WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer care delivery

  1. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S A; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions.

  2. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Neuman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

  3. Redesigning Cancer Care Delivery: Views From Patients and Caregivers.

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    Patel, Manali I; Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Blayney, Douglas W; Moore, David; Nevedal, Andrea; Asch, Steven; Milstein, Arnold; Coker, Tumaini R

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Although treatments have improved, patients and caregivers continue to report significant gaps in their care. The objective of this study was to examine the views of patients and caregivers on their experiences with current cancer care delivery and identify key strategies to improve the delivery of care. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 75 patients and 45 caregivers across the United States. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. Participants reported multiple gaps in care delivery, including barriers in health communication with health care providers, lack of elucidation of care goals, lack of care coordination, and challenges in accessing care. Participants identified that greater use of nonphysician providers and alternative formats, such as telephone-based care and home and community-based care, would narrow these gaps. Understanding patients' and caregivers' experiences with gaps in cancer care delivery can inform cancer care delivery redesign efforts and lead to targeted interventions that result in patient-centered and family-oriented care.

  4. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

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    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are important collaborative referral sources for each other who can work together to improve the lives of cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by improving both quality of care and quality of life. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care involve the delivery of important but underutilized medical services to oncology patients by interdisciplinary teams. These subspecialties are similar in many respects, including their focus on improving cancer-related symptoms or cancer treatment-related side effects, improving health-related quality of life, lessening caregiver burden, and valuing patient-centered care and shared decision-making. They also aim to improve healthcare efficiencies and minimize costs by means such as reducing hospital lengths of stay and unanticipated readmissions. Although their goals are often aligned, different specialized skills and approaches are used in the delivery of care. For example, while each specialty prioritizes goal-concordant care through identification of patient and family preferences and values, palliative care teams typically focus extensively on using patient and family communication to determine their goals of care, while also tending to comfort issues such as symptom management and spiritual concerns. Rehabilitation clinicians may tend to focus more specifically on functional issues such as identifying and treating deficits in physical, psychological, or cognitive impairments and any resulting disability and negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, although palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are trained to diagnose and treat medically complex patients, rehabilitation clinicians also treat many patients with a single impairment and a low symptom burden. In these cases, the goal is often cure of the underlying neurologic or musculoskeletal condition. This report defines and describes cancer rehabilitation and palliative care, delineates their

  5. Accelerating the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer care.

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    Abrahams, Edward; Foti, Margaret; Kean, Marcia A

    2015-05-15

    Significant progress has been made in the past 50 years across the field of oncology, and, as a result, the number of cancer survivors in the United States is more than 14.5 million. In fact, the number of cancer survivors continues to grow on an annual basis, which is due in part to improved treatments that help people with cancer live longer, and improvements in early detection that allow doctors to find cancer earlier when the disease is easier to treat. However, in spite of this progress, innovation in cancer research and care is at risk as the rise in health care spending is leading to significant pressure to contain costs. As the oncology community seeks to ensure that innovation in cancer research and care continues, it is imperative that stakeholders focus their attention on the value that the research and care continuum provides. Over the past several years, the Turning the Tide Against Cancer initiative has worked with the cancer community to accelerate the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer research and care, while addressing value and cost. This article highlights policy recommendations that resulted from the convening of an expert working group comprising leaders from across the oncology field. Of the recommendations, the co-conveners have identified several issue areas that merit particular focus in 2015: Support FDA's efforts to modernize its framework for bringing new medicines to patients, through facilitating and implementing innovative approaches to drug development and regulatory review. Ensure that cancer clinical pathways or similar decision-support tools are transparent; developed through a physician-driven process that includes patient input; and meet minimum standards for clinical appropriateness, timeliness, and patient centeredness. Support oncology decision-support tools that are timely, clinically appropriate, and patient centered. Build on existing efforts to convene a multistakeholder committee and develop a report on

  6. Measuring the quality of a childhood cancer care delivery system: quality indicator development.

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    Bradley, Nicole M E; Robinson, Paula D; Greenberg, Mark L; Barr, Ronald D; Klassen, Anne F; Chan, Y Lilian; Greenberg, Corin M

    2013-06-01

    A set of indicators to assess the quality of a childhood cancer system has not been identified in any jurisdiction internationally, despite the movement toward increased accountability and provision of high-quality care with limited health care resources. This study was conducted to develop a set of quality indicators (QIs) of a childhood cancer control and health care delivery system in Ontario, Canada. A systematic review and targeted gray literature search were conducted to identify potential childhood cancer QIs. A series of investigator focus group sessions followed to review all QIs identified in the literature, and to generate a provisional QI set for a childhood cancer system. QIs were evaluated by three content experts in a sequential selection process on the basis of a series of criteria to select a subset for presentation to stakeholders. Following an appraisal of the relevance of quality assessment frameworks, remaining QIs were mapped onto the Cancer System Quality Index framework. The systematic review yielded few relevant childhood cancer system QIs. Overall, 120 provisional QIs were developed by the investigator group. Based on median QI rating scores, representation across the childhood cancer continuum, and feasibility of data collection, a subset of 33 QIs was selected for stakeholder consideration. The subset of 33 QIs developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and consensus provides the basis for the selection of a set of QIs for ongoing, standardized monitoring of various dimensions of quality in a childhood cancer system. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacist-led, interdisciplinary model for delivery of supportive care in the ambulatory cancer clinic setting.

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    Valgus, John; Jarr, Sandra; Schwartz, Robert; Rice, Michelle; Bernard, Stephen A

    2010-11-01

    To describe a pharmacist-led, interdisciplinary method of care delivery begun at the University of North Carolina. We describe the characteristics of the population seen and the role of the individual members of the interdisciplinary team, and provide an early analysis of the program's impact on symptom improvement. A supportive care consultation service was begun at the University of North Carolina Hospitals to serve adult outpatients with cancer undergoing treatment or follow-up. Patients data were entered into an institutional review board-approved database to permit detailed assessments over time. Patient demographics were analyzed using descriptive statistics, medications used and changes made were noted, and symptom scores from a previously described instrument were captured and compared over time. Patients were seen from all adult oncology services, including gynecologic, radiation, medical, and surgical. The characteristics of the population seen were similar to those of the hospital population as a whole. Most of the patients were seen for pain management, and many required a medication change. Symptom scores improved by the second visit, and the improvement was maintained. We are able to demonstrate that the use of a pharmacist-led, interdisciplinary team produced an improvement in symptom scores comparable to what has been seen in the inpatient palliative care service within our institution. Projected shortages of oncology providers may be mitigated by pharmacists working in collaborative practices, with prescriptive authority, in the ambulatory oncology setting.

  8. Managing cancer care through service delivery networks: The role of professional collaboration in two European cancer networks.

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    Prades, Joan; Morando, Verdiana; Tozzi, Valeria D; Verhoeven, Didier; Germà, Jose R; Borras, Josep M

    2017-01-01

    Background The study examines two meso-strategic cancer networks, exploring to what extent collaboration can strengthen or hamper network effectiveness. Unlike macro-strategic networks, meso-strategic networks have no hierarchical governance structures nor are they institutionalised within healthcare services' delivery systems. This study aims to analyse the models of professional cooperation and the tools developed for managing clinical practice within two meso-strategic, European cancer networks. Methods Multiple case study design based on the comparative analysis of two cancer networks: Iridium, in Antwerp, Belgium and the Institut Català d'Oncologia in Catalonia, Spain. The case studies applied mixed methods, with qualitative research based on semi-structured interviews ( n = 35) together with case-site observation and material collection. Results The analysis identified four levels of collaborative intensity within medical specialties as well as in multidisciplinary settings, which became both platforms for crosscutting clinical work between hubs' experts and local care teams and the levers for network-based tools development. The organisation of clinical practice relied on professional-based cooperative processes and tiers, lacking vertical integration mechanisms. Conclusions The intensity of professional linkages largely shaped the potential of meso-strategic cancer networks to influence clinical practice organisation. Conversely, the introduction of managerial techniques or network governance structures, without introducing vertical hierarchies, was found to be critical solutions.

  9. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  10. A Work Sampling Assessment of the Nursing Delivery of Palliative Care in Ambulatory Cancer Centers.

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    Davison, Jennifer; Schenker, Yael; Donovan, Heidi; Rosenzweig, Margaret

    2016-08-01

    Most cancer care occurs within infusion rooms at ambulatory cancer centers, which are staffed by RNs administering chemotherapies and other cancer care medications. Many patients receiving these therapies have basic palliative care needs that could be addressed by the RNs. However, the extent to which these RNs spend their time on basic, or "primary," palliative care is unknown. The aim of this project was to conduct a work sampling assessment of infusion room RNs' work activities and provision of primary palliative care. A single observer conducted direct observation work sampling at three academic cancer center infusion rooms. Nursing tasks were recorded via freehand text and later assigned an appropriate task code. Observed infusion room RNs spent about 1% of their time on direct care palliative care tasks, primarily symptom assessment. The remainder of their time was divided among direct (28%) and indirect (56%) nonpalliative care activities, unit-related activities (7%), and personal time (9%). Infusion room RNs spent less than a third of their time on administering direct patient care and very minimal time on performing palliative care activities.

  11. Capacity for Cancer Care Delivery Research in National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Community Practices: Availability of Radiology and Primary Care Research Partners.

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    Carlos, Ruth C; Sicks, JoRean D; Chang, George J; Lyss, Alan P; Stewart, Teresa L; Sung, Lillian; Weaver, Kathryn E

    2017-12-01

    Cancer care spans the spectrum from screening and diagnosis through therapy and into survivorship. Delivering appropriate care requires patient transitions across multiple specialties, such as primary care, radiology, and oncology. From the program's inception, the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites were tasked with conducting cancer care delivery research (CCDR) that evaluates structural, organizational, and social factors, including care transitions that determine patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the capacity of the NCORP to conduct multidisciplinary CCDR that includes radiology and primary care practices. The NCORP includes 34 community and 12 minority and underserved community sites. The Landscape Capacity Assessment was conducted in 2015 across these 46 sites, composed of the 401 components and subcomponents designated to conduct CCDR. Each respondent had the opportunity to designate an operational practice group, defined as a group of components and subcomponents with common care practices and resources. The primary outcomes were the proportion of adult oncology practice groups with affiliated radiology and primary care practices. The secondary outcomes were the proportion of those affiliated radiology and primary care groups that participate in research. Eighty-seven percent of components and subcomponents responded to at least some portion of the assessment, representing 230 practice groups. Analyzing the 201 adult oncology practice groups, 85% had affiliated radiologists, 69% of whom participate in research. Seventy-nine percent had affiliated primary care practitioners, 31% of whom participate in research. Institutional size, multidisciplinary group practice, and ownership by large regional or multistate health systems was associated with research participation by affiliated radiology and primary care groups. Research participation by these affiliated specialists was not significantly

  12. A Rapid Access Clinic to improve delivery of ambulatory care to cancer patients.

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    Kuo, James C; De Silva, Madhawa; Diwakarla, Chandra; Yip, Desmond

    2017-06-01

    Cancer patients may find it challenging to access timely advice and care. We evaluated the improvement in delivering ambulatory care in establishing a Rapid Assessment Clinic (RAC) in a cancer center. Patients receiving chemotherapy who presented for assessment at the RAC from September 2013 to June 2014 were included for review. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, presenting complaints, time to assessment, total time spent at the RAC and assessment outcome were extracted. Similar data for cancer patients presented to the emergency department (ED) but were appropriate for RAC assessment from February 2012 to August 2012 were reviewed for comparison. For patients with febrile neutropenia, time to empirical antibiotic therapy was also reviewed and analyzed. Comparing to ED presentation (n = 152), patients reviewed at the RAC (n = 217) had a shorter waiting time to medical review (28.5 vs 40 min, P = 0.12), shorter total time spent for review (3.1 vs 9.7 hrs, P care, resulting in a lower rate of hospital admission and inpatient length of stay for cancer patients. There was, however, no difference in the management of febrile neutropenia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen ML

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon2,3 1Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney Local Health District and University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of

  14. Using Quality Improvement Methods and Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing to Improve Value-Based Cancer Care Delivery at a Cancer Genetics Clinic.

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    Tan, Ryan Y C; Met-Domestici, Marie; Zhou, Ke; Guzman, Alexis B; Lim, Soon Thye; Soo, Khee Chee; Feeley, Thomas W; Ngeow, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    To meet increasing demand for cancer genetic testing and improve value-based cancer care delivery, National Cancer Centre Singapore restructured the Cancer Genetics Service in 2014. Care delivery processes were redesigned. We sought to improve access by increasing the clinic capacity of the Cancer Genetics Service by 100% within 1 year without increasing direct personnel costs. Process mapping and plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles were used in a quality improvement project for the Cancer Genetics Service clinic. The impact of interventions was evaluated by tracking the weekly number of patient consultations and access times for appointments between April 2014 and May 2015. The cost impact of implemented process changes was calculated using the time-driven activity-based costing method. Our study completed two PDSA cycles. An important outcome was achieved after the first cycle: The inclusion of a genetic counselor increased clinic capacity by 350%. The number of patients seen per week increased from two in April 2014 (range, zero to four patients) to seven in November 2014 (range, four to 10 patients). Our second PDSA cycle showed that manual preappointment reminder calls reduced the variation in the nonattendance rate and contributed to a further increase in patients seen per week to 10 in May 2015 (range, seven to 13 patients). There was a concomitant decrease in costs of the patient care cycle by 18% after both PDSA cycles. This study shows how quality improvement methods can be combined with time-driven activity-based costing to increase value. In this paper, we demonstrate how we improved access while reducing costs of care delivery. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Transdisciplinary Coordination and Delivery of Care.

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    Mueller, Scarlott K

    2016-05-01

    To generate ideas and explore the future possibilities of patient-centered, transdisciplinary care delivery for individuals with cancer. Journal articles, cancer-related professional resources, and web-based resources. As health care access increases, new strategies for transdisciplinary care need to evolve through education, research, and clinical practice. Application and utilization of palliative care models, survivorship plans, technological advances and other resources will be important components to improve quality of life and the cancer experience. Oncology nurse clinicians (at all levels), educators, researchers, and administrators involved in inpatient and outpatient settings should lead and participate in changes that will drive a more robust approach to transdisciplinary cancer care delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Delivery of meaningful cancer care: a retrospective cohort study assessing cost and benefit with the ASCO and ESMO frameworks.

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    Del Paggio, Joseph C; Sullivan, Richard; Schrag, Deborah; Hopman, Wilma M; Azariah, Biju; Pramesh, C S; Tannock, Ian F; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    drug costs were negatively correlated (ρ=-0·207; p=0·039). Treatments that met ESMO benefit thresholds had a lower median incremental drug cost than did those that did not meet benefit thresholds (US$2981 [IQR 320-9059] vs $8621 [1174-13 930]; p=0·018). There is only fair correlation between these two major value care frameworks, and negative correlations between framework outputs and drug costs. Delivery of optimal cancer care in a sustainable health system will necessitate future oncologists, investigators, and policy makers to reconcile the disconnect between drug cost and clinical benefit. None. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advancing the Future of Patient Safety in Oncology: Implications of Patient Safety Education on Cancer Care Delivery.

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    James, Ted A; Goedde, Michael; Bertsch, Tania; Beatty, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    Emerging challenges in health care delivery demand systems of clinical practice capable of ensuring safe and reliable patient care. Oncology in particular is recognized for its high degree of complexity and potential for adverse events. New models of student education hold promise for producing a health care workforce armed with skills in patient safety. This training may have a particular impact on risk reduction in cancer care and ultimately improve clinical performance in oncology. A 1-day student program focused on the principles of patient safety was developed for the third-year medical school class. The core curriculum consisted of an online patient safety module, root cause analyses of actual patient safety events, and simulation scenarios designed to invoke patient safety skills. The program was successfully implemented and received an average of 4.2/5 on evaluations pertaining to its importance and effectiveness. Student surveys demonstrated that 59 % of students were not previously aware of system-based approaches to improving safety, 51 % of students had witnessed or experienced a patient safety issue, while only 10 % reported these events. Students reported feeling more empowered to act on patient safety issues as a result of the program. Educational programs can provide medical students with a foundation for skill development in medical error reduction and help enhance an organization's culture of safety. This has the potential to reduce adverse events in complex patient care settings such as clinical oncology.

  18. The current situation in education and training of health-care professionals across Africa to optimise the delivery of palliative care for cancer patients

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    Rawlinson, FM; Gwyther, L; Kiyange, F; Luyirika, E; Meiring, M; Downing, J

    2014-01-01

    The need for palliative care education remains vital to contribute to the quality of life of patients, both adults and children, with cancer in Africa. The number of patients with cancer continues to rise, and with them the burden of palliative care needs. Palliative care has been present in Africa for nearly four decades, and a number of services are developing in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, the needs of cancer patients remain a challenge. Education and training initiatives have developed throughout this time, using a combination of educational methods, including, more recently, e-learning initiatives. The role of international and national organisations in supporting education has been pivotal in developing models of education and training that are robust, sustainable, and affordable. Developing a material for education and professional development needs to continue in close collaboration with that already in production in order to optimise available resources. Seeking ways to evaluate programmes in terms of their impact on patient care remains an important part of programme delivery. This article reviews the current situation. PMID:25624873

  19. Space age health care delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  20. Evaluation of Patient and Family Outpatient Complaints as a Strategy to Prioritize Efforts to Improve Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jennifer W; Jacobson, Joseph; Frank, David; Cronin, Angel M; Horvath, Kathleen; Allen, Victoria; Wind, Jennifer; Schrag, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    Limited systematic data about complaints related to cancer care are available. Patient complaints related to ambulatory care at a large academic cancer center were examined to better understand patient experiences of care and prioritize opportunities for quality improvement. Content analysis of outpatient complaints made to the Patient/Family Relations Office at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, in a two-year period (January 2013-December 2014) were conducted. Narrative complaint records were reviewed independently by two to four reviewers to categorize primary and secondary reasons underlying complaints and to assess complaint severity. Among 78,668 outpatients seen during the two-year period, 266 complaints (0.3%) were made to the Patient/Family Relations Office. Some 48% of the complaints involved management issues, including finance and billing (10%), service issues (15%), delays (13%), and access and admission (6%); 11% of complaints related to quality and safety, whereas 41% of complaints related to relationships, including communication breakdowns (15%), patient-staff dialogue (5%), and humanness and caring (18%). Twenty percent of the complaints were classified as high severity, including 57% of quality- and safety-related complaints. Eleven percent of the patients involved in complaints ultimately transferred care to another provider or institution; 43% of high-severity complaints resulted in a transfer of care. Most of the concerns represented in the complaints related to humanistic rather than technical aspects of care. A systematic review of complaints would offer the opportunity to improve patient-centeredness of care by identifying areas where care fails to meet patient and family needs. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

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    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  2. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  3. When populism takes over the delivery of health care: Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryanani, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    Adequate and modern health care is not available in Venezuela at this moment. A humanitarian crisis of post war dimensions is currently rampant and afflicting all Venezuelans alike. The delivery and availability of cancer care is severely limited and inadequate. No funding is available as populist measures, mismanagement, pillaging, corruption, lack of forethought and expertise have brought the country into severe economic collapse and political turmoil.

  4. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lee, Tae Hwa; Willmann, Jugen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB) mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  5. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Mullick Chowdhury

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  6. Redefining global health-care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jim Yong; Farmer, Paul; Porter, Michael E

    2013-09-21

    Initiatives to address the unmet needs of those facing both poverty and serious illness have expanded significantly over the past decade. But many of them are designed in an ad-hoc manner to address one health problem among many; they are too rarely assessed; best practices spread slowly. When assessments of delivery do occur, they are often narrow studies of the cost-effectiveness of a single intervention rather than the complex set of them required to deliver value to patients and their families. We propose a framework for global health-care delivery and evaluation by considering efforts to introduce HIV/AIDS care to resource-poor settings. The framework introduces the notion of care delivery value chains that apply a systems-level analysis to the complex processes and interventions that must occur, across a health-care system and over time, to deliver high-value care for patients with HIV/AIDS and cooccurring conditions, from tuberculosis to malnutrition. To deliver value, vertical or stand-alone projects must be integrated into shared delivery infrastructure so that personnel and facilities are used wisely and economies of scale reaped. Two other integrative processes are necessary for delivering and assessing value in global health: one is the alignment of delivery with local context by incorporating knowledge of both barriers to good outcomes (from poor nutrition to a lack of water and sanitation) and broader social and economic determinants of health and wellbeing (jobs, housing, physical infrastructure). The second is the use of effective investments in care delivery to promote equitable economic development, especially for those struggling against poverty and high burdens of disease. We close by reporting our own shared experience of seeking to move towards a science of delivery by harnessing research and training to understand and improve care delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CancerCare

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    ... physically and financially. Cancer Care ® can help. For Patients & Survivors For Caregivers & Loved Ones For Health Care Professionals We provide Counseling Support Groups Connect Education Workshops Publications Financial and Co‑Pay Assistance Community ...

  8. Models of care and delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    this diversity include differences in health policy, health insurance structures, case load and the prevalence of HIV-related morbidity. In clinical stable populations, the current trend is to gradually extend intervals between HIV-specific visits in a shared care model with GPs. A similar shared-model approach......Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good...... outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP), or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining...

  9. Models of care and delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Lundgren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP, or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining this diversity include differences in health policy, health insurance structures, case load and the prevalence of HIV-related morbidity. In clinical stable populations, the current trend is to gradually extend intervals between HIV-specific visits in a shared care model with GPs. A similar shared-model approach with community clinics for injecting drug-dependent persons is also being implemented. Shared care models require oversight to ensure that primary responsibility is defined for the persons overall health situation, for screening of co-morbidities, defining indication to treat comorbidities, prescription of non-HIV medicines, etc. Intelligent bioinformatics platforms (i.e. generation of alerts if course of care deviates from a prior defined normality are being developed to assist in providing this oversight and to provide measure of quality. Although consensus exists to assess basic quality indicators of care, a comprehensive set of harmonized indicators are urgently needed to define best practise standards via benchmarking. Such a tool will be central to guide ongoing discussions on restructuring of models, as quality of care should not be compromised in this process.

  10. Psychosocial cancer care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper briefly reviews some of the current interests in the international field of psychosocial oncology, focusing on adults with cancer. The articles cited describe cancer in general – not specific cancers. It is not possible to give a comprehensive literature review on such a wide and dynamic field of care, but what follows.

  11. A randomized trial comparing live and telemedicine deliveries of an imagery-based behavioral intervention for breast cancer survivors: reducing symptoms and barriers to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lyn W; White, Rebecca; Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Sutton, Sue; Stewart, Mary; Palmer, J Lynn; Link, Judith; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    This multi-site randomized trial evaluates the quality of life (QOL) benefits of an imagery-based group intervention titled 'Envision the Rhythms of Life'(ERL). Breast cancer survivors >6 weeks post-treatment were randomized to attend five weekly 4-h group sessions at a community center with therapist present (live delivery (LD), n = 48), therapist streamed via telemedicine (telemedicine delivery (TD), n = 23), or to a waitlist control (WL) group (n = 47). Weekly individual phone calls to encourage at-home practice began at session one and continued until the 3-month follow-up. Seven self-report measures of QOL were examined at baseline, 1-month and 3-month post-treatments including health-related and breast cancer-specific QOL, fatigue, cognitive function, spirituality, distress, and sleep. The Bonferroni method was used to correct for multiple comparisons, and alpha was adjusted to 0.01. Linear multilevel modeling analyses revealed less fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disturbance for LD and TD compared with WL across the follow-up (p's live and telemedicine delivered ERL intervention resulted in improvements in multiple QOL domains for breast cancer survivors compared with WL. Further, there were no significant differences between LD and TD, suggesting telemedicine delivered ERL intervention may represent an effective and viable option for cancer survivors in remote areas. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Interpreting at the End of Life: A Systematic Review of the Impact of Interpreters on the Delivery of Palliative Care Services to Cancer Patients with Limited English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Milagros D.; Genoff, Margaux; Zaballa, Alexandra; Jewell, Sarah; Stabler, Stacy; Gany, Francesca M.; Diamond, Lisa C.

    2016-01-01

    Context Language barriers can influence the health quality and outcomes of Limited English Poficiency (LEP) patients at end of life, including symptom assessment and utilization of hospice services. Objective To determine how professional medical interpreters influence the delivery of palliative care services to LEP patients. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature in all available languages of six databases from 1966 to 2014. Studies evaluated use of language services for LEP patients who received palliative care services. Data were abstracted from ten articles and collected on study design, size, comparison groups, outcomes and interpreter characteristics. Results Six qualitative and four quantitative studies assessed the use of interpreters in palliative care. All studies found that the quality of care provided to LEP patients receiving palliative services is influenced by the type of interpreter used. When professional interpreters were not used, LEP patients and families had inadequate understanding about diagnosis and prognosis during goals of care conversations, and patients had worse symptom management at the end of life, including pain and anxiety. Half of the studies concluded that professional interpreters were not utilized adequately and several suggested that pre-meetings between clinicians and interpreters were important to discuss topics and terminology to be used during goals of care discussions. Conclusion LEP patients had worse quality of end-of-life care and goals of care discussions when professional interpreters were not used. More intervention studies are needed to improve the quality of care provided to LEP patients and families receiving palliative services. PMID:26549596

  13. Benchmarking comprehensive cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke

    2017-01-01

    The number of cancer patients and survivors is steadily increasing and despite or perhaps because of rapid improvements in diagnostics and therapeutics, important inequalities in cancer survival exist within and between different countries in Europe. Improving the quality of care is part of the

  14. A new model for health care delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepros John P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health care delivery system in the United States is facing cost and quality pressures that will require fundamental changes to remain viable. The optimal structures of the relationships between the hospital, medical school, and physicians have not been determined but are likely to have a large impact on the future of healthcare delivery. Because it is generally agreed that academic medical centers will play a role in the sustainability of this future system, a fundamental understanding of the relative contributions of the stakeholders is important as well as creativity in developing novel strategies to achieve a shared vision. Discussion Core competencies of each of the stakeholders (the hospital, the medical school and the physicians must complement the others and should act synergistically. At the same time, the stakeholders should determine the common core values and should be able to make a meaningful contribution to the delivery of health care. Summary Health care needs to achieve higher quality and lower cost. Therefore, in order for physicians, medical schools, and hospitals to serve the needs of society in a gratifying way, there will need to be change. There needs to be more scientific and social advances. It is obvious that there is a real and urgent need for relationship building among the professionals whose duty it is to provide these services.

  15. Perspectives on Palliative Care in Cancer Clinical Trials: Diverse Meanings from Multidisciplinary Cancer Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Michelle A; Kent, Erin E; Castro, Kathleen M; Ellis, Erin M; Ferrer, Rebecca A; Falisi, Angela L; Gaysynsky, Anna; Huang, Grace C; Palan, Martha A; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care (PC) is often misunderstood as exclusively pertaining to end-of-life care, which may be consequential for its delivery. There is little research on how PC is operationalized and delivered to cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials. We sought to understand the diverse perspectives of multidisciplinary oncology care providers caring for such patients in a teaching hospital. We conducted qualitative semistructured interviews with 19 key informants, including clinical trial principal investigators, oncology fellows, research nurses, inpatient and outpatient nurses, spiritual care providers, and PC fellows. Questions elicited information about the meaning providers assigned to the term "palliative care," as well as their experiences with the delivery of PC in the clinical trial context. Using grounded theory, a team-based coding method was employed to identify major themes. Four main themes emerged regarding the meaning of PC: (1) the holistic nature of PC, (2) the importance of symptom care, (3) conflict between PC and curative care, and (4) conflation between PC and end-of-life care. Three key themes emerged with regard to the delivery of PC: (1) dynamics among providers, (2) discussing PC with patients and family, and (3) the timing of PC delivery. There was great variability in personal meanings of PC, conflation with hospice/end-of-life care, and appropriateness of PC delivery and timing, particularly within cancer clinical trials. A standard and acceptable model for integrating PC concurrently with treatment in clinical trials is needed.

  16. Characterising cancer burden and quality of care at two palliative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also assesses the extent of differences in service delivery and the impact these might have on outcomes. Methods: Data on all cancer ... to services available. Quality of care was assessed as superior at Tiyanjane, demonstrating the importance of multiple stakeholder involvement in the delivery of palliative care services.

  17. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finished Treatment Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go ... fewer procedures and better quality of life. Good communication between patients, family caregivers, and the health care ...

  18. Changes in Quality of Health Care Delivery after Vertical Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Caroline S; Dowd, Bryan; Feldman, Roger

    2015-08-01

    To fill an empirical gap in the literature by examining changes in quality of care measures occurring when multispecialty clinic systems were acquired by hospital-owned, vertically integrated health care delivery systems in the Twin Cities area. Administrative data for health plan enrollees attributed to treatment and control clinic systems, merged with U.S. Census data. We compared changes in quality measures for health plan enrollees in the acquired clinics to enrollees in nine control groups using a differences-in-differences model. Our dataset spans 2 years prior to and 4 years after the acquisitions. We estimated probit models with errors clustered within enrollees. Data were assembled by the health plan's informatics team. Vertical integration is associated with increased rates of colorectal and cervical cancer screening and more appropriate emergency department use. The probability of ambulatory care-sensitive admissions increased when the acquisition caused disruption in admitting patterns. Moving a clinic system into a vertically integrated delivery system resulted in limited increases in quality of care indicators. Caution is warranted when the acquisition causes disruption in referral patterns. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  19. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  20. The Role of Advanced Practice Nurses in Cancer Survivorship Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Stacie; Dunne, Megan; McCabe, Mary S

    2015-11-01

    To review advanced practice nursing roles in planning, implementing, and evaluating survivorship care. Review of the literature, published articles, government and organizational reports. The increased focus on improving post-treatment cancer care presents opportunities for advanced practice nurses to meet the physical and psychosocial needs of cancer survivors. As experts in the comprehensive delivery of care, oncology advanced practice nurses are positioned to initiate, deliver, and evaluate survivorship care through innovative models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Care Delivery Patterns, Processes, and Outcomes for Primary Ovarian Cancer Surgery: A Population-Based Review Using a National Administrative Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Saad; Elit, Laurie; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Schneider, Laura; Finley, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In this pan-Canadian study, we sought to elucidate the current state of surgical care for primary ovarian cancers and factors influencing selected short-term outcomes; these were in-hospital mortality (IHM), major complications (MCs), failure-to-rescue (FTR), and hospital length of stay (LOS). We created a population cohort using inpatient admission records from the Canadian Institute of Health Information data set (2004-2012). Multilevel logistic regression and flexible parametric survival analyses, adjusted for hospital clustering effect, were conducted to determine the effect of patient-specific factors (i.e., age, comorbidities, and admission category); procedural complexity; and the surgical volume and specialty of each care provider on the outcomes of interest. A total of 16 089 women underwent surgeries for primary ovarian cancer across Canada. The crude rates of IHM, MC, and FTR were 0.89%, 5.7%, and 9.09%, respectively, with a median LOS of four days (interquartile range 3 to 6). The majority of surgical procedures were performed by surgeons and hospitals with annual surgical volumes of less than five such procedures. Hospitals with higher surgical volumes were associated with lower risk of IHM (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99) and FTR (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99) and a higher chance of earlier discharge (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.06). Surgeons with higher surgical volumes were associated with lower odds of early discharge (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.87 to 0.94) and a higher risk of MC (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.23). Compared with gynaecologic oncologists, general surgeons had a significantly higher risk of IHM (OR 3.50, 95% CI 1.82 to 6.74) and MC (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.33) and lower odds of early discharge (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.47). Despite limitations in the administrative data set, valuable information was available for this pan-Canadian analysis. Our findings support centralization of surgical procedures for women with ovarian cancer in

  2. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes.

  3. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Ordikhani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods.

  4. Efficient health care service delivery using network analysis: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficient health care service delivery using network analysis: a case study of Kwara State, Nigeria. ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management ... This paper addresses challenges with prompt health care delivery using Network Analysis of Critical Path Model (CPM) to plan the hospital capacity with a ...

  5. Cells as delivery vehicles for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Shrestha, Tej B; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2014-05-01

    Cell-based therapeutics have advanced significantly over the past decade and are poised to become a major pillar of modern medicine. Three cell types in particular have been studied in detail for their ability to home to tumors and to deliver a variety of different payloads. Neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and monocytes have each been shown to have great potential as future delivery systems for cancer therapy. A variety of other cell types have also been studied. These results demonstrate that the field of cell-based therapeutics will only continue to grow.

  6. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use to create one: American Society of Clinical Oncology -- www.cancer.net/survivorship/follow-care-after-cancer-treatment/asco- ... your doctor visits. References American Society of Clinical Oncology. Survivorship. Cancer.net. Updated July 2016. www.cancer.net/survivorship . ...

  7. Patients' experiences with care for lung cancer and colorectal cancer: findings from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Arora, Neeraj K; Kahn, Katherine L; Malin, Jennifer L; Ganz, Patricia A; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kiefe, Catarina I; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M; Weeks, Jane C; Harrington, David P

    2010-09-20

    To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health.

  8. Patients' Experiences With Care for Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Findings From the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanian, John Z.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Ganz, Patricia A.; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Harrington, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. Patients and Methods For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). Results English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health. PMID:20713876

  9. Modularity in Cancer Care Provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobbi, Chiara; Hsuan, Juliana

    2012-01-01

    and treatment service. Customization is obtained by combining different components in the diagnosis phase (examinations) and different treatment options in the treating phase. Findings show that the process of delivery cure for cancer is highly modularized and customization is driven by cancer specificity (type...

  10. Palliative Care in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCI support palliative care research? What is palliative care? Palliative care is care given to improve the quality ... the direction of a physician. Who gives palliative care ? Palliative care is usually provided by palliative care specialists, ...

  11. Essential newborn care after home delivery in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Målqvist, Mats; Pun, Asha; Kc, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    Postnatal care of the newborn is essential in order to reduce neonatal mortality. Nepal has made great efforts to improve maternal and child health by focusing on accessibility and outreach over the past decades. This study aims to examine trends, over the past decade, in levels and equity of facility delivery rates and the provision of newborn care after home delivery in Nepal. Household-level data from the Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) 2006 and 2011 and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS5) from 2014 performed in Nepal was sourced for the study. Coverage rates of facility delivery and newborn care after home delivery were calculated and logistic regression models were used to ascertain inequity. Home delivery rate dropped from 79.2% in 2006 to 46.5% in 2014, a development showing an inequitable distribution, with a larger share of better-off families shifting to facility delivery. For those who still delivered at home there was an increased rate of early initiation of breastfeeding and adequate temperature control, but only 2.2% of women delivering at home received a home visit by a health professional in the first week of delivery. No inequity in receiving newborn care after home delivery could be detected. There have been significant improvements in facility delivery rates over the last 10 years in Nepal and postnatal care at home has improved. There is, however, an alarmingly low level of home visits during an infant's first week.

  12. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  13. Improving oral health and oral health care delivery for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crall, James J

    2011-02-01

    National and state-level evidence has documented ongoing disparities in children's health and utilization of oral health care services, prompting a re-examination of factors associated with poor oral health and low use of oral health services. These efforts have yielded a wide array of proposals for improving children's oral health and oral health care delivery. This paper offers a perspective on the current context of efforts to improve children's oral health and oral health care delivery.

  14. Nonviral Delivery Systems For Cancer Gene Therapy: Strategies And Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Le, Quoc-Viet; Park, Gyu Thae; Kwon, Taekhyun; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2018-01-19

    Gene therapy has been receiving widespread attention due to its unique advantage in regulating the expression of specific target genes. In the field of cancer gene therapy, modulation of gene expression has been shown to decrease oncogenic factors in cancer cells or increase immune responses against cancer. Due to the macromolecular size and highly negative physicochemical features of plasmid DNA, efficient delivery systems are an essential ingredient for successful gene therapy. To date, a variety of nanostructures and materials have been studied as nonviral gene delivery systems. In this review, we will cover nonviral delivery strategies for cancer gene therapy, with a focus on target cancer genes and delivery materials. Moreover, we will address current challenges and perspectives for nonviral delivery-based cancer gene therapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Embedding a Palliative Approach in Nursing Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, Pat; Roberts, Della; Lee, Joyce; Liang, Leah; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Pesut, Barb; Schalkwyk, Tilly; Stajduhar, Kelli; Tayler, Carolyn; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Thorne, Sally

    2017-01-01

    A palliative approach involves adapting and integrating principles and values from palliative care into the care of persons who have life-limiting conditions throughout their illness trajectories. The aim of this research was to determine what approaches to nursing care delivery support the integration of a palliative approach in hospital, residential, and home care settings. The findings substantiate the importance of embedding the values and tenets of a palliative approach into nursing care delivery, the roles that nurses have in working with interdisciplinary teams to integrate a palliative approach, and the need for practice supports to facilitate that embedding and integration. PMID:27930401

  16. Embedding a Palliative Approach in Nursing Care Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Sawatzky, Richard; Porterfield, Pat; Roberts, Della; Lee, Joyce; Liang, Leah; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Pesut, Barb; Schalkwyk, Tilly; Stajduhar, Kelli; Tayler, Carolyn; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Thorne, Sally

    2017-01-01

    A palliative approach involves adapting and integrating principles and values from palliative care into the care of persons who have life-limiting conditions throughout their illness trajectories. The aim of this research was to determine what approaches to nursing care delivery support the integration of a palliative approach in hospital, residential, and home care settings. The findings substantiate the importance of embedding the values and tenets of a palliative approach into nursing care...

  17. Scenarios cancer in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, L.F.J. van der; Schellevis, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies predicted an increase in both the incidence and prevalence of cancer in the Netherlands. Other studies showed that cancer patients use primary care more frequently than non-cancer patients. Finally, during the “chronic phase” of the disease, task substitution from

  18. Satisfaction with health facility delivery care services and ssociated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Satisfaction with health facility delivery care services and ssociated factors: The case of Lindi and Mtwara rural districts, southern Tanzania. RNM Mpembeni, SN Massawe, MT Leshabari, DV Kakoko, E Duysburgh, P Wangwe, F Sukums, H Saronga, S Loukanova ...

  19. Robotics in Endometrial Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in women in most of the developed world. The majority of these women with endometrial cancer will be unaffected by their disease. The challenge therefore is for surgical treatment not to be worse than the disease. Robotics has changed the way that we care for women living with endometrial cancer by making low-impact surgical treatment available to more women than was previously possible.

  20. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaiyan Shima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development.

  1. Telemedicine for rural cancer care in North Queensland: bringing cancer care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Sabe; Larkins, Sarah; Evans, Rebecca; Varma, Suresh; Andrews, Athena; Beuttner, Petra; Brennan, Sean; Young, Michael

    2012-10-01

    To describe the use of telemedicine in cancer care (teleoncology model of care) for rural patients in North Queensland. This is a descriptive study. Data on demographical and clinical factors were retrieved from the teleoncology database of Townsville Hospital and review of medical records for the period between May 2007 and May 2011. The medical oncologists at the Townsville Cancer Centre, a regional cancer centre in North Queensland, have been providing their services to rural hospitals in Townsville and Mt Isa districts via videoconferencing since 2007.   Cancer care delivery to rural sites via Townsville teleoncology model. The ability of the teleoncology model to provide the following services to rural towns: (i) specialist consultations; (ii) urgent specialist medical care; (iii) care for Indigenous patients; and (iv) remote supervision of chemotherapy administration. Between May 2007 and May 2011, 158 patients from 18 rural towns received a total of 745 consultations. Ten of these patients were consulted urgently and treatment plans initiated locally, avoiding interhospital transfers. Eighteen Indigenous patients received consultative services, being accompanied by more than four to six family members. Eighty-three patients received a range of intravenous and oral chemotherapy regimens in Mt Isa and oral agents in other towns through remote supervision by medical oncologists from Townsville. Teleoncology model of care allows rural and Indigenous cancer patients to receive specialist consultations and chemotherapy treatments closer to home, thus minimising the access difficulties faced by the rural sector. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  2. Utilization of Antenatal Care and Delivery Services in Sagamu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of Antenatal Care and Delivery Services in Sagamu, SouthWestern Nigeria. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Results: Majority of the women received antenatal care (84.6%) during their last pregnancy while 11.2% used other sources such as traditional herbal and spiritual healing homes ...

  3. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Your cancer care team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer (cancer passed down through your genes). A genetic counselor can help you or your family members decide if you want to get tested for these types of cancer. A counselor can also help you make decisions based on test results. Nurse practitioners. A nurse with a graduate degree in ...

  5. Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Babu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy.

  6. Controlled drug delivery systems towards new frontiers in patient care

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Filippo; Masi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview of controlled drug delivery systems, covering the most important innovative applications. The principles of controlled drug release and the mechanisms involved in controlled release are clearly explained. The various existing polymeric drug delivery systems are reviewed, and new frontiers in material design are examined in detail, covering a wide range of polymer modification techniques. The concluding chapter is a case study focusing on use of a drug-eluting stent. The book is designed to provide the reader with a complete understanding of the mechanisms and design of controlled drug delivery systems, and to this end includes numerous step-by-step tutorials. It illustrates how chemical engineers can advance medical care by designing polymeric delivery systems that achieve either temporal or spatial control of drug delivery and thus ensure more effective therapy that eliminates the potential for both under-and overdosing.

  7. Integrating Acupuncture into Cancer Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ju Chien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oncology acupuncture has become a new and promising field of research because more and more cancer patients have sought non-pharmacological alternatives for symptom management. While different mechanisms have been proposed to explain its efficacy, including theories of the neural system, endocrine cytokine or immunological regulation, its eventual role has become that of alleviating the side effects induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the related articles focusing on acupuncture mechanisms and applications in cancer care to provide a quick sketch of acupuncture in cancer care. A detailed search was performed to identify the randomized controlled trials (RCTs and systematic reviews on acupuncture in oncology, using PUBMED and Cochrane. The search terms included: Acupuncture, acupressure, and cancer. Additional terms were used to target specific symptoms (i.e., breast cancer, hot flash, xerostomia, nausea, vomiting, cancer pain, insomnia, fatigue. Two authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Ultimately, 25 articles underwent full-text review. Recent trials made efforts in studying (a hot flashes in breast cancer, (b xerostomia induced by radiotherapy in head and neck cancer, (c nausea and vomiting post-chemotherapy, (d cancer pain, and (e fatigue and insomnia in cancer patients. Controversial results for acupuncture application in cancer care appeared in different categories, but a trend emerged that acupuncture can palliate cancer-related symptoms. The research to date certainly offers us a valid complementary therapy in treating cancer-related symptoms. Meanwhile, practical strategies with safe measures for enhancing the efficacy are needed in further interventions, as well as continuing research with a validated methodology.

  8. Development In Drug Targeting And Delivery In Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Urvashi; Goyal, Amit Kumar; Rath, Goutam

    2017-10-09

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Standard treatment options available for cervical cancer including chemotherapy, surgery and radiation therapy associated with their own side effects and toxicities. Tumor-targeted delivery of anticancer drugs is perhaps one of the most appropriate strategies to achieve optimal outcomes from treatment and improve quality of life. Recently nanocarriers based drug delivery systems owing to their unique properties have been extensively investigated for anticancer drug delivery. In addition to that addressing the anatomical significance of cervical cancer, various local drug delivery strategies for the cancer treatment are introduced like: gels, nanoparticles, polymeric films, rods and wafers, lipid based nanocarrier. Localized drug delivery systems allows passive drug targeting results in high drug concentration at the target site. Further they can be tailor made to achieve both sustained and controlled release behavior, substantially improving therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side effects. This review summarizes the meaningful advances in drug delivery strategies to treat cervical cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Efficiency performance of China's health care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyu; Cheng, Gang; Song, Suhang; Yuan, Beibei; Zhu, Weiming; He, Li; Ma, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingyue

    2017-07-01

    Improving efficiency performance of the health care delivery system has been on the agenda for the health system reform that China initiated in 2009. This study examines the changes in efficiency performance and determinants of efficiency after the reform to provide evidence to assess the progress of the reform from the perspective of efficiency. Descriptive analysis, Data Envelopment Analysis, the Malmquist Index, and multilevel regressions are used with data from multiple sources, including the World Bank, the China Health Statistical Yearbook, and routine reports. The results indicate that over the last decade, health outcomes compared with health investment were relatively higher in China than in most other countries worldwide, and the trend was stable. The overall efficiency and total factor productivity increased after the reform, indicating that the reform was likely to have had a positive impact on the efficiency performance of the health care delivery system. However, the health care delivery structure showed low system efficiency, mainly attributed to the weakened primary health care system. Strengthening the primary health care system is central to enhancing the future performance of China's health care delivery system. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Sexual minority cancer survivors' satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Kamen, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Satisfaction with care is important to cancer survivors' health outcomes. Satisfaction with care is not equal for all cancer survivors, and sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) cancer survivors may experience poor satisfaction with care. Data were drawn from the 2010 LIVESTRONG national survey. The final sample included 207 sexual minority cancer survivors and 4,899 heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care was compared by sexual orientation, and a Poisson regression model was computed to test the associations between sexual orientation and satisfaction with care, controlling for other relevant variables. Sexual minority cancer survivors had lower satisfaction with care than did heterosexual cancer survivors (B = -0.12, SE = 0.04, Wald χ(2) = 9.25, pSexual minorities experience poorer satisfaction with care compared to heterosexual cancer survivors. Satisfaction with care is especially relevant to cancer survivorship in light of the cancer-related health disparities reported among sexual minority cancer survivors.

  11. A global health delivery framework approach to epilepsy care in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Maggie F; Berkowitz, Aaron L

    2015-11-15

    The Global Health Delivery (GHD) framework (Farmer, Kim, and Porter, Lancet 2013;382:1060-69) allows for the analysis of health care delivery systems along four axes: a care delivery value chain that incorporates prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of a medical condition; shared delivery infrastructure that integrates care within existing healthcare delivery systems; alignment of care delivery with local context; and generation of economic growth and social development through the health care delivery system. Here, we apply the GHD framework to epilepsy care in rural regions of low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where there are few or no neurologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lower Costs, Better Care- Reforming Our Health Care Delivery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act includes tools to improve the quality of health care that can also lower costs for taxpayers and patients. This means avoiding costly...

  13. Use of pharmacy delivery robots in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Marc R; Seagull, F Jacob; Vaidya, Neelesh; Xiao, Yan

    2011-01-01

    The use of pharmacy delivery robots in an institution's intensive care units was evaluated. In 2003, the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) began a pilot program to determine the logistic capability and functional utility of robotic technology in the delivery of medications from satellite pharmacies to patient care units. Three satellite pharmacies currently used the robotic system. Five data sources (electronic robot activation records, logs, interviews, surveys, and observations) were used to assess five key aspects of robotic delivery: robot use, reliability, timeliness, cost minimization, and acceptance. A 19-item survey using a 7-point Likert-type scale was developed to determine if pharmacy delivery robots changed nurses' perception of pharmacy service. The components measured included general satisfaction, reliability, timeliness, stat orders, services, interaction with pharmacy, and status tracking. A total of 23 pre-implementation, 96 post-implementation, and 30 two-year follow-up surveys were completed. After implementation of the robotic delivery system, time from fax to label, order preparation time, and idle time for medications to be delivered decreased, while nurses' general satisfaction with the pharmacy and opinion of the reliability of pharmacy delivery significantly increased. Robotic delivery did not influence the perceived quality of delivery service or the timeliness of orders or stat orders. Robot reliability was a major issue for the technician but not for pharmacists, who did not have as much interaction with the devices. By considering the needs of UMMC and its patients and matching them with available technology, the institution was able to improve the medication-use process and timeliness of medication departure from the pharmacy.

  14. The entrepreneurial revolution in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, A D

    1987-06-01

    The rapid changes in the health marketplace have opened the door for entrepreneurs. The author shows how entrepreneurs seek previously unthought of solutions to problems and through a team effort increase corporate value. According to the author, there is a specific profile of the successful entrepreneur. The qualities of the entrepreneur and the managers that work with them, therefore, are discussed in detail. Finally, several examples of problems in health care that present entrepreneurial opportunities are presented. The author includes scenarios for taking advantage of these opportunities.

  15. Clinician Behaviors in Telehealth Care Delivery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Beverly W.; Block, Derryl E.; Ciesla, James R.; McGowan, Beth Ann; Vozenilek, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Literature on telehealth care delivery often addresses clinical, cost, technological, system, and organizational impacts. Less is known about interpersonal behaviors such as communication patterns and therapeutic relationship-building, which may have workforce development considerations. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic…

  16. Learning the landscape: implementation challenges of primary care innovators around cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Denalee; Hudson, Shawna V; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Howard, Jenna; Rubinstein, Ellen; Lee, Heather S; Overholser, Linda S; Shaw, Amy; Givens, Sarah; Burton, Jay S; Grunfeld, Eva; Parry, Carly; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2017-02-01

    This study describes the experiences of early implementers of primary care-focused cancer survivorship delivery models. Snowball sampling was used to identify innovators. Twelve participants (five cancer survivorship primary care innovators and seven content experts) attended a working conference focused on cancer survivorship population strategies and primary care transformation. Data included meeting discussion transcripts/field notes, transcribed in-depth innovator interviews, and innovators' summaries of care models. We used a multistep immersion/crystallization analytic approach, guided by a primary care organizational change model. Innovative practice models included: (1) a consultative model in a primary care setting; (2) a primary care physician (PCP)-led, blended consultative/panel-based model in an oncology setting; (3) an oncology nurse navigator in a primary care practice; and (4) two subspecialty models where PCPs in a general medical practice dedicated part of their patient panel to cancer survivors. Implementation challenges included (1) lack of key stakeholder buy-in; (2) practice resources allocated to competing (non-survivorship) change efforts; and (3) competition with higher priority initiatives incentivized by payers. Cancer survivorship delivery models are potentially feasible in primary care; however, significant barriers to widespread implementation exist. Implementation efforts would benefit from increasing the awareness and potential value-add of primary care-focused strategies to address survivors' needs. Current models of primary care-based cancer survivorship care may not be sustainable. Innovative strategies to provide quality care to this growing population of survivors need to be developed and integrated into primary care settings.

  17. Carbohydrate-based amphiphilic nano delivery systems for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kegang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Hunziker, Patrick

    2016-09-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are novel drug delivery systems that have been attracting more and more attention in recent years, and have been used for the treatment of cancer, infection, inflammation and other diseases. Among the numerous classes of materials employed for constructing NPs, organic polymers are outstanding due to the flexibility of design and synthesis and the ease of modification and functionalization. In particular, NP based amphiphilic polymers make a great contribution to the delivery of poorly-water soluble drugs. For example, natural, biocompatible and biodegradable products like polysaccharides are widely used as building blocks for the preparation of such drug delivery vehicles. This review will detail carbohydrate based amphiphilic polymeric systems for cancer therapy. Specifically, it focuses on the nature of the polymer employed for the preparation of targeted nanocarriers, the synthetic methods, as well as strategies for the application and evaluation of biological activity. Applications of the amphiphilic polymer systems include drug delivery, gene delivery, photosensitizer delivery, diagnostic imaging and specific ligand-assisted cellular uptake. As a result, a thorough understanding of the relationship between chemical structure and biological properties facilitate the optimal design and rational clinical application of the resulting carbohydrate based nano delivery systems for cancer therapy.

  18. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  19. The importance of nanoparticle shape in cancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Nghia P; Whittaker, Michael R; Mak, Catherine W; Davis, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been successfully used for cancer drug delivery since 1995. In the design of commercial nanoparticles, size and surface characteristics have been exploited to achieve efficacious delivery. However, the design of optimized drug delivery platforms for efficient delivery to disease sites with minimal off-target effects remains a major research goal. One crucial element of nanoparticle design influencing both pharmacokinetics and cell uptake is nanoparticle morphology (both size and shape). In this succinct review, the authors collate the recent literature to assess the current state of understanding of the influence of nanoparticle shape on the effectiveness of drug delivery with a special emphasis on cancer therapy. This review draws on studies that have focused on the role of nonspherical nanoparticles used for cancer drug delivery. In particular, the authors summarize the influence of nanoparticle shape on biocirculation, biodistribution, cellular uptake and overall drug efficacy. By comparing spherical and nonspherical nanoparticles, they establish some general design principles to serve as guidelines for developing the next generation of nanocarriers for drug delivery. Pioneering studies on nanoparticles show that nonspherical shapes show great promise as cancer drug delivery vectors. Filamentous or worm-like micelles together with other rare morphologies such as needles or disks may become the norm for next-generation drug carriers, though at present, traditional spherical micelles remain the dominant shape of nanocarriers described in the literature due to synthesis and testing difficulties. The few reports that do exist describing nonspherical nanoparticles show a number of favorable properties that should encourage more efforts to develop facile and versatile nanoparticle synthesis methodologies with the flexibility to create different shapes, tunable sizes and adaptable surface chemistries. In addition, the authors note that there is a

  20. Telemedicine in diabetes foot care delivery: health care professionals' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolltveit, Beate-Christin Hope; Gjengedal, Eva; Graue, Marit; Iversen, Marjolein M; Thorne, Sally; Kirkevold, Marit

    2016-04-18

    Introducing new technology in health care is inevitably a challenge. More knowledge is needed to better plan future telemedicine interventions. Our aim was therefore to explore health care professionals' experience in the initial phase of introducing telemedicine technology in caring for people with diabetic foot ulcers. Our methodological strategy was Interpretive Description. Data were collected between 2014 and 2015 using focus groups (n = 10). Participants from home-based care, primary care and outpatient hospital clinics were recruited from the intervention arm of an ongoing cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01710774). Most were nurses (n = 29), but the sample also included one nurse assistant, podiatrists (n = 2) and physicians (n = 2). The participants reported experiencing meaningful changes to their practice arising from telemedicine, especially associated with increased wound assessment knowledge and skills and improved documentation quality. They also experienced more streamlined communication between primary health care and specialist health care. Despite obstacles associated with finding the documentation process time consuming, the participants' attitudes to telemedicine were overwhelmingly positive and their general enthusiasm for the innovation was high. Our findings indicate that using a telemedicine intervention enabled the participating health care professionals to approach their patients with diabetic foot ulcer with more knowledge, better wound assessment skills and heightened confidence. Furthermore, it streamlined the communication between health care levels and helped seeing the patients in a more holistic way.

  1. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Pain: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery systems can be used to manage refractory or persistent cancer pain. We investigated the benefits, harms, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of these systems compared with current standards of care for adult patients with chronic pain due owing to cancer. We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Library databases, National Health Service's Economic Evaluation Database, and Tufts Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry from January 1994 to April 2014 for evidence of effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness. We used existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screen methods and searched for studies published after the search date reported in the latest systematic review to identify studies. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. The cost burden of publicly funding intrathecal drug delivery systems for cancer pain was estimated for a 5-year timeframe using a combination of published literature, information from the device manufacturer, administrative data, and expert opinion for the inputs. We included one randomized trial that examined effectiveness and harms, and one case series that reported an eligible economic evaluation. We found very low quality evidence that intrathecal drug delivery systems added to comprehensive pain management reduce overall drug toxicity; no significant reduction in pain scores was observed. Weak conclusions from economic evidence suggested that intrathecal drug delivery systems had the potential to be more cost-effective than high-cost oral therapy if administered for 7 months or longer. The cost burden of publicly funding this therapy is estimated to be $100,000 in the first year, increasing to $500,000 by the fifth year. Current evidence could not establish the benefit, harm, or cost-effectiveness of intrathecal drug delivery systems compared with current standards of care for managing refractory cancer pain in adults. Publicly funding intrathecal drug

  2. Recommendations to support nurses and improve the delivery of oncology and palliative care in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia T LeBaron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nurses in India often practice in resource-constrained settings and care for cancer patients with high symptom burden yet receive little oncology or palliative care training. Aim: The aim of this study is to explore challenges encountered by nurses in India and offer recommendations to improve the delivery of oncology and palliative care. Methods: Qualitative ethnography. Setting: The study was conducted at a government cancer hospital in urban South India. Sample: Thirty-seven oncology/palliative care nurses and 22 others (physicians, social workers, pharmacists, patients/family members who interact closely with nurses were included in the study. Data Collection: Data were collected over 9 months (September 2011– June 2012. Key data sources included over 400 hours of participant observation and 54 audio-recorded semi-structured interviews. Analysis: Systematic qualitative analysis of field notes and interview transcripts identified key themes and patterns. Results: Key concerns of nurses included safety related to chemotherapy administration, workload and clerical responsibilities, patients who died on the wards, monitoring family attendants, and lack of supplies. Many participants verbalized distress that they received no formal oncology training. Conclusions: Recommendations to support nurses in India include: prioritize safety, optimize role of the nurse and explore innovative models of care delivery, empower staff nurses, strengthen nurse leadership, offer relevant educational programs, enhance teamwork, improve cancer pain management, and engage in research and quality improvement projects. Strong institutional commitment and leadership are required to implement interventions to support nurses. Successful interventions must account for existing cultural and professional norms and first address safety needs of nurses. Positive aspects from existing models of care delivery can be adapted and integrated into general nursing

  3. Recommendations to Support Nurses and Improve the Delivery of Oncology and Palliative Care in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBaron, Virginia T; Palat, Gayatri; Sinha, Sudha; Chinta, Sanjeeva Kumari; Jamima, Beaulah John Battula; Pilla, Usha Lakshmi; Podduturi, Nireekshana; Shapuram, Yadamma; Vennela, Padma; Rapelli, Vineela; Lalani, Zahra; Beck, Susan L

    2017-01-01

    Context: Nurses in India often practice in resource-constrained settings and care for cancer patients with high symptom burden yet receive little oncology or palliative care training. Aim: The aim of this study is to explore challenges encountered by nurses in India and offer recommendations to improve the delivery of oncology and palliative care. Methods: Qualitative ethnography. Setting: The study was conducted at a government cancer hospital in urban South India. Sample: Thirty-seven oncology/palliative care nurses and 22 others (physicians, social workers, pharmacists, patients/family members) who interact closely with nurses were included in the study. Data Collection: Data were collected over 9 months (September 2011– June 2012). Key data sources included over 400 hours of participant observation and 54 audio-recorded semi-structured interviews. Analysis: Systematic qualitative analysis of field notes and interview transcripts identified key themes and patterns. Results: Key concerns of nurses included safety related to chemotherapy administration, workload and clerical responsibilities, patients who died on the wards, monitoring family attendants, and lack of supplies. Many participants verbalized distress that they received no formal oncology training. Conclusions: Recommendations to support nurses in India include: prioritize safety, optimize role of the nurse and explore innovative models of care delivery, empower staff nurses, strengthen nurse leadership, offer relevant educational programs, enhance teamwork, improve cancer pain management, and engage in research and quality improvement projects. Strong institutional commitment and leadership are required to implement interventions to support nurses. Successful interventions must account for existing cultural and professional norms and first address safety needs of nurses. Positive aspects from existing models of care delivery can be adapted and integrated into general nursing practice. PMID:28503040

  4. Recommendations to Support Nurses and Improve the Delivery of Oncology and Palliative Care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBaron, Virginia T; Palat, Gayatri; Sinha, Sudha; Chinta, Sanjeeva Kumari; Jamima, Beaulah John Battula; Pilla, Usha Lakshmi; Podduturi, Nireekshana; Shapuram, Yadamma; Vennela, Padma; Rapelli, Vineela; Lalani, Zahra; Beck, Susan L

    2017-01-01

    Nurses in India often practice in resource-constrained settings and care for cancer patients with high symptom burden yet receive little oncology or palliative care training. The aim of this study is to explore challenges encountered by nurses in India and offer recommendations to improve the delivery of oncology and palliative care. Qualitative ethnography. The study was conducted at a government cancer hospital in urban South India. Thirty-seven oncology/palliative care nurses and 22 others (physicians, social workers, pharmacists, patients/family members) who interact closely with nurses were included in the study. Data were collected over 9 months (September 2011- June 2012). Key data sources included over 400 hours of participant observation and 54 audio-recorded semi-structured interviews. Systematic qualitative analysis of field notes and interview transcripts identified key themes and patterns. Key concerns of nurses included safety related to chemotherapy administration, workload and clerical responsibilities, patients who died on the wards, monitoring family attendants, and lack of supplies. Many participants verbalized distress that they received no formal oncology training. Recommendations to support nurses in India include: prioritize safety, optimize role of the nurse and explore innovative models of care delivery, empower staff nurses, strengthen nurse leadership, offer relevant educational programs, enhance teamwork, improve cancer pain management, and engage in research and quality improvement projects. Strong institutional commitment and leadership are required to implement interventions to support nurses. Successful interventions must account for existing cultural and professional norms and first address safety needs of nurses. Positive aspects from existing models of care delivery can be adapted and integrated into general nursing practice.

  5. Health care expenditure for hospital-based delivery care in Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douangvichit Daovieng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery by a skilled birth attendant (SBA in a hospital is advocated to improve maternal health; however, hospital expenses for delivery care services are a concern for women and their families, particularly for women who pay out-of-pocket. Although health insurance is now implemented in Lao PDR, it is not universal throughout the country. The objectives of this study are to estimate the total health care expenses for vaginal delivery and caesarean section, to determine the association between health insurance and family income with health care expenditure and assess the effect of health insurance from the perspectives of the women and the skilled birth attendants (SBAs in Lao PDR. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two provincial hospitals in Lao PDR, from June to October 2010. Face to face interviews of 581 women who gave birth in hospital and 27 SBAs was carried out. Both medical and non-medical expenses were considered. A linear regression model was used to assess influencing factors on health care expenditure and trends of medical and non-medical expenditure by monthly family income stratified by mode of delivery were assessed. Results Of 581 women, 25% had health care insurance. Health care expenses for delivery care services were significantly higher for caesarean section (270 USD than for vaginal delivery (59 USD. After adjusting for the effect of hospital, family income was significantly associated with all types of expenditure in caesarean section, while it was associated with non-medical and total expenditures in vaginal delivery. Both delivering women and health providers thought that health insurance increased the utilisation of delivery care. Conclusions Substantially higher delivery care expenses were incurred for caesarean section compared to vaginal delivery. Three-fourths of the women who were not insured needed to be responsible for their own health care payment. Women who had higher family

  6. Brain-drain and health care delivery in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misau, Yusuf Abdu; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Gerei, Adamu Bakari

    2010-09-01

    Migration of health workers 'Brain drain' is defined as the movement of health personnel in search of a better standard of living and life quality, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide. The debate about migration of health workers from the developing to the developed world has remained pertinent for decades now. Regardless of the push and pull factors, migration of health care workers from developing countries to developed ones, have done more harm than good on the health care deliveries in the developing countries. This article reviews the literature on the effects of cross-border migration of health care professionals.

  7. Fatigue and the delivery of medical care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-01-01

    Lack of sleep has well established effects on physiological, cognitive and behavioural functionality. Sleep deprivation can adversely affect clinical performance as severely as alcohol according to some sources. Sleep deficiency may be due to loss of one night’s sleep or repeated interruptions of sleep. Chronic sleep degrades the ability to recognise one’s ability to recognise the impairments induced by sleep loss. The problem of sleep deprivation has vexed acute medical practice for decades. Improvement has been painfully slow. The problem is that all 168 hours throughout every week of every year have to be covered and there are a finite number of doctors to shoulder the burden. There are many strongly held views about how best to provide night-time and week-end care. Constructive innovations are thin on the ground. The biggest gap is between administration and doctors with financial considerations being the limiting factor. It is, however, generally accepted on all sides that sleep loss and fatigue can have adverse effects on both patients and doctors.

  8. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alternate service delivery models in cancer genetic counseling: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hudson Buchanan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Demand for cancer genetic counseling has grown rapidly in recent years as germline genomic information has become increasingly incorporated into cancer care and the field has entered the public consciousness through high-profile celebrity publications. Increased demand and existing variability in the availability of trained cancer genetics clinicians place a priority on developing and evaluating alternate service delivery models for genetic counseling. This mini-review summarizes the state of science regarding service delivery models such as telephone counseling, telegenetics and group counseling. Research on comparative effectiveness of these models in traditional individual, in-person genetic counseling has been promising for improving access to care in a manner acceptable to patients. Yet, it has not fully evaluated the short- and long-term patient- and system-level outcomes that will help answer the question of whether these models achieve the same beneficial psychosocial and behavioral outcomes as traditional cancer genetic counseling. We propose a research agenda focused on comparative effectiveness of available service delivery models and how to match models to patients and practice settings. Only through this rigorous research can clinicians and systems find the optimal balance of clinical quality, ready and secure access to care, and financial sustainability. Such research will be integral to achieving the promise of genomic medicine in oncology.

  10. Liposome as nanocarrier: Site targeted delivery in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is fatal and spreading rapidly worldwide. Different clinical strategies are applied to stop this cancer. As the lung is a delicate organ, special clinical applications must be used and nanodrugs delivery systems are the most important applications of all. This review discusses the lung problems such as lung cancer, lung inflammation and bronchi constrictions followed by repetitive intake of some drugs. The objective of this review is to study how nanodrug delivery systems were synthesized and used in lung disorder treatment especially in lung cancer. The authors studied some articles from 1989 to 2015. Liposome encapsulation was done in various ways for the delivery of different drugs such as metaproterenol into liposomes caused bronchodilation, immunoliposomes bearing antibodies for doxorubicin reduced 50% inhibitory effects, radioliposomes with high penetrating ability to peripheral airways, aerosol delivery systems with deep pulmonary deposition, polymeric drug delivery having potential to improve beneficial index of drug, solid lipid liposomes, liposomal gentamicin with altered different clinical susceptibilities of resistance, transferrin conjugated liposomes to deliver cytostatic drugs to site of lungs, anti-inflammatory drugs with mannosylated liposomes, liposomal suspensions with single stranded RNAs and peptide encapsulation of liposomes. This review indicates that many animals perished with intravenous administration of drugs but survived in liposomal targeting groups.

  11. Selenium nanoparticles: potential in cancer gene and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyo, Fiona; Singh, Moganavelli

    2017-05-01

    In recent decades, colloidal selenium nanoparticles have emerged as exceptional selenium species with reported chemopreventative and therapeutic properties. This has sparked widespread interest in their use as a carrier of therapeutic agents with results displaying synergistic effects of selenium with its therapeutic cargo and improved anticancer activity. Functionalization remains a critical step in selenium nanoparticles' development for application in gene or drug delivery. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the synthesis and functionalization strategies of selenium nanoparticles used in cancer drug and gene delivery systems. We also provide an update of recent preclinical studies utilizing selenium nanoparticles in cancer therapeutics.

  12. Improving Value in Musculoskeletal Care Delivery: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, David H; Hawker, Gillian A; Jevsevar, David S; Bozic, Kevin J

    2015-05-06

    Improving value in musculoskeletal health care has emerged as an important objective in both the United States and Canada. In order to achieve this objective, providers need to have a clear definition of value and an infrastructure for measuring outcomes of interest to patients and costs over the episode of care. Although national patient registries have been established in the United States and Canada, they nevertheless lag behind other registries worldwide in terms of collecting patient-reported outcomes and capturing data from a wide cross-section of hospitals and physicians. With the help of professional medical societies and the creation of national initiatives, patient-reported outcomes data collection on a large scale may be possible, but many challenges remain regarding implementation. Alternatives to the fee-for-service payment model, including pay-for-reporting and pay-for-performance, may help incentivize physicians and health-care providers to obtain and improve on patient-reported outcomes data collection. Other payment reforms, such as bundled payments, have been piloted in certain regions, but their sustainability and long-term success are unclear at this time. Novel health-care delivery strategies aimed at improving quality, coordinating multispecialty care, and enhancing patient participation in shared decision-making have shown promise in improving patient-centered outcomes, but delivery models continue to vary greatly throughout the United States and Canada. The current status of musculoskeletal health-care delivery requires substantial change before the goal of improving patient outcomes and lowering health-care costs can be achieved. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  13. Racial/Ethnic Disparity in NICU Quality of Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Bennett, Mihoko; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Draper, David; Phibbs, Ciaran S.; Lee, Henry C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Differences in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) quality of care provided to very-low-birth-weight (VLBW; <1500g) infants may contribute to the persistence of racial/ethnic disparity. An examination of such disparities in a population-based sample across multiple dimensions of care and outcomes is lacking. METHODS Prospective observational analysis of 18,616 VLBW infants in 134 California NICUs between January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. We assessed quality of care delivery via the Baby-MONITOR, a composite indicator consisting of nine process and outcome measures of quality. For each NICU we calculated a risk adjusted composite and individual component quality score for each race/ethnicity. We standardized each score to the overall population to compare quality of care between and within NICUs. RESULTS We found clinically and statistically significant racial/ethnic variation in quality of care delivery between NICUs as well as within NICUs. Composite quality scores ranged by 5.26 standard units (range −2.30 to 2.96). Adjustment of Baby-MONITOR scores by race/ethnicity had only minimal effect on comparative assessments of NICU performance. Among subcomponents of the Baby-MONITOR, non-Hispanic White infants scored higher on measures of process compared with non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics. Compared with Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks scored higher on measures of outcome; Hispanics scored lower on seven of the nine Baby-MONITOR subcomponents. CONCLUSION Significant racial/ethnic variation in quality of care delivery exists between and within NICUs. Providing feedback of disparity scores to NICUs could serve as an important starting point for promoting improvement and reducing disparities. PMID:28847984

  14. Exploring Different Strategies for Efficient Delivery of Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the world. Currently available chemotherapy of CRC usually delivers the drug to both normal as well as cancerous tissues, thus leading to numerous undesirable effects. Much emphasis is being laid on the development of effective drug delivery systems for achieving selective delivery of the active moiety at the anticipated site of action with minimized unwanted side effects. Researchers have employed various techniques (dependent on pH, time, pressure and/or bacteria for targeting drugs directly to the colonic region. On the other hand, systemic drug delivery strategies to specific molecular targets (such as FGFR, EGFR, CD44, EpCAM, CA IX, PPARγ and COX-2 overexpressed by cancerous cells have also been shown to be effective. This review aims to put forth an overview of drug delivery technologies that have been, and may be developed, for the treatment of CRC.

  15. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima NN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nádia Nara Rolim Lima,1 Vânia Barbosa do Nascimento,1 Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho,1 Modesto Leite Rolim Neto,2 Marcial Moreno Moreira,2 Aline Quental Brasil,2 Francisco Telésforo Celestino Junior,2 Gislene Farias de Oliveira,2 Alberto Olavo Advíncula Reis3 1Health Sciences Postgraduate Program, ABC Region Medical School, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil; 3Public Health Postgraduate Program, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS] was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people's welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers

  16. Cannabis in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  17. Determinants of antenatal care, institutional delivery and postnatal care services utilization in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiru, Tukur; Oche, Oche Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of antenatal care, institutional delivery and postnatal care services in Nigeria are poor even by african average. We analysed the 2013 Nigeria DHS to determine factors associated with utilization of these health MCH indicators by employing both bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Overall, 54% of women had at least four ANC visits, 37% delivered in health facility and 29% of new born had postnatal care within two of births. Factors that consistently predict the utilization of the three MCH services are maternal and husband's level education, place of residence, wealth level and parity. Antenatal care strongly predicts both health facility delivery (OR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.99-2.34) and postnatal care utilization (OR = 4.67, 95%CI: 3.95-5.54); while health facility delivery equally predicting postnatal care (OR = 2.84, 95%CI: 2.20-2.80). Improving utilization of these three MCH indicators will require targeting women in the rural areas and those with low level of education as well as creating demand for health facility delivery. Improving ANC use by making it available and accessible will have a multiplier effect of improving facility delivery which will lead to improved postnatal care utilization.

  18. The effect of midwifery care on rates of cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Beverley A; Koch, Abby; Stanley, James; Geller, Stacie E

    2013-12-01

    To examine whether changing to a midwifery-led maternity service model was associated with a lower national rate of cesarean delivery. We analyzed trends in the rate of cesarean delivery per 1000 live births between 1996 and 2010 in New Zealand. Estimates of relative increases in rate were calculated via Poisson regression for several maternal age groups over the study period. Rates of cesarean delivery increased over the study period, from 156.9 per 1000 live births in 1996 to 235 per 1000 in 2010: a crude increase of 49.8%. Increasing trends were apparent in each age group, with the largest increases occurring before 2003 and relatively stable rates in the subsequent period. The smoothed estimate showed that the increase in cesarean rate across all age groups was 43.7% (95% confidence interval, 41.6-45.8) over the 15-year period. A national midwifery-led care model was not associated with a decreased rate of cesarean delivery but, instead, with an increase similar to that in other high-resource countries. This indicates that other factors may account for the increase. Further research is needed to examine maternity outcomes associated with different models of maternity care. © 2013.

  19. Gene Delivery for Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pang, Shen

    2001-01-01

    .... Enhanced by the bystander effect, the specific expression of the DTA gene causes significant cell death in prostate cancer cell cultures, with very low background cell eradication in control cell lines...

  20. Household cost of antenatal care and delivery services in a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Household cost of antenatal care and delivery services in a rural community of Kaduna state, northwestern Nigeria. ... Nigerian Medical Journal ... Conclusion: Cost of Antenatal care and delivery services were not catastrophic but were a barrier to accessing antenatal care and facility‑based delivery services in the study ...

  1. LGBT Populations' Barriers to Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike

    2018-02-01

    To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available. Nurses can make a difference in LGBT individuals' cancer care by obtaining training on LGBT health and their cancer-related needs and by providing a welcoming and respectful relationship with LGBT patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Leukocytes as carriers for targeted cancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths. Numerous nanoparticle platforms have been developed to target and treat cancer, yet efficient delivery of these systems to the appropriate site remains challenging. Leukocytes, which share similarities to tumor cells in terms of their transport and migration through the body, are well suited to serve as carriers of drug delivery systems to target cancer sites. This review focuses on the use and functionalization of leukocytes for therapeutic targeting of metastatic cancer. Tumor cell and leukocyte extravasation, margination in the bloodstream, and migration into soft tissue are discussed, along with the potential to exploit these functional similarities to effectively deliver drugs. Current nanoparticle-based drug formulations for the treatment of cancer are reviewed, along with methods to functionalize delivery vehicles to leukocytes, either on the surface and/or within the cell. Recent progress in this area, both in vitro and in vivo, is also discussed, with a particular emphasis on targeting cancer cells in the bloodstream as a means to interrupt the metastatic process. Leukocytes interact with cancer cells both in the bloodstream and at the site of solid tumors. These interactions can be utilized to effectively deliver drugs to targeted areas, which can reduce both the amount of drug required and various nonspecific cytotoxic effects within the body. If drug delivery vehicle functionalization does not interfere with leukocyte function, this approach may be utilized to neutralize tumor cells in the bloodstream to prevent the formation of new metastases, and also to deliver drugs to metastatic sites within tissues.

  3. Delivery by Cesarean Section and risk of childhood cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momen, Natalie; Olsen, Jørn; Gissler, Mika

    Introduction Studies suggest delivery by Cesarean section (CS) may impact the development of the immune system. Meta-analyses on CS and risks of type I diabetes mellitus and asthma have found risks increased by 20%. Three different mechanisms have been proposed by which CS may influence immune...... suggest CS does not influence overall childhood cancer risk. We did not see any difference between the two types of CS. Additionally it was not strongly associated with any specific childhood cancer, but power was limited for some types. Considering the high CS rates, even a small increase in risk...... of childhood cancer could therefore have public health impact....

  4. Engagement and experience with cancer-related follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancer after transfer to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalda, Dava; Pierce, Lisa; Hobbie, Wendy; Ginsberg, Jill P; Brumley, Lauren; Wasik, Monika; Li, Yimei; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2016-04-01

    Young adult survivors (YAS) of childhood cancer require annual adult-focused, cancer-related follow-up given their risk for late effects of treatment. This study describes perception of and engagement with adult-focused, cancer-related follow-up care and general health care among YAS formally transferred to adult care from pediatric survivorship care. YAS transferred from pediatric survivorship care in the prior 1-5 years completed measures indicating engagement with cancer-related follow-up care, other health care utilization, content of communication by providers, quality of cancer-related care, and satisfaction with health care in the prior year. Eighty YAS (M age = 27.7 years, M time since diagnosis = 10.4 years) participated. Just over half of YAS surveyed (n = 44, 55%) endorsed continuing cancer-related follow-up care since transfer. Those with cancer-related follow-up endorsed seeing subspecialty survivorship providers (n = 16, 44%) and primary care providers (n = 22, 50%) or utilizing a shared care model (n = 6, 14%). About a third of YAS endorsed seeing subspecialists (n = 29, 36%) or using other support services (n = 22, 27%). YAS-perceived content of communication varied significantly depending on care model with less cancer-related content being discussed by primary care providers, though perceived quality of cancer-related care and satisfaction with health care was generally favorable. YAS report less than optimal engagement in cancer-related follow-up care and communication in their health care encounters. Young adult survivors should receive anticipatory guidance about expectations for delivery and content of adult-focused cancer-related follow-up care.

  5. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made...

  6. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    OpenAIRE

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients contact their Primary Care Physician (PCP) 2-5 years after diagnosis. Methods: Using data from the Netherlands Information Network of Primary Care (LINH), we determined the volume and diagnoses made dur...

  7. The Oral Health Care Delivery System in 2040: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L

    2017-09-01

    This executive summary for Section 4 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century" project examines the projected oral health care delivery system in 2040 and the likely impact of system changes on dental education. Dental care is at an early stage of major changes with the decline in solo practice and increase in large group practices. These groups are not consolidated at the state level, but further consolidation is expected as they try to increase their negotiating leverage with dental insurers. At this time, there is limited integration of medical and dental care in terms of financing, regulation, education, and delivery. This pattern may change as health maintenance organizations and integrated medical systems begin to offer dental care to their members. By 2040, it is expected that many dentists will be employed in large group practices and working with allied dental staff with expanded duties and other health professionals, and more dental graduates will seek formal postdoctoral training to obtain better positions in group practices.

  8. Online medical care: the current state of "eVisits" in acute primary care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Ryan; Talbert, Jeffery; Thornbury, William C; Perin, Nathan R; Goodin, Amie J

    2015-02-01

    Online technologies offer the promise of an efficient, improved healthcare system. Patients benefit from increased access to care, physicians are afforded greater flexibility in care delivery, and the health system itself benefits from lower costs to provide such care. One method of incorporating online care into clinical practice, called electronic office visits or "eVisits," allows physicians to provide a consultation with patients online. We performed an analysis of the current published literature on eVisits as well as present emerging research describing the use of mobile platforms as the delivery model. We focused on the role of eVisits in acute primary care practice. A literature review was conducted using electronic databases with a variety of search terms related to the use of eVisits in primary care. Several advantages to eVisit utilization in the primary care setting were identified, namely, improvements in efficiency, continuity of care, quality of care, and access to care. Barriers to eVisit implementation were also identified, including challenges with incorporation into workflow, reimbursement, physician technological literacy, patient health literacy, overuse, security, confidentiality, and integration with existing medical technologies. Only one study of patient satisfaction with eVisit acute primary care services was identified, and this suggests that previous analyses of eVisit utilization are lacking this key component of healthcare service delivery evaluations. The delivery of primary care via eVisits on mobile platforms is still in adolescence, with few methodologically rigorous analyses of outcomes of efficiency, patient health, and satisfaction.

  9. Brain-drain and health care delivery in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Abdu Misau

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Migration of health workers ‘Brain drain’ is defined as the movement of health personnel in search of a better standard of living and life quality, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide. The debate about migration of health workers from the developing to the developed world has remained pertinent for decades now. Regardless of the push and pull factors, migration of health care workers from developing countries to developed ones, have done more harm than good on the health care deliveries in the developing countries. This article reviews the literature on the effects of cross-border migration of health care professionals.

  10. End-of-Life Care for People Who Have Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care (PDQ®) Coping with Advanced Cancer Coping with Cancer Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®) Hospice Care Last Days of Life (PDQ®) Palliative Care in Cancer When Someone You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support ...

  11. The Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit-An Evolving Model for Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, John; Puthawala, Tauqir; Sutton, Brad S; Brown, Lorrel E; Pronovost, Peter J; DeFilippis, Andrew P

    2017-02-01

    Prior to the advent of the coronary care unit (CCU), patients having an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were managed on the general medicine wards with reported mortality rates of greater than 30%. The first CCUs are believed to be responsible for reducing mortality attributed to AMI by as much as 40%. This drastic improvement can be attributed to both advances in medical technology and in the process of health care delivery. Evolving considerably since the 1960s, the CCU is now more appropriately labeled as a cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) and represents a comprehensive system designed for the care of patients with an array of advanced cardiovascular disease, an entity that reaches far beyond its early association with AMI. Grouping of patients by diagnosis to a common physical space, dedicated teams of health care providers, as well as the development and implementation of evidence-based treatment algorithms have resulted in the delivery of safer, more efficient care, and most importantly better patient outcomes. The CICU serves as a platform for an integrated, team-based patient care delivery system that addresses a broad spectrum of patient needs. Lessons learned from this model can be broadly applied to address the urgent need to improve outcomes and efficiency in a variety of health care settings.

  12. Increased health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. We aimed to determine how often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  13. Increases health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As the number of cancer survivors increases and these patients often experience longlasting consequences of cancer and its treatment, more insight into primary health care use of cancer survivors is needed. Research question: How often and for which reasons do adult cancer patients

  14. Strategic health communication across the continuum of breast cancer care in limited-resource countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L; Sivaram, Rama

    2008-10-15

    Strategic health communication is a critical component of healthcare that should be implemented across the continuum of care. Recognizing the importance of communication strategies and incorporating such strategies into healthcare policies, programs, and interventions is essential to the effective delivery of breast cancer care. The authors reviewed relevant literature and suggested practical evidence-based strategies for effective communication interventions across the continuum of care for breast cancer patients, including early detection, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, palliative care, and end-of-life care. Examples were provided from limited-resource nations to support health communication recommendations. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  15. Severe Obesity in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streu, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Increasing weight and body fat composition has an impact on cancer detection and staging. Obese women are less likely to engage in breast and cervical screening practices. Excessive adipose tissue makes physical assessment more difficult, and patients with a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 may have deeper and wider pelvic structures, which make internal examinations problematic. A retrospective review of 324 primary surgical patients found that patients with a BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 are seven times less likely to undergo complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer compared with individuals with a BMI less than 40 kg/m2. In addition, healthcare provider bias against the need for screening, feelings of discomfort and embarrassment, as well as patient's fears of guilt, humiliation, and shame pose significant barriers to addressing the issue of obesity in clinical care with patients and family members. 
.

  16. Understanding Emergency Care Delivery Through Computer Simulation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Lauren F; Torabi, Elham; France, Daniel J; Froehle, Craig M; Goldlust, Eric J; Hoot, Nathan R; Kasaie, Parastu; Lyons, Michael S; Barg-Walkow, Laura H; Ward, Michael J; Wears, Robert L

    2017-08-10

    In 2017, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference entitled, "Catalyzing System Change through Health Care Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes." This article, a product of the breakout session on "understanding complex interactions through systems modeling," explores the role that computer simulation modeling can and should play in research and development of emergency care delivery systems. This article discusses areas central to the use of computer simulation modeling in emergency care research. The four central approaches to computer simulation modeling are described (Monte Carlo simulation, system dynamics modeling, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based simulation), along with problems amenable to their use and relevant examples to emergency care. Also discussed is an introduction to available software modeling platforms and how to explore their use for research, along with a research agenda for computer simulation modeling. Through this article, our goal is to enhance adoption of computer simulation, a set of methods that hold great promise in addressing emergency care organization and design challenges. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Combination Drug Delivery Approaches in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated metastatic breast cancer needs aggressive treatment due to its reduced response to anticancer treatment and hence low survival and quality of life. Although in theory a combination drug therapy has advantages over single-agent therapy, no appreciable survival enhancement is generally reported whereas increased toxicity is frequently seen in combination treatment especially in chemotherapy. Currently used combination treatments in metastatic breast cancer will be discussed with their challenges leading to the introduction of novel combination anticancer drug delivery systems that aim to overcome these challenges. Widely studied drug delivery systems such as liposomes, dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and water-soluble polymers can concurrently carry multiple anticancer drugs in one platform. These carriers can provide improved target specificity achieved by passive and/or active targeting mechanisms.

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  19. Nanotechnology for the delivery of phytochemicals in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Yang, Zhaogang; Zhou, Chenguang; Zhu, Jing; Lee, Robert J; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize advances that have been made in the delivery of phytochemicals for cancer therapy by the use of nanotechnology. Over recent decades, much research effort has been invested in developing phytochemicals as cancer therapeutic agents. However, several impediments to their wide spread use as drugs still have to be overcome. Among these are low solubility, poor penetration into cells, high hepatic disposition, and narrow therapeutic index. Rapid clearance or uptake by normal tissues and wide tissue distribution result in low drug accumulation in the target tumor sites can result in undesired drug exposure in normal tissues. Association with or encapsulation in nanoscale drug carriers is a potential strategy to address these problems. This review discussed lessons learned on the use of nanotechnology for delivery of phytochemicals that been tested in clinical trials or are moving towards the clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Jamwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care.

  1. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry...... was opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  2. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy i...

  3. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  4. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warangkana Lohcharoenkal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy.

  5. Management plan and delivery of care in Graves' ophthalmopathy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Morgan; Perros, Petros

    2012-06-01

    Most patients with Graves' orbitopathy have mild disease that requires no or minimal intervention. For the minority of patients with moderate or severe disease, multiple medical and surgical treatments may be required at different stages. It is crucial that such patients are monitored closely and treatments applied with care in the right sequence. Medical treatments should be used as early as possible and only during the active phase of the disease. Rehabilitative surgery is indicated in the inactive phase of the disease and should follow the sequence: surgical decompression followed by eye muscle surgery, followed by lid surgery. Delivery of care in a coordinated fashion that makes use of best available expertise is important and best implemented through a Combined Thyroid Eye clinic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Institute of Medicine report on high-quality cancer care: implications for oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; McCabe, Mary S; Levit, Laura

    2013-11-01

    To present key recommendations from a recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on high-quality cancer care. The recommendations were derived from the IOM report Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. The authors reviewed each of the recommendations to identify implications for oncology nurses. Nurses will play a vital role in the future design and delivery of high-quality cancer care. Oncology nurses should use the IOM recommendations in their settings to prepare for the delivery of oncology care amidst health system challenges, including an aging society. The IOM recommendations identify key areas of concern to nurses. Key aspects of nursing practice, including involvement in advanced care planning, patient-centered care, and evidence-based practice, are essential for high-quality care. Oncology nurses will be centrally involved in healthcare innovations, such as rapid learning systems, and as key members of a well-trained workforce.

  7. Redesigning Care Delivery with Patient Support Personnel: Learning from Accountable Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Ksenia O; Fraze, Taressa; Lewis, Valerie A

    2016-09-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are a value-based payment model in the United States rooted in holding groups of healthcare providers financially accountable for the quality and total cost of care of their attributed population. To succeed in reaching their quality and efficiency goals, ACOs implement a variety of care delivery changes, including workforce redesign. Patient support personnel (PSP)-non-physician staff such as care coordinators, community health workers, and others-are critical to restructuring care delivery. Little is known about how ACOs are redesigning their patient support personnel in terms of responsibilities, location, and evaluation. We conducted semi-structured one-hour interviews with 25 executives at 16 distinct ACOs. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes, using a qualitative coding and analysis process. ACOs deployed PSP to perform four clusters of responsibilities: care provision, care coordination, logistical help with transportation, and social and emotional support. ACOs deployed these personnel strategically across settings (primary care, inpatient services, emergency department, home care and community) depending on their population needs. Most ACOs used personnel with the same level of training across settings. Few ACOs planned to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of their PSP to optimize their value. ACO strategies in workforce redesign indicate a shift from a physician-centered to a team-based approach. Employing personnel with varying levels of clinical training to perform different tasks can help further optimize care delivery. More robust evaluation of the deployment of PSP and their performance is needed to demonstrate cost-saving benefits of workforce redesign.

  8. [Beyond the horizon of health-care delivery - medical marketing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M; Großterlinden, L G; Rueger, J M; Ruecker, A H

    2014-12-01

    The progress in medical health care and demographic changes cause increasing financial expenses. The rising competitive environment on health-care delivery level calls for economisation and implementation of a professional marketing set-up in order to ensure long-term commercial success. The survey is based on a questionnaire-analysis of 100 patients admitted to a trauma department at a university hospital in Germany. Patients were admitted either for emergency treatment or planned surgical procedures. Competence and localisation represent basic criteria determing hospital choice with a varying focus in each collective. Both collectives realise a trend toward economisation, possibly influencing medical care decision-making. Patients admitted for planned surgical treatment are well informed about their disease, treatment options and specialised centres. The main source of information is the internet. Both collectives claim amenities during their in-hospital stay. Increasing economisation trends call for a sound and distinct marketing strategy. The marketing has to be focused on the stakeholders needs. Concomitant factors are patient satisfaction, the establishment of cooperation networks and maintenance/improvement of medical health-care quality. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Mental health service delivery in long-term care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, John

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of mental disorders in long-term care (LTC) homes is high, but quality and availability of mental health services to assess and help in management of cases have been criticized. Literature concerning mental health problems in LTC homes was reviewed, especially regarding models of mental health service delivery and factors that affect development, persistence and reduction of symptoms and distress. The advantages of consultation-liaison arrangements and of telepsychiatry were noted. Discussions led to development of recommendations aimed at improving mental health expertise and provision of assessment and intervention services in LTC homes in diverse countries. Prompt recognition of mental health problems among residents is required, with availability of a team working within the facility to deal with these problems. Commonly such multidisciplinary teams are formed by facility staff linking with visiting mental health professionals or services. Quality of care is also affected by the organization, attitudes and education within LTC facilities. Provision of optimal mental health care in LTC settings is dependent on adequate funding, availability of expertise and education, positive and caring attitudes, recognition of needs, and supportive teamwork. The latter should include cooperative links between well-resourced and under-resourced regions.

  10. A systematic review of care delivery models and economic analyses in lymphedema: health policy impact (2004-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, N L; Weiss, R; Feldman, J L; Stewart, B R; Armer, J M; Cormier, J N; Shih, Y-C T

    2013-03-01

    A project of the American Lymphedema Framework Project (ALFP), this review seeks to examine the policy and economic impact of caring for patients with lymphedema, a common side effect of cancer treatment. This review is the first of its kind undertaken to investigate, coordinate, and streamline lymphedema policy initiatives in the United States with potential applicability worldwide. As part of a large scale literature review aiming to systematically evaluate the level of evidence of contemporary peer-reviewed lymphedema literature (2004 to 2011), publications on care delivery models, health policy, and economic impact were retrieved, summarized, and evaluated by a team of investigators and clinical experts. The review substantiates lymphedema education models and clinical models implemented at the community, health care provider, and individual level that improve delivery of care. The review exposes the lack of economic analysis related to lymphedema. Despite a dearth of evidence, efforts towards policy initiatives at the federal and state level are underway. These initiatives and the evidence to support them are examined and recommendations for translating these findings into clinical practice are made. Medical and community-based disease management interventions, taking on a public approach, are effective delivery models for lymphedema care and demonstrate great potential to improve cancer survivorship care. Efforts to create policy at the federal, state, and local level should target implementation of these models. More research is needed to identify costs associated with the treatment of lymphedema and to model the cost outlays and potential cost savings associated with comprehensive management of chronic lymphedema.

  11. Integration of genomics in cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Erika Maria Monteiro; Edwards, Quannetta T; Floria-Santos, Milena

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The article aims to introduce nurses to how genetics-genomics is currently integrated into cancer care from prevention to treatment and influencing oncology nursing practice. ORGANIZING CONSTRUCT: An overview of genetics-genomics is described as it relates to cancer etiology, hereditary...... cancer syndromes, epigenetics factors, and management of care considerations. METHODS: Peer-reviewed literature and expert professional guidelines were reviewed to address concepts of genetics-genomics in cancer care. FINDINGS: Cancer is now known to be heterogeneous at the molecular level, with genetic...... and genomic factors underlying the etiology of all cancers. Understanding how these factors contribute to the development and treatment of both sporadic and hereditary cancers is important in cancer risk assessment, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management and surveillance. CONCLUSIONS...

  12. Graphene quantum dots for cancer targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannazzo, Daniela; Pistone, Alessandro; Salamò, Marina; Galvagno, Signorino; Romeo, Roberto; Giofré, Salvatore V; Branca, Caterina; Visalli, Giuseppa; Di Pietro, Angela

    2017-02-25

    A biocompatible and cell traceable drug delivery system Graphene Quantum Dots (GQD) based, for the targeted delivery of the DNA intercalating drug doxorubicin (DOX) to cancer cells, is here reported. Highly dispersible and water soluble GQD, synthesized by acidic oxidation and exfoliation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), were covalently linked to the tumor targeting module biotin (BTN), able to efficiently recognize biotin receptors over-expressed on cancer cells and loaded with DOX. Biological test performed on A549 cells reported a very low toxicity of the synthesized carrier (GQD and GQD-BTN). In GQD-BTN-DOX treated cancer cells, the cytotoxicity was strongly dependent from cell uptake which was greater and delayed after treatment with GQD-BTN-DOX system with respect to what observed for cells treated with the same system lacking of the targeting module BTN (GQD-DOX) or with the free drug alone. A delayed nuclear internalization of the drug is reported, due to the drug detachment from the nanosystem, triggered by the acidic environment of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer nanomedicine: from targeted delivery to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-04-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as large surface-to-volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate various drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, give them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make NPs a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This review highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using NPs as drug delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2011-06-01

    Although the effectiveness of prostate cancer screening is controversial, screening rates have risen dramatically among primary care providers in the United States. The authors' findings suggest more collaboration among primary care and specialty organizations, especially with respect to decision aid endorsement, is needed to achieve more discriminatory and patient-centered prostate cancer screening.

  15. Science of health care delivery milestones for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havyer, Rachel D; Norby, Suzanne M; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Starr, Stephanie R; Lang, Tara R; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Reed, Darcy A

    2017-08-25

    The changing healthcare landscape requires physicians to develop new knowledge and skills such as high-value care, systems improvement, population health, and team-based care, which together may be referred to as the Science of Health Care Delivery (SHCD). To engender public trust and confidence, educators must be able to meaningfully assess physicians' abilities in SHCD. We aimed to develop a novel set of SHCD milestones based on published Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones that can be used by medical schools to assess medical students' competence in SHCD. We reviewed all ACGME milestones for 25 specialties available in September 2013. We used an iterative, qualitative process to group the ACGME milestones into SHCD content domains, from which SHCD milestones were derived. The SHCD milestones were categorized within the current ACGME core competencies and were also mapped to Association of American Medical Colleges' Entrustable Professional Activities (AAMC EPAs). Fifteen SHCD sub-competencies and corresponding milestones are provided, grouped within ACGME core competencies and mapped to multiple AAMC EPAs. This novel set of milestones, grounded within the existing ACGME competencies, defines fundamental expectations within SHCD that can be used and adapted by medical schools in the assessment of medical students in this emerging curricular area. These milestones provide a blueprint for SHCD content and assessment as ongoing revisions to milestones and curricula occur.

  16. Identification of Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis Using Tissue Specific Virus Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jechlinger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    To investigate breast cancer metastasis we propose to use a tissue-specific viral delivery system that will allow the somatic delivery of secondary lesions in the background of a tumor-inducing primary oncogene...

  17. Identification of Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis Using Tissue Specific Virus Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jechlinger, Martin

    2006-01-01

    To investigate breast cancer metastasis, we propose to use a tissue specific viral delivery system that will allow the somatic delivery of secondary lesions in the background of a tumor-inducing primary oncogene...

  18. Influence of Teamwork on Health Care Workers' Perceptions About Care Delivery and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry; Stahlke, Sarah; Coatsworth-Puspoky, Robin

    2018-01-16

    The aim of the current study was to examine the nature of teamwork in care facilities and its impact on the effectiveness of care delivery to older adults and job satisfaction among health care workers. A focused ethnography was conducted at two care facilities where older adults reside. Analysis of interviews with 22 participants revealed perceptions of teamwork and understandings about facilitators of and barriers to effective teamwork. Participants indicated that team relationships impacted care provided and job satisfaction. Participants also identified trust and reciprocity, communication, and sharing a common goal as critical factors in effective teamwork. In addition, participants identified the role of management as important in setting the tone for teamwork. Future research is needed to understand the complexity of supporting teamwork in residential settings given the challenges of culture, diversity, and individuals working multiple jobs. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  20. [Spiritual care model for terminal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Fen; Lin, Ya-Ching; Huang, Pai-Ho; Wei, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Jia-Ling

    2014-12-01

    Providing spiritual care to patients with advanced cancer may improve the quality of life of these patients and help them experience a good death. Cancer patients are eager for additional spiritual care and for a sense of peace at the end of their life. However, spirituality is an abstract concept. The literature on spiritual care focuses primarily on elaborations of spirituality theory. Thus, first-line medical care professionals lack clear guidelines for managing the spiritual needs of terminal cancer patients. The purposes of this article were to: 1) introduce a spiritual care model based on the concept of repair and recovery of relationships that addresses the relationship between the self and God, others, id, and objects and 2) set out a four-step strategy for this model that consists of understanding, empathizing, guiding, and growing. This article provides operational guidelines for the spiritual care of terminal cancer patients.

  1. Where there is no morphine: The challenge and hope of palliative care delivery in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Tanzania, a country of 42 million, access to oral morphine is rare.Aim: To demonstrate the effectiveness of palliative care teams in reducing patients’ pain and in increasing other positive life qualities in the absence of morphine; and to document the psychological burden experienced by their clinical providers, trained in morphine delivery, as they observed their patients suffering and in extreme pain.Setting: One hundred and forty-fie cancer patients were included from 13 rural hospitals spread across Tanzania.Method: A mixed method study beginning with a retrospective quantitative analysis of cancer patients who were administered the APCA African POS tool four times. Bivariate analyses of the scores at time one and four were compared across the domains. The qualitative arm included an analysis of interviews with six nurses, each with more than fie years’ palliative care experience and no access to strong opioids.Results: Patients and their family caregivers identifid statistically signifiant (p < 0.001 improvements in all of the domains. Thematic analysis of nurse interviews described the patient and family benefis from palliative care but also their great distress when ‘bad cases’ arose who would likely benefi only from oral morphine.Conclusion: People living with chronic cancer-related pain who receive palliative care experience profound physical, spiritual and emotional benefis even without oral morphine. These results demonstrate the need for continued advocacy to increase the availability of oral morphine in these settings in addition to palliative care services.

  2. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Matthew Y; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M

    2015-06-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science.

  3. Impact Of Health Care Delivery System Innovations On Total Cost Of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin W; Bir, Anupa; Freeman, Nikki L B; Koethe, Benjamin C; Cohen, Julia; Day, Timothy J

    2017-03-01

    Using delivery system innovations to advance health care reform continues to be of widespread interest. However, it is difficult to generalize about the success of specific types of innovations, since they have been examined in only a few studies. To gain a broader perspective, we analyzed the results of forty-three ambulatory care programs funded by the first round of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation's Health Care Innovations Awards. The innovations' impacts on total cost of care were estimated by independent evaluators using multivariable difference-in-differences models. Through the first two years, most of the innovations did not show a significant effect on total cost of care. Using meta-regression, we assessed the effects on costs of five common components of these innovations. Innovations that used health information technology or community health workers achieved the greatest cost savings. Savings were also relatively large in programs that targeted clinically fragile patients-clinically complex populations at risk for disease progression. While the magnitude of these effects was often substantial, none achieved conventional levels of significance in our analyses. Meta-analyses of a larger number of delivery system innovations are needed to more clearly establish their potential for patient care cost savings. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. Role of Kindness in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Leonard L; Danaher, Tracey S; Chapman, Robert A; Awdish, Rana L A

    2017-11-01

    The wonders of high-tech cancer care are best complemented by the humanity of high-touch care. Simple kindnesses can help to diffuse negative emotions that are associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment-and may even help to improve patients' outcomes. On the basis of our experience in cancer care and research, we propose six types of kindness in cancer care: deep listening , whereby clinicians take the time to truly understand the needs and concerns of patients and their families; empathy for the patient with cancer, expressed by both individual clinicians and the care culture, that seeks to prevent avoidable suffering; generous acts of discretionary effort that go beyond what patients and families expect from a care team; timely care that is delivered by using a variety of tools and systems that reduce stress and anxiety; gentle honesty, whereby the truth is conveyed directly in well-chosen, guiding words; and support for family caregivers, whose physical and mental well-being are vital components of the care their loved ones receive. These mutually reinforcing manifestations of kindness-exhibited by self-aware clinicians who understand that how care is delivered matters-constitute a powerful and practical way to temper the emotional turmoil of cancer for patients, their families, and clinicians themselves.

  5. Exploring aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlyskyj, K; Roddam, H; Rawlinson, G; Selfe, J

    2014-06-01

    To explore the reported value of physiotherapy care received by patients who had accessed a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service. Exploratory qualitative study using in-depth interviews to explore aspects of physiotherapy care valued by breast cancer patients. Thematic network analysis was used to interpret the data and bring together the different experiences of the participants and identify common themes. Physiotherapy Department at a NHS Foundation Trust Teaching Hospital. Nineteen participants were recruited and three were selected to take part in the in-depth interviews. All participants had received physiotherapy care from a Specialist Breast Care Physiotherapy Service and had been discharged within the last six months. Participants valued a patient-centred holistic approach to care and access to a Specialist Service with an experienced clinician. In particular the importance of the therapeutic alliance and the value of psychological, emotional and educational support emerged, with the participants feeling empowered in their recovery. Participants reported an overall positive experience of their physiotherapy care. This study supports the need for service providers to evaluate their current physiotherapy provision and subsequently develop Specialised Services to meet the physiotherapy needs of breast cancer patients throughout all stages of their treatment pathway from the delivery of pre-operative care through to post-treatment follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Delivering Coordinated Cancer Care by Building Transactive Memory in a Team of Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elizabeth; Silva, Abigail; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Czerlanis, Cheryl; Bernard, Margie; Chauhan, Cynthia; Schalk, Denise; Stewart, Greg

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care delivery is highly complex. Treatment involves coordination within oncology health-care teams and across other teams of referring primary and specialty providers (a team of teams). Each team interfaces with patients and caregivers to offer component parts of comprehensive care. Because patients frequently obtain specialty care from divergent health-care systems resulting in cross-system health-care use, oncology teams need mechanisms to coordinate and collaborate within and across health-care systems to optimize clinical outcomes for all cancer patients. Transactive memory is one potential strategy that can help improve comprehensive patient care delivery. Transactive memory is a process by which two or more team professionals develop a shared system for encoding, storing, and retrieving information. Each professional is responsible for retaining only part of the total information. Applying this concept to a team of teams results in system benefits wherein all teams share an understanding of specialized knowledge held by each component team. The patient's role as the unifying member of the team of teams is central to successful treatment delivery. This clinical case presents a patient who is receiving oral treatment for advanced prostate cancer within two health systems. The case emphasizes the potential for error when multiple teams function without a point team (the team coordinating efforts of all other primary and specialty teams) and when the specialty knowledge of providers and patients is not well integrated into all phases of the care delivery process.

  7. Challenges faced by palliative care physicians when caring for doctors with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S I R; Nelson, A; Finlay, I G

    2008-01-01

    It is possible that patients with advanced cancer, who are from the medical profession, have different or additional care needs than other patients. Previous training, professional experiences and access to information and services may influence their needs and subsequent illness behaviour. Caring for ;one of our own' may also evoke particular feelings and emotions from health professionals involved in their care and pose unique challenges in the delivery of equitable patient-centred care. To explore the experiences of palliative care physicians when caring for members of the medical profession with advanced incurable cancer. Semi-structured interviews exploring the experiences of senior palliative care physicians were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) for emergent themes. Data were collected from ten senior palliative care physicians with a combined total of 107 years of palliative care career experience, caring for a reported combined estimate of 120 doctor-patients. On the basis of their reflections, palliative care physicians reported that doctor-patients appear to find it difficult to assume a patient role, especially at a time they are likely to be truly vulnerable. This patient group will routinely attempt to maintain control of their care and environment using various strategies. These include self-referrals, accessing their own tests, directing the consultation and putting barriers up to psychosocial aspects of palliative care. Doctor-patients' general practitioners are at risk of exclusion from the management of care, and referral to palliative care services appears to occur later in the illness journey of doctor-patients compared to lay patients. Participants recalled how caring for colleagues evokes powerful emotional responses, such as a strong desire to provide the best care possible as well as feelings of anxiety. They frequently find themselves under pressure to disclose

  8. Puerperal infection from the perspective of humanized delivery care at a public maternity hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Elisângela Euripedes Resende; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado; de Oliveira, Adriana Cristina

    2007-01-01

    This is an epidemiological, prospective and non-concurrent study of the cohort type about puerperal infection from the perspective of humanized delivery care, based on information from 5,178 records of patients who went through the experience of humanized delivery. The study aimed at describing the women who underwent humanized delivery, determining the incidence and time for manifestation of puerperal infections and investigating the association between the infection and the risk factors. An accumulated puerperal infection rate of 2.92% was found. The risk factors associated to puerperal infection in Cesarean delivery were the duration of labor and the number of digital examinations. No variable behaved as a risk factor for infection in normal delivery. Cesarean delivery was an important risk factor for puerperal infection. The results reinforce the need to develop alternative forms of delivery care that provides effective conditions for normal delivery, in order to reduce the number of Cesarean sections.

  9. Issues in adult blood cancer survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugos, Kelly G

    2015-02-01

    To describe the current literature and future directions of survivorship care for the adult blood cancer population including unique features, identification of needs, practice guidelines, care models and the implications for nursing. Peer reviewed literature, government and national advocacy organization reports, professional organization guidelines. Adult blood cancer survivors are a heterogeneous population that often receives complicated treatments to live a longer life. Survivorship needs among this population are often unmet throughout the cancer care continuum. The limited research literature and guidelines point to survivorship care strategies from the day of diagnosis to enhance long-term outcomes and improve quality of life. Nurses are experts in symptom management and central to preventing, detecting, measuring, educating, and treating the effects of cancer and its treatment. Moreover, nurses are key to implementing strategies to support blood cancer survivors, families, and caregivers from the day of diagnosis to the last day of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Global health from a cancer care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesec, Madeline; Sherertz, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is now recognized as one of the four leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and incidence is expected to rise significantly in the next two decades. Unfortunately, low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) suffer disproportionately from the world's cancer cases. The growing burden of cancer and maldistribution of cancer care resources in LMIC warrant a massive re-evaluation of the structural inequalities that produce global oncological disparities and a worldwide commitment to improve both prevention and treatment strategies. Efforts to improve cancer care capacity should focus on horizontal strengthening of healthcare systems that provide safe, affordable, effective and sustainable care. In response to current deficiencies, many international organizations have started to partner with LMIC to create solutions. Telemedicine and international collaboration are also promising ways to effect change and improve global oncological care.

  11. Radiology as the Point of Cancer Patient and Care Team Engagement: Applying the 4R Model at a Patient's Breast Cancer Care Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, Christine B; Friedewald, Sarah M; Kulkarni, Swati A; Simon, Melissa A; Carlos, Ruth C; Strauss, Jonathan B; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Trosman, Julia R

    2016-12-01

    Radiologists aspire to improve patient experience and engagement, as part of the Triple Aim of health reform. Patient engagement requires active partnerships among health providers and patients, and rigorous teamwork provides a mechanism for this. Patient and care team engagement are crucial at the time of cancer diagnosis and care initiation but are complicated by the necessity to orchestrate many interdependent consultations and care events in a short time. Radiology often serves as the patient entry point into the cancer care system, especially for breast cancer. It is uniquely positioned to play the value-adding role of facilitating patient and team engagement during cancer care initiation. The 4R approach (Right Information and Right Care to the Right Patient at the Right Time), previously proposed for optimizing teamwork and care delivery during cancer treatment, could be applied at the time of diagnosis. The 4R approach considers care for every patient with cancer as a project, using project management to plan and manage care interdependencies, assign clear responsibilities, and designate a quarterback function. The authors propose that radiology assume the quarterback function during breast cancer care initiation, developing the care initiation sequence, as a project care plan for newly diagnosed patients, and engaging patients and their care teams in timely, coordinated activities. After initial consultations and treatment plan development, the quarterback function is transitioned to surgery or medical oncology. This model provides radiologists with opportunities to offer value-added services and solidifies radiology's relevance in the evolving health care environment. To implement 4R at cancer care initiation, it will be necessary to change the radiology practice model to incorporate patient interaction and teamwork, develop 4R content and local adaption approaches, and enrich radiology training with relevant clinical knowledge, patient interaction

  12. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2008-01-01

    care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...... a need to optimize was found. 2) Shared care, which was lacking. 3) The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion: Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs......Background: Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary...

  13. Anti-cancer Drug Delivery Using Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mihad; Sabouni, Rana; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of cells in the body and is considered as one of the major causes of death globally. There are several cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer including methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, tamoxifen, doxorubicin and others. Although billions of dollars have been spent on cancer research to develop these chemotherapies, it still remains a major illness for mankind partly due to the shortcomings of these therapies. These shortcomings include low targeting specificity, severe side effects (due to high doses) and poor pharmacokinetics. To avoid these drawbacks, anti-cancer drug delivery systems have been developed recently using nanocarriers including liposomes, micelles, polyelectrolyte capsules and others. One of the recent class of nanoparticles investigated for chemotherapeutic use are metal organic frameworks (MOFs) which are hybrid polymers that consist of metal ions or clusters and organic ligands. MOFs are used in many applications including gas/vapor separation, gas storage, catalysis, luminescent materials, and biomedical imaging. These structures have additional features that promote their use as drug carriers in the biomedical field. First, they are nontoxic, biodegradable and have the ability to carry high loadings of the anti-neoplastic agent due to their porous nature. Also, they have well-defined crystalline structures that can be characterized by different analytical techniques and their sizes are suitable to control their in vivo drug release. This paper reviews the methods used to synthesize MOFs and their recent use as antineoplastic drug delivery carriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Infection control and changing health-care delivery systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, W R

    2001-01-01

    In the past, health care was delivered mainly in acute-care facilities. Today, health care is delivered in hospital, outpatient, transitional care, long-term care, rehabilitative care, home, and private office settings. Measures to reduce health-care costs include decreasing the number of hospitals and the length of patient stays, increasing outpatient and home care, and increasing long-term care for the elderly. The home-care industry and managed care have become major providers of health ca...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  16. Shared care involving cancer specialists and primary care providers - What do cancer survivors want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Koczwara, Bogda

    2017-10-01

    Cancer survivors are living longer, prompting greater focus on managing cancer as a chronic condition. Shared care between primary care providers (PCPs) and cancer specialists, involving explicit partnership in how care is communicated, could ensure effective transitions between services. However, little is known about cancer patients' and survivors' preferences regarding shared care. To explore Australian cancer survivors' views on shared care: what cancer survivors need from shared care; enablers and barriers to advancing shared care; and what successful shared care looks like. Community forum held in Adelaide, Australia, in 2015 with 21 participants: 11 cancer survivors, 2 family caregivers, and 8 clinicians and researchers (members of PC4-Primary Care Collaborative Cancer Clinical Trials Group). Qualitative data from group discussion of the objectives. Participants stressed that successful shared care required patients being at the centre, ensuring accurate communication, ownership, and access to their medical records. PCPs were perceived to lack skills and confidence to lead complex cancer care. Patients expressed burden in being responsible for navigating information sharing and communication processes between health professionals and services. Effective shared care should include: shared electronic health records, key individuals as care coordinators; case conferences; shared decision making; preparing patients for self-management; building general practitioners' skills; and measuring outcomes. There was clear support for shared care but a lack of good examples to help guide it for this population. Recognizing cancer as a chronic condition requires a shift in how care is provided to these patients. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Metrics for evaluating patient navigation during cancer diagnosis and treatment: crafting a policy-relevant research agenda for patient navigation in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Dohan, Daniel; Raich, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities as well as other vulnerable populations experience disparate cancer-related health outcomes. Patient navigation is an emerging health care delivery innovation that offers promise in improving quality of cancer care delivery to these patients who experience unique health-access barriers. Metrics are needed to evaluate whether patient navigation can improve quality of care delivery, health outcomes, and overall value in health care during diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Information regarding the current state of the science examining patient navigation interventions was gathered via search of the published scientific literature. A focus group of providers, patient navigators, and health-policy experts was convened as part of the Patient Navigation Leadership Summit sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Key metrics were identified for assessing the efficacy of patient navigation in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Patient navigation data exist for all stages of cancer care; however, the literature is more robust for its implementation during prevention, screening, and early diagnostic workup of cancer. Relatively fewer data are reported for outcomes and efficacy of patient navigation during cancer treatment. Metrics are proposed for a policy-relevant research agenda to evaluate the efficacy of patient navigation in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Patient navigation is understudied with respect to its use in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Core metrics are defined to evaluate its efficacy in improving outcomes and mitigating health-access barriers. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  19. An integrated methodology for process improvement and delivery system visualization at a multidisciplinary cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singprasong, Rachanee; Eldabi, Tillal

    2013-01-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer centers require an integrated, collaborative, and stream-lined workflow in order to provide high quality of patient care. Due to the complex nature of cancer care and continuing changes to treatment techniques and technologies, it is a constant struggle for centers to obtain a systemic and holistic view of treatment workflow for improving the delivery systems. Project management techniques, Responsibility matrix and a swim-lane activity diagram representing sequence of activities can be combined for data collection, presentation, and evaluation of the patient care. This paper presents this integrated methodology using multidisciplinary meetings and walking the route approach for data collection, integrated responsibility matrix and swim-lane activity diagram with activity time for data representation and 5-why and gap analysis approach for data analysis. This enables collection of right detail of information in a shorter time frame by identifying process flaws and deficiencies while being independent of the nature of the patient's disease or treatment techniques. A case study of a multidisciplinary regional cancer centre is used to illustrate effectiveness of the proposed methodology and demonstrates that the methodology is simple to understand, allowing for minimal training of staff and rapid implementation. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  20. Impact of free delivery care on health facility delivery and insurance coverage in Ghana's Brong Ahafo Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Dzakpasu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many sub-Saharan countries, including Ghana, have introduced policies to provide free medical care to pregnant women. The impact of these policies, particularly on access to health services among the poor, has not been evaluated using rigorous methods, and so the empirical basis for defending these policies is weak. In Ghana, a recent report also cast doubt on the current mechanism of delivering free care--the National Health Insurance Scheme. Longitudinal surveillance data from two randomized controlled trials conducted in the Brong Ahafo Region provided a unique opportunity to assess the impact of Ghana's policies. METHODS: We used time-series methods to assess the impact of Ghana's 2005 policy on free delivery care and its 2008 policy on free national health insurance for pregnant women. We estimated their impacts on facility delivery and insurance coverage, and on socioeconomic differentials in these outcomes after controlling for temporal trends and seasonality. RESULTS: Facility delivery has been increasing significantly over time. The 2005 and 2008 policies were associated with significant jumps in coverage of 2.3% (p = 0.015 and 7.5% (p<0.001, respectively after the policies were introduced. Health insurance coverage also jumped significantly (17.5%, p<0.001 after the 2008 policy. The increases in facility delivery and insurance were greatest among the poorest, leading to a decline in socioeconomic inequality in both outcomes. CONCLUSION: Providing free care, particularly through free health insurance, has been effective in increasing facility delivery overall in the Brong Ahafo Region, and especially among the poor. This finding should be considered when evaluating the impact of the National Health Insurance Scheme and in supporting the continuation and expansion of free delivery care.

  1. Spiritual Care Communication in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Billitteri, Jacob; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-12-01

    To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. Literature review. Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies. Spirituality is recognized as an essential component of quality care. Spiritual conversations can increase patients' satisfaction with care and improve well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Medical Schools in Fragile States: Implications for Delivery of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; McKenzie, Erica D; Rose, Sherri

    2018-01-24

    To report on medical schools in fragile states, countries with severe development challenges, and the impact on the workforce for health care delivery. 2007 and 2012 World Bank Harmonized List of Fragile Situations; 1998-2012 WHO Global Health Observatory; 2014 World Directory of Medical Schools. Fragile classification established from 2007 and 2012 World Bank status. Population, gross national income, health expenditure, and life expectancy were 2007 figures. Physician density was most recently available from WHO Global Health Observatory (1998-2012), with number of medical schools from 2014 World Directory of Medical Schools. Regression analyses assessed impact of fragile state status in 2012 on the number of medical schools in 2014. Fragile states were 1.76 (95 percent CI 1.07-2.45) to 2.37 (95 percent CI 1.44-3.30) times more likely to have fewer than two medical schools than nonfragile states. Fragile states lack the infrastructure to train sufficient numbers of medical professionals to meet their population health needs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. [Delivery care in Chiapas, Mexico: who and where does provide it?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, H J; Ochoa-Díaz López, H; Navarro i Giné, A; Martín-Mateo, M

    1998-01-01

    To identify the place and provider of delivery care; to analyse the relationship between the type of delivery care provider and prenatal care and sociodemographic factors; to identify groups with greater and lesser probability of receiving attention at health centers and to identify the reasons for not attending the health center nearest to the household. Data on the delivery care of 297 women of La Fraylesca Region, Chiapas, were gathered using multivariate logit models to identify groups. From the total, 32% of childbirths occurred at health centers and 60% at home (mostly with poor sanitary conditions). Only 10% of women with less than 5 prenatal visits, school level under 3 years and whose household head was a peasant were attended by health care personnel. The accessibility and quality of health centers must be improved, and a programme aimed at increasing the number of deliveries that are attended by trained health care personnel should be implemented.

  4. Delivery should happen soon and my pain will be reduced: understanding women's perception of good delivery care in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghita Bhattacharyya

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding a woman's perspective and her needs during childbirth and addressing them as part of quality-improvement programmes can make delivery care safe, affordable, and respectful. It has been pointed out that the patient's judgement on the quality and goodness of care is indispensible to improving the management of healthcare systems. Objective: The objective of the study is to understand the aspects of care that women consider important during childbirth. Design: Individual in-depth interviews (IDIs and focus-group discussions (FGDs with women who recently delivered were the techniques used. Seventeen IDIs and four FGDs were conducted in Jharkhand state in east India between January and March 2012. Women who had normal deliveries with live births at home and in primary health centres were included. To minimise recall bias, interviews were conducted within 42 days of childbirth. Using the transcripts of interviews, the data were analysed thematically. Results: Aspects of care most commonly cited by women to be important were: availability of health providers and appropriate medical care (primarily drugs in case of complications; emotional support; privacy; clean place after delivery; availability of transport to reach the institution; monetary incentives that exceed expenses; and prompt care. Other factors included kind interpersonal behaviour, cognitive support, faith in the provider's competence, and overall cleanliness of the facility and delivery room. Conclusions: Respondents belonging to low socio-economic strata with basic literacy levels might not understand appropriate clinical aspects of care, but they want care that is affordable and accessible, along with privacy and emotional support during delivery. The study highlighted that healthcare quality-improvement programmes in India need to include non-clinical aspects of care as women want to be treated humanely during delivery – they desire respectful treatment

  5. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients' individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients' entire pathway of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. How do the characteristics of breast cancer diagnostic assessment programmes influence service delivery: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, A R; Honein-AbouHaidar, G; Stuart-McEwan, T; Smylie, J; Arnaout, A; Seely, J; Wright, F C; Dobrow, M J; Brouwers, M C; Bukhanov, K; McCready, D R

    2017-06-21

    Diagnostic assessment programmes (DAPs) coordinate multidisciplinary teamwork (MDT), and improve wait times and patient satisfaction. No research has established optimal DAP design. This study explored how DAP characteristics influence service delivery. A mixed methods case study of four breast cancer DAPs was conducted including qualitative interviews with health-care providers and retrospective chart review. Data were integrated using multiple approaches. Twenty-three providers were interviewed; 411 medical records were reviewed. The number of visits and wait times from referral to diagnosis and consultation were lowest at a one-stop model. DAP characteristics (rural-remote region, human resources, referral volume, organisation of services, adherence to service delivery targets and one-stop model) may influence service delivery (number of visits, wait times). MDT, influenced by other DAP characteristics (co-location of staff, patient navigators, team functioning), may also influence service delivery. While the one-stop model may be ideal, all sites experienced similar and unique challenges. Further research is needed to understand how to optimise the organisation and delivery of DAP services. Measures reflecting individual, team and patient-reported outcomes should be used to assess the effectiveness and impact of DAPs in addition to more traditional measures such as wait times. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Situational awareness, relational coordination and integrated care delivery to hospitalized elderly in the Netherlands: A comparison between hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hartgerink (Jacqueline); J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.J. de Vos (Annemarie); T.J.E.M. Bakker (Ton); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: It is known that interprofessional collaboration is crucial for integrated care delivery, yet we are still unclear about the underlying mechanisms explaining effectiveness of integrated care delivery to older patients. In addition, we lack research

  9. Situational awareness, relational coordination and integrated care delivery to hospitalized elderly in the Netherlands: A comparison between hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hartgerink, Jacqueline; Cramm, Jane; Vos, Annemarie; Bakker, Ton; Steyerberg, Ewout; Mackenbach, Johan; Nieboer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    .... Therefore, this study aims to (i) provide insight into the underlying components 'relational coordination' and 'situational awareness' of integrated care delivery and the role of team and organizational context in integrated care delivery; and (ii...

  10. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care Immediately after Delivery on Mother-infant Attachment 3 Months after Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zahra Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background  The aim of this study was determine the effect of kangaroo mother care (KMC immediately after delivery on mother-infant attachment 3-month after delivery. Materials and Methods: In this RCT study, 72 mother-infant pairs were randomly divided in to kangaroo mother care and routine care groups.The intervention group received kangaroo mother care (KMC in the first two hours post birth. The control group just received routine hospital care. Mothers in the intervention group were encouraged to keep the baby in KMC as much as possible during the day and night throughout the neonatal period. Participants were followed up for three months after birth. The Main outcome measure was mother-infant attachment at 3 months postpartum and maternal anxiety about the baby at the same time. The data was collected by questionnaire (demographic information of parents and neonates and maternal attachment scale. Analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 14. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding their baseline data. Mean maternal attachment score in the KMC group and in the routine care group at three months after delivery was 52.40±3.30 and 49.86±4.18 respectively, which was significantly higher in the KMC group (P

  11. Process of Care Failures in Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weingart, Saul N; Saadeh, Mark G; Simchowitz, Brett; Gandhi, Tejal K; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Studdert, David M; Puopolo, Ann Louise; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-01-01

    Process of care failures may contribute to diagnostic errors in breast cancer care.To identify patient- and provider-related process of care failures in breast cancer screening and follow-up in a non-claims-based...

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spiritual Care for Cancer Patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Jolfaei, Atefeh Ghanbari; Ghaempanah, Zeinab; Shirvani, Armin; Vand, Hoda Doos Ali; Ghahari, Shahrbanoo; Bolhari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a return to spirituality is a major coping response in cancer patients so that therapists can adopt a holistic approach by addressing spirituality in their patient care. The present study was conducted to develop a guideline in the spiritual field for healthcare providers who serve cancer patients in Iran. Relevant statements were extracted from scientific documents that through study questions were reviewed and modified by a consensus panel. The statements were arranged in six areas, including spiritual needs assessment, spiritual care candidates, the main components of spiritual care, spiritual care providers, the settings of spiritual care and the resources and facilities for spiritual care. In addition to the development and preparation of these guidelines, health policy-makers should also seek to motivate and train health service providers to offer these services and facilitate their provision and help with widespread implementation.

  14. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  15. Comparison of domiciliary and institutional delivery-care practices in rural Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sharad D; Iyengar, Kirti; Suhalka, Virendra; Agarwal, Kumaril

    2009-04-01

    A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess key practices and costs relating to home- and institutional delivery care in rural Rajasthan, India. One block from each of two sample districts was covered (estimated population--279,132). Field investigators listed women who had delivered in the past three months and contacted them for structured case interview. In total, 1947 (96%) of 2031 listed women were successfully interviewed. An average of 2.4 and 1.7 care providers attended each home- and institutional delivery respectively. While 34% of the women delivered in health facilities, modem care providers attended half of all the deliveries. Intramuscular injections, intravenous drips, and abdominal fundal pressure were widely used for hastening delivery in both homes and facilities while post-delivery injections for active management of the third stage were administered to a minority of women in both the venues. Most women were discharged prematurely after institutional delivery, especially by smaller health facilities. The cost of accessing home-delivery care was Rs 379 (US$ 8) while the mean costs in facilities for elective, difficult vaginal deliveries and for caesarean sections were Rs 1336 (US$ 30), Rs 2419 (US$ 54), and Rs 11,146 (US$ 248) respectively. Most families took loans at high interest rates to meet these costs. It is concluded that widespread irrational practices by a range of care providers in both homes and facilities can adversely affect women and newborns while inadequate observance of beneficial practices and high costs are likely to reduce the benefits of institutional delivery, especially for the poor. Government health agencies need to strengthen regulation of delivery care and, especially, monitor perinatal outcomes. Family preference for hastening delivery and early discharge also require educational efforts.

  16. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life.

  17. Determinants of antenatal care, institutional delivery and postnatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Improving utilization of these three MCH indicators will require targeting women in the rural areas and those with low level of education as well as creating demand for health facility delivery. Improving ANC use by making it available and accessible will have a multiplier effect of improving facility delivery which ...

  18. Embedding a Palliative Approach in Nursing Care Delivery: An Integrated Knowledge Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky, Richard; Porterfield, Pat; Roberts, Della; Lee, Joyce; Liang, Leah; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Pesut, Barb; Schalkwyk, Tilly; Stajduhar, Kelli; Tayler, Carolyn; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Thorne, Sally

    A palliative approach involves adapting and integrating principles and values from palliative care into the care of persons who have life-limiting conditions throughout their illness trajectories. The aim of this research was to determine what approaches to nursing care delivery support the integration of a palliative approach in hospital, residential, and home care settings. The findings substantiate the importance of embedding the values and tenets of a palliative approach into nursing care delivery, the roles that nurses have in working with interdisciplinary teams to integrate a palliative approach, and the need for practice supports to facilitate that embedding and integration.

  19. Relational coordination promotes quality of chronic care delivery in Dutch disease-management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with the delivery of hospital care, acute care, emergency care, trauma care, and nursing home care. The effect of relational coordination in primary care settings, such as disease-management programs, remains unknown. This study examined relational coordination between general practitioners and other professionals in disease-management programs and assessed the impact of relational coordination on the delivery of chronic illness care. Professionals (n = 188; response rate = 57%) in 19 disease-management programs located throughout the Netherlands completed surveys that assessed relational coordination and chronic care delivery. We used a cross-sectional study design. Our study demonstrated that the delivery of chronic illness care was positively related to relational coordination. We found positive relationships with community linkages (r = .210, p management support (r = .217, p management team members: practice nurses (M = 2.69 vs. 3.73; p management professionals with different disciplines is expected to improve chronic illness care delivery.

  20. Determinants and Gaps in Preventive Care Delivery for Indigenous Australians: A Cross-sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Christopher; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Jodie; Burgess, Paul; Copley, Kerry; Kennedy, Catherine; Moore, Liz; Larkins, Sarah; Thompson, Sandra; Bailie, Ross Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Potentially preventable chronic diseases are the greatest contributor to the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non--Indigenous Australians. Preventive care is important for earlier detection and control of chronic disease, and a number of recent policy initiatives have aimed to enhance delivery of preventive care. We examined documented delivery of recommended preventive services for Indigenous peoples across Australia and investigated the influence of health center and client level factors on adherence to best practice guidelines. Clinical audit data from 2012 to 2014 for 3,623 well adult clients (aged 15-54) of 101 health centers from four Australian states and territories were analyzed to determine adherence to delivery of 26 recommended preventive services classified into five different modes of care on the basis of the way in which they are delivered (e.g., basic measurement; laboratory tests and imaging; assessment and brief interventions, eye, ear, and oral checks; follow-up of abnormal findings). Summary statistics were used to describe the delivery of each service item across jurisdictions. Multilevel regression models were used to quantify the variation in service delivery attributable to health center and client level factors and to identify factors associated with higher quality care. Delivery of recommended preventive care varied widely between service items, with good delivery of most basic measurements but poor follow-up of abnormal findings. Health center characteristics were associated with most variation. Higher quality care was associated with Northern Territory location, urban services, and smaller service population size. Client factors associated with higher quality care included age between 25 and 34 years, female sex, and more regular attendance. Wide variation in documented preventive care delivery, poor follow-up of abnormal findings, and system factors that influence quality of care should be addressed

  1. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  2. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  3. Multifunctional High Drug Loading Nanocarriers for Cancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Erlei

    2011-12-01

    Most anticancer drugs have poor water-solubility, rapid blood clearance, low tumor-selectivity and severe systemic toxicity to healthy tissues. Thus, polymeric nanocarriers have been widely explored for anticancer drugs to solve these problems. However, polymer nanocarriers developed to date still suffer drawbacks including low drug loading contents, premature drug release, slow cellular internalization, slow intracellular drug release and thereby low therapeutic efficiency in cancer thermotherapy. Accordingly, in this dissertation, functional nanocapsules and nanoparticles including high drug loading liposome-like nanocapsules, high drug loading phospholipid-mimic nanocapsules with fast intracellular drug release, high drug loading charge-reversal nanocapsules, TAT based long blood circulation nanoparticles and charge-reversal nuclear targeted nanoparticles are designed and synthesized. These functional carriers have advantages such as high drug loading contents without premature drug release, fast cellular internalization and intracellular drug release, nuclear targeted delivery and long blood circulation. As a result, all these drug carriers show much higher in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities.

  4. Nanotechnology for delivery of gemcitabine to treat pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Gebremariam; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Zandi-Karimi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most deadly and quickly fatal human cancers with a 5-year mortality rate close to 100%. Its prognosis is very poor, mainly because of its hostile biological behavior and late onset of symptoms for clinical diagnosis; these bring limitations on therapeutic interventions. Factors contributing for the difficulties in treating PC include: high rate of drug resistance, fast metastasis to different organs, poor prognosis and relapse of the tumor after therapy. After being approved by US FDA 1997, Gemcitabine (Gem) is the first line and the gold standard drug for all stages of advanced PC till now. However, its efficacy is unsatisfactory, mainly due to; its chemical instability and poor cellular uptake, resulting in an extremely short half-life and low bioavailability. To solve this drawbacks and increase the therapeutic outcome important progress has been achieved in the field of nanotechnology and offers a promising and effective alternative. This review mainly focus on the most commonly investigated nanoparticle (NP) delivery systems of Gem for PC treatment and the latest progresses achieved. Novel nanocarriers with better tumor targeting efficiencies and maximum treatment outcome to treat this deadly due are given much attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Commentary: dinosaurs fated for extinction? Health care delivery at academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Bryan N; Formisano, Roger A; Getto, Carl J

    2010-05-01

    Health care delivery at academic health centers (AHCs) can be viewed as dinosaur-like. Both are large and complex entities that consume many resources and are slow to adapt to competitive predatory forces. The potential for severe climate shifts, with changes in payer mix, competition from the private sector, and health care reform all occurring in the current health care system, could precipitate either the beginning of extinction for the AHC dinosaur or, hopefully, stimulate its evolution and development into a new model of health care delivery.Given the importance of clinical revenue to the entirety of the AHC enterprise, there is incentive for AHCs to maintain and indeed expand their clinical care delivery mechanisms. Yet, AHCs are institutions of investigation and inquiry. New models of care delivery and their impact on the current clinical care system must be developed through local demonstration projects and experimental clinical models. These models must be studied, and the findings should be shared with the community.The authors argue that this course of action will be challenging because traditional workflows must be restricted to improve care coordination and a changing workforce demographic. It will also require thoughtful approaches to reward innovative clinical work and new directions in strategic management by institution leaders. This commentary outlines recommendations to stave off extinction and enhance the next generation of clinical care delivery at AHCs.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene: Nano-delivery of Gambogic acid increases its cytotoxicty in various cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Lamya M.

    Nanomedicine is a new branch of medicine that has been developed due to the critical need to treat challenging diseases, especially cancer since it remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the second most common cause of death after heart disease in the USA. One of the most important health care applications of nanomedicine concerns the development of drug delivery systems. Graphene (Gn), an atom-thick carbon monolayer of sp2- bonded carbon atoms arranged in a two dimensional (2D) honeycomb crystal lattice, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (1D, tubular) are among the most promising nanomaterials with the capability of delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to cancerous cells. For example, they have been used as vehicles for the anti-cancer, low-toxicity drug Gambogic acid (GA). Here, the cytotoxicity of GA in breast (MCF-7), pancreatic (PANC-1), cervical (HELA), ovarian (NCI/ADR), and prostate (PC3) cancer cells was assessed to determine what effect nanodelivery by either Gn or SWCNTs had on the efficacy of this promising drug. The nanomaterials showed no toxicity at the concentrations used. The inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis of the cells was due to the effects of GA which was significantly enhanced by nanodelivery. Such delivery of GA by either Gn or SWCNTs represents a first step toward assessing their effectiveness in more complex, targeted nano-delivery in vivo settings and signals their potential application in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Danish cancer patients’ perspective on health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandager, Mette; Sperling, Cecilie; Jensen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    and better involvement of patient and relatives. The study indicates that women, younger and higher educated patients tend to be less satisfied with the health care they received. This study shows that even though the majority of patients are satisfied with the quality of health care, there is room......Patient’s experiences and patient surveys are increasingly being used for the evaluation of the quality of health care. Patient information is valuable input when we aim to improve healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess Danish cancer patients’ experiences and assessment...... of the health care they have received, in regard to access to diagnostics, coordination and continuity of care, information and communication and involvement of patients and relatives. Questions and the opportunity to comment in free text were distributed to 6,720 newly diagnosed cancer patients in the summer...

  8. Evaluation of care of the Newborn in delivery facilities at Osogbo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information concerning the place of delivery of the neonates, the specifics of the care received at birth such as measurement of birth weight, the time interval between delivery and breast feeding and enquiries as to whether or not Vitamin K was administered were obtained. The biodata of all the subjects were also obtained.

  9. How to achieve optimal organization of primary care service delivery at system level: Lessons from Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelone, F.; Kringos, D.S.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; de Belvis, A.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the relative efficiency of primary care (PC) in turning their structures into services delivery and turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study based on the dataset of the Primary Healthcare Activity Monitor for Europe project. Two Data

  10. How to achieve optimal organization of primary care service delivery at system level: lessons from Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelone, F.; Kringos, D.S.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Belvis, A.G. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To measure the relative efficiency of primary care (PC) in turning their structures into services delivery and turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. Design: Cross-sectional study based on the dataset of the Primary Healthcare Activity Monitor for Europe project. Two Data

  11. Preventive care receipt and office visit use among breast and colorectal cancer survivors relative to age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Salloum, Ramzi G; Fishman, Paul A; Ritzwoller, Debra Pearson; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen C; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2015-06-01

    We compare breast and colorectal cancer survivors' annual receipt of preventive care and office visits to that of age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls. Automated data, including tumor registries, were used to identify insured individuals aged 50+ at the time of breast or colorectal cancer diagnosis between 2000 and 2008 as well as cancer-free controls receiving care from four integrated delivery systems. Those with metastatic or un-staged disease, or a prior cancer diagnosis were excluded. Annual visits to primary care, oncology, and surgery as well as receipt of mammography, colorectal cancer, Papanicolaou, bone densitometry, and cholesterol screening were observed for 5 years. We used generalized estimating equations that accounted for repeated observations over time per person to test annual service use differences by cancer survivor/cancer-free control status and whether survivor/cancer-free status associations were moderated by patient age breast and 1530 colorectal cancer survivors were identified, representing 12,923 and 5103 patient-years of follow-up, respectively. Compared to cancer-free controls, breast and colorectal cancer survivors were equally or more likely to use all types of office visits and to receive cancer screenings and bone densitometry testing. Both breast and colorectal cancer survivors were less likely than cancer-free controls to receive cholesterol testing, regardless of age, year of diagnosis, or use of primary care. Programs targeting cancer survivors may benefit from addressing a broad range of primary preventive care needs, including recommended cardiovascular disease screening.

  12. Cancer survivorship care-planning: Practice, research, and policy implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard W; Pritzker, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of cancer survivors are living longer than 5 years from their diagnosis date. This has resulted in a growing population of cancer survivors, expected to reach 19 million by 2024. Survivors frequently experience late effects caused by cancer and its treatment, reducing survivors' quality of life in multiple domains. Survivorship care-plans may aid the many physical, psychosocial, and financial needs that emerge posttreatment. However, the lack of reimbursement mechanisms, the limited amount of effectiveness research, and minimal guidelines for content and delivery are barriers to the widespread provision of survivorship care-plans. Challenges and opportunities for social work practice, research, and policy are identified and discussed.

  13. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C H

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care.

  14. Caring Science: Transforming the Ethic of Caring-Healing Practice, Environment, and Culture within an Integrated Care Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss Durant, Anne; McDermott, Shawna; Kinney, Gwendolyn; Triner, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    In early 2010, leaders within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Northern California's Patient Care Services division embarked on a journey to embrace and embed core tenets of Caring Science into the practice, environment, and culture of the organization. Caring Science is based on the philosophy of Human Caring, a theory articulated by Jean Watson, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, as a foundational covenant to guide nursing as a discipline and a profession. Since 2010, Caring Science has enabled KP Northern California to demonstrate its commitment to being an authentic person- and family-centric organization that promotes and advocates for total health. This commitment empowers KP caregivers to balance the art and science of clinical judgment by considering the needs of the whole person, honoring the unique perception of health and healing that each member or patient holds, and engaging with them to make decisions that nurture their well-being. The intent of this article is two-fold: 1) to provide context and background on how a professional practice framework was used to transform the ethic of caring-healing practice, environment, and culture across multiple hospitals within an integrated delivery system; and 2) to provide evidence on how integration of Caring Science across administrative, operational, and clinical areas appears to contribute to meaningful patient quality and health outcomes.

  15. COPD care delivery pathways in five European Union countries: mapping and health care professionals’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyali R

    2016-11-01

    studied care pathways. General practitioners/family doctors are responsible for liaising between different teams/services, except in Greece where this is done through pulmonologists. Ireland and the UK are the only countries with services for patients at home to shorten unnecessary hospital stay. HCPs emphasized lack of communication, limited resources, and poor patient engagement as issues in the current pathways. Furthermore, no specified role exists for pharmacists and informal carers.Conclusion: Service and professional integration between care settings using a unified system targeting COPD and comorbidities is a priority. Better communication between health care providers, establishing a clear role for informal carers, and enhancing patients’ engagement could optimize current care pathways resulting in a better integrated system. Keywords: COPD, comorbidities, care delivery pathway, comparative analysis

  16. Determinants and Gaps in Preventive Care Delivery for Indigenous Australians: A Cross-sectional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bailie, Christopher; Matthews, Veronica; Bailie, Jodie; Burgess, Paul; Copley, Kerry; Kennedy, Catherine; Moore, Liz; Larkins, Sarah; Thompson, Sandra; Bailie, Ross Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Background Potentially preventable chronic diseases are the greatest contributor to the health gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-­Indigenous Australians. Preventive care is important for earlier detection and control of chronic disease, and a number of recent policy initiatives have aimed to enhance delivery of preventive care. We examined documented delivery of recommended preventive services for Indigenous peoples across Australia and investigated the infl...

  17. 45 CFR 50.5 - Waivers for the delivery of health care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waivers for the delivery of health care service. 50.5 Section 50.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION U.S. EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM-REQUEST FOR WAIVER OF THE TWO-YEAR FOREIGN RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT § 50.5 Waivers for the delivery of health care service. In...

  18. Provider perceptions and expectations of breast cancer post-treatment care: A University of California Athena Breast Health Network project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Erin E.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Melisko, Michelle; Pierce, John; von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Marlene; Lane, Karen; Hiatt, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The Athena Breast Health Network collaboration is a University of California system-wide project initiated with the intent to drive innovation in breast cancer prevention, screening and treatment. This qualitative research examines provider perceptions and expectations of post-treatment breast cancer care across five Network sites with the goal of better understanding provider behavior during the post-treatment phase of the cancer care trajectory. Methods Investigators at each site conducted semi-structured interviews with oncology specialists and primary care providers (PCPs). Interviews used case study examples and open- and closed-ended questions on the delivery of post-treatment breast cancer care. Informant responses were manually recorded by the interviewer, compiled in a database, then coded and analyzed using NVivo 9 software. Results There were 39 key informants across the sites: 14 medical oncologists, 7 radiation oncologists, 11 surgeons, 3 oncology nurses, and 4 PCPs. Care coordination was a major unprompted theme identified in the interviews. There was a perceived need for greater care coordination across institutions in order to improve delivery of post-treatment health care services and a need for greater care coordination within oncology, particularly to help avoid duplication of follow-up care and services. Participants expect frequent follow-up visits and to use biomarker tests and advanced imaging services as part of routine surveillance care. Implementing survivorship care programs was perceived as a way to improve care delivery. Conclusions These results identify a need for increased focus on care coordination during the post-treatment phase of breast cancer care within the UC system, and the potential for system and provider level interventions that could help increase coordination of post-treatment care. Implications for Cancer Survivors Breast cancer survivors do not always receive evidence-based care. This research helps to better

  19. Barriers and facilitators to implementing cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M; Dittus, Kim L; Sprague, Brian L; Pollack, Lori A; Hawkins, Nikki A; Geller, Berta M

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Descriptive pilot study. Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3-6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver SCPs, transitioning patients from oncology care to a PCP in a shared-care model of optimal wellness. Institution support for

  20. Setting the stage for universal financial distress screening in routine cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Nandita; Holland, Jimmie C; Griffin, Joan M

    2017-11-01

    Financial burden from cancer treatment is increasingly being recognized as a threat to optimal access, quality, and outcomes of cancer care for patients. Although research in the area is moving at a fast pace, multiple questions remain unanswered, such as how to practically integrate the assessment and management of financial burden into routine health care delivery for patients with cancer. Although psychological distress screening for patients undergoing cancer treatment now is commonplace, the authors raise the provocative idea of universal screening for financial distress to identify and assist vulnerable groups of patients. Herein, the authors outline the arguments to support screening for financial burden in addition to psychological distress, examining it as an independent patient-reported outcome for all patients with cancer at various time points during their treatment. The authors describe the proximal and downstream impact of such a strategy and reflect on some challenges and potential solutions to help integrate this concept into routine cancer care delivery. Cancer 2017;123:4092-4096. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. 2014 President's plenary international psycho-oncology society: moving toward cancer care for the whole patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D; Travado, Luzia; Jacobsen, Paul B; Turner, Jane; Borras, Josep M; Ullrich, Andreas W H

    2015-12-01

    The International Psycho-oncology Society (IPOS) has just celebrated its 30th anniversary. The growth of psychosocial oncology has been exponential, and this relatively new field is becoming a core service that focuses on prevention, reducing the burden of cancer, and enhancing the quality of life from time of diagnosis, through treatment, survivorship, and palliative care. Looking back over the past 30 years, we see that cancer care globally has evolved to a new and higher standard. Today, 'cancer care for the whole patient' is being accomplished with an evidence-based model that addresses psychosocial needs and integrates psycho-oncology into the treatment and care of patients. The President's Plenary Session in Lisbon, Portugal, highlighted the IPOS Mission of promoting global excellence in psychosocial care of people affected by cancer through our research, public policy, advocacy, and education. The internationally endorsed IPOS Standard of Quality Cancer Care, for example, clearly states the necessity of integrating the psychosocial domain into routine care, and that distress should be measured as the sixth vital sign after temperature, blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, and pain. The plenary paper also discussed the global progress being made in Europe, North America, and Australia in providing quality cancer care for the whole patient. Collaborative partnerships between IPOS and organizations such as the European Partnership Action Against Cancer and the World Health Organization are essential in building capacity for the delivery of high-quality psycho-oncology services in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Medical Education and Health Care Delivery: A Call to Better Align Goals and Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, David P; Hemmer, Paul A; Durning, Steven J

    2017-09-14

    The transformation of the U.S. health care system is under way, driven by the needs of an aging population, rising health care spending, and the availability of health information. However, the speed and effectiveness of the transformation of health care delivery will depend, in large part, upon engagement of the health professions community and changes in clinicians' practice behaviors. Current efforts to influence practice behaviors emphasize changes in the health payment system with incentives to move from fee-for-service to alternative payment models.The authors describe the potential of medical education to augment payment incentives to make changes in clinical practice and the importance of aligning the purpose and goals of medical education with those of the health care delivery system. The authors discuss how curricular and assessment changes and faculty development can align medical education with the transformative trends in the health care delivery system. They also explain how the theory of situated cognition offers a shared conceptual framework that could help address the misalignment of education and clinical care. They provide examples of how quality improvement, health care innovation, population care management, and payment alignment could create bridges for joining health care delivery and medical education to meet the health care reform goals of a high-performing health care delivery system while controlling health care spending. Finally, the authors illustrate how current payment incentives such as bundled payments, value-based purchasing, and population-based payments can work synergistically with medical education to provide high-value care.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As such, copyright does not extend to the

  3. Spiritual care for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D; Schneider, D

    1997-11-01

    To review literature pertinent to spirituality of children with cancer and to identify practical strategies for providing care for this dimension in children. Nursing research and literature about pediatric nursing care and spirituality; theoretical formulations of Piaget, Fowler, and Erikson. Children diagnosed with cancer have unique spiritual needs that place them at risk for developing spiritual distress. With the diagnosis may come experiences of loss of normalcy, physical stamina, relationships, body image, and future goals. Spiritual care includes interventions that assist children to find meaning and purpose in life, to continue relationships, and to transcend beyond the self. Spiritual care includes caregiver and child assessment and interventions appropriate to the developmental stages of infancy through adolescents. Tables outlining how this can be done by oncology nurses are included.

  4. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Erin E; Rowland, Julia H; Northouse, Laurel; Litzelman, Kristin; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Timura, Catherine; O'Mara, Ann; Huss, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Informal/family caregivers are a fundamental source of care for cancer patients in the United States, yet the population of caregivers and their tasks, psychosocial needs, and health outcomes are not well understood. Changes in the nature of cancer care and its delivery, along with the growing population of survivors and their caregivers, warrant increased attention to the roles and demands of caregiving. This article reviews current evidence presented at a 2-day meeting examining the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving that was convened by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Nursing Research. The meeting sought to define who is an informal cancer caregiver, summarize the state of the science in informal cancer caregiving, and describe both the kinds of interventions developed to address caregiving challenges and the various outcomes used to evaluate their impact. This article offers recommendations for moving science forward in 4 areas: 1) improving the estimation of the prevalence and burden of informal cancer caregiving; 2) advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; 3) generating and testing strategies for integrating caregivers into formal health care settings; and 4) promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers. Cancer 2016;122:1987-95. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  5. [Effects of delivery nursing care using essential oils on delivery stress response, anxiety during labor, and postpartum status anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Cheong, NamYoun; Yun, HyeSung; Lee, MiKyoung; Song, Youngshin

    2005-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of delivery nursing care using essential oils on labor stress response, labor anxiety and postpartum status anxiety for primipara. This study used nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects of this experiment consisted of forty eight primipara with single gestation, full term, & uncomplicated pregnancies. Twenty four primipra were in the experimental and control group each. Their mean age was 27.9 years old, their mean gestation period 279.9 days. As a treatment, delivery nursing care using essential oils was applied by nurses. Data collected epinephrine, norepinephrine, anxiety during labor. In the 24 hours after birth, the data for the postpartum mother's status anxiety was collected. Data was analyzed by t-test, repeated measures ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U test, & Wilcoxon signed ranks test with SPSS Program. Plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine were significantly low in the experimental group (P=0.001, P=0.033, respectively). There was no significant difference between the two groups in anxiety during labor and postpartum mother's status anxiety. These findings indicate that delivery nursing care using essential oils could be effective in decreasing plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine. But, that could not be verified in decreasing mother's anxiety.

  6. Reframing HIV care: putting people at the centre of antiretroviral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Chris; Rosenblum, Scott; Hellmann, Nicholas; Holmes, Charles; Wilkinson, Lynne; Biot, Marc; Bygrave, Helen; Hoos, David; Garnett, Geoff

    2015-04-01

    The delivery of HIV care in the initial rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment was based on existing clinic-based models, which are common in highly resourced settings and largely undifferentiated for individual needs. A new framework for treatment based on variable intensities of care tailored to the specific needs of different groups of individuals across the cascade of care is proposed here. Service intensity is characterised by four delivery components: (i) types of services delivered, (ii) location of service delivery, (iii) provider of health services and (iv) frequency of health services. How these components are developed into a service delivery framework will vary across countries and populations, with the intention being to improve acceptability and care outcomes. The goal of getting more people on treatment before they become ill will necessitate innovative models of delivering both testing and care. As HIV programmes expand treatment eligibility, many people entering care will not be 'patients' but healthy, active and productive members of society. To take the framework to scale, it will be important to: (i) define which individuals can be served by an alternative delivery framework; (ii) strengthen health systems that support decentralisation, integration and task shifting; (iii) make the supply chain more robust; and (iv) invest in data systems for patient tracking and for programme monitoring and evaluation. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Examining racial disparities in colorectal cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jamillah; Bumpers, Kevin; Ogunlade, Vickie; Glover, Roni; Davis, Sharon; Counts-Spriggs, Margaret; Kauh, John; Flowers, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately burdened with colorectal cancer. Although incidence and mortality rates have declined in the past two decades, the disparity in health outcomes has progressively increased. This comprehensive review examines the existing literature regarding racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage at diagnosis, and treatment to determine if differences exist in the quality of care delivered to African Americans. A comprehensive review of relevant literature was performed. Two databases (EBSCOHOST Academic Search Premier and Scopus) were searched from 2000 to 2007. Articles that assessed racial disparities in colorectal cancer screening, stage of disease at diagnosis, and treatment were selected. The majority of studies identified examined colorectal cancer screening outcomes. Although racial disparities in screening have diminished in recent years, African American men and women continue to have higher colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and are diagnosed at more advanced stages. Several studies regarding stage of disease at diagnosis identified socioeconomic status (SES) and health insurance status as major determinants of disparity. However, some studies found significant racial disparities even after controlling for these factors. Racial disparities in treatment were also found at various diagnostic stages. Many factors affecting disparities between African Americans and Whites in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality remain unexplained. Although the importance of tumor biology, genetics, and lifestyle risk factors have been established, prime sociodemographic factors need further examination to understand variances in the care of African Americans diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

  8. Palliative care for the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, Barbara; Axelrod, David; Maury, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Palliation of symptoms to optimize QOL is the foundation of cancer care regardless of stage of disease or level of anticancer treatment. Patients commonly experience pain, constipation, nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, fatigue, and delirium. Many valid clinical tools are available to the primary care clinician to screen for symptoms, assess severity, measure treatment response, and elicit the patient's subjective symptom experience. Although there is limited evidence regarding the relative efficacy of symptom interventions from randomized controlled trials, clinical practice guidelines are available.

  9. [Cancer and elderly people, what palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyahia, Stéphanie; N'Fissi, Karima; Sahut-D'Izarn, Marine; Cudennec, Tristan

    Epidemiological data relating to cancer and the ageing of the population highlight the need for oncology, geriatrics and palliative care to work more closely together. Geriatric and palliative care assessments in oncology are complex procedures and result in the modification of the oncological therapeutic choices. They have a significant impact on the methods of treatment of the patients concerned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advanced Cancer for information on end-of-life issues.) Spirituality and religion may have different meanings. The terms spirituality and ... to the wishes of the patient. Spirituality and religion are very personal issues. Patients should expect doctors and caregivers to respect ...

  11. Refining and validating a conceptual model of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam; Williams, Marjory; Su, Wei; Hites, Lisle

    2017-02-01

    To empirically validate a conceptual model of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery. There is limited evidence of frontline care delivery models that consistently achieve quality patient outcomes. Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery is a promising nursing model with a growing record of success. However, theoretical clarity is necessary to generate causal evidence of effectiveness. Sequential mixed methods. A preliminary Clinical Nurse Leader practice model was refined and survey items developed to correspond with model domains, using focus groups and a Delphi process with a multi-professional expert panel. The survey was administered in 2015 to clinicians and administrators involved in Clinical Nurse Leader initiatives. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were used to validate the measurement and model structure. Final sample n = 518. The model incorporates 13 components organized into five conceptual domains: 'Readiness for Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery'; 'Structuring Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery'; 'Clinical Nurse Leader Practice: Continuous Clinical Leadership'; 'Outcomes of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery'; and 'Value'. Sample data had good fit with specified model and two-level measurement structure. All hypothesized pathways were significant, with strong coefficients suggesting good fit between theorized and observed path relationships. The validated model articulates an explanatory pathway of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery, including Clinical Nurse Leader practices that result in improved care dynamics and patient outcomes. The validated model provides a basis for testing in practice to generate evidence that can be deployed across the healthcare spectrum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. STATE OF THE ART OF CANCER CARE DELIVER Y IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Gnatyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The globally increased concern with the situation, existing in oncology, is conditioned by a steady incidence rate of malignant neoplasms, having a tendency to its growth. Annually over 7 million people die in the world due to cancer, by 2020, according to WHO estimations, this index will increase to 10 million. By the end of the 2013 report year patient population with cancer, registered in cancer care facilities of the Russian Federation, is 3 098 855 (2 995 566 in 2012, i. e. 2,1% of the population of the country. The system of cancer care delivery to the population in the Russian Federation and in Moscow is aimed at an early diagnostics and prevention of malignant neoplasms. Municipal cancer care service establishes the patients’ routes at suspicion on oncological disease and determines the functions of all links of health care for this type of patients. Stateof-the-art delivery of oncological specialty care has been built up with account of modern demands and is functionally structured in accordance with tree-level municipal health care system.

  13. Provider perceptions and expectations of breast cancer posttreatment care: a University of California Athena Breast Health Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Erin E; Ganz, Patricia A; Melisko, Michelle E; Pierce, John P; von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Marlene; Lane, Karen T; Hiatt, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The Athena Breast Health Network collaboration is a University of California system-wide project initiated with the intent to drive innovation in breast cancer prevention, screening, and treatment. This qualitative research examines provider perceptions and expectations of posttreatment breast cancer care across five network sites with the goal of better understanding provider behavior during the posttreatment phase of the cancer care trajectory. Investigators at each site conducted semi-structured interviews with oncology specialists and primary care providers (PCPs). Interviews used case study examples and open- and closed-ended questions on the delivery of posttreatment breast cancer care. Informant responses were manually recorded by the interviewer, compiled in a database, then coded and analyzed using NVivo 9 software. There were 39 key informants across the sites: 14 medical oncologists, 7 radiation oncologists, 11 surgeons, 3 oncology nurses, and 4 PCPs. Care coordination was a major unprompted theme identified in the interviews. There was a perceived need for greater care coordination across institutions in order to improve delivery of posttreatment health care services and a need for greater care coordination within oncology, particularly to help avoid duplication of follow-up care and services. Participants expect frequent follow-up visits and to use biomarker tests and advanced imaging services as part of routine surveillance care. Implementing survivorship care programs was perceived as a way to improve care delivery. These results identify a need for increased focus on care coordination during the posttreatment phase of breast cancer care within the University of California system and the potential for system and provider-level interventions that could help increase coordination of posttreatment care. Breast cancer survivors do not always receive evidence-based care. This research helps to better understand what motivates provider behavior during the

  14. An update on applications of nanostructured drug delivery systems in cancer therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberoumandi, Seyed Mohsen; Mohammadhosseini, Majid; Abasi, Elham; Saghati, Sepideh; Nikzamir, Nasrin; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Panahi, Yunes; Davaran, Soodabeh

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is a main public health problem that is known as a malignant tumor and out-of-control cell growth, with the potential to assault or spread to other parts of the body. Recently, remarkable efforts have been devoted to develop nanotechnology to improve the delivery of anticancer drug to tumor tissue as minimizing its distribution and toxicity in healthy tissue. Nanotechnology has been extensively used in the advance of new strategies for drug delivery and cancer therapy. Compared to customary drug delivery systems, nano-based drug delivery method has greater potential in different areas, like multiple targeting functionalization, in vivo imaging, extended circulation time, systemic control release, and combined drug delivery. Nanofibers are used for different medical applications such as drug delivery systems.

  15. Point of Care Testing Services Delivery: Policy Analysis using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Anderson's normative policy analysis model was used to analyze the policy guidelines and procedures of sample collection, analysis and generation of results. Results: The policy analysis shows that problems of POCT service delivery are triangular with the patients at the base (receiving end) of the triangle.

  16. Drivers of prenatal care quality and uptake of supervised delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The study sought to identify the determinants of perceived quality of ANC and uptake of skilled delivery services. Subjects and Methods: A total of 363 expectant mothers were randomly selected in urban health facilities for interview. Logistic regression models were computed to examine the relative odds of reporting ...

  17. Targeted delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible gold nanoparticles into cancer cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Curry, Taeyjuana; Che, Yong; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-02-01

    Nucleus remains a significant target for nanoparticles with diagnostic and therapeutic applications because both genetic information of the cell and transcription machinery reside there. Novel therapeutic strategies (for example, gene therapy), enabled by safe and efficient delivery of nanoparticles and drug molecules into the nucleus, are heralded by many as the ultimate treatment for severe and intractable diseases. However, most nanomaterials and macromolecules are incapable of reaching the cell nucleus on their own, because of biological barriers carefully honed by evolution including cellular membrane and nuclear envelope. In this paper, we have demonstrated an approach of fabrication of biocompatible gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based vehicles which can entering into cancer cell nucleus by modifying Au NPs with both PEG 5000 and two different peptides (RGD and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide). The Au NPs used were fabricated via femtosecond laser ablation of Au bulk target in deionized water. The Au NPs produced by this method provide chemical free, virgin surface, which allows us to carry out "Sequential Conjugation" to modify their surface with PEG 5000, RGD, and NLS. "Sequential Conjugation" described in this presentation is very critical for the fabrication of Au NP-based vehicles capable of entering into cancer cell nucleus as it enables the engineering and tuning surface chemistries of Au NPs by independently adjusting amounts of PEG and peptides bound onto surface of Au NPs so as to maximize their nuclear targeting performance and biocompatibility regarding the cell line of interest. Both optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to confirm the in vitro targeted nuclear delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible Au NPs by showing their presence in the cancer cell nucleus.

  18. Material Resources For Eye Care Delivery In Urban South-Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the availability and distribution of material resources for primary and secondary level eye care delivery in Enugu-North Local Government Area (LGA) of Enugu State. Methods: A survey of Public (State and Local Government administered) health care facilities in Enugu North LGA was done.

  19. Evaluation of care of the Newborn in delivery facilities at Osogbo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a prospective study of 193 consecutive neonates brought to the immunization clinic for vaccination at the State Hospital, Osogbo, evaluation of the neonatal care received at the facility, where the neonates were delivered was conducted. Information concerning the place of delivery of the neonates, the specifics of the care ...

  20. Telehealth: New Directions and Technology for Health Care Delivery in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas W.

    Advances in technology and health care delivery have included the use of telemedicine and telepsychology for crisis intervention, assessment, treatment, and education of patients. The use of telemedicine and telepsychology is examined for a variety of health care services to rural America. Telehealth has been considered a partial solution to the…

  1. Delayed Prenatal Care and the Risk of Low Birth Weight Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueston, William J.; Gilbert, Gregory E.; Davis, Lucy; Sturgill, Vanessa

    2003-01-01

    Assessed whether the timing of prenatal care related to low birth weight delivery, adjusting for sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors. Data on births to white and African American women showed no benefits for early initiation of prenatal care in reducing the risk of low birth weight.(SM)

  2. Specialized palliative care in advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmenlund, Kristina; Sjogren, Per; Nordly, Mie

    2017-01-01

    was to review the existing literature about SPC and its effect on QoL, on physical and psychological symptoms, and on survival in adult patients with advanced cancer. Method: We utilized a search strategy based on the PICO (problem/population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework and employed......Objective: Due to the multiple physical, psychological, existential, and social symptoms involved, patients with advanced cancer often have a reduced quality of life (QoL), which requires specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions. The primary objective of the present systematic review...... terminology related to cancer, QoL, symptoms, mood, and palliative care. The search was performed in Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Selected studies were analyzed and categorized according to methods, results, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendation...

  3. Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0548 TITLE: Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL...Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...they are produced, but can also signal intercellularly to other cells and tissues at distant sites via exosomal transport. We hypothesize that miRNAs

  4. A survey of National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers' oral health supportive care practices and resources in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joel B; Parker, Ira R; Epstein, Matthew S; Gupta, Anurag; Kutis, Susan; Witkowski, Daniela M

    2007-04-01

    The oral complications and morbidity resulting from overall cancer therapy utilizing radiation, chemotherapy, and/or stem cell transplantation can have significant impact on a patient's health, quality of life, cost of care, and cancer management. There has been minimal health services research focusing on the status of medically necessary, oral supportive services at US cancer centers. A pre-tested, survey questionnaire was distributed to the directors of National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer centers to assess each institution's resource availability and clinical practices, as it relates to the prevention and management of oral complications during cancer treatment. Sixteen of the 39 comprehensive cancer centers responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 56% of the centers did not have a dental department. The sites of delivery of oral supportive care services range from the provision of in-house dental care to community-based, private practice sites. No standard protocols were in place for either oral preventive care or for supportive services for oral complications during or after cancer therapy. Fifty percent of the responding comprehensive cancer centers reported orally focused research and/or clinical trial activities. Comprehensive cancer care must include an oral care component, particularly for those cancer patients who are at high risk for oral complications. This requires a functional team of oral care providers collaborating closely within the oncology team. Considering the number of cancer patients receiving aggressive oncologic treatment that may result in oral toxicity, the impact of oral conditions on a compromised host, and the potential lack of appropriate resources and healthcare personnel to manage these complications, future research efforts are needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of present oral supportive care delivery systems at both NCI-designated cancer centers and community-based oncology practices.

  5. Education to improve cancer care in rural South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoon, Elizabeth A; Newbury, Jonathan W; Chapman, Peter; Price, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cancer management follows the overall trend of rural health disparities, with higher incidence rates of preventable cancers and lower survival rates in rural Australia. Cancer prevention and management has been identified as a priority area and Cancer Australia has funded a variety of innovations throughout Australia. The Rural Chemotherapy Mentoring Program (RCMP) forms part of this drive to improve access to chemotherapy for rural based cancer sufferers in South Australia (SA). The key strategy of this program was the provision of opportunities for rural health clinicians (nurses and GPs) to enhance their knowledge and skills in the delivery of chemotherapy and cancer care through clinical placements at metropolitan oncology units. The RCMP enrolled 43 current SA rural clinicians (five GPs and 38 nurses). This evaluation was undertaken at the end of RCMP's initial 18 months. It considered how those involved in the RCMP perceived development and delivery of the RCMP, identifying key aspects of the program that were successful. This report emphasises lessons learnt which may be of relevance more widely in the development of other rural health professional education. The evaluation used a mixed method approach, designed to accommodate different perspectives from the health professionals with different roles in the program. Quantitative and qualitative questionnaire data from clinician participants, their employers, and providers of education at metropolitan cancer units, were supplemented with qualitative interview data from these sample groups and from the program's steering committee. The analysis used interpretative methods to examine the key strengths, limitations and the potential for future development of the program. The vast majority of participants, employers, providers of training and the steering committee representatives expressed high levels of overall satisfaction about their involvement in RCMP. A clear identifiable need for increased knowledge and

  6. Skilled delivery care service utilization in Ethiopia: analysis of rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995): Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization. Health Care. System. External. Environment. Perceived. Health Status. Evaluated. Health Status. Consumer. Satisfaction. Predisposing Characteristics. Demographic Factors. Women's Age.

  7. An Implantable MEMS Drug Delivery Device for Rapid Delivery in Ambulatory Emergency Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    vol. 32, pp. 377-379, 2000. I. Singer and H. L. Edmonds, "Head-up tilt testing predicts syncope during ventricular tachycardia in implantable... pulse through it, as has been demonstrated in the past (Maloney, 2005). The limitations of this solution are: the significant increase in current to...H. Brem, M. J. Cima, and R. Langer, "Multi- pulse drug delivery from a resorbable polymeric microchip device," Nature Materials, vol. 2, pp. 767-772

  8. Frank Gilbreth and health care delivery method study driven learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towill, Denis R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to look at method study, as devised by the Gilbreths at the beginning of the twentieth century, which found early application in hospital quality assurance and surgical "best practice". It has since become a core activity in all modern methods, as applied to healthcare delivery improvement programmes. The article traces the origin of what is now currently and variously called "business process re-engineering", "business process improvement" and "lean healthcare" etc., by different management gurus back to the century-old pioneering work of Frank Gilbreth. The outcome is a consistent framework involving "width", "length" and "depth" dimensions within which healthcare delivery systems can be analysed, designed and successfully implemented to achieve better and more consistent performance. Healthcare method (saving time plus saving motion) study is best practised as co-joint action learning activity "owned" by all "players" involved in the re-engineering process. However, although process mapping is a key step forward, in itself it is no guarantee of effective re-engineering. It is not even the beginning of the end of the change challenge, although it should be the end of the beginning. What is needed is innovative exploitation of method study within a healthcare organisational learning culture accelerated via the Gilbreth Knowledge Flywheel. It is shown that effective healthcare delivery pipeline improvement is anchored into a team approach involving all "players" in the system especially physicians. A comprehensive process study, constructive dialogue, proper and highly professional re-engineering plus managed implementation are essential components. Experience suggests "learning" is thereby achieved via "natural groups" actively involved in healthcare processes. The article provides a proven method for exploiting Gilbreths' outputs and their many successors in enabling more productive evidence-based healthcare delivery as summarised

  9. Considerations for developing chronic care system for traumatic brain injury based on comparisons of cancer survivorship and diabetes management care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Siobhan M; Caldwell, Barrett S

    2018-01-01

    Experts in traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation recently proposed the framing of TBI as a chronic disease rather than a discrete event. Within the framework of the Chronic Care Model (CCM), a systematic comparison of three diseases - cancer survivorship, diabetes management and TBI chronic care - was conducted regarding chronic needs and the management of those needs. In addition, comparisons of these conditions require comparative evaluations of disease management characteristics and the survivor concept. The analysis found diabetes is more established within the CCM, where care is integrated across specialists and primary care providers. No single comparison provides a full analogue for understanding the chronic care health delivery system for TBI, indicating the need for a separate model to address needs and resources for TBI survivors. The findings from this research can provide practitioners with a context to develop a robust continued care health system for TBI. Practitioner Summary: We examine development of a chronic care system for traumatic brain injury. We conducted a systematic comparison of Chronic Care Model elements of decision and information support. Development of capabilities using a benchmark of diabetes care, with additional insights from cancer care, provides insights for implementing TBI chronic care systems.

  10. [Simulation in health to improve the delivery of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesnière, Antoine; Fleury, Cynthia

    2017-11-01

    Simulation in health care is a very effective training tool. Using mannequins, 'standardised patients' or virtual care environments, it encourages participants to reflect on nursing practices while practising in a safe and controlled space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Managing care in an integrated delivery system via an Intranet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamka, J. D.; Hughes, M.; Mack, J.; Hurwitz, M.; Davis, F.; Wood, D.; Borten, K.; Saal, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The CareGroup Provider Service Network is a managed care contracting organization which provides central administrative services for over 1800 physicians and 200,000 managed care lives. Services include utilization management, disease management and credentialing for the entire network. The management model of the Provider Service Network empowers local physician groups with information and education. To meet the managed care information needs of the network, we implemented an intranet-based executive information system, PSNWeb, which retrieves data from a managed care data warehouse. The project required the integration of diverse technologies and development of a complex security/confidentiality infrastructure to deliver information to 8 major clinician groups, each with different information needs. PMID:9929250

  12. Liposomal systems as viable drug delivery technology for skin cancer sites with an outlook on lipid-based delivery vehicles and diagnostic imaging inputs for skin conditions'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naseem; Khan, Riaz A

    2016-10-01

    Skin cancer is among one of the most common human malignancies wide-spread world-over with mortality statistics rising continuously at an alarming rate. The increasing frequency of these malignancies has marked the need for adopting effective treatment plan coupled with better and site-specific delivery options for the desired therapeutic agent's availability at the affected site. The concurrent delivery approaches to cancerous tissues are under constant challenge and, as a result, are evolving and gaining advancements in terms of delivery modes, therapeutic agents and site-specificity of the therapeutics delivery. The lipid-based liposomal drug delivery is an attractive and emerging option, and which is meticulously shaping up beyond a threshold level to a promising, and viable route for the effective delivery of therapeutic agents and other required injuctions to the skin cancer. An update on liposomal delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, natural-origin compounds, photosensitizer, and DNA repair enzymes as well as other desirable and typical delivery modes employed in drug delivery and in the treatment of skin cancers is discussed in details. Moreover, liposomal delivery of nucleic acid-based therapeutics, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA), mRNA therapy, and RGD-linked liposomes are among the other promising novel technology under constant development. The current clinical applicability, viable clinical plans, future prospects including transport feasibility of delivery vesicles and imaging techniques in conjunction with the therapeutic agents is also discussed. The ongoing innovations in liposomal drug delivery technology for skin cancers hold promise for further development of the methodology for better, more effective and site-specific delivery as part of the better treatment plan by ensuring faster drug transport, better and full payload delivery with enough and required concentration of the dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Update on Nanotechnology-based Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Benjamin N; Pfeffer, Claire M; Singh, Amareshwar T K

    2017-11-01

    The emerging field of nanotechnology meets the demands for innovative approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The nanoparticles are biocompatible and biodegradable and are made of a core, a particle that acts as a carrier, and one or more functional groups on the core which target specific sites. Nanotech in drug delivery includes nanodisks, High Density Lipoprotein nanostructures, liposomes, and gold nanoparticles. The fundamental advantages of nanoparticles are: improved delivery of water-insoluble drugs, targeted delivery, co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy, and visualization of the drug delivery site by combining imaging system and a therapeutic drug. One of the potential applications of nanotechnology is in the treatment of cancer. Conventional methods for cancer treatments have included chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation. Early recognition and treatment of cancer with these approaches is still challenging. Innovative technologies are needed to overcome multidrug resistance, and increase drug localization and efficacy. Application of nanotechnology to cancer biology has brought in a new hope for developing treatment strategies on cancer. In this study, we present a review on the recent advances in nanotechnology-based approaches in cancer treatment. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Challenges of Rural Cancer Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Mary; Schlichting, Jennifer; Chioreso, Catherine; Ward, Marcia; Vikas, Praveen

    2015-09-01

    Rural cancer patients face many challenges in receiving care, including limited availability of cancer treatments and cancer support providers (oncologists, social workers, mental healthcare providers, palliative care specialists, etc), transportation barriers, financial issues, and limited access to clinical trials. Oncologists and other cancer care providers experience parallel challenges in delivering care to their rural cancer patients. Although no one approach fully addresses the many challenges of rural cancer care, a number of promising strategies and interventions have been developed that transcend the issues associated with long travel distances. These include outreach clinics, virtual tumor boards, teleoncology and other telemedicine applications, workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and provider and patient education programs. Given the projected increase in demand for cancer care due to the aging population and increasing number of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, expansion of these efforts and development of new approaches are critical to ensure access to high-quality care.

  15. Perspectives of men on antenatal and delivery care service utilisation in rural western Kenya: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwambai, Titus K.; Dellicour, Stephanie; Desai, Meghna; Ameh, Charles A.; Person, Bobbie; Achieng, Florence; Mason, Linda; Laserson, Kayla F.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.

    2013-01-01

    Poor utilisation of facility-based antenatal and delivery care services in Kenya hampers reduction of maternal mortality. Studies suggest that the participation of men in antenatal and delivery care is associated with better health care seeking behaviour, yet many reproductive health programs do not

  16. Oral Cancer Care and Oromaxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S K

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancers are one of the most common cancers affecting people of Nepal and it the sixth most common cancer in the world. Unlike other cancers the early detection of the disease is possible through a routine examination of the oral cavity which is usually done by a dental practitioner. Through a series of phases like prevention, screening, early intervention, diagnosis and staging, management with tumor ablative surgeries, and rehabilitation to restore the function and esthetic part for better clinical outcome, the role of the specialty of dentistry is immensified. From a patient perspective, having a direct referral line within the dental community between dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons will contribute to cost reduction and improvement in outcomes. Trained oral and maxillofacial surgeon especially in the head and neck oncology plays a vital role in exploring functional multidisciplinary efforts to enhance patient care, academic excellence and research initiatives and evaluate for gaps in patient care. This article highlights the role of such professionals in a multidisciplinary team approach for the proper management of head and neck cancers which have significantly and logically additive effect for a better outcome.

  17. Oncology and Palliative Medicine: Providing Comprehensive Care for Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Laura; Green, Alva Roche; Malhotra, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the evidence for the fundamental need for palliative medicine services in the practice of oncology, integration of these medical specialties remains a clinical challenge. We reviewed the current literature regarding the practice of palliative medicine in the field of oncology, examining randomized clinical trials of palliative medicine services in advanced cancer, models of palliative medicine delivery, studies of cost effectiveness, and national palliative medicine practice and referral guidelines. In this review, we describe the role of palliative medicine in oncology, including the timing of palliative medicine consultation, models of care delivery, and improvements in patient outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and national guidelines support early referral of patients with cancer to palliative medicine. Palliative medicine has a fundamental role in symptom management, distress relief, family and caregiver support, and advance care planning. Integration of palliative medicine in oncology improves patient outcomes and decreases healthcare costs. Early involvement of palliative medicine after the cancer diagnosis is supported by national guidelines, but barriers include variable referral patterns among oncologists and the need for an expanded palliative medicine workforce. Palliative medicine has a wide-ranging role in the spectrum of comprehensive cancer care-from patient diagnosis to survivorship. The entire multidisciplinary care team has a role in providing palliative care in inpatient and outpatient settings. An effective palliative medicine and oncology collaboration improves patient care and quality of life, has broad research and guideline support, and is cost effective.

  18. Nucleolin-targeted Extracellular Vesicles as a Versatile Platform for Biologics Delivery to Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yayu; Chen, Xiaojia; Tian, Baoqing; Liu, Jiafan; Yang, Li; Zeng, Lilan; Chen, Tianfen; Hong, An; Wang, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNA)/microRNAs (miRNA) have promising therapeutic potential, yet their clinical application has been hampered by the lack of appropriate delivery systems. Herein, we employed extracellular vesicles (EVs) as a targeted delivery system for small RNAs. EVs are cell-derived small vesicles that participate in cell-to-cell communication for protein and RNA delivery. We used the aptamer AS1411-modified EVs for targeted delivery of siRNA/microRNA to breast cancer tissues. Tumor targeting was facilitated via AS1411 binding to nucleolin, which is highly expressed on the surface membrane of breast cancer cells. This delivery vesicle targeted let-7 miRNA delivery to MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro as confirmed with fluorescent microscopic imaging and flow cytometry. Also, intravenously delivered AS1411-EVs loaded with miRNA let-7 labeled with the fluorescent marker, Cy5, selectively targeted tumor tissues in tumor-bearing mice and inhibited tumor growth. Importantly, the modified EVs were well tolerated and showed no evidence of nonspecific side effects or immune response. Thus, the RNAi nanoplatform is versatile and can deliver siRNA or miRNA to breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that the AS1411-EVs have a great potential as drug delivery vehicles to treat cancers.

  19. Health care and cancer screening experience of chinese immigrants in New York City: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kenny; Mak, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess the health care and cancer screening experience of Chinese immigrants in New York City and identify health care delivery system barriers to cancer education and screening activities. A qualitative, exploratory research methodology based on a grounded theory approach was used. Thirty-nine low-income and medically underserved Chinese men and women participated in 4 focus group sessions and 14 in-depth interviews. Findings revealed numerous barriers experienced by participants: red tape and bureaucracy in the health care system, provider insensitivity to their concerns, lack of availability in doctor schedule, long waiting time in clinics, and fragmentation of the medical care system. This study highlighted the importance of cultural relevancy and appropriateness in the design and implementation of effective cancer screening programs for this population.

  20. Promoting Early Detection of Breast Cancer and Care Strategies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    care for patients with advanced breast cancer because, at this stage, patients will no longer gain from antitumor interventions 10. The creation of palliative and supportive care for patients with advanced breast cancer will help to prevent unnecessary and avoidable suffering. Palliative and supportive care. Palliative care has ...

  1. Medical care delivery in the US space program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donald F.

    1991-01-01

    The stated goal of this meeting is to examine the use of telemedicine in disaster management, public health, and remote health care. NASA has a vested interest in providing health care to crews in remote environments. NASA has unique requirements for telemedicine support, in that our flight crews conduct their job in the most remote of all work environments. Compounding the degree of remoteness are other environmental concerns, including confinement, lack of atmosphere, spaceflight physiological deconditioning, and radiation exposure, to name a few. In-flight medical care is a key component in the overall support for missions, which also includes extensive medical screening during selection, preventive medical programs for astronauts, and in-flight medical monitoring and consultation. This latter element constitutes the telemedicine aspect of crew health care. The level of in-flight resources dedicated to medical care is determined by the perceived risk of a given mission, which in turn is related to mission duration, planned crew activities, and length of time required for return to definitive medical care facilities.

  2. Intensive care for cancer patients: An interdisciplinary challenge for cancer specialists and intensive care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellongowski, Peter; Kiehl, Michael; Kochanek, Matthias; Staudinger, Thomas; Beutel, Gernot

    Every sixth to eighth European intensive care unit patient suffers from an underlying malignant disease. A large proportion of these patients present with cancer-related complications. This review explains why the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has improved substantially over the last decades and which risk factors are of prognostic importance. Furthermore, the main reasons for intensive care unit admission - acute respiratory failure and septic complications - are discussed with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic specifics. In addition, we discuss potential intensive care unit admission criteria with respect to cancer prognosis. The successful management of critically ill cancer patients requires a close collaboration of intensivists with hematologists, oncologists and colleagues from other disciplines, such as infectious disease specialists, microbiologists, radiologists, surgeons, pharmacists, and others.

  3. Distance to care, facility delivery and early neonatal mortality in Malawi and Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhi J Lohela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally, approximately 3 million babies die annually within their first month. Access to adequate care at birth is needed to reduce newborn as well as maternal deaths. We explore the influence of distance to delivery care and of level of care on early neonatal mortality in rural Zambia and Malawi, the influence of distance (and level of care on facility delivery, and the influence of facility delivery on early neonatal mortality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: National Health Facility Censuses were used to classify the level of obstetric care for 1131 Zambian and 446 Malawian delivery facilities. Straight-line distances to facilities were calculated for 3771 newborns in the 2007 Zambia DHS and 8842 newborns in the 2004 Malawi DHS. There was no association between distance to care and early neonatal mortality in Malawi (OR 0.97, 95%CI 0.58-1.60, while in Zambia, further distance (per 10 km was associated with lower mortality (OR 0.55, 95%CI 0.35-0.87. The level of care provided in the closest facility showed no association with early neonatal mortality in either Malawi (OR 1.02, 95%CI 0.90-1.16 or Zambia (OR 1.02, 95%CI 0.82-1.26. In both countries, distance to care was strongly associated with facility use for delivery (Malawi: OR 0.35 per 10km, 95%CI 0.26-0.46. All results are adjusted for available confounders. Early neonatal mortality did not differ by frequency of facility delivery in the community. CONCLUSIONS: While better geographic access and higher level of care were associated with more frequent facility delivery, there was no association with lower early neonatal mortality. This could be due to low quality of care for newborns at health facilities, but differential underreporting of early neonatal deaths in the DHS is an alternative explanation. Improved data sources are needed to monitor progress in the provision of obstetric and newborn care and its impact on mortality.

  4. Can branding by health care provider organizations drive the delivery of higher technical and service quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snihurowych, Roman R; Cornelius, Felix; Amelung, Volker Eric

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of branding in nearly all other major industries, most health care service delivery organizations have not fully embraced the practices and processes of branding. Facilitating the increased and appropriate use of branding among health care delivery organizations may improve service and technical quality for patients. This article introduces the concepts of branding, as well as making the case that the use of branding may improve the quality and financial performance of organizations. The concepts of branding are reviewed, with examples from the literature used to demonstrate their potential application within health care service delivery. The role of branding for individual organizations is framed by broader implications for health care markets. Branding strategies may have a number of positive effects on health care service delivery, including improved technical and service quality. This may be achieved through more transparent and efficient consumer choice, reduced costs related to improved patient retention, and improved communication and appropriateness of care. Patient satisfaction may be directly increased as a result of branding. More research into branding could result in significant quality improvements for individual organizations, while benefiting patients and the health system as a whole.

  5. The risks and opportunities of the globalization of health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven; Hasham, Salim

    2012-01-01

    The pace and scale of globalization in health care services delivery have accelerated over the past decade. There have been numerous collaborations in health care service delivery between the private sector in North America and Europe with public and private entities in various emerging markets. These partnerships can be extremely fruitful, but also carry significant challenges. Johns Hopkins Medicine International (JHI) has been active for more than a decade in supporting international partners in building capacity and improving delivery systems. In addressing the challenges of globalization we have learned a number of lessons and have come up with several innovations to better help providers in emerging markets respond to the health care needs unique to their regions.

  6. 'Scraps': hidden nursing information and its influence on the delivery of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardey, M; Payne, S; Coleman, P

    2000-07-01

    What nurses commonly describe as 'scraps' are defined as the personalized recordings of information that is routinely made on any available piece of paper (hence scraps) or in small notebooks. The use of scraps is common in practice and has been noted in research from across the globe. Drawing on an empirical study it is argued that scraps are a unique combination of personal and professional knowledge that informs the delivery of care. The overall aim of the study was to discover how nurses define and communicate information about patients and the delivery of care to each other on an elderly care unit. The processes by which information was constructed and the organizational structure and interactions that influenced this were also identified. The research design was an ethnographic one that involved: observations of formal nursing end of shift reports (23 handovers) and informal interactions between nurses (146 hours); interviews (n + 34) with registered nurses, student nurses and nursing auxiliaries; and analysis of written records. Data were collected from five acute elderly care wards at a district general hospital in the south of England. A grounded theory analysis was undertaken which revealed that scraps may have a significant role in the communication of information and the delivery of care. Therefore a categorization of scraps within three main themes was undertaken. First, the analysis revealed the processes involved in the construction of scraps. Second, the content and role of scraps in influencing the delivery of care was exposed. Finally, the potentially confidential nature of scraps and consequent problems of storage and disposal was recognized. The findings are discussed in relation to a suggested model of the interrelationship between paperwork, scraps, handovers and the delivery of nursing care. It is concluded that scraps are significant in facilitating nursing care and that this should be recognized in research, education and practice.

  7. 'One-stop shop': lung cancer patients' and caregivers' perceptions of multidisciplinary care in a community healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Satish K; Ward, Kenneth D; Digney, Siri A; Jackson, Bianca M; Nellum, April L; McHugh, Laura; Roark, Kristina S; Osborne, Orion T; Crossley, Fayre J; Faris, Nicholas; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U

    2015-08-01

    Multidisciplinary care is rarely practiced in community healthcare settings where the majority of patients receive lung cancer care in the US. We sought direct input from patients and their informal caregivers on their experience of lung cancer care delivery. We conducted focus groups of patient and caregiver dyads. Patients had received care for lung cancer in or out of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncology clinic coordinated by a nurse navigator. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using Creswell's 7-step process. Recurring overlapping themes were developed using constant comparative methods within the Grounded Theory framework. A total of 46 participants were interviewed in focus groups of 5 patient-caregiver dyads. Overlapping themes were a perception that multidisciplinary care improved physician collaboration, patient-physician communication, and patient convenience, while reducing redundancy in testing. Improved coordination decreased confusion, stress, and anxiety. Negative experience of serial care included poor communication among physicians, insensitive communication about illness, delays in diagnosis and treatment, misdiagnosis, and mistreatment. Physician-to-physician communication and patient education were suggested areas for improvement in the multidisciplinary model. Multidisciplinary care was perceived as more patient-centered, effective, safe, and efficient than standard serial care. It was also believed to improve the timeliness of care and equitable access to high quality care. Additional studies to compare these perspectives to those of other key stakeholders, including clinicians, hospital administrators and representatives of third party payers, will facilitate better understanding of the role of multidisciplinary care programs in lung cancer care delivery.

  8. Polymer nanoparticles for drug and small silencing RNA delivery to treat cancers of different phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided powerful and efficient tools in development of cancer diagnosis and therapy. There are numerous nanocarriers that are currently approved for clinical use in cancer therapy. In recent years, biodegradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted a considerable attention for their ability to function as a possible carrier for target-specific delivery of various drugs, genes, proteins, peptides, vaccines, and other biomolecules in humans without much toxicity. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances in polymer-based nanocarriers for various drugs and small silencing RNA’s loading and delivery to treat different types of cancer. PMID:23996830

  9. Preconception healthcare delivery at a population level: construction of public health models of preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Geordan D; Alberg, Corinna; Nacul, Luis; Pashayan, Nora

    2014-08-01

    A key challenge of preconception healthcare is identifying how it can best be delivered at a population level. To review current strategies of preconception healthcare, explore methods of preconception healthcare delivery, and develop public health models which reflect different preconception healthcare pathways. Preconception care strategies, programmes and evaluations were identified through a review of Medline and Embase databases. Search terms included: preconception, pre-pregnancy, intervention, primary care, healthcare, model, delivery, program, prevention, trial, effectiveness, congenital disorders OR abnormalities, evaluation, assessment, impact. Inclusion criteria for review articles were: (1) English, (2) human subjects, (3) women of childbearing age, (4) 1980–current data, (5) all countries, (6) both high risk and universal approaches, (7) guidelines or recommendations, (8) opinion articles, (9) experimental studies. Exclusion criteria were: (1) non-human subjects, (2) non-English, (3) outside of the specified timeframe, (4) articles on male healthcare. The results of the literature review were synthesised into public health models of care: (1) primary care; (2) hospital-based and inter-conception care; (3) specific preconception care clinics; and, (4) community outreach. Fifteen evaluations of preconception care were identified. Community programmes demonstrated a significant impact on substance use, folic acid supplementation, diabetes optimization, and hyperphenylalaninemia. An ideal preconception visits entail risk screening, education, and intervention if indicated. Subsequently, four public health models were developed synthesizing preconception care delivery at a population level. Heterogeneity of risk factors, health systems and strategies of care reflect the lack of consensus about the best way to deliver preconception care. The proposed models aim to reflect differing aspects of preconception healthcare delivery.

  10. Depression and diabetes: Treatment and health-care delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrak, Frank; Baumeister, Harald; Skinner, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    , which are often implemented through collaborative care and stepped-care approaches. The evidence for improved glycaemic control in the treatment of depression by use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or psychological approaches is conflicting; only some analyses show small to moderate......© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Despite research efforts in the past 20 years, scientific evidence about screening and treatment for depression in diabetes remains incomplete and is mostly focused on North American and European health-care systems. Validated instruments to detect depression in diabetes......, although widely available, only become effective and thus recommended if subsequent treatment pathways are accessible, which is often not the case. Because of the well known adverse effects of the interaction between depression and diabetes, treatment goals should focus on the remission or improvement...

  11. Primary care delivery, risk pooling and economic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael C M

    2010-04-01

    The consequences of consumer-driven health care under different health insurance plans are studied by means of a game theoretic approach. Suitable demand-side cost-sharing can induce consumer behavior that avoids over-treatment when there are information asymmetries between providers and consumers, leading to the efficient recommendations and provision of treatment by providers. If under-treatment can be penalized, then a full insurance model that pays providers a fixed salary and fee-for-service or one that requires patients to present a referral letter before specialist care is delivered also achieves provision efficiency. The two models, however, yield higher welfare for consumers. Hence, the findings in this paper favor some amount of regulation in health-care markets.

  12. Bumps in the journey toward a new care delivery model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell-Falik, Nancy; Ide, Patricia; Mohr, Bernard J; Laliberte, Robert A; de Guerre, Donald W

    2012-01-01

    On a journey to the future, an initial strategy of engagement and design is essential but inevitably inadequate. Instead, as bumps in the road emerge, the ability of leadership to regroup and refocus is the key. This is the story of one such journey-a journey pursuing the triple aim of excellence in patient care, patient and staff satisfaction, and economic sustainability. It is one chapter in the transformation of an 1800-employee patient care services organization. It is not the first chapter nor will it be the last.

  13. Retail and Real Estate: The Changing Landscape of Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    By its nature, retail medicine is founded in real estate. That retail medicine has expanded so dramatically in a relatively short period of time has taken people by surprise. This rapid growth of integrating healthcare services into retail real estate begs the question of whether real estate will eventually take on the importance in healthcare delivery that it has in retail. This article advances the view that it will. In the end, what retail and healthcare have in common is that they both reflect the attributes of demanding consumers as part of an experience-based economy, where products and services are sought based on how they fit with their lifestyles and how they make them feel (Pine and Gilmore 1998). Changing the selection process for healthcare services to be more like retail is already expanding how and where healthcare services are delivered.

  14. Home delivery and newborn care practices among urban women in western Nepal: a questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Sabitri

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 98% of newborn deaths occur in developing countries, where most newborns deaths occur at home. In Nepal, approximately, 90% of deliveries take place at home. Information about reasons for delivering at home and newborn care practices in urban areas of Nepal is lacking and such information will be useful for policy makers. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the immunisation clinics of Pokhara city, western Nepal during January and February, 2006. Two trained health workers administered a semi-structured questionnaire to the mothers who had delivered at home. Results A total of 240 mothers were interviewed. Planned home deliveries were 140 (58.3% and 100 (41.7% were unplanned. Only 6.2% of deliveries had a skilled birth attendant present and 38 (15.8% mothers gave birth alone. Only 46 (16.2% women had used a clean home delivery kit and only 92 (38.3% birth attendants had washed their hands. The umbilical cord was cut after expulsion of placenta in 154 (64.2% deliveries and cord was cut using a new/boiled blade in 217 (90.4% deliveries. Mustard oil was applied to the umbilical cord in 53 (22.1% deliveries. Birth place was heated throughout the delivery in 88 (64.2% deliveries. Only 100 (45.8% newborns were wrapped within 10 minutes and 233 (97.1% were wrapped within 30 minutes. Majority (93.8% of the newborns were given a bath soon after birth. Mustard oil massage of the newborns was a common practice (144, 60%. Sixteen (10.8% mothers did not feed colostrum to their babies. Prelacteal feeds were given to 37(15.2% newborns. Initiation rates of breast-feeding were 57.9% within one hour and 85.4% within 24 hours. Main reasons cited for delivering at home were 'preference' (25.7%, 'ease and convenience' (21.4% for planned deliveries while 'precipitate labor' (51%, 'lack of transportation' (18% and 'lack of escort' during labor (11% were cited for the unplanned ones. Conclusion High-risk home delivery and

  15. Internet tools to enhance breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-01-01

    Internet tools have become a great aid in the daily practice of physicians who treat breast cancer patients. In cancer care there are frequent and important intersections where major decisions need to be made; these include (1) whether or not to give chemotherapy; (2) how much toxicity to expect, and (3) the life expectancy of the patient, considering non-breast cancer comorbidities. These decisions can be made more accurately using calculators based on data sets of thousands of patients as opposed to physician intuition. Such tools also help patients and caregivers in optimal decision making, as they estimate the absolute benefits and risks of treatment. In this perspective we describe selected internet sites that are useful across several domains of care, including the potential benefits of different adjuvant regimens for early breast cancer, prognosis after neoadjuvant therapy, prognosis for ductal carcinoma in situ, and toxicity and life expectancy estimates. We review the variables required to use the tools, the results obtained, the methods of validation, and the advantages and disadvantages of each tool.

  16. Parental perspectives on the awareness and delivery of preconception care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, M; Koster, M P H; Franx, A; van Stel, H F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The attention for Preconception Care (PCC) has grown substantially in recent years, yet the implementation of PCC appears challenging as uptake rates remain low. The objective of this study was to assess parental perspectives on how PCC should be provided. METHODS: Recruitment of

  17. Changes in Quality of Health Care Delivery after Vertical Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlin, Caroline S; Dowd, Bryan; Feldman, Roger

    2015-01-01

    ... has examined the impact of integration of hospitals and clinic systems on quality of care, despite theoretical groundwork by Burns and Muller ( ), Gal‐Or ( ), and Trybou, Gemmel, and Annemans ( ). This empirical study analyzed the acquisition of three large, multispecialty clinic systems in the Minneapolis–St. Paul metropolitan area by two hospital‐owned ...

  18. Commentary to Adam Oliver's 'Incentivising improvements in health care delivery'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The commentary discusses key issues for assessment of performance management within health care. It supports the ambition to develop more realistic understandings of performance management based on insights from behavioral economics as suggested by Adam Oliver. However, it also points to several...

  19. Tropical plants in health care delivery in Nigeria: Contributions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method of preparation and administration include infusions, decoctions, maceration and pounding, drying and steam baths. Conclusions: The abundance of species and variety of ailments treated justify further research on the contributions of Compositae in Nigeria. Key words: Tropical plants, Health care, Nigeria.

  20. Pharmaceutical care and home delivery of medication to patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña San José Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the implementation of a new model face to face and remote pharmaceutical care with home delivery of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were selected to start this new model of care. Four characteristics were taken into account for the choice: chronicity of the disease, frequency of doctor visits, pharmaceutical care value and conservation of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines at room temperature. Results: Out of 68 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and treated with tyronsine kinase inhibitors, 42 were selected due to the frequency of their hematologist visits. An introductory letter and a questionnaire about their preferences were sent to these patients.Sixteen of them expressed their desire to participate. The legal department designed a confidentiality contract, as well as a model of informed consent. A logistic distribution model based on defined routes and timetables was established. Prior to inclusion, pharmaceutical care was performed in a face to face consultation and the communication way was established for the followings remote consultations. Home delivery had a monthly cost of 13.2 € (including VAT per patient. All the patients who started this program continue in it. To date, 5 deliveries per patient have been conducted Conclusions: It is possible to establish an alternative model of pharmaceutical care with home delivery of medication, keeping the pharmacist-patient relationship, avoiding travel, ensuring the confidentiality and rationalizing the stocks

  1. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting: Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results Three main categories of experience were identified: 1 The health professionals' management, where a need to optimize was found. 2 Shared care, which was lacking. 3 The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs improvement and attention should be drawn to the "professionalization" of the relatives and the need to strike a balance between their needs, wishes and resources in end-of-life care and bereavement.

  2. Pursuing Normality: Reflections on Cancer Survivorship Care of Lymphoma Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Louise S; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-16

    The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. The aim of this study was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46 semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease." The findings add to our understanding of possible barriers for participation in cancer survivorship care and outline important aspects to account for in the practice of health professionals. The study findings may guide practice to establish a systematic approach for providing information to cancer survivors regarding the possible management of their symptoms and of the content and purpose of cancer survivorship care.

  3. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Sridhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  4. Impact of state nurse practitioner scope-of-practice regulation on health care delivery: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Ye, Zhiqiu; Brewer, Carol; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    One proposed strategy to expand primary care capacity is to use nurse practitioners (NPs) more effectively in health care delivery. However, the ability of NPs to provide care to the fullest extent of their education is moderated by state scope-of-practice (SOP) regulations. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of state SOP regulations on the following three key issues: (a) NP workforce, (b) access to care and health care utilization, and (c) health care costs. Systematic review. States granting NPs greater SOP authority tend to exhibit an increase in the number and growth of NPs, greater care provision by NPs, and expanded health care utilization, especially among rural and vulnerable populations. Our review indicates that expanded NP practice regulation can impact health care delivery by increasing the number of NPs in combination with easing restrictions on their SOP. Findings show promise that removing restrictions on NP SOP regulations could be a viable and effective strategy to increase primary care capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The transplant center and business unit as a model for specialized care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, A Osama; Schwartz, Roberta L; Bernard, David P; Zylicz, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Transplant centers are valuable assets to a transplantation hospital and essential to organize the delivery of patient care. A transplant center defined around physicians and activities of caring for patients with organ failure creates a team better equipped to manage care across the continuum of the diseases treated by transplantation. Through monitoring of clinical and financial outcomes, the transplant center can better respond to the changing regulatory and financial landscape of health care. This article seeks to explain the major organizational challenges facing the transplant center and how a transplant center can best serve its patients and parent organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain-drain and health care delivery in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Misau, Yusuf Abdu; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Gerei, Adamu Bakari

    2010-01-01

    Migration of health workers ‘Brain drain’ is defined as the movement of health personnel in search of a better standard of living and life quality, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide. The debate about migration of health workers from the developing to the developed world has remained pertinent for decades now. Regardless of the push and pull factors, migration of health care workers from developing coun...

  7. Combinatorial delivery of Crizotinib-Palbociclib-Sildenafil using TPGS-PLA micelles for improved cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo-Diogo, Duarte; Gaspar, Vítor M; Costa, Elisabete C; Moreira, André F; Oppolzer, David; Gallardo, Eugénia; Correia, Ilídio J

    2014-11-01

    The co-delivery of multiple chemotherapeutics by micellar delivery systems is a valuable approach to improve cancer treatment since various disease hallmarks can be targeted simultaneously. However, the delivery of multiple drugs requires a nanocarrier structure that can encapsulate various bioactive molecules. In this study, we evaluate the simultaneous encapsulation of a novel triple drug combination in D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-poly(lactic acid) (TPGS-PLA) amphiphilic micelles for cancer therapy. The drug mixture involves two anti-tumoral drugs, Crizotinib and Palbociclib combined with Sildenafil, a compound that is capable of increasing drug accumulation in the intracellular compartment. Such combination aims to achieve an enhanced cytotoxic effect in cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that TPGS-PLA copolymers self-assembled into stable nanosized micelles (158.3nm) capable of co-encapsulating the three drugs with high loading efficiency. Triple drug loaded TPGS-PLA micelles were internalized in A549 non-small lung cancer cells and exhibited an improved cytotoxic effect in comparison with single (Crizotinib) or dual (Crizotinib-Palbociclib) drug loaded micelles, indicating the therapeutic potential of the triple co-delivery strategy. These findings demonstrate that TPGS-PLA micelles are suitable carriers for multiple drug delivery and also that this particular drug combination may have potential to improve cancer treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. THE ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGISTS IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahass, Saeed H.

    2005-01-01

    Advances in the biomedical and the behavioral sciences have paved the way for the integration of medical practice towards the biopsychosocial approach. Therefore, dealing with health and illness overtakes looking for the presence or absence of the disease and infirmity (the biomedical paradigm) to the biopsychosocial paradigm in which health means a state of complete physical, psychological and social well-being. Psychology as a behavioral health discipline is the key to the biopsychosocial practice, and plays a major role in understanding the concept of health and illness. The clinical role of psychologists as health providers is diverse with the varying areas of care giving (primary, secondary and tertiary care) and a variety of subspecialties. Overall, psychologists assess, diagnose, and treat the psychological problems and the behavioral dysfunctions resulting from, or related to physical and mental health. In addition, they play a major role in the promotion of healthy behavior, preventing diseases and improving patients’ quality of life. They perform their clinical roles according to rigorous ethical principles and code of conduct. This article describes and discusses the significant role of clinical health psychology in the provision of health care, following a biopsychosocial perspective of health and illness. Professional and educational issues have also been discussed. PMID:23012077

  9. Association Between the Safe Delivery App and Quality of Care and Perinatal Survival in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Stine; Boas, Ida Marie; Bedesa, Tariku

    2016-01-01

    instructions for management. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was perinatal death. Secondary outcomes included the knowledge and clinical management of neonatal resuscitation (skills) of health care workers before the intervention and after 6 and 12 months. Results: The analysis included 3601......Importance: Health apps in low-income countries are emerging tools with the potential to improve quality of health care services, but few apps undergo rigorous scientific evaluation. Objective: To determine the effects of the safe delivery app (SDA) on perinatal survival and on health care workers......, 3601 women in active labor were included at admission and followed up until 7 days after delivery to record perinatal mortality. Knowledge and skills in neonatal resuscitation were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after the intervention among 176 health care workers at the included...

  10. Determinants of increased primary health care use in cancer survivors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.; Schellevis, F.; Rijken, M.; Hoek, L. van der; Korevaar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The number of cancer survivors is increasing, and patients with cancer often experience long-lasting consequences of cancer and its treatment. Because of the variety of health problems and high prevalence of comorbidity, primary care physicians (PCPs) seem obvious candidates to take care of

  11. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Follow-Up Medical Care Once you’re done with cancer treatment, you ... to this page included, e.g., “Follow-Up Medical Care was originally published by the National Cancer Institute.” ...

  12. Achieving Better Integration in Trauma Care Delivery in India: Insights from a Patient Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Chaudhuri, Atanu; Venkataramanaiah, S

    2018-01-01

    Interdependencies among health care providers result in complex health care supply chains with fragmented health care processes characterized by coordination failure and incentive misalignment. In developing countries where resources are scarce such coordination failures can have potentially severe...... impact on patient health. But, there is limited understanding about how coordination takes place across and within the different health care service providers and how this influence hospital transfer time and length of stay. This article addresses this gap in literature by studying trauma care delivery...... in India using a patient survey (n=104). The Indian healthcare system is particularly interesting as India has to provide low cost care to large populations living in geographically big areas, at the same time when the health care infrastructure is struggling to meet increasing demands. The findings...

  13. Delivery of Services of Day Care Workers In Sta. Maria, Laguna

    OpenAIRE

    ROLANDO R. CRUZADA, JR.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the determination of the delivery of services of day care workers in the municipality of Sta. Maria, Province of Laguna during the first semester of school year 2012-2013. Descriptive research was used in this study. Among the key findings were that Day Care Workers with respect to interactional relationship accomplished the functions with outstanding adequacy such as constantly giving feedback and praises on the performance of children, along with workers and parents co...

  14. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for treatment of oral cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana; Bernegossi, Jéssica; Fonseca-Santos, Bruno; Chorilli, Marlus

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer (oral cavity and oropharynx) is a common and aggressive cancer that invades local tissue, can cause metastasis, and has a high mortality rate. Conventional treatment strategies, such as surgery and chemoradiotherapy, have improved over the past few decades; however, they remain far from optimal. Currently, cancer research is focused on improving cancer diagnosis and treatment methods (oral cavity and oropharynx) nanotechnology, which involves the design, characterization, production, and application of nanoscale drug delivery systems. In medicine, nanotechnologies, such as polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, gold nanoparticles, hydrogels, cyclodextrin complexes, and liquid crystals, are promising tools for diagnostic probes and therapeutic devices. The objective of this study is to present a systematic review of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for oral cancers.

  15. Nanotechnology-based combinational drug delivery: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. In recent years, nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery to tumor tissues has emerged as an effective strategy by overcoming many biological, biophysical and biomedical barriers that the body stages against successful delivery of anticancer drugs. The sustained, controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination approach enhanced therapeutic anticancer effects with reduced drug-associated side effects. In this article, we have reviewed the scope of various nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery approaches and also summarized the current perspective and challenges facing the successful treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A changed climate for mental health care delivery in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cultural and multi-cosmological context for health and mental health care delivery has come to pass. To health administrators, though, the inclusion of traditional healers into the formal public health system and mental health may still prove to be ...

  17. Obstacles to the delivery of primary palliative care as perceived by GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.; Crul, B.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In order to facilitate GPs in their work and increase the possibilities for patients to remain at home, it is important to identify the obstacles which hinder the delivery of primary palliative care. From previous research we learned about some of the problems experienced by GPs. In

  18. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: A case-base approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, G.C.; Does, R.J.M.M.; de Mast, J.; Trip, A.; van den Heuvel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning

  19. Implementation of the Zambia electronic perinatal record system for comprehensive prenatal and delivery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Benjamin H; Vwalika, Bellington; Killam, William P; Wamalume, Chibesa; Giganti, Mark J; Mbewe, Reuben; Stringer, Elizabeth M; Chintu, Namwinga T; Putta, Nande B; Liu, Katherine C; Chibwesha, Carla J; Rouse, Dwight J; Stringer, Jeffrey S A

    2011-05-01

    To characterize prenatal and delivery care in an urban African setting. The Zambia Electronic Perinatal Record System (ZEPRS) was implemented to record demographic characteristics, past medical and obstetric history, prenatal care, and delivery and newborn care for pregnant women across 25 facilities in the Lusaka public health sector. From June 1, 2007, to January 31, 2010, 115552 pregnant women had prenatal and delivery information recorded in ZEPRS. Median gestation age at first prenatal visit was 23weeks (interquartile range [IQR] 19-26). Syphilis screening was documented in 95663 (83%) pregnancies: 2449 (2.6%) women tested positive, of whom 1589 (64.9%) were treated appropriately. 111108 (96%) women agreed to HIV testing, of whom 22% were diagnosed with HIV. Overall, 112813 (98%) of recorded pregnancies resulted in a live birth, and 2739 (2%) in a stillbirth. The median gestational age was 38weeks (IQR 35-40) at delivery; the median birth weight of newborns was 3000g (IQR 2700-3300g). The results demonstrate the feasibility of using a comprehensive electronic medical record in an urban African setting, and highlight its important role in ongoing efforts to improve clinical care. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dutch digital breast cancer screening: implications for breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Johanna M; den Heeten, Gerard J; Adang, Eddy M; Otten, Johannes D; Verbeek, André L; Broeders, Mireille J

    2012-12-01

    In comparison to other European population-based breast cancer screening programmes, the Dutch programme has a low referral rate, similar breast cancer detection and a high breast cancer mortality reduction. The referral rate in the Netherlands has increased over time and is expected to rise further, mainly following nationwide introduction of digital mammography, completed in 2010. This study explores the consequences of the introduction of digital mammography on the balance between referral rate, detection of breast cancer, diagnostic work-up and associated costs. Detailed information on diagnostic work-up (chart review) was obtained from referred women (n = 988) in 2000-06 (100% analogue mammography) and 2007 (75% digital mammography) in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The average referral rate increased from 15 (2000-06) to 34 (2007) per 1000 women screened. The number of breast cancers detected increased from 5.5 to 7.8 per 1000 screens, whereas the positive predictive value fell from 37% to 23%. A sharp rise in diagnostic work-up procedures and total diagnostic costs was seen. On the other hand, costs of a single work-up slightly decreased, as less surgical biopsies were performed. Our study shows that a low referral rate in combination with the introduction of digital mammography affects the balance between referral rate and detection rate and can substantially influence breast cancer care and associated costs. Referral rates in the Netherlands are now more comparable to other countries. This effect is therefore of value in countries where implementation of digital breast cancer screening has just started or is still under discussion.

  1. Individual and Area Level Factors Associated with Prenatal, Delivery, and Postnatal Care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Henna; Hearld, Kristine Ria; Harbison, Hanne

    2015-10-01

    This research examines individual and area level factors associated with maternal health care utilization in Pakistan. The 2012-2013 Pakistan Demographic and Health Surveys data was used to model five outcomes: prenatal care within the first trimester, four plus prenatal visits, birth attendance by a skilled attendant, birth in a medical facility, and receipt of postnatal care. Less than half of births were to mothers receiving prenatal care in the first trimester, and approximately 57 % had trained personnel at delivery. Over half were born to mothers who received postnatal care. Evidence was found to support the positive effect of individual level variables, education and wealth, on the utilization of maternal health care across all five measures. Although, this study did not find unilateral differences between women residing in rural and urban settings, rural women were found to have lower odds of utilizing prenatal services as compared to mothers in urban environments. Additionally, women who cited distance as a barrier, had lower odds of receiving postnatal health care, but still engaged in prenatal services and often had a skilled attendant present at delivery. The odds of utilizing prenatal care increased when women resided in an area where prenatal utilization was high, and this variability was found across measures across provinces. The results found in this paper highlight the uneven progress made around improving prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care in Pakistan; disparities persist which may be attributed to factors both at the individual and community level, but may be addressed through a consorted effort to change national policy around women's health which should include the promotion of evidence based interventions such as incentivizing health care workers, promoting girls' education, and improving transportation options for pregnant women and recent mothers with the intent of ultimately lowering the Maternal Mortality Rate as recommended in the U

  2. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective communication in cancer care between the health care team, cancer patients, and their family is important. Learn about communication skills that support a patient-centered practice and how to talk with adults and children about their diagnosis, prognosis, and transition to end-of-life care in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Protocol for the OUTREACH trial: a randomised trial comparing delivery of cancer systemic therapy in three different settings - patient's home, GP surgery and hospital day unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The national Cancer Reform Strategy recommends delivering care closer to home whenever possible. Cancer drug treatment has traditionally been administered to patients in specialist hospital-based facilities. Technological developments mean that nowadays, most treatment can be delivered in the out-patient setting. Increasing demand, care quality improvements and patient choice have stimulated interest in delivering some treatment to patients in the community, however, formal evaluation of delivering cancer treatment in different community settings is lacking. This randomised trial compares delivery of cancer treatment in the hospital with delivery in two different community settings: the patient's home and general practice (GP surgeries. Methods/design Patients due to receive a minimum 12 week course of standard intravenous cancer treatment at two hospitals in the Anglia Cancer Network are randomised on a 1:1:1 basis to receive treatment in the hospital day unit (control arm, or their own home, or their choice of one of three neighbouring GP surgeries. Overall patient care, treatment prescribing and clinical review is undertaken according to standard local practice. All treatment is dispensed by the local hospital pharmacy and treatment is delivered by the hospital chemotherapy nurses. At four time points during the 12 week study period, information is collected from patients, nursing staff, primary and secondary care teams to address the primary end point, patient-perceived benefits (using the emotional function domain of the EORTC QLQC30 patient questionnaire, as well as secondary end points: patient satisfaction, safety and health economics. Discussion The Outreach trial is the first randomised controlled trial conducted which compares delivery of out-patient based intravenous cancer treatment in two different community settings with standard hospital based treatment. Results of this study may better inform all key

  4. pH-sensitive nano-systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Huang, Yuran; Kumar, Anil; Tan, Aaron; Jin, Shubin; Mozhi, Anbu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been widely used in the development of new strategies for drug delivery and cancer therapy. Compared to traditional drug delivery systems, nano-based drug delivery system have greater potential in a variety of areas, such as multiple targeting functionalization, in vivo imaging, combined drug delivery, extended circulation time, and systemic control release. Nano-systems incorporating stimulus-responsive materials have remarkable properties which allow them to bypass biological barriers and achieve targeted intracellular drug delivery. As a result of the active metabolism of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment (TME) is highly acidic compared to normal tissues. pH-Sensitive nano-systems have now been developed in which drug release is specifically triggered by the acidic tumor environment. Studies have demonstrated that novel pH-sensitive drug delivery systems are capable of improving the efficiency of cancer treatment. A number of these have been translated from bench to clinical application and have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of various cancerous diseases. Herein, this review mainly focuses on pH-sensitive nano-systems, including advances in drug delivery, mechanisms of drug release, and possible improvements in drug absorption, with the emphasis on recent research in this field. With deeper understanding of the difference between normal and tumor tissues, it might be possible to design ever more promising pH-responsive nano-systems for drug delivery and cancer therapy in the near future. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Moving Toward Improved Teamwork in Cancer Care: The Role of Psychological Safety in Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anshu K; Fennell, Mary L; Chagpar, Anees B; Connolly, Hannah K; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2016-11-01

    Effective communication is a requirement in the teamwork necessary for improved coordination to deliver patient-centered, value-based cancer care. Communication is particularly important when care providers are geographically distributed or work across organizations. We review organizational and teams research on communication to highlight psychological safety as a key determinant of high-quality communication within teams. We first present the concept of psychological safety, findings about its communication effects for teamwork, and factors that affect it. We focus on five factors applicable to cancer care delivery: familiarity, clinical hierarchy-related status differences, geographic dispersion, boundary spanning, and leader behavior. To illustrate how these factors facilitate or hinder psychologically safe communication and teamwork in cancer care, we review the case of a patient as she experiences the treatment-planning process for early-stage breast cancer in a community setting. Our analysis is summarized in a key principle: Teamwork in cancer care requires high-quality communication, which depends on psychological safety for all team members, clinicians and patients alike. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of psychological safety in clinical care and suggestions for future research.

  6. Theranostic applications of carbon nanomaterials in cancer: Focus on imaging and cargo delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A; Zhu, Kaicheng; Hong, Hao

    2015-07-28

    Carbon based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention over the past decades due to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art applications of carbon nanomaterials in cancer imaging and drug delivery/therapy. The carbon nanomaterials will be categorized into fullerenes, nanotubes, nanohorns, nanodiamonds, nanodots and graphene derivatives based on their morphologies. The chemical conjugation/functionalization strategies of each category will be introduced before focusing on their applications in cancer imaging (fluorescence/bioluminescence, magnetic resonance (MR), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), photoacoustic, Raman imaging, etc.) and cargo (chemo/gene/therapy) delivery. The advantages and limitations of each category and the potential clinical utilization of these carbon nanomaterials will be discussed. Multifunctional carbon nanoplatforms have the potential to serve as optimal candidates for image-guided delivery vectors for cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Access to Cancer Care and General Medical Care Services Among Cancer Survivors in the United States: An Analysis of 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Janet S; Virgo, Katherine S; Li, Chunyu; Chawla, Neetu; Han, Xuesong; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Ekwueme, Donatus U; McNeel, Timothy S; Rodriguez, Juan L; Yabroff, K Robin

    2016-11-01

    Cancer survivors require appropriate health care to manage their unique health needs. This study describes access to cancer care among cancer survivors in the United States and compares access to general medical care between cancer survivors and people who have no history of cancer. We assessed access to general medical care using the core 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). We assessed access to cancer care using the MEPS Experiences With Cancer Survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to compare access to general medical care among 2 groups of cancer survivors (those who reported having access to all necessary cancer care [n = 1088] and those who did not [n = 70]) with self-reported access to general medical care among people who had no history of cancer (n = 22 434). Of the 1158 cancer survivors, 70 (6.0%) reported that they did not receive all necessary cancer care. Adjusted analyses found that cancer survivors who reported not receiving all necessary cancer care were also less likely to report receiving general medical care (78.0%) than cancer survivors who reported having access to necessary cancer care (87.1%) and people who had no history of cancer (87.8%). This study provides nationally representative data on the proportion of cancer survivors who have access to necessary cancer care and yields insight into factors that impede survivors' access to both cancer care and general medical care. This study is a reference for future work on access to care.

  8. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  9. Lung cancer patterns of care in south western Sydney, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Vinod, S; Delaney, G; Bauman, A; Barton, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in New South Wales (NSW). There is a significantly higher incidence of lung cancer in the South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS) than the NSW average. The aim of this study was to document patterns of lung cancer care for SWSAHS residents.

  10. Enhancing Health Care Delivery through Ambient Intelligence Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine Stephanidis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of a smart environment that employs Ambient Intelligence technologies in order to augment a typical hospital room with smart features that assist both patients and medical staff. In this environment various wireless and wired sensor technologies have been integrated, allowing the patient to control the environment and interact with the hospital facilities, while a clinically oriented interface allows for vital sign monitoring. The developed applications are presented both from a patient’s and a doctor’s perspective, offering different services depending on the user’s role. The results of the evaluation process illustrate the need for such a service, leading to important conclusions about the usefulness and crucial role of AmI in health care.

  11. Enhancing Health Care Delivery through Ambient Intelligence Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartakis, Sokratis; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Tourlakis, Panagiotis; Zacharioudakis, Georgios; Stephanidis, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of a smart environment that employs Ambient Intelligence technologies in order to augment a typical hospital room with smart features that assist both patients and medical staff. In this environment various wireless and wired sensor technologies have been integrated, allowing the patient to control the environment and interact with the hospital facilities, while a clinically oriented interface allows for vital sign monitoring. The developed applications are presented both from a patient's and a doctor's perspective, offering different services depending on the user's role. The results of the evaluation process illustrate the need for such a service, leading to important conclusions about the usefulness and crucial role of AmI in health care. PMID:23112664

  12. Delivery of nursing care in Alabama public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Allison J

    2009-02-01

    Many states, including Alabama, allow registered nurses (RNs) in school settings to delegate procedures such as assistance with medication to unlicensed assistive personnel. In Alabama, the Board of Nursing(the Board) is accountable for enforcing the regulations that allow for this action. The Alabama Board of Nursing Administrative Code addresses delegation by school nurses and lists specific tasks that cannot be delegated because they require nursing judgment. As a result of this reporting requirement, Alabama's Center for Nursing, a division of the Board of Nursing, implemented an annual survey of school nurses to determine how nursing care is delivered to students in Alabama public schools. This study investigates the results of this survey and its implications for school nursing both in Alabama and in other states.

  13. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Pilot Randomized Trial of Active Music Engagement Intervention Parent Delivery for Young Children With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sheri L; Haase, Joan E; Perkins, Susan M; Haut, Paul R; Henley, Amanda K; Knafl, Kathleen A; Tong, Yan

    2017-03-01

    To examine the feasibility/acceptability of a parent-delivered Active Music Engagement (AME + P) intervention for young children with cancer and their parents. Secondary aim to explore changes in AME + P child emotional distress (facial affect) and parent emotional distress (mood; traumatic stress symptoms) relative to controls. A pilot two-group randomized trial was conducted with parents/children (ages 3-8 years) receiving AME + P ( n  =  9) or attention control ( n  =  7). Feasibility of parent delivery was assessed using a delivery checklist and child engagement; acceptability through parent interviews; preliminary outcomes at baseline, postintervention, 30 days postintervention. Parent delivery was feasible, as they successfully delivered AME activities, but interviews indicated parent delivery was not acceptable to parents. Emotional distress was lower for AME + P children, but parents derived no benefit. Despite child benefit, findings do not support parent delivery of AME + P.

  15. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...... countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  16. Quality of care: Distress, health care use and needs of women with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lo-Fo-Wong, D.N.N.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to: (1) examine enduring distress and its predictors in women with breast cancer; (2) determine the extent to which distress-related problems are portrayed in a graphic novel about breast cancer; (3) examine health care use and additional needs (with regard to medical, paramedical, psychosocial, supplementary, CAM, and dental care services), and predictors of health care use in women with breast cancer; and (4) examine predictors of unmet care needs of women with ...

  17. Women's perception of prenatal and delivery care in cases of neonatal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Munhoz Gaíva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze women's perception of care in prenatal and delivery care in cases of neonatal death. Method: A qualitative study was carried out with women whose children died in the neonatal period. Data were collected through open-ended interviews and analyzed according to the thematic analysis technique. Results: The professional-patient relationship in which there is dialogue is associated with good prenatal experience for women. Guidelines and information about health are seen as a positive aspect to achieve quality of care. The difficulty of access to exams and the lack of preparation of women for childbirth appear as negative aspects for care. Conclusions: Negative health care factors are reflected in a biographical way on these women. Implications for practice: Include results that can serve as a warning for professionals who provide care for pregnant and parturient women.

  18. Primary care providers as partners in long-term follow-up of pediatric cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Lillian R; Edwards, Paula J; Cherven, Brooke O; Palgon, Michael; Espinoza, Sofia; Hassen-Schilling, Leann; Mertens, Ann C

    2012-09-01

    To develop a model of shared healthcare delivery that includes primary care providers (PCP) and ensures best practice in follow-up of pediatric cancer survivors. Structured interviews with healthcare professionals (HCPs) were used to ascertain familiarity and confidence in providing care to survivors. Partnerships were made with HCP societies, and survivor care lectures were given at HCP meetings. HCP's preferences for ongoing continuing education (CE) opportunities were ascertained. Cancer SurvivorLink(TM), a web-based tool, was developed to allow patients to securely store their healthcare documents and share them electronically with registered HCPs. Educational material developed for Cancer SurvivorLink(TM) includes CE modules and QuickFacts--concise summaries of late effects. Website utilization was monitored utilizing Google Analytics. HCPs described moderate to very low familiarity with survivor care, but high interest in online CE learning. Thirty-one lectures were given to HCP groups to increase awareness. Preferred types of ongoing CE were: lectures, online text, and video modules. CE material was developed based on feedback from HCPs and website utilizations and includes 19 QuickFacts and 5 CE modules. During the first year, the website had 471 unique visitors and 1,129 total visits. QuickFacts received 345 views with Neurocognitive, Survivor Care 101, and Endocrine being most visited, and 49 CME modules have been completed. PCPs are interested in partnering in models of shared care for pediatric cancer survivors. Effective educational initiatives include lectures within HCP's professional education constructs and web-based CE opportunities. PCP involvement in survivor care alleviates some barriers to care such as geographic distance to the the cancer center and ensures that more pediatric cancer survivors receive recommended coordinated surveillance for late effects of cancer therapy.

  19. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  20. Quality audit--a review of the literature concerning delivery of continence care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaffield, J

    1995-09-01

    This paper outlines the role of quality audit within the framework of quality assurance, presenting the concurrent and retrospective approaches available. The literature survey provides a review of the limited audit tools available and their application to continence services and care delivery, as well as attempts to produce tools from national and local standard setting. Audit is part of a process; it can involve staff, patients and their relatives and the team of professionals providing care, as well as focusing on organizational and management levels. In an era of market delivery of services there is a need to justify why audit is important to continence advisors and managers. Effectiveness, efficiency and economics may drive the National Health Service, but quality assurance, which includes standards and audit tools, offers the means to ensure the quality of continence services and care to patients and auditing is also required in the purchaser/provider contracts for patient services. An overview and progress to date of published and other a projects in auditing continence care and service is presented. By outlining and highlighting the audit of continence service delivery and care as a basis on which to build quality assurance programmes, it is hoped that this knowledge will be shared through the setting up of a central auditing clearing project.

  1. Chiropractor perceptions and practices regarding interprofessional service delivery in the Danish primary care context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Fogh-Schultz, Anders Lyck

    2014-01-01

    For the past 20 years, chiropractors have enjoyed access to the Danish health care system and have been free to build integrated health care delivery partnerships. An electronic survey of chiropractic clinics around Denmark was conducted in order to observe interprofessional practice trends. From...... the available population of 252 practices, 166 responses were received. Ninety-six percent of respondents considered inter-disciplinary/interprofessional practice to be either "very" or "extremely" important in the context of modern Danish health care. Three occupational groups appear to be commonly involved...... in practice alongside chiropractors, these being massage therapists (82%), physiotherapists (58%) and acupuncturists (37%). Interestingly only 11% considered a medical practitioner to be an active participant in their current interprofessional service delivery. Danish chiropractors consider interprofessional...

  2. Successful interviewing and selection strategies for patient-centered care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, D; Miller, B; Hobbs, M; Gentzsch, P; Pierson, C

    1995-03-01

    St. Jude Medical Center, a Sisters of St. Joseph Health System Corporation in Fullerton California, in their efforts at work redesign, realized that the success of a patient-centered care delivery system largely depended upon successful selection of the most suitable team members. The interviewing and selection process used at St. Jude Medical Center includes a structured interview process with integration of both situational and behavioral styles in conjunction with objective rating scales and values driven questions. A common thread woven into the hiring criteria for all levels of personnel in the patient-centered care delivery model was creativity, adaptability, interpersonal skills and compatibility of values. Additionally, the clinical competence of the caregiver within the scope of practice/responsibility was essential for their expanded role. Management and leadership abilities for the managers are also addressed in the interview and selection process to provide the best team members for the overall success of the patient-care redesign.

  3. Disruptive innovation in health care delivery: a framework for business-model innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jason; Christensen, Clayton M

    2008-01-01

    Disruptive innovation has brought affordability and convenience to customers in a variety of industries. However, health care remains expensive and inaccessible to many because of the lack of business-model innovation. This paper explains the theory of disruptive innovation and describes how disruptive technologies must be matched with innovative business models. The authors present a framework for categorizing and developing business models in health care, followed by a discussion of some of the reasons why disruptive innovation in health care delivery has been slow.

  4. Learning to Learn: towards a Relational and Transformational Model of Learning for Improved Integrated Care Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Diamond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Health and social care systems are implementing fundamental changes to organizational structures and work practices in an effort to achieve integrated care. While some integration initiatives have produced positive outcomes, many have not. We reframe the concept of integration as a learning process fueled by knowledge exchange across diverse professional and organizational communities. We thus focus on the cognitive and social dynamics of learning in complex adaptive systems, and on learning behaviours and conditions that foster collective learning and improved collaboration. We suggest that the capacity to learn how to learn shapes the extent to which diverse professional groups effectively exchange knowledge and self-organize for integrated care delivery.

  5. Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0540 TITLE: Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nina Bickell CONTRACTING...11-1-0540 Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC101939 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...the quality of prostate cancer care delivered may be contributing to the racial disparity in mortality. While it is clear that physician

  6. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  7. Drug delivery strategies for chemoprevention of UVB-induced skin cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagde, Arvind; Mondal, Arindam; Singh, Mandip

    2018-01-01

    Annually, more skin cancer cases are diagnosed than the collective incidence of the colon, lung, breast, and prostate cancer. Persistent contact with sunlight is a primary cause for all the skin malignancies. UVB radiation induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the skin which eventually leads to DNA damage and mutation. Various delivery approaches for the skin cancer treatment/prevention have been evolving and are directed toward improvements in terms of delivery modes, therapeutic agents, and site-specificity of therapeutics delivery. The effective chemoprevention activity achieved is based on the efficiency of the delivery system used and the amount of the therapeutic molecule deposited in the skin. In this article, we have discussed different studies performed specifically for the chemoprevention of UVB-induced skin cancer. Ultra-flexible nanocarriers, transethosomes nanocarriers, silica nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles, nanocapsule suspensions, microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and polymeric nanoparticles which have been used so far to deliver the desired drug molecule for preventing the UVB-induced skin cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Liposomes and inorganic nanoparticles for drug delivery and cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneweer, Carola; Gendy, Samuel E M; Peñate-Medina, Oula

    2012-05-01

    Recently, there have been several advancements in material sciences and nanosciences. At the moment these new techniques are slowly entering into clinical settings in drug delivery and imaging. In this review, we will look more closely at the applications that are at the forefront of this translation and examine critical aspects that are involved in the process. Nanoparticles have been increasingly used in clinical settings for drug delivery over the past two decades. Lipid-based nanoparticles are front-runners, but other innovative strategies, such as small inorganic nanoparticles, are entering into the field, particularly for imaging applications. Lipid-based nanoparticles can be metabolized and consumed by the body and are regarded as safe for clinical use. They are usually large with hydrodynamic diameters of approximately 100-200 nm; however, phospholipid-containing particles such as microbubbles with diameters as low as 10 microm in size and micelles with diameters of 10-40 nm can also be used. Hollow liposomes with a large aqueous inner cavity can carry high payloads of drugs and imaging moieties, but are easily trapped by liver kupffer cells and can result in lower tissue penetration rates. New classes of particles with hydrodynamic diameters of < 10 nm, which are cleared by the kidneys, have recently been developed. These particles have been used primarily for imaging applications since they offer only small loading capacities for drugs. However, new strategies such as surface-coupled prodrugs have been developed to facilitate drug delivery in small nanoparticles. We describe different strategies for targeted delivery, imaging and controlled release, and discuss the ability of small inorganic particles as well as larger nanoparticles to be used broadly in human diagnostics and drug delivery.

  9. Emerging Trends in Cancer Care: Health Plans’ and Pharmacy Benefit Managers’ Perspectives on Changing Care Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenapple, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    covered under the specialty tier by 59% of the plans. The use of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network practice guidelines for coverage and reimbursement of oncologic agents is reported as “very frequent” by 10% of survey respondents, “frequent” by 21%, and “moderately frequent” by 7%. Most (66%) respondents believe that it is probable and 3% believe it is highly probable that healthcare reform will help to control oncology treatment costs, although 59% also predict an increase in utilization restrictions and 48% predict more stringent comparative effectiveness evidence requirements. The survey reveals a considerable uncertainty among health plans and PBMs about the eventual impact of ACOs on oncology care. Although 82% of those surveyed believe that measures such as increasing adherence to evidence-based treatments will achieve cost-savings, nearly half (48%) had no plans to use such measures. Conclusions Recent trends in healthcare legislation, rising drug costs, and changing reimbursement practices are poised to significantly alter conventional models of cancer care delivery and payment. The results of this survey indicate that health plans and PBMs anticipate greater use of evidence-based management strategies, including CER, quality initiatives, and biomarker testing for appropriate cancer therapy selection. In addition, they anticipate greater focus on cost control, with a greater role for utilization management and increased patient cost-sharing. Finally, there is a high level of uncertainty among plans and PBMs about the eventual impact of ACOs and other aspects of healthcare reform on oncology practice. PMID:24991323

  10. The nursing organization and the transformation of health care delivery for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, M J

    1998-01-01

    Market transformations occurring within the health care industry require new patterns of organization and management to meet the increasing complexity of service delivery. A greater understanding of the innovation and entrepreneurial dynamic allows administrators, managers, and leaders to create a new vision of service delivery. Central management and leadership objectives include the development of service technologies that capitalize upon the inherent knowledge of workers to meet consumer needs. A strong sense of innovation and entrepreneurship leading to the introduction of new or improved nursing technologies is a primary component in the evolution of professional nursing practice for the 21st century.

  11. Nanomaterials for targeted drug delivery to cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orza, Anamaria; Casciano, Daniel; Biris, Alexandru

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in cancer biology have identified the existence of a sub-poplulation of cells - cancer stem cells (CSC) that are resistant to most traditional therapies (e.g. chemotherapy and radiotherapy) and have the ability to repair their damaged DNA. These findings have necessitated a break with traditional oncology management and encouraged new perspectives concerning cancer treatment. Understanding the functional biology of CSCs - especially the signaling pathways that are involved in their self-renewal mechanisms - is crucial for discovering new forms of treatment. In this review, we highlight current and future prospects for potential cancer therapies based on the use of nano-sized materials. Nanomaterials could revolutionize cancer management because of their distinctive features - unique surface chemistry, strong electronic, optic, and magnetic properties - that are found neither in bulk materials nor in single molecules. Based on these distinct properties, we believe that nanomaterials could be excellent candidates for use in CSC research in order to optimize cancer therapeutics. Moreover, we propose these nanomaterials for the inhibition of the self-renewal pathways of CSCs by focusing on the Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt/β-catenin self-renewal mechanisms. By introducing these methods for the detection, targeting, and destruction of CSCs, an efficient alternative treatment for the incurable disease of cancer could be provided.

  12. Operationalising emergency care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: consensus-based recommendations for healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Emilie J B; Tenner, Andrea G; Broccoli, Morgan C; Skog, Alexander P; Muck, Andrew E; Tupesis, Janis P; Brysiewicz, Petra; Teklu, Sisay; Wallis, Lee; Reynolds, Teri

    2016-08-01

    A major barrier to successful integration of acute care into health systems is the lack of consensus on the essential components of emergency care within resource-limited environments. The 2013 African Federation of Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference was convened to address the growing need for practical solutions to further implementation of emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa. Over 40 participants from 15 countries participated in the working group that focused on emergency care delivery at health facilities. Using the well-established approach developed in the WHO's Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care, the workgroup identified the essential services delivered-signal functions-associated with each emergency care sentinel condition. Levels of emergency care were assigned based on the expected capacity of the facility to perform signal functions, and the necessary human, equipment and infrastructure resources identified. These consensus-based recommendations provide the foundation for objective facility capacity assessment in developing emergency health systems that can bolster strategic planning as well as facilitate monitoring and evaluation of service delivery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Models in the delivery of depression care: A systematic review of randomised and controlled intervention trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clack Dannielle

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is still debate as to which features, types or components of primary care interventions are associated with improved depression outcomes. Previous reviews have focused on components of collaborative care models in general practice settings. This paper aims to determine the effective components of depression care in primary care through a systematic examination of both general practice and community based intervention trials. Methods Fifty five randomised and controlled research trials which focused on adults and contained depression outcome measures were identified through PubMed, PsycInfo and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Trials were classified according to the components involved in the delivery of treatment, the type of treatment, the primary focus or setting of the study, detailed features of delivery, and the discipline of the professional providing the treatment. The primary outcome measure was significant improvement on the key depression measure. Results Components which were found to significantly predict improvement were the revision of professional roles, the provision of a case manager who provided direct feedback and delivered a psychological therapy, and an intervention that incorporated patient preferences into care. Nurse, psychologist and psychiatrist delivered care were effective, but pharmacist delivery was not. Training directed to general practitioners was significantly less successful than interventions that did not have training as the most important intervention. Community interventions were effective. Conclusion Case management is important in the provision of care in general practice. Certain community models of care (education programs have potential while others are not successful in their current form (pharmacist monitoring.

  14. PLGA-Chitosan nanoparticle-mediated gene delivery for oral cancer treatment: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, L. M.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Doolaanea, A. A.; Ichwan, S. J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer becomes a serious issue on society with increasing of their growth and proliferation, either in well economic developed countries or not. Recent years, oral cancer is one of the most threatening diseases impairing the quality of life of the patient. Scientists have emphasised on application of gene therapy for oral cancer by using nanoparticle as transportation vectors as a new alternative platform in order to overcome the limitations of conventional approaches. In modern medicine, nanotechnologies’ application, such as nanoparticles-mediated gene delivery, is one of promising tool for therapeutic devices. The objective of this article is to present a brief review summarizes on the current progress of nanotechnology-based gene delivery treatment system targeted for oral cancer.

  15. Nuclear-Shell Biopolymers Initiated by Telomere Elongation for Individual Cancer Cell Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuting; Zhu, Mengting; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-04-04

    Here, we propose a strategy for unique nuclear-shell biopolymers initiated by telomere elongation for telomerase activity detection and precise drug delivery to individual cancer cells. Telomerase-triggered DNA rolling-circle amplification (RCA) is used to assemble nuclear-shell biopolymers with signal molecules for selective cancer cell recognition and efficient drug delivery to targeted individual cells. This strategy not only should allow the creation of clustered 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-fluorescence spots in response to human-telomerase activity in individual cancer cells but also could efficiently deliver drugs to reduce the undesired death of healthy cells. These findings offer new opportunities to improve the efficacy of cancer cell imaging and therapy.

  16. Facility Delivery, Postnatal Care and Neonatal Deaths in India: Nationally-Representative Case-Control Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Shaza A.; Ram, Usha; Morris, Shaun K.; Begum, Rehana; Shet, Anita; Jotkar, Raju; Jha, Prabhat

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies demonstrate the efficacy of interventions to reduce neonatal deaths, but there are fewer studies of their real-life effectiveness. In India, women often seek facility delivery after complications arise, rather than to avoid complications. Our objective was to quantify the association of facility delivery and postnatal checkups with neonatal mortality while examining the “reverse causality” in which the mothers deliver at a health facility due to adverse perinatal events. Methods We conducted nationally representative case-control studies of about 300,000 live births and 4,000 neonatal deaths to examine the effect of, place of delivery and postnatal checkup on neonatal mortality. We compared neonatal deaths to all live births and to a subset of live births reporting excessive bleeding or obstructed labour that were more comparable to cases in seeking care. Findings In the larger study of 2004–8 births, facility delivery without postnatal checkup was associated with an increased odds of neonatal death (Odds ratio = 2.5; 99% CI 2.2–2.9), especially for early versus late neonatal deaths. However, use of more comparable controls showed marked attenuation (Odds ratio = 0.5; 0.4–0.5). Facility delivery with postnatal checkup was associated with reduced odds of neonatal death. Excess risks were attenuated in the earlier study of 2001–4 births. Conclusion The combined effect of facility deliveries with postnatal checks ups is substantially higher than just facility delivery alone. Evaluation of the real-life effectiveness of interventions to reduce child and maternal deaths need to consider reverse causality. If these associations are causal, facility delivery with postnatal check up could avoid about 1/3 of all neonatal deaths in India (~100,000/year). PMID:26479476

  17. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  18. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential patterns

  19. Trajectories of personal control in cancer patients receiving psychological care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Lei; Schroevers, Maya J.; van der Lee, Marije; Garssen, Bert; Stewart, Roy E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Objective: This study aimed to (1) identify subgroups of cancer patients with distinct personal control trajectories during psychological care, (2) examine whether socio-demographic, clinical, and psychological care characteristics could distinguish trajectories, and (3) examine differential

  20. Information technology-enabled team-based, patient-centered care: The example of depression screening and management in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Gurvaneet S; Ahern, David K; Hesse, Bradford W

    2017-03-01

    The existing healthcare delivery systems across the world need to be redesigned to ensure high-quality care is delivered to all patients. This redesign needs to ensure care is knowledge-based, patient-centered and systems-minded. The rapid advances in the capabilities of information and communication technology and its recent rapid adoption in healthcare delivery have ensured this technology will play a vital role in the redesign of the healthcare delivery system. This commentary highlights promising new developments in health information technology (IT) that can support patient engagement and self-management as well as team-based, patient-centered care. Collaborative care is an effective approach to screen and treat depression in cancer patients and it is a good example of the benefits of team-based and patient-centered care. However, this approach was developed prior to the widespread adoption and use of health IT. We provide examples to illustrate how health IT can improve prevention and treatment of depression in cancer patients. We found several knowledge gaps that limit our ability to realize the full potential of health IT in the context of cancer and comorbid depression care. These gaps need to be filled to improve patient engagement; enhance the reach and effectiveness of collaborative care and web-based programs to prevent and treat depression in cancer patients. We also identify knowledge gaps in health IT design and implementation. Filling these gaps will help shape policies that enable clinical teams to deliver high-quality cancer care globally.

  1. From Cancer Screening to Treatment: Service Delivery and Referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W.; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D.; Royalty, Janet E.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. PMID:25099897

  2. Research collaboration in the discovery, development, and delivery networks of a statewide cancer coalition

    OpenAIRE

    Provan, Keith G; Leischow, Scott J.; Keagy, Judith; Nodora, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    This study examines and evaluates collaborative network involvement among 18 organizations within the Arizona Cancer Coalition. All were involved in one or more of three types of research activity: discovery, development, and delivery, consistent with the 3D continuum developed by the National Cancer Institute. Data were collected in 2007 using surveys of key informants in each organization. Using network analysis methods, we examined the structure of each type of network as well as the relat...

  3. Spiritual care by nurses in curative cancer care: Protocol for a national, multicentre, mixed method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Marieke; Ebenau, Anne F.; Koning, Helen; Visser, Anja; Leget, Carlo; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Leeuwen, René; Ruben, Riet; Wulp, Marijke; Garssen, Bert

    2017-01-01

    To gain insight into the quantity and quality of spiritual care provided by nurses in curative cancer care, from the perspectives of both patients and nurses. Cancer causes patients to suffer from diverse symptoms related to their illness. Nurses play an important role in the care for people with

  4. Spiritual care by nurses in curative cancer care : Protocol for a national, multicentre, mixed method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Marieke; Ebenau, Anne F; Koning, Helen; Visser, Anja; Leget, Carlo; Van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Van Leeuwen, René; Ruben, Riet; Wulp, Marijke; Garssen, Bert

    Aim: To gain insight into the quantity and quality of spiritual care provided by nurses in curative cancer care, from the perspectives of both patients and nurses. Background: Cancer causes patients to suffer from diverse symptoms related to their illness. Nurses play an important role in the care

  5. US Health Care Reform and Transplantation, Part II: impact on the public sector and novel health care delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, D A; Millman, D; Abecassis, M M

    2010-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed in 2010 will result in dramatic expansion of publically funded health insurance coverage for low-income individuals. It is estimated that of the 32 million newly insured, 16 million will obtain coverage through expansion of the Medicaid Program, and the remaining 16 million will purchase coverage through their employer or newly legislated insurance exchanges. While the Act contains numerous provisions to improve access to private insurance as discussed in Part I of this analysis, public sector coverage will significantly be affected. The cost of health care reform will be borne disproportionately by Medicare, which faces nearly $500 billion in cuts to be identified by a new independent board. Transplant centers should be concerned about the impact of the reform on the financial aspects of transplantation. In addition, this legislation also utilizes the Medicare Program to drive reform of the health care delivery system, by encouraging the development of integrated Accountable Care Organizations, experimentation with new 'models' of healthcare delivery, and expanded support for Comparative Effectiveness Research. Transplant providers, including transplant centers and physicians/surgeons need to lead this movement, drawing on our experience providing comprehensive multidisciplinary care under global budgets with publically reported outcomes.

  6. 205_WS: Improving the Delivery of Primary Care Through Risk Stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinder, Karen; Kristensen, Troels; Abrams, Chad

    Objectives The aim of this workshop is to provide an insight into how information gained through applications of risk stratification in the primary health care sector, from integrated care networks to primary care clinics and finally at the individual clinician level can improve the delivery...... of primary care. Background As has been demonstrated in both public and private healthcare systems around the globe, risk stratification contributes to improved clinical management of populations. This includes the ability to: – Predict high-risk individuals for inclusion in population health management....... Content The workshop will open with an introductory presentation on the numerous applications of risk stratification within the integrated and primary care sectors. The workshop will then focus on individual sessions based on three applications: – Case Management. – Improving Coordination...

  7. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  8. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer survivorship: implications for improving quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2013-08-01

    Primary care providers often care for men with prostate cancer due to its prolonged clinical course and an increasing number of survivors. However, their attitudes and care patterns are inadequately studied. In this context, we surveyed primary care providers regarding the scope of their prostate cancer survivorship care. The 2006 Early Detection and Screening for Prostate Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice Survey conducted by the Michigan Public Health Institute investigated the beliefs and practice patterns of primary care providers in Michigan. We evaluated responses from 902 primary care providers regarding the timing and content of their prostate cancer survivorship care and relationships with specialty care. Two-thirds (67.6%) of providers cared for men during and after prostate cancer treatment. Providers routinely inquired about incontinence, impotence and bowel problems (83.3%), with a few (14.2%) using surveys to measure symptoms. However, only a minority felt 'very comfortable' managing the side effects of prostate cancer treatment. Clear plans (76.1%) and details regarding management of treatment complications (65.2%) from treating specialists were suboptimal. Nearly one-half (45.1%) of providers felt it was equally appropriate for them and treating specialists to provide prostate cancer survivorship care. Primary care providers reported that prostate cancer survivorship care is prevalent in their practice, yet few felt very comfortable managing side effects of prostate cancer treatment. To improve quality of care, implementing prostate cancer survivorship care plans across specialties, or transferring primary responsibility to primary care providers through survivorship guidelines, should be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Technology to Improve Cancer Care: Social Media, Wearables, and Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Michael J; Chung, Arlene E; Accordino, Melissa K

    2016-01-01

    Digital engagement has become pervasive in the delivery of cancer care. Internet- and cellular phone-based tools and systems are allowing large groups of people to engage with each other and share information. Health systems and individual health professionals are adapting to this revolution in consumer and patient behavior by developing ways to incorporate the benefits of technology for the purpose of improving the quality of medical care. One example is the use of social media platforms by oncologists to foster interaction with each other and to participate with the lay public in dialogue about science, medicine, and cancer care. In addition, consumer devices and sensors (wearables) have provided a new, growing dimension of digital engagement and another layer of patient-generated health data to foster better care and research. Finally, electronic health records have become the new standard for oncology care delivery, bringing new opportunities to measure quality in real time and follow practice patterns, as well as new challenges as providers and patients seek ways to integrate this technology along with other forms of digital engagement to produce more satisfaction in the process of care along with measurably better outcomes.

  10. Cancer screening delivery in persistent poverty rural counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kevin J; Pumkam, Chaiporn; Bellinger, Jessica D; Probst, Janice C

    2011-10-01

    Rural populations are diagnosed with cancer at different rate and stages than nonrural populations, and race/ethnicity as well as the area-level income exacerbates the differences. The purpose of this analysis was to explore cancer screening rates across persistent poverty rural counties, with emphasis on nonwhite populations. The 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was used, combined with data from the Area Resource File (analytic n = 309 937 unweighted, 196 344 347 weighted). Unadjusted analysis estimated screening rates for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer. Multivariate analysis estimated the odds of screening, controlling for individual and county-level effects. Rural residents, particularly those in persistent poverty counties, were less likely to be screened than urban residents. More African Americans in persistent poverty rural counties reported not having mammography screening (18.3%) compared to 15.9% of urban African Americans. Hispanics had low screening rates across all service types. Multivariate analysis continued to find disparities in screening rates, after controlling for individual and county-level factors. African Americans in persistent poverty rural counties were more likely to be screened for both breast cancer (odds ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.85) and cervical cancer (1.46; 1.07-1.99) when compared with urban whites. Disparities in cancer screening rates exist across not only race/ethnicity but also county type. These disparities cannot be fully explained by either individual or county-level effects. Programs have been successful in improving screening rates for African American women and should be expanded to target other vulnerable women as well as other services such as colorectal cancer screening.

  11. SUPPORTIVE SUPERVISION AS A TECHNOLOGY OF IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF HOSPITAL CARE DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Mukhortova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of medical care is a priority in countries with developed and developing health care system. There are various approaches to improve the quality and safety of patient’s care, as well as various strategies to encourage hospitals to achieve this goal. The purpose of the presented literature review was to analyze existing experience of the implementation of technology of supportive supervision in health care facilities to improve the quality of hospital care delivery. The data sources for publication were obtained from the following medical databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medscape, e-library, and books on the topic of the review written by experts. The article discusses the results of the research studies demonstrating the successes and failures of supportive supervision technology application. Implementation of supportive supervision in medical facilities based on generalized experience of different countries is a promising direction in improving the quality of medical care delivery. This technology opens up opportunities to improve skills and work quality of the staff at pediatric hospitals in the Russian Federation.

  12. Service quality of delivered care from the perception of women with caesarean section and normal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar S; Askari, Samira; Fardiazar, Zahra; Koshavar, Hossein; Gholipour, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 - (Importance × Performance) based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women's perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. "Confidentiality", "autonomy", "choice of care provider" and "communication" achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and "support group", "prompt attention", "prevention and early detection", "continuity of care", "dignity", "safety", "accessibility and "basic amenities" got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008). A notable gap between the participants‟ expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care.

  13. An overview of drug delivery vehicles for cancer treatment: Nanocarriers and nanoparticles including photovoltaic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Silvia; Yusof, Faridah; Salim, Wan Wardatul Amani Wan; Sulaiman, Nadzril; Faruck, Mohammad Omer

    2016-11-01

    Cancer is a complicated disease for which finding a cure presents challenges. In recent decades, new ways to treat cancer are being sought; one being nanomedicine, which manipulates nanoparticles to target a cancer and release drugs directly to the cancer cells. A number of cancer treatments based on nanomedicine are under way and mostly are in preclinical trials owing to challenges in administration, safety, and effectiveness. One alternative method for drug delivery is the use of photovoltaic nanoparticles, which has the potential to deliver drugs via light activation. The concepts are based on standard photovoltaic cell that holds opposite charges on its surfaces and releases drugs when charge intensity or polarity changes upon photo-stimulation such as from a laser source or sunlight. This review will cover some recent progress in cancer treatment using nanoparticles, including photovoltaic nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The State of Essential Newborn Care by Delivery Location in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunsoo Timothy; Singh, Kavita

    2017-11-01

    Introduction Essential newborn care (ENC) around the time of birth is critical in improving neonatal survival. There is currently a gap in our knowledge of the use of ENC by place of delivery in Bangladesh. This study assesses the provision of ENC and examines the odds of newborns receiving ENC by different levels of delivery care in Bangladesh. Methods Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were performed on ENC practices from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey dataset. ENC practices included nonapplication of substances to the cord; application of antiseptic to the cord; drying newborn within 5 min; wrapping newborn within 5 min; delaying first bath until the first 72 h; and breastfeeding within 1 h. Key predictors included home delivery with a lay attendant, delivery with primary healthcare services and delivery with higher-level healthcare services. Results Coverage of ENC practices was low. Women who delivered with primary and higher-level healthcare services generally reported greater odds of their newborns receiving recommended ENC than women who had home delivery with a lay attendant, the referent category. However, the odds of delayed first bath until 72 h and breastfeeding within 1 h were not statistically different for newborns who were delivered with primary healthcare services. Discussion These findings have significant public health implications as primary healthcare facilities are the first point of entry into the healthcare system. Provision of ENC, particularly delayed first bath until 72 h and breastfeeding within 1 h, should be encouraged for all healthy mother-newborn pairs in Bangladesh.

  15. Improving chronic care delivery and outcomes: the impact of the cystic fibrosis Care Center Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogayzel, Peter J; Dunitz, Jordan; Marrow, Laura C; Hazle, Leslie A

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem, life-shortening genetic disease that requires complex care. To facilitate this expert, multidisciplinary care, the CF Foundation established a Care Center Network and accredited the first care centres in 1961. This model of care brings together physicians and specialists from other disciplines to provide care, facilitate basic and clinical research, and educate the next generation of providers. Although the Care Center Network has been invaluable in achieving substantial gains in survival and quality of life, additional opportunities for improvements in CF care exist. In 1999, analysis of data from the CF Foundation's Patient Registry detected variation in care practices and outcomes across centres, identifying opportunities for improvement. In 2002, the CF Foundation launched a comprehensive quality improvement (QI) initiative to enhance care by assembling national experts to develop a strategic plan to disseminate QI training and processes throughout the Care Center Network. The QI strategies included developing leadership (nationally and within each care centre), identifying best CF care practices, and incorporating people with CF and their families into improvement efforts. The goal was to improve the care for every person with CF in the USA. Multiple tactics were undertaken to implement the strategic plan and disseminate QI training and tools throughout the Care Center Network. In addition, strategies to foster collaboration between care centre staff and individuals with CF and their families became a cornerstone of QI efforts. Today it is clear that the application of QI principles within the CF Care Center Network has improved adherence to clinical guidelines and achievement of important health outcomes.

  16. Targeted chimera delivery to ovarian cancer cells by heterogeneous gold magnetic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Xu, Mengjiao; Guo, Yi; Tu, Keyao; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Jianjun; Tong, Xiaowen; Wu, Wenjuan; Qi, Lifeng; Shi, Donglu

    2017-01-01

    Efficient delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the targeted cells has remained a significant challenge in clinical applications. In the present study, we developed a novel aptamer-siRNA chimera delivery system mediated by cationic Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). The chimera constructed by VEGF RNA aptamer and Notch3 siRNA was bonded with heterogeneous Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles by electrostatic interaction. The obtained complex exhibited much higher silencing efficiency against Notch3 gene compared with chimera alone and lipofectamine-siRNA complex, and improved the antitumor effects of the loaded chimera. Moreover, the efficient delivery of the chimera by Au-Fe3O4 NPs could reverse multi-drug resistance (MDR) of ovarian cancer cells against the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, indicating its potential capability for future targeted cancer therapy while overcoming MDR.

  17. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  18. Making pragmatic choices: women’s experiences of delivery care in Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebrehiwot Tesfay

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, the Ethiopian Ministry of Health launched the Health Extension Programme (HEP, which was intended to increase access to reproductive health care. Despite enormous effort, utilization of maternal health services remains limited, and the reasons for the low utilization of the services offered through the HEP previously have not been explored in depth. This study explores women’s experiences and perceptions regarding delivery care in Tigray, a northern region of Ethiopia, and enables us to make suggestions for better implementation of maternal health care services in this setting. Methods We used six focus group discussions with 51 women to explore perceptions and experiences regarding delivery care. The data were analysed by means of grounded theory. Results One core category emerged, ‘making pragmatic choices’, which connected the categories ‘aiming for safer deliveries’, ‘embedded in tradition’, and ‘medical knowledge under constrained circumstances’. In this setting, women – aiming for safer deliveries – made choices pragmatically between the two available models of childbirth. On the one hand, choice of home delivery, represented by the category ‘embedded in tradition’, was related to their faith, the ascendancy of elderly women, the advantages of staying at home and the custom of traditional birth attendants (TBAs. On the other, institutional delivery, represented by the category ‘medical knowledge under constrained circumstances’, and linked to how women appreciated medical resources and the support of health extension workers (HEWs but were uncertain about the quality of care, emphasized the barriers to transportation. In Tigray women made choices pragmatically and seemed to not feel any conflict between the two available models, being supported by traditional birth attendants, HEWs and husbands in their decision-making. Representatives of the two models were not as open to

  19. Public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jȩdrzejewski, Mariusz; Thallinger, Christiane; Mrozik, Magda; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph; Jassem, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    We compared the public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria. Both countries are members of the European Union (EU) but reflect two extremes in health-related per capita spending. Recently, the EUROCARE-5 study reported on very discrepant cancer outcomes between the two countries. A one-time survey was conducted to compare the public perception of cancer treatment in Poland and Austria. In total, 3,649 subjects, representing the general population, cancer patients, and cancer patients' family members, were surveyed. In both countries, cancer was considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care was indicated as the most important issue influencing political election decisions. Polish compared with Austrian cancer patients gave a significantly lower positive assessment of overall cancer treatment efficacy and detection methods. Cancer cure rates estimated by Polish and Austrian citizens were 29% and 44%, respectively. The majority of all citizens interviewed thought that cancer patients should have access to all available registered cancer drugs. However, only 18% of Poles versus 62% of Austrians agreed with the notion that the available cancer treatment in their countries is of a standard comparable to that of other EU countries. Consequently, 24% of Poles and 7% of Austrians identified financial status, age, gender, and residence as factors influencing the availability of cancer treatments. In both countries, cancer is considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care issues may strongly influence decisions for political elections. Vast differences in the two populations' perceptions of cancer care reflect actual cancer outcomes and the national per capita spending on health-related issues. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. The sigma-2 receptor as a therapeutic target for drug delivery in triple negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makvandi, Mehran; Tilahun, Estifanos D.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Anderson, Redmond-Craig; Zeng, Chenbo; Xu, Kuiying; Hou, Catherine; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Mach, Robert H., E-mail: rmach@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2015-11-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with high relapse rates and increased mortality when compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In contrast to receptor positive breast cancers, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. Identifying biomarkers for TNBC is of high importance for the advancement of patient care. The sigma-2 receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer in vivo and has been characterized as a marker of proliferation. The aim of the present study was to define the sigma-2 receptor as a target for therapeutic drug delivery and biomarker in TNBC. Methods: Three TNBC cell lines were evaluated: MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and HCC1806. Sigma-2 compounds were tested for pharmacological properties specific to the sigma-2 receptor through competitive inhibition assays. Sigma-2 receptor expression was measured through radioligand receptor saturation studies. Drug sensitivity for taxol was compared to a sigma-2 targeting compound conjugated to a cytotoxic payload, SW IV-134. Cell viability was assessed after treatments for 2 or 48 h. Sigma-2 blockade was assessed to define sigma-2 mediated cytotoxicity of SW IV-134. Caspase 3/7 activation induced by SW IV-134 was measured at corresponding treatment time points. Results: SW IV-134 was the most potent compound tested in two of the three cell lines and was similarly effective in all three. MDA-MB-231 displayed a statistically significant higher sigma-2 receptor expression and also was the most sensitive cell line evaluated to SW IV-134. Conclusion: Targeting the sigma-2 receptor with a cytotoxic payload was effective in all the three cell lines evaluated and provides the proof of concept for future development of a therapeutic platform for the treatment of TNBC. - Highlights: • TNBC cells are sensitive to sigma-2 receptor targeted drug conjugate SW IV-134. • MDA-MB-231 displayed the highest amount of sigma-2 receptors and corresponded well with

  1. Breast Cancer Diagnosed During Pregnancy: Adapting Recent Advances in Breast Cancer Care for Pregnant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Schmidt, André; Gentilini, Oreste; Kaufman, Bella; Kuhl, Christine; Denkert, Carsten; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Parokonnaya, Anastasia; Stensheim, Hanne; Thomssen, Christoph; van Calsteren, Kristel; Poortmans, Philip; Berveiller, Paul; Markert, Udo R; Amant, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer during pregnancy (BCP), although rare, is becoming more common and treatment should be as similar as possible to that for nonpregnant young patients with breast cancer. A group of specialists convened to review current guidelines and provide guidance on how recent advances in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment can be adapted for pregnant patients. The majority of patients with BCP will be considered for treatment during the pregnancy. Premature delivery should be avoided whenever possible. Most treatments, including sentinel lymph node biopsy, systemic therapy with taxanes, platinum agents, or dose-dense treatment can be safely given during pregnancy, after careful risk/benefit assessment for mother and child. Chemotherapy is contraindicated during the first trimester because of a higher risk of fetal malformations but is feasible in the second and third trimesters. Other treatments such as radiation therapy or anti-human epidermal growth receptor 2 treatment are in general not indicated during pregnancy but might be considered in some instances. Patient data should be collected in a systematic way whenever possible.

  2. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  3. Characteristics of Indigenous primary health care service delivery models: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfield, Stephen G; Davy, Carol; McArthur, Alexa; Munn, Zachary; Brown, Alex; Brown, Ngiare

    2018-01-25

    Indigenous populations have poorer health outcomes compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. The evolution of Indigenous primary health care services arose from mainstream health services being unable to adequately meet the needs of Indigenous communities and Indigenous peoples often being excluded and marginalised from mainstream health services. Part of the solution has been to establish Indigenous specific primary health care services, for and managed by Indigenous peoples. There are a number of reasons why Indigenous primary health care services are more likely than mainstream services to improve the health of Indigenous communities. Their success is partly due to the fact that they often provide comprehensive programs that incorporate treatment and management, prevention and health promotion, as well as addressing the social determinants of health. However, there are gaps in the evidence base including the characteristics that contribute to the success of Indigenous primary health care services in providing comprehensive primary health care. This systematic scoping review aims to identify the characteristics of Indigenous primary health care service delivery models. This systematic scoping review was led by an Aboriginal researcher, using the Joanna Briggs Institute Scoping Review Methodology. All published peer-reviewed and grey literature indexed in PubMed, EBSCO CINAHL, Embase, Informit, Mednar, and Trove databases from September 1978 to May 2015 were reviewed for inclusion. Studies were included if they describe the characteristics of service delivery models implemented within an Indigenous primary health care service. Sixty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and then thematically analysed to identify the characteristics of Indigenous PHC service delivery models. Culture was the most prominent characteristic underpinning all of the other seven characteristics which were identified - accessible health services, community

  4. Guidelines for audiology service delivery in nursing homes. Ad Hoc Committee on Audiology Service Delivery in Home Care and Institutional Settings. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The increasing number of older adults in society as well as changing consumer preference and health care delivery systems have led to more frequent activity of audiologists in the delivery of services in nursing homes. The nursing home setting presents a number of challenges for the audiologist. It is anticipated that this document will provide audiologists with a comprehensive hearing management protocol and facilitate audiologists to confront the numerous challenges of the nursing home setting and provide quality audiology services.

  5. Infection control in delivery care units, Gujarat state, India: A needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani KV

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, women in India attend health facilities for childbirth, partly due to incentives paid under government programs. Increased use of health facilities can alleviate the risks of infections contracted in unhygienic home deliveries, but poor infection control practices in labour and delivery units also cause puerperal sepsis and other infections of childbirth. A needs assessment was conducted to provide information on procedures and practices related to infection control in labour and delivery units in Gujarat state, India. Methods Twenty health care facilities, including private and public primary health centres and referral hospitals, were sampled from two districts in Gujarat state, India. Three pre-tested tools for interviewing and for observation were used. Data collection was based on existing infection control guidelines for clean practices, clean equipment, clean environment and availability of diagnostics and treatment. The study was carried out from April to May 2009. Results Seventy percent of respondents said that standard infection control procedures were followed, but a written procedure was only available in 5% of facilities. Alcohol rubs were not used for hand cleaning and surgical gloves were reused in over 70% of facilities, especially for vaginal examinations in the labour room. Most types of equipment and supplies were available but a third of facilities did not have wash basins with "hands-free" taps. Only 15% of facilities reported that wiping of surfaces was done immediately after each delivery in labour rooms. Blood culture services were available in 25% of facilities and antibiotics are widely given to women after normal delivery. A few facilities had data on infections and reported rates of 3% to 5%. Conclusions This study of current infection control procedures and practices during labour and delivery in health facilities in Gujarat revealed a need for improved information systems

  6. Cancer antigen 125 after delivery in women with a normal pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal B; Andersen, Malene R; Bjørngaard, Brian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish reference intervals for cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) in women with expected normal pregnancy, delivery, and early postpartum period. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Obstetrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte...... the gestational period and around delivery. RESULTS: CA-125 was fairly stable below 35 U/mL during pregnancy but increased markedly during vaginal delivery, to a minor degree during emergency cesarean section, and only slightly during elective cesarean section. In the early postpartum period, CA-125 decreased...... it unlikely that small fluctuations in CA-125 can be clinically useful for identifying other conditions. Measuring CA-125 around the time of delivery is not recommended. Gestational age-specific reference intervals during normal pregnancy are not needed....

  7. Divided care and the Third Way: user involvement in statutory and voluntary sector cancer services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritter, J Q; Barley, V; Daykin, N; Evans, Simon; McNeill, Judith; Rimmer, James; Sanidas, M; Turton, Pat

    2003-07-01

    In health care, as in much of the public sphere, the voluntary sector is playing an increasingly large role in the funding, provision and delivery of services and nowhere is this more apparent than in cancer care. Simultaneously the growth of privatisation, marketisation and consumerism has engendered a rise in the promotion of 'user involvement' in health care. These changes in the organisation and delivery of health care, in part inspired by the 'Third Way' and the promotion of public and citizen participation, are particularly apparent in the British National Health Service. This paper presents initial findings from a three-year study of user involvement in cancer services. Using both case study and survey data, we explore the variation in the definition, aims, usefulness and mechanisms for involving users in the evaluation and development of cancer services across three Health Authorities in South West England. The findings have important implications for understanding shifts in power, autonomy and responsibility between patients, carers, clinicians and health service managers. The absence of any common definition of user involvement or its purpose underlines the limited trust between the different actors in the system and highlights the potentially negative impact of a Third Way health service.

  8. Bicalutamide 150 mg plus standard care vs standard care alone for early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLeod, David G; Iversen, Peter; See, William A

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer.......To evaluate, in the ongoing Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) trial programme, the efficacy and tolerability of bicalutamide 150 mg once daily in addition to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer....

  9. Obstetrical nursing care based on good practices: from admission to delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraysa Jéssyca de Oliveira Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the obstetric nurse’s care from admission to delivery based on good obstetric practices. It is a descriptive, retrospective, and documentary study, with a quantitative approach based on the analysis of 500 medical records. The research identified that an episiotomy was done in 12.2%, an amniotomy in 13%, oxytocin was used in 42.8%, non-pharmacological methods for pain relief were applied in 75.4%, and skin-to-skin contact was used to stimulate in 91.6%. Most of the good obstetrical practices recommended by the World Health Organization were observed to be used by the obstetric nurses when providing care from admission to delivery and this is close to what has been recommended by scientific evidence.

  10. [The humanization of birth: how health professionals working in delivery care perceive it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Taísa Guimarães; Gaíva, Maria Aparecida Munhoz; Modes, Priscilla Shirley Siniak dos Anjos

    2011-09-01

    This was a qualitative exploratory study, which aimed to investigate how health professionals working in delivery care perceive the humanization of the birth process. 17 professionals who work in the area were interviewed. The data were obtained through semi-structured interviews and processed through thematic analysis. During the data analysis 3 categories emerged: the meaning of humanization of birth; the humanization practice in the studied services; and difficulties of the humanization process. The results show that the humanization of birth care is not yet a common practice in most of the studied hospitals and that the staff is not prepared to provide a humanized and qualified service for mothers and newborns. We conclude that it is essential to change the biomedical model from a mainly technical approach to an approach that values the social and cultural aspects of pregnancy and delivery.

  11. Impact of psychosocial risk factors on prenatal care delivery: a national provider survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Elizabeth E; Moloci, Nicholas M; Housey, Michelle T; Davis, Matthew M

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate providers' perspectives regarding the delivery of prenatal care to women with psychosocial risk factors. A random, national sample of 2,095 prenatal care providers (853 obstetricians and gynecologists (Ob/Gyns), 270 family medicine (FM) physicians and 972 midwives) completed a mailed survey. We measured respondents' practice and referral patterns regarding six psychosocial risk factors: adolescence (age ≤19), unstable housing, lack of paternal involvement and social support, late prenatal care (>13 weeks gestation), domestic violence and drug or alcohol use. Chi square and logistic regression analyses assessed the association between prenatal care provider characteristics and prenatal care utilization patterns. Approximately 60 % of Ob/Gyns, 48.4 % of midwives and 32.2 % of FM physicians referred patients with psychosocial risk factors to clinicians outside of their practice. In all three specialties, providers were more likely to increase prenatal care visits with alternative clinicians (social workers, nurses, psychologists/psychiatrists) compared to themselves for all six psychosocial risk factors. Drug or alcohol use and intimate partner violence were the risk factors that most often prompted an increase in utilization. In multivariate analyses, Ob/Gyns who recently completed clinical training were significantly more likely to increase prenatal care utilization with either themselves (OR 2.15; 95 % CI 1.14-4.05) or an alternative clinician (2.27; 1.00-4.67) for women with high psychosocial risk pregnancies. Prenatal care providers frequently involve alternative clinicians such as social workers, nurses and psychologists or psychiatrists in the delivery of prenatal care to women with psychosocial risk factors.

  12. Transforming health care delivery through consumer engagement, health data transparency, and patient-generated health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, D Z; Wald, J S

    2014-08-15

    Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Literature review. Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions.

  13. Aligning health information technologies with effective service delivery models to improve chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M; Thielke, Stephen M; Katon, Wayne; Unützer, Jürgen; Areán, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    Healthcare reforms in the United States, including the Affordable Care and HITECH Acts, and the NCQA criteria for the Patient Centered Medical Home have promoted health information technology (HIT) and the integration of general medical and mental health services. These developments, which aim to improve chronic disease care, have largely occurred in parallel, with little attention to the need for coordination. In this article, the fundamental connections between HIT and improvements in chronic disease management are explored. We use the evidence-based collaborative care model as an example, with attention to health literacy improvement for supporting patient engagement in care. A review of the literature was conducted to identify how HIT and collaborative care, an evidence-based model of chronic disease care, support each other. Five key principles of effective collaborative care are outlined: care is patient-centered, evidence-based, measurement-based, population-based, and accountable. The potential role of HIT in implementing each principle is discussed. Key features of the mobile health paradigm are described, including how they can extend evidence-based treatment beyond traditional clinical settings. HIT, and particularly mobile health, can enhance collaborative care interventions, and thus improve the health of individuals and populations when deployed in integrated delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intrathecal Drug Delivery and Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fangfang; Yong, R Jason; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2018-02-05

    The purpose of the present investigation is to summarize the body and quality of evidence including the most recent studies in support of intrathecal drug delivery systems and spinal cord stimulation for the treatment of cancer-related pain. In the past 3 years, a number of prospective studies have been published supporting intrathecal drug delivery systems for cancer pain. Additional investigation with adjuvants to morphine-based analgesia including dexmedetomidine and ziconotide support drug-induced benefits of patient-controlled intrathecal analgesia. A study has also been recently published regarding cost-savings for intrathecal drug delivery system compared to pharmacologic management, but an analysis in the Ontario, Canada healthcare system projects additional financial costs. Finally, the Polyanalgesic Consensus Committee has updated its recommendations regarding clinical guidelines for intrathecal drug delivery systems to include new information on dosing, trialing, safety, and systemic opioid reduction. There is still a paucity of clinical evidence for spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of cancer pain. There are new intrathecal drugs under investigation including various conopeptides and AYX1. Large, prospective, modern, randomized controlled studies are still needed to support the use of both intrathecal drug delivery systems as well as spinal cord stimulation for cancer pain populations. There are multiple prospective and small randomized controlled studies that highlight a potential promising future for these interventional modalities. Related to the challenge and urgency of cancer pain, the pain practitioner community is moving toward a multimodal approach that includes discussions regarding the role of intrathecal therapies and spinal cord stimulation to the individualized treatment of patients.

  15. Quality of nursing care as perceived by cancer patients: A cross-sectional survey in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Christina; Patiraki, Elisabeth; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Radwin, Laurel; Charalambous, Andreas; Charalambous, Melanie; Berg, Agneta; Sjövall, Katarina; Katajisto, Jouko; Stolt, Minna; Suhonen, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    To explore and compare cancer patients' perceptions on the quality of nursing care in four European countries. Data were collected in Cyprus, Finland, Greece and Sweden. The sample comprised 596 hospitalized cancer patients. The quality of nursing care was measured using the "Oncology Patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care Scale" (OPPQNCS). Patient characteristics were also collected. Analysis of variance was used to examine the effects of country on the perceptions of the quality of nursing care. Patients' age ranged from 18 to 86 years, and 58% were male. The comparison of cancer patients' perceptions regarding the quality of nursing care between the four countries showed a statistically significant difference in the total OPPQNCS scores (pquality care. Quality of nursing care as perceived by cancer patients was high, but differed between the four countries. The impact of the clinical status of cancer patients on the quality of nursing care and managerial factors such as staffing/nursing care delivery models that influence the ability of nurses to offer high quality care should also be explored by more focused studies.

  16. Health care use after diagnosis of cancer in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Lorenzi, M.F.; Korevaar, J.C.; McBride, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Young patients with cancer often require extensive care during and shortly after cancer treatment for medical, psychosocial and educational problems. Approximately 85% are treated by an oncologist; however, their additional health care in this phase has barely been studied. The role of the

  17. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holge-Hazelton, B.; Blake-Gumbs, L.; Miedema, B.; Rijswijk, E. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare and

  18. Assessing breast cancer risk in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Deirdre; Schwartz, Shira

    2014-10-15

    Individuals who are given a preventive exam by a primary care provider are more likely to agree to cancer screening. The provider recommendation has been identified as the strongest factor associated with screening utilization. This article provides a framework for breast cancer risk assessment for an advanced practice registered nurse working in primary care practice.

  19. Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy: the other side of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (TMA) based therapies for cancer have advanced significantly over the past two decades both in their molecular sophistication and clinical efficacy. Initial development efforts focused mainly on humanizing the antibody protein to overcome problems of immunogenicity and on expanding of the target antigen repertoire. In parallel to naked TMAs, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have been developed for targeted delivery of potent anti-cancer drugs with the aim of bypassing the morbidity common to conventional chemotherapy. This paper first presents a review of TMAs and ADCs approved for clinical use by the FDA and those in development, focusing on hematological malignancies. Despite advances in these areas, both TMAs and ADCs still carry limitations and we highlight the more important ones including cancer cell specificity, conjugation chemistry, tumor penetration, product heterogeneity and manufacturing issues. In view of the recognized importance of targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy, we discuss the advantages of alternative drug carriers and where these should be applied, focusing on peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs), particularly those discovered through combinatorial peptide libraries. By defining the advantages and disadvantages of naked TMAs, ADCs and PDCs it should be possible to develop a more rational approach to the application of targeted drug delivery strategies in different situations and ultimately, to a broader basket of more effective therapies for cancer patients. PMID:23140144

  20. Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy: the other side of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firer Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (TMA based therapies for cancer have advanced significantly over the past two decades both in their molecular sophistication and clinical efficacy. Initial development efforts focused mainly on humanizing the antibody protein to overcome problems of immunogenicity and on expanding of the target antigen repertoire. In parallel to naked TMAs, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs have been developed for targeted delivery of potent anti-cancer drugs with the aim of bypassing the morbidity common to conventional chemotherapy. This paper first presents a review of TMAs and ADCs approved for clinical use by the FDA and those in development, focusing on hematological malignancies. Despite advances in these areas, both TMAs and ADCs still carry limitations and we highlight the more important ones including cancer cell specificity, conjugation chemistry, tumor penetration, product heterogeneity and manufacturing issues. In view of the recognized importance of targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy, we discuss the advantages of alternative drug carriers and where these should be applied, focusing on peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs, particularly those discovered through combinatorial peptide libraries. By defining the advantages and disadvantages of naked TMAs, ADCs and PDCs it should be possible to develop a more rational approach to the application of targeted drug delivery strategies in different situations and ultimately, to a broader basket of more effective therapies for cancer patients.

  1. Preparing students for health care delivery of the future: a service education partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, M J; Porter, R; Burton, S M

    1996-12-01

    In conclusion, redesigning the senior leadership management theory course in our undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program to incorporate new concepts of managed care, case management, critical paths, and multidisciplinary collaborations was successful. Providing students with a "real world" project developing critical paths provided an opportunity for them to make a contribution to an organization while learning verbal and written collaborative skills that may prove crucial to their future in nursing. Critical path development projects will be pursued until those specific needs of the organization have been met. Other opportunities will become obvious for class projects as new challenges are presented for organizations to address in this ever-changing health care delivery system.

  2. The Impact of Electronic Medical records on improvement of health care delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Giaedi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: There is an increasing need to incorporate the use of electronic medical records EMR in our healthcare delivery. The advancement in information technology and its impact in all sectors including healthcare has accelerated this need amidst the ever growing challenges facing healthcare today. These challenges include; reducing preventable errors, improving communication among health care providers and facilities, and controlling the cost of medical care. I may argue that employing an electronic medical record system may be the one solution that will addresses all of these issues. The literature shows that Innovations in electronic record keeping have dramatically improved communication and patient safety without increasing costs.

  3. Organizational structure and the delivery of primary care to older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, J S; Mor, V

    1998-06-01

    To explore how internal factors, such as organizational size, mission, ownership, and managerial communication and control structures, affect the delivery of primary care to older Americans across a wide variety of practice settings: ambulatory practices, hospitals, nursing homes, and home healthcare agencies. Use of the structure/process/outcome paradigm and contingency theory to examine the empirical research linking structural factors to outcomes. Using these studies as a background, we consider the implications for the provision of primary care to older Americans including the impact of evolving intraorganizational structure in healthcare organization.

  4. Exploring information systems outsourcing in U.S. hospital-based health care delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Mark L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors associated with outsourcing of information systems (IS) in hospital-based health care delivery systems, and to determine if there is a difference in IS outsourcing activity based on the strategic value of the outsourced functions. IS sourcing behavior is conceptualized as a case of vertical integration. A synthesis of strategic management theory (SMT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) serves as the theoretical framework. The sample consists of 1,365 hospital-based health care delivery systems that own 3,452 hospitals operating in 2004. The findings indicate that neither TCE nor SMT predicted outsourcing better than the other did. The findings also suggest that health care delivery system managers may not be considering significant factors when making sourcing decisions, including the relative strategic value of the functions they are outsourcing. It is consistent with previous literature to suggest that the high cost of IS may be the main factor driving the outsourcing decision.

  5. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

  6. Service Quality of Delivered Care from the Perception of Women with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar S. Tabrizi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 – (Importance × Performance based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women‟s perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. Results: “Confidentiality”, “autonomy”, “choice of care provider” and “communication” achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and “support group”, “prompt attention”, “prevention and early detection”, “continuity of care”, “dignity”, “safety”, “accessibility and “basic amenities” got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008. Conclusion: A notable gap between the participants‟ expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care.

  7. The group employed model as a foundation for health care delivery reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, Jenny; Helms, David; Luft, Harold; Guterman, Stuart; Weil, Henry

    2010-04-01

    With a focus on delivering low-cost, high-quality care, several organizations using the group employed model (GEM)-with physician groups whose primary and specialty care physicians are salaried or under contract-have been recognized for creating a culture of patient-centeredness and accountability, even in a toxic fee-for-service environment. The elements that leaders of such organizations identify as key to their success are physician leadership that promotes trust in the organization, integration that promotes teamwork and coordination, governance and strategy that drive results, transparency and health information technology that drive continual quality improvement, and a culture of accountability that focuses providers on patient needs and responsibility for effective care and efficient use of resources. These organizations provide important lessons for health care delivery system reform.

  8. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  9. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  10. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare...... issues the YA cancer patient may present with. The role of the FP in follow-up care seems to be very limited. CONCLUSIONS: YACs in the western world seem to have comparable medical and psychosocial problems. However, the nature of health insurance is such that it impacts differently on the care...

  11. Creating a culture of compassion: developing supportive care for people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alison

    2004-12-01

    Receiving the 2003 Distinguished Merit Award from the European Oncology Nursing Society is a great moment in my professional career. It is also a time for reflection. We can easily become immersed in the specifics of our work and forget the larger picture. An opportunity such as this allows me to step back, reflect and review what I have accomplished. It also challenges me to think about the totality of cancer nursing and cancer care, look at where we have been and about where we should be going. At the heart of this lies the concept of supportive care. I would like to consider three pertinent areas. First, I will define what I consider the domain of supportive care in cancer to be. Second, I will look at what is needed to further supportive care for people with cancer. This involves building the discipline of more rigorous symptom assessment and documentation; better management of the symptoms and concerns that confront people with cancer; moving beyond the traditional framework of treatment and care, embracing a more integrated approach; addressing quality whilst at the same expediting the delivery of supportive care services. Third, I would like to consider the challenges to reform that this presents for cancer nursing and cancer nurses. A road map for change will be presented which highlights both the necessity to promote a supportive care culture whilst simultaneously building a dedicated infrastructure of staff and services. Nurses must play a key role in supportive care. Because of our unique clinical and research base, we are primed to assume leadership roles in both these spheres. Mutual valuing, partnership and shared working are the only means of delivering enhanced cancer care. We should grasp opportunities, confident that together we have the skills and knowledge to move forward. Today is yesterday's tomorrow. We cannot do anything about yesterday, but we can do something about today to ensure tomorrow is how we want it to be. We can become what we

  12. Necessary but not yet sufficient: a survey of aged residential care staff perceptions of palliative care communication, education and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has indicated that staff in aged residential care (ARC) may be unprepared for their role in palliative care provision. The need for palliative care knowledge among ARC staff has been characterised as 'pervasive'. Determining the palliative care education, communication and support needs of ARC clinical care staff is, therefore, of critical importance to the delivery of quality healthcare in this setting. A survey of clinical staff (n=431) in 52 ARC facilities in 1 urban district health board was conducted, using a paper-based questionnaire. Instruments included the 3-item Experiences with End of Life scale, developed measures of communication and support (13 items), support accessibility (12 items), and palliative care education (19 items). Only 199 (46.2%) of staff participants reported undertaking palliative care education. Nurses were more likely to have engaged in palliative care education in comparison with healthcare assistants (HCAs) (χ(2)(1, N=387)=18.10, p=0.00). Participants (n=347) who wanted further education preferred an interactive, hands-on applied education (13.9%) in comparison to short topic-specific sessions/seminars (6.5%) or lecture-based courses (7.7%). The study reveals an ongoing need for staff palliative care education. Results suggest the development of an integrated model of care which draws on both hospice and ARC staff expertise. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Best Practice in Basic Oral Care among Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wanyonyi, Celestine; Suila, Jennibeth

    2015-01-01

    Basic oral care maintains oral cleanliness, reduces the impact of oral microbial flora, prevents infections in the oral cavity, thereby preventing cancer treatment complications. Nurses caring for cancer patients are well situated to perform various roles that affect the patients’ oral health such as identifying patients at risk of developing oral complications, and educating cancer patients about the importance and means of having good oral health throughout their treatment to prevent, ...

  14. Information communication technology: new approach for rural cancer care improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserat, Elham

    2008-01-01

    Cancer control aims to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of cancer and to improve the quality of life of cancer patients. For rural populations this presents particular problems. This article covers challenges of oncology care in rural areas and solutions via applying information communication technology with specialty telemedicine for overcoming problems in prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, and palliative care. In addition, telecommunications infrastructures and frameworks for implementation of telemedicine are described.

  15. [Organisation of medical care delivery to citizens, enjoying a right to get medical care at military-medical organisations of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisun, A Ya; Kuvshinov, K Ye; Pastukhov, A G; Zemlyakov, S V

    2015-09-01

    One of the main priorities of the medical service of the armed forces of the Russian federation is a realization of rights for military retirees and members of their families to free medical care. For this purpose was founded a system of organization of medical care delivery at military-medical subdivisions, units and organizations of the ministry of defence of the Russian federation, based on territorial principle of medical support. In order to improve availability and quality of medical care was determined the order of free medical care delivery to military servicemen and military retirees in medical organizations of state and municipal systems of the health care.

  16. Targeted Zinc Delivery: A Novel Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    prostatic lesions tend to remain focal and restrictively localized to the prostate gland itself. This, combined with the anatomic accessibility of the...unpleasant side effects for the patient. Secondly, during early phases of the disease, the malignant prostatic lesions tend to remain focal and...consumption, such as that which affects more than 10% of the US population, to such diseases as anorexia nervosa , Ahlzeimer’s Disease, and cancer. Several

  17. Targeted Delivery of Carbon Nanotubes to Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT...FA, Chen B, Kirschner AN, Wilson SR, Erlanger BF. X-ray crystal structure of an anti-buckminsterfullerene antibody Fab fragment: biomolecular...369. 4. Bross PF, et al. (2001) Approval summary: Gemtuzumab ozogamicin in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia . Clin Cancer Res 7:1490–1496. 5. Sharkey RM

  18. Nano-enabled drug delivery systems for brain cancer and Alzheimer's disease: research patterns and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-10-01

    "Tech mining" applies bibliometric and text analytic methods to scientific literature of a target field. In this study, we compare the evolution of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) systems for two different applications - viz., brain cancer (BC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) - using this approach. In this process, we derive research intelligence from papers indexed in MEDLINE. Review by domain specialists helps understand the macro-level disease problems and pathologies to identify commonalities and differences between BC and AD. Results provide a fresh perspective on the developmental pathways for NEDD approaches that have been used in the treatment of BC and AD. Results also point toward finding future solutions to drug delivery issues that are critical to medical practitioners and pharmaceutical scientists addressing the brain. Drug delivery to brain cells has been very challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Suitable and effective nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) system is urgently needed. In this study, the authors utilized "tech-mining" tools to describe and compare various choices of delivery system available for the diagnosis, as well as treatment, of brain cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Bernegossi, Jéssica; de Freitas, Laura Marise; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Chorilli, Marlus

    2016-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS) is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs) with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs), solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  20. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Maria Fioramonti Calixto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising alternative approach for improved cancer treatment. In PDT, a photosensitizer (PS is administered that can be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which causes selective damage to the tumor and its surrounding vasculature. The success of PDT is limited by the difficulty in administering photosensitizers (PSs with low water solubility, which compromises the clinical use of several molecules. Incorporation of PSs in nanostructured drug delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, hydrogels, liposomes, liquid crystals, dendrimers, and cyclodextrin is a potential strategy to overcome this difficulty. Additionally, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems may improve the transcytosis of a PS across epithelial and endothelial barriers and afford the simultaneous co-delivery of two or more drugs. Based on this, the application of nanotechnology in medicine may offer numerous exciting possibilities in cancer treatment and improve the efficacy of available therapeutics. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems for photodynamic therapy of cancer.

  1. Cost evaluation of reproductive and primary health care mobile service delivery for women in two rural districts in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Schnippel

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer screening is a critical health service that is often unavailable to women in under-resourced settings. In order to expand access to this and other reproductive and primary health care services, a South African non-governmental organization established a van-based mobile clinic in two rural districts in South Africa. To inform policy and budgeting, we conducted a cost evaluation of this service delivery model.The evaluation was retrospective (October 2012-September 2013 for one district and April-September 2013 for the second district and conducted from a provider cost perspective. Services evaluated included cervical cancer screening, HIV counselling and testing, syndromic management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs, breast exams, provision of condoms, contraceptives, and general health education. Fixed costs, including vehicle purchase and conversion, equipment, operating costs and mobile clinic staffing, were collected from program records and public sector pricing information. The number of women accessing different services was multiplied by ingredients-based variable costs, reflecting the consumables required. All costs are reported in 2013 USD.Fixed costs accounted for most of the total annual costs of the mobile clinics (85% and 94% for the two districts; the largest contributor to annual fixed costs was staff salaries. Average costs per patient were driven by the total number of patients seen, at $46.09 and $76.03 for the two districts. Variable costs for Pap smears were higher than for other services provided, and some services, such as breast exams and STI and tuberculosis symptoms screening, had no marginal cost.Staffing costs are the largest component of providing mobile health services to rural communities. Yet, in remote areas where patient volumes do not exceed nursing staff capacity, incorporating multiple services within a cervical cancer screening program is an approach to potentially expand access to

  2. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  3. Palliative care for patients with cancer: do patients receive the care they consider important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Hofstede, J.; Rijken, P.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.; Francke, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care from a GP and homecare nurse. Care for physical/psychosocial well-being, respect for patients’ autonomy and information provision are important elements of palliative care, but it is not known whether patients receive the care

  4. Impact of combined hospice care on terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Song-Seng; Rau, Kung-Ming; Huang, Chih-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Many patients with advanced cancer will develop physical and psychological symptoms related to their disease. These symptoms are infrequently treated by conventional care. Palliative care programs have been developed to fill this gap in care. However, there are limited beds in hospice units. To allow more terminal cancer patients to receive care from a hospice team, a combined hospice care system was recently developed in Taiwan. This study is a report of our experiences with this system. From January to December 2009, terminal cancer patients who accepted consultation from a hospice team for combined hospice care were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, clinical symptoms, referring department, type of cancer, and outcome were analyzed. A total of 354 terminal cancer patients in acute wards were referred to a hospice consulting team. The mean patient age was 61 years, and the proportion of males was 63.28%. After combined hospice care, there was a significant improvement in the sign rate of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders from 41.53% to 71.47% (p care also enabled 64.21% of terminal cancer patients who were not transferred to hospice ward to receive combined care by a hospice consulting team while in acute wards, thus increasing the hospice utilization of terminal cancer patients. The major symptoms presented by the patients were pain (58%), dyspnea (52%), constipation (45%), and fatigue (23%). Through the hospice consulting system, hospice combined care has a positive effect on the utilization of hospice care, rate of DNR signing and quality of end-of-life care for terminal cancer patients.

  5. Toward a Learning Health-care System - Knowledge Delivery at the Point of Care Empowered by Big Data and NLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaggal, Vinod C; Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Mehrabi, Saeed; Pankratz, Joshua J; Sohn, Sunghwan; Wang, Yanshan; Li, Dingcheng; Rastegar, Majid Mojarad; Murphy, Sean P; Ross, Jason L; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Buntrock, James D; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of optimizing health care by understanding and generating knowledge from previous evidence, ie, the Learning Health-care System (LHS), has gained momentum and now has national prominence. Meanwhile, the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) enables the data collection required to form the basis for facilitating LHS. A prerequisite for using EHR data within the LHS is an infrastructure that enables access to EHR data longitudinally for health-care analytics and real time for knowledge delivery. Additionally, significant clinical information is embedded in the free text, making natural language processing (NLP) an essential component in implementing an LHS. Herein, we share our institutional implementation of a big data-empowered clinical NLP infrastructure, which not only enables health-care analytics but also has real-time NLP processing capability. The infrastructure has been utilized for multiple institutional projects including the MayoExpertAdvisor, an individualized care recommendation solution for clinical care. We compared the advantages of big data over two other environments. Big data infrastructure significantly outperformed other infrastructure in terms of computing speed, demonstrating its value in making the LHS a possibility in the near future.

  6. Early term delivery and health care utilization in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Patricia M; Rizzo, Joanne H; England, Lucinda J; Callaghan, William M; Vesco, Kimberly K; Bruce, F Carol; Bulkley, Joanna E; Sharma, Andrea J; Hornbrook, Mark C

    2012-08-01

    To assess health care utilization during the first year of life among early term-born infants. We assessed health care utilization of 22420 singleton term infants (37-42 weeks gestational age [GA]) without major birth defects, fetal growth restriction, or exposure to diabetes or hypertension in utero, delivered between 1998 and 2007 and continuously enrolled at Kaiser Permanente Northwest for 12 months after delivery. GA, duration of delivery hospitalization, and postdelivery rehospitalizations and sick/emergency room visits in the first year of life were obtained from electronic medical records. Logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between GA and number of hospitalizations and length of stay. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted mean number of sick/emergency visits. Overall, 20.9% of term infants were born early. Infants delivered vaginally at 37 weeks GA had a 2.2 greater odds (95% CI, 1.6-3.1) of staying 4 or more days compared with those born at 39-40 weeks GA. Similar association was found among infants delivered by cesarean delivery at 37 or 38 weeks GA. Infants born at 37 weeks GA had increased odds of being rehospitalized within 2 weeks of delivery (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.9-3.6). The adjusted mean number of sick/emergency room visits was higher for infants born at 37 and 38 weeks GA than for those born at 39-40 weeks GA (8.1, 7.7, and 7.3, respectively; P < .0001). Early term-born infants had greater health care utilization during their entire first year of life than infants born at 39-40 weeks GA. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 42 CFR 440.385 - Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent coverage through managed care entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.385 Delivery of benchmark and benchmark-equivalent coverage through managed care entities. In implementing benchmark or benchmark...

  8. Interest in Health Behavior Intervention Delivery Modalities Among Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily C; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Cox, Matthew G; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Carmack, Cindy L; Blalock, Janice A; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-02-11

    Effective, broad-reaching channels are important for the delivery of health behavior interventions in order to meet the needs of the growing population of cancer survivors in the United States. New technology presents opportunities to increase the reach of health behavior change interventions and therefore their overall impact. However, evidence suggests that older adults may be slower in their adoption of these technologies than the general population. Survivors' interest for more traditional channels of delivery (eg, clinic) versus new technology-based channels (eg, smartphones) may depend on a variety of factors, including demographics, current health status, and the behavior requiring intervention. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that predict cancer survivors' interest in new technology-based health behavior intervention modalities versus traditional modalities. Surveys were mailed to 1871 survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Participants' demographics, diet and physical activity behaviors, interest in health behavior interventions, and interest in intervention delivery modalities were collected. Using path analysis, we explored the relationship between four intervention modality variables (ie, clinic, telephone, computer, and smartphone) and potential predictors of modality interest. In total, 1053 respondents to the survey (56.3% response rate); 847 provided complete data for this analysis. Delivery channel interest was highest for computer-based interventions (236/847, 27.9% very/extremely interested) and lowest for smartphone-based interventions (73/847, 8.6%), with interest in clinic-based (147/847, 17.3%) and telephone-delivered (143/847, 16.9%) falling in between. Use of other technology platforms, such as Web cameras and social networking sites, was positively predictive of interest in technology-based delivery channels. Older survivors were less likely to report interest in smartphone-based diet interventions

  9. Integrative Review: Delivery of Healthcare Services to Adolescents and Young Adults During and After Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jennifer L

    The purpose of this integrative review is to summarize evidence describing delivery of healthcare services to adolescents while in foster care and to young adults after they exit foster care. The long-term, deleterious effect of abuse and/or neglect by caregivers among youth who have been placed in foster care is grounded in empirical evidence demonstrating the relationship between long-term health needs and exposure to trauma in childhood. Evidence is needed to provide culturally-specific care and also to identify knowledge gaps in the care of adolescents and young adults who have been in the foster care system. Peer-reviewed research studies published between 2004 and 2014 that include samples of youth 12 to 30 years of age are included in the review. Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria for the review. Physical and behavioral healthcare needs among youth with foster care experience are significant. The ability to adequately meet health needs are inextricable from the ability to negotiate resources and to successfully interact with adults. Challenges that youth with foster care histories experience when transitioning into young adulthood are comparable to other populations of vulnerable youth not in foster care. Nurses must use each healthcare encounter to assess how the social determinants of health facilitate or impede optimal health among youth with foster care experience. The development of integrated intervention strategies to inform best practice models is a priority for current and former foster care youth as they transition into young adulthood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary Care Clinicians' Perspectives on Reducing Low-Value Care in an Integrated Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Diana S M; Chang, Eva; Handley, Matt; Pardee, Roy; Gundersen, Gabrielle; Cheadle, Allen; Reid, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions about low-value care (eg, medical tests and procedures that may be unnecessary and/or harmful) among clinicians with capitated salaries are unknown. Explore clinicians' perceived use of and responsibility for reducing low-value care by focusing on barriers to use, awareness of the Choosing Wisely campaign, and response to reports of peer-comparison resource use and practice patterns. Electronic, cross-sectional survey, distributed in 2013, to 304 salaried primary care physicians and physician assistants at Group Health Cooperative. Attitudes, awareness, and barriers of low-value care strategies and initiatives. A total of 189 clinicians responded (62% response rate). More than 90% believe cost is important to various stakeholders and believe it is fair to ask clinicians to be cost-conscious. Most found peer-comparison resource-use reports useful for understanding practice patterns and prompting peer discussions. Two-thirds of clinicians were aware of the Choosing Wisely campaign; among them, 97% considered it a legitimate information source. Although 88% reported being comfortable discussing low-value care with patients, 80% reported they would order tests or procedures when a patient insisted. As key barriers in reducing low-value care, clinicians identified time constraints (45%), overcoming patient preferences/values (44%), community standards (43%), fear of patients' dissatisfaction (41%), patients' knowledge about the harms of low-value care (38%), and availability of tools to support shared decision making (37%). Salaried clinicians are aware of rising health care costs and want to be stewards of limited health care resources. Evidence-based initiatives such as the Choosing Wisely campaign may help motivate clinicians to be conscientious stewards of limited health care resources.

  11. Primary Care Clinicians’ Perspectives on Reducing Low-Value Care in an Integrated Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Diana SM; Chang, Eva; Handley, Matt; Pardee, Roy; Gundersen, Gabrielle; Cheadle, Allen; Reid, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Context: Perceptions about low-value care (eg, medical tests and procedures that may be unnecessary and/or harmful) among clinicians with capitated salaries are unknown. Objective: Explore clinicians’ perceived use of and responsibility for reducing low-value care by focusing on barriers to use, awareness of the Choosing Wisely campaign, and response to reports of peer-comparison resource use and practice patterns. Methods: Electronic, cross-sectional survey, distributed in 2013, to 304 salaried primary care physicians and physician assistants at Group Health Cooperative. Main Outcome Measures: Attitudes, awareness, and barriers of low-value care strategies and initiatives. Results: A total of 189 clinicians responded (62% response rate). More than 90% believe cost is important to various stakeholders and believe it is fair to ask clinicians to be cost-conscious. Most found peer-comparison resource-use reports useful for understanding practice patterns and prompting peer discussions. Two-thirds of clinicians were aware of the Choosing Wisely campaign; among them, 97% considered it a legitimate information source. Although 88% reported being comfortable discussing low-value care with patients, 80% reported they would order tests or procedures when a patient insisted. As key barriers in reducing low-value care, clinicians identified time constraints (45%), overcoming patient preferences/values (44%), community standards (43%), fear of patients’ dissatisfaction (41%), patients’ knowledge about the harms of low-value care (38%), and availability of tools to support shared decision making (37%). Conclusions: Salaried clinicians are aware of rising health care costs and want to be stewards of limited health care resources. Evidence-based initiatives such as the Choosing Wisely campaign may help motivate clinicians to be conscientious stewards of limited health care resources. PMID:26562308

  12. Utilization of health care services by pregnant mothers during delivery: a community based study in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B M; Alex-Hart, B A; George, I O

    2011-03-01

    Poor utilization of health facilities during delivery by pregnant mothers is still a major cause of maternal and childhood morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to determine the level of utilization of health care services by pregnant women during delivery in Gokana Local Government Area of River State, Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire; based study involving 112 mothers aged 15 years to 49 years from Gokana Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. The local Government Area has 12 health centres and 6 health centres were selected by multistage sampling. 112 were then selected by simple random sampling. Of the 112 mothers interviewed 91 (81.3%) were married, 13 (11.6%) were single, 5 (4.5%) were widows, 2 (1.8%) divorced and 1 (0.9%) separated. Ninety seven (86.6%) of these mothers (n = 112) had formal education while 15 (13.4%) had no formal education. Most 42 (37.5%) of the mothers were between 25-29 years. Sixty four (57.1%) of the 112 mothers in their recent delivery used a health facility while 48 (42.9%) did not. Factors responsible for non utilization of health facility for delivery include: Long distance to health facility 33 (68.7%), onset of labour at night 40 (83.3%), unavailability of means of transportation 37 (77.1%), Lack of money for transportation 26 (54.2%), unsatisfactory services at health facility 26 (54.2%), unfriendly attitude of staff of the health facility 34 (70.8%), unavailability of staff at health facility 32 (64.0%), lack of urgency at health facility 36 (75.0%), previous uneventful delivery at the health facility 32 (66.7%). Utilization of health care services during delivery in Nigeria is still poor. Concerted efforts should be made both at community and Government levels to improve utilization of health facility during delivery. This will go a long way in reducing maternal and child mortality.

  13. Neuro-Ophthalmology: Transitioning From Old to New Models of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Larry P

    2017-06-01

    In contradiction to fundamental laws of supply and demand, 2 decades of payment policies have led to some medical specialties experiencing declines in both manpower and reimbursement. This paradox has resulted in increasingly long wait times to see some specialists, some specialties becoming less attractive to potential trainees, and a dearth of new trainees entering these fields. Evolving models of health care delivery hold the promise of increasing patient access to most providers and may diminish costs and improve outcomes for most patients/conditions. However, patients who need care in understaffed fields may, in the future, be unable to quickly access a specialist with the requisite expertise. Impeding the sickest and most complex patients from seeing physicians with appropriate expertise may lead to increased costs and deleterious outcomes-consequences contrary to the goals of health care reform. To ensure appropriate access for these patients requires 2 conditions: 1. Compensation models that do not discourage trainees from pursuing nonprocedural specialties, and 2. A care delivery model that expediently identifies and routes these patients to the appropriate specialist.

  14. Primary care provider approaches to preventive health delivery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Hemalatha; Spigner, Clarence; McKinney, Christy M; Wong, Christopher J

    2018-01-08

    Aim The objective of this study was to seek decision-making insights on the provider level to gain understanding of the values that shape how providers deliver preventive health in the primary care setting. The primary care clinic is a core site for preventive health delivery. While many studies have identified barriers to preventive health, less is known regarding how primary care providers (PCPs) make preventive health decisions such as what services to provide, under what circumstances, and why they might choose one over another. Qualitative methods were chosen to deeply explore these issues. We conducted semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with 21 PCPs at clinics affiliated with an academic medical center. Interviews with providers were recorded and transcribed. We conducted a qualitative analysis to identify themes and develop a theoretical framework using Grounded Theory methods. Findings The following themes were revealed: longitudinal care with an established PCP-patient relationship is perceived as integral to preventive health; conflict and doubt accompany non-preventive visits; PCPs defer preventive health for pragmatic reasons; when preventive health is addressed, providers use multiple contextual factors to decide which interventions are discussed; and PCPs desired team-based preventive health delivery, but wish to maintain their role when shared decision-making is required. We present a conceptual framework called Pragmatic Deferral.

  15. Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. After exploring specific discrepancies in global health care justice, I will point to the need for delivery doctors in the developing world to provide basic assistance to women who hazard many pregnancies as a priority before offering assisted reproduction to women in the developed world. The wide disparities between maternal health in the developing world and elective fertility treatments in the developed world are clearly unjust within Catholic social teachings. I conclude this article by offering policy suggestions for moving closer to health care justice via doctor distribution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ferritin nanocages: A biological platform for drug delivery, imaging and theranostics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truffi, Marta; Fiandra, Luisa; Sorrentino, Luca; Monieri, Matteo; Corsi, Fabio; Mazzucchelli, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays cancer represents a prominent challenge in clinics. Main achievements in cancer management would be the development of highly accurate and specific diagnostic tools for early detection of cancer onset, and the generation of smart drug delivery systems for targeted chemotherapy release in cancer cells. In this context, protein-based nanocages hold a tremendous potential as devices for theranostics purposes. In particular, ferritin has emerged as an excellent and promising protein-based nanocage thanks to its unique architecture, surface properties and high biocompatibility. By exploiting natural recognition of the Transferrin Receptor 1, which is overexpressed on tumor cells, ferritin nanocages may ensure a proper drug delivery and release. Moreover, researchers have applied surface functionalities on ferritin cages for further providing active tumor targeting. Encapsulation strategies of non metal-containing drugs within ferritin cages have been explored and successfully performed with encouraging results. Various preclinical studies have demonstrated that nanoformulation within ferritin nanocages significantly improved targeted therapy and accurate imaging of cancer cells. Aims of this review are to describe structure and functions of ferritin nanocages, and to provide an overview about the nanotechnological approaches implemented for applying them to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A co-delivery nanosystem of chemotherapeutics and DNAzyme overcomes cancer drug resistance and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Pin; Liu, Ching-Ping; Huang, I.-Ping; Chu, Chia-Hui; Chung, Ming-Fang; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Lin, Shu-Yi; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2017-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) constitutes a major problem in the management of cancer and cancer metastasized from primary-source tumor causes cancer-related deaths. Our new approach is the co-delivery of chemotherapy drugs with a transcription-factor-targeting genetic agent to simultaneously inhibit the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. C-Jun is a transcription factor that regulates multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) pump efflux transcription and tumor metastasis. In this work, we reported that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) can be functionalized to co-deliver doxorubicin (Dox) and DNAzyme (Dz) to increase cancer cell killing in an additive fashion. The MSNs were sequentially conjugated with Dox into the MSNs’ nanochannels and Dz onto the MSNs’ outermost surface to target c-Jun as the Dox@MSN-Dz co-delivery system. The Dox-resistant PC-3 cells treated with Dox@MSN-Dz efficiently enhanced the intracellular Dox concentration due to the abrogation of Dox-induced MRP1 expression through the downregulation of c-Jun expression by Dz. Additionally, significant reductions in invasion and migration related to metastasis were also observed in cells treated with Dox@MSN-Dz. Therefore, our results contribute new insight to the treatment of MDR combined metastatic cancer cells, worthwhile for studying its potential for development in clinical translation.

  18. Tumor Angiogenesis Therapy Using Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel to the Vasculature of Breast Cancer Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer aberrantly expresses tissue factor (TF in cancer tissues and cancer vascular endothelial cells (VECs. TF plays a central role in cancer angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis and, as such, is a target for therapy and drug delivery. TF is the cognate receptor of factor VIIa (fVIIa. We have coupled PTX (paclitaxel, also named Taxol with a tripeptide, phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine chloromethyl ketone (FFRck and conjugated it with fVIIa. The key aim of the work is to evaluate the antiangiogenic effects of PTX-FFRck-fVIIa against a PTX-resistant breast cancer cell line. Matrigel mixed with VEGF and MDA-231 was injected subcutaneously into the flank of athymic nude mice. Animals were treated by tail vein injection of the PTX-FFRck-fVIIa conjugate, unconjugated PTX, or PBS. The PTX-FFRck-fVIIa conjugate significantly reduces microvessel density in matrigel (p<0.01–0.05 compared to PBS and unconjugated PTX. The breast cancer lung metastasis model in athymic nude mice was developed by intravenous injection of MDA-231 cells expressing luciferase. Animals were similarly treated intravenously with the PTX-FFRck-fVIIa conjugate or PBS. The conjugate significantly inhibits lung metastasis as compared to the control, highlighting its potential to antagonize angiogenesis in metastatic carcinoma. In conclusion, PTX conjugated to fVIIa is a promising therapeutic approach for improving selective drug delivery and inhibiting angiogenesis.

  19. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  20. Engineered nanoparticles for drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianmeng; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Pang, Bo; Hyun, Dong Choon; Yang, Miaoxin; Xia, Younan

    2014-11-10

    In medicine, nanotechnology has sparked a rapidly growing interest as it promises to solve a number of issues associated with conventional therapeutic agents, including their poor water solubility (at least, for most anticancer drugs), lack of targeting capability, nonspecific distribution, systemic toxicity, and low therapeutic index. Over the past several decades, remarkable progress has been made in the development and application of engineered nanoparticles to treat cancer more effectively. For example, therapeutic agents have been integrated with nanoparticles engineered with optimal sizes, shapes, and surface properties to increase their solubility, prolong their circulation half-life, improve their biodistribution, and reduce their immunogenicity. Nanoparticles and their payloads have also been favorably delivered into tumors by taking advantage of the pathophysiological conditions, such as the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and the spatial variations in the pH value. Additionally, targeting ligands (e.g., small organic molecules, peptides, antibodies, and nucleic acids) have been added to the surface of nanoparticles to specifically target cancerous cells through selective binding to the receptors overexpressed on their surface. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that multiple types of therapeutic drugs and/or diagnostic agents (e.g., contrast agents) could be delivered through the same carrier to enable combination therapy with a potential to overcome multidrug resistance, and real-time readout on the treatment efficacy. It is anticipated that precisely engineered nanoparticles will emerge as the next-generation platform for cancer therapy and many other biomedical applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Research collaboration in the discovery, development, and delivery networks of a statewide cancer coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, Keith G; Leischow, Scott J; Keagy, Judith; Nodora, Jesse

    2010-11-01

    This study examines and evaluates collaborative network involvement among 18 organizations within the Arizona Cancer Coalition. All were involved in one or more of three types of research activity: discovery, development, and delivery, consistent with the 3D continuum developed by the National Cancer Institute. Data were collected in 2007 using surveys of key informants in each organization. Using network analysis methods, we examined the structure of each type of network as well as the relationship between network position and the importance of cancer research to each organization's mission. Findings indicated that while both the discovery and delivery networks were comparably densely connected, their centrality structures were quite different. In contrast, the structures of both these networks were similar to the development network. Centrality in the discovery and development networks was positively related to the importance of cancer research to the organization, but not in the delivery network. Implications of the findings for future research, policy, and planning are discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Current treatment options and drug delivery systems as potential therapeutic agents for ovarian cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongye; Karim, Anis Abdul; Loh, Xian Jun

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common and deadliest gynecologic cancer with about 75% of the patients presenting in advanced stages. The introduction of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in 2006 had led to a 16 month improvement in the overall survival. However, catheter-related complication and the complexity of the procedure had deterred intraperitoneal route as the preferred route of treatment. Other alternative treatments had been developed by incorporating other FDA-approved agents or procedures such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and the administration of bevacizumab. Various clinical trials were conducted on these alternatives as both the first-line treatment and second- or third-line therapy for the recurrent disease. The outcome of these studies were summarized and discussed. A prospective improvement in the treatment of ovarian cancer could be done through the use of a drug delivery system. Selected promising recent developments in ovarian cancer drug delivery systems using different delivery vehicles, surface modifications, materials and drugs were also reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyphenols delivery by polymeric materials: challenges in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorio, Orazio; Curcio, Manuela; Cojoc, Monica; Goya, Gerardo F; Hampel, Silke; Iemma, Francesca; Dubrovska, Anna; Cirillo, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Nanotechnology can offer different solutions for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of polyphenols, a class of natural products widely explored for a potential applicability for the treatment of different diseases including cancer. While possessing interesting anticancer properties, polyphenols suffer from low stability and unfavorable pharmacokinetics, and thus suitable carriers are required when planning a therapeutic protocol. In the present review, an overview of the different strategies based on polymeric materials is presented, with the aim to highlight the strengths and the weaknesses of each approach and offer a platform of ideas for researchers working in the field.

  4. Delivery of maternal health care in Indigenous primary care services: baseline data for an ongoing quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbold, Alice R; Bailie, Ross S; Si, Damin; Dowden, Michelle C; Kennedy, Catherine M; Cox, Rhonda J; O'Donoghue, Lynette; Liddle, Helen E; Kwedza, Ru K; Thompson, Sandra C; Burke, Hugh P; Brown, Alex D H; Weeramanthri, Tarun; Connors, Christine M

    2011-03-07

    Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) populations have disproportionately high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes relative to other Australians. Poorer access to good quality maternal health care is a key driver of this disparity. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of delivery of maternity care and service gaps in primary care services in Australian Indigenous communities. We undertook a cross-sectional baseline audit for a quality improvement intervention. Medical records of 535 women from 34 Indigenous community health centres in five regions (Top End of Northern Territory 13, Central Australia 2, Far West New South Wales 6, Western Australia 9, and North Queensland 4) were audited. The main outcome measures included: adherence to recommended protocols and procedures in the antenatal and postnatal periods including: clinical, laboratory and ultrasound investigations; screening for gestational diabetes and Group B Streptococcus; brief intervention/advice on health-related behaviours and risks; and follow up of identified health problems. The proportion of women presenting for their first antenatal visit in the first trimester ranged from 34% to 49% between regions; consequently, documentation of care early in pregnancy was poor. Overall, documentation of routine antenatal investigations and brief interventions/advice regarding health behaviours varied, and generally indicated that these services were underutilised. For example, 46% of known smokers received smoking cessation advice/counselling; 52% of all women received antenatal education and 51% had investigation for gestational diabetes. Overall, there was relatively good documentation of follow up of identified problems related to hypertension or diabetes, with over 70% of identified women being referred to a GP/Obstetrician. Participating services had both strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of maternal health care. Increasing access to evidence-based screening and

  5. Delivery of maternal health care in Indigenous primary care services: baseline data for an ongoing quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwedza Ru K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous populations have disproportionately high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes relative to other Australians. Poorer access to good quality maternal health care is a key driver of this disparity. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of delivery of maternity care and service gaps in primary care services in Australian Indigenous communities. Methods We undertook a cross-sectional baseline audit for a quality improvement intervention. Medical records of 535 women from 34 Indigenous community health centres in five regions (Top End of Northern Territory 13, Central Australia 2, Far West New South Wales 6, Western Australia 9, and North Queensland 4 were audited. The main outcome measures included: adherence to recommended protocols and procedures in the antenatal and postnatal periods including: clinical, laboratory and ultrasound investigations; screening for gestational diabetes and Group B Streptococcus; brief intervention/advice on health-related behaviours and risks; and follow up of identified health problems. Results The proportion of women presenting for their first antenatal visit in the first trimester ranged from 34% to 49% between regions; consequently, documentation of care early in pregnancy was poor. Overall, documentation of routine antenatal investigations and brief interventions/advice regarding health behaviours varied, and generally indicated that these services were underutilised. For example, 46% of known smokers received smoking cessation advice/counselling; 52% of all women received antenatal education and 51% had investigation for gestational diabetes. Overall, there was relatively good documentation of follow up of identified problems related to hypertension or diabetes, with over 70% of identified women being referred to a GP/Obstetrician. Conclusion Participating services had both strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of maternal

  6. A qualitative study examining the sustainability of shared care in the delivery of palliative care services in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiglio, Lily; Williams, Allison M

    2013-08-29

    This paper focuses on the sustainability of existing palliative care teams that provide home-based care in a shared care model. For the purposes of this study, following Evashwick and Ory (2003), sustainability is understood and approached as the ability to continue the program over time. Understanding factors that influence the sustainability of teams and ways to mitigate these factors is paramount to improving the longevity and quality of service delivery models of this kind. Using qualitative data collected in interviews, the aim of this study is twofold: (1) to explore the factors that affect the sustainability of the teams at three different scales, and; (2) based on the results of this study, to propose a set of recommendations that will contribute to the sustainability of PC teams. Sustainability was conceptualized from two angles: internal and external. An overview of external sustainability was provided and the merging of data from all participant groups showed that the sustainability of teams was largely dependent on actors and organizations at the local (community), regional (Local Health Integration Network or LHIN) and provincial scales. The three scales are not self-contained or singular entities but rather are connected. Integration and collaboration within and between scales is necessary, as community capacity will inevitably reach its threshold without support of the province, which provides funding to the LHIN. While the community continues to advocate for the teams, in the long-term, they will need additional supports from the LHIN and province. The province has the authority and capacity to engrain its support for teams through a formal strategy. The recommendations are presented based on scale to better illustrate how actors and organizations could move forward. This study may inform program and policy specific to strategic ways to improve the provision of team-based palliative home care using a shared care model, while simultaneously providing

  7. Improving intensive care unit-based palliative care delivery: a multi-center, multidisciplinary survey of critical care clinician attitudes and beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Hua, May; Hough, Catherine L.; Gundel, Stephanie; Docherty, Sharron L.; Jones, Derek M.; Reagan, Owen; Goucher, Haley; Mcfarlin, Jessica; Galanos, Anthony; Knudsen, Nancy; Cox, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Addressing the quality gap in intensive care unit (ICU)-based palliative care is limited by uncertainty about acceptable models of collaborative specialist and generalist care. Therefore, we characterized the attitudes of physicians and nurses about palliative care delivery in an ICU environment. Design Mixed-methods study. Setting Medical and surgical ICUs at three large academic hospitals. Participants 303 nurses, intensivists, and advanced practice providers. Measurements and main results Clinicians completed written surveys that assessed attitudes about specialist palliative care presence and integration into the ICU setting, as well as acceptability of 23 published palliative care prompts (‘triggers’) for specialist consultation. Most (n=225, 75%) reported that palliative care consultation was underutilized. Prompting consideration of eligibility for specialist consultation by electronic health record searches for triggers was most preferred (n=123, 41%); only 17 (6%) felt current processes were adequate. The most acceptable specialist triggers were metastatic malignancy, unrealistic goals of care, end of life decision making, and persistent organ failure. Advanced age, length of stay, and duration of life support were the least acceptable. Screening led by either specialists or ICU teams was equally preferred. Central themes derived from qualitative analysis of 65 written responses to open-ended items included concerns about the roles of physicians and nurses, implementation, and impact on ICU team-family relationships. Conclusions Integration of palliative care specialists in the ICU is broadly acceptable and desired. However, the most commonly used current triggers for prompting specialist consultation were among the least well accepted, while more favorable triggers are difficult to abstract from electronic health record systems. There is also disagreement about the role of ICU nurses in palliative care delivery. These findings provide

  8. Teleradiology as a foundation for an enterprise-wide health care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, J D; Taira, R K; Sinha, U; Johnson, D B; Dai, B Y; Tashima, G H; Blythe, S; Johnson, R; Kangarloo, H

    2000-01-01

    An effective, integrated telemedicine system has been developed that allows (a) teleconsultation between local primary health care providers (primary care physicians and general radiologists) and remote imaging subspecialists and (b) active patient participation related to his or her medical condition and patient education. The initial stage of system development was a traditional teleradiology consultation service between general radiologists and specialists; this established system was expanded to include primary care physicians and patients. The system was developed by using a well-defined process model, resulting in three integrated modules: a patient module, a primary health care provider module, and a specialist module. A middle agent layer enables tailoring and customization of the modules for each specific user type. Implementation by using Java and the Common Object Request Broker Architecture standard facilitates platform independence and interoperability. The system supports (a) teleconsultation between a local primary health care provider and an imaging subspecialist regardless of geographic location and (b) patient education and online scheduling. The developed system can potentially form a foundation for an enterprise-wide health care delivery system. In such a system, the role of radiologist specialists is enhanced from that of a diagnostician to the management of a patient's process of care.

  9. Non-communicable diseases and HIV care and treatment: models of integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Malia; Ojikutu, Bisola; Andrian, Soa; Sohng, Elaine; Minior, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing cause of morbidity in low-income countries including in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Integration of NCD and HIV services can build upon experience with chronic care models from HIV programmes. We describe models of NCD and HIV integration, challenges and lessons learned. A literature review of published articles on integrated NCD and HIV programs in low-income countries and key informant interviews were conducted with leaders of identified integrated NCD and HIV programs. Information was synthesised to identify models of NCD and HIV service delivery integration. Three models of integration were identified as follows: NCD services integrated into centres originally providing HIV care; HIV care integrated into primary health care (PHC) already offering NCD services; and simultaneous introduction of integrated HIV and NCD services. Major challenges identified included NCD supply chain, human resources, referral systems, patient education, stigma, patient records and monitoring and evaluation. The range of HIV and NCD services varied widely within and across models. Regardless of model of integration, leveraging experience from HIV care models and adapting existing systems and tools is a feasible method to provide efficient care and treatment for the growing numbers of patients with NCDs. Operational research should be conducted to further study how successful models of HIV and NCD integration can be expanded in scope and scaled-up by managers and policymakers seeking to address all the chronic care needs of their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Needs of labor and delivery nurses caring for women undergoing pregnancy termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alyson; Swanson, Hilary; Frunchak, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    To explore the psychosocial, educational, and administrative support needs of labor and delivery (L&D) nurses who care for women undergoing pregnancy termination. A qualitative, descriptive design. This study was conducted on a L&D unit at a large, university-affiliated hospital in Quebec, Canada. A convenience sample of 10 L&D nurses participated in this study. Ages of participants ranged from 25 to 55 years, and experience on the unit ranged from 1 to 30 years. One-time, face-to-face interviews were conducted with each participant. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using inductive content analysis. Participants valued interpersonal support from nurse colleagues and guidance from experienced nurses in managing the emotional aspect of this care. They raised concerns about the effect of nursing workload and patient-to-nurse ratios on patient care. Nurses noted a desire for knowledge and skill-building through access to evidence-based literature, continuing education sessions, and workshops. They also expressed a need for more information regarding the genetic counseling process and community resources available to women undergoing pregnancy termination. Ensuring continuity of care through knowledge sharing related to genetic counseling and community resources creates the context for holistic patient care. Increased attention to the particular needs of L&D nurses providing care to women undergoing termination may enhance the quality and safety of care for this unique population. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  11. A Qualitative Evaluation of Web-Based Cancer Care Quality Improvement Toolkit Use in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Candice; Luck, Jeff; Gale, Randall C; Smith, Nina; York, Laura S; Asch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Disease severity, complexity, and patient burden highlight cancer care as a target for quality improvement (QI) interventions. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) implemented a series of disease-specific online cancer care QI toolkits. To describe characteristics of the toolkits, target users, and VHA cancer care facilities that influenced toolkit access and use and assess whether such resources were beneficial for users. Deductive content analysis of detailed notes from 94 telephone interviews with individuals from 48 VHA facilities. We evaluated toolkit access and use across cancer types, participation in learning collaboratives, and affiliation with VHA cancer care facilities. The presence of champions was identified as a strong facilitator of toolkit use, and learning collaboratives were important for spreading information about toolkit availability. Identified barriers included lack of personnel and financial resources and complicated approval processes to support tool use. Online cancer care toolkits are well received across cancer specialties and provider types. Clinicians, administrators, and QI staff may benefit from the availability of toolkits as they become more reliant on rapid access to strategies that support comprehensive delivery of evidence-based care. Toolkits should be considered as a complement to other QI approaches.

  12. Multidisciplinary training in perineal care during labor and delivery for the reduction of anal sphincter injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jonathan; Gundry, Rowan; Young, Helen; Naguib, Adel

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the introduction of a multidisciplinary intrapartum perineal-care training program reduced the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in patients undergoing vaginal deliveries. A prospective observational cohort study enrolled women undergoing vaginal deliveries at a district general hospital maternity unit in the United Kingdom between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014. All women experiencing obstetric anal sphincter injuries during the study period were identified and the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries before (2012-2013) a multidisciplinary training program was implemented was compared with the rate after (2013-2014) implementation using logistic regression analysis. The study enrolled 4920 patients. Following the implementation of the training program, the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries decreased from 4.8% to 3.1% of vaginal deliveries (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.493-0.899; P = 0.008). The integration of intrapartum perineal-care training into mandatory annual staff training was associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of Indigenous primary health care models of service delivery: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfield, Stephen; Davy, Carol; Kite, Elaine; McArthur, Alexa; Munn, Zachary; Brown, Ngiare; Brown, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the scoping review is to identify and describe within the existing literature the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggest practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people. More specifically, the review question is:What are the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggested practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people?Findings from this scoping review will inform two systematic reviews. One of these will explore the acceptability and the other the effectiveness of identified characteristics. The scoping review will follow the JBI Scoping Review methodology as outlined in the 2015 Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers' Manual. Indigenous populations in colonized countries experience worse health outcomes relative to their non-Indigenous counterparts. In Australia, in the period 2010 to 2012 the estimated gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians was 10 years Similar gaps in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous have been demonstrated in other countries, such as New Zealand, Canada and the United StatesThe gap in life expectancy and the health disadvantage experienced by Indigenous people is in part the result of mainstream health services not adequately meeting the health needs of Indigenous people and Indigenous people's inability to access mainstream services Part of the solution has been the establishment of primary health care services for and in many cases run by Indigenous people. Indigenous primary health services have been developed to provide culturally appropriate services that meet the needs of local Indigenous communities.In Australia, the first Aboriginal medical service was established in 1971 in Redfern, New South Wales, by "community activists in response to ongoing discrimination against Aboriginal people within

  14. Surgical care in the Solomon Islands: a road map for universal surgical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natuzzi, Eileen S; Kushner, Adam; Jagilly, Rooney; Pickacha, Douglas; Agiomea, Kaeni; Hou, Levi; Houasia, Patrick; Hendricks, Phillip L; Ba'erodo, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    Access to surgical care and emergency obstetrical care is limited in low-income countries. The Solomon Islands is one of the poorest countries in the Pacific region. Access to surgical care in Solomon Islands is limited and severely affected by a country made up of islands. Surgical care is centralized to the National Referral Hospital (NRH) on Guadalcanal, leaving a void of care in the provinces where more than 80% of the people live. To assess the ability to provide surgical care to the people living on outer islands in the Solomon Islands, the provincial hospitals were evaluated using the World Health Organization's Global Initiative for Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Needs Assessment Tool questionnaire. Data on infrastructure, workforce, and equipment available for treating surgical disease was collected at each provincial hospital visited. Surgical services are centralized to the NRH on Guadalcanal in Solomon Islands. Two provincial hospitals provide surgical care when a surgeon is available. Six of the hospitals evaluated provide only very basic surgical procedures. Infrastructure problems exist at every hospital including lack of running water, electricity, adequate diagnostic equipment, and surgical supplies. The number of surgeons and obstetricians employed by the Ministry of Health is currently inadequate for delivering care at the outer island hospitals. Shortages in the surgical workforce can be resolved in Solomon Islands with focused training of new graduates. Training surgeons locally, in the Pacific region, can minimize the "brain drain." Redistribution of surgeons and obstetricians to the provincial hospitals can be accomplished by creating supportive connections between these hospitals, the NRH, and international medical institutions.

  15. Emerging Models of Interprofessional Collaboration in Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Teresa; Wujcik, Debra; Wujcik, Kari

    2017-11-01

    To present emerging models for oncology health professionals to consider when coordinating cancer care among professionals, beginning as early as initial professional education and training and continuing along the cancer continuum to include cancer treatment and psychosocial support. Journal articles indexed on the National Library of Medicine database and personal communications with oncology colleagues. Interprofessional collaboration is becoming increasingly important in the specialty of oncology. The complexity of new therapies and their associated side-effect profiles benefit from a collaborative, interprofessional approach to the care of the patient with cancer. Additionally, oncology patients can benefit from interprofessional collaboration across the complexities of the care continuum. Oncology nurses are often in roles that can facilitate interprofessional collaboration, optimizing the care of patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Patient Care Delivery Model--an open system framework: conceptualisation, literature review and analytical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Meyer, Raquel M; Hayes, Laureen J; Wang, Sping

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the Patient Care Delivery Model to illustrate interrelationships between model components and to support its application in research using advanced analytical techniques, including structural equation modelling. Many complex factors contribute to the nature of healthcare environments and to nurse, patient and system outcomes. A better understanding of these factors and their interrelationships would provide insight for decision-makers to develop strategies to improve outcomes. A literature review approach was used to address the objectives. A threefold approach used existing theory to explicate a comprehensive conceptual framework, reviewed empirical studies of the proposed relationships and considered the application of advanced analytical techniques to inform future research directions. As per general system theory, inputs (patient, nurse and system characteristics) to the Patient Care Delivery Model interact with throughputs (nursing interventions, work environments and environmental complexity) to produce intermediate (staffing levels) and distal outputs (patient, nurse and system outcomes). Application of the model in research and its relevance for healthcare settings is supported in the current literature. Statistical techniques that allow model testing and the investigation of multiple relationships simultaneously have demonstrated the interconnections among the model components. Development of the Patient Care Delivery Model is a step towards understanding work environments and providing healthcare managers with evidence-based management tools. Formal testing of comprehensive, multilevel conceptual models will provide empirical linkages between inputs and outputs and will identify potential mediators between predictors and outcomes to offer new insight into organisational practices. A better understanding of how factors in the work environment impact clinical outcomes can facilitate care processes in the nursing unit. Future studies

  17. Prostate cancer and supportive care: a systematic review and qualitative synthesis of men's experiences and unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A J L; Evans, M; Moore, T H M; Paterson, C; Sharp, D; Persad, R; Huntley, A L

    2015-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide, accounting for an estimated 1.1 million new cases diagnosed in 2012 (www.globocan.iarc.fr). Currently, there is a lack of specific guidance on supportive care for men with prostate cancer. This article describes a qualitative systematic review and synthesis examining men's experience of and need for supportive care. Seven databases were searched; 20 journal articles were identified and critically appraised. A thematic synthesis was conducted in which descriptive themes were drawn out of the data. These were peer support, support from partner, online support, cancer specialist nurse support, self-care, communication with health professionals, unmet needs (emotional support, information needs, support for treatment-induced side effects of incontinence and erectile dysfunction) and men's suggestions for improved delivery of supportive care. This was followed by the development of overarching analytic themes which were: uncertainty, reframing, and the timing of receiving treatment, information and support. Our results show that the most valued form of support men experienced following diagnosis was one-to-one peer support and support from partners. This review highlights the need for improved access to cancer specialist nurses throughout the care pathway, individually tailored supportive care and psychosexual support for treatment side effects. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Why do some women still prefer traditional birth attendants and home delivery?: a qualitative study on delivery care services in West Java Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titaley Christiana R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trained birth attendants at delivery are important for preventing both maternal and newborn deaths. West Java is one of the provinces on Java Island, Indonesia, where many women still deliver at home and without the assistance of trained birth attendants. This study aims to explore the perspectives of community members and health workers about the use of delivery care services in six villages of West Java Province. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs and in-depth interviews was conducted in six villages of three districts in West Java Province from March to July 2009. Twenty FGDs and 165 in-depth interviews were conducted involving a total of 295 participants representing mothers, fathers, health care providers, traditional birth attendants and community leaders. The FGD and in-depth interview guidelines included reasons for using a trained or a traditional birth attendant and reasons for having a home or an institutional delivery. Results The use of traditional birth attendants and home delivery were preferable for some community members despite the availability of the village midwife in the village. Physical distance and financial limitations were two major constraints that prevented community members from accessing and using trained attendants and institutional deliveries. A number of respondents reported that trained delivery attendants or an institutional delivery were only aimed at women who experienced obstetric complications. The limited availability of health care providers was reported by residents in remote areas. In these settings the village midwife, who was sometimes the only health care provider, frequently travelled out of the village. The community perceived the role of both village midwives and traditional birth attendants as essential for providing maternal and health care services. Conclusions A comprehensive strategy to increase the availability, accessibility, and

  19. Why do some women still prefer traditional birth attendants and home delivery?: a qualitative study on delivery care services in West Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titaley, Christiana R; Hunter, Cynthia L; Dibley, Michael J; Heywood, Peter

    2010-08-11

    Trained birth attendants at delivery are important for preventing both maternal and newborn deaths. West Java is one of the provinces on Java Island, Indonesia, where many women still deliver at home and without the assistance of trained birth attendants. This study aims to explore the perspectives of community members and health workers about the use of delivery care services in six villages of West Java Province. A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews was conducted in six villages of three districts in West Java Province from March to July 2009. Twenty FGDs and 165 in-depth interviews were conducted involving a total of 295 participants representing mothers, fathers, health care providers, traditional birth attendants and community leaders. The FGD and in-depth interview guidelines included reasons for using a trained or a traditional birth attendant and reasons for having a home or an institutional delivery. The use of traditional birth attendants and home delivery were preferable for some community members despite the availability of the village midwife in the village. Physical distance and financial limitations were two major constraints that prevented community members from accessing and using trained attendants and institutional deliveries. A number of respondents reported that trained delivery attendants or an institutional delivery were only aimed at women who experienced obstetric complications. The limited availability of health care providers was reported by residents in remote areas. In these settings the village midwife, who was sometimes the only health care provider, frequently travelled out of the village. The community perceived the role of both village midwives and traditional birth attendants as essential for providing maternal and health care services. A comprehensive strategy to increase the availability, accessibility, and affordability of delivery care services should be considered in these West Java

  20. Teleophthalmology: A Model for Eye Care Delivery in Rural and Underserved Areas of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaraghavan Prathiba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To describe the application of teleophthalmology in rural and underserved areas of India. Study Design. This paper describes the major teleophthalmology projects in India and its benefits. Results. Teleophthalmology is the use of telecommunication for electronic transfer of health-related data from rural and underserved areas of India to specialities in urban cities. The MDRF/WDF Rural Diabetes Project has proved to be very beneficial for improvement of quality health care in Tamilnadu and can be replicated at the national level. This community outreach programme using telemedicine facilities has increased awareness of eye diseases, improved access to specialized health care, helped in local community empowerment, and provided employment opportunities. Early detection of sight threatening disorders by teleophthalmology and prompt treatment can help decrease visual impairment. Conclusion. Teleophthalmology can be a very effective model for improving eye care delivery system in rural and underserved areas of India.

  1. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  2. Types and delivery of emotional support to promote linkage and engagement in HIV care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook CL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Christa L Cook,1 Shantrel Canidate,2 Nicole Ennis,3 Robert L Cook4 1Department of Family, Community, and Health System Science, College of Nursing, 2Social and Behavioral Science, College of Public Health and Health Profession, 3Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: Despite recommendations for early entry into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care, many people diagnosed with HIV delay seeking care. Multiple types of social support (ie, cognitive, emotional, and tangible are often needed for someone to transition into HIV care, but a lack of emotional support at diagnosis may be the reason why some people fail to stay engaged in care. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify how people living with HIV conceptualized emotional support needs and delivery at diagnosis. Method: We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data from 27 people living with HIV, many of whom delayed entry into HIV care. Results: Participants described their experiences seeking care after an HIV diagnosis and identified components of emotional support that aided entry into care – identification, connection, and navigational presence. Many participants stated that these types of support were ideally delivered by peers with HIV. Conclusion: In clinical practice, providers often use an HIV diagnosis as an opportunity to educate patients about HIV prevention and access to services. However, this type of social support may not facilitate engagement in care if emotional support needs are not met. Keywords: linkage to care, engagement in care, social support, qualitative

  3. Match of psychosocial risk and psychosocial care in families of a child with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sint Nicolaas, S M; Schepers, S A; van den Bergh, E M M; de Boer, Y; Streng, I; van Dijk-Lokkart, E M; Grootenhuis, M A; Verhaak, C M

    2017-12-01

    The Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) was developed to screen for psychosocial risk, aimed to be supportive in directing psychosocial care to families of a child with cancer. This study aimed to determine (i) the match between PAT risk score and provided psychosocial care with healthcare professionals blind to outcome of PAT assessment, and (ii) the match between PAT risk score and team risk estimation. Eighty-three families of children with cancer from four pediatric oncology centers in the Netherlands participated (59% response rate). The PAT and team risk estimation was assessed at diagnosis (M = 40.2 days, SD = 14.1 days), and the content of provided psychosocial care in the 5-month period thereafter resulting in basic or specialized care. According to the PAT, 65% of families were defined as having low (universal), 30% medium (targeted), and 5% high (clinical) risk for developing psychosocial problems. Thirty percent of patients from universal group got basic psychosocial care, 63% got specialized care, and 7% did not get any care. Fourteen percent of the families at risk got basic care, 86% got specialized care. Team risk estimations and PAT risk scores matched with 58% of the families. This study showed that families at risk, based on standardized risk assessment with the PAT, received more specialized care than families without risk. However, still 14% of the families with high risks only received basic care, and 63% of the families with standard risk got specialized care. Standardized risk assessment can be used as part of comprehensive care delivery, complementing the team. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. CHALLENGING ISSUES OF SPECIALIZED CARE DELIVERY TO VICTIMS OF BURNS IN THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Porkhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. The number of burn victims in Russia is growing annually. However, combustiology remains one of the few medical specialties in the country, which has no accepted procedure for the care delivery.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The article presents an analysis of high-tech medical assistance delivery to victims of burns in the Krasnodar Region. We also consider challenging issues on combustiology services organization in Russia and economic aspects for patients with burn injury under the compulsory medical insurance.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Up to 3,000 patients requiring hospital treatment are registered in the Krasnodar Region. Of 2,200 operations, 2,000 surgeries are performed in the regional burn center. Implementation of regional system of “early surgical treatment” allowed to reach some of the lowest mortality rates in Russia (in the Region: total 2.43%, adults 4.69%, children 0.16%.

  5. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Leadership Perspectives on Operationalizing the Learning Health Care System in an Integrated Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psek, Wayne; Davis, F. Daniel; Gerrity, Gloria; Stametz, Rebecca; Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Henninger, Debra; Sellers, Dorothy; Darer, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Healthcare leaders need operational strategies that support organizational learning for continued improvement and value generation. The learning health system (LHS) model may provide leaders with such strategies; however, little is known about leaders’ perspectives on the value and application of system-wide operationalization of the LHS model. The objective of this project was to solicit and analyze senior health system leaders’ perspectives on the LHS and learning activities in an integrated delivery system. Methods: A series of interviews were conducted with 41 system leaders from a broad range of clinical and administrative areas across an integrated delivery system. Leaders’ responses were categorized into themes. Findings: Ten major themes emerged from our conversations with leaders. While leaders generally expressed support for the concept of the LHS and enhanced system-wide learning, their concerns and suggestions for operationalization where strongly aligned with their functional area and strategic goals. Discussion: Our findings suggests that leaders tend to adopt a very pragmatic approach to learning. Leaders expressed a dichotomy between the operational imperative to execute operational objectives efficiently and the need for rigorous evaluation. Alignment of learning activities with system-wide strategic and operational priorities is important to gain leadership support and resources. Practical approaches to addressing opportunities and challenges identified in the themes are discussed. Conclusion: Continuous learning is an ongoing, multi-disciplinary function of a health care delivery system. Findings from this and other research may be used to inform and prioritize system-wide learning objectives and strategies which support reliable, high value care delivery. PMID:27683668

  7. Disparities in delivery of ophthalmic care; An exploration of public Medicare data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia S Lee

    Full Text Available Cataract is a major cause of age-related eye diseases in the United States, and cataract extraction is the most commonly performed surgery on Medicare beneficiaries. Analyzing the pattern in delivery of cataract care at the national level can highlight areas of disparities. We evaluated geographic disparities seen in cataract surgery delivery to Medicare beneficiaries in the United States.Cataract extractions across the United States in 2012.Cross-sectional study examining distance to provider and observed versus expected number of cataract extractions.Cataract extraction current procedural terminology codes were used to sum the total observed number of cataract extractions per cataract surgeon. Epidemiology data on expected number of cataract surgeries in one year by decade of life were extrapolated via a Gaussian Process model. A linear regression model was used to compare differences in delivery of care between US economic regions.2.2 million patients underwent cataract surgery in the Medicare dataset in 2012. The average distance to the nearest provider was 9.846 miles (standard deviation: 11.410 miles. This distance was statistically significant (p < 2.0 x 10-22 in the New England (5.935 mi, Mideast (6.356 mi, Great Lakes (8.733 mi, Far West (9.038 mi, Southeast (9.793 mi, Southwest (12.711 mi, Plains (16.047 mi, and Rocky Mountain (17.934 mi regions. The total number of expected cataract surgeries greater than 100 miles to the nearest cataract surgeon was 1,901, where Montana, South Dakota, and Texas each had over 200 of these expected distances.A large discrepancy exists in cataract delivery to the Medicare population based on geographic factors. Patients who live in rural areas travel farther on average to see ophthalmologists, resulting in a lower observed than expected rate of cataract surgery. Our results have implications in future allocation of resources and ophthalmologists.

  8. Safe Delivery Posts: an intervention to provide equitable childbirth care services to vulnerable groups in Zahedan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudi, Zahra; Ghazi Tabatabaie, Mahmood; Mahdi Tabatabaei, Seyed; Vedadhir, AbouAli

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there has been a shift towards alternative childbirth services to increase access to skilled care during childbirth. This study aims to assess the past 10 years of experience of the first Safe Delivery Posts (SDPs) established in Zahedan, Iran to determine the number of deliveries and the intrapartum transfer rates, and to examine the reasons why women choose to give birth at a Safe Delivery Post and not in one of the four large hospitals in Zahedan. A mixed-methods research strategy was used for this study. In the quantitative phase, an analysis was performed on the existing data that are routinely collected in the health-care sector. In the qualitative phase, a grounded theory approach was used to collect and analyse narrative data from in-depth interviews with women who had given birth to their children at the Safe Delivery Posts. Women were selected from two Safe Delivery Posts in Zahedan city in southeast Iran. Nineteen mothers who had given birth in the Safe Delivery Posts were interviewed. During the 10-year period, 22,753 low-risk women gave birth in the Safe Delivery Posts, according to the records. Of all the women who were admitted to the Safe Delivery Posts, on average 2.1% were transferred to the hospital during labour or the postpartum period. Three key categories emerged from the analysis: barriers to hospital use, opposition to home birth and finally, reasons for choosing the childbirth care provided by the SDPs. Implementing a model of midwifery care that offers the benefits of modern medical care and meets the needs of the local population is feasible and sustainable. This model of care reduces the cost of giving birth and ensures equitable access to care among vulnerable groups in Zahedan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer: Rationales, delivery technologies and dosage regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy...... using different pharmaceuticals has been proven highly effective due to the ability to affect multiple cellular pathways involved in the disease progression. However, the currently used drug combination designs are primarily based on empirical clinical studies, and little attention has been given...... for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials....

  10. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Gynecologic and Obstetric Care for Breast Cancer Survivors: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Griffin

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer treatment has an impact on the physical, psychologic, sexual, and reproductive aspects of women's lives. Therefore, it is important for obstetrician-gynecologists to be well versed in the screening, diagnosis, and management of breast cancer. This monograph is an overview of critical issues related to the provision of ongoing care to breast cancer survivors.

  11. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Long, Margaret E; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M

    2015-11-01

    Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health.

  12. Interprofessional Team's Perception of Care Delivery After Implementation of a Pediatric Pain and Sedation Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveski, Sandra L; Wu, May; Tesoro, Tiffany M; Roth, Stephen J; Cisco, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Pain and agitation are common experiences of patients in pediatric cardiac intensive care units. Variability in assessments by health care providers, communication, and treatment of pain and agitation creates challenges in management of pain and sedation. To develop guidelines for assessment and treatment of pain, agitation, and delirium in the pediatric cardiac intensive unit in an academic children's hospital and to document the effects of implementation of the guidelines on the interprofessional team's perception of care delivery and team function. Before and after implementation of the guidelines, interprofessional team members were surveyed about the members' perception of analgesia, sedation, and delirium management RESULTS: Members of the interprofessional team felt more comfortable with pain and sedation management after implementation of the guidelines. Team members reported improvements in team communication on patients' comfort. Members thought that important information was less likely to be lost during transfer of care. They also noted that the team carried out comfort management plans and used pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies better after implementation of the guidelines than they did before implementation. Guidelines for pain and sedation management were associated with perceived improvements in team function and patient care by members of the interprofessional team. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Global Lessons In Frugal Innovation To Improve Health Care Delivery In The United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Yasser; Taylor, Andrea; Harris, Matthew; Wadge, Hester; Escobar, Erin; Prime, Matt; Patel, Hannah; Carter, Alexander W; Parston, Greg; Darzi, Ara W; Udayakumar, Krishna

    2017-11-01

    In a 2015 global study of low-cost or frugal innovations, we identified five leading innovations that scaled successfully in their original contexts and that may provide insights for scaling such innovations in the United States. We describe common themes among these diverse innovations, critical factors for their translation to the United States to improve the efficiency and quality of health care, and lessons for the implementation and scaling of other innovations. We highlight promising trends in the United States that support adapting these innovations, including growing interest in moving care out of health care facilities and into community and home settings; the growth of alternative payment models and incentives to experiment with new approaches to population health and care delivery; and the increasing use of diverse health professionals, such as community health workers and advanced practice providers. Our findings should inspire policy makers and health care professionals and inform them about the potential for globally sourced frugal innovations to benefit US health care.

  14. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-05-22

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme 'On Your Own Feet Ahead!' in the Netherlands. A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1 year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Transition programme. Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents' characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (pteam climate (pteam climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Using a supportive care framework to understand and improve palliative care among cancer patients in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2016-06-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in Africa, which is leading to greater demands for palliative care. There has been little progress in terms of research, pain management, and policies related to palliative care. Palliative care in Africa is scarce and scattered, with most African nations lacking the basic services. To address these needs, a guiding framework that identifies care needs and directs palliative care services could be utilized. Therefore, using the supportive care framework developed by Fitch (Fitch, 2009), we here review the literature on palliative care for patients diagnosed with cancer in Africa and make recommendations for improvement. The PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Medline databases were searched. Some 25 English articles on research from African countries published between 2004 and 2014 were selected and reviewed. The reviewed literature was analyzed and presented using the domains of the supportive care framework. Palliative care patients with cancer in Africa, their families, and caregivers experience increasing psychological, physical, social, spiritual, emotional, informational, and practical needs. Care needs are often inadequately addressed because of a lack of awareness as well as deficient and scattered palliative care services and resources. In addition, there is sparse research, education, and policies that address the dire situation in palliative care. Our review findings add to the existing body of knowledge demonstrating that palliative care patients with cancer in Africa experience disturbing care needs in all domains of the supportive care framework. To better assess and address these needs, holistic palliative care that is multidomain and multi-professional could be utilized. This approach needs to be individualized and to offer better access to services and information. In addition, research, education, and policies around palliative care for cancer

  16. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya’an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  17. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  18. The potentials of nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for treatment of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes for death of women. Every year the percentage of mortality rate is increasing day by day. Various chemotherapeutic agents are used to increase the survival rate of patients with ovarian cancer, but the available conventional dosage forms/marketed preparations are associated with several limitations. The use of nanotechnology in drug delivery contributes to their small size (10-100 nm), which improves the circulation and enables superior accumulation of therapeutic drugs at the tumor sites. In future, the use of nanotechnology will enable passive targeting and further improvements can be made using targeting moieties.

  19. Transferrin functionalized chitosan-PEG nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Mukesh; Gajbhiye, Virendra; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K

    2016-12-01

    The present investigation was aimed to utilize the stealth property of polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) and active targeting function of transferrin (Tf) by transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis to promote drug delivery to cancer cells. Paclitaxel (PTX) loaded nanoparticles (PTX-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method; PEGylation was carried out by coupling amine group present on the surface of NPs with hydroxyl group present on the PEG (NP-PEG). Tf conjugation was carried out by coupling carboxylic group present on the surface of ligand and hydroxyl group present on the PEG (NP-PEG-Tf). The uptake of NP-PEG-Tf into cancer cells was found to be higher as compared to non-targeted NPs. Compared with free PTX, PTX-NPs and PTX-NPs-PEG, the PTX-NPs-PEG-Tf demonstrated higher cytotoxicity to human Non-Small Cell Lung cancer cell lines (HOP-62), higher intracellular uptake especially in nuclei and lower hemolytic toxicity. Tf conjugated NPs showed increased retention time in the lungs as well as in blood. These findings indicate that Tf conjugated PEGylated nanoparticles are promising nanoconstructs for the delivery of anti-cancer drugs to cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Last Advances in Nanocarriers-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Ana R; Jimenez-Lopez, Julia; Cabeza, Laura; Jimenez-Luna, Cristina; Leiva, Maria C; Perazzoli, Gloria; Hernandez, Rosa; Zafra, Inmaculada; Ortiz, Raul; Melguizo, Consolacion; Prados, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer in both, men and women. The development of metastasis is very frequent, especially in patients with advanced stage, who require intensive chemotherapy that often results in poor response and significant morbidity. The undesirable effects of intensive chemotherapy on normal cells and the development of multidrug resistance are two of the main causes of treatment failure. Recent advances in nanotechnology allow to target cancer cells using cytotoxic drugs without affecting normal cells. Nanocarriers such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, among others, are able to improve drug distribution and bioavailability, cytotoxic concentration in the tumor mass and drug delivery to tumor tissue and, at the same time, reduce side effects. Current research studies are being conducted to develop new biomaterials that improve the characteristics of these nanomolecules. Several preclinical assays have disclosed the efficacy of nanotherapy in colon cancer, although further clinical trials will be necessary to demonstrate its efficacy. This review discusses the current status and the potential advantages of using nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems for colorectal cancer.

  1. Considering an integrated nephrology care delivery model: six principles for quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, L Lee; Hostetter, Thomas H; Shaffer, Rachel N

    2013-04-01

    In 2012, 27 organizations will initiate participation in the Medicare Shared Savings Program as Accountable Care Organizations. This level of participation reflects the response of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to criticism that the program as outlined in the proposed rule was overly burdensome, prescriptive, and too risky. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service made significant changes in the final rule, making the Accountable Care Organization program more attractive to these participants. However, none of these changes addressed the serious concerns raised by subspecialty societies-including the American Society of Nephrology-regarding care of patients with multiple chronic comorbidities and complex and end stage conditions. Virtually all of these concerns remain unaddressed, and consequently, Accountable Care Organizations will require guidance and partnership from the nephrology community to ensure that these patients are identified and receive the individualized care that they require. Although the final rule fell short of addressing the needs of patients with kidney disease, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation presents an opportunity to test the potentially beneficial concepts of the Accountable Care Organization program within this patient population. The American Society of Nephrology Accountable Care Organization Task Force developed a set of principles that must be reflected in a possible pilot program or demonstration project of an integrated nephrology care delivery model. These principles include preserving a leadership role for nephrologists, encompassing care for patients with later-stage CKD and kidney transplants as well as ESRD, enabling the participation of a diversity of dialysis provider sizes and types, facilitating research, and establishing monitoring systems to identify and address preferential patient selection or changes in outcomes.

  2. Breast Cancer Targeting Peptide Binds Keratin 1: A New Molecular Marker for Targeted Drug Delivery to Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudy, Rania; Etayash, Hashem; Bahadorani, Kamran; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2017-03-06

    The biomarkers or receptors expressed on cancer cells and the targeting ligands with high binding affinity for biomarkers play a key role in early detection and treatment of breast cancer. The breast cancer targeting peptide p160 (12-mer) and its enzymatically stable analogue 18-4 (10-mer) showed marked potential for breast cancer drug delivery using cell studies and animal models. Herein, we used affinity purification, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and proteomics to identify keratin 1 (KRT1) as the target receptor highly expressed on breast cancer cells for p160 peptide(s). Western blot and immunocytochemistry in MCF-7 breast cancer cells confirmed the identity of KRT1. We demonstrate that the p160 or 18-4 binding to MCF-7 breast cancer cells is dependent on the expression of KRT1, and we confirm peptide-KRT1 binding specificity using SPR experiments (Kd ∼ 1.1 μM and 0.98 μM for p160 and 18-4, respectively). Furthermore, we assessed the ability of peptide 18-4 to improve the cellular uptake and anticancer activity of a pro-apoptotic antimicrobial peptide, microcin J25 (MccJ25), in breast cancer cells. A covalent conjugate of peptide 18-4 with MccJ25 showed preferential cytotoxicity toward breast cancer cells with minimal cytotoxicity against normal HUVEC cells. The conjugate inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 MDR multidrug-resistant cells with an IC50 comparable to that of nonresistant cells. Conjugation improved selective cellular uptake of MccJ25, and the conjugate triggered cancer cell death by apoptosis. Our findings establish KRT1 as a new marker for breast cancer targeting. Additionally, it pinpoints the potential use of antimicrobial lasso peptides as a novel class of anticancer therapeutics.

  3. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  4. Continuity of Care Document (CCD) Enables Delivery of Medication Histories to the Primary Care Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonaitis, Linas; Belsito, Anne; Cravens, Gary; Shen, Changyu; Overhage, J. Marc

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of the Enhanced Medication History (EMH) project is to provide medication histories to ambulatory primary care practices in the Indiana Network for Patient Care. Methods: Medications were aggregated from three different sources of pharmacy data (Medicaid, SureScripts, and the county health system of Indianapolis). Dispensing events were assembled into the Continuity of Care Document (CCD), and presented to clinicians as RxNorm Clinical Drugs. Results: The EMH project completed 46 weeks of operation in a community health center in Indianapolis. Medication Histories were generated for 10498 office visits for 4449 distinct patients. Seven (of nine) attending physicians responded to a written survey and found the Medication Histories useful (3.9±0.4 on a scale of 1 to 5). Conclusion: Implementation of the EMH project demonstrated the successful use (as well as the challenging aspects) of the CCD and the RxNorm terminology in the outpatient clinical setting. PMID:21347078

  5. End-of-life care at a community cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, David E; Yu, Bennett W; Heineken, Sandra L; Lewis, Elizabeth N; Chaudhry, Vishal; Daugherty, Joan M

    2012-07-01

    The evidence-based use of resources for cancer care at end of life (EOL) has the potential to relieve suffering, reduce health care costs, and extend life. Internal benchmarks need to be established within communities to achieve these goals. The purpose for this study was to evaluate data within our community to determine our EOL cancer practices. A random sample of 390 patients was obtained from the 942 cancer deaths in Wicomico County, Maryland, for calendar years 2004 to 2008. General demographic, clinical event, and survival data were obtained from that sample using cancer registry and hospice databases as well as manual medical record reviews. In addition, the intensity of EOL cancer care was assessed using previously proposed indicator benchmarks. The significance of potential relationships between variables was explored using χ(2) analyses. Mean age at death was 70 years; 52% of patients were male; 34% died as a result of lung cancer. Median survival from diagnosis to death was 8.4 months with hospice admission and 5.8 months without hospice (P = .11). Four of eight intensity-of-care indicators (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission within last month of life, > one hospitalization within last month of life, hospital death, and hospice referral < 3 days before death) all significantly exceeded the referenced benchmarks. Hospice versus nonhospice admissions were associated (P < .001) with ICU admissions (2% v 13%) and hospital deaths (2% v 54%). These data suggest opportunities to improve community cancer center EOL care.

  6. Value-added care: a paradigm shift in patient care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upenieks, Valda V; Akhavan, Jaleh; Kotlerman, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Spiraling costs in health care have placed hospitals in a constant state of transition. As a result, nursing practice is now influenced by numerous factors and has remained in a continuous state of flux. Multiple changes within the last 2 decades in nurse/patient ratio and blend of front-line nurses are examples of this transition. To reframe the nursing practice into an economic equation that captures the cost, quality, and service, a paradigm shift in thinking is needed in order to assess work redesign. Nursing productivity must be evaluated in terms of value-added care, a vision that goes beyond direct care activities and includes team collaboration, physician rounding, increased RN-to-aide communication, and patient centeredness; all of which are crucial to the nurse's role and the patient's well-being. The science of appropriating staffing depends on assessment and implementation of systematic changes best illustrated through a "systems theory" framework. A throughput transformation is required to create process changes with input elements (number of front-line nurses) in order to increase time spent in value-added care and to decrease waste activities with an improvement in efficiency, quality, and service. The purpose of this pilot study was two-fold: (a) to gain an understanding of how much time RNs spent in value-added care, and (b) whether increasing the combined level of RNs and unlicensed assistive personnel increased the amount of time spent in value-added care compared to time spent in necessary tasks and waste.

  7. [Care pathways of cancer patients: Modeling and risks analysis induced by oral anticancer drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renet, Sophie; Maritaz, Christophe; Lotz, Jean-Pierre; Burnel, Sylvie; Paubel, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The care pathway of cancer patients is complex and therefore difficult to define. The oral anticancers (AKPO) have shown their benefits to patients and health professionals, however, the risks induced on the care pathway remain unknown. The objective of the study is to define, quantify the risks from AKPO and their effects on the care pathway (breakdown [Ds], rupture [Rt]). From the proposed care pathway model, FMEA method is used to analyze risks. For the 3 identified processes (1 monotherapy, 2 bitherapies: 2 AKPO or 1 AKPO/1 AKIV), analysis revealed an average of 91 risks, 173 Ds, 147 Rt, increased for 1 AKPO/1 AKIV therapy. The administration and delivery are the most risky steps. The lack of training and information of patients and healthcare professionals generates 80% of Ds and Rt. This model confirms the complexity, variability of the care pathway. The development of actions to improve town-hospital coordination and exchange of information is required to optimize and secure the route, confirming the objectives of "Plan Cancer 3". Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The facilitators and impediment factors of structural empowerment in pregnancy and delivery care: achievement of power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janighorban, M; Yousefi, H; Yamani, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: The organizations essentially affect empowerment of personnel through the preparation of the needed grounds for them. Also, the students may acquire the required potentials and capabilities in the educational organizations when the possibility is provided to them to access power and opportunity in educational environments. Objective: The present study aimed to explain the facilitators and impediment factors of structural empowerment in pregnancy and delivery care. Methods: According to Kanter's theory, this qualitative study was conducted with the participation of 15 superior midwifery students, ten academic teachers of midwifery, and two midwives employed in the educational hospitals. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews individually and in the group and analyzed by using a directed content analysis method. Results: To explain the facilitators and impediment factors of empowerment in pregnancy and delivery care in the power structure, the access was provided to a support formed by three broad categories of support from the instructors, support from personnel, and support from a classmate. The access to resources was created with three broad categories of access to the appropriate clinical environment, to the laboratory of clinical skills and to information sources, and to information, forming with two broad categories of awareness of the educational objectives as well as legal and legitimate issues. Conclusion: One could prepare the ground for the midwifery students to access this empowerment in pregnancy and delivery cares more than ever by providing equipped clinical environments and the presence of all-inclusive supportive climate in such environments. Along with the efficient training of students in the laboratory.

  9. Optimizing CIGB-300 intralesional delivery in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarduy, M R; García, I; Coca, M A; Perera, A; Torres, L A; Valenzuela, C M; Baladrón, I; Solares, M; Reyes, V; Hernández, I; Perera, Y; Martínez, Y M; Molina, L; González, Y M; Ancízar, J A; Prats, A; González, L; Casacó, C A; Acevedo, B E; López-Saura, P A; Alonso, D F; Gómez, R; Perea-Rodríguez, S E

    2015-05-12

    We conducted a phase 1 trial in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer by injecting 0.5 ml of the CK2-antagonist CIGB-300 in two different sites on tumours to assess tumour uptake, safety, pharmacodynamic activity and identify the recommended dose. Fourteen patients were treated with intralesional injections containing 35 or 70 mg of CIGB-300 in three alternate cycles of three consecutive days each before standard chemoradiotherapy. Tumour uptake was determined using (99)Tc-radiolabelled peptide. In situ B23/nucleophosmin was determined by immunohistochemistry. Maximum tumour uptake for CIGB-300 70-mg dose was significantly higher than the one observed for 35 mg: 16.1 ± 8.9 vs 31.3 ± 12.9 mg (P = 0.01). Both, AUC24h and biological half-life were also significantly higher using 70 mg of CIGB-300 (P 300 diffused rapidly to blood and was mainly distributed towards kidneys, and marginally in liver, lungs, heart and spleen. There was no DLT and moderate allergic-like reactions were the most common systemic side effect with strong correlation between unincorporated CIGB-300 and histamine levels in blood. CIGB-300, 70 mg, downregulated B23/nucleophosmin (P = 0.03) in tumour specimens. Intralesional injections of 70 mg CIGB-300 in two sites (0.5 ml per injection) and this treatment plan are recommended to be evaluated in phase 2 studies.

  10. A novel microparticulate vaccine for melanoma cancer using transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Tuhin; D'Souza, Bernadette; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Oettinger, Carl; Selvaraj, Periasamy; D'Souza, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we formulated a microparticulate melanoma cancer vaccine via the transdermal route. The vaccine was delivered using microneedle-based Dermaroller® which is available for cosmetic purposes. Unlike subcutaneous injections, administration using microneedles is painless and in general can increase the permeability of many compounds ranging in size from small molecules to proteins and microparticles that do not normally penetrate the skin. The vaccine microparticles were taken up by the antigen presenting cells which demonstrated a strong IgG titre level of 930 ug/mL in serum samples. The formulation increased the immunogenicity of the vaccine by incorporating the antigen into an albumin matrix having a size range of around 0.63-1.4 µm which acted as a synthetic adjuvant. The animals were vaccinated with 1 prime and 4 booster doses administered every 14 days over 8 weeks duration, followed by challenge with live tumour cells which showed protection after transdermal vaccination.

  11. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available.

  12. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  13. Exploring nurses' reactions to a novel technology to support acute health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Bridie; Redley, Bernice; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Nguyen, Lemai; Taylor, Nyree J; Moghimi, Hoda; Botti, Mari

    2015-08-01

    To explore nurses' reactions to new novel technology for acute health care. Past failures of technology developers to deliver products that meet nurses' needs have led to resistance and reluctance in the technology adoption process. Thus, involving nurses in a collaborative process from early conceptualisation serves to inform design reflective upon current clinical practice, facilitating the cementing of 'vision' and expectations of the technology. An exploratory descriptive design to capture nurses' immediate impressions. Four focus groups (52 nurses from medical and surgical wards at two hospitals in Australia; one private and one public). Nursing reactions towards the new technology illustrated a variance in barrier and enabler comments across multiple domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework. Most challenging for nurses were the perceived threat to their clinical skill, and the potential capability of the novel technology to capture their clinical workflow. Enabling reactions included visions that this could help integrate care between departments; help management and support of nursing processes; and coordinating their patients care between clinicians. Nurses' reactions differed across hospital sites, influenced by their experiences of using technology. For example, Site 1 nurses reported wide variability in their distribution of barrier and enabling comments and nurses at Site 2, where technology was prevalent, reported mostly positive responses. This early involvement offered nursing input and facilitated understanding of the potential capabilities of novel technology to support nursing work, particularly the characteristics seen as potentially beneficial (enabling technology) and those conflicting (barrier technology) with the delivery of both safe and effective patient care. Collaborative involvement of nurses from the early conceptualisation of technology development brings benefits that increase the likelihood of successful use of a tool intended to

  14. Regional healthcare delivery and demographic change in Germany - scenarios for dermatological care in 2035.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Anne; Augustin, Matthias; Augustin, Jobst

    2017-12-01

    The 'demand planning guidelines' issued by the Federal Joint Committee are meant to ensure nationwide delivery of healthcare in Germany. The calculatory variable used to reflect the actual care situation in relation to a given geographical entity is referred to as 'adjusted supply rate'. Against the backdrop of demographic change and already existing problems in replacing retiring physicians, the question arises as to how future dermatological care will evolve at the regional level. Using current 'demand planning guidelines' as well as nationwide data on the location of dermatologists and current and projected population figures at the county level, the adjusted supply rate - in terms of dermatological care - was calculated for the year 2035 based on three possible scenarios (scenario 1: 100 % replacement of retiring dermatologists; scenario 2: non-replacement of one dermatologist per planning area; and scenario 3: non-replacement of two dermatologists in rural areas). While scenario 1 shows an actual improvement in regional dermatological care in certain areas between 2014 and 2035 (n = 3 no longer undersupplied), the more likely scenarios 2 and 3 are potentially associated with considerable regional undersupply. Taking demographic change into account, it is safe to assume that the geographical heterogeneity of dermatological care will increase. This requires greater effort not only in terms of demand planning but also with regard to offering alternative methods of delivering healthcare and intercommunal cooperation. In this context, the objective will be to adapt healthcare delivery to changes both in demography as well as in the plans young physicians have for their own lives. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmer MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediatric oncology populations. This paper describes pediatric palliative care and provides an overview of literature related to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer. Nurses can provide optimal palliative care by accounting for children's understanding of death, encouraging early initiation of palliative care services, and improving utilization of pediatric palliative care in cancer settings. Specific roles of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in pediatric palliative care will be addressed. Recommendations for future research are made to further advance the science of pediatric palliative care and decrease suffering for children and teens with cancer.Keywords: pediatric palliative care, pediatric cancer, oncology, child, suffering

  16. Lung cancer physicians’ referral practices for palliative care consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. B.; Nelson, J. E.; Berman, A. R.; Powell, C. A.; Fleischman, J.; Salazar-Schicchi, J.; Wisnivesky, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Integration of palliative care with standard oncologic care improves quality of life and survival of lung cancer patients. We surveyed physicians to identify factors influencing their decisions for referral to palliative care. Methods: We provided a self-administered questionnaire to physicians caring for lung cancer patients at five medical centers. The questionnaire asked about practices and views with respect to palliative care referral. We used multiple regression analysis to identify predictors of low referral rates (palliative care consultation. Multivariate analysis, controlling for provider characteristics, found that low referral rates were associated with physicians’ concerns that palliative care referral would alarm patients and families [odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21–0.98], while the belief that palliative care specialists have more time to discuss complex issues (OR 3.07, 95% CI 1.56–6.02) was associated with higher rates of referral. Conclusions: Although palliative care consultation is increasingly available and recommended throughout the trajectory of lung cancer, our data indicate it is underutilized. Understanding factors influencing decisions to refer can be used to improve integration of palliative care as part of lung cancer management. PMID:21804051

  17. Redesigning care delivery in response to a high-performance network: the Virginia Mason Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hoangmai H; Ginsburg, Paul B; McKenzie, Kelly; Milstein, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    We examine how an integrated delivery system responded to threatened exclusion from an insurer's high-performance network by attempting to reduce costs through fundamental redesign of care processes. Some factors facilitating this transformation, such as its structure as a large salaried medical group exclusively affiliated with a hospital, might be specific to the organization and its market. Other essential elements could be replicated. But in a fee-for-service payment system, cost reduction from reducing the number of services or changing their mix can reduce profitability. Making the business case for sustaining desirable provider behavior may require that purchasers and plans make equally fundamental changes in payment policy.

  18. Jewish laws, customs, and practice in labor, delivery, and postpartum care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anita; Rom, Miriam; Newsome-Wicks, Mona; Engelhardt, Kay; Woloski-Wruble, Anna

    2009-07-01

    Many communities throughout the world, especially in the United States and Israel, contain large populations of religiously observant Jews. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive, descriptive guide to specific laws, customs, and practices of traditionally, religious observant Jews for the culturally sensitive management of labor, delivery, and postpartum. Discussion includes intimacy issues between husband and wife, dietary laws, Sabbath observance, as well as practices concerning prayer, communication trends, modesty issues, and labor and birth customs. Health care professionals can tailor their practice by integrating their knowledge of specific cultures into their management plan.

  19. Creating patient value in glaucoma care : applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); J.C.A. Sol (Kees); T. Custers (Thomas); E. van Sprundel (Esther); B.M. van Ineveld (Martin); H.G. Lemij (Hans); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. Design/methodology/approach: In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model

  20. Caring for survivors of breast cancer: perspective of the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S L; Wai, E S; Alexander, C; Singh-Carlson, S

    2011-10-01

    Increasing numbers of women are surviving breast cancer, and survivorship care is becoming more complex. Primary care physicians provide care for most survivors of breast cancer in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The present study offers insight into the confidence of primary care physicians in their abilities to provide such care. It also explores potential ways to assist those providers in enhancing this aspect of their practice. A questionnaire was mailed to 1000 primary care physicians caring for survivors of breast cancer. The questionnaire explored the perspectives of the responding physicians on their ability to manage various aspects of survivorship care for breast cancer patients, identified preferences for the content and format of communication from oncologists at the time of transition from active oncology treatment to survivorship, and determined the means most commonly used to obtain knowledge about breast cancer. This 1-page, 31-item checkbox and open-answer questionnaire assessed the perceptions of primary care physicians about the care of breast cancer survivors after completion of active treatment and their personal preferences for resources providing information about breast cancer. The questionnaire response rate was 59%. Primary care physicians reported being most confident in screening for recurrence and managing patient anxiety; they were least confident in managing lymphedema and providing psychosocial counselling. Compared with physicians following fewer survivors of breast cancer, those who followed more breast cancer survivors had higher confidence in managing the biomedical aspects of follow-up and in providing counselling about nutrition and exercise. Most physicians found discharge letters from oncologists to be useful. Point-form discharge information was preferred by 43%; detailed description, by 19%; and both formats, by 38%. The most useful information items identified for inclusion in a discharge letter were a diagnosis

  1. The role of a public-private partnership: translating science to improve cancer care in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Donna M; Kaluzny, Arnold D

    2014-01-01

    Health reform is bringing about changes in the healthcare environment, but an equally significant transformation is occurring in science with the sequencing of the human genome and the increasing role of personalized medicine in the delivery of new cancer therapies. These changes directly affect the ability of hospitals to provide value-based, state-of-the-art care and represent major strategic decisions that must be made by management. In the United States, an estimated 85% of cancer patients receive care in community settings, but patients' outcomes are often not equivalent to those achieved in academic health centers. Care of cancer patients in the community is often fragmented, as most oncologists are in private practice and have limited access to formal mechanisms for coordinating care across specialties or with primary care physicians. Furthermore, genetic analysis, advanced diagnostic tests, and clinical trials are not always available to patients in these settings. The evolution of cancer care requires a reconfiguration of processes and investment in new services. In response, the National Cancer Institute launched the Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 as a public-private partnership with 16 community hospitals. This article draws on the results of an external evaluation of the pilot program and assesses the role of such a partnership as a means of facilitating the translation of the developing science to the community setting, with reference to the role of management in the implementation of such partnerships.

  2. Delivery of Services of Day Care Workers In Sta. Maria, Laguna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLANDO R. CRUZADA, JR.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the determination of the delivery of services of day care workers in the municipality of Sta. Maria, Province of Laguna during the first semester of school year 2012-2013. Descriptive research was used in this study. Among the key findings were that Day Care Workers with respect to interactional relationship accomplished the functions with outstanding adequacy such as constantly giving feedback and praises on the performance of children, along with workers and parents coordination and cooperation, with verbal interpretation of Always Observe. In terms of instructional quality both group of respondents perceived that day care workers in-charge had adequate abilities and competencies concerning their education and trainings in connection with teaching small children with verbal interpretation of Always Observe. The parents had confidence to the day care workers in-charge of their children aside from regularly consulting the day care workers about their children’s progress with verbal interpretation of Always Observe. There were only 871 households who availed of the services of day care centers in which 27 workers were employed and each of them assigned to handle an average of 33 children. Notable along with other findings was the day care workers and parents had the same perception as to the extent of services provided by the Day Care Center with respect to interactional relationship, instructional quality and parental participation. Subsequently the study ensued with these five factual remarks: Children’s interactions with parents in the centers were the direct mechanisms through which children learn. The educational qualification and the capability of the day care workers to handle small children were the primary essentials in children’s learning. Parents’ participation in the day care centers premises brought harmonious relationship between the Day Care Workers and children as well. The capacity of day care worker

  3. The nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Jane B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome. Its defining feature is involuntary weight loss, which arises, in part, because of muscle atrophy and is accompanied by functional decline. International expert consensus recommends that nutritional support and counselling is a component of multimodal therapy for cancer cachexia, as poor nutritional intake can contribute to progression of the syndrome. The present paper focuses on what is presently known about the nursing contribution to nutritional care in cancer cachexia. There is potential for nurses to play an important role. However, obstacles to this include lack of a robust evidence base to support their nutritional care practices and unmet need for education about nutrition in cancer. The nursing role's boundaries and the outcomes of nurse-delivered nutritional care in cancer cachexia are both uncertain and should be investigated.

  4. Endocrine surgery as a model for value-based health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Amer G; Ituarte, Philip H G; Wiggins, Randi; Teisberg, Elizabeth O; Harari, Avital; Yeh, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Experts advocate restructuring health care in the United States into a value-based system that maximizes positive health outcomes achieved per dollar spent. We describe how a value-based system implemented by the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA Section of Endocrine Surgery (SES) has optimized both quality and costs while increasing patient volume. Two SES clinical pathways were studied, one allocating patients to the most appropriate surgical care setting based on clinical complexity, and another standardizing initial management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The mean cost per endocrine case performed from 2005 to 2010 was determined at each of three care settings: A tertiary care inpatient facility, a community inpatient facility, and an ambulatory facility. Blood tumor marker levels (thyroglobulin, Tg) and reoperation rates were compared between PTC patients who underwent routine central neck dissection (CND) and those who did not. Surgical patient volume and regional market share were analyzed over time. The cost of care was substantially lower in both the community inpatient facility (14% cost savings) and the ambulatory facility (58% cost savings) in comparison with the tertiary care inpatient facility. Patients who underwent CND had lower Tg levels (6.6 vs 15.0 ng/mL; P = 0.024) and a reduced need for re-operation (1.5 vs 6.1%; P = 0.004) compared with those who did not undergo CND. UCLA maintained its position as the market leader in endocrine procedures while expanding its market share by 151% from 4.9% in 2003 to 7.4% in 2010. A value-driven health care delivery system can deliver improved clinical outcomes while reducing costs within a subspecialty surgical service. Broader application of these principles may contribute to resolving current dilemmas in the provision of care nationally.

  5. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  6. Fighting Global Disparities in Cancer Care: A Surgical Oncology View

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoekstra, Harald J; Wobbes, Theo; Heineman, Erik; Haryono, Samuel; Aryandono, Teguh; Balch, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    .... Surgery is still the mainstay for most solid tumors; however, low- and middle-income countries are facing an increasing lack of primary surgical care for easily treatable conditions, including breast, colon, and head and neck cancers...

  7. Cancer Care Gets Personal: How Tumor Treatments Are Changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... January 2018 Print this issue Cancer Care Gets Personal How Tumor Treatments Are Changing En español Send ... also be passed down from your parents. These insights have led scientists to look for the unique ...

  8. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Melissa C; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Canada. Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative, repurposing existing resources, receiving financial support, and

  9. Urokinase plasminogen activator system-targeted delivery of nanobins as a novel ovarian cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yilin; Kenny, Hilary A; Swindell, Elden P; Mitra, Anirban K; Hankins, Patrick L; Ahn, Richard W; Gwin, Katja; Mazar, Andrew P; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Lengyel, Ernst

    2013-12-01

    The urokinase system is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and is expressed at low levels in normal cells. To develop a platform for intracellular and targeted delivery of therapeutics in ovarian cancer, we conjugated urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) antibodies to liposomal nanobins. The arsenic trioxide-loaded nanobins had favorable physicochemical properties and the ability to bind specifically to uPA. Confocal microscopy showed that the uPA-targeted nanobins were internalized by ovarian cancer cells, whereas both inductively coupled plasma optical mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analyses confirmed more than four-fold higher uptake of targeted nanobins when compared with untargeted nanobins. In a coculture assay, the targeted nanobins showed efficient uptake in ovarian cancer cells but not in the normal primary omental mesothelial cells. Moreover, this uptake could be blocked by either downregulating uPA receptor expression in the ovarian cancer cells using short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) or by competition with free uPA or uPA antibody. In proof-of-concept experiments, mice bearing orthotopic ovarian tumors showed a greater reduction in tumor burden when treated with targeted nanobins than with untargeted nanobins (47% vs. 27%; P cancer cells could serve as the foundation for a new targeted cancer therapy using protease receptors. ©2013 AACR.

  10. Telemedicine and telesurgery in cancer care: inaugural conference at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, Robert L; Bogler, Oliver; Hyle, Laurel; Lee, Andrew; Simmons, Angela; Williams, Robert; Hawk, Ernest; Matin, Surena; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2014-09-01

    Despite the growing incidence of cancer worldwide, there are an insufficient number of primary care physicians, community oncologists, and surgeons to meet the demand for cancer care, especially in rural and other medically underserved areas. Teleoncology, including diagnostics, treatment, and supportive care, has the potential to enhance access to cancer care and to improve clinician education and training. Major cancer centers such as The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center must determine how teleoncology will be used as part of strategic planning for the future. The Telemedicine and Telesurgery in Cancer Care (TTCC) conference was convened to determine technologically based strategies for addressing global access to essential cancer care services. The TTCC conference brought policy makers together with physicians, legal and regulatory experts to define strategies to optimize available resources, including teleoncology, to advance global cancer care. The TTCC conference discourse provided insight into the present state of access to care, expertise, training, technology and other interventions, including teleoncology, currently available through MD Anderson, as well as a vision of what might be achievable in the future, and proposals for moving forward with a comprehensive strategy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Teleoncology: Current and future applications for improving cancer care globally

    OpenAIRE

    Hazin, Ribhi; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Access to quality cancer care is often unavailable not only in low- and middle-income countries but also in rural or remote areas of high-income countries. Teleoncology (oncology applications of medical telecommunications, including pathology, radiology, and other related disciplines) has the potential to enhance both access to and the quality of clinical cancer care as well as education and training. Its implementation in the developing world requires an approach tailored to priorities, reso...

  12. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. AIM: To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The Danish...... Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...... scales and survival. RESULTS: Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0...

  13. 45 CFR 61.9 - Reporting civil judgments related to the delivery of a health care item or service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting civil judgments related to the delivery of a health care item or service. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND...

  14. Estimation of an optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate for cancer: setting an evidence-based benchmark for quality cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S A; Ng, W L; Do, V

    2015-02-01

    There is wide variation in the proportion of newly diagnosed cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, indicating the need for a benchmark rate of chemotherapy utilisation. This study describes an evidence-based model that estimates the proportion of new cancer patients in whom chemotherapy is indicated at least once (defined as the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate). The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can act as a benchmark for measuring and improving the quality of care. Models of optimal chemotherapy utilisation were constructed for each cancer site based on indications for chemotherapy identified from evidence-based treatment guidelines. Data on the proportion of patient- and tumour-related attributes for which chemotherapy was indicated were obtained, using population-based data where possible. Treatment indications and epidemiological data were merged to calculate the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate. Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the effect of controversial chemotherapy indications and variations in epidemiological data on our model. Chemotherapy is indicated at least once in 49.1% (95% confidence interval 48.8-49.6%) of all new cancer patients in Australia. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rates for individual tumour sites ranged from a low of 13% in thyroid cancers to a high of 94% in myeloma. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can serve as a benchmark for planning chemotherapy services on a population basis. The model can be used to evaluate service delivery by comparing the benchmark rate with patterns of care data. The overall estimate for other countries can be obtained by substituting the relevant distribution of cancer types. It can also be used to predict future chemotherapy workload and can be easily modified to take into account future changes in cancer incidence, presentation stage or chemotherapy indications. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by

  15. Using information technology for an improved pharmaceutical care delivery in developing countries. Study case: Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edoh, Thierry Oscar; Teege, Gunnar

    2011-10-01

    One of the problems in health care in developing countries is the bad accessibility of medicine in pharmacies for patients. Since this is mainly due to a lack of organization and information, it should be possible to improve the situation by introducing information and communication technology. However, for several reasons, standard solutions are not applicable here. In this paper, we describe a case study in Benin, a West African developing country. We identify the problem and the existing obstacles for applying standard ECommerce solutions. We develop an adapted system approach and describe a practical test which has shown that the approach has the potential of actually improving the pharmaceutical care delivery. Finally, we consider the security aspects of the system and propose an organizational solution for some specific security problems.

  16. Assessment of collaboration in U.S. health care delivery: a perspective from systems theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCovery, Jarred; Matusitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This analysis applies the core principles of systems theory to health care delivery in the United States. Particularly examined is the role of collaboration between health care agencies/organizations in the United States. This includes cooperation and teamwork among health professionals (i.e., nurses, technicians, physicians, and laboratory staff). By and large, systems theory posits that (a) all singular units within a system are interconnected and (b) the whole is more than the sum of its parts. This analysis identifies areas within the U.S. public health system where it is essential to embody elements of cooperation and collaboration, not only to bolster physical and financial support, but also to ensure a substantial impact within the community.

  17. Impact of financial incentives on alcohol intervention delivery in primary care: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Amy; Haighton, Catherine; Chappel, David; Shevills, Colin; Kaner, Eileen

    2016-11-25

    Local and national financial incentives were introduced in England between 2008 and 2015 to encourage screening and brief alcohol intervention delivery in primary care. We used routine Read Code data and interviews with General Practitioners (GPs) to assess their impact. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods study was conducted in 16 general practices representing 106,700 patients and 99 GPs across two areas in Northern England. Data were extracted on screening and brief alcohol intervention delivery for 2010-11 and rates were calculated by practice incentive status. Semi-structured interviews with 14 GPs explored which factors influence intervention delivery and recording in routine consultations. Screening and brief alcohol intervention rates were higher in financially incentivised compared to non-incentivised practices. However absolute rates were low across all practices. Rates of short screening test administration ranged from 0.05% (95% CI: 0.03-0.08) in non-incentivised practices to 3.92% (95% CI: 3.70-4.14) in nationally incentivised practices. For the full AUDIT, rates were also highest in nationally incentivised practices (3.68%, 95% CI: 3.47-3.90) and lowest in non-incentivised practices (0.17%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.22). Delivery of alcohol interventions was highest in practices signed up to the national incentive scheme (9.23%, 95% CI: 8.91-9.57) and lowest in non-incentivised practices (4.73%, 95% CI: 4.50-4.96). GP Interviews highlighted a range of influences on alcohol intervention delivery and subsequent recording including: the hierarchy of different financial incentive schemes; mixed belief in the efficacy of alcohol interventions; the difficulty of codifying complex conditions; and GPs' beliefs about patient-centred practice. Financial incentives have had some success in encouraging screening and brief alcohol interventions in England, but levels of recorded activity remain low. To improve performance, future policies must prioritise alcohol

  18. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facil