease in cell viability (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) cleavage of PARP, (iv) activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9, (v) increase in Bax with a concomitant decrease in Bcl-2 protein, and (vi) G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. NF-kappaB provides a mechanistic link between inflammation and cancer, and is a major factor controlling the ability of both pre-neoplastic and malignant cells to resist apoptosis-based tumor surveillance mechanisms. We therefore, determined the effect of delphinidin on NF-kappaB signaling pathway. The immunoblot, ELISA and EMSA analysis demonstrated that the treatment of HCT116 cells with delphinidin resulted in the inhibition of (i) IKKalpha, (ii) phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, (iii) phosphorylation of NF-kappaB/p65 at Ser(536), (iv) nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB/p65, (v) NF-kappaB/p65 DNA binding activity, and (vi) transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that delphinidin treatment of HCT116 cells suppressed NF-kappaB pathway, resulting in G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. We suggest that delphinidin could have potential in inhibiting colon cancer growth. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Effect of Chimaerins, Novel Receptors for Phorbol Esters, on Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    GTPases are over-expressed in human tumors. Int. J. Cancer 81: 682-687. Mettouchi, A., Klein, S., Guo, W., Lopez- Lago , M., Lemichez, E., Westwick, J.K...G- -- e-- - Tota IRae EGF - + + ++ + + + + + + 7 I GOIG1 -_0 S 20 G21M Rac-GTP B 𔄀-- - Total Rae M O T -Ifl~e 1. 0 * ’ UO 10 M401 ( 50 10111 112...Mettouchi, A., Klein, S., Gue, W., Lopez- Lago , M., Lemichez, E., Westwick, J. K., and Giancotti, F. G. (2001) Mol. Cell 8, 115-127 pRb

  2. K+ channels and cell cycle progression in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HALIMA eOUADID-AHIDOUCH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available K+ ions play a major role in many cellular processes. The deregulation of K+ signaling is associated with a variety of diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes. K+ ions are important for setting the membrane potential, the driving force for Ca2+ influx, and regulate volume of growing cells. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that K+ channels control cell proliferation through a novel signaling mechanisms triggered and modulated independently of ion fluxes. In cancer, aberrant expression, regulation and/or sublocalization of K+ channels can alter the downstream signals that converge on the cell cycle machinery. Various K+ channels are involved in cell cycle progression and are needed only at particular stages of the cell cycle. Consistent with this idea, the expression of Eag1 and HERG channels fluctuate along the cell cycle. Despite of acquired knowledge, our understanding of K+ channels functioning in cancer cells requires further studies. These include identifying the molecular mechanisms controling the cell cycle machinery. By understanding how K+ channels regulate cell cycle progression in cancer cells, we will gain insights into how cancer cells subvert the need for K+ signal and its downstream targets to proliferate.

  3. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  4. ATM Expression Predicts Veliparib and Irinotecan Sensitivity in Gastric Cancer by Mediating P53-Independent Regulation of Cell Cycle and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Tan, Shi Hui; Yeo, Mei Shi; Yan, Fui Leng; Peethala, Praveen C; Liem, Natalia; Krishnan, Vaidehi; Yong, Wei Peng

    2016-12-01

    Identification of synthetically lethal cellular targets and synergistic drug combinations is important in cancer chemotherapy as they help to overcome treatment resistance and increase efficacy. The Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase is a nuclear protein that plays a major role in the initiation of DNA repair signaling and cell-cycle check points during DNA damage. Although ATM was shown to be associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer, its implications as a predictive biomarker for cancer chemotherapy remain unexplored. The present study evaluated ATM-induced synthetic lethality and its role in sensitization of gastric cancer cells to PARP and TOP1 inhibitors, veliparib (ABT-888) and irinotecan (CPT-11), respectively. ATM expression was detected in a panel of gastric cell lines, and the IC50 against each inhibitors was determined. The combinatorial effect of ABT-888 and CPT-11 in gastric cancer cells was also determined both in vitro and in vivo ATM deficiency was found to be associated with enhanced sensitivity to ABT-888 and CPT-11 monotherapy, hence suggesting a mechanism of synthetic lethality. Cells with high ATM expression showed reduced sensitivity to monotherapy; however, they showed a higher therapeutic effect with ABT-888 and CPT-11 combinatorial therapy. Furthermore, ATM expression was shown to play a major role in cellular homeostasis by regulating cell-cycle progression and apoptosis in a P53-independent manner. The present study highlights the clinical utility of ATM expression as a predictive marker for sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to PARP and TOP1 inhibition and provides a deeper mechanistic insight into ATM-dependent regulation of cellular processes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 3087-96. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. HDAC8 Inhibition Blocks SMC3 Deacetylation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression without Affecting Cohesin-dependent Transcription in MCF7 Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Tanushree; Antony, Jisha; Braithwaite, Antony W; Horsfield, Julia A

    2016-06-10

    Cohesin, a multi-subunit protein complex involved in chromosome organization, is frequently mutated or aberrantly expressed in cancer. Multiple functions of cohesin, including cell division and gene expression, highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target. The SMC3 subunit of cohesin is acetylated (ac) during S phase to establish cohesion between replicated chromosomes. Following anaphase, ac-SMC3 is deacetylated by HDAC8. Reversal of SMC3 acetylation is imperative for recycling cohesin so that it can be reloaded in interphase for both non-mitotic and mitotic functions. We blocked deacetylation of ac-SMC3 using an HDAC8-specific inhibitor PCI-34051 in MCF7 breast cancer cells, and examined the effects on transcription of cohesin-dependent genes that respond to estrogen. HDAC8 inhibition led to accumulation of ac-SMC3 as expected, but surprisingly, had no influence on the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes that are altered by siRNA targeting of RAD21 or SMC3. Knockdown of RAD21 altered estrogen receptor α (ER) recruitment at SOX4 and IL20, and affected transcription of these genes, while HDAC8 inhibition did not. Rather, inhibition of HDAC8 delayed cell cycle progression, suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that HDAC8 inhibition does not change the estrogen-specific transcriptional role of cohesin in MCF7 cells, but instead, compromises cell cycle progression and cell survival. Our results argue that candidate inhibitors of cohesin function may differ in their effects depending on the cellular genotype and should be thoroughly tested for predicted effects on cohesin's mechanistic roles. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. [10]-Gingerol, a major phenolic constituent of ginger root, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Megan M; McConnery, Jason R; Hoskin, David W

    2017-04-01

    The ginger rhizome is rich in bioactive compounds, including [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [10]-gingerol; however, to date, most research on the anti-cancer activities of gingerols have focused on [6]-gingerol. In this study, we compared [10]-gingerol with [8]-gingerol and [6]-gingerol in terms of their ability to inhibit the growth of human and mouse mammary carcinoma cells. A colorimetric assay based on the enzymatic reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide revealed that [10]-gingerol was more potent than [6]-gingerol and at least as potent as [8]-gingerol for the inhibition of triple-negative human (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) and mouse (4T1, E0771) mammary carcinoma cell growth. Further investigation of [10]-gingerol showed that it suppressed the growth of estrogen receptor-bearing (MCF-7, T47D) and HER2-overexpressing (SKBR3) breast cancer cells. The inhibitory effect of [10]-gingerol on the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with a reduction in the number of rounds of cell division and evidence of S phase-cell cycle arrest, as well as induction of apoptosis due to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial cytochrome c and SMAC/DIABLO into the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, killing of MDA-MB-231 cells by [10]-gingerol was not affected by a pan-caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk) or an anti-oxidant (N-acetylcysteine), suggesting that the cytotoxic effect of [10]-gingerol did not require caspase activation or the accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that further investigation of [10]-gingerol is warranted for its possible use in the treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The class I HDAC inhibitor MGCD0103 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer initiating cells by upregulating Dickkopf-1 and non-canonical Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikandar, Shaheen; Dizon, Diana; Shen, Xiling; Li, Zuomei; Besterman, Jeffery; Lipkin, Steven M

    2010-11-01

    Colorectal cancer metastatic recurrence and chemoresistance are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Colon cancer initiating cells (CCIC) are thought to contribute to both these processes. To identify drugs with anti-CCIC activity we screened a number of FDA approved and investigational compounds. We found that the class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) MGCD0103 has significant activity against CCIC, and also significantly inhibits non-CCIC CRC cell xenograft formation. Both MGCD0103 and the pan-HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin impairs CCIC clonogenicity and cause cell cycle arrest and cell death. Gene expression profiling revealed that the canonical WNT ligand DKK-1 is a highly upregulated target of HDAC inhibitors. Despite the presence of APC mutations and constitutive WNT signaling in CCIC, both transfected and recombinant DKK-1 dramatically inhibit CCIC proliferation and clonogenicity. Overall, these data show that inhibition of class I HDACs is a promising novel approach to target both CCIC and non-CCIC CRC cells. Our studies also provide novel insights into roles for DKK1 in addition to canonical WNT signaling and the mechanism of CCIC tumor formation.

  8. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kulcenty, Katarzyna [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Wierzchowski, Marcin [Department of Chemical Technology of Drugs, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Murias, Marek [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Department of Cancer Diagnostics and Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland); Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga, E-mail: liebert@ump.edu.pl [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  9. Anti cancer effects of curcumin: cycle of life and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Tanya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increasing knowledge on the cell cycle deregulations in cancers has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, which can either modulate signaling pathways leading to cell cycle regulation or directly alter cell cycle regulatory molecules, in cancer therapy. Most human malignancies are driven by chromosomal translocations or other genetic alterations that directly affect the function of critical cell cycle proteins such as cyclins as well as tumor suppressors, e.g., p53. In this respect, cell cycle regulation and its modulation by curcumin are gaining widespread attention in recent years. Extensive research has addressed the chemotherapeutic potential of curcumin (diferuloylmethane, a relatively non-toxic plant derived polyphenol. The mechanisms implicated are diverse and appear to involve a combination of cell signaling pathways at multiple levels. In the present review we discuss how alterations in the cell cycle control contribute to the malignant transformation and provide an overview of how curcumin targets cell cycle regulatory molecules to assert anti-proliferative and/or apoptotic effects in cancer cells. The purpose of the current article is to present an appraisal of the current level of knowledge regarding the potential of curcumin as an agent for the chemoprevention of cancer via an understanding of its mechanism of action at the level of cell cycle regulation. Taken together, this review seeks to summarize the unique properties of curcumin that may be exploited for successful clinical cancer prevention.

  10. Piper nigrum ethanolic extract rich in piperamides causes ROS overproduction, oxidative damage in DNA leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Grinevicius, Valdelúcia Maria Alves; Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; Santos Mota, Nádia Sandrini Ramos; Ourique, Fabiana; Porfirio Will Castro, Luiza Sheyla Evenni; Andreguetti, Rafaela Rafognato; Gomes Correia, João Francisco; Filho, Danilo Wilhem; Pich, Claus Tröger; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2016-08-02

    Ayurvedic and Chinese traditional medicine and tribal people use herbal preparations containing Piper nigrum fruits for the treatment of many health disorders like inflammation, fever, asthma and cancer. In Brazil, traditional maroon culture associates the spice Piper nigrum to health recovery and inflammation attenuation. The aim of the current work was to evaluate the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by Piper nigrum ethanolic extract and its antitumor activity. The plant was macerated in ethanol. Extract constitution was assessed by TLC, UV-vis and ESI-IT-MS/MS spectrometry. The cytotoxicity, proliferation and intracellular ROS generation was evaluated in MCF-7 cells. DNA damage effects were evaluated through intercalation into CT-DNA, plasmid DNA cleavage and oxidative damage in CT-DNA. Tumor growth inhibition, survival time increase, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress were assessed in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice. Extraction yielded 64mg/g (36% piperine and 4.2% piperyline). Treatments caused DNA damage and reduced cell viability (EC50=27.1±2.0 and 80.5±6.6µg/ml in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells, respectively), inhibiting cell proliferation by 57% and increased ROS generation in MCF-7 cells (65%). Ehrlich carcinoma was inhibited by the extract, which caused reduction of tumor growth (60%), elevated survival time (76%), cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis. The treatment with extract increased Bax and p53 and inhibited Bcl-xL and cyclin A expression. It also induced an oxidative stress in vivo verified as enhanced lipid peroxidation and carbonyl proteins content and increased activities of glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase. GSH concentration was decreased in tumor tissue from mice. The ethanolic extract has cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and antitumor effect in vivo probably due to ROS overproduction

  11. 6-Gingerol Mediates its Anti Tumor Activities in Human Oral and Cervical Cancer Cell Lines through Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vaishali; Aggarwal, Sadhna; Das, Satya N

    2016-04-01

    6-Gingerol, a potent nutraceutical, has been shown to have antitumor activity in different tumors, although its mechanism of action is not well understood. In this study, we evaluated antitumor activities of 6-gingerol on human oral (SCC4, KB) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cell lines with or without wortmannin, rapamycin, and cisplatin. Tumor cell proliferation was observed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H tetrazolium, inner salt assay, cell cycle analysis by propidium iodide labeling and flow cytometry, apoptosis by Annexin-V binding assay, and caspase activity by chemiluminescence assay. 6-Gingerol showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity in all three cell lines. Combinations of 6-gingerol with wortmannin and cisplatin showed additive effects, while with rapamycin, it showed 50% cytotoxicity that was equivalent to IC50 of 6-gingerol alone. Treatment with 6-gingerol resulted in G2-phase arrest in KB and HeLa cells and S-phase arrest in SCC4 cells. 6-Gingerol, wortmannin, and rapamycin treatment showed almost two-fold higher expression of caspase 3 in all cell lines. The results imply that 6-gingerol either alone or in combination with PI-3 K inhibitor and cisplatin may provide better therapeutic effects in oral and cervical carcinoma. Thus, 6-gingerol appears to be a safe and potent chemotherapeutic/chemopreventive compound acting through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in human oral and cervical tumor cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A metabolite of nobiletin, 4'-demethylnobiletin and atorvastatin synergistically inhibits human colon cancer cell growth by inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Qiu, Peiju; Li, Fang; Wang, Minqi; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Qi; Xu, Fei; Xiao, Hang

    2018-01-24

    Combining different chemopreventive agents is a promising strategy to reduce cancer incidence and mortality due to potential synergistic interactions between these agents. Previously, we demonstrated that oral administration of nobiletin (NBT, a citrus flavonoid) at 0.05% (w/w, in diet) together with atorvastatin (ATST, a lipid-lowering drug) at 0.02% (w/w, in diet) produced much stronger inhibition against colon carcinogenesis in rats in comparison with that produced by NBT (at 0.1% w/w in diet) or ATST (at 0.04% w/w in diet) alone at higher doses. To further elucidate the mechanism of this promising synergy between NBT and ATST, herein, we measured the levels of NBT, its major metabolites and ATST in the colonic tissue of rats fed NBT (0.05% w/w, in diet) + ATST (0.02% w/w, in diet), and determined the mode of interaction between the major NBT metabolite and ATST in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth. HPLC-MS analysis showed that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN) is the most abundant metabolite of NBT with a level about 5-fold as high as that of NBT in the colonic tissue, which indicated the potential significance of 4DN in mediating the biological effects of NBT in the colon. We found that co-treatments of 4DN/ATST at 2 : 1 concentration ratio produced much stronger growth inhibitory effects on human colon cancer HT-29 cells than 4DN or ATST alone, and isobologram analysis confirmed that this enhanced inhibitory effect by the 4DN/ATST combination was highly synergistic. The co-treatment of 4DN/ATST led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced extensive apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Furthermore, the 4DN/ATST co-treatment profoundly modulated key signaling proteins related to the regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Our results demonstrated a strong synergy produced by the 4DN/ATST co-treatment in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, which provided a novel mechanism by which NBT/ATST in combination synergistically inhibit colon carcinogenesis.

  13. MiR-26a and miR-138 block the G1/S transition by targeting the cell cycle regulating network in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Kati; Kaulke, Knut; Rieger, Christiane; Salomo, Karsten; Wirth, Manfred P; Fuessel, Susanne

    2016-11-01

    The tumor-suppressive microRNAs miR-26a and miR-138 are significantly down-regulated in prostate cancer (PCa) and have been identified as direct regulators of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which is a known oncogene in PCa. In the present study, the influence of miR-26a and miR-138 on EZH2 and cellular function including the impact on the cell cycle regulating network was evaluated in PCa cells. PC-3 and DU-145 PCa cells were transfected with 100 nM of miRNA mimics, siRNA against EZH2 (siR-EZH2) or control constructs for 4 h. Analyses of gene expression and cellular function were conducted 48 h after transfection. Both miRNAs influenced the EZH2 expression and activity only marginally, whereas siR-EZH2 led to a notable decrease of the EZH2 expression and activity. Both miRNAs inhibited short- and/or long-term proliferation of PCa cells but showed no effect on viability and apoptosis. In PC-3 cells, miR-26a and miR-138 caused a significant surplus of cells in the G0/G1 phase of 6 and 12 %, respectively, thus blocking the G1/S-phase transition. Treatment with siR-EZH2 was without substantial influence on cellular function and cell cycle. Therefore, alternative target genes involved in cell cycle regulation were identified in silico. MiR-26a significantly diminished the expression of its targets CCNE1, CCNE2 and CDK6, whereas CCND1, CCND3 and CDK6 were suppressed by their regulator miR-138. The present findings suggest an anti-proliferative role for miR-26a and miR-138 in PCa by blocking the G1/S-phase transition independent of EZH2 but via a concerted inhibition of crucial cell cycle regulators.

  14. Liriodenine, an aporphine alkaloid from Enicosanthellum pulchrum, inhibits proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis via the mitochondrial signaling pathway and blocking cell cycle progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Noraziah; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Rahman, Mashitoh Abd; Hassan, Zalila; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Enicosanthellum pulchrum is a tropical plant from Malaysia and belongs to the Annonaceae family. This plant is rich in isoquinoline alkaloids. In the present study, liriodenine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, was examined as a potential anticancer agent, particularly in ovarian cancer. Liriodenine was isolated by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Cell viability was performed to determine the cytotoxicity, whilst the detection of morphological changes was carried out by acridine orange/propidium iodide assay. Initial and late apoptosis was examined by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and DNA laddering assays, respectively. The involvement of pathways was detected via caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 analyses. Confirmation of pathways was further performed in mitochondria using a cytotoxicity 3 assay. Apoptosis was confirmed at the protein level, including Bax, Bcl-2, and survivin, while interruption of the cell cycle was used for final validation of apoptosis. The result showed that liriodenine inhibits proliferation of CAOV-3 cells at 37.3 μM after 24 hours of exposure. Changes in cell morphology were detected by the presence of cell membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies. Early apoptosis was observed by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate bound to the cell membrane as early as 24 hours. Liriodenine activated the intrinsic pathway by induction of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Involvement of the intrinsic pathway in the mitochondria could be seen, with a significant increase in mitochondrial permeability and cytochrome c release, whereas the mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased. DNA fragmentation occurred at 72 hours upon exposure to liriodenine. The presence of DNA fragmentation indicates the CAOV-3 cells undergo late apoptosis or final stage of apoptosis. Confirmation of apoptosis at the protein level showed overexpression of Bax and suppression of Bcl-2 and survivin. Liriodenine inhibits progression

  15. Molecular control of the cell cycle in cancer: biological and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2003-01-01

    The RB1 pathway and the p53 pathway represent important, interconnected biochemical units frequently perturbed in human cancer. Essential tumor protective mechanisms, such as cellular growth control and apoptosis, are regulated through these systems. Comprehensive studies of these pathways, inclu...... D3 is important in lymphomagenesis. However, further studies are needed to implicate cyclin D3 definitively as an oncoprotein. Our data contain several lines of evidence supporting roles of CDKN2A and MDM2 in progression of neoplastic disease. We found that loss of p16INK4A coincided...

  16. Low-dose methotrexate enhances cycling of highly anaplastic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Ilaria; Rovida, Elisabetta; Olivotto, Massimo; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously showed that cellular RedOx state governs the G1-S transition of AH130 hepatoma, a tumor spontaneously reprogrammed to the embryonic stem cell stage. This transition is impaired when the mithocondrial electron transport system is blocked by specific inhibitors (antimycin A) or the respiratory chain is saturated by adding to the cells high concentrations of pyruvate. The antimycin A or pyruvate block is removed by the addition of adequate concentrations of folate (F). Thi...

  17. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial–mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narang, Himanshi, E-mail: narangh@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Amit [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bhat, Nagesh [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Pandey, Badri N.; Ghosh, Anu [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Biological effectiveness of proton and gamma irradiation is compared in A549 cells. • Proton irradiation is two times more cytotoxic than gamma irradiation. • It alters ten times more number of early genes, as observed by microarray study. • It does not enhance cell migration, invasion and adhesion, unlike gamma irradiation. • It was more effective in reducing the percentage of cancer stem cell like cells. - Abstract: Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and “stemness” in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3 MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44{sup +}, a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  18. Plumbagin induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2015-01-01

    PLB and investigate the underlying mechanism in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that PLB exhibited potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via the modulation of cell cycle regulators including CDK1/CDC2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. PLB treatment concentration- and time-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog, beclin 1, and the ratio of LC3-II over LC3-I in both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. PLB induced inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK pathways and activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the proautophagic activities of PLB in both cell lines. Furthermore, SB202190, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and wortmannin, a potent, irreversible, and selective PI3K inhibitor, remarkably enhanced PLB-induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, indicating the roles of PI3K and p38 MAPK mediated signaling pathways in PLB-induced autophagic cell death in both cell lines. In addition, PLB significantly inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in both cell lines with an increase in the expression level of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. Moreover, PLB treatment significantly suppressed the expression of Sirt1 in both cell lines. These findings show that PLB promotes cell cycle arrest and autophagy but inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/protein kinase B/ mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 MAPK mediated pathways. Keywords: Plumbagin, pancreatic cancer, cell cycle, autophagy, EMT, Sirt1

  19. Beryllium sulfate induces p21 CDKN1A expression and a senescence-like cell cycle arrest in susceptible cancer cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjala, Priyatham; Gary, Ronald K

    2010-12-01

    In fibroblasts, beryllium salt causes activation of the p53 transcription factor and induction of a senescence-like state. It is not known whether Be(2+) can affect the proliferation of cancer cells, which are generally unsusceptible to senescence. A172 glioblastoma and RKO colon carcinoma cell lines each have wildtype p53, so these cell types have the potential to be responsive to agents that activate p53. In A172 cells, BeSO(4) produced a G(0)/G(1)-phase cell cycle arrest and increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, an enzymatic marker of senescence. BeSO(4) caused phosphorylation of serine-15 of p53, accumulation of p53 protein, and expression of p21, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that is prominent during senescence. BeSO(4) inhibited A172 growth with an IC(50) = 4.7 μM in a 6-day proliferation assay. In contrast, BeSO(4) had no effect on RKO cells, even though Be(2+) uptake was similar for the two cell types. This differential responsiveness marks BeSO(4) as a reagent capable of activating a separable branch of the p53 signaling network. A172 and RKO cells are known to exhibit p53-dependent upregulation of p21 in response to DNA damage. The RKO cells produced high levels of p21 when exposed to DNA damaging agents, yet failed to express p21 when treated with BeSO(4). Conversely, BeSO(4) did not cause DNA damage in A172 cells, yet it was a potent inducer of p21 expression. These observations indicate that the growth control pathway affected by BeSO(4) is distinct from the DNA damage response pathway, even though both ultimately converge on p53 and p21.

  20. Alloimperatorin and its epoxide derivative exhibit in vitro antitumor activity in HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia cancer cells via inducing apoptosis, cell cycle disruption and inhibition of cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to synthesize epoxide derivative of alloimperatorin and evaluating its antitumor and apoptotic effects in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells. The cytotoxic effects were demonstrated by MTT assay. Fluorescence microscopy along with flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the effect of alloimperatorin epoxide on apoptosis and cell cycle. In vitro wound healing assay was performed to study compound’s effect on cancer cell migration. The results indicated that alloimperatorin epoxide (IC50 = 32.1 µM was much more effective in inhibiting HL-60 cancer cell growth as compared to alloimperatorin (IC50 = 128 µM. Further, alloimperatorin epoxide induced apoptosis related morphological alterations in HL-60 cells including blebbing of plasma membrane, DNA fragmentation and formation of apoptotic bodies. Alloimperatorin epoxide also led to G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and suppressed HL-60 cancer cell migration indicating that this compound may be a promising candidate for the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  1. Cytotoxicity of trans-chalcone and licochalcone A against breast cancer cells is due to apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Luis Felipe Buso; Barbosa, Flávia Regina; Silva, Gabriel; Bitencourt, Tamires Aparecida; Beleboni, Rene Oliveira; Baek, Seung Joon; Marins, Mozart; Fachin, Ana Lúcia

    2017-01-01

    Chalcones are precursors of flavonoids that exhibit structural heterogeneity and potential antitumor activity. The objective of this study was to characterize the cytotoxicity of trans-chalcone and licochalcone A (LicoA(1)) against a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and normal murine fibroblasts (3T3). Also the mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of these two compounds were studied. The alkaline comet assay revealed dose-dependent genotoxicity, which was more responsive against the tumor cell line, compared to the 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line. Flow cytometry showed that the two chalcones caused the cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Using PCR Array, we found that trans-chalcone and LicoA trigger apoptosis mediated by the intrinsic pathway as demonstrated by the inhibition of Bcl-2 and induction of Bax. In western blot assay, the two chalcones reduced the expression of cell death-related proteins such as Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 and promoted the cleavage of PARP. However, only trans-chalcone induced the expression of the CIDEA gene and protein in these two experiments. Furthermore, transient transfections of MCF-7 using a construction of a promoter-luciferase vector showed that trans-chalcone induced the expression of the CIDEA promoter activity in 24 and 48h. In conclusion, the results showed that trans-chalcone promoted high induction of the CIDEA promoter gene and protein, which is related to DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Xanthatin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest at G2/M Checkpoint and Apoptosis via Disrupting NF-κB Pathway in A549 Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Lu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xanthatin, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, has significant antitumor activity against a variety of cancer cells, yet little is known about its anticancer mechanism. In this study, we demonstrated that xanthatin had obvious dose-/time-dependent cytotoxicity against the human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line A549. Flow cytometry analysis showed xanthatin induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Xanthatin also had pro-apoptotic effects on A549 cells as evidenced by Hoechst 33258 staining and annexin V-FITC staining. Mechanistic data revealed that xanthatin downregulated Chk1, Chk2, and phosphorylation of CDC2, which contributed to the cell cycle arrest. Xathatin also increased total p53 protein levels, decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and expression of the downstream factors procaspase-9 and procaspase-3, which triggered the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, xanthatin blocked phosphorylation of NF-κB (p65 and IκBa, which might also contribute to its pro-apoptotic effects on A549 cells. Xanthatin also inhibited TNFa induced NF-κB (p65 translocation. We conclude that xanthatin displays significant antitumor effects through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in A549 cells. These effects were associated with intrinsic apoptosis pathway and disrupted NF-κB signaling. These results suggested that xanthatin may have therapeutic potential against NSCLC.

  3. Cell cycle-related genes as modifiers of age of onset of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: a large-scale study in non-Hispanic white patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala; Huang, Yu-Jing; Wei, Chongjuan; Amos, Christopher I; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Meldrum, Cliff J; Chen, Wei V; Gorlov, Ivan P; Lynch, Patrick M; Scott, Rodney J; Frazier, Marsha L

    2013-02-01

    Heterogeneity in age of onset of colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) suggests the influence of other lifestyle and genetic modifiers. We hypothesized that genes regulating the cell cycle influence the observed heterogeneity as cell cycle-related genes respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and induce transcription of genes that facilitate repair. We examined the association of 1456 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 128 cell cycle-related genes and 31 DNA repair-related genes in 485 non-Hispanic white participants with Lynch syndrome to determine whether there are SNPs associated with age of onset of colorectal cancer. Genotyping was performed on an Illumina GoldenGate platform, and data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree (CART) methods. Ten SNPs were independently significant in a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model after correcting for multiple comparisons (P Lynch syndrome.

  4. The ubiquitin peptidase UCHL1 induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through stabilizing p53 and is frequently silenced in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingxiu Xiang

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BrCa is a complex disease driven by aberrant gene alterations and environmental factors. Recent studies reveal that abnormal epigenetic gene regulation also plays an important role in its pathogenesis. Ubiquitin carboxyl- terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1 is a tumor suppressor silenced by promoter methylation in multiple cancers, but its role and alterations in breast tumorigenesis remain unclear.We found that UCHL1 was frequently downregulated or silenced in breast cancer cell lines and tumor tissues, but readily expressed in normal breast tissues and mammary epithelial cells. Promoter methylation of UCHL1 was detected in 9 of 10 breast cancer cell lines (90% and 53 of 66 (80% primary tumors, but rarely in normal breast tissues, which was statistically correlated with advanced clinical stage and progesterone receptor status. Pharmacologic demethylation reactivated UCHL1 expression along with concomitant promoter demethylation. Ectopic expression of UCHL1 significantly suppressed the colony formation and proliferation of breast tumor cells, through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Subcellular localization study showed that UCHL1 increased cytoplasmic abundance of p53. We further found that UCHL1 induced p53 accumulation and reduced MDM2 protein level, and subsequently upregulated the expression of p21, as well as cleavage of caspase3 and PARP, but not in catalytic mutant UCHL1 C90S-expressed cells.UCHL1 exerts its tumor suppressive functions by inducing G0/G1cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in breast tumorigenesis, requiring its deubiquitinase activity. Its frequent silencing by promoter CpG methylation may serve as a potential tumor marker for breast cancer.

  5. The Abbreviated Pluripotent Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinas, Kristina; Grandy, Rodrigo; Ghule, Prachi; Medina, Ricardo; Becker, Klaus; Pardee, Arthur; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Lian, Jane; Stein, Janet; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells proliferate rapidly and divide symmetrically producing equivalent progeny cells. In contrast, lineage committed cells acquire an extended symmetrical cell cycle. Self-renewal of tissue-specific stem cells is sustained by asymmetric cell division where one progeny cell remains a progenitor while the partner progeny cell exits the cell cycle and differentiates. There are three principal contexts for considering the operation and regulation of the pluripotent cell cycle: temporal, regulatory andstructural. The primary temporal context that the pluripotent self-renewal cell cycle of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a short G1 period without reducing periods of time allocated to S phase, G2, and mitosis. The rules that govern proliferation in hESCs remain to be comprehensively established. However, several lines of evidence suggest a key role for the naïve transcriptome of hESCs, which is competent to stringently regulate the ESC cell cycle. This supports the requirements of pluripotent cells to self propagate while suppressing expression of genes that confer lineage commitment and/or tissue specificity. However, for the first time, we consider unique dimensions to the architectural organization and assembly of regulatory machinery for gene expression in nuclear microenviornments that define parameters of pluripotency. From both fundamental biological and clinical perspectives, understanding control of the abbreviated embryonic stem cell cycle can provide options to coordinate control of proliferation versus differentiation. Wound healing, tissue engineering, and cell-based therapy to mitigate developmental aberrations illustrate applications that benefit from knowledge of the biology of the pluripotent cell cycle. PMID:22552993

  6. The expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase associated cell cycle (GACC genes correlates with cancer stage and poor survival in patients with solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunrui Wang

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is often used as a stable housekeeping marker for constant gene expression. However, the transcriptional levels of GAPDH may be highly up-regulated in some cancers, including non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC. Using a publically available microarray database, we identified a group of genes whose expression levels in some cancers are highly correlated with GAPDH up-regulation. The majority of the identified genes are cell cycle-dependent (GAPDH Associated Cell Cycle, or GACC. The up-regulation pattern of GAPDH positively associated genes in NSCLC is similar to that observed in cultured fibroblasts grown under conditions that induce anti-senescence. Data analysis demonstrated that up-regulated GAPDH levels are correlated with aberrant gene expression related to both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways. Down-regulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1 in gluconeogenesis in conjunction with up-regulation of most glycolytic genes is closely related to high expression of GAPDH in the tumors. The data presented demonstrate that up-regulation of GAPDH positively associated genes is proportional to the malignant stage of various tumors and is associated with an unfavourable prognosis. Thus, this work suggests that GACC genes represent a potential new signature for cancer stage identification and disease prognosis.

  7. Soy milk digestion extract inhibits progression of prostate cancer cell growth via regulation of prostate cancer‑specific antigen and cell cycle-regulatory genes in human LNCaP cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Hee; Shin, Hee-Chang; Oh, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyun-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-08-01

    Soy milk, which is produced from whole soybeans, contains a variety of biologically active components. Isoflavones are a class of soy-derived phytoestrogens with beneficial effects, among which genistein (GEN) has been previously indicated to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The present study evaluated the effects of soy milk digestion extract (SMD) on the progression of prostate cancer via the estrogen receptor (ER)β in human LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the effects of SMD (daizein, 1.988 mg/100g, glycitein, 23.537 mg/100 g and GEN, 0.685 mg/100g) on cell proliferation, LNCaP cells were cultured in media containing vehicle (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide), 17β‑estradiol (E2; 2.7x10‑7 mg/ml), GEN (2.7x10-2 mg/ml) of SMD (total aglycon concentration, 0.79 mg/ml), after which the cell viability was examined using an MTT assay. The cell viability was significantly elevated by E2 (by 45±0.18%), while it was markedly reduced by GEN (73.2±0.03%) or SMD (74.8±0.09%). Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes, including ERβ, prostate cancer‑specific antigen (PSA) and cell cycle regulators p21, Cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4. The expression of ERβ was almost completely diminished by E2, whereas it was significantly elevated by SMD. In addition, the expression levels of PSA were considerably reduced by SMD. The expression of p21 was significantly elevated by SMD, while it was markedly reduced by E2. Of note, the expression levels of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 were considerably elevated by E2, while being significantly reduced by GEN and SMD. All of these results indicated that SMD may inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells via regulating the expression of ERβ, PSA, p21, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 in an ER-dependent manner.

  8. [Solanine inhibits prostate cancer Du145 xenograft growth in nude mice by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1/S phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Feng; Liu, Si-Ping; Pan, Bin; Tang, Zhao-Feng; Zhong, Jin-Guang; Zhou, Fang-Jian

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effect of solanine on the growth of human prostate cancer cell xenograft in nude mice. Human prostate cancer Du145 cells were injected into the subcutaneous layers on the back of nude mice. After a week, the mice bearing subcutaneous tumor graft were randomly divided into solanine treatment group and saline control group for treatment for 3 weeks. The tumor grafts were then harvested to evaluate the inhibition rate. The mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle-related genes in the tumors were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively, and tumor cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL method. The tumor growth rate in solanine-treated group was significantly slower than that in the control group (Psolanine. Solanine significantly up-regulated p21 mRNA and protein expression in the tumors and induced a higher apoptosis rate of the tumor cells than saline (Psolanine is probably mediated by regulating the expressions of genes related with G1/S cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis.

  9. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  10. Antrodia salmonea induces G2 cell-cycle arrest in human triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Huang, Hui-Chi; Hsu, Li-Sung; Huang, Pei-Jane; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2017-01-20

    Antrodia salmonea (AS), is a well-known folk medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the effects of AS on cell-cycle arrest in vitro in MDA-MB-231 cells and on tumor regression in vivo using an athymic nude mice model. AS (0-200μg/mL) treatment significantly induced G2 cell-cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells by reducing the levels of cyclin B1, cyclin A, cyclin E, and CDC2 proteins. In addition, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment prevented AS induced G2 cell-cycle arrest, indicating that ROS accumulation and subsequent cell cycle arrest might be a major mechanism of AS-induced cytotoxicity. Further, AS treatment decreased COX-2 expression and induced PARP cleavage was significantly reversed by NAC pretreatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. The in vivo study results revealed that AS treatment was effective in terms of delaying the tumor incidence and reducing the tumor growth in MDA-MB-231-xenografted nude mice. TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting confirmed that AS significantly modulated the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by induction of apoptosis, autophagy, and cell-cycle arrest. Our data strongly suggest that Antrodia salmonea could be an anti-cancer agent for human breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pokemon enhances proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis activity of colorectal cancer independently of p14ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Yao, Yun-hong; Li, Li; An, Wei-fang; Chen, Hong-zen; Sun, Li-ping; Kang, Hai-xian; Wang, Sen; Hu, Xin-rong

    2014-12-01

    Pokemon has been showed to directly suppress p14(ARF) expression and also to overexpress in multiple cancers. However, p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway is usually aberrant in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim is to confirm whether Pokemon plays a role in CRC and explore whether Pokemon works through p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway in CRC. Immunohistochemistry for Pokemon, p14(ARF) and Mtp53 protein was applied to 45 colorectal epitheliums (CREs), 42 colorectal adenomas (CRAs) and 66 CRCs. Pokemon was knocked down with RNAi technique in CRC cell line Lovo to detect mRNA expression of p14(ARF) with qRT-PCR, cell proliferation with CCK8 assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis with flowcytometry analysis. The protein expression rates were significantly higher in CRC (75.8%) than in CRE (22.2 %) or CRA (38.1%) for Pokemon and higher in CRC (53.0%) than in CRE (0) or CRA (4.8%) for Mtp53, but not significantly different in CRC (86.4 %) versus CRE (93.3%) or CRA (90.5 %) for p14(ARF). Higher expression rate of Pokemon was associated with lymph node metastasis and higher Duke's stage. After knockdown of Pokemon in Lovo cells, the mRNA level of p14(ARF) was not significantly changed, the cell proliferation ability was decreased by 20.6%, cell cycle was arrested by 55.7% in G0/G1 phase, and apoptosis rate was increased by 19.0%. Pokemon enhanced the oncogenesis of CRC by promoting proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis activity of CRC cells independently of p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway. This finding provided a novel idea for understanding and further studying the molecular mechanism of Pokemon on carcinogenesis of CRC.

  12. Increased radiosensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines due to cell cycle dysregulation and induction of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, Andrea; Ziemann, Frank; Wittig, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Philipps-University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, BMFZ - Biomedical Research Center, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Christina; Wagner, Steffen; Klussmann, Jens-Peter; Wittekindt, Claus [Justus Liebig University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Giessen (Germany); Dreffke, Kirstin [Philipps-University, Institute for Radiobiology and Molecular Radiooncology, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) respond favourably to radiotherapy as compared to HPV-unrelated HNSCC. We investigated DNA damage response in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC cell lines aiming to identify mechanisms, which illustrate reasons for the increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancers of the oropharynx. Radiation response including clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and cell cycle redistribution in four HPV-positive (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) cell lines was evaluated. HPV-positive cells were more radiosensitive (mean SF2: 0.198 range: 0.22-0.18) than HPV-negative cells (mean SF2: 0.34, range: 0.45-0.27; p = 0.010). Irradiated HPV-positive cell lines progressed faster through S-phase showing a more distinct accumulation in G2/M. The abnormal cell cycle checkpoint activation was accompanied by a more pronounced increase of cell death after x-irradiation and a higher number of residual and unreleased DSBs. The enhanced responsiveness of HPV-related HNSCC to radiotherapy might be caused by a higher cellular radiosensitivity due to cell cycle dysregulation and impaired DNA DSB repair. (orig.) [German] Fuer Patienten mit HPV-assoziierten Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNSCC) ist im Vergleich zu Patienten mit nicht-HPV-assoziierten Tumoren ein besseres Ueberleben nach Radiotherapie gesichert. Ziel der Untersuchung war die Identifizierung von Unterschieden in der zellulaeren DNA-Schadensantwort von HPV-positiven und HPV-negativen Zelllinien, wodurch die bereits in Erprobung stehende Deeskalation einer Radiotherapie bei Patienten mit HPV-assoziierten HNSCC durch experimentelle Daten abgesichert werden koennte. Klonogenes Ueberleben, Induktion von Apoptose, DNA-Doppelstrang-Reparatur und Zellzyklusverhalten wurden in vier HPV-positiven (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) und vier HPV

  13. Combinational siRNA delivery using hyaluronic acid modified amphiphilic polyplexes against cell cycle and phosphatase proteins to inhibit growth and migration of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Manoj B; Meenakshi Sundaram, Daniel Nisakar; K C, Remant Bahadur; Maranchuk, Robert; Montazeri Aliabadi, Hamidreza; Hugh, Judith C; Löbenberg, Raimar; Uludağ, Hasan

    2018-01-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer with few therapeutic options if it recurs after adjuvant chemotherapy. RNA interference could be an alternative therapy for metastatic breast cancer, where small interfering RNA (siRNA) can silence the expression of aberrant genes critical for growth and migration of malignant cells. Here, we formulated a siRNA delivery system using lipid-substituted polyethylenimine (PEI) and hyaluronic acid (HA), and characterized the size, ζ-potential and cellular uptake of the nanoparticulate delivery system. Higher cellular uptake of siRNA by the tailored PEI/HA formulation suggested better interaction of complexes with breast cancer cells due to improved physicochemical characteristics of carrier and HA-binding CD44 receptors. The siRNAs against specific phosphatases that inhibited migration of MDA-MB-231 cells were then identified using library screen against 267 protein-tyrosine phosphatases, and siRNAs to inhibit cell migration were further validated. We then assessed the combinational delivery of a siRNA against CDC20 to decrease cell growth and a siRNA against several phosphatases shown to decrease migration of breast cancer cells. Combinational siRNA therapy against CDC20 and identified phosphatases PPP1R7, PTPN1, PTPN22, LHPP, PPP1R12A and DUPD1 successfully inhibited cell growth and migration, respectively, without interfering the functional effect of the co-delivered siRNA. The identified phosphatases could serve as potential targets to inhibit migration of highly aggressive metastatic breast cancer cells. Combinational siRNA delivery against cell cycle and phosphatases could be a promising strategy to inhibit both growth and migration of metastatic breast cancer cells, and potentially other types of metastatic cancer. The manuscript investigated the efficacy of a tailored polymeric siRNA delivery system formulation as well as combinational siRNA therapy in metastatic breast cancer cells to inhibit

  14. Sequence dependent effect of paclitaxel on gemcitabine metabolism in relation to cell cycle and cytotoxicity in non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Kroep, J.R.; Giaccone, G; Tolis, C; Voorn, D A; Loves, W.J.P.; van Groeningen, C J; Pinedo, H. M.; Peters, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    Gemcitabine and paclitaxel are active agents in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To optimize treatment drug combinations, simultaneously and 4 and 24 h intervals, were studied using DNA flow cytometry and multiple drug effect analysis in the NSCLC cell lines H460, H322 and Lewis Lung. All combinations resulted in comparable cytotoxicity, varying from additivity to antagonism (combination index: 1.0?2.6). Gemcitabine caused a S (48%) and G1 (64%) arrest at IC-50 and 10 ? IC...

  15. Cell cycle- and cancer-associated gene networks activated by Dsg2: evidence of cystatin A deregulation and a potential role in cell-cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilasha Gupta

    Full Text Available Cell-cell adhesion is paramount in providing and maintaining multicellular structure and signal transmission between cells. In the skin, disruption to desmosomal regulated intercellular connectivity may lead to disorders of keratinization and hyperproliferative disease including cancer. Recently we showed transgenic mice overexpressing desmoglein 2 (Dsg2 in the epidermis develop hyperplasia. Following microarray and gene network analysis, we demonstrate that Dsg2 caused a profound change in the transcriptome of keratinocytes in vivo and altered a number of genes important in epithelial dysplasia including: calcium-binding proteins (S100A8 and S100A9, members of the cyclin protein family, and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA. CSTA is deregulated in several skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC and loss of function mutations lead to recessive skin fragility disorders. The microarray results were confirmed by qPCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. CSTA was detected at high level throughout the newborn mouse epidermis but dramatically decreased with development and was detected predominantly in the differentiated layers. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of Dsg2 by siRNA or shRNA reduced CSTA expression. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of CSTA resulted in cytoplasmic localization of Dsg2, perturbed cytokeratin 14 staining and reduced levels of desmoplakin in response to mechanical stretching. Both knockdown of either Dsg2 or CSTA induced loss of cell adhesion in a dispase-based assay and the effect was synergistic. Our findings here offer a novel pathway of CSTA regulation involving Dsg2 and a potential crosstalk between Dsg2 and CSTA that modulates cell adhesion. These results further support the recent human genetic findings that loss of function mutations in the CSTA gene result in skin fragility due to impaired cell-cell adhesion: autosomal-recessive exfoliative ichthyosis or acral peeling skin syndrome.

  16. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  17. Hwanggeumchal sorghum induces cell cycle arrest, and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis through Jak2/STAT pathways in breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer.

  18. Danusertib Induces Apoptosis, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Autophagy but Inhibits Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition Involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma (OC is one of the most common gynecological malignancies, with a poor prognosis for patients at advanced stage. Danusertib (Danu is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases with unclear anticancer effect and underlying mechanisms in OC treatment. This study aimed to examine the cancer cell killing effect and explore the possible mechanisms with a focus on proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in human OC cell lines C13 and A2780cp. The results showed that Danu remarkably inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and autophagy, and suppressed EMT in both cell lines. Danu arrested cells in G2/M phase and led to an accumulation of polyploidy through the regulation of the expression key cell cycle modulators. Danu induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in dose and time-dependent manners. Danu suppressed PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, evident from the marked reduction in the phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, contributing to the autophagy inducing effect of Danu in both cell lines. In addition, Danu inhibited EMT. In aggregate, Danu exerts potent inducing effect on cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy, but exhibits a marked inhibitory effect on EMT. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway contributes, partially, to the cancer cell killing effect of Danu in C13 and A2780cp cells.

  19. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  20. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kim, Ji Hee; Huang, Zunnan; Song, Hyerim; Oh, Yoon Sin; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2016-02-22

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC) was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker), cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC.

  1. Benzyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Prostate Cancer Development in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP Model, Which Is Associated with the Induction of Cell Cycle G1 Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jin Cho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC is a hydrolysis product of glucotropaeolin, a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, and has been shown to have anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated whether BITC inhibits the development of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP mice. Five-week old, male TRAMP mice and their nontransgenic littermates were gavage-fed with 0, 5, or 10 mg/kg of BITC every day for 19 weeks. The weight of the genitourinary tract increased markedly in TRAMP mice and this increase was suppressed significantly by BITC feeding. H and E staining of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate demonstrated that well-differentiated carcinoma (WDC was a predominant feature in the TRAMP mice. The number of lobes with WDC was reduced by BITC feeding while that of lobes with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was increased. BITC feeding reduced the number of cells expressing Ki67 (a proliferation marker, cyclin A, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2 in the prostatic tissue. In vitro cell culture results revealed that BITC decreased DNA synthesis, as well as CDK2 and CDK4 activity in TRAMP-C2 mouse prostate cancer cells. These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression contributes to the inhibition of prostate cancer development in TRAMP mice treated with BITC.

  2. Norsolorinic acid inhibits proliferation of T24 human bladder cancer cells by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and inducing a Fas/membrane-bound Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Clay C C; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jiunn-Kae; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2008-11-01

    1. Norsolorinic acid, isolated from Aspergillus nidulans, has been shown to have antiproliferative activity in T24 human bladder cancer cells by arresting the cell cycle at the G(0)/G(1) phase and inducing apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antiproliferative activity of norsolorinic acid in T24 human bladder cancer cells. 2. The effects of norsolorinic acid (1, 5, 10 and 20 micromol/L) on the proliferation of T24 cells and on the distribution of cells within different phases of the cell cycle were investigated indirectly using an XTT assay and a flow cytometer, respectively. Factors affecting the cell cycle and apoptosis, including p53, p21, Fas receptor, Fas ligand (FasL) and caspase 8 activity, were examined using ELISA. 3. The results showed that norsolorinic acid inhibited proliferation of T24 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC(50) of 10.5 micromol/L. The effect involved the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase and apoptosis. 4. These results demonstrate that G(0)/G(1) phase arrest is due to increased expression of p21 in cells treated with norsolorinic acid (10 and 20 micromol/L) for 24 h. Moreover, enhanced Fas and membrane-bound Fas ligand (mFasL) may be responsible for the apoptotic effect of norsolorinic acid. Thus, the present study reports, for the first time, that induction of p21 and the Fas/mFas ligand apoptotic system may participate in the antiproliferative action of norsolorinic acid in T24 human bladder cancer cells.

  3. Sequence dependent effect of paclitaxel on gemcitabine metabolism in relation to cell cycle and cytotoxicity in non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroep, J R; Giaccone, G; Tolis, C; Voorn, D A; Loves, W J; Groeningen, C J; Pinedo, H M; Peters, G J

    2000-10-01

    Gemcitabine and paclitaxel are active agents in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To optimize treatment drug combinations, simultaneously and 4 and 24 h intervals, were studied using DNA flow cytometry and multiple drug effect analysis in the NSCLC cell lines H460, H322 and Lewis Lung. All combinations resulted in comparable cytotoxicity, varying from additivity to antagonism (combination index: 1.0-2.6). Gemcitabine caused a S (48%) and G1 (64%) arrest at IC-50 and 10 x IC-50 concentrations, respectively. Paclitaxel induced G2/M arrest (70%) which was maximal within 24 h at 10 x IC-50. Simultaneous treatment increased S-phase arrest, while at the 24 h interval after 72 h the first drug seemed to dominate the effect. Apoptosis was more pronounced when paclitaxel preceded gemcitabine (20% for both intervals) as compared to the reverse sequence (8%, P = 0.173 for the 4 h and 12%, P = 0.051 for the 24 h time interval). In H460 cells, paclitaxel increased 2-fold the accumulation of dFdCTP, the active metabolite of gemcitabine, in contrast to H322 cells. Paclitaxel did not affect deoxycytidine kinase levels, but ribonucleotide levels increased possibly explaining the increase in dFdCTP. Paclitaxel did not affect gemcitabine incorporation into DNA, but seemed to increase incorporation into RNA. Gemcitabine almost completely inhibited DNA synthesis in both cell lines (70-89%), while paclitaxel had a minor effect and did not increase that of gemcitabine. In conclusion, various gemcitabine-paclitaxel combinations did not show sequence dependent cytotoxic effects; all combinations were not more than additive. However, since paclitaxel increased dFdCTP accumulation, gemcitabine incorporation into RNA and the apoptotic index, the administration of paclitaxel prior to gemcitabine might be favourable as compared to reversed sequences. Copyright 2000 Cancer Research Campaign.

  4. Resveratrol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with docetaxel in prostate cancer cells via a p53/ p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27KIP1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Banerjee, Saswati; Acosta, Edward P; Lillard, James W; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-03-07

    Resveratrol (RES) is the most effective natural products used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. In this study, we tested the effect of RES in enhancing the efficacy of docetaxel (DTX) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. The C4-2B and DU-145 cell lines were treated with RES, DTX and combination followed by evaluating the apoptosis and cell cycle progression. The combined drug treatment up-regulates the pro-apoptotic genes (BAX, BID, and BAK), cleaved PARP and down regulates the anti-apoptotic genes (MCL-1, BCL-2, BCL-XL) promoting apoptosis. In C4-2B cells the combination up regulated the expression of p53, and cell cycle inhibitors (p21WAF1/CIP1, p27KIP), which, in turn, inhibited the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, cyclin E1 and induced hypo-phosphorylation of Rb thus blocking the transition of cells in the G0/G1 to S phase. In contrast, the synergistic effect was not profound in DU145 due to its lesser sensitivity to DTX. The suppression of cyclin B1 and CDK1 expression in both cell lines inhibits the further progression of cells in G2/M phase. The current study demonstrates that combination treatment blocks the cell cycle arrest by modulation of key regulators and promotes apoptosis via p53 dependent and independent mechanism in PCa.

  5. MicroRNA-210 regulates mitochondrial free radical response to hypoxia and krebs cycle in cancer cells by targeting iron sulfur cluster protein ISCU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Favaro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in cancers results in the upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 and a microRNA, hsa-miR-210 (miR-210 which is associated with a poor prognosis.In human cancer cell lines and tumours, we found that miR-210 targets the mitochondrial iron sulfur scaffold protein ISCU, required for assembly of iron-sulfur clusters, cofactors for key enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle, electron transport, and iron metabolism. Down regulation of ISCU was the major cause of induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS in hypoxia. ISCU suppression reduced mitochondrial complex 1 activity and aconitase activity, caused a shift to glycolysis in normoxia and enhanced cell survival. Cancers with low ISCU had a worse prognosis.Induction of these major hallmarks of cancer show that a single microRNA, miR-210, mediates a new mechanism of adaptation to hypoxia, by regulating mitochondrial function via iron-sulfur cluster metabolism and free radical generation.

  6. MicroRNA-210 regulates mitochondrial free radical response to hypoxia and krebs cycle in cancer cells by targeting iron sulfur cluster protein ISCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Elena; Ramachandran, Anassuya; McCormick, Robert; Gee, Harriet; Blancher, Christine; Crosby, Meredith; Devlin, Cecilia; Blick, Christopher; Buffa, Francesca; Li, Ji-Liang; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Glazer, Peter; Iborra, Francisco; Ivan, Mircea; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Harris, Adrian L

    2010-04-26

    Hypoxia in cancers results in the upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and a microRNA, hsa-miR-210 (miR-210) which is associated with a poor prognosis. In human cancer cell lines and tumours, we found that miR-210 targets the mitochondrial iron sulfur scaffold protein ISCU, required for assembly of iron-sulfur clusters, cofactors for key enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle, electron transport, and iron metabolism. Down regulation of ISCU was the major cause of induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hypoxia. ISCU suppression reduced mitochondrial complex 1 activity and aconitase activity, caused a shift to glycolysis in normoxia and enhanced cell survival. Cancers with low ISCU had a worse prognosis. Induction of these major hallmarks of cancer show that a single microRNA, miR-210, mediates a new mechanism of adaptation to hypoxia, by regulating mitochondrial function via iron-sulfur cluster metabolism and free radical generation.

  7. Anticancer effects of the flavonoid diosmetin on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MDA-MB 468 breast cancer cells due to CYP1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Mahale, Sachin; Arroo, Randolph R J; Potter, Gerry

    2009-06-01

    Flavonoids constitute a large class of polyphenolic compounds with cancer preventative properties. We have examined the ability of the natural flavone diosmetin to inhibit proliferation of breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB 468 and normal breast MCF-10A cells and found that this compound is selective for the cancer cells with slight toxicity in the normal breast cells. Diosmetin was metabolised to the structurally similar flavone luteolin in MDA-MB 468 cells, whereas no metabolism was seen in MCF-10A cells. Diosmetin caused G1 arrest at 10 microM in MDA-MB 468 cells after 48-h treatment whereas this effect was not observed in MCF-10A cells. We suggest that diosmetin exerts cytostatic effects in MDA-MB 468 cells, due to CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 catalyzed conversion to the flavone luteolin.

  8. Primers on molecular pathways - cycling toward pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Elsawa, Sherine F; Almada, Luciana L

    2010-01-01

    Human cells divide and proliferate during the early stages of life to support development, and throughout adult life to support normal cellular turnover. Each dividing cell follows an orderly and tightly regulated series of events known as the cell cycle. This process ensures proper cellular division that maintains DNA and chromosomal integrity and responds appropriately to external signals which communicate the level of demand for new cells. In cancer, genetic mutations leading to the overexpression of proteins which support cell cycle progression, or the downregulation of proteins involved in cell cycle inhibition contributes to the dysregulated cellular division and proliferation of malignant cells. The resulting uninhibited cellular proliferation provides ample opportunity for additional genetic mutations that lead to tumor progression. In the following review, we provide a brief introduction to the cell cycle and a discussion of the mechanism underlying the dysregulation of the cell cycle in human cancer. We pay particular attention to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, an aggressive tumor that has a 5-year survival rate of 3-5%, and is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the US. and IAP.

  9. Analysis of Cell Cycle Switches in Drosophila Oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongyu; Huang, Yi-Chun; Deng, Wu-Min

    2015-01-01

    The study of Drosophila oogenesis provides invaluable information about signaling pathway regulation and cell cycle programming. During Drosophila oogenesis, a string of egg chambers in each ovariole progressively develops toward maturity. Egg chamber development consists of 14 stages. From stage 1 to stage 6 (mitotic cycle), main-body follicle cells undergo mitotic divisions. From stage 7 to stage 10a (endocycle), follicle cells cease mitosis but continue three rounds of endoreduplication. From stage 10b to stage 13 (gene amplification), instead of whole genome duplication, follicle cells selectively amplify specific genomic regions, mostly for chorion production. So far, Drosophila oogenesis is one of the most well studied model systems used to understand cell cycle switches, which furthers our knowledge about cell cycle control machinery and sheds new light on potential cancer treatments. Here, we give a brief summary of cell cycle switches, the associated signaling pathways and factors, and the detailed experimental procedures used to study the cell cycle switches.

  10. The aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa induces cell cycle arrest in human cervical cancer cell lines SiHa (HPV-16 Positive and apoptosis in HeLa (HPV-18 positive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit S Choudhari

    Full Text Available Natural products are being extensively explored for their potential to prevent as well as treat cancer due to their ability to target multiple molecular pathways. Ficus religiosa has been shown to exert diverse biological activities including apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. In the present study, we report the anti-neoplastic potential of aqueous extract of F. religiosa (FRaq bark in human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. FRaq altered the growth kinetics of SiHa (HPV-16 positive and HeLa (HPV-18 positive cells in a dose-dependent manner. It blocked the cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in SiHa that was characterized by an increase in the expression of p53, p21 and pRb proteins with a simultaneous decrease in the expression of phospho Rb (ppRb protein. On the other hand, in HeLa, FRaq induced apoptosis through an increase in intracellular Ca(2+ leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c and increase in the expression of caspase-3. Moreover, FRaq reduced the migration as well as invasion capability of both the cervical cancer cell lines accompanied with downregulation of MMP-2 and Her-2 expression. Interestingly, FRaq reduced the expression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 in both the cervical cancer cell lines. All these data suggest that F. religiosa could be explored for its chemopreventive potential in cervical cancer.

  11. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  12. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman eAleem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia, and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219, pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638 as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  13. A resveratrol analog, phoyunbene B, induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanghui; Guo, Xiaoyu; Chen, Haifeng; Lin, Ting; Xu, Yang; Chen, Quancheng; Liu, Jie; Zeng, Jinzhang; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Yao, Xinsheng

    2012-03-01

    Among the seven natural resveratrol analogs separated and identified from Pholidota yunnanensis R(OLFE), we found phoyunbene B (PYB, trans-3,4'-dihydroxy-2',3',5-trimethoxystilbene) was more effective in inhibiting the growth of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells than resveratrol. The inhibitory effect of PYB in HepG2 cells was due to its induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Induction of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest by PYB was associated with its up-regulation of Cyclin B1, while its induction of apoptosis was accompanied with its down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax. Our in vitro invasion/migration assays also showed that PYB could inhibit the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The inhibition of PI3K and NFκB promoted curcumin-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M via altering polyamine metabolism in Bcl-2 overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrak, Özge; Akkoç, Yunus; Arısan, Elif Damla; Çoker-Gürkan, Ajda; Obakan-Yerlikaya, Pınar; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2016-02-01

    Bcl-2 protein has been contributed with number of genes which are involved in oncogenesis. Among the many targets of Bcl-2, NFκB have potential role in induction of cell cycle arrest. Curcumin has potential therapeutic effects against breast cancer through multiple signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of curcumin in induction of cell cycle arrest via regulating of NFκB and polyamine biosynthesis in wt and Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. To examine the effect of curcumin on cell cycle regulatory proteins, PI3K/Akt, NFκB pathways and polyamine catabolism, we performed immunoblotting assay. In addition, cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The results indicated that curcumin induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase by downregulation of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 and inhibited colony formation in MCF-7wt cells. However, Bcl-2 overexpression prevented the inhibition of cell cycle associated proteins after curcumin treatment. The combination of LY294002, PI3K inhibitor, and curcumin induced cell cycle arrest by decreasing CDK4, CDK2 and cyclin E2 in Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. Moreover, LY294002 further inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt in Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. Curcumin could suppress the nuclear transport of NFκB through decreasing the interaction of P-IκB-NFκB. The combination of wedelolactone, NFκB inhibitor, and curcumin acted different on SSAT expression in wt MCF-7 and Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. NFκB inhibition increased the SSAT after curcumin treatment in Bcl-2 overexpressed MCF-7 cells. Inhibition of NFκB activity as well as suppression of ROS generation with NAC resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint after curcumin treatment in wt MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, the potential role of curcumin in induction of cell cycle arrest is related with NFκB-regulated polyamine biosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative Characterization of Cell Behaviors through Cell Cycle Progression via Automated Cell Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuliang; Jeong, Younkoo; Jhiang, Sissy M.; Yu, Lianbo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Cell behaviors are reflections of intracellular tension dynamics and play important roles in many cellular processes. In this study, temporal variations in cell geometry and cell motion through cell cycle progression were quantitatively characterized via automated cell tracking for MCF-10A non-transformed breast cells, MCF-7 non-invasive breast cancer cells, and MDA-MB-231 highly metastatic breast cancer cells. A new cell segmentation method, which combines the threshold method and our modified edge based active contour method, was applied to optimize cell boundary detection for all cells in the field-of-view. An automated cell-tracking program was implemented to conduct live cell tracking over 40 hours for the three cell lines. The cell boundary and location information was measured and aligned with cell cycle progression with constructed cell lineage trees. Cell behaviors were studied in terms of cell geometry and cell motion. For cell geometry, cell area and cell axis ratio were investigated. For cell motion, instantaneous migration speed, cell motion type, as well as cell motion range were analyzed. We applied a cell-based approach that allows us to examine and compare temporal variations of cell behavior along with cell cycle progression at a single cell level. Cell body geometry along with distribution of peripheral protrusion structures appears to be associated with cell motion features. Migration speed together with motion type and motion ranges are required to distinguish the three cell-lines examined. We found that cells dividing or overlapping vertically are unique features of cell malignancy for both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas abrupt changes in cell body geometry and cell motion during mitosis are unique to highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our live cell tracking system serves as an invaluable tool to identify cell behaviors that are unique to malignant and/or highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PMID:24911281

  16. A novel quinazoline-based analog induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human A549 lung cancer cells via a ROS-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hailong; Li, Yan; Ren, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yaohong; Yang, Zhen; Qi, Chenze

    2017-04-29

    6-amino-4-(4-phenoxyphenylethylamino)quinazoline (QNZ) is an excellent quinazoline-containing NF-κB inhibitor also acting as a novel anticancer agent. Considering both the medicinal significance of quinazoline scaffold and the tunable functionality of Michael acceptor-centric pharmacophores in the electrophilicity-based prooxidant strategy, we designed a novel QNZ-inspired electrophilic molecule QNZ-A by introducing a Michael acceptor unit at position-6 of quinazoline ring in QNZ. Our results identified QNZ-A as a promising selective cytotoxic agent against A549 cells. QNZ-A, by virtue of its Michael acceptor unit, induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation associated with collapse of the redox buffering system in A549 cells. This caused up-regulation of p53-inducible p21 and down-regulation of redox sensitive Cdc25C along with Cyclin B1/Cdk1, leading to a G2/M cell cycle arrest and final cell apoptosis. By contrast, QNZ-B, a reduction product of QNZ-A lacking the Michael acceptor unit failed to induce ROS generation and all these cell cycle-related events. In conclusion, this work provided a successful example of designing QNZ-directed anticancer agent by a ROS-promoting strategy and identified QNZ-A as a selective anticancer agent against A549 cells through G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine?suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xen...

  18. Investigating core genetic-and-epigenetic cell cycle networks for stemness and carcinogenic mechanisms, and cancer drug design using big database mining and genome-wide next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cell cycle plays a central role in development and carcinogenesis. Thus, the use of big databases and genome-wide high-throughput data to unravel the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying cell cycle progression in stem cells and cancer cells is a matter of considerable interest. Real genetic-and-epigenetic cell cycle networks (GECNs) of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and HeLa cancer cells were constructed by applying system modeling, system identification, and big database mining to genome-wide next-generation sequencing data. Real GECNs were then reduced to core GECNs of HeLa cells and ESCs by applying principal genome-wide network projection. In this study, we investigated potential carcinogenic and stemness mechanisms for systems cancer drug design by identifying common core and specific GECNs between HeLa cells and ESCs. Integrating drug database information with the specific GECNs of HeLa cells could lead to identification of multiple drugs for cervical cancer treatment with minimal side-effects on the genes in the common core. We found that dysregulation of miR-29C, miR-34A, miR-98, and miR-215; and methylation of ANKRD1, ARID5B, CDCA2, PIF1, STAMBPL1, TROAP, ZNF165, and HIST1H2AJ in HeLa cells could result in cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis through NFκB, TGF-β, and PI3K pathways. We also identified 3 drugs, methotrexate, quercetin, and mimosine, which repressed the activated cell cycle genes, ARID5B, STK17B, and CCL2, in HeLa cells with minimal side-effects.

  19. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  20. Seed Oil of Brucea javanicaInduces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis via Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daxuan; Qu, Xueqin; Zhuang, Xibin; Geng, Guojun; Hou, Jihuan; Xu, Nengluan; Li, Wenlan; Hu, Tianhui; Chen, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Brucea javanica oil (BJO), a traditional herbal medicine extracted from the seeds of B. javanica, has been clinically used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in China. However, how BJO exerts this antitumor effect is still largely unknown. Here, effects of BJO on the growth of NSCLC and SCLC cell lines were investigated by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenytetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay, and the results showed that BJO inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells (NSCLC) and H446 cells (SCLC). Further studies revealed that BJO induced G0/G1 arrest partly via regulating p53 and cyclin D1 in these two cell lines. BJO also has pro-apoptotic effect on H446 and A549 cells through mitochondria/caspase-mediated pathway, which was initiated by the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings thus revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of BJO on SCLC and NSCLC, which may benefit the further clinical application of BJO.

  1. 5-alpha-reductase type I (SRD5A1 is up-regulated in non-small cell lung cancer but does not impact proliferation, cell cycle distribution or apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapp Friedrich G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the most frequent malignancies and has a high mortality rate due to late detection and lack of efficient treatments. Identifying novel drug targets for this indication may open the way for new treatment strategies. Comparison of gene expression profiles of NSCLC and normal adjacent tissue (NAT allowed to determine that 5-alpha-reductase type I (SRD5A1 was up-regulated in NSCLC compared to NAT. This raised the question whether SRD5A1 was involved in sustained proliferation and survival of NSCLC. Methods siRNA-mediated silencing of SRD5A1 was performed in A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell lines in order to determine the impact on proliferation, on distribution during the different phases of the cell cycle, and on apoptosis/necrosis. In addition, lung cancer cell lines were treated with 4-azasteroids, which specifically inhibit SRD5A1 activity, and the effects on proliferation were measured. Statistical analyses using ANOVA and post-hoc Tamhane-T2-test were performed. In the case of non-parametric data, the Kruskal-Wallis test and the post-hoc Mann-Whitney-U-test were used. Results The knock-down of SRDA51 expression was very efficient with the SRD5A1 transcripts being reduced to 10% of control levels. Knock-down efficiency was furthermore confirmed at the protein level. However, no effect of SRD5A1 silencing was observed in the proliferation assay, the cell cycle analysis, and the apoptosis/necrosis assay. Treatment of lung cancer cell lines with 4-azasteroids did not significantly inhibit proliferation. Conclusions In summary, the results suggest that SRD5A1 is not a crucial enzyme for the sustained proliferation of NSCLC cell lines.

  2. 1,25(OH)2D3 disrupts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer cells leading to a truncation of the TCA cycle and inhibition of TXNIP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Maaty, Mohamed A; Alborzinia, Hamed; Khan, Shehryar J; Büttner, Michael; Wölfl, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cell metabolism exhibits distinct profiles pre- and post-malignancy. The malignant metabolic shift converts prostate cells from "citrate-producing" to "citrate-oxidizing" cells, thereby enhancing glucose metabolism, a phenotype that contrasts classical tumoral Warburg metabolism. An on-line biosensor chip system (BIONAS 2500) was used to monitor metabolic changes (glycolysis and respiration) in response to the putative anti-cancer nutraceutical 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], in different prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (LNCaP, VCaP, DU145 and PC3). LNCaP cells exhibited profound metabolic responsiveness to the treatment and thus extensive analysis of metabolism-modulating effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 were performed, including mRNA expression analysis of key metabolic genes (e.g. GLUT1 and PDHK1), analysis of TCA cycle metabolites, glucose uptake/consumption measurements, ATP production, and mitochondrial biogenesis/activity. Altogether, data demonstrate a vivid disruption of glucose metabolism by 1,25(OH)2D3, illustrated by a decreased glucose uptake and an accumulation of citrate/isocitrate due to TCA cycle truncation. Depletion of glycolytic intermediates led to a consistent decrease in TXNIP expression in response to 1,25(OH)2D3, an effect that coincided with the activation of AMPK signaling and a reduction in c-MYC expression. Reduction in TXNIP levels in response to 1,25(OH)2D3 was rescued by an AMPK signaling inhibitor and mimicked by a MYC inhibitor highlighting the possible involvement of both pathways in mediating 1,25(OH)2D3's metabolic effects in PCa cells. Furthermore, pharmacological and genetic modulation of the androgen receptor showed similar and disparate effects on metabolic parameters compared to 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment, highlighting the AR-independent nature of 1,25(OH)2D3's metabolism-modulating effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional interplay between cell cycle and cell phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chiang; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Phillip, Jude M.; Khatau, Shyam B.; Choi, Jae Min; Dallas, Matthew R.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Sun, Sean X.; Lee, Jerry S.H.; Hodzic, Didier; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle distribution of adherent cells is typically assessed using flow cytometry, which precludes the measurements of many cell properties and their cycle phase in the same environment. Here we develop and validate a microscopy system to quantitatively analyze the cell-cycle phase of thousands of adherent cells and their associated cell properties simultaneously. This assay demonstrates that population-averaged cell phenotypes can be written as a linear combination of cell-cycle fractions and phase-dependent phenotypes. By perturbing cell cycle through inhibition of cell-cycle regulators or changing nuclear morphology by depletion of structural proteins, our results reveal that cell cycle regulators and structural proteins can significantly interfere with each other’s prima facie functions. This study introduces a high-throughput method to simultaneously measure cell cycle and phenotypes at single-cell resolution, which reveals a complex functional interplay between cell cycle and cell phenotypes. PMID:23319145

  4. Crataegus azarolus Leaves Induce Antiproliferative Activity, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human HT-29 and HCT-116 Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Simon, Alain; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-05-01

    Limited success has been achieved in extending the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). There is a strong need for novel agents in the treatment and prevention of CRC. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract in HCT-116 and HT-29 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, we attempted to investigate the signaling pathways that should be involved in its cytotoxic effect. The Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced growth inhibitory effect was associated with DNA fragmentation, sub-G1 peak, loss of mitochondrial potential, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus induced the cleavage of caspase-8. It has no effect on steady-state levels of total Bcl-2 protein. Whereas Bax levels decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in both tested cell lines. Taken together, these findings confirm the involvement of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The apoptotic cell death induced by ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus was accompanied by an enhancement of the p21 expression but not through p53 activation in human colorectal cancer cells. The above-mentioned data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced apoptosis in CRC. Therefore, this compound should be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of CRC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. MicroRNA-Related DNA Repair/Cell-Cycle Genes Independently Associated With Relapse After Radiation Therapy for Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, Harriet E., E-mail: harriet.gee@sydney.edu.au [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buffa, Francesca M.; Harris, Adrian L. [Department of Medical Oncology, The University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Toohey, Joanne M.; Carroll, Susan L. [The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Cooper, Caroline L. [Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Beith, Jane [The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); McNeil, Catriona [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Carmalt, Hugh; Mak, Cindy; Warrier, Sanjay [The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Holliday, Anne [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); Selinger, Christina; Beckers, Rhiannon [Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Kennedy, Catherine [Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW (Australia); Swarbrick, Alexander [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); St Vincent' s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Kensington, NSW (Australia); and others

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence and distant failure after adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer remain significant clinical problems, incompletely predicted by conventional clinicopathologic markers. We had previously identified microRNA-139-5p and microRNA-1274a as key regulators of breast cancer radiation response in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate standard clinicopathologic markers of local recurrence in a contemporary series and to establish whether putative target genes of microRNAs involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control could better predict radiation therapy response in vivo. Methods and Materials: With institutional ethics board approval, local recurrence was measured in a contemporary, prospectively collected series of 458 patients treated with radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Additionally, independent publicly available mRNA/microRNA microarray expression datasets totaling >1000 early-stage breast cancer patients, treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, with >10 years of follow-up, were analyzed. The expression of putative microRNA target biomarkers—TOP2A, POLQ, RAD54L, SKP2, PLK2, and RAG1—were correlated with standard clinicopathologic variables using 2-sided nonparametric tests, and to local/distant relapse and survival using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. Results: We found a low rate of isolated local recurrence (1.95%) in our modern series, and that few clinicopathologic variables (such as lymphovascular invasion) were significantly predictive. In multiple independent datasets (n>1000), however, high expression of RAD54L, TOP2A, POLQ, and SKP2 significantly correlated with local recurrence, survival, or both in univariate and multivariate analyses (P<.001). Low RAG1 expression significantly correlated with local recurrence (multivariate, P=.008). Additionally, RAD54L, SKP2, and PLK2 may be predictive, being prognostic in radiation therapy–treated patients but not in untreated matched

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, M.

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators play an important role during cell cycle progression. A subset of these even seems to have a critical function in regulating cell cycle transitions. In this thesis, I have addressed the importance of transcriptional control in the regulation of cell cycle progression, in

  7. Cytotoxicity and Proapoptotic Effects of Allium atroviolaceum Flower Extract by Modulating Cell Cycle Arrest and Caspase-Dependent and p53-Independent Pathway in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Khazaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women and despite significant advances in therapy, it remains a critical health problem worldwide. Allium atroviolaceum is an herbaceous plant, with limited information about the therapeutic capability. We aimed to study the anticancer effect of flower extract and the mechanisms of action in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The extract inhibits the proliferation of the cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The underlying mechanism involved the stimulation of S and G2/M phase arrest in MCF-7 and S phase arrest in MDA-MB-231 associated with decreased level of Cdk1, in a p53-independent pathway. Furthermore, the extract induces apoptosis in both cell lines, as indicated by the percentage of sub-G0 population, the morphological changes observed by phase contrast and fluorescent microscopy, and increase in Annexin-V-positive cells. The apoptosis induction was related to downregulation of Bcl-2 and also likely to be caspase-dependent. Moreover, the combination of the extract and tamoxifen exhibits synergistic effect, suggesting that it can complement current chemotherapy. LC-MS analysis displayed 17 major compounds in the extract which might be responsible for the observed effects. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential applications of Allium atroviolaceum extract as an anticancer drug for breast cancer treatment.

  8. Comparison of Two Components of Propolis: Caffeic Acid (CA and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE Induce Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Breast Cancer Cells MDA-MB-231

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Kabała-Dzik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies show that caffeic acid (CA and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE are compounds with potent chemopreventive effects. Breast cancer is a common form of aggressive cancer among women worldwide. This study shows a comparison of CA and CAPE activity on triple-negative human caucasian breast adenocarcinoma line cells (MDA-MB-231. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated by CA and CAPE with doses of from 10 to 100 µM, for periods of 24 h and 48 h. Cytotoxicity MTT tests, apoptosis by Annexin V, and cell cycle with Dead Cell Assays were performed. Cytotoxic activity was greater for CAPE compared to CA (both incubation times, same dosage. IC50 values for CAPE were 27.84 µM (24 h and 15.83 µM (48 h and for CA > 10,000 µM (24 h and > 1000 µM (48 h. Polyphenols induced apoptosis, while CAPE (dose dependently, induced a higher apoptotic effect. CAPE also induced cell cycle arrest in S phase (time and dose dependently, CA did it only for 50 and 100 µM. A dose dependent decline was seen for the G0/G1 phase (CAPE, 48 h, as well as elimination of phase G2/M by 100 µM of CAPE (only mild effect for CA. Comparing CA and CAPE activity on MDA-MB-231, CAPE clearly showed better activity for the same dosages and experiment times.

  9. Metabolic control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalucka, Joanna; Missiaen, Rindert; Georgiadou, Maria; Schoors, Sandra; Lange, Christian; De Bock, Katrien; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a metabolically demanding process, requiring the production of large amounts of energy and biomass. Not surprisingly therefore, a cell's decision to initiate division is co-determined by its metabolic status and the availability of nutrients. Emerging evidence reveals that metabolism is not only undergoing substantial changes during the cell cycle, but it is becoming equally clear that metabolism regulates cell cycle progression. Here, we overview the emerging role of those metabolic pathways that have been best characterized to change during or influence cell cycle progression. We then studied how Notch signaling, a key angiogenic pathway that inhibits endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, controls EC metabolism (glycolysis) during the cell cycle.

  10. Regulación del ciclo celular y desarrollo de cáncer: perspectivas terapéuticas Relationship between cell cycle and cancer development: Therapeutical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSCAR PERALTA-ZARAGOZA

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Durante el proceso de transformación de las células normales a células cancerosas, ocurren varias alteraciones genéticas. En este proceso se presenta la pérdida del control de los mecanismos de replicación y reparación del ADN, así como de la segregación del material genético. Aunque las células normales tienen estrategias de defensa contra el desarrollo del cáncer, las células tumorales activan diferentes vías de escape que permiten la progresión de la neoplasia. Avances recientes han permitido enfocar la investigación del cáncer hacia la identificación de algunos de sus factores etiológicos. El estudio del ciclo celular y su regulación han permitido conocer cómo la fidelidad y la integridad de la replicación del genoma son mantenidas por las funciones coordinadas de los puntos de control y de los sistemas de reparación del ADN. El funcionamiento adecuado de estos procesos puede ser alterado por mutaciones genéticas. Estos hallazgos sugieren que los mecanismos moleculares de regulación que participan en la transformación celular pueden ser empleados como sistemas potenciales para instrumentar nuevas terapias contra el desarrollo del cáncer.Several genetic alterations occur during the transformation process from normal to tumor cells, that involve the loss of fidelity of processes as replication, reparation, and segregation of the genomic material. Although normal cells have defense mechanisms against cancer progression, in tumor cells different escape pathways are activated leading to tumor progression. Recent advances have permitted cancer research to focus on the identification of some of its etiological factors. The knowledge of cell cycle reveals a precise mechanism achieved by the coordinated interactions and functions of cyclin-dependent kinases, control checkpoint, and repair pathways. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that this coordinated function can be abrogated by specific genetic changes. These

  11. Tumor suppressor gene p16/INK4A/CDKN2A-dependent regulation into and out of the cell cycle in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Payal; Sandey, Maninder; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-06-01

    p16/INK4A/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that arrests cell cycle in G1 phase inhibiting binding of CDK4/6 with cyclin D1, leaving the Rb tumor suppressor protein unphosphorylated and E2F bound and inactive. We hypothesized that p16 has a role in exit from cell cycle that becomes defective in cancer cells. Well characterized p16-defective canine mammary cancer cell lines (CMT28, CMT27, and CMT12), derived stably p16-transfected CMT cell clones (CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F), and normal canine fibroblasts (NCF), were used to investigate expression of p16 after serum starvation into quiescence followed by re-feeding to induce cell cycle re-entry. The parental CMT cell lines used lack p16 expression either at the mRNA or protein expression levels, while p27 and other p16-associated proteins, including CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1, and Rb, were expressed. We have successfully demonstrated cell cycle arrest and relatively synchronous cell cycle re-entry in parental CMT12, CMT28 and NCF cells as well as p16 transfected CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F cells and confirmed this by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution. p16-transfected CMT27A and CMT27H cells exited cell cycle post-serum-starvation in contrast to parental CMT27 cells. NCF, CMT27A, and CMT28F cells expressed upregulated levels of p27 and p16 mRNA, post-serum starvation, as cells exited cell cycle and entered quiescence. Because quiescence and differentiation are associated with increased levels of p27, our data demonstrating that p16 was upregulated along with p27 during quiescence, suggests a potential role for p16 in maintaining these non-proliferative states. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R. Evelyn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL and serum response factor (SRF drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B, which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis.

  13. MAPK uncouples cell cycle progression from cell spreading and cytoskeletal organization in cycling cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margadant, Coert; Cremers, Lobke; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Boonstra, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cytoskeletal tension supports growth-factor-induced proliferation, and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in growth factor-stimulated cells prevents the re-expression of cyclin D and cell cycle re-entry from quiescence. In contrast to cells that enter the cell cycle from G0, cycling cells continuously express cyclin D, and are subject to major cell shape changes during the cell cycle. Here, we investigated the cell cycle requirements for cytoskeletal tension and cell spreading in cycling mammalian cells that enter G1-phase from mitosis. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton at progressive time-points in G1-phase induced cell rounding, FA disassembly, and attenuated both integrin signaling and growth factor-induced p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Although cyclin D expression was reduced, the expression of cyclin A and entry into S-phase were not affected. Moreover, expression of cyclin B1, progression through G2- and M-phase, and commitment to a new cell cycle occurred normally. In contrast, cell cycle progression was strongly prevented by inhibition of MAPK activity in G1-phase, whereas cell spreading, cytoskeletal organization, and integrin signaling were not impaired. MAPK inhibition also prevented cytoskeleton-independent cell cycle progression. Thus, these results uncouple the requirements for cell spreading and cytoskeletal organization from MAPK signaling, and show that cycling mammalian cells can proliferate independently of actin stress fibers, focal adhesions, or cell spreading, as long as a threshold level of MAPK activity is sustained.

  14. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  15. Up-regulation of cell cycle arrest protein BTG2 correlates with increased overall survival in breast cancer, as detected by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirström Karin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that the ADIPOR1, ADORA1, BTG2 and CD46 genes differ significantly between long-term survivors of breast cancer and deceased patients, both in levels of gene expression and DNA copy numbers. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression of the corresponding proteins in breast carcinoma and to determine their correlation with clinical outcome. Methods Protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in an independent breast cancer cohort of 144 samples represented on tissue microarrays. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the differences in protein expression between dead and alive patients. We used Cox-regression multivariate analysis to assess whether the new markers predict the survival status of the patients better than the currently used markers. Results BTG2 expression was demonstrated in a significantly lower proportion of samples from dead patients compared to alive patients, both in overall expression (P = 0.026 and cell membrane specific expression (P = 0.013, whereas neither ADIPOR1, ADORA1 nor CD46 showed differential expression in the two survival groups. Furthermore, a multivariate analysis showed that a model containing BTG2 expression in combination with HER2 and Ki67 expression along with patient age performed better than a model containing the currently used prognostic markers (tumour size, nodal status, HER2 expression, hormone receptor status, histological grade, and patient age. Interestingly, BTG2 has previously been described as a tumour suppressor gene involved in cell cycle arrest and p53 signalling. Conclusions We conclude that high-level BTG2 protein expression correlates with prolonged survival in patients with breast carcinoma.

  16. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  17. Antiproliferative activity of novel thiopyran analogs on MCF-7 breast and HCT-15 colon cancer cells: synthesis, cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis, and DNA-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolinia, Fatemeh; Baghipour, Tayebeh; Hossaini, Zinatossadat; Zareyee, Daryoush; Khalilzadeh, Mohammad A; Rajabi, Mehdi

    2012-08-01

    A series of 6H-thiopyran-2,3-dicarboxylate derivatives 4a-d were synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxic effect against HCT-15 colon and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines using Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. The results showed that these compounds could exhibit a good cytotoxicity to both cell lines. In addition, these compounds were found to exhibit significant DNA-binding affinity. Ultraviolet-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy was conducted to determine the ability of the ligand under analysis. The effect of ligand complexation on DNA structure led to overall affinity constants of K(4a)=3.5×10(4) M(-1), K(4b)=6.4×10(4) M(-1), K(4c)=3.2×10(4) M(-1), and K(4d)=2.4×10(4) M(-1). Our findings could provide new evidence showing the relationship between the chemical structure and biological activity and may be useful for the discovery of new anti-cancer drugs.

  18. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carcinoma Small cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Secondhand smoke and lung cancer Normal lungs and alveoli Respiratory system Smoking hazards Bronchoscope References Horn L, Eisenberg R, ...

  19. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of exposure ...

  20. Weight cycling and cancer: weighing the evidence of intermittent caloric restriction and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Henry J; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Overweight and obese individuals frequently restrict caloric intake to lose weight. The resultant weight loss, however, typically is followed by an equal or greater weight gain, a phenomenon called weight cycling. Most attention to weight cycling has focused on identifying its detrimental effects, but preclinical experiments indicating that intermittent caloric restriction or fasting can reduce cancer risk have raised interest in potential benefits of weight cycling. Although hypothesized adverse effects of weight cycling on energy metabolism remain largely unsubstantiated, there is also a lack of epidemiologic evidence that intentional weight loss followed by regain of weight affects chronic-disease risk. In the limited studies of weight cycling and cancer, no independent effect on postmenopausal breast cancer but a modest enhancement of risk for renal cell carcinoma, endometrial cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have been reported. An effect of either intermittent caloric restriction or fasting in protecting against cancer is not supported by the majority of rodent carcinogenesis experiments. Collectively, the data argue against weight cycling and indicate that the objective of energy balance-based approaches to reduce cancer risk should be to strive to prevent adult weight gain and maintain body weight within the normal range defined by body mass index.

  1. Gene expression profiling: cell cycle deregulation and aneuploidy do not cause breast cancer formation in WAP-SVT/t transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andreas; Guhl, Eva; Zollinger, Raphael; Tzeng, Yin-Jeh; Wessel, Ralf; Hummel, Michael; Graessmann, Monika; Graessmann, Adolf

    2005-05-01

    Microarray studies revealed that as a first hit the SV40 T/t antigen causes deregulation of 462 genes in mammary gland cells (ME cells) of WAP-SVT/t transgenic animals. The majority of deregulated genes are cell proliferation specific and Rb-E2F dependent, causing ME cell proliferation and gland hyperplasia but not breast cancer formation. In the breast tumor cells a further 207 genes are differentially expressed, most of them belonging to the cell communication category. In tissue culture breast tumor cells frequently switch off WAP-SVT/t transgene expression and regain the morphology and growth characteristics of normal ME cells, although the tumor-revertant cells are aneuploid and only 114 genes regain the expression level of normal ME cells. The profile of retransformants shows that only 38 deregulated genes are tumor-specific, and that none of them is considered to be a typical breast cancer gene.

  2. EZH2 promotes malignant behaviors via cell cycle dysregulation and its mRNA level associates with prognosis of patient with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cao

    Full Text Available Epigenetic silencing is a common mechanism to inactivate tumor suppressor genes during carcinogenesis. Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2 is the histone methyltransferase subunit in polycomb repressive complex 2 which mediates transcriptional repression through histone methylation. EZH2 overexpression has been linked to aggressive phenotypes of certain cancers. However, the mechanism that EZH2 played in promoting malignancy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains unclear. In addition, the correlation of EZH2 overexpression and the prognosis of NSCLC patients in non-Asian cohort need to be determined.Up-regulation of EZH2 was found in NSCLC cells compared with normal human bronchial epithelial cells by western blot assay. Upon EZH2 knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA, the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and invasion of NSCLC cells were remarkably suppressed with profound induction of G1 arrest. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin D1 was notably reduced whereas p15(INK4B, p21(Waf1/Cip1 and p27(Kip1 were increased in NSCLC cells after EZH2-siRNA delivery. To determine whether EZH2 expression contributes to disease progression in patients with NSCLC, Taqman quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure the expression of EZH2 in paired tumor and normal samples. Univariate analysis revealed that patients with NSCLC whose tumors had a higher EZH2 expression had significantly inferior overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survivals compared to those whose tumors expressed lower EZH2 (P = 0.005, P = 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively. In multivariate analysis, EZH2 expression was an independent predictor of disease-free survival (hazard ratio = 0.450, 95% CI: 0.270 to 0.750, P = 0.002.Our results demonstrate that EZH2 overexpression is critical for NSCLC progression. EZH2 mRNA levels may serve as a prognostic predictor for patients with NSCLC.

  3. Systems Level Modeling of the Cell Cycle Using Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in the regulation of the cell cycle are highly conserved across all eukaryotes, and so a relatively simple eukaryote such as yeast can provide insight into a variety of cell cycle perturbations including those that occur in human cancer. To date, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided the largest amount of experimental and modeling data on the progression of the cell cycle, making it a logical choice for in-depth studies of this process. Moreover, the advent of methods for collection of high-throughput genome, transcriptome, and proteome data has provided a means to collect and precisely quantify simultaneous cell cycle gene transcript and protein levels, permitting modeling of the cell cycle on the systems level. With the appropriate mathematical framework and suffi cient and accurate data on cell cycle components, it should be possible to create a model of the cell cycle that not only effectively describes its operation, but can also predict responses to perturbations such as variation in protein levels and responses to external stimuli including targeted inhibition by drugs. In this review, we summarize existing data on the yeast cell cycle, proteomics technologies for quantifying cell cycle proteins, and the mathematical frameworks that can integrate this data into representative and effective models. Systems level modeling of the cell cycle will require the integration of high-quality data with the appropriate mathematical framework, which can currently be attained through the combination of dynamic modeling based on proteomics data and using yeast as a model organism.

  4. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL, a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells.

  5. G2/M cell cycle arrest on HT-29 cancer cells and toxicity assessment of triphenylphosphanegold(I) carbonimidothioates, Ph3PAu[SC(OR)=NPh], R=Me, Et, and iPr, during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Kah Kooi; Yeo, Chien Ing; Mahandaran, Theventhiran; Ang, Kok Pian; Akim, Abdah Md; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Seng, Hoi-Ling; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2017-01-01

    Phosphanegold(I) thiolates, Ph3PAu[SC(OR)=NPh], R=Me (1), Et (2) and iPr (3), were previously shown to be significantly cytotoxic toward HT-29 cancer cells and to induce cell death by both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways whereby 1 activated the p73 gene, and each of 2 and 3 activated p53; 2 also caused apoptotic cell death via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Apoptosis pathways have been further evaluated by mitochondrial cytochrome c measurements and annexin V screening, confirming apoptotic pathways of cell death. Cell cycle analysis showed the majority of treated HT-29 cells were arrested at the G2/M checkpoint after 24h; results of both assays were confirmed by changes in populations of relevant genes (PCR array analysis). Cell invasion studies showed inhibition of metastasis through Matrigel™ matrix to 17-22% cf. untreated cells. LC50 values were determined in zebrafish (8.36, 8.17, and 7.64μM for 1-3). Finally, the zebrafish tolerated doses of 1 and 2 up to 0.625μM, and 3 was tolerated at even higher doses of up to 1.25μM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Esculetin, a natural coumarin compound, evokes Ca(2+) movement and activation of Ca(2+)-associated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved cell cycle arrest in ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong-Tai; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Lin, You-Sheng; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Jan, Chung-Ren; Liang, Wei-Zhe

    2016-04-01

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin), a derivative of coumarin compound, is found in traditional medicinal herbs. It has been shown that esculetin triggers diverse cellular signal transduction pathways leading to regulation of physiology in different models. However, whether esculetin affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in breast cancer cells has not been explored. This study examined the underlying mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by esculetin and established the relationship between Ca(2+) signaling and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. The results showed that esculetin induced concentration-dependent rises in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in ZR-75-1 (but not in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cells. In ZR-75-1 cells, this Ca(2+) signal response was reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+) and was inhibited by the store-operated Ca(2+) channel blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). In Ca(2+)-free medium, pre-treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) abolished esculetin-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Conversely, incubation with esculetin abolished TG-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Esculetin induced cytotoxicity that involved apoptosis, as supported by the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and the proteolytic activation of caspase-9/caspase-3, which were partially reversed by pre-chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Moreover, esculetin increased the percentage of cells in G2/M phase and regulated the expressions of p53, p21, CDK1, and cyclin B1. Together, in ZR-75-1 cells, esculetin induced [Ca(2+)]i rises by releasing Ca(2+) from the ER and causing Ca(2+) influx through 2-APB-sensitive store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Furthermore, esculetin activated Ca(2+)-associated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved G2/M cell cycle arrest. Graphical abstract The summary of esculetin

  7. Combination of 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan on modulation of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase I expression and cell cycle regulation in human colon cancer LoVo cells: clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Ming; Azzariti, Amalia; Tommasi, Stefania; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Colucci, Giuseppe; Johnston, Patrick G; Church, Stewart W; Paradiso, Angelo

    2002-11-01

    This study was designed to explore the possible interaction of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) in vitro. Human colon cancer LoVo cells were treated in both a dose- and time-dependent manner using clinically relevant concentrations of and exposure to 5-FU and/or SN-38. The expression of thymidylate synthase (TS), topoisomerase I, and cell cycle kinetics were evaluated by Western blot analysis and flow cytometry, respectively. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. The cytotoxic effects of combination treatment were determined by median effect analysis. Topoisomerase I expression was downregulated following 12 hours of exposure to treatment, and topoisomerase I expression recovered 8 hours after SN-38 was removed. The TS expression was decreased following 24 hours of 5-FU and it remained at reduced levels for > 24 hours after removal of 5-FU. SN-38 induced an arrest at S/G2/M phase, reaching its maximum effect at 12 hours. This cell cycle arrest was reversed 24 hours after SN-38 was removed. 5-FU induced an arrest at the S phase, and maximum arrest occurred at 12 hours and lasted for > 48 hours. After 12 hours of sequential SN-38, LoVo cells were arrested in S phase, thereby potentiating the effect of 5-FU. Cytotoxicity studies confirmed the synergistic interaction between 5-FU and irinotecan. These findings suggest that the proper sequencing of 5-FU/irinotecan depends on regulation of topoisomerase I, and cell cycle kinetics

  8. The emerging role and targetability of the TCA cycle in cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nicole M; Mucka, Patrick; Kern, Joseph G; Feng, Hui

    2017-07-26

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central route for oxidative phosphorylation in cells, and fulfills their bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and redox balance requirements. Despite early dogma that cancer cells bypass the TCA cycle and primarily utilize aerobic glycolysis, emerging evidence demonstrates that certain cancer cells, especially those with deregulated oncogene and tumor suppressor expression, rely heavily on the TCA cycle for energy production and macromolecule synthesis. As the field progresses, the importance of aberrant TCA cycle function in tumorigenesis and the potentials of applying small molecule inhibitors to perturb the enhanced cycle function for cancer treatment start to evolve. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the fuels feeding the cycle, effects of oncogenes and tumor suppressors on fuel and cycle usage, common genetic alterations and deregulation of cycle enzymes, and potential therapeutic opportunities for targeting the TCA cycle in cancer cells. With the application of advanced technology and in vivo model organism studies, it is our hope that studies of this previously overlooked biochemical hub will provide fresh insights into cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis, subsequently revealing vulnerabilities for therapeutic interventions in various cancer types.

  9. The TCA cycle as a bridge between oncometabolism and DNA transactions in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarone, Fabio; Vegliante, Rolando; Di Leo, Luca; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2017-12-01

    Cancer cells exploit metabolic rearrangements for sustaining their high proliferation rate and energy demand. The TCA cycle is a central metabolic hub necessary for ATP production and for providing precursors used in many biosynthetic pathways. Thus, dysregulation of the TCA cycle flux is frequently observed in cancer. The identification of mutations in several enzymes of the TCA cycle in human tumours demonstrated a direct connection between this metabolic pathway and cancer occurrence. Moreover, changes in the expression/activity of these enzymes were also shown to promote metabolic adaptation of cancer cells. In this review, the main genetic and non-genetic alterations of TCA cycle in cancer will be described. Particular attention will be given to extrametabolic roles of TCA cycle enzymes and metabolites underlying the regulation of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA transactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  11. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ansems (Marleen); J.N. Søndergaard (Jonas Nørskov); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); M.W.G. Looman (Maaike W. G.); M. Smid (Marcel); A.M.A. de Graaf (Annemarie M. A.); V. de Weerd (Vanja); M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); J.A. Foekens (John); J.W.M. Martens (John); G.J. Adema (Gosse J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent

  12. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansems, M.; Sondergaard, J.N.; Sieuwerts, A.M.; Looman, M.W.G.; Smid, M.; Graaf, A.M.A. de; Weerd, V. de; Zuidscherwoude, M.; Foekens, J.A.; Martens, J.W.; Adema, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERalpha) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERalpha and as a strong and independent

  13. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    cycles. This junction may determine the characteristic parvovirus tropism for proliferative and cancer cells, and its disturbance could critically contribute to persistence in host tissues. PMID:26067441

  14. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  15. Cell cycle control factors and skeletal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Ogasawara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the oral and maxillofacial region, conditions such as delayed bone healing after tooth extraction, bone fracture, trauma-induced bone or cartilage defects, and tumors or birth defects are common, and it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that control skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, in order to establish new treatment strategies for these conditions. Multiple studies have been conducted to investigate the involvement of factors that may be crucial for skeletogenesis or the differentiation of cells, including transcription factors, growth factors and cell cycle factors. Several genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors have been generated in research seeking to identify cell cycle factor(s involved in the differentiation of cells, carcinogenesis, etc. Many groups have also reported the importance of cell cycle factors in the differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes and other cell types. Herein, we review the phenotypes of the genetically engineered mouse models of cell cycle factors with a particular focus on the size, body weight and skeletal abnormalities of the mice, and we discuss the potential of cell cycle factors as targets of clinical applications.

  16. Microfluidic Cell Cycle Analysis of Spread Cells by DAPI Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell cell cycle analysis is an emerging technique that requires detailed exploration of the image analysis process. In this study, we established a microfluidic single-cell cell cycle analysis method that can analyze cells in small numbers and in situ on a microfluidic chip. In addition, factors that influenced the analysis were carefully investigated. U87 or HeLa cells were seeded and attached to microfluidic channels before measurement. Cell nucleic DNA was imaged by 4′-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining under a fluorescent microscope and subsequently fluorescent intensities of the cell nuclei DNA were converted to depict histograms for cell cycle phases. DAPI concentration, microscopic magnification, exposure time and cell number were examined for optimal cell cycle analysis conditions. The results showed that as few as a few hundred cells could be measured by DAPI staining in the range of 0.4–0.6 μg/mL to depict histograms with typical cell cycle phase distribution. Microscopic magnification during image acquisition, however, could distort the phase distribution. Exposure time did not significantly affect the cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, cell cycle inhibitor rapamycin treatment changed the cell cycle phase distribution as expected. In conclusion, a method for microfluidic single-cell cell cycle analysis of spread cells in situ was developed. Factors such as dye concentration and microscopic magnification had more influence on cell cycle phase distribution. Further studies will focus on detail differentiation of cell cycle phases and the application of such a method for biological meanings.

  17. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  18. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer. PMID:26029155

  19. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  20. Cancer stem cell metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    .... Cancer stem cells also seem to adapt their metabolism to microenvironmental changes by conveniently shifting energy production from one pathway to another, or by acquiring intermediate metabolic phenotypes...

  1. Delayed cell cycle progression from SEPW1 depletion is p53- and p21-dependent in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential redox-active element with close connections to cancer. Most of Se’s biological functions have been attributed to the antioxidant properties of Se-containing proteins. The relative contribution of selenoproteins and small Se compounds in cancer protection is a matter of ...

  2. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) induces ferroptosis and causes cell cycle arrest in head and neck carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Renyu; Zhang, Ziheng; Chen, Lingfeng; Zhou, Yunfang; Zou, Peng; Feng, Chen; Wang, Li; Liang, Guang

    2016-10-10

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, exhibits a wide range of biological roles including a highly efficient and specific anti-tumor activity. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of DHA on head and neck carcinoma cells and elucidate the potential mechanisms. We used five head and neck carcinoma cell lines and two non-tumorigenic normal epithelial cell lines to achieve our goals. Cells were exposed to DHA and subjected to cellular activity assays including viability, cell cycle analysis, cell death, and angiogenic phenotype. Our results show that DHA causes cell cycle arrest which is mediated through Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1). We also demonstrate that DHA induces ferroptosis and apoptosis in head and neck carcinoma cells. Lastly, our results show that DHA alters the angiogenic phenotype of cancer cells by reducing the expression of angiogenic factors and the ability of cancer cells to support endothelial cell tubule formation. Our study suggests that DHA specifically causes head and neck cancer cell death through contribution from both ferroptosis and apoptosis. DHA may represent an effective strategy in head and neck cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of cell cycle bio-markers and telomere length in papillary thyroid carcinoma: a comparative study between radiation-associated and spontaneous cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achille, M.; Boukheris, H.; Caillou, B.; Talbot, M.; De Vathaire, F.; Sabatier, L.; Desmaze, C.; Schlumberger, M.; Soria, J.C. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, DSV/DRR/Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Villejuif (France)

    2009-07-01

    Objective: Radiation exposure during childhood is the only well-established risk factor for papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). To better define the biologic profile of radiation-induced and sporadic PTC, we compared in these two groups of PTC the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and telomere length. Methods: Cell cycle markers (cyclin A, B1, D1, E, and Ki67) were evaluated on 100 PTC specimens (26 radiation-induced and 74 sporadic PTCs). The expression of cell cycle regulators was studied using immunohistochemistry; telomere length heterogeneity was studied using in situ hybridization in a subset of 16 formalin-fixed samples (8 radiation-induced and 8 sporadic PTCs). Results: At multivariate analysis, only cytoplasmic cyclin E staining was over expressed in sporadic cases (P = 0.006). The other cell cycle markers and telomere length did not differ significantly between sporadic PTC and radiation-induced PTC. Conclusions: These markers cannot be used to differentiate radiation-induced from sporadic PTCs. (authors)

  4. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  5. Cell cycle activation by plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Almeida Engler, de J.; Verhees, J.; Krol, van der S.; Helder, J.; Gheysen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are important pests of crop plants. They are biotrophic parasites that can induce the (re)differentiation of either differentiated or undifferentiated plant cells into specialized feeding cells. This (re)differentiation includes the reactivation of the cell cycle in specific

  6. Basal cell cancer (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure ... is required to watch for new sites of basal cell cancer.

  7. Prostate cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate gland formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative androgen receptor-negative (AR(-)) status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade therapy. The androgen-regulated gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG could be used to clarify both the cells of origin and the evolution of prostate cancer cells. In this review, we show that the hypothesis that distinct subtypes of cancer result from abnormalities within specific cell types-the stem cell theory of cancer-may instigate a major paradigm shift in cancer research and therapy. Ultimately, the stem cell theory of cancers will affect how we practice clinical oncology: our diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy of prostate and other cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic alterations in Krebs cycle and its impact on cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajnani, Karishma; Islam, Farhadul; Smith, Robert Anthony; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells exhibit alterations in many cellular processes, including oxygen sensing and energy metabolism. Glycolysis in non-oxygen condition is the main energy production process in cancer rather than mitochondrial respiration as in benign cells. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of Krebs cycle enzymes favour the shift of cancer cells from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis. Mutations in genes encoding aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and citrate synthase are noted in many cancers. Abnormalities of Krebs cycle enzymes cause ectopic production of Krebs cycle intermediates (oncometabolites) such as 2-hydroxyglutarate, and citrate. These oncometabolites stabilize hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1), nuclear factor like 2 (Nrf2), inhibit p53 and prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PDH3) activities as well as regulate DNA/histone methylation, which in turn activate cell growth signalling. They also stimulate increased glutaminolysis, glycolysis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, genetic alterations in Krebs cycle enzymes are involved with increased fatty acid β-oxidations and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction. These altered phenomena in cancer could in turn promote carcinogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and survival. Overall, epigenetic and genetic changes of Krebs cycle enzymes lead to the production of oncometabolite intermediates, which are important driving forces of cancer pathogenesis and progression. Understanding and applying the knowledge of these mechanisms opens new therapeutic options for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Visualizing cell-cycle kinetics after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tatsuaki; Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-12-10

    Hypoxia induces G1 arrest in many cancer cell types. Tumor cells are often exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation, especially under acute hypoxic conditions in vivo. In this study, we investigated cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Hypoxic treatment halted cell-cycle progression during mid-S to G2 phase, as determined by the cell cycle-regulated E3 ligase activities of SCF(Skp2) and APC/C(Cdh1), which are regulators of the Fucci probes; however, the DNA content of the arrested cells was equivalent to that in G1 phase. After reoxygenation, time-lapse imaging and DNA content analysis revealed that all cells reached G2 phase, and that Fucci fluorescence was distinctly separated into two fractions 24h after reoxygenation: red cells that released from G2 arrest after repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) exhibited higher clonogenic survival, whereas most cells that stayed green contained many DSBs and exhibited lower survival. We conclude that hypoxia disrupts coordination of DNA synthesis and E3 ligase activities associated with cell-cycle progression, and that DSB repair could greatly influence cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ETV4 Facilitates Cell-Cycle Progression in Pancreatic Cells through Transcriptional Regulation of Cyclin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Nikhil; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Azim, Shafquat; Ahmad, Aamir; Al-Ghadhban, Ahmed; Singh, Ajay P; Carter, James E; Wang, Bin; Singh, Seema

    2017-11-08

    The ETS family transcription factor ETV4 is aberrantly expressed in a variety of human tumors and plays an important role in carcinogenesis through upregulation of relevant target gene expression. Here, it is demonstrated that ETV4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues as compared with the normal pancreas, and is associated with enhanced growth and rapid cell-cycle progression of pancreatic cancer cells. ETV4 expression was silenced through stable expression of a specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (ASPC1 and Colo357), while it was ectopically expressed in BXPC3 cells. Silencing of ETV4 in ASPC1 and Colo357 cells reduced the growth by 55.3% and 38.9%, respectively, while forced expression of ETV4 in BXPC3 cells increased the growth by 46.8% in comparison with respective control cells. Furthermore, ETV4-induced cell growth was facilitated by rapid transition of cells from G1- to S-phase of the cell cycle. Mechanistic studies revealed that ETV4 directly regulates the expression of Cyclin D1 CCND1, a protein crucial for cell-cycle progression from G1- to S-phase. These effects on the growth and cell cycle were reversed by the forced expression of Cyclin D1 in ETV4-silenced pancreatic cancer cells. Altogether, these data provide the first experimental evidence for a functional role of ETV4 in pancreatic cancer growth and cell-cycle progression.Implications: The functional and mechanistic data presented here regarding ETV4 in pancreatic cancer growth and cell-cycle progression suggest that ETV4 could serve as a potential biomarker and novel target for pancreatic cancer therapy. Mol Cancer Res; 1-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Single-cell model of prokaryotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abner, Kristo; Aaviksaar, Tõnis; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-01-21

    One of the recognized prokaryotic cell cycle theories is Cooper-Helmstetter (CH) theory which relates start of DNA replication to particular (initiation) cell mass, cell growth and division. Different aspects of this theory have been extensively studied in the past. In the present study CH theory was applied at single cell level. Universal equations were derived for different cell parameters (cell mass and volume, surface area, DNA amount and content) depending on constructivist cell cycle parameters (unit mass, replication and division times, cell age, cell cycle duration) based on selected growth laws of cell mass (linear, exponential). The equations derived can be integrated into single-cell models for the analysis and design of bacterial cells. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A map of protein dynamics during cell-cycle progression and cell-cycle exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gookin, Sara; Min, Mingwei; Phadke, Harsha; Chung, Mingyu; Moser, Justin; Miller, Iain; Carter, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    The cell-cycle field has identified the core regulators that drive the cell cycle, but we do not have a clear map of the dynamics of these regulators during cell-cycle progression versus cell-cycle exit. Here we use single-cell time-lapse microscopy of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2) activity followed by endpoint immunofluorescence and computational cell synchronization to determine the temporal dynamics of key cell-cycle proteins in asynchronously cycling human cells. We identify several unexpected patterns for core cell-cycle proteins in actively proliferating (CDK2-increasing) versus spontaneously quiescent (CDK2-low) cells, including Cyclin D1, the levels of which we find to be higher in spontaneously quiescent versus proliferating cells. We also identify proteins with concentrations that steadily increase or decrease the longer cells are in quiescence, suggesting the existence of a continuum of quiescence depths. Our single-cell measurements thus provide a rich resource for the field by characterizing protein dynamics during proliferation versus quiescence. PMID:28892491

  13. Cancer stem cells of the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Hugh S; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cells of the digestive system are ideal in many ways for research, given they are abundant, highly proliferative and have a uniform structural arrangement. This in turn has enormously aided the research of cancer stem cells of the digestive system, which is now shaping our understanding of cancer stem cells. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of cancer stem cells of the digestive system have been summarized, including aspects such as their identification, origin, cell-cycle dormancy, relationship with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular metabolism and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newly acquired knowledge concerning cancer stem cells have led to the development of novel cancer therapeutics with provisional yet encouraging results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.baptista@ist.utl.pt [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley [Intelligent Energy, Charnwood Building, HolywellPark, Ashby Road, Loughborough, LE11 3GR (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO{sub 2} emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: > A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. > The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions results. > A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  15. Mitochondrial regulation of cell cycle progression through SLC25A43

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielson, Marike; Reizer, Edwin [School of Health and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden); Stål, Olle [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Linköping University, SE 58185 Linköping (Sweden); Tina, Elisabet, E-mail: elisabet.tina@regionorebrolan.se [Department of Clinical Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, SE 70182 Örebro (Sweden)

    2016-01-22

    An increasing body of evidence is pointing towards mitochondrial regulation of the cell cycle. In a previous study of HER2-positive tumours we could demonstrate a common loss in the gene encoding for the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43 and also a significant relation between SLC25A43 protein expression and S-phase fraction. Here, we investigated the consequence of suppressed SLC25A43 expression on cell cycle progression and proliferation in breast epithelial cells. In the present study, we suppressed SLC25A43 using siRNA in immortalised non-cancerous breast epithelial MCF10A cells and HER2-positive breast cancer cells BT-474. Viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation rate, cell cycle phase distribution, and nuclear Ki-67 and p21, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle related gene expressions were analysed using real-time PCR. We found that SLC25A43 knockdown in MCF10A cells significantly inhibited cell cycle progression during G{sub 1}-to-S transition, thus significantly reducing the proliferation rate and fraction of Ki-67 positive MCF10A cells. In contrast, suppressed SLC25A43 expression in BT-474 cells resulted in a significantly increased proliferation rate together with an enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S transition. This was reflected by an increased fraction of Ki-67 positive cells and reduced level of nuclear p21. In line with our previous results, we show a role for SLC25A43 as a regulator of cell cycle progression and proliferation through a putative mitochondrial checkpoint. These novel data further strengthen the connection between mitochondrial function and the cell cycle, both in non-malignant and in cancer cells. - Highlights: • Proposed cell cycle regulation through the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43. • SLC25A43 alters cell proliferation rate and cell cycle progression. • Suppressed SLC25A43 influences transcription of cell cycle regulatory genes.

  16. MiRNA-362-3p induces cell cycle arrest through targeting of E2F1, USF2 and PTPN1 and is associated with recurrence of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Tobiasen, Heidi; Holm, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in Western countries. A significant number of CRC patients undergoing curatively intended surgery subsequently develop recurrence and die from the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in cancers and appear to have......-3p in a second independent cohort of 43 CRC patients, using single TaqMan® microRNA assays. In vitro functional analysis showed that over-expression of miR-362-3p in colon cancer cell lines reduced cell viability, and proliferation mainly due to cell cycle arrest. E2F1, USF2 and PTPN1 were identified...... both diagnostic and prognostic significance. In this study, we identified novel miRNAs associated with recurrence of CRC, and their possible mechanism of action. TaqMan® Human MicroRNA Array Set v2.0 was used to profile the expression of 667 miRNAs in 14 normal colon mucosas and 46 microsatellite...

  17. Analysis of cell-cycle regulation following exposure of lung-derived cells to γ-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, D.; Lucchetti, C.; Cassone, M.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Acute exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation results in a delay of cell-cycle progression and/or augmentation of apoptosis. Following ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest in the G1- or G2-phase of the cell-cycle prevents or delays DNA replication or mitosis, providing time for the DNA repair machinery to exert its function. Deregulation or failing of cell-cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair mechanisms may lead normal cells bearing chromosome mutations to acquire neoplastic autonomy, which in turn can trigger the onset of cancer. Existing studies have focused on the impact of p53 status on the radiation response of lung cancer (LC) cell lines in terms of both cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis, while no comparative studies have been performed on the radiation response of lung derived normal and cancerous epithelial cells. To investigate the radiation response in normal and cancerous phenotypes, along with the role and impact of p53 status, and possible correlations with pRb/p105 or other proteins involved in carcinogenesis and cell-cycle regulation, we selected two lung-derived epithelial cell lines, one normal (NL20, p53 wild-type) and one non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), H358 (known to be p53-deficient). We compared the levels of γ-induced cell proliferation ability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptotic index, and expression levels of cell-cycle regulating and regulated proteins. The different cell sensitivity, apoptotic response and protein expression profiles resulting from our study for NL20 and H358 cells suggest that still unknown mechanisms involving p53, pRb/p105 and their target molecules might play a pivotal role in determining cell sensitivity and resistance upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  18. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  19. Regulation of cell cycle transition and induction of apoptosis in HL-60 leukemia cells by lipoic acid: role in cancer prevention and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh Tze-chen; Selvakumar Elangovan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Lipoic acid (LA), a potent antioxidant, has been used as a dietary supplement to prevent and treat many diseases, including stroke, diabetes, neurodegenerative and hepatic disorders. Recently, potent anti-tumorigenic effects induced by LA were also reported and evident as assayed by suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in malignant cells. However, the mechanism by which LA elicits its chemopreventive effects remains unclear. Methods and Results Here...

  20. Forced Expression of ZNF143 Restrains Cancer Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kimitoshi Kohno; Noriaki Kitamura; Akihiro Kuma; Yoshihiro Yasuniwa; Takahiro Yamaguchi; Masaki Akiyama; Hiroto Izumi

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that the transcription factor Zinc Finger Protein 143 (ZNF143) regulates the expression of genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, and that downregulation of ZNF143 induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. To assess the function of ZNF143 expression in the cell cycle, we established two cells with forced expression of ZNF143 derived from PC3 prostate cancer cell lines. These cell lines overexpress genes associated with cell cycle and cell division, such as polo-li...

  1. Pseudolaric acid B induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma l929 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing hua; Liu, Chun yu; Zheng, Gui bin; Zhang, Li Ying; Yan, Ming hui; Zhang, Wen yan; Meng, Xian ying; Yu, Xiao fang

    2013-01-01

    PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC.

  2. Hurthle Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Hurthle cell cancer Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  3. Basal cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell skin cancer almost never spreads. If it is left untreated, it may spread into surrounding areas and nearby tissues and bone. In these cases, treatment can injure the appearance of the skin.

  4. Optimal Live Cell Tracking for Cell Cycle Study Using Time-Lapse Fluorescent Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuhai; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    Cell cycle study using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy images is important for understanding the mechanisms of cell division and screening of anti-cancer drugs. Cell tracking is necessary for quantifying cell behaviors. However, the complex behaviors and similarity of individual cells in a dense population make the cell population tracking challenging. To deal with these challenges, we propose a novel tracking algorithm, in which the local neighboring information is introduced to distinguish the nearby cells with similar morphology, and the Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter is employed to compensate for cell migrations. Based on a similarity metric, integrating the local neighboring information, migration prediction, shape and intensity, the integer programming is used to achieve the most stable association between cells in two consecutive frames. We evaluated the proposed method on the high content screening assays of HeLa cancer cell populations, and achieved 92% average tracking accuracy.

  5. Introductory review of computational cell cycle modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriete, Andres; Noguchi, Eishi; Sell, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the modeling of the cell cycle through computer simulation demonstrate the power of systems biology. By definition, systems biology has the goal to connect a parts list, prioritized through experimental observation or high-throughput screens, by the topology of interactions defining intracellular networks to predict system function. Computer modeling of biological systems is often compared to a process of reverse engineering. Indeed, designed or engineered technical systems share many systems-level properties with biological systems; thus studying biological systems within an engineering framework has proven successful. Here we review some aspects of this process as it pertains to cell cycle modeling.

  6. Ursolic acid induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of gallbladder carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Hao; Tan, Zhu-Jun; Hu, Yun-Ping; Shu, Yi-Jun; Bao, Run-Fa; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Xiang-Song; Li, Mao-Lan; Ding, Qian; Wang, Xu-An; Xiang, Shan-Shan; Li, Huai-Feng; Cao, Yang; Tao, Feng; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Ursolic acid (UA), a plant extract used in traditional Chinese medicine, exhibits potential anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-tumoral properties of UA against gallbladder carcinoma and investigated the potential mechanisms responsible for its effects on proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro. Methods The anti-tumor activity of UA against GBC-SD and SGC-996 cells was assessed using MTT and col...

  7. Control points within the cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  8. Response of breast cancer cells and cancer stem cells to metformin and hyperthermia alone or combined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyemi Lee

    Full Text Available Metformin, the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes, has been shown to exert significant anticancer effects. Hyperthermia has been known to kill cancer cells and enhance the efficacy of various anti-cancer drugs and radiotherapy. We investigated the combined effects of metformin and hyperthermia against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 0.5-10 mM metformin for 48 h caused significant clonogenic cell death. Culturing breast cancer cells with 30 µM metformin, clinically relevant plasma concentration of metformin, significantly reduced the survival of cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to CD44(high/CD24(low cells of MCF-7 cells and, CD44(high/CD24(high cells of MIA PaCa-2 cells, which are known to be cancer stem cells (CSCs of MCF-7 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells, respectively. Heating at 42°C for 1 h was slightly toxic to both cancer cells and CSCs, and it markedly enhanced the efficacy of metformin to kill cancer cells and CSCs. Metformin has been reported to activate AMPK, thereby suppressing mTOR, which plays an important role for protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. For the first time, we show that hyperthermia activates AMPK and inactivates mTOR and its downstream effector S6K. Furthermore, hyperthermia potentiated the effect of metformin to activate AMPK and inactivate mTOR and S6K. Cell proliferation was markedly suppressed by metformin or combination of metformin and hyperthermia, which could be attributed to activation of AMPK leading to inactivation of mTOR. It is conclude that the effects of metformin against cancer cells including CSCs can be markedly enhanced by hyperthermia.

  9. Cancer stem cells revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batlle, Eduard; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept was proposed four decades ago, and states that tumor growth, analogous to the renewal of healthy tissues, is fueled by small numbers of dedicated stem cells. It has gradually become clear that many tumors harbor CSCs in dedicated niches, and yet their

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM) communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution...

  11. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  13. In vivo pharmacodynamics of indole-3-carbinol in the inhibition of prostate cancer in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice: involvement of Nrf2 and cell cycle/apoptosis signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tien-Yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Khor, Tin Oo; Pung, Douglas; Boyanapalli, Sarandeep S S; Kong, Ah-Ng Tong

    2012-10-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) found abundantly in crucifers has been shown to possess anti-cancer effects. The present study aims to examine the chemopreventive effects and the molecular mechanism of I3C, particularly the anti-oxidative stress pathway regulated by nuclear erythroid related factor 2 (Nrf2). HepG2-C8-ARE-luciferase cells were used for Nrf2-ARE activity. TRAMP C1 cells were used to investigate the effects of I3C on Nrf2-mediated genes. To test the chemopreventive efficacy of I3C, transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed with 1% I3C supplemented diet for 12 or 16 wk. The expression of Nrf2 and its downstream target genes, cell cycle and apoptosis genes were investigated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The protein expressions of these biomarkers were also investigated using Western blotting. I3C induced antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatments of TRAMP C1 cells with I3C also resulted in the induction of Nrf2-mediated genes. I3C significantly suppressed the incidence of palpable tumor and reduced the genitourinary weight in TRAMP mice. Western blots and qPCR analyses of prostate tissues showed that I3C induced the expression of Nrf2, NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) as well as cell cycle and apoptosis related biomarkers in I3C-fed TRAMP mice. This study demonstrated that the effectiveness of I3C as prostate cancer chemoprevention agent via up-regulation of a novel Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidative stress pathway. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Natural Compounds as Modulators of Cell Cycle Arrest: Application for Anticancer Chemotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; Cevallos-Solorzano, Gabriela; Romero-Benavides, Juan Carlos; Orellana, Maria Isabel Ramirez

    2017-04-01

    Natural compounds from various plants, microorganisms and marine species play an important role in the discovery novel components that can be successfully used in numerous biomedical applications, including anticancer therapeutics. Since uncontrolled and rapid cell division is a hallmark of cancer, unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying mitosis is key to understanding how various natural compounds might function as inhibitors of cell cycle progression. A number of natural compounds that inhibit the cell cycle arrest have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro, in vivo and in clinical settings. Significant advances that have been recently made in the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the cell cycle regulation using the chemotherapeutic agents is of great importance for improving the efficacy of targeted therapeutics and overcoming resistance to anticancer drugs, especially of natural origin, which inhibit the activities of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, as well as other proteins and enzymes involved in proper regulation of cell cycle leading to controlled cell proliferation.

  15. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  16. Reevesioside A, a cardenolide glycoside, induces anticancer activity against human hormone-refractory prostate cancers through suppression of c-myc expression and induction of G1 arrest of the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohn-Jenn Leu

    Full Text Available In the past decade, there has been a profound increase in the number of studies revealing that cardenolide glycosides display inhibitory activity on the growth of human cancer cells. The use of potential cardenolide glycosides may be a worthwhile approach in anticancer research. Reevesioside A, a cardenolide glycoside isolated from the root of Reevesia formosana, displayed potent anti-proliferative activity against human hormone-refractory prostate cancers. A good correlation (r² = 0.98 between the expression of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase α₃ subunit and anti-proliferative activity suggested the critical role of the α₃ subunit. Reevesioside A induced G1 arrest of the cell cycle and subsequent apoptosis in a thymidine block-mediated synchronization model. The data were supported by the down-regulation of several related cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDC25A. Reevesioside A also caused a profound decrease of RB phosphorylation, leading to an increased association between RB and E2F1 and the subsequent suppression of E2F1 activity. The protein and mRNA levels of c-myc, which can activate expression of many downstream cell cycle regulators, were dramatically inhibited by reevesioside A. Transient transfection of c-myc inhibited the down-regulation of both cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression to reevesioside A action, suggesting that c-myc functioned as an upstream regulator. Flow cytometric analysis of JC-1 staining demonstrated that reevesioside A also induced the significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, the data suggest that reevesioside A inhibits c-myc expression and down-regulates the expression of CDC25A, cyclin D1 and cyclin E, leading to a profound decrease of RB phosphorylation. G1 arrest is, therefore, induced through E2F1 suppression. Consequently, reevesioside A causes mitochondrial damage and an ultimate apoptosis in human hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells.

  17. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  18. Re-thinking cell cycle regulators : the cross-talk with metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluis eFajas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of genetically engineered mice deficient for cell cycle regulators, including E2F1, cdk4, or, pRB showed that the major phenotypes are metabolic perturbations. These key cell cycle regulators contribute to lipid synthesis, glucose production, insulin secretion, and glycolytic metabolism and it has been shown how deregulation of those pathways can lead to metabolic perturbations and related metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes. The cyclin-cdk-Rb-E2F1 pathway regulates adipogenesis in addition to its well-described roles in cell cycle regulation and cancer. It was also proved that E2F1 directly participates in the regulation of pancreatic growth and function. Similarly, cyclin D3, cdk4, and cdk9 are also adipogenic factors with strong effects on whole organism metabolism. These examples illustrate the growing notion that cell cycle regulatory proteins can also modulate metabolic processes. Cell cycle regulators are activated by insulin and glucose, even in non-proliferating cells. Most importantly cell cycle regulators trigger the adaptive metabolic switch that normal and cancer cells require in order to proliferate. These changes include increased lipid synthesis, decreased oxidative, and increased glycolytic metabolism. In summary, cell cycle regulators are essential in the control of anabolic, biosynthetic processes, and block at the same time oxidative and catabolic pathways, which are the metabolic hallmarks of cancer.

  19. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  20. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  1. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  2. Ionizing radiation damage to cells: effects of cell cycle redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P L; Brenner, D J; Sachs, R K

    1995-04-01

    If a population of cycling cells is exposed to a fixed dose of ionizing radiation delivered over time T, it is sometimes observed that increasing T increases the amount of cell killing. This is essentially because at first the radiation preferentially kills cells in a sensitive portion of the cycle and the surviving, more resistant cells then have time to reach more sensitive stages. We refer to this effect as population resensitization, caused by redistribution within the cell cycle. We investigate the effect theoretically by employing the McKendrick-von Foerster equation for age-structured proliferating cell populations, generalized by introducing a radiation damage term. Within our formalism, we show that population resensitization occurs whenever: (a) prior to irradiation the cell population has the stable age-distribution approached asymptotically by an unirradiated population, and (b) T is sufficiently small. Examples and other cases are outlined. The methods of Volterra integral equations, renewal theory, and positive semigroup theory are applied. The effect of varying T is evaluated by considering the ultimate amplitude of the stable age-distribution population at times much greater than both the irradiation duration and the average cell-cycle time. The main biological limitations of the formalism are the following: considering only radiation damage which is not subject to enzymatic repair or quadratic misrepair, using an overly naive method of ensuring loss of cell cycle synchrony, neglecting nonlinear effects such as density inhibition of growth, and neglecting radiatively induced perturbations of the cell cycle. Possible methods for removing these limitations are briefly discussed.

  3. A thermodynamic cycle for the solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Jenkins, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    A solar cell is a heat engine, but textbook treatments are not wholly satisfactory from a thermodynamic standpoint, since they present solar cells as directly converting the energy of light into electricity, and the current in the circuit as maintained by an electrostatic potential. We propose a thermodynamic cycle in which the gas of electrons in the p phase serves as the working substance. The interface between the p and n phases acts as a self-oscillating piston that modulates the absorption of heat from the photons so that it may perform a net positive work during a complete cycle of its motion, in accordance with the laws of thermodynamics. We draw a simple hydrodynamical analogy between this model and the "putt-putt" engine of toy boats, in which the interface between the water's liquid and gas phases serves as the piston. We point out some testable consequences of this model.

  4. Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colorectal Carcinoma by Litchi Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Litchi (Litchi chinensis fruit products possess rich amounts of flavanoids and proanthocyanidins. Its pericarp has been shown to inhibit breast and liver cancer cell growth. However, the anticolorectal cancer effect of Litchi seed extract has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of polyphenol-rich Litchi seed ethanol extract (LCSP on the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of two colorectal cancer cell lines Colo320DM and SW480 were examined. The results demonstrated that LCSP significantly induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner and arrested cell cycle in G2/M in colorectal carcinoma cells. LCSP also suppressed cyclins and elevated the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and caspase 3 activity. This study provides in vitro evidence that LCSP serves as a potential chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer.

  5. Lipid degradation promotes prostate cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Harri M; Brown, Michael; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Tredwell, Gregory; Lau, Chung Ho; Barfeld, Stefan; Hart, Claire; Guldvik, Ingrid J.; Takhar, Mandeep; Heemers, Hannelore V.; Erho, Nicholas; Bloch, Katarzyna; Davicioni, Elai; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Mohler, James L.; Clarke, Noel; Swinnen, Johan V.; Keun, Hector C.; Rekvig, Ole P.; Mills, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer and androgen receptor (AR) is the major driver of the disease. Here we show that Enoyl-CoA delta isomerase 2 (ECI2) is a novel AR-target that promotes prostate cancer cell survival. Increased ECI2 expression predicts mortality in prostate cancer patients (p = 0.0086). ECI2 encodes for an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, and we use multiple metabolite profiling platforms and RNA-seq to show that inhibition of ECI2 expression leads to decreased glucose utilization, accumulation of fatty acids and down-regulation of cell cycle related genes. In normal cells, decrease in fatty acid degradation is compensated by increased consumption of glucose, and here we demonstrate that prostate cancer cells are not able to respond to decreased fatty acid degradation. Instead, prostate cancer cells activate incomplete autophagy, which is followed by activation of the cell death response. Finally, we identified a clinically approved compound, perhexiline, which inhibits fatty acid degradation, and replicates the major findings for ECI2 knockdown. This work shows that prostate cancer cells require lipid degradation for survival and identifies a small molecule inhibitor with therapeutic potential. PMID:28415728

  6. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cell cancer include: Having light-colored skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Long-term, daily sun exposure (such as in people who work outside) Many severe sunburns early in life Older age Having had many x-rays Chemical exposure A weakened immune system, especially in ...

  7. Cell cycle population effects in perturbation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Lijnzaad, Philip; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Margaritis, Thanasis; Brok, Mariel O; Kemmeren, Patrick; Holstege, Frank C P

    2014-06-21

    Growth condition perturbation or gene function disruption are commonly used strategies to study cellular systems. Although it is widely appreciated that such experiments may involve indirect effects, these frequently remain uncharacterized. Here, analysis of functionally unrelated Saccharyomyces cerevisiae deletion strains reveals a common gene expression signature. One property shared by these strains is slower growth, with increased presence of the signature in more slowly growing strains. The slow growth signature is highly similar to the environmental stress response (ESR), an expression response common to diverse environmental perturbations. Both environmental and genetic perturbations result in growth rate changes. These are accompanied by a change in the distribution of cells over different cell cycle phases. Rather than representing a direct expression response in single cells, both the slow growth signature and ESR mainly reflect a redistribution of cells over different cell cycle phases, primarily characterized by an increase in the G1 population. The findings have implications for any study of perturbation that is accompanied by growth rate changes. Strategies to counter these effects are presented and discussed. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. The cell cycle as a brake for ?-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    The generation of insulin-producing ? cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic ? cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle ...

  9. Inhibition of E2F1 activity and cell cycle progression by arsenic via retinoblastoma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lynn A

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of cell cycle progression by steroid hormones and growth factors is important for maintaining normal cellular processes including development and cell proliferation. Deregulated progression through the G1/S and G2/M cell cycle transitions can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and cancer. The transcription factor E2F1, a key cell cycle regulator, targets genes encoding proteins that regulate cell cycle progression through the G1/S transition as well as proteins important in DNA repair and apoptosis. E2F1 expression and activity is inhibited by inorganic arsenic (iAs) that has a dual role as a cancer therapeutic and as a toxin that leads to diseases including cancer. An understanding of what underlies this dichotomy will contribute to understanding how to use iAs as a more effective therapeutic and also how to treat cancers that iAs promotes. Here, we show that quiescent breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells treated with 17-β estradiol (E2) progress through the cell cycle, but few cells treated with E2 + iAs progress from G1 into S-phase due to a block in cell cycle progression. Our data support a model in which iAs inhibits the dissociation of E2F1 from the tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (pRB) due to changes in pRB phosphorylation which leads to decreased E2F1 transcriptional activity. These findings present an explanation for how iAs can disrupt cell cycle progression through E2F1-pRB and has implications for how iAs acts as a cancer therapeutic as well as how it may promote tumorigenesis through decreased DNA repair.

  10. Studying cell cycle checkpoints using Drosophila cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; de Jong, Jannie; Sibon, Ody

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila cell lines are valuable tools to study a number of cellular processes, including DNA damage responses and cell cycle checkpoint control. Using an in vitro system instead of a whole organism has two main advantages: it saves time and simple and effective molecular techniques are available.

  11. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chang-Jie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC still is a big burden for China. In recent years, the third-generation platinum compounds have been proposed as potential active agents for HCC. However, more experimental and clinical data are warranted to support the proposal. In the present study, the effect of lobaplatin was assessed in five HCC cell lines and the underlying molecular mechanisms in terms of cell cycle kinetics were explored. Methods Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin to human HCC cell lines was examined using MTT cell proliferation assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry. Expression of cell cycle-regulated genes was examined at both the mRNA (RT-PCR and protein (Western blot levels. The phosphorylation status of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and retinoblastoma (Rb protein was also examined using Western blot analysis. Results Lobaplatin inhibited proliferation of human HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. For the most sensitive SMMC-7721 cells, lobaplatin arrested cell cycle progression in G1 and G2/M phases time-dependently which might be associated with the down-regulation of cyclin B, CDK1, CDC25C, phosphorylated CDK1 (pCDK1, pCDK4, Rb, E2F, and pRb, and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27. Conclusion Cytotoxicity of lobaplatin in human HCC cells might be due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression which would contribute to the potential use of lobaplatin for the management of HCC.

  12. Cell cycle regulation of Golgi membrane dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Danming; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a membranous organelle in the cell that plays essential roles in protein and lipid trafficking, sorting, processing and modification. Its basic structure is a stack of closely aligned flattened cisternae. In mammalian cells, dozens of Golgi stacks are often laterally linked into a ribbon-like structure. Biogenesis of the Golgi during cell division occurs through a sophisticated disassembly and reassembly process that can be divided into three distinct but cooperative steps, including the deformation and reformation of the Golgi cisternae, stacks and ribbon. Here, we review our current understanding of the protein machineries that control these three steps in the cycle of mammalian cell division: GRASP65 and GRASP55 in Golgi stack and ribbon formation; ubiquitin and AAA ATPases in post-mitotic Golgi membrane fusion; and golgins and cytoskeleton in Golgi ribbon formation. PMID:23453991

  13. Cell growth and cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: basic regulatory design and protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberghina, Lilia; Mavelli, Gabriella; Drovandi, Guido; Palumbo, Pasquale; Pessina, Stefania; Tripodi, Farida; Coccetti, Paola; Vanoni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In this review we summarize the major connections between cell growth and cell cycle in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In S. cerevisiae regulation of cell cycle progression is achieved predominantly during a narrow interval in the late G1 phase known as START (Pringle and Hartwell, 1981). At START a yeast cell integrates environmental and internal signals (such as nutrient availability, presence of pheromone, attainment of a critical size, status of the metabolic machinery) and decides whether to enter a new cell cycle or to undertake an alternative developmental program. Several signaling pathways, that act to connect the nutritional status to cellular actions, are briefly outlined. A Growth & Cycle interaction network has been manually curated. More than one fifth of the edges within the Growth & Cycle network connect Growth and Cycle proteins, indicating a strong interconnection between the processes of cell growth and cell cycle. The backbone of the Growth & Cycle network is composed of middle-degree nodes suggesting that it shares some properties with HOT networks. The development of multi-scale modeling and simulation analysis will help to elucidate relevant central features of growth and cycle as well as to identify their system-level properties. Confident collaborative efforts involving different expertises will allow to construct consensus, integrated models effectively linking the processes of cell growth and cell cycle, ultimately contributing to shed more light also on diseases in which an altered proliferation ability is observed, such as cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alcohol and Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Xu; Jia Luo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption has been associated with increased risk of several cancers, including cancer of the colon, rectum, female breast, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, liver, and esophagus. It appears that alcohol exposure not only promotes carcinogenesis but also enhances the progression and aggressiveness of existing cancers. The molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol tumor promotion, however, remain unclear. Cancer stem cells (CSC), a subpopulation of cancer cells with self-renewal and ...

  15. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer. PMID:25028488

  16. Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    abrogated by small interfering RNA to PTEN, indicating PTEN-dependence. Using FACS analysis , we showed that GEN induced cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 phase...isolated from WT (PND 100) and Tg (PND75) mice. The percentage of mammary SCs was quantified by Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of...fruits and vegetables in breast cancer prevention due to their phytochemical components, yet mechanisms underlying their presumed anti-tumor activities

  17. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  18. Stromal interaction molecule 1 regulates growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human tongue squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaobo; Song, Laixiao; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Boqian; Wang, Wei

    2017-04-30

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common type of oral carcinomas. However, the molecular mechanism by which OTSCC developed is not fully identified. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a transmembrane protein, mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). STIM1 is involved in several types of cancers. Here, we report that STIM1 contributes to the development of human OTSCC. We knocked down STIM1 in OTSCC cell line Tca-8113 with lentivirus-mediated shRNA and found that STIM1 knockdown repressed the proliferation of Tca-8113 cells. In addition, we also showed that STIM1 deficiency reduced colony number of Tca-8113 cells. Knockdown of STIM1 repressed cells to enter M phase of cell cycle and induced cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, we performed microarray and bioinformatics analysis and found that STIM1 was associated with p53 and MAPK pathways, which may contribute to the effects of STIM1 on cell growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Finally, we confirmed that STIM1 controlled the expression of MDM2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible α (GADD45A) in OTSCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that STIM1 contributes to the development of OTSCC partially through regulating p53 and MAPK pathways to promote cell cycle and survival. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death; Regulation du cycle cellulaire et de la mort cellulaire radio-induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  20. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), fumarate hydratase (FH), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology.

  1. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cardaci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, fumarate hydratase (FH, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology.

  2. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chun-Xiu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yin-Xue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Tianxing; Pan, Si-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I) to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression of

  3. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate anticancer effects of bergenin on human colorectal cancer cell lines. Methods: Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 was treated with various concentrations of bergenin for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were analyzed ...

  4. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Dyall

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis is becoming more widely accepted as a model for carcinogenesis. Tumours are heterogeneous both at the molecular and cellular level, containing a small population of cells that possess highly tumourigenic “stem-cell” properties. Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumour-initiating cells, have the ability to self-renew, generate xenografts reminiscent of the primary tumour that they were derived from, and are chemoresistant. The characterisation of the CSC population within a tumour that drives its growth could provide novel target therapeutics against these cells specifically, eradicating the cancer completely. There have been several reports describing the isolation of putative cancer stem cell populations in several cancers; however, no defined set of markers has been identified that conclusively characterises “stem-like” cancer cells. This paper highlights the current experimental approaches that have been used in the field and discusses their limitations, with specific emphasis on the identification and characterisation of the CSC population in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  5. Stressing the cell cycle in senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Hollie; Peters, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Senescence represents a permanent exit from the cell cycle and its role in curtailing the proliferation of damaged and potentially oncogenic cells has relevance both as a front-line defense against cancer and as an underlying cause of aging. The retinoblastoma protein (RB) and p53 tumor suppressors are central to the process and the growth arrest is primarily implemented by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p16INK4a and p21CIP1. In contrast to terminal differentiation, senescence is a general response to a diverse range of cellular stresses and is typically accompanied by a characteristic set of phenotypic changes. Of particular note is a secretory program whose autocrine and paracrine effects can advertize the presence of senescent cells within a tissue and promote their clearance by the immune system. In this short review, we will highlight recent advances in understanding the relationship between senescence and aging and the distinction between senescence and terminal differentiation, from a cell cycle perspective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  7. The oncogene c-Myc coordinates regulation of metabolic networks to enable rapid cell cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Hockenbery, David M

    2008-04-15

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is rapidly activated by serum and regulates genes involved in metabolism and cell cycle progression. This gene is thereby uniquely poised to coordinate both the metabolic and cell cycle regulatory events required for cell cycle entry. However, this function of Myc has not been evaluated. Using a rat fibroblast model of isogenic cell lines, myc(-/-), myc(+/-), myc(+/+) and myc(-/-) cells with an inducible c-myc transgene (mycER), we show that the Myc protein programs cells to utilize both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to drive cell cycle progression. We demonstrate this coordinate regulation of metabolic networks is essential, as specific inhibitors of these pathways block Myc-induced proliferation. Metabolic events temporally correlated with cell cycle entry include increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial function, pyruvate and lactate production, and ATP generation. Treatment of normal cells with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation recapitulates the myc(-/-) phenotype, resulting in impaired cell cycle entry and reduced metabolism. Combined with a kinetic expression profiling analysis of genes linked to mitochondrial function, our study indicates that Myc's ability to coordinately regulate the mitochondrial metabolic network transcriptome is required for rapid cell cycle entry. This function of Myc may underlie the pervasive presence of Myc in many human cancers.

  8. Cancer treatments transform residual cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harless William W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiologic wound repair and tissue regeneration are associated with distinct cellular behaviors triggered by tissue damage. Normally quiescent stem cells proliferate to regenerate damaged tissue, while relatively immobile epithelial cells can transform into a motile, tissue invasive phenotype through a partial epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These distinct cellular behaviors may have particular relevance to how cancer cells can be predicted to behave after treatments damaging a tumor. Presentation of the hypothesis Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy trigger highly conserved wound healing pathways that: (1 facilitate the phenotypic transformation of surviving cancer cells into a highly mobile, metastatic phenotype through an EMT or epithelial-mesenchymal transition and (2 induce residual cancer stem cell proliferation. Testing the hypothesis Tissue damage caused by cancer treatments will trigger the release of distinct cytokines with established roles in physiologic wound healing, EMT induction, and stem cell activation. They will be released rapidly after treatment and detectable in the patient's blood. Careful histologic evaluation of cancerous tissue before and after treatment will reveal cellular changes suggestive of EMT induction (down regulation of cytokeratin expression and cancer stem cell enrichment (stem cell markers upregulated. Implications of the hypothesis Cancer cells surviving treatment will be more capable of metastasis and resistant to conventional therapies than the pre-treatment population of cancer cells. These changes will develop rapidly after treatment and, in distinct contrast to selection pressures fostering such changes, be triggered by highly conserved wound repair signals released after tissue damage. This pattern of tissue (tumor repair may be amenable to treatment intervention at the time it is upregulated.

  9. Stem cells and solid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart A C; Graham, Trevor A; Schier, Stefanie; Wright, Nicholas A; Alison, Malcolm R

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been significant advances in our knowledge of stem cells found in tissues that can develop solid tumours. In particular, novel stem cell markers have been identified for the first time identifying multipotential cells: a required characteristic of a stem cell. The scarcity of cancer stem cells has been questioned. Current dogma states that they are rare, but novel research has suggested that this may not be the case. Here, we review the latest literature on stem cells, particularly cancer stem cells within solid tumours. We discuss current thinking on how stem cells develop into cancer stem cells and how they protect themselves from doing so and do they express unique markers that can be used to detect stem cells. We attempt to put into perspective these latest advances in stem cell biology and their potential for cancer therapy.

  10. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  11. Fasting cycles potentiate the efficacy of gemcitabine treatment in in vitro and in vivo pancreatic cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aronzo, Martina; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Mazza, Tommaso; Panebianco, Concetta; Saracino, Chiara; Pereira, Stephen P; Graziano, Paolo; Pazienza, Valerio

    2015-07-30

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in treatment options, a modest impact on the outcome of the disease is observed so far. Short-term fasting cycles have been shown to potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapy against glioma. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of fasting cycles on the efficacy of gemcitabine, a standard treatment for PC patients, in vitro and in an in vivo pancreatic cancer mouse xenograft model. BxPC-3, MiaPaca-2 and Panc-1 cells were cultured in standard and fasting mimicking culturing condition to evaluate the effects of gemcitabine. Pancreatic cancer xenograft mice were subjected to 24h starvation prior to gemcitabine injection to assess the tumor volume and weight as compared to mice fed ad libitum. Fasted pancreatic cancer cells showed increased levels of equilibrative nucleoside transporter (hENT1), the transporter of gemcitabine across the cell membrane, and decreased ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) levels as compared to those cultured in standard medium. Gemcitabine was more effective in inducing cell death on fasted cells as compared to controls. Consistently, xenograft pancreatic cancer mice subjected to fasting cycles prior to gemcitabine injection displayed a decrease of more than 40% in tumor growth. Fasting cycles enhance gemcitabine effect in vitro and in the in vivo PC xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that restrictive dietary interventions could enhance the efficacy of existing cancer treatments in pancreatic cancer patients.

  12. Immunotherapy using slow-cycling tumor cells prolonged overall survival of tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qing

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite considerable progress in the development of anticancer therapies, there is still a high mortality rate caused by cancer relapse and metastasis. Dormant or slow-cycling residual tumor cells are thought to be a source of tumor relapse and metastasis, and are therefore an obstacle to therapy. In this study, we assessed the drug resistance of tumor cells in mice, and investigated whether vaccination could promote survival. Methods The mouse colon carcinoma cell line CT-26 was treated with 5-fluorouracil to assess its sensitivity to drug treatment. Mice with colon tumors were immunized with inactivated slow-cycling CT-26 cells to estimate the efficacy of this vaccine. Results We identified a small population of slow-cycling tumor cells in the mouse colon carcinoma CT-26 cell line, which was resistant to conventional chemotherapy. To inhibit tumor recurrence and metastasis more effectively, treatments that selectively target the slow-cycling tumor cells should be developed to complement conventional therapies. We found that drug-treated, slow-cycling tumor cells induced a more intense immune response in vitro. Moreover, vaccination with inactivated slow-cycling tumor cells caused a reduction in tumor volume and prolonged the overall survival of tumor-bearing mice. Conclusions These findings suggest that targeting of slow-cycling tumor cells application using immunotherapy is a possible treatment to complement traditional antitumor therapy.

  13. An extensive program of periodic alternative splicing linked to cell cycle progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Daniel; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Weatheritt, Robert; Wang, Yang; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-01-01

    Progression through the mitotic cell cycle requires periodic regulation of gene function at the levels of transcription, translation, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modification and degradation. However, the role of alternative splicing (AS) in the temporal control of cell cycle is not well understood. By sequencing the human transcriptome through two continuous cell cycles, we identify ~1300 genes with cell cycle-dependent AS changes. These genes are significantly enriched in functions linked to cell cycle control, yet they do not significantly overlap genes subject to periodic changes in steady-state transcript levels. Many of the periodically spliced genes are controlled by the SR protein kinase CLK1, whose level undergoes cell cycle-dependent fluctuations via an auto-inhibitory circuit. Disruption of CLK1 causes pleiotropic cell cycle defects and loss of proliferation, whereas CLK1 over-expression is associated with various cancers. These results thus reveal a large program of CLK1-regulated periodic AS intimately associated with cell cycle control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10288.001 PMID:27015110

  14. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Lincan [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Shen, Hongmei [Cancer Center of Integrative Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhao, Guangqiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Yang, Runxiang [Cancer Chemotherapy Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Cai, Xinyi [Colorectal Cancer Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Jin, Congguo [Cancer Institute, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Huang, Yunchao, E-mail: daliduanlincan@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  15. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  16. Radioprotection and cell cycle arrest of intestinal epithelial cells by darinaparsin, a tumor radiosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M; Knox, Susan J

    2013-12-01

    It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intermittent Stem Cell Cycling Balances Self-Renewal and Senescence of the C. elegans Germ Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cinquin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewing organs often experience a decline in function in the course of aging. It is unclear whether chronological age or external factors control this decline, or whether it is driven by stem cell self-renewal-for example, because cycling cells exhaust their replicative capacity and become senescent. Here we assay the relationship between stem cell cycling and senescence in the Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive system, defining this senescence as the progressive decline in "reproductive capacity," i.e. in the number of progeny that can be produced until cessation of reproduction. We show that stem cell cycling diminishes remaining reproductive capacity, at least in part through the DNA damage response. Paradoxically, gonads kept under conditions that preclude reproduction keep cycling and producing cells that undergo apoptosis or are laid as unfertilized gametes, thus squandering reproductive capacity. We show that continued activity is in fact beneficial inasmuch as gonads that are active when reproduction is initiated have more sustained early progeny production. Intriguingly, continued cycling is intermittent-gonads switch between active and dormant states-and in all likelihood stochastic. Other organs face tradeoffs whereby stem cell cycling has the beneficial effect of providing freshly-differentiated cells and the detrimental effect of increasing the likelihood of cancer or senescence; stochastic stem cell cycling may allow for a subset of cells to preserve proliferative potential in old age, which may implement a strategy to deal with uncertainty as to the total amount of proliferation to be undergone over an organism's lifespan.

  18. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence that arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase 2 is a negative cell cycle regulator in normal prostate epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaohua; Bhatia, Bobby; Maldonado, Carlos J; Yang, Peiying; Newman, Robert A; Liu, Junwei; Chandra, Dhyan; Traag, Jeanine; Klein, Russell D; Fischer, Susan M; Chopra, Dharam; Shen, Jianjun; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Tang, Dean G

    2002-05-03

    15-Lipoxygenase 2 (15-LOX2) is a recently cloned human lipoxygenase that shows tissue-restricted expression in prostate, lung, skin, and cornea. The protein level and enzymatic activity of 15-LOX2 have been shown to be down-regulated in prostate cancers compared with normal and benign prostate tissues. The biological function of 15-LOX2 and the role of loss of 15-LOX2 expression in prostate tumorigenesis, however, remain unknown. We report the cloning and functional characterization of 15-LOX2 and its three splice variants (termed 15-LOX2sv-a, 15-LOX2sv-b, and 15-LOX2sv-c) from primary prostate epithelial cells. Western blotting with multiple primary prostate cell strains and prostate cancer cell lines reveals that the expression of 15-LOX2 is lost in all prostate cancer cell lines, accompanied by decreased enzymatic activity revealed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analyses. Further experiments show that the loss of 15-LOX2 expression results from transcriptional repression caused by mechanism(s) other than promoter hypermethylation or histone deacetylation. Subsequent functional studies indicate the following: 1) the 15-LOX2 product, 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, inhibits prostate cancer cell cycle progression; 2) 15-LOX2 expression in primary prostate epithelial cells is inversely correlated with cell cycle; and 3) restoration of 15-LOX2 expression in prostate cancer cells partially inhibits cell cycle progression. Taken together, these results suggest that 15-LOX2 could be a suppressor of prostate cancer development, which functions by restricting cell cycle progression.

  20. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  1. Subpopulations of stem-like cells in side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z-F; Huang, Y-J; Lin, T-X; Zhou, Y-X; Jiang, C; Xu, K-W; Huang, H; Yin, X-B; Huang, J

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cells can be isolated from human tumours using specific cell surface markers. Bladder cancer cells, however, lack specific cell surface markers, making this approach impracticable. In this study an alternative method was used, involving isolation of side population cells to explore the stem cell characteristics of bladder cancer. Side population cells were isolated from the bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 and examined for potential stem cell characteristics related to proliferation, cell cycle distribution, self-renewal and differentiation. It was observed that T24 side population cells have stronger proliferative and colony formation abilities than non-side population cells. Side population cells were also more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which may be due to expression of the ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, sub-family G, member 2 protein. Overall, the results suggest that side population cells from the human bladder transitional cell cancer cell line T24 harbour stem-like cells.

  2. Distinguishing between stochasticity and determinism: Examples from cell cycle duration variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl Mizrahi, Sivan; Sandler, Oded; Lande-Diner, Laura; Balaban, Nathalie Q; Simon, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    We describe a recent approach for distinguishing between stochastic and deterministic sources of variability, focusing on the mammalian cell cycle. Variability between cells is often attributed to stochastic noise, although it may be generated by deterministic components. Interestingly, lineage information can be used to distinguish between variability and determinism. Analysis of correlations within a lineage of the mammalian cell cycle duration revealed its deterministic nature. Here, we discuss the sources of such variability and the possibility that the underlying deterministic process is due to the circadian clock. Finally, we discuss the "kicked cell cycle" model and its implication on the study of the cell cycle in healthy and cancerous tissues. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Radiosensitization effect of black garlic extract on lung cancer cell line Lewis cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gui-qing; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yi-shan; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Ke

    2013-08-01

    To explore the radiosensitization effect of black garlic extract (BGE) on lung cancer cell line Lewis cells. The inhibition rate of lung cancer cells after BGE action was detected by MTT. Effect of BGE combined radiotherapy on the colony formation rate was observed by cloning formation assay. Changes of the cell morphology were observed by Hoechst staining. Changes of the cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. Real time PCR was used to detect mRNA expressions of bcl-2 and bax. BGE could have significant inhibitory action on the growth of lung cancer Lewis cells. The combination of BGE and radiotherapy (by 60Co gamma) significantly induced Lewis cells' apoptosis in G2/M stage, obviously decreased the expression of bcl-2, and up-regulated the expression of bax. BGE could sensitize the lung cancer Lewis cells to ionizing irradiation. This effect might be probably caused by changing the cell cycles and affecting expressions of bax and bcl-2.

  4. Molecular signatures of cell cycle transcripts in the pathogenesis of Glial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Rabindra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocytic brain tumors are among the most lethal and morbid tumors of adults, often occurring during the prime of life. These tumors form an interesting group of cancer to understand the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis. Histological grading of Astrocytoma based on WHO classification does not provide complete information on the proliferation potential and biological behavior of the tumors. It is known that cancer results from the disruption of the orderly regulated cycle of replication and division. In the present study, we made an attempt to identify the cell cycle signatures and their involvement in the clinical aggressiveness of gliomas. Methods The variation in expression of various cell cycle genes was studied in different stages of glial tumor progression (low and high grades, and the results were compared with their corresponding expression levels in the normal brain tissue. Macroarray analysis was used for the purpose. Results Macroarray analysis of 114 cell cycle genes in different grades of glioma indicated differential expression pattern in 34% of the gene transcripts, when compared to the normal tissue. Majority of the transcripts belong to the intracellular kinase networks, cell cycle regulating kinases, transcription factors and transcription activators. Conclusion Based on the observation in the expression pattern in low grade and high grade gliomas, it can be suggested that the upregulation of cell cycle activators are seen as an early event in glioma; however, in malignancy it is not the cell cycle activators alone, which are involved in tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular details of cell cycle regulation and checkpoint abnormalities in cancer could offer an insight into potential therapeutic strategies.

  5. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Paul L.; Williams, Mark C.; Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  6. Cell cycle checkpoints: reversible when possible, irreversible when needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are reversible in nature, and can prevent progression into the next cell cycle phase if needed. In the case of DNA damage, cells can prevent progression from G1 into S phase, and from G2 into mitosis in the presence of DNA double strand breaks. Following DNA repair, these

  7. Sunitinib for advanced renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Coppin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chris CoppinBC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CanadaAbstract: Renal cell cancer has been refractory to drug therapy in the large majority of patients. Targeted agents including sunitinib have been intensively evaluated in renal cell cancer over the past 5 years. Sunitinib is an oral small molecule inhibitor of several targets including multiple tyrosine kinase receptors of the angiogenesis pathway. This review surveys the rationale, development, validation, and clinical use of sunitinib that received conditional approval for use in North America and Europe in 2006. In patients with the clear-cell subtype of renal cell cancer and metastatic disease with good or moderate prognostic factors for survival, sunitinib 50 mg for 4 weeks of a 6-week cycle provides superior surrogate and patient-reported outcomes when compared with interferon-alfa, the previous commonly used first-line drug. Overall survival has not yet shown improvement over interferon and is problematic because of patient crossover from the control arm to sunitinib at disease progression. Toxicity is significant but manageable with experienced monitoring. Sunitinib therapy is an important step forward for this condition. High cost and limited efficacy support the ongoing search for further improved therapy.Keywords: renal cell cancer, targeted therapy, sunitinib

  8. Effect of particle irradiation on cell cycle progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Kiyomi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ohara, Hiroshi

    1997-02-01

    We studied effects of fractionated exposure of heavy ion beams with high linear energy transfer (LET). Asynchronous V79 cells were irradiated by He-3 or C ion beam at cyclotron at NIRS (12 MeV/u, LET{approx_equal} 20-250 keV/{mu}m). Extent of recovery of sublethal damage (SLDR) decreased with increasing LET. At the highest LET tested, the enhancement of cell killing (potentiation) was observed. Flow cytometry data showed the more efficient accumulation of cells at a G2/M phase at 4 h after irradiation by high LET particle beams than by X-rays. This potentiation might be caused by partial synchronization at a cell cycle position (s) where cells are sensitive to heavy ion exposure. When carbon ion beam with spread-out Bragg peak (SBP) at the RIKEN Ring Cyclotron (initial energy=135 MeV/u) were split into 2 equal exposure at 12-hr-interval, SLDR was observed at the entrance of the beam. In contrast, little recovery was observed at middle or distal peak positions. These results showed the benefits of carbon ion beam for cancer therapy, because we can expect some recovery in normal tissue at entrance of the beam, whereas no recovery in tumor at SBP. (author)

  9. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  10. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felthaus, O. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Brockhoff, G. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reck, A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Zeitler, K. [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Hautmann, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reichert, T.E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Schmalz, G. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Morsczeck, C., E-mail: christian.morsczeck@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  11. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Horn L, Eisenberg R, Gius D, et al. Cancer of the lung. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan ...

  12. Cell cycle arrest and cell survival induce reverse trends of cardiolipin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chao

    Full Text Available Cell survival from the arrested state can be a cause of the cancer recurrence. Transition from the arrest state to the growth state is highly regulated by mitochondrial activity, which is related to the lipid compositions of the mitochondrial membrane. Cardiolipin is a critical phospholipid for the mitochondrial integrity and functions. We examined the changes of cardiolipin species by LC-MS in the transition between cell cycle arrest and cell reviving in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We have identified 41 cardiolipin species by MS/MS and semi-quantitated them to analyze the detailed changes of cardiolipin species. The mass spectra of cardiolipin with the same carbon number form an envelope, and the C64, C66, C68, C70 C72 and C74 envelopes in HT1080 cells show a normal distribution in the full scan mass spectrum. The cardiolipin quantity in a cell decreases while entering the cell cycle arrest, but maintains at a similar level through cell survival. While cells awakening from the arrested state and preparing itself for replication, the groups with short acyl chains, such as C64, C66 and C68 show a decrease of cardiolipin percentage, but the groups with long acyl chains, such as C70 and C72 display an increase of cardiolipin percentage. Interestingly, the trends of the cardiolipin species changes during the arresting state are completely opposite to cell growing state. Our results indicate that the cardiolipin species shift from the short chain to long chain cardiolipin during the transition from cell cycle arrest to cell progression.

  13. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle and specific cell synchronization with butyrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable in many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. The possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells was explored and the properties of butyrate-induced cell ...

  14. Temporal fluxomics reveals oscillations in TCA cycle flux throughout the mammalian cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eunyong; Kumar, Praveen; Mukha, Dzmitry; Tzur, Amit; Shlomi, Tomer

    2017-11-06

    Cellular metabolic demands change throughout the cell cycle. Nevertheless, a characterization of how metabolic fluxes adapt to the changing demands throughout the cell cycle is lacking. Here, we developed a temporal-fluxomics approach to derive a comprehensive and quantitative view of alterations in metabolic fluxes throughout the mammalian cell cycle. This is achieved by combining pulse-chase LC-MS-based isotope tracing in synchronized cell populations with computational deconvolution and metabolic flux modeling. We find that TCA cycle fluxes are rewired as cells progress through the cell cycle with complementary oscillations of glucose versus glutamine-derived fluxes: Oxidation of glucose-derived flux peaks in late G1 phase, while oxidative and reductive glutamine metabolism dominates S phase. These complementary flux oscillations maintain a constant production rate of reducing equivalents and oxidative phosphorylation flux throughout the cell cycle. The shift from glucose to glutamine oxidation in S phase plays an important role in cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. Enhancing circadian clock function in cancer cells inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Silke; Beaulieu-Laroche, Lou; Blum, Ian D; Landgraf, Dominic; Welsh, David K; Storch, Kai-Florian; Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2017-02-14

    Circadian clocks control cell cycle factors, and circadian disruption promotes cancer. To address whether enhancing circadian rhythmicity in tumor cells affects cell cycle progression and reduces proliferation, we compared growth and cell cycle events of B16 melanoma cells and tumors with either a functional or dysfunctional clock. We found that clock genes were suppressed in B16 cells and tumors, but treatments inducing circadian rhythmicity, such as dexamethasone, forskolin and heat shock, triggered rhythmic clock and cell cycle gene expression, which resulted in fewer cells in S phase and more in G1 phase. Accordingly, B16 proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo was slowed down. Similar effects were observed in human colon carcinoma HCT-116 cells. Notably, the effects of dexamethasone were not due to an increase in apoptosis nor to an enhancement of immune cell recruitment to the tumor. Knocking down the essential clock gene Bmal1 in B16 tumors prevented the effects of dexamethasone on tumor growth and cell cycle events. Here we demonstrated that the effects of dexamethasone on cell cycle and tumor growth are mediated by the tumor-intrinsic circadian clock. Thus, our work reveals that enhancing circadian clock function might represent a novel strategy to control cancer progression.

  16. Mechanotransduction in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jin; Zhang, Yueling; Ye, Rui; Zheng, Yingcheng; Zhao, Zhihe; Li, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept, which arose about a decade ago, proposes that tumor growth is sustained by a subpopulation of highly malignant cells. These cells, termed CSCs, are capable of extensive self-renewal that contributes to metastasis and treatment resistance. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target CSCs should be developed for improving outcomes of cancer patients. Recent progress has highlighted the importance of physical properties of the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction pathway in cancer cells during cancer development. On the other hand, the significance of CXCR1, an upstream signal of FAK/PI3K/Akt has been revealed in CSCs. FAK/PI3K/Akt is a key signal mediator in mechanotransduction pathway. Therefore, mechanotransduction could be a new target for CSCs, and would be an innovative way to treat cancer by inhibiting FAK/PI3K/Akt. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. Nanotechniques Inactivate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Anatoliy N.; Babenko, Natalya N.; Gaevskaya, Yulia A.; Bondarovich, Nikolay A.; Dubrava, Tatiana G.; Ostankov, Maksim V.; Chelombitko, Olga V.; Malyukin, Yuriy V.; Klochkov, Vladimir K.; Kavok, Nataliya S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the tasks of current oncology is identification of cancer stem cells and search of therapeutic means capable of their specific inhibition. The paper presents the data on phenotype characteristics of Ehrlich carcinoma cells as convenient and easy-to-follow model of tumor growth. The evidence of cancer stem cells as a part of Ehrlich carcinoma and significance of CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations in maintaining the growth of this type of tumor were demonstrated. A high (tenfold) tumorigenic activity of the Ehrlich carcinoma CD44+ cells if compared to CD44- cells was proven. In this pair of comparison, the CD44+ cells had a higher potential of generating in peritoneal cavity of CD44high, CD44+CD24-, CD44+CD24+ cell subpopulations, highlighting the presence of cancer stem cells in a pool of CD44+ cells.

  18. Effect of Quercetin on Cell Cycle and Cyclin Expression in Ovarian Carcinoma and Osteosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Vianello, Caterina; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major problem in cancer treatment. The search for new interventions able to overcome this resistance may involve compounds of natural origin, such as flavonoids, ubiquitously present in many foods. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects and cell cycle modulation of the flavonoid quercetin were investigated in ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3) and osteosarcoma (U2OS) human cell lines and in their cisplatin (CDDP)-resistant counterparts (SKOV3/CDDP and U2OSPt cells, respectively). Quercetin (10-50 μM) caused evident changes in the distribution of cell cycle phases in the CDDP-resistant SKOV3/CDDP ovarian cell line. The levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 were determined by means of Western blot in all cell lines incubated with quercetin (50 μM) for 48 hours. The cyclin D1 expression was significantly decreased following the treatment with quercetin in SKOV3 and U2OSPt cells, but not in SKOV3/CDDP and U2OS cells. The reduction of cyclin D1 level could be linked to the G1/S phase alteration found in quercetin-treated cells. Although cyclin B1 is required for G2/M phase, and despite our observation that quercetin influenced the G2/M phase of cell cycle, the flavonoid did not affect cyclin B1 levels in all cell lines, indicating the involvement of other possible mechanisms. These results suggest that quercetin, exceeding the resistance to CDDP, might become an interesting tool to evaluate cytotoxic activity in combination with chemotherapy drugs.

  19. A data integration approach for cell cycle analysis oriented to model simulation in systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosca Ettore

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell cycle is one of the biological processes most frequently investigated in systems biology studies and it involves the knowledge of a large number of genes and networks of protein interactions. A deep knowledge of the molecular aspect of this biological process can contribute to making cancer research more accurate and innovative. In this context the mathematical modelling of the cell cycle has a relevant role to quantify the behaviour of each component of the systems. The mathematical modelling of a biological process such as the cell cycle allows a systemic description that helps to highlight some features such as emergent properties which could be hidden when the analysis is performed only from a reductionism point of view. Moreover, in modelling complex systems, a complete annotation of all the components is equally important to understand the interaction mechanism inside the network: for this reason data integration of the model components has high relevance in systems biology studies. Description In this work, we present a resource, the Cell Cycle Database, intended to support systems biology analysis on the Cell Cycle process, based on two organisms, yeast and mammalian. The database integrates information about genes and proteins involved in the cell cycle process, stores complete models of the interaction networks and allows the mathematical simulation over time of the quantitative behaviour of each component. To accomplish this task, we developed, a web interface for browsing information related to cell cycle genes, proteins and mathematical models. In this framework, we have implemented a pipeline which allows users to deal with the mathematical part of the models, in order to solve, using different variables, the ordinary differential equation systems that describe the biological process. Conclusion This integrated system is freely available in order to support systems biology research on the cell cycle and

  20. Differential roles of leptin in regulating cell migration in thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Yin, Pen-Hui; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Chi, Chin-Wen

    2010-06-01

    Excess body weight is associated with a moderately increased risk of thyroid cancer. Adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has been shown to enhance cell growth and migration in many cancer types. Limited evidence suggests that leptin has direct actions on the thyroid gland, but there are no data available on the effect of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. We evaluated the action of leptin on gene expression, cell growth, cell cycle, and cell migration in anaplastic (ARO), follicular (WRO) and papillary (CGTH-W3) thyroid carcinoma cell lines. Expression of long-form leptin receptors was observed in all thyroid cancer cell lines. Leptin stimulation did not alter the expression levels of leptin, leptin receptor and sodium-iodide symporter. Cell growth and cell cycle were not changed after leptin treatment. However, leptin was able to promote cell migration of papillary thyroid cancer cells, but inhibited migration of anaplastic and follicular cancer cells. In summary, our study suggests that leptin modulates cell migration of thyroid cancer cells in a cell type-specific manner.

  1. Weight Cycling and Cancer: Weighing the Evidence of Intermittent Caloric Restriction and Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Henry J. Thompson; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Overweight and obese individuals frequently restrict caloric intake to lose weight. The resultant weight loss, however, typically is followed by an equal or greater weight gain, a phenomenon called weight cycling. Most attention to weight cycling has focused on identifying its detrimental effects, but preclinical experiments indicating that intermittent caloric restriction or fasting can reduce cancer risk have raised interest in potential benefits of weight cycling. Although hypothesized adv...

  2. Single-cell paired-end genome sequencing reveals structural variation per cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Thierry; Kumar, Parveen; Van Loo, Peter; Cooke, Susanna L; Marshall, John; Lin, Meng-Lay; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Van der Aa, Niels; Mateiu, Ligia; McBride, David J; Bignell, Graham R; McLaren, Stuart; Teague, Jon; Butler, Adam; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A; Quail, Michael A; D'Hooghe, Thomas; Moreau, Yves; Futreal, P Andrew; Stratton, Michael R; Vermeesch, Joris R; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    The nature and pace of genome mutation is largely unknown. Because standard methods sequence DNA from populations of cells, the genetic composition of individual cells is lost, de novo mutations in cells are concealed within the bulk signal and per cell cycle mutation rates and mechanisms remain elusive. Although single-cell genome analyses could resolve these problems, such analyses are error-prone because of whole-genome amplification (WGA) artefacts and are limited in the types of DNA mutation that can be discerned. We developed methods for paired-end sequence analysis of single-cell WGA products that enable (i) detecting multiple classes of DNA mutation, (ii) distinguishing DNA copy number changes from allelic WGA-amplification artefacts by the discovery of matching aberrantly mapping read pairs among the surfeit of paired-end WGA and mapping artefacts and (iii) delineating the break points and architecture of structural variants. By applying the methods, we capture DNA copy number changes acquired over one cell cycle in breast cancer cells and in blastomeres derived from a human zygote after in vitro fertilization. Furthermore, we were able to discover and fine-map a heritable inter-chromosomal rearrangement t(1;16)(p36;p12) by sequencing a single blastomere. The methods will expedite applications in basic genome research and provide a stepping stone to novel approaches for clinical genetic diagnosis.

  3. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  4. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  5. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Seiko [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Oral Biology Research Center, Kyushu Dental University (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga,