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Sample records for cancer carcinoembryonic antigen

  1. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

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    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  2. Diagnostic Values of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cancer Antigen 15-3 and Cancer Antigen 125 Levels in Nipple Discharge.

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    Zhao, Song; Gai, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongmei; Liang, Weili; Gao, Haidong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Ma, Rong

    2015-12-31

    An expedient and cost-effective diagnostic tool is needed to complement galactography and exfoliative cytology for detection of benign or malignant breast diseases with nipple discharge. The aim of this prospective study is to explore the utility of carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 and cancer antigen 125 levels in nipple discharge for the diagnosis of various breast diseases. We evaluated the pre-operative tumor marker levels in 153 nipple discharge samples collected from one or both breasts of 142 women undergoing surgery. Patients with nipple discharge underwent auxiliary examination (ultrasonography, exfoliative cytology, ductoscopy and galactography). Statistically higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 were found in patients in the malignant group as compared to those in the benign group. No statistically significant difference in the level of cancer antigen 125 (P = 0.895). Sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 for diagnosing breast cancer were 74.42% and 58.14%, and specificities were 87.27% and 80.00% where as the cutoff values with max-sum of sensitivity and specificity were 224.3 ng/ml and 1368.2 U/ml, respectively. The following sensitivities for telling malignant from benign could be determined: exfoliative cytology 46.67%, ultrasonography 76.74%, galactography 75.00%, and ductoscopy 0%. Exfoliative cytology was found to be a valuable alternative method for differentiating benign from malignancy. Thus, tumor marker analysis of nipple discharge fluid for carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 would enhance the accurate assessment and treatment planning for patients with nipple discharge.

  3. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

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    Hao Hong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET] have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”.

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer

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    Knudsen, Mie Grunnet; Sorensen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic...... and risk of death measured over time. No studies found CEA levels useful as a diagnostic marker for lung cancer. With regard to NSCLC the level of CEA measured in tumor tissue in NSCLC patients, were not of prognostic, diagnostic or predictive significance for OS or recurrence after treatment. In one study...... significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those...

  5. Interpretation of sequential measurements of cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) based on analytical imprecision and biological variation in the monitoring of ovarian cancer

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    Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Sölétormos, G; Petersen, P H

    2001-01-01

    The main objective with cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) monitoring of ovarian cancer patients is to detect an early change of disease activity with high reliability. We hypothesized that a monitoring scheme for ovarian cancer patie...

  6. Tumor markers cancer antigen 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen for monitoring metastatic breast cancer during first-line chemotherapy and follow-up

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    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether model systems integrating stochastic variation into criteria for marker assessment could be used for monitoring metastatic breast cancer. A total of 3989 serum samples was obtained from 204 patients receiving first-line chemotherapy and from 112 of these patients during...... follow-up. Each sample was analyzed for cancer antigen 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen. The efficiency for identifying progression and nonprogression was 94% during therapy and 85% during follow-up, with no false-positive marker results for progressive disease. At clinical...... unnecessary toxicity. Marker information may also be useful in studies investigating whether early treatment during follow-up will alter the prognosis of metastatic breast cancer....

  7. Correlation Between Preoperative Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels and Expression on Pancreatic and Rectal Cancer Tissue

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    LSF Boogerd

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA–targeted imaging and therapeutic agents are being tested in clinical trials. If CEA overexpression in malignant tissue corresponds with elevated serum CEA, serum CEA could assist in selecting patients who may benefit from CEA-targeted agents. This study aims to assess the relationship between serum CEA and CEA expression in pancreatic (n = 20 and rectal cancer tissues (n = 35 using histopathology. According to local laboratory standards, a serum CEA >3 ng/mL was considered elevated. In pancreatic cancer patients a significant correlation between serum CEA and percentage of CEA-expressing tumor cells was observed ( P  = .04, ρ = .47. All 6 patients with homogeneous CEA expression in the tumor had a serum CEA >3 ng/mL. Most rectal cancer tissues (32/35 showed homogeneous CEA expression, independent of serum CEA levels. This study suggests that selection of pancreatic cancer patients for CEA-targeted agents via serum CEA appears adequate. For selection of rectal cancer patients, serum CEA levels are not informative.

  8. Synuclein gamma predicts poor clinical outcome in colon cancer with normal levels of carcinoembryonic antigen

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    Xing Xiaofang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synuclein gamma (SNCG, initially identified as a breast cancer specific gene, is aberrantly expressed in many different malignant tumors but rarely expressed in matched nonneoplastic adjacent tissues. In this study, we investigated the prognostic potential of SNCG in colon cancer particularly in the patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels. Methods SNCG levels were assessed immunohistochemically in cancer tissues from 229 colon adenocarcinoma patients with a mean follow-up of 44 months. Correlations between SNCG levels and clinicopathologic features, preoperative serum CEA level, and clinical outcome were analyzed statistically using SPSS. Results SNCG levels in colon adenocarcinoma were closely associated with intravascular embolus and tumor recurrence but independent of preoperative serum CEA levels. SNCG expression was an independent prognostic factor of a shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS (P P = 0.001, P = 0.001, 0.002 for 97 patients with normal preoperative serum CEA level. Conclusions Our results suggest for the first time that SNCG is a new independent predicator for poor prognosis in patients with colon adenocarcinoma, including those with normal CEA levels. Combination of CEA with SNCG improves prognostic evaluation for patients with colon adenocarcinoma.

  9. Preoperative Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Marker for Predicting the Outcome of Three Cancers

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    Jingzhu Nan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA are associated with a variety of tumors. Objective: This study evaluated the prognostic value of pretreatment serum CEA levels in predicting the outcomes of multiple tumors subjected to treatment. Methods: Prior to therapy, serum samples from 71 prostate, 46 breast, 77 gastric, and 31 pancreatic cancer patients were collected to examine serum CEA levels. The cutoff value for CEA was set as determined by the maximum Youden index. The data were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier curves generated by the log-rank test and Cox multivariate analysis. Results: The overall survival rate for all the patients was 71.11%. The 3-year survival rate of patients with prostate, breast, gastric, and pancreatic cancers was 81.69%, 95.65%, 54.55%, and 51.61%, respectively. The 3-year survival rate showed significant statistical differences between patients with serum CEA levels <2.885 µg/L and those with serum CEA levels ⩾2.885 µg/L ( P  < .001. The statistical differences of the 3-year survival rate also existed in the men ( P  = .010 or women group ( P  < .001, as well as in the 3 different types of cancer, which include breast cancer ( P  = .025, gastric cancer ( P  = .001, and pancreatic cancer ( P  = .047. Conclusions: Serum CEA levels can provide additional prognostic information and may be useful in treatment implementation for patients with breast, gastric, or pancreatic cancer.

  10. New insights into the role of age and carcinoembryonic antigen in the prognosis of colorectal cancer

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    Gobbi, P G; Valentino, F; Berardi, E; Tronconi, C; Brugnatelli, S; Luinetti, O; Moratti, R; Corazza, G R

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify through relative survival (an estimate of cancer-specific survival) the true prognostic factors of colorectal cancer. The study involved 506 patients who underwent locally radical resection. All the clinical, histological and laboratory parameters were prognostically analysed for both overall and relative survival. This latter was calculated from the expected survival of the general population with identical age, sex and calendar years of observation. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to the proportional hazards model. Liver metastases, age, lymph node involvement and depth of bowel wall involvement were independent prognosticators of both overall and relative survival, whereas carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was predictive only of relative survival. Increasing age was unfavourably related to overall survival, but mildly protective with regard to relative survival. Three out of the five prognostic factors identified are the cornerstones of the current staging systems, and were confirmed as adequate by the analysis of relative survival. The results regarding age explain the conflicting findings so far obtained from studies considering overall survival only and advise against the adoption of absolute age limits in therapeutic protocols. Moreover, the prechemotherapy CEA level showed a high clinical value. PMID:18026187

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

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    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  12. Diagnostic and prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen in pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Meng Q

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Qingcai Meng,1–3,* Si Shi,1–3,* Chen Liang,1–3,* Dingkong Liang,1–3 Wenyan Xu,1–3 Shunrong Ji,1–3 Bo Zhang,1–3 Quanxing Ni,1–3 Jin Xu,1–3 Xianjun Yu1–3 1Department of Pancreatic Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, 3Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is one of the most widely used tumor markers and is increased in 30%–60% of patients with pancreatic cancer. Although carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9 is the most important serum biomarker in pancreatic cancer, the diagnostic and prognostic value of CEA is gradually being recognized.Materials and methods: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched for related literature published until January 2017. Diagnostic accuracy variables were pooled using the Meta-Disc software. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs for prognostic data were calculated and analyzed using Stata software.Results: A total of 3,650 participants enrolled in 19 studies met our inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of a CEA-based panel were 0.45 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41–0.50, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.86–0.91, 5.39 (95% CI, 3.16–9.18, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.41–0.72, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC, 0.90 and Q-value (0.84 of the CEA-based panel indicated a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy compared with CEA or CA19-9 alone. Moreover, there was also a significant association between high levels of CEA and worse overall survival (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.31–1.56.Conclusion: Our meta-analysis indicated that elevated serum CEA level, as a vital supplementary to CA19-9, can play an important role in the clinical diagnosis of pancreatic cancer patients and predict poor prognosis. Keywords: carcinoembryonic

  13. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter

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    Ana R. Rama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  14. Crosstalk of carcinoembryonic antigen and transforming growth factor-β via their receptors: comparing human and canine cancer.

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    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Fazekas, Judit; Singer, Josef; Hofstetter, Gerlinde; Oida, Kumiko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2015-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) pathways are tightly connected and play a key role in malignant transformation in cancer. Immune infiltration by regulatory T- and B-lymphocytes (Tregs, Bregs) has recently gained increased attention for being an important source of TGF-β. There is a plethora of studies examining the pro-tumorigenic functions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), but its receptor CEAR is far less studied. So far, there is a single connecting report that TGF-β also may signal through CEAR. The crosstalk between cancer tissues is further complicated by the expression of CEAR and TGF-β receptors in stromal cells, and implications of TGF-β in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, tumor-infiltrating Tregs and Bregs may directly instruct cancer cells by secreting TGF-β binding to their CEAR. Therefore, both TGF-β and CEA may act synergistically in breast cancer and cause disease progression, and NFκB could be a common crossing point between their signaling. CEAR, TGF-β1-3, TGF-β-R types I-III and NFκB class I and II molecules have an outstanding human-canine sequence identity, and only a canine CEA homolog has not yet been identified. For these reasons, the dog may be a valid translational model patient for investigating the crosstalk of the interconnected CEA and TGF-β networks.

  15. Does Obesity-Related Hemodilution of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Exist in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients?

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    Tomita, Masaki; Ayabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Kunihide

    2017-04-01

    Previous investigations reported inverse relationship between prostate-specific antigen concentration and body mass index (BMI). These results have been explained by a hemodilution effect among obese men. However, the hemodilution of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentration in obese patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been ever reported. Consecutive 381 NSCLC patients were enrolled. A body surface area (BSA)-based and a hematocrit (HCT)-based equations were applied for plasma volume (PV) estimation. The relationship between BMI and PV, serum CEA concentration and CEA amount, representing the total amount of CEA protein within the circulation, were examined. Higher BMI was significantly associated with higher PV (P < 0.001). However, serum CEA concentration was not significantly associated with increasing BMI. Furthermore, there was no significant association between BMI and CEA amount. The 5-year survival rate of patients with a high serum CEA concentration was significantly lower than that of patients with a normal CEA. There was no difference in the prognostic significance of serum CEA concentration and CEA amount. We failed to find the association between BMI and CEA, suggesting no or small hemodilution effect of CEA in NSCLC patients. Furthermore, the measurement of the CEA amount could not provide any additional information.

  16. Association of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels with chemoradiation-induced downstaging and downsizing of rectal cancer.

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    Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify pretreatment clinical parameters associated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced downstaging and downsizing of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC T3-4 or N+). Data from 51 LARC patients, who received preoperative CRT and radical surgery between 2010 and 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Rectal adenocarcinoma was histologically confirmed in all patients, who ranged in age between 41 and 81 years (median, 64 years). CRT consisted of 50.4 Gy pelvic radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. After a median interval of 7 weeks post-CRT, the patients underwent total mesorectal excision. Downstaging was defined as the transition from cStage II-III to ypStage 0-I. The longest tumor diameter was measured pre- and post-CRT using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and based on the surgical specimen, respectively. Downstaging was observed in 16 (31.4%) patients, including 5 (9.8%) with a pathological complete response. The median downsizing rate was 60%. The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels were 0.8-153.9 ng/ml (median, 4.4 ng/ml). The maximum standardized uptake value was 4.7-33.9 (median, 10.8). On univariate analysis, cT stage, tumor size and CEA level were associated with downstaging. On multivariate analysis, only CEA level (≤5 ng/ml) was a significant predictor of downstaging (odds ratio = 16.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-146.7; P=0.014). CEA level was the only factor significantly associated with downsizing (>60%) in the univariate analysis. These results demonstrated that pretreatment serum CEA levels are significantly associated with downstaging as well as downsizing of LARC following preoperative CRT. Therefore, this parameter may be useful in personalizing the management of LARC patients.

  17. Near-infrared-conjugated humanized anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody targets colon cancer in an orthotopic nude-mouse model.

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    DeLong, Jonathan C; Murakami, Takashi; Yazaki, Paul J; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The success of a curative surgery for cancer is dependent on the complete removal of all cancer cells. Tumor visualization by the surgeon can be enhanced through fluorescent-antibody targeting. To further develop such technology, we selected humanized anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) conjugated to a near-infrared dye to target orthotopically-implanted human colon cancer in nude mice. The HT-29 human colon cancer cell line was grown in culture and subcutaneously injected in mice. After 3 wk of growth, tumors were resected and cut into 2 mm3 fragments that were sutured to the cecum of five additional nude mice for orthotopic implantation. The tumors were allowed to grow for 4 wk at which point 3 had successful orthotopic tumor growth and were selected for injection of the humanized anti-CEA antibody conjugated to the near-infrared dye IRDye800CW (anti-CEA-IRDye800CW). The antibody-dye conjugate (75 μg) was administered via tail vein injection. Images were obtained with the Pearl Trilogy Small Animal Imaging System with both 700 and 800 nm channels and evaluated using Image Studio. Laparotomy was performed 24 h after labeling the tumors. When imaged through the 800 nm channel, the tumors were observed to be strongly labeled with anti-CEA-IRDye800. At 48 h, laparotomy was repeated which again demonstrated strong labeling of the tumors through the 800 nm channel, but with a lower absolute intensity (in relative units), than at 24 h. Humanized anti-CEA-IRDye800CW can rapidly and effectively label CEA-expressing human colon cancer in an orthotopic nude mouse model. Given the ability of this technology to target and label tumors with great specificity, the anti-CEA-IRDye800CW is currently being developed for clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Study of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Tumor Marker in Stomach and Colon Cancer Patients in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

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    Ahmad, Bashir; Gul, Bushra; Ali, Sajid; Bashir, Shumaila; Mahmood, Nourin; Ahmad, Jamshed; Nawaz, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increase in morbidity and mortality rate, cancer has become an alarming threat to the human population worldwide. Since cancer is a progressive disorder, timely diagnosis would be helpful to prevent/stop cancer from progressing to severe stage. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, most of the time, tumors are diagnosed with endoscopy and biopsy; therefore rare studies exist regarding the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GIT) carcinomas based on tumor markers, especially CEA. This study made a comparative analysis of CEA in admitted hospitalized stomach and colon cancer patients diagnosed as GIT with biopsy. In this study, a total of 66 cases were included. The level of CEA was determined in the blood of these patients using ELISA technique. Out of 66 patients, the level of CEA was high in 59.1% of the total, 60.7% in colon cancer patients and 57.9 % in stomach cancer patients. Moreover, the incidence of colorectal and stomach cancer was greater in males as compared to females. Patients were more of the age group of 40- 60 and the level of CEA was comparatively higher in patients (51.5%) with histology which was moderately differentiated, than patients with well differentiated and poorly differentiated tumor histology. CEA level was high in more than 50% of the total patients. Moreover, CEA exhibited higher sensitivity for colon than stomach cancer.

  19. Study of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen's Profile for Breast Cancer in Western Algeria: 100 cases.

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    Tahari, Zenib; Medjdoub, Asmahane; Sahraoui, Tewfik; Belhabri, Leila; El Kebir, Fatima Zohra

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Biology contributes to the early diagnosis and monitoring of breast cancer with several categories of markers such as prognostic markers (ER, PR, HER2), proliferative markers (Ki67), and tumor markers such as CEA and CA 15-3. CEA can be detected at a high concentration in serum of patients with malignant tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the concentrations of CEA in serum of women with breast cancer and to verify the existence of a possible link between the average rates of CEA and SBR grade. Serum samples from 100 patients with breast cancer and 100 controls was recovered and examined with an AxSYM analyzer (Abbott Laboratories, USA) to measure CEA using Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay (MEIA) technology. In our clinical study, the mean age of patients and controls were 52.7 and 50.3 years respectively. The results revealed an elevation in the CEA levels from patients with an average value of 16.61 ± 0.2 ng/ml. Positive correlation was found between CEA concentrations and SBR grade, it has found with 45,7 ± 1 ng/ml in grade III. CEA represents an excellent marker for breast cancer development. Changes in its concentration reflect the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of treatment.

  20. Assaying Carcinoembryonic Antigens by Normalized Saturation Magnetization

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    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Shi, Jin-Cheng; Chiang, Ming-Hsien

    2015-07-01

    Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) that provide unique advantages have been extensively used to develop immunoassay methods. However, these developed magnetic methods have been used only for specific immunoassays and not in studies of magnetic characteristics of materials. In this study, a common vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) was used for the measurement of the hysteresis loop for different carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA) concentrations ( Φ CEA) based on the synthesized BMNs with anti-CEA coating. Additionally, magnetic parameters such as magnetization ( M), remanent magnetization ( M R), saturation magnetization ( M S), and normalized parameters (Δ M R/ M R and Δ M S/ M S) were studied. Here, Δ M R and Δ M s were defined as the difference between any ΦCEA and zero Φ CEA. The parameters M, Δ M R, and Δ M S increased with Φ CEA, and Δ M S showed the largest increase. Magnetic clusters produced by the conjugation of the BMNs to CEAs showed a Δ M S greater than that of BMNs. Furthermore, the relationship between Δ M S/ M S and Φ CEA could be described by a characteristic logistic function, which was appropriate for assaying the amount of CEAs. This analytic Δ M S/ M S and the BMNs used in general magnetic immunoassays can be used for upgrading the functions of the VSM and for studying the magnetic characteristics of materials.

  1. Description of a computer program to assess cancer antigen 15.3, carcinoembryonic antigen, and tissue polypeptide antigen information during monitoring of metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Schiøler, V

    2000-01-01

    It is time-consuming to process and compare the clinical and marker information registered during monitoring of breast cancer patients. To facilitate the assessment, we developed a computer program for interpreting consecutive measurements. The intraindividual biological variation, the analytical...... of individual breast cancer patients with tumor marker measurements. It may also be implemented in trials investigating the utility of potential new markers in breast cancer as well as in other malignancies....

  2. Progression criteria for cancer antigen 15.3 and carcinoembryonic antigen in metastatic breast cancer compared by computer simulation of marker data

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    Sölétormos, G; Hyltoft Petersen, P; Dombernowsky, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the utility of computer simulation models for performance comparisons of different tumor marker assessment criteria to define progression or nonprogression of metastatic breast cancer. METHODS: Clinically relevant values for progressive cancer antigen 15...... of progression. CONCLUSIONS: The computer simulation model is a fast, effective, and inexpensive approach for comparing the diagnostic potential of assessment criteria during clinically relevant conditions of steady-state and progressive disease. The model systems can be used to generate tumor marker assessment...

  3. Relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations with the influence on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai ZX

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zuxun Cai Department of Thoracic Surgery, Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Zhengzhou City, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to analyze the influence of CEA level on postoperative survival time in lung cancer patients. Methods: A total of 296 patients who were treated in Thoracic Surgery Department of Henan Provincial Chest Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 were recruited. The level of tumor markers, such as CEA, was determined before the surgery, and EGFR gene mutations were detected after surgery. Thereby, the relationship between tumor makers, including CEA, and EGFR mutation and its influence on prognosis could be investigated. Results: Among 296 patients, the positive rate of EGFR gene mutation was 37.84% (112/296; the mutation occurred more frequently in nonsmokers, adenocarcinoma patients, women, and patients aged <60 years (P<0.05. Both tumor markers and chemosensitivity indicators were related to the profile of EGFR mutations. Elevated squamous cell carcinoma and Cyfra21-1 as well as positively expressed ERCC1 were more common in patients with wild-type EGFR (P<0.05, whereas increased CEA level was observed more frequently in patients with EGFR gene mutation (P=0.012. The positive rate of EGFR gene mutations was higher as the serum CEA level increased, that is, the positive rate in patients with serum CEA level <5, 5–20, and >20 µg/L was 39.81%, 45.32%, and 65.47%, respectively (P=0.004. Logistic regression analysis showed that CEA level was an independent factor in predicting EGFR gene mutations, and serum CEA level was also an independent factor in affecting the prognosis of NSCLC patients, as the overall 2-year survival rate was 73.86% in elevated CEA group and 86.43% in normal group (P<0.01. Conclusion: The prognosis of

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen: assay following heat compared with perchloric acid extraction in patients with colon cancer, non-neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases, or chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, L R; Shuler, S E; Alyea, K; Husserl, F E

    1983-10-01

    Heat inactivation has been proposed as an alternative to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitation for the extraction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from human plasma. We examined a commercial RIA kit using heat inactivation, and compared results with those obtained with PCA precipitation. Adequate sensitivity (1.5 micrograms CEA/l plasma), satisfactory analytical recovery of CEA added to plasma, and dilutional linearity of samples found to have elevated CEA concentrations, were demonstrated for the heat-inactivation assay. Between-assay precision was better with the heat inactivation than with the PCA assay. Although the absolute concentration of CEA estimated after heat inactivation was consistently lower than that estimated after PCA extraction of plasma specimens, there was excellent correlation between results obtained with the two methods in colon cancer patients free of disease, colon cancer patients with residual or recurrent disease, patients with benign gastrointestinal disease, and in patients with chronic renal failure. We conclude that the heat-inactivation assay is an excellent alternative to the PCA assay.

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen: assay following heat compared with perchloric acid extraction in patients with colon cancer, non-neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases, or chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, L.R.; Shuler, S.E.; Alyea, K.; Husserl, F.E.

    1983-10-01

    Heat inactivation has been proposed as an alternative to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitation for the extraction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from human plasma. A commercial RIA kit using heat inactivation was examined and results compared with those obtained with PCA precipitation. Adequate sensitivity (1.5 ..mu..g CEA/I plasma), satisfactory analytical recovery of CEA added to plasma, and dilutional linearity of samples found to have elevated CEA concentrations, were demonstrated for the heat-inactivation assay. Between-assay precision was better with the heat inactivation than with the PCA assay. Although the absolute concentration of CEA estimated after heat inactivation was consistently lower than that estimated after PCA extraction of plasma specimens, there was excellent correlation between results obtained with the two methods in colon cancer patients free of disease, colon cancer patients with residual or recurrent disease, patients with benign gastrointestinal disease, and in patients with chronic renal failure. The heat-inactivation assay is an excellent alternative to the PCA assay.

  6. Protein expression levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in Danish ovarian cancer patients: from the Danish 'MALOVA'ovarian cancer study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogdall, E.V.; Christensen, L.; Blaakaer, J.

    2008-01-01

    from 189 women diagnosed with low malignant potential ovarian tumours (LMP, borderline ovarian tumours) and 571 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC). RESULTS: Using 30% as the cut-off level for CEA over-expression, 18% of LMPs and 4% of OCs were positive. A higher proportion of mucinous tumours...... (I to IV), the highest CEA expression compared with no expression was found to be a prognostic factor (level 3 versus negative: HR = 2.12, 95%CI 1.11-4.05). FIGO stage, residual tumour after primary surgery, age at diagnosis, other histological types versus serous adenocarcinoma and low versus high...

  7. Evaluation of the use of decision-support software in carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA-based follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verberne Charlotte J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper is a first evaluation of the use of "CEAwatch", a clinical support software system for surgeons for the follow-up of colorectal cancer (CRC patients. This system gathers Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA values and automatically returns a recommendation based on the latest values. Methods Consecutive patients receiving follow-up care for CRC fulfilling our in- and exclusion criteria were identified to participate in this study. From August 2008, when the software was introduced, patients were asked to undergo the software-supported follow-up. Safety of the follow-up, experiences of working with the software, and technical issues were analyzed. Results 245 patients were identified. The software-supported group contained 184 patients; the control group contained 61 patients. The software was safe in finding the same amount of recurrent disease with fewer outpatient visits, and revealed few technical problems. Clinicians experienced a decrease in follow-up workload of up to 50% with high adherence to the follow-up scheme. Conclusion CEAwatch is an efficient software tool helping clinicians working with large numbers of follow-up patients. The number of outpatient visits can safely be reduced, thus significantly decreasing workload for clinicians.

  8. Immunosensing procedures for carcinoembryonic antigen using graphene and nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, John H T; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2017-03-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) graphene, sp 2 -hybridized carbon, and its two major derivatives, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have played an important role in immunoassays (IAs) and immunosensing (IMS) platforms for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), an implicated tumor biomarker found in several types of cancer. The graphene family with high surface area is functionalized to form stable nanocomposites with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and electron mediators. The capture anti-CEA antibody (Ab) with high density can be anchored on AuNPs of such composites to provide remarkable detection sensitivity, significantly below the level found in normal subjects and cancer patients. Electrochemical and fluorescence/chemiluminescence-quenching properties of graphene-based nanocomposites are exploited in various detection schemes. Future endeavors are envisioned for the development of an array platform with high-throughput for CEA together with other tumor biomarkers and C-reactive protein, a universal biomarker for infection and inflammation. The ongoing efforts dedicated to the replacement of a lab-based detector by a cellphone with smart applications will further enable cost-effective and frequent monitoring of CEA in order to establish its clinical relevance and provide tools for real-time monitoring of patients during chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Significance of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Lung Adenocarcinoma

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    Jae Jun Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A raised carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA may be associated with significant pathology during the postoperative follow-up of lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 305 patients who underwent surgical resections for primary lung adenocarcinoma at a single institution between April 2006 and February 2013. Results: Preoperative CEA levels were significantly associated with age, smoking history, pathologic stage including pT (pathologic tumor stge, pN (pathologic nodal stage and overall pathological stage, tumor size and differentiation, pathologically positive total lymph node, N1 and N2 lymph node, N2 nodal station (0/1/2=1.83/2.94/7.21 ng/mL, p=0.019, and 5-year disease-free survival (0.591 in group with normal preoperative CEA levels vs. 0.40 in group with high preoperative CEA levels, p=0.001. Preoperative CEA levels were significantly higher than postoperative CEA levels (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Postoperative CEA level was also significantly associated with disease-free survival (p<0.001. A follow-up serum CEA value of >2.57 ng/mL was found to be the appropriate cutoff value for the prediction of cancer recurrence with sensitivity and specificity of 71.4% and 72.3%, respectively. Twenty percent of patients who had recurrence of disease had a CEA level elevated above this cutoff value prior to radiographic evidence of recurrence. Postoperative CEA, pathologic stage, differentiation, vascular invasion, and neoadjuvant therapy were identified as independent predictors of 5-year disease- free survival in a multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The follow-up CEA level can be a useful tool for detecting early recurrence undetected by postoperative imaging studies. The perioperative follow-up CEA levels may be helpful for providing personalized evaluation of lung adenocarcinoma.

  10. Fully human IgG and IgM antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA Gold 4 epitope and designed for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugnière Martine

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are needed for colon cancer radioimmunotherapy (RIT to allow for repeated injections. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA being the reference antigen for immunotargeting of these tumors, we developed human anti-CEA MAbs. Methods XenoMouse®-G2 animals were immunized with CEA. Among all the antibodies produced, two of them, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM, were selected for characterization in vitro in comparison with the human-mouse chimeric anti-CEA MAb X4 using flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and binding to radiolabeled soluble CEA and in vivo in human colon carcinoma LS174T bearing nude mice. Results Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated binding of MAbs on CEA-expressing cells without any binding on NCA-expressing human granulocytes. In a competitive binding assay using five reference MAbs, directed against the five Gold CEA epitopes, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were shown to be directed against the Gold 4 epitope. The affinities of purified VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were determined to be 0.19 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1 and 1.30 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1, respectively, as compared with 0.61 ± 0.05 × 108 M-1 for the reference MAb X4. In a soluble phase assay, the binding capacities of VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM to soluble CEA were clearly lower than that of the control chimeric MAb X4. A human MAb concentration of about 10-7 M was needed to precipitate approximatively 1 ng 125I-rhCEA as compared with 10-9 M for MAb X4, suggesting a preferential binding of the human MAbs to solid phase CEA. In vivo, 24 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ demonstrated a high tumor uptake (25.4 ± 7.3%ID/g, close to that of 131I-X4 (21.7 ± 7.2%ID/g. At 72 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ was still concentrated in the tumor (28.4 ± 11.0%ID/g whereas the tumor concentration of 131I-X4 was significantly reduced (12.5 ± 4.8%ID/g. At no time after injection was there any accumulation of the radiolabeled MAbs in normal tissues. A pertinent analysis of

  11. Carbohydrate antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the differentiation of tuberculous peritonitis and peritonitis carcinomatosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Huan; Tai, Yang; Ye, Cheng; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Lin-Hao; Gao, Jin-Hang; Yan, Zhao-Ping; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Tumor markers could increase in both tuberculous peritonitis and peritonitis carcinomatosa, confusing the differentiation of these diseases. This study aimed to better understand the extent of elevation and diagnostic efficacies of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA 125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and combinative use of them in tuberculous peritonitis and peritonitis carcinomatosa. Of 2998 patients reviewed, 101, 120 and 71 patients were assigned to TBP group (tuberculous peritonitis), non-OCA...

  12. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  13. The Roles of Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Liver Metastasis and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Han Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a highly complicated and sequential process in which primary cancer spreads to secondary organic sites. Liver is a well-known metastatic organ from colorectal cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is expressed in most gastrointestinal, breast, and lung cancer cells. Overexpression of CEA is closely associated with liver metastasis, which is the main cause of death from colorectal cancer. CEA is widely used as a diagnostic and prognostic tumor marker in cancer patients. It affects many steps of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer cells. CEA inhibits circulating cancer cell death. CEA also binds to heterogeneous nuclear RNA binding protein M4 (hnRNP M4, a Kupffer cell receptor protein, and activates Kupffer cells to secrete various cytokines that change the microenvironments for the survival of colorectal cancer cells in the liver. CEA also activates cell adhesion-related molecules. The close correlation between CEA and cancer has spurred the exploration of many CEA-targeted approaches as anticancer therapeutics. Understanding the detailed functions and mechanisms of CEA in liver metastasis will provide great opportunities for the improvement of anticancer approaches against colorectal cancers. In this report, the roles of CEA in liver metastasis and CEA-targeting anticancer modalities are reviewed.

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen has prognostic value for tumor downstaging and recurrence in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy and curative surgery: A multi-institutional and case-matched control study of KROG 14-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Sung Hwan; Cho, Hyeon Min; Shim, Byoung Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Nam, Taek Keun; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae Uk; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Jin Hee; Jeong, Bae Kwon

    2015-08-01

    The Korean Radiation Oncology Group evaluated the significance of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels both as a predictor of tumor response after CRT and as a prognosticator for recurrence-free survival. 1804 rectal cancer patients, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, participated in a multicenter study. The patients were administered preoperative radiation of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with 5-FU or capecitabine, followed by total mesorectal excision. Patients with elevated CEA levels (>5 ng/mL) were matched at a 1 (n=595):1 (n=595) ratio with patients with normal CEA (⩽5 ng/mL). The tumor response after CRT and the recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were evaluated and compared between two arms. An elevated CEA level (p5 ng/mL) is a negative predictor of tumor downstaging after CRT and also has a negative impact on RFS in rectal cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and ppancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  16. Gold nanoparticle-based low limit of detection Love wave biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Fan, Chunhai; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2017-09-15

    In this work, a Love wave biosensing platform is described for detecting cancer-related biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). An ST 90°-X quartz Love wave device with a layer of SiO2 waveguide was combined with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to amplify the mass loading effect of the acoustic wave sensor to achieve a limit of detection of 37pg/mL. The strategy involves modifying the Au NPs with anti-CEA antibody conjugates to form nanoprobes in a sandwich immunoassay. The unamplified detection limit of the Love wave biosensor is 9.4ng/mL. This 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the limit of detection brings the SAW platform into the range useful for clinical diagnosis. Measurement electronics and microfluidics are easily constructed for acoustic wave biosensors, such as the Love wave device described here, allowing for robust platforms for point of care applications for cancer biomarkers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Value of carcinoembryonic antigen monitoring in curative surgery for recurrent colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucha, P A; Rosen, L; Olenwine, J A; Reed, J F; Riether, R D; Stasik, J J; Khubchandani, I T

    1997-02-01

    This study is designed to review a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-driven postoperative protocol designed to identify patients suitable for curative reresection when recurrent colorectal cancer is identified. A total of 285 patients who were operated on for colon or rectal carcinoma between 1981 and 1985 were evaluated (with CEA levels) every two months for the first two years, every three months for the third year, every six months for years 4 and 5, and annually thereafter. CEA levels above 5 microg were considered abnormal and were evaluated with diagnostic imaging and/or endoscopy. Follow-up was available for 280 patients (98.2 percent). Distribution of patients by Astler-Coller was: A, 14 percent; B1, 20 percent; B2, 39 percent; C1, 5 percent; C2, 21 percent. There were 62 of 280 patients (22 percent) who developed elevated CEA levels, with 44 patients who demonstrated clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence. Eleven patients were selected for surgery with curative intent (4 hepatic resections, 1 pulmonary wedge resection, 2 abdominoperineal resections, 2 segmental bowel resections, and 2 cranial metastasectomies). Three of 11 patients (27 percent) benefited and have disease-free survivals greater than 60 months. Of the 223 patients without elevated CEA, 22 (9.9 percent) had recurrent cancer without any survivors. Overall, 3 of 285 patients (1.1 percent) were cured as a result of CEA follow-up. CEA-driven surgery is useful in selected patients and can produce long-term survivors.

  18. Dendritic cells recognize tumor-specific glycosylation of carcinoembryonic antigen on colorectal cancer cells through dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Aarnoudse, Corlien A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Immature dendritic cells are located intratumorally within colorectal cancer and intimately interact with tumor cells, whereas mature dendritic cells are present peripheral to the tumor. The majority of colorectal

  19. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Is Not Influenced by Dominant Strictures or Bacterial Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannhoff, Andreas; Rupp, Christian; Friedrich, Kilian; Knierim, Johannes; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel N

    2017-02-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can be used to screen for biliary tract cancer in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). To study the influence of benign dominant strictures (DS), superimposed bacterial cholangitis (SBC), smoking status, and inflammatory bowel disease on CEA serum levels. A retrospective analysis of CEA values in cancer-free PSC patients was performed. We included the maximal CEA value obtained during follow-up and information on the presence of DS and SBC at that time, and we analyzed the CEA values in the presence and absence of DS and SBC. Results are reported as medians with the interquartile range (IQR). The median maximal CEA level, which was 1.8 ng/mL (IQR 1.2-2.9) in the final 270 PSC patients included in the study, was not influenced by the presence of either DS or SBC (P = 0.320). Moreover, in 49 patients, the first CEA value available at the time of DS (1.5 ng/mL; IQR 1.2-2.1) and that at a time without DS (1.6 ng/mL; IQR 1.1-2.3) did not differ significantly (P = 0.397). Lastly, in 24 patients, the median CEA values at a time without SBC (1.8 ng/mL; IQR 1.2-2.5) and at the time of SBC (1.8 ng/mL; IQR 1.0-3.0) were comparable (P = 0.305). Smoking did not influence CEA-based cancer screening. Serum CEA level is not influenced by the presence of DS or SBC and might therefore serve as a favorable parameter for improving cancer screening in PSC patients.

  20. Advantages of fluorescence-guided laparoscopic surgery of pancreatic cancer labeled with fluorescent anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies in an orthotopic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metildi, Cristina A; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed fluorescence-guided surgery of pancreatic and other cancers in orthotopic mouse models. Laparoscopic surgery is being used more extensively in surgical oncology. This report describes the efficacy of laparoscopic fluorescence-guided surgery of pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic mouse model. Mouse models of human pancreatic cancer were established with fragments of the BxPC-3 red fluorescent protein-expressing human pancreatic cancer using surgical orthotopic implantation. Mice were randomized to bright-light laparoscopic surgery (BLLS) or to fluorescence-guided laparoscopic surgery (FGLS). Fluorescence-guided laparoscopic surgery was performed with a light-emitting diode light source through a 495-nm emission filter in order to resect the primary tumors and any additional separate submillimeter tumor deposits within the pancreas, the latter of which was not possible with BLLS. Tumors were labeled with anti-CEA AlexaFluor 488 antibodies 24 hours before surgery with intravenous injection. Perioperative fluorescence images were obtained to evaluate tumor size. Mice were followed postoperatively to assess for recurrence and at termination to evaluate tumor burden. At termination, the FGLS-treated mice had less pancreatic tumor volume than the BLLS-treated mice (5.75 mm(2) vs 28.43 mm(2), respectively; p = 0.012) and lower tumor weight (21.1 mg vs 174.4 mg, respectively; p = 0.033). Fluorescence-guided laparoscopic surgery compared with BLLS also decreased local recurrence (50% vs 80%, respectively; p = 0.048) and distant recurrence (70% vs 95%, respectively; p = 0.046). More mice in the FGLS group than the BLLS group were free of tumor at termination (25% vs 5%, respectively). Median disease-free survival was lengthened from 2 weeks with BLLS (95% CI, 1.635-2.365) to 7 weeks with FGLS (95% CI, 5.955-8.045; p = 0.001). Fluorescence-guided laparoscopic surgery is more effective than BLLS and, therefore, has important potential

  1. Clinical implications of carcinoembryonic antigen distribution in serum exosomal fraction-Measurement by ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Serum exosomal proteins have great potential as indicators of disease status in cancer, inflammatory or metabolic diseases. The association of a fraction of various serum proteins such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA with circulating exosomes has been debated. The establishment of a method to measure the exosomal fraction of such proteins might help resolve this controversy. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs to measure serum exosomal molecules, for example CEA, is rare in research laboratories and totally absent in clinical biology. In this study, we optimized a method for assessment of serum exosomal molecules combining a treatment by volume-excluding polymers to isolate the exosomes, their subsequent solubilization in an assay buffer and ELISA.One hundred sixteen consecutive patients with colorectal cancer were enrolled for this study between June 2015 and June 2016 at Wakayama Medical University Hospital (WMUH. Whole blood samples were collected from patients during surgery. Exosomes were isolated using the ExoQuick reagent, solubilized in an assay buffer and subjected to CEA detection by ELISA. The procedure of serum exosome isolation and the formulation of the assay buffer used for the ELISA were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the assay.A five-fold increase in the concentration of the exosomes in the assay buffer (using initial serum volume as a reference and the addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA resulted in more accurate measurements of the serum exosomal CEA. The thawing temperature of frozen serum samples before exosome extraction was also optimized. A validation study that included one hundred sixteen patients with colorectal cancer demonstrated that serum exosomal CEA from samples thawed at 25°C exhibited a better AUC value, sensitivity, and specificity as well as a more correct classification than serum CEA.We optimized an easy and rapid detection method for assessment of

  2. Tumor Expression of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen Correlates with High Mitotic Activity and Cell Pleomorphism Index in Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rancés Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, some research efforts are focusing on the evaluation of a variety of tumor associated antigens (TAAs for a better understanding of tumor biology and genetics of lung tumors. For this reason, we evaluated the tissue expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and ior C2 (a cell surface O-linked glycoprotein carbohydrate chain TAA in lung carcinomas, as well as its correlation with a variety of clinicopathological features. The tissue expression of CEA was evidenced in 22/43 (51.16% lung carcinomas and it was correlated with mitotic activity, cell pleomorphism indexes, and age of patients. The expression of ior C2 was observed in 15/43 (34.88% tumors but no correlation with the clinicopathological features mentioned above was obtained. No correlation between both CEA and ior C2 antigens expression and the overall survival (OS of non-small-cell lung cancer patients was also observed. However, CEA-negative patients displayed higher OS rates as compared with positive ones (69.74 versus 58.26 months. Our results seem to be in agreement with the role of CEA expression in tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of cell polarizations and tissue architecture distortion. The significance of ior C2 antigen in these malignancies and it potential use in diagnosis, prognosis, and/or immunotherapy must be reevaluated.

  3. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer

    2011-01-01

    for the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an important...

  4. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen is positively associated with leukocyte count in Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yu-Jin; Lee, Hye-Sun; Shim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Yong-Jae

    2017-06-27

    Emerging evidence shows that serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels may modestly be increased in non-neoplastic conditions such as cardiometabolic diseases, which are increasingly being seen as inflammatory diseases. Leukocyte count is widely evaluated marker of inflammation in clinical practice and a useful predictor of cardiometabolic disease. In this study, we aimed to determine the relationship between serum CEA levels and leukocyte counts in Korean adults. This cross-sectional study included a total of 19 834 individuals enrolled from a health promotion center between November 2006 and July 2010. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between serum CEA levels and leukocyte counts after adjusting for confounding variables. According to both stepwise-method and enter-method multiple linear regression analyses, serum CEA levels were positively and independently associated with leukocyte counts (Pleukocyte counts in Korean adults. Our results suggested that an elevated serum CEA level may reflect chronic inflammation state. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Carcino-embryonic antigen in monitoring the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma tumour cells SK-CO-1 and HT-29 in vitro and in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Fogh, J M; Sehested-Hansen, B

    1997-01-01

    A set of experimental model systems were designed to investigate (a) the inter-relationship between growth of two human cancer cell lines (SK-CO-1, HT-29) and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) kinetics; and (b) whether neoplastic growth or CEA concentration is modulated by human growth hormone (h....... In conclusion, our results suggest that experimental models may be useful for investigating the role of serological markers as monitors of increasing tumour burden. It will be of interest to investigate the performance of those model systems in examining the effect of cytotoxic agents in neoplastic growth....

  6. Dual Immunomagnetic Nanobeads-Based Lateral Flow Test Strip for Simultaneous Quantitative Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Neuron Specific Enolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenting; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Qin, Weijian; Hou, Yafei; Xu, Hao; Yan, Xinyu; Chen, Yanrong; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel immunomagnetic nanobeads -based lateral flow test strip was developed for the simultaneous quantitative detection of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which are sensitive and specific in the clinical diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Using this nanoscale method, high saturation magnetization, carboxyl-modified magnetic nanobeads were successfully synthesized. To obtain the immunomagnetic probes, a covalent bioconjugation of the magnetic nanobeads with the antibody of NSE and CEA was carried out. The detection area contained test line 1 and test line 2 which captured the immune complexes sensitively and formed sandwich complexes. In this assay, cross-reactivity results were negative and both NSE and CEA were detected simultaneously with no obvious influence on each other. The magnetic signal intensity of the nitrocellulose membrane was measured by a magnetic assay reader. For quantitative analysis, the calculated limit of detection was 0.094 ng/mL for NSE and 0.045 ng/mL for CEA. One hundred thirty clinical samples were used to validate the test strip which exhibited high sensitivity and specificity. This dual lateral flow test strip not only provided an easy, rapid, simultaneous quantitative detection strategy for NSE and CEA, but may also be valuable in automated and portable diagnostic applications. PMID:28186176

  7. Highly sensitive and selective lateral flow immunoassay based on magnetic nanoparticles for quantitative detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangming; Zhang, Honglian; Wu, Zhenhua; Dong, Haidao; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Dawei; Ge, Yuqing; Jia, Chunping; Liu, Huiying; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhang, Qiqing; Mao, Hongju

    2016-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is an important biomarker in cancer diagnosis. Here, we present an efficient, selective lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for in situ sensitive and accurate point-of-care detection of CEA. Signal amplification mechanism involved linking of detection MNPs with signal MNPs through biotin-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and streptavidin. To verify the effectiveness of this modified LFIA system, the sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Sensitivity evaluation showed a broad detection range of 0.25-1000ng/ml for CEA protein by the modified LFIA, and the limit of detection (LOD) of the modified LFIA was 0.25ng/ml, thus producing significant increase in detection threshold compared with the traditional LFIA. The modified LFIA could selectively recognize CEA in presence of several interfering proteins. In addition, this newly developed assay was applied for quantitative detection of CEA in human serum specimens collected from 10 randomly selected patients. The modified LFIA system detected minimum 0.27ng/ml of CEA concentration in serum samples. The results were consistent with the clinical data obtained using commercial electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) (pdetected CEA with higher sensitivity and selectivity, and thus has great potential to be commercially applied as a sensitive tumor marker filtration system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrochemical Immunosensor Based on Fe3O4/PANI/AuNP Detecting Interface for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Biomarker

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    Amarasiri, Chamali; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Nguyen, Loc Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Thuy, Nguyen Thi My; Dai Lam, Tran

    2017-10-01

    A low-cost screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified with Fe3O4, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and polyaniline (PANI) has been developed for rapid measurement of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biomarker. The electrode surface was covered with Fe3O4 nanoparticles by drop coating then with PANI via electropolymerization. The resulting surface was further modified by AuNPs via electrodeposition. Key factors affecting the electrochemical behavior and sensing performance of the electrode were investigated. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4 mass loading of 2 mg/cm2 and 15 cycles of PANI polymerization were optimal for electrochemical measurement of CEA biomarker. In addition, compared with bare SPCE, coating the electrode surface with PANI, Fe3O4/PANI, and Fe3O4/PANI/AuNP significantly enhanced the peak oxidation current by approximately 16%, 52%, and 93%, respectively. The sensors exhibited linear trends with CEA concentration from 0 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. The limit of detection and sensitivity of the electrode were estimated to be 0.25 ng/mL and 0.3827 μA/ng mL-1, respectively. Such sensors could be easily integrated into microfluidic platforms and could serve as a low-cost, rapid, point-of-care measurement method for CEA cancer biomarker.

  9. Specific Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Fluorescence Quenching of Hollow Porous Gold Nanoshells with Roughened Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ting-Yang; Zhao, Jing; Weng, Guo-Jun; Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2017-10-25

    The detection of tumor biomarkers in the early stage is highly desirable for the therapy of cancer. However, rapid, low-cost, sensitive, and selective detection of biomarkers remains a challenge owing to the sequence homology, short length, and low abundance. This Research Article describes the synthesis of a novel carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) probe using hollow porous gold nanoparticles (HPGNPs) with roughened surface based on fluorescence quenching. For specific detection of CEA, the surface of HPGNP is modified by carboxyl modification, carboxyl activation, and antibody conjugation. Furthermore, to enhance the detection performance, we have systematically optimized the parameters, such as particle size, surfactants, surface roughness, surface hole size, and the molecule-particle distance (MPD). The results demonstrate that the fluorescence quenching efficiency would be enhanced with a larger particle size and surface hole size, roughened surface and a greater MPD. Also, with careful inspection of different surfactants of CTAB and PVP, we find that PVP has the optimal performance on fluorescence quenching. Under these optimized conditions, CEA could be detected with an ultralow detection limit of 1.5 pg/mL, and the probe shows a linear range from 2 to 100 pg/mL. The limit of detection is an order of intensity lower than related methods. Interference experiment results have shown that the influence of the interfering proteins could be neglected in the detection procedure.

  10. Perylenetetracarboxylic acid and carbon quantum dots assembled synergistic electrochemiluminescence nanomaterial for ultra-sensitive carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lan-Lan; Zhang, Wei; Shang, Lei; Ma, Rong-Na; Jia, Li-Ping; Jia, Wen-Li; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Niu, Li

    2018-04-30

    It is important to design a nice electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biological nanomaterial for fabricating sensitive ECL immunosensor to detect tumor markers. Most reported ECL nanomaterial was decorated by a number of mono-luminophore. Here, we report a novel ECL nanomaterial assembled by dual luminophores perylenetetracarboxylic acid (PTCA) and carbon quantum dots (CQDs). In the ECL nanomaterial, graphene was chosen as nanocarrier. Significant ECL intensity increases are seen in the ECL nanomaterial, which was interpreted with the proposed synergistic promotion ECL meachanism of PTCA and CQDs. Furthermore, this ECL nanomaterial was used to label secondary antibody and fabricate a sandwiched carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) immunosensor. The CEA immunosensor exhibits high sensitivity and the linear semilogarithmical range was from 0.001fgmL-1 to 1ngmL-1 with low detection limit 0.00026fgmL-1. And the CEA immunosensor is also suitable for various cancers' sample detection providing potential specific applications in diagnostics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Cutoff Values of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in Normal Korean Adults and Factors Influencing Serum CEA Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Soon [Hanil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    Carcinoembryonic Antigen is one of most frequently checked tumor markers in cancer management. We performed statistical analysis with serum CEA data of 2626 persons who received regular health examination and were thought to be free of active disease to determine the cutoff values of serum CEA level in normal Korean adults and to study the factors influencing serum CEA levels in normal subjects. 1) The cutoff values of serum CEA in normal Korean adults in general were 9.28 ng/ml for men, 5.90 ng/ml for women. 2) Serum CEA level was influenced by age, present smoking history, sex, and abnormal findings in chest X ray. 3) Serum CEA level had no correlation with the history of amount of alcohol consumption or obesity. 4) Cutoff values of serum CEA in normal Korean adults were tabulated according to age, sex, and smoking history. Serum CEA level was influenced by age, sex, present smoking history and abnormal findings in chest X ray and cutoff values of serum CEA were tabulated according to age, sex, and smoking history.

  12. A graphene quantum dots based electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen detection using poly(5-formylindole)/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guangming; Wang, Yang; Tang, Yun; Zhao, Dan; Guo, Qingfu

    2018-03-15

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed using signal amplification strategy based on poly(5-formylindole)/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (P5FIn/erGO) and Au nanoparticle (AuNP) decorated graphene quantum dots (GQDs) (GQDs@AuNP). As an effective matrix for immobilization of primary antibody (Ab1), P5FIn/erGO nanocomposite facilitated the ion transport during the redox reactions and provided larger surface areas for the immobilization of Ab1. GQDs@AuNP was used as labels to conjugate with secondary antibody (Ab2), which improved electron transfer capability with stable ECL intensity. The multiple amplification of P5FIn/erGO and GQDs@AuNP made the ECL immunosensor have a broad linear range from 0.1pgmL-1 to 10ngmL-1 and a low detection limit with 3.78fgmL-1. In addition, this ECL immunosensor performed with admirable stability and good selectivity and reproducibility as well. When this immunosensor was used for the analysis of CEA in human serum, good recoveries were obtained. Thus, there will be a promising future in the early diagnosis of cancer to detect CEA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of graphene/gold-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K F; Lim, H N; Shams, N; Jayabal, S; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M

    2016-01-01

    Immunosensors based on gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) were successfully synthesized using an electrochemical deposition method. The modified SPEs were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the morphology and composition of AuNPs and rGO. Both the FESEM and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the AuNPs were successfully anchored on the thin film of rGO deposited on the surface of the SPEs. Characterization with a ferri-ferrocyanide couple [Fe(CN)6(3-/4-)] showed that the electron transfer kinetic between the analyte and electrode was enhanced after the modification with the AuNPs/rGO composite on the electrode surface, in addition to increasing the effective surface area of the electrode. The modified SPE was immobilized with a sandwich type immunosensor to mimic the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) immunoassay. The modified SPE that was fortified with the sandwich type immunosensor exhibited double electrochemical responses in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with linear ranges of 0.5-50 ng/mL and 250-2000 ng/mL and limits of detection of 0.28 ng/mL and 181.5 ng/mL, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Colorectal carcinoma: nucleosomes, carcinoembryonic antigen and ca 19-9 as apoptotic markers; a comparative study

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    Mahgoub Samir S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal carcinoma is a common and often fatal disease in which methods of early detection and monitoring are essential. The present study was conducted for measuring serum levels of nucleosomes, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and CA 19-9 in patients newly diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma and confirmed by clinicopathological study. Method Thirty subjects were included in the current study: six normal subjects as a control group with mean age (45.6 ± 7.9 and twenty four colorectal carcinoma patients with mean age (46.9 ± 15.6, which were classified pathologically according to the degree of malignant cell differentiation into well differentiated (group I, moderately differentiated (group II and poorly differentiated (group III. Fasting venous blood samples were collected preoperative. Results The results revealed a significant increase in serum level of nucleosomes in patients with poorly differentiated tumors versus patients with well differentiated tumors (p = 0.041. The levels of CEA and CA19-9 showed no significant increase (p = 0.569 and 0.450, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, serum level of nucleosomes provides a highly sensitive and specific apoptotic marker for colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Fabrication of graphene/gold-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K.F. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, 43400 Selangor (Malaysia); Lim, H.N., E-mail: janetlimhn@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, 43400 Selangor (Malaysia); Shams, N. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, 43400 Selangor (Malaysia); Jayabal, S.; Pandikumar, A.; Huang, N.M. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-01-01

    Immunosensors based on gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) were successfully synthesized using an electrochemical deposition method. The modified SPEs were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the morphology and composition of AuNPs and rGO. Both the FESEM and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the AuNPs were successfully anchored on the thin film of rGO deposited on the surface of the SPEs. Characterization with a ferri–ferrocyanide couple [Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3−/4−}] showed that the electron transfer kinetic between the analyte and electrode was enhanced after the modification with the AuNPs/rGO composite on the electrode surface, in addition to increasing the effective surface area of the electrode. The modified SPE was immobilized with a sandwich type immunosensor to mimic the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) immunoassay. The modified SPE that was fortified with the sandwich type immunosensor exhibited double electrochemical responses in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with linear ranges of 0.5–50 ng/mL and 250–2000 ng/mL and limits of detection of 0.28 ng/mL and 181.5 ng/mL, respectively. - Highlights: • An AuNP/rGO-modified SPE is prepared via an in-situ electrodeposition method. • It is introduced in a sandwich-type immunoassay for the detection of CEA. • The LODs for CEA are 0.28 ng/mL for 0.5–25 ng/mL, and 181.5 ng/mL for 250–2000 ng/mL.

  16. Top-down nanofabrication of silicon nanoribbon field effect transistor (Si-NR FET) for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zengtao; Sun, Jialin; Zhao, Xiaoqian; Li, Zengyao; Cui, Songkui; Meng, Qingyang; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Tong; Jiang, Yanfeng

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of tumor markers is highly required in the clinic for cancer diagnosis and consequent treatment. A field-effect transistor-based (FET-based) nanobiosensor emerges with characteristics of being label-free, real-time, having high sensitivity, and providing direct electrical readout for detection of biomarkers. In this paper, a top-down approach is proposed and implemented to fulfill a novel silicon nano-ribbon FET, which acts as biomarker sensor for future clinical application. Compared with the bottom-up approach, a top-down fabrication approach can confine width and length of the silicon FET precisely to control its electrical properties. The silicon nanoribbon (Si-NR) transistor is fabricated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrate by a top-down approach with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible technology. After the preparation, the surface of Si-NR is functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Glutaraldehyde is utilized to bind the amino terminals of APTES and antibody on the surface. Finally, a microfluidic channel is integrated on the top of the device, acting as a flowing channel for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) solution. The Si-NR FET is 120 nm in width and 25 nm in height, with ambipolar electrical characteristics. A logarithmic relationship between the changing ratio of the current and the CEA concentration is measured in the range of 0.1-100 ng/mL. The sensitivity of detection is measured as 10 pg/mL. The top-down fabricated biochip shows feasibility in direct detecting of CEA with the benefits of real-time, low cost, and high sensitivity as a promising biosensor for tumor early diagnosis.

  17. Individualized Cutoff Value of the Preoperative Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level is Necessary for Optimal Use as a Prognostic Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byeong Geon; Shin, Rumi; Chung, Jung Kee; Jung, In Mok; Heo, Seung Chul

    2013-06-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is an important prognostic marker in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, in some stages, it does not work. We performed this study to find a way in which preoperative CEA could be used as a constant prognostic marker in harmony with the TNM staging system. Preoperative CEA levels and recurrences in CRC were surveyed. The distribution of CEA levels and the recurrences in each TNM stage of CRC were analyzed. An optimal cutoff value for each TNM stage was calculated and tested for validity as a prognostic marker within the TNM staging system. The conventional cutoff value of CEA (5 ng/mL) was an independent prognostic factor on the whole. However, when evaluated in subgroups, it was not a prognostic factor in stage I or stage III of N2. A subgroup analysis according to TNM stage revealed different CEA distributions and recurrence rates corresponding to different CEA ranges. The mean CEA levels were higher in advanced stages. In addition, the recurrence rates of corresponding CEA ranges were higher in advanced stages. Optimal cutoff values from the receiver operating characteristic curves were 7.4, 5.5, and 4.5 ng/mL for TNM stage I, II, and III, respectively. Those for N0, N1, and N2 stages were 5.5, 4.8, and 3.5 ng/mL, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survivals were significantly different according to these cutoff values for each TNM and N stage. The multivariate analysis confirmed the new cutoff values to be more efficient in discriminating the prognosis in the subgroups of the TNM stages. Individualized cutoff values of the preoperative CEA level are a more practical prognostic marker following and in harmony with the TNM staging system.

  18. Development of an FPW Biosensor with Low Insertion Loss and High Fabrication Yield for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Je-Wei; Huang, I-Yu; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chang-Yu; Chen, Jian-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, various flexural plate-wave (FPW)-based biosensors with low phase velocity, low operation frequency, high sensitivity, and short response time, have been developed. However, conventional FPW transducers have low fabrication yield because controlling the thickness of silicon/isolation/metal/piezoelectric multilayer floating thin-plate is difficult. Additionally, conventional FPW devices usually have high insertion loss because of wave energy dissipation to the silicon substrate or outside area of the output interdigital transducers (IDTs). These two disadvantages hinder the application of FPW devices. To reduce the high insertion loss of FPW devices, we designed two focus-type IDTs (fan-shaped and circular, respectively) that can effectively confine the launched wave energy, and adopted a focus-type silicon-grooved reflective grating structure (RGS) that can reduce the wave propagation loss. To accurately control the thickness of the silicon thin-plate and substantially improve the fabrication yield of FPW transducers, a 60 °C/27 °C two-step anisotropic wet etching process was developed. Compared with conventional FPW devices (with parallel-type IDTs and without RGS), the proposed FPW devices have lower insertion loss (36.04 dB) and higher fabrication yield (63.88%). Furthermore, by using cystamine-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) nanotechnology, we used the improved FPW device to develop a novel FPW-based carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biosensor for detection of colorectal cancer, and this FPW-CEA biosensor has a low detection limit (5 ng/mL), short response time (<10 min), high sensitivity (60.16–70.06 cm2/g), and high sensing linearity (R-square = 0.859–0.980). PMID:27834798

  19. Coevolution of activating and inhibitory receptors within mammalian carcinoembryonic antigen families

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    Kammerer Robert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most rapidly evolving gene families are involved in immune responses and reproduction, two biological functions which have been assigned to the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA gene family. To gain insights into evolutionary forces shaping the CEA gene family we have analysed this gene family in 27 mammalian species including monotreme and marsupial lineages. Results Phylogenetic analysis provided convincing evidence that the primordial CEA gene family in mammals consisted of five genes, including the immune inhibitory receptor-encoding CEACAM1 (CEA-related cell adhesion molecule ancestor. Our analysis of the substitution rates within the nucleotide sequence which codes for the ligand binding domain of CEACAM1 indicates that the selection for diversification is, perhaps, a consequence of the exploitation of CEACAM1 by a variety of viral and bacterial pathogens as their cellular receptor. Depending on the extent of the amplification of an ancestral CEACAM1, the number of CEACAM1-related genes varies considerably between mammalian species from less than five in lagomorphs to more than 100 in bats. In most analysed species, ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs or ITAM-like motif-containing proteins exist which contain Ig-V-like, ligand binding domains closely related to that of CEACAM1. Human CEACAM3 is one such protein which can function as a CEACAM1 decoy receptor in granulocytes by mediating the uptake and destruction of specific bacterial pathogens via its ITAM-like motif. The close relationship between CEACAM1 and its ITAM-encoding relatives appears to be maintained by gene conversion and reciprocal recombination. Surprisingly, secreted CEACAMs resembling immunomodulatory CEACAM1-related trophoblast-specific pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs found in humans and rodents evolved only in a limited set of mammals. The appearance of PSG-like genes correlates with invasive trophoblast growth in these species

  20. Proposta para estadiamento do câncer colorretal baseada em critérios morfofuncionais: correlação com níveis séricos do antígeno carcinoembrionário Proposal for colorectal cancer stages based on morphofunctional criteria: correlation with carcinoembryonic antigen levels

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    Denise Gonçalves Priolli

    2007-12-01

    tempo de sobrevida, a classificação morfofuncional e o nível sérico de antígeno carcinoembrionário. CONCLUSÃO: O estadiamento morfofuncional é válido para a avaliação prognóstica dos pacientes com adenocarcinoma colorretal, e relaciona-se com os níveis séricos do CEA.The analysis of morphofunctions characteristics can be useful in the colorectal cancer evolution, especially if related to the serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. The research of chromosomes and genes instability, as well as the alterations of tissue protein codified, makes attractive the possibility to use potentially valid functional factors as variables for the understanding of colorectal carcinoma prognosis. OBJECTIVE: To consider classes based on morphologic and functional colorectal carcinoma characteristics, valuing serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels prognostic power. METHOD: Third-five patients in different stages of colorectal carcinoma underwent operations from 2001 to 2007. Serum CEA levels, histological grade, tissue CEA cell polarization capacity were analyzed. Colorectal carcinoma was classified according to TNM stages. The morphofunctional classification was determined by the combination between histological grade and antigen polarization, morphofunctional stages have been based in association between morphofunctional classification and stages TNM, by punctuation attributed to each one classification. The results had been analyzed by variance analysis, correlation test and survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier and Cox Model Regression, adopting p<0.05. RESULTS: Morphofunctional stages survival curve resulted similar to the joined ones in stages TNM. It had relation between new classification proposed and patient survival time. They had observed relation among survival time, morphofunctional classification and serum carcinoembryonic antigen. CONCLUSION: Morphofunctional classification is valid for colorectal cancer patient's prognostic evaluation and is related with the serum CEA

  1. A chitosan-Au-hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles-based antifouling immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Ma, Lie; Qian, Qiuhui; Parmar, Soniya; Zhao, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Shen, Jian

    2014-09-07

    Analysts are always interested in finding new functional nanomaterials and devices with good properties for electrochemical sensor applications. In this paper, hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles with carboxylic acid functional groups (HBPE-CA NPs) were synthesized and combined with chitosan wrapped around Au nanoparticles (CS-Au NPs) to prepare a novel and sensitive electrochemical immunosensor by adsorption of carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) on the (HBPE-CA)/CS-Au NPs modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). Under the optimized conditions, the proposed immunosensor displayed a good amperometric response to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Moreover, based on the antibiofouling properties, the immunosensor could be used for the direct detection of CEA in whole blood, and exhibited a wide detection range (1-10(7) fg mL(-1)), and a low detection limit of 0.251 fg mL(-1) (signal/noise = 3). Control experiments were also carried out by using ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), human immunoglobulin G (IgG), BSA and glucose in the absence of CEA. The good stability and repeatability of this immunosensor were also proven. Importantly, the results of the detection of clinical whole blood specimens with the proposed immunosensor showed good consistency with the data determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples. Furthermore, the developed immunosensor could provide a promising immunoassay strategy for clinical applications, since the values we measured in whole blood directly are likely closer to the real values.

  2. The combination of preoperative serum C-reactive protein and carcinoembryonic antigen is a useful prognostic factor in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a combined ROC analysis

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    Huang Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ying Huang,1 Jin-Shi Liu,2 Ji-Feng Feng2 1Department of Nursing, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: The prognostic value of inflammatory index in esophageal cancer (EC has not been established. In the present study, therefore, we initially evaluated a novel prognostic system, named the COCC (COmbination of C-reactive protein [CRP] and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], for making a prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC.Methods: A total of 327 patients with ESCC between January 2006 and December 2008 were included in this retrospective study. The COCC was calculated by combined CRP and CEA according to the logistic equation. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate the cancer-specific survival (CSS, and the difference was assessed by the log-rank test. Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic factors.Results: In our study, COCC was defined as CRP +0.71 CEA according to the logistic equation. Receiver operating characteristic curves for CSS prediction were plotted to verify the optimum cutoff points for CRP, CEA, and COCC, which were 9.8 mg/L, 4.2 ng/mL, and 8.0, respectively. Patients with COCC ≤8.0 had a significantly better CSS than patients with COCC >8.0 (53.1% vs 15.3%, P<0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that COCC was an independent prognostic factor in patients with ESCC (P=0.006. In addition, the area under the curve (AUC was 0.722 for COCC, 0.645 for CRP, and 0.618 for CEA, indicating that COCC was superior to CRP or CEA for CSS prediction.Conclusion: The COCC is an independent prognostic factor in patients with ESCC. We conclude that COCC was superior to CRP or CEA as a more precise prognostic factor in patients with ESCC. Keywords: esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, C-reactive protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer-specific survival, prognosis

  3. Label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on Nile blue A-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan-Sha; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Xu, Jing-Kun; Lu, Li-Min; Wang, Wen-Min; Yang, Tao-Tao; Xing, Hua-Kun; Yu, Yong-Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a novel, label-free, and inherent electroactive redox immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Nile blue A (NB) hybridized electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (NB-ERGO) is proposed. The composite of NB-graphene oxide (NB-GO) was prepared by π-π stacking interaction. Then, chronoamperometry was adopted to simultaneously reduce HAuCl4 and nanocomposites of NB-GO for synthesizing AuNPs/NB-ERGO. The immunosensor was fabricated by capturing CEA antibody (anti-CEA) at this nanocomposite modified electrode. The immunosensor determination was based on the fact that, due to the formation of antigen-antibody immunocomplex, the decreased response currents of NB were directly proportional to the concentrations of CEA. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the proposed immunosensor was estimated to be from 0.001 to 40 ng ml(-1) and the detection limit was estimated to be 0.00045 ng ml(-1). The proposed immunosensor was used to determine CEA in clinical serum samples with satisfactory results. The proposed method may provide promising potential application in clinical immunoassays with the properties of facile procedure, stability, high sensitivity, and selectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Label-Free Microelectrode Array Based on One-Step Synthesis of Chitosan–Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Thionine for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

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    Huiren Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA not only for rapid analysis of serum samples, but also for cell detection in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we depict a simple approach to modify chitosan–multi-walled carbon nanotubes–thionine (CS–MWCNTs–THI hybrid film through one-step electrochemical deposition and the CS-MWCNTs-THI hybrid films are successfully employed to immobilize anti-CEA for fabricating simple, label-free, and highly sensitive electro-chemical immune MEAs. The detection principle of immune MEA was based on the fact that the increasing formation of the antigen-antibody immunocomplex resulted in the decreased response currents and the relationship between the current reductions with the corresponding CEA concentrations was directly proportional. Experimental results indicated that the label-free MEA had good selectivity and the limit of detection for CEA is 0.5 pg/mL signal to noise ratio (SNR = 3. A linear calibration plot for the detection of CEA was obtained in a wide concentration range from 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL (r = 0.996. This novel MEA has potential applications for detecting CEA for the research on cancer cells and cancer tissue slices as well as for effective early diagnosis.

  5. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled silver/reduced graphene oxide thin film-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S X; Lim, H N; Ibrahim, I; Jamil, A; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a disposable and simple electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen. In this method, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were mixed with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to modify the surface of screen-printed carbon electrode (SPE). Initially, AgNPs-rGO modified-SPEs were fabricated by using simple electrochemical deposition method. Then the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was immobilized between the primary antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibody onto AgNPs-rGO modified-SPEs to fabricate a sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor. The proposed method could detect the CEA with a linear range of 0.05-0.50µgmL -1 and a detection limit down to 0.035µgmL -1 as compared to its non-sandwich counterpart, which yielded a linear range of 0.05-0.40µgmL -1 , with a detection limit of 0.042µgmL -1 . The immunosensor showed good performance in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen, exhibiting a simple, rapid and low-cost. The immunosensor showed a higher sensitivity than an enzymeless sensor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation of Au-polydopamine functionalized carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposites and their application for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lei; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Gao, Jian; Wang, Qi; Hu, Lihua; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in two-dimensional (2D) porous graphitic carbon nanocomposites (Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites) were synthesized by situ synthesis strategy, which provided a sensor platform owing to a large aspect ratio and porous structure. Polydopamine (PDA) were modified on the surface of Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites through self-polymerization of dopamine, acting as both the reductant and template for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The prepared Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites show ferromagnetic features, extremely excellent electron transfer, large specific surface area and excellent dispersing property. These are conducive to the electrochemical signal output and the immobilization of antibody. In this work, a highly label-free sensitive magnetic immunosensor was developed based on Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites for the detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The magnetic glassy carbon electrode was used to fix the Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites with the help of magnetic force. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (0.001 ng/mL–20.0 ng/mL), a low detection limit (0.33 pg/mL), good reproducibility, selectivity and acceptable stability. The proposed sensing strategy may provide a potential application in the detection of other cancer biomarkers. PMID:26868035

  7. A novel label-free amperometric immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen based on Ag nanoparticle decorated infinite coordination polymer fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenbo; Cao, Xiaowei; Tao, Lin; Ge, Juan; Dong, Jian; Qian, Weiping

    2014-07-15

    In this article, for the first time, a novel, high-yield and template-free method for the synthesis of Ag nanoparticle decorated thionine/infinite coordination polymer (AgNP/THI/ICP) fibres is proposed. The thionine can be adsorbed to the AgNP/THI/ICP fibres by π-conjugation and act as the redox probe. The AgNP/THI/ICP fibres not only favor the immobilization of antibody but also facilitate the electron transfer. It is found that the AgNP/THI/ICP fibres can be designed to act as a sensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) determination. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of the proposed immunosensor is estimated to be from 50 fg/mL to 100 ng/mL and the detection limit is estimated to be 0.5 fg/mL at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. The prepared immunosensor for detection of CEA shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. Our study demonstrates that the proposed immunosensor has also been used to determine CEA successfully in diluted blood samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on functionalized nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuying; Liu, Qing; Liu, Yan; Cui, Jianjian; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ping; Li, Yueyun; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Zengdian; Dong, Yunhui

    2017-04-15

    A novel and ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for quantitative detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) supported PtPd bimetallic nanoparticles (PtPd/N-GQDs) were synthesized by a simple and green hydrothermal procedure. Subsequently, PtPd/N-GQDs functionalized Au nanoparticles (PtPd/N-GQDs@Au) were prepared successfully via a self-assembly approach. Because of the synergetic effect present in PtPd/N-GQDs@Au, this novel nanocomposites has shown excellent electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction. Featuring good biocompatibility, excellent conductivity and large surface area, PtPd/N-GQDs@Au was applied as transducing materials to efficiently conjugate capture antibodies and amplify electrochemical signal. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed immunosensor was used for the detection of CEA with wide dynamic range in the range from 5 fg/mL to 50ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2fg/mL (S/N=3). Furthermore, this label-free immunosensor possesses high sensitivity, special selectivity and long-term stability, which shows promising application in bioassay analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel sandwiched electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen based on carbon quantum dots and signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nian-Lu; Jia, Li-Ping; Ma, Rong-Na; Jia, Wen-Li; Lu, Yi-Yang; Shi, Sha-Shan; Wang, Huai-Sheng

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a novel sandwiched electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed. The nanocomposite of polydopamine and Ag nanoparticles (PDA-AgNPs) was prepared by the redox reaction between Ag(+) and dopamine. This nanocomposite not only provided an effective matrix for the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab1) but also enhanced the conductivity of the electrode. Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were immobilized on the poly(ethylenimine) functionalized graphene oxide (PEI-GO) through amido-bond. Then Au nanoparticles were decorated on the CQDs modified PEI-GO matrix, and the resulted complex AuNPs/CQDs-PEI-GO was introduced to link secondary antibody (Ab2). The CQDs can be connected to the electrode surface through the combination of CEA with Ab1 and Ab2, and then the amplified electrochemiluminescence signal of CQDs was obtained with the synergistic effect of AgNPs, polydopamine, AuNPs and PEI-GO. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL intensity was proportional to the logarithm value of CEA concentration in the linear range from 5pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.67pgmL(-1) for CEA detection. The immunosensor was applied for the CEA detection in real samples with satisfactory results. The proposed ECL immunosensor showed good performance with high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, stability and will be potential in clinical detection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Pretargeted 177Lu radioimmunotherapy of carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing human colonic tumors in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schoffelen, R; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Franssen, G.M; Sharkey, R.M; Goldenberg, D.M; McBride, W.J; Rossi, E.A; Eek, A; Oyen, W.J.G; Boerman, O.C

    2010-01-01

    ... (CEA)-expressing human tumors. METHODS: To obtain the optimal therapeutic efficacy, several strategies were evaluated to increase the total amount of radioactivity targeted to subcutaneous LS174T colon cancer tumors in BALB/c nude mice...

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen detection with "Handing"-controlled fluorescence spectroscopy using a color matrix for point-of-care applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weijian; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Hou, Yafei; Lu, Wenting; Xu, Hao; Wo, Yan; Feng, Shaoqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-04-15

    In this study, we developed a power-free, accurate, and portable diagnostic platform called Handing based on embedded technology, which can rapidly detect fluorescent signals from quantum dots (QDs) on lateral flow test strips (LFTSs). The Handing system has three components: a hand-held test terminal, LFTS cartridge, and data server. The hand-held test terminal is the primary system component and it is integrated with tiny components using printed circuit board packaging for image acquisition, processing, and data handling by a specific program. A black smooth shell and three-dimensional printed test cartridge are used to facilitate the portability of the detection terminal, which provides a closed detection process as well as enhancing the anti-interference capacity. The functions of the data server comprise pre-editing, storage, range querying, and sharing with an international network. Multiple hand-held terminal devices can be linked simultaneously to the same data server. In this study, we detected the tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) using the QD-LFTS system, which allowed quantitative analysis in the range of 1-100ng/mL with an ideal detection limit of 0.049ng/mL. Thus, the system is suitable for detecting CEA in the clinically accepted range. We also detected 70 positive and 30 negative serum samples using the Handing system, which exhibited good specificity and sensitivity. Thus, Handing has the capacity for rapid quantitative detection with high stability and repeatability, so it could be used for in vitro diagnostics in the laboratory and in other conditions for various applications, e.g., food evaluation, disease screening, environmental monitoring, and drug testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pretargeted 177Lu radioimmunotherapy of carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing human colonic tumors in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelen, R.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Franssen, G.M.; Sharkey, R.M.; Goldenberg, D.M.; McBride, W.J.; Rossi, E.A.; Eek, A.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2010-01-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) with bispecific antibodies in combination with a radiolabeled peptide reduces the radiation dose to normal tissues, especially the bone marrow. In this study, the optimization, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity of PRIT of colon cancer with a (177)Lu-labeled

  13. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  14. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact a Scientist Find Us On Social Media: Facebook Twitter Google Plus Get the Mobile App: Footer Menu Home About This Site Contact Us Terms Of Use In The News Policies Editorial Review Board Partner | Advertise | License Sponsors and Partners Spread the Word Subscribe ...

  15. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...... functions, including support of growth, survival and metastasis. This novel insight into the function of cancer/testis antigens has the potential to deliver more effective cancer vaccines. Moreover, immune targeting of oncogenic cancer/testis antigens in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapies...

  16. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review addresses recently reported progress in cancer antigen 125 as a prognostic marker in patients with ovarian cancer. RECENT FINDINGS: Serum cancer antigen 125 levels measured preoperatively in both early and late stage ovarian cancer may be of prognostic value. Before...... cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value....... Furthermore, recent studies have shown that the level of expression of cancer antigen 125 in tissue may be an independent prognostic indicator in late stage ovarian cancer. SUMMARY: Prognostic markers may potentially help to individualize treatment within subgroups of patients. In a recent study the level...

  18. A high-sensitivity electrochemical aptasensor of carcinoembryonic antigen based on graphene quantum dots-ionic liquid-nafion nanomatrix and DNAzyme-assisted signal amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Yi; Zhao, Lang; Lei, Wan; Wen, Wei; Wang, Yi-Jia; Bao, Ting; Xiong, Hua-Yu; Zhang, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Fu

    2018-01-15

    In this work, we have developed an electrochemical aptasensor for high-sensitivity determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on lead ion (Pb(2+))-dependent DNAzyme-assisted signal amplification and graphene quantum dot-ionic liquid-nafion (GQDs-IL-NF) composite film. We designed hairpin DNA containing CEA-specific aptamers and DNAzyme chains. In the presence of CEA, hairpin DNA recognized the target and performed a DNAzyme-assisted signal amplification reaction to yield a large number of single-stranded DNA. The GQDs-IL-NF composite film was immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode for the interaction with single-stranded DNA through noncovalent π-π stacking interaction. Therefore, the methylene blue-labeled substrate DNA (MB-substrate) was fixed on the electrode and exhibited an initial electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the response current change was proportional to the concentration of CEA, demonstrating a wide linear range from 0.5fgmL(-1) to 0.5ngmL(-1), with a low detection limit of 0.34fgmL(-1). Furthermore, the proposed aptasensor was successfully applied in determining CEA in serum samples, showing its superior prospects in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Facile Synthesis of a MoS2-Prussian Blue Nanocube Nanohybrid-Based Electrochemical Sensing Platform for Hydrogen Peroxide and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shao; Han, Xiaoyan; Lu, Zaiwei; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Dan; Chao, Jie; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Weng, Lixing; Wang, Lianhui

    2017-04-12

    Herein, an electrochemical detection platform was designed based on a Prussian blue nanocube-decorated molybdenum disulfide (MoS2-PBNCs) nanocomposite. Shape-controlled and high-dispersion PBNCs were supported on the MoS2 nanosheet surface, which would be simply controlled by varying the experimental conditions. Expectedly, such obtained MoS2-based nanocomposites possessed excellent electrocatalytic ability, which could be employed to construct an electrochemical sensor for nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection. More interestingly, MoS2-PBNCs nanocomposites could be utilized to construct a sensor for label-free detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The electrochemical response of the MoS2-based immunosensor was linear with the CEA concentration ranging from 0.005 to 10 ng mL(-1). Moreover, the detection limit was calculated to be 0.54 pg mL(-1). The acceptable selectivity and high stability made such immunosensors detect CEA in human serum with satisfactory results. All data indicated that this MoS2-PBNCs nanocomposite may be a promising electrochemical sensing platform for the detection of chemical and biological molecules.

  20. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L- 1 and 0.054 μg L- 1 with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L- 1) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2-50 μg L- 1. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications.

  1. Label-Free Electrochemiluminescent Immunosensor for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Nanocomposites of GO/MWCNTs-COOH/Au@CeO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuehui; Li, Jianxiu; Zhao, Yongbei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Du, Bin; Ma, Hongmin; Wei, Qin

    2015-09-02

    A high-sensitivity electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor was conducted to detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Nanocomposites of graphene oxide/carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes/gold/cerium oxide nanoparticles (GO/MWCNTs-COOH/Au@CeO2) were used as antibody carriers and sensing platforms to modify on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). CeO2 nanoparticles were first exploited as an ECL luminescent material and the possible ECL mechanism was proposed in this work. GO/MWCNTs-COOH was used as a loading matrix for CeO2 nanoparticles because of the superior conductivity and large specific surface area. Au nanoparticles were further deposited on this matrix to attach anti-CEA and enhance the sensitivity of immunosensor. The proposed sensing platform showed excellent cathodic ECL performance and sensitive response to CEA. The effects of experimental conditions on the ECL performance were investigated. The proposed immunosensor showed the broad linear range (0.05-100 ng/mL) and the low detection limit (LOD, 0.02 ng/mL, signal-to-noise ratio = 3) according to the selected experimental conditions. The excellent analysis performance for determination of CEA in the human serum samples simplied this immunosensor displayed high sensitivity and excellent repeatability. More importantly, this conducted immunosensor broadens the use scope of CeO2 nanoparticles.

  2. Urine carcinoembryonic antigen levels are more useful than serum levels for early detection of Bilharzial and non-Bilharzial urinary bladder carcinoma: Observations of 43 Egyptian cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwan Mohamed S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both urinary bilharziasis and urothelial neoplasia are associated with increased production of tissue carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. Patients and methods Urine and serum CEA were determined in 43 patients with urinary bladder carcinoma including 22 post bilharzial and 21 nonbiharzial cases, in addition to 10 normal control cases. Results A significant increase was detected in both urine and serum CEA levels with bladder carcinoma compared to control cases. Urinary CEA was significantly elevated in 86% of bilharzial, versus 62% in nonbilharzial bladder carcinoma. Only 10.5% of control cases had urinary CEA elevation. The mean urinary CEA in bilharzial, was higher than that of nonbilharzial carcinoma, but the difference was not statistically significant. There was a definite relationship between urine CEA and the stage of malignancy; the higher the stage, the higher the level of urine CEA. No relationship could be detected between the stage of malignancy and serum CEA, or between the grades of malignancy and urine or serum CEA levels. Conclusion Urinary CEA is more useful than serum CEA in the early detection of urotherlial carcinoma particularly if provoked by bilharziasis. Its level is also correlated with the tumor stage.

  3. Capillary-based three-dimensional immunosensor assembly for high-performance detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaoling; Wang, Xu; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-02-04

    A novel capillary-based three-dimensional (3D) fluoroimmunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen detection was explored for the first time. The immunosensor was designed in symmetrical cylinder structure and fabricated with capillary tubes encapsulated in a quartz tube. The 3D design of the sensor increased the area of sensing surface, flexibility in light path design and efficiency of fluorescence collection by aluminum foil, resulting in analytical performance improvement. The CEA immunosensor was constructed in double antibody sandwich format. Fluorescence signals from DyLight 550-labeled antibody were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry. There is an obvious improvement in the linear detection range of 0.7-80 ng/mL. This novel 3D immunosensor dramatically improved the detection limit (1.1 pmol/L CEA) and sensitivity. Assay validation studies indicated that the correlation coefficient reached 0.9935, with recoveries of 92.82-118.81%. Furthermore, the immunosensor was successfully applied to CEA determination in actual saliva specimens with high sensitivity and acceptable precision. Regarding accuracy, the results obtained by 3D immunosensor were not significantly different (t test) from those obtained by validated electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. This new 3D CEA immunosensor was demonstrated to be a high-performance tool for CEA diagnostics.

  4. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... or novel immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade or adoptive transfer, represents a highly synergistic approach with the potential to improve patient survival....

  5. Bioresponsive Release System for Visual Fluorescence Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen from Mesoporous Silica Nanocontainers Mediated Optical Color on Quantum Dot-Enzyme-Impregnated Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-05-02

    An all-in-one paper-based analytical device (PAD) was successfully developed for visual fluorescence detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on CdTe/CdSe quantum dot (QD)-enzyme-impregnated paper by coupling with a bioresponsive controlled-release system from DNA-gated mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs). The assay was carried out in a centrifuge tube by using glucose-loaded MSNs with a CEA aptamer and a QD-enzyme-paper attached on the lid. Initially, single-strand complementary DNA to a CEA aptamer was covalently conjugated to the aminated MSN, and then glucose (enzyme substrate) molecules were gated into the pore with the help of the aptamer. Glucose oxidase (GOD) and CdTe/CdSe QDs were coimmobilized on paper for the visual fluorescence signal output. Upon target CEA introduction in the detection cell, the analyte specifically reacted with the immobilized aptamer on the MSN to open the pore, thereby resulting in the glucose release. The released glucose was oxidized by the immobilized GOD on paper to produce gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the latter quenched the fluorescence of CdTe/CdSe QDs, which could be determined by the naked eye on a portable smartphone and a commercial fluorospectrometer. Under optimal conditions, the PAD-based sensing system enabled sensitive discrimination of target CEA against other biomarkers or proteins in a linear range of 0.05-20 ng mL-1 with a limit of detection of 6.7 pg mL-1 (ppt). In addition, our strategy displayed high specificity, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy for analyzing human serum specimens with a commercial human CEA ELISA kit. Importantly, this methodology offers promise for simple analysis of biological samples and is suitable for use in the mass production of miniaturized devices, thus opening new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  6. Gene expression profiles in hypoxic preconditioning using cDNA microarray analysis: altered expression of an angiogenic factor, carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jone; Chen, Huei-Wen; Yu, Sung-Liang; Huang, Chien-Hua; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2005-08-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning has been shown to exhibit cardioprotective effects on myocardium from ischemic or reperfusion injury. The specific regulated gene involved in the hypoxia-induced cardioprotective effects is profiled in this study. Young male Wistar rats and ICR mice were exposed to sea level (as normal control) or simulated high altitude for 15 h/day for 2, 4, or 8 weeks, or for 4 weeks at high altitude after 2 weeks at sea level. The left ventricles of the animals were isolated for mRNA isolation and cDNA microarray analysis. Our data demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning significantly ameliorated cardiac ischemic injury by minimizing the infarct size. After cluster analysis of expression profiles after different courses of hypoxic preconditioning (0, 2, 4, and 8 weeks), 386 genes showed an ascending pattern, whereas 301 genes showed a descending pattern. The ascending genes include several angiogenic factors: FGF receptor 4, vascular endothelial growth factor (vEGF), and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM-1). The microvessel density was also significantly increased in hypoxic hearts. Using Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis, the protein expression level and localization of CEACAM-1 were observed in hypoxic myocardium. The results also indicated that CEACAM-1 was upregulated as with other hypoxic angiogenic factors, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), in in vitro cultured cardiomyocytes (H9c2) after hypoxia treatment and in vivo hypoxic preconditioning. Furthermore, incubation with recombinant vEGF could also increase the expression level of CEACAM-1 in H9c2 cells. These results demonstrated that hypoxic preconditioning resulted in transcriptional changes, and some of these genes have been correlated with angiogenesis. The HIF-1/vEGF/CEACAM-1 pathway might be important for hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the heart during hypoxic preconditioning.

  7. Cerium oxide-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.W. [Department of Chemistry, NSBI, Dankook University, 126 Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.H.; Hur, N.H. [Department of Chemistry, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, H.B., E-mail: plasma@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, NSBI, Dankook University, 126 Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Sandwich-type immunoassay using ICP-MS and nanoparticles to determine biomarkers. • CeO{sub 2}-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a probe. • Ratiometric measurement significantly improved the calibration linearity. • Excellent detection limit was achieved by signal amplification. - Abstract: CeO{sub 2}-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a probe to determine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The prepared mesoporous nanoparticles were modified and tagged to the target for sandwich-type immunoassay. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were also synthesized and immobilized with antibody to extract the target biomarker. The calibration curve of the synthesized CeO{sub 2}-deposited silica nanoparticles, which was plotted by the signal ratio of {sup 140}Ce/{sup 57}Fe measured by ICP-MS vs. the concentration of CEA, showed excellent linearity and sensitivity owing to the signal amplification and low spectral interference. Under optimal conditions, the sandwich-type analytical method was applied to determine CEA in serum spiked in the range of 0.001–5 ng mL{sup −1} and showed a limit of detection of 0.36 ng mL{sup −1}. Since the deposited CeO{sub 2} in the mesoporous silica layer can be substituted by other metal compounds, various kinds of metal-deposited nanoparticles can be prepared as probe materials for multiplex detection in bioanalysis.

  8. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin, E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L{sup −1} and 0.054 μg L{sup −1} with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L{sup −1}) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2–50 μg L{sup −1}. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications. - Highlights: • 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared and characterized. • ICP-MS based magnetic immunoassay approach was developed for quantification of glycoproteins. • AFP and CEA were quantified simultaneously with Au and Ag NPs as element tags. • The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for target glycoproteins.

  9. Randomised Phase I/II trial assessing the safety and efficacy of radiolabelled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen I131 KAb201 antibodies given intra-arterially or intravenously in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosonnet Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, and the current standard of care (gemcitabine based chemotherapy provides a small survival advantage. However the drawback is the accompanying systemic toxicity, which targeted treatments may overcome. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of KAb201, an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody, labelled with I131 in pancreatic cancer (ISRCTN 16857581. Methods Patients with histological/cytological proven inoperable adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas were randomised to receive KAb 201 via either the intra-arterial or intravenous delivery route. The dose limiting toxicities within each group were determined. Patients were assessed for safety and efficacy and followed up until death. Results Between February 2003 and July 2005, 25 patients were enrolled. Nineteen patients were randomised, 9 to the intravenous and 10 to the intra-arterial arms. In the intra-arterial arm, dose limiting toxicity was seen in 2/6 (33% patients at 50 mCi whereas in the intravenous arm, dose limiting toxicity was noted in 1/6 patients at 50 mCi, but did not occur at 75 mCi (0/3. The overall response rate was 6% (1/18. Median overall survival was 5.2 months (95% confidence interval = 3.3 to 9 months, with no significant difference between the intravenous and intra-arterial arms (log rank test p = 0.79. One patient was still alive at the time of this analysis. Conclusion Dose limiting toxicity for KAb201 with I131 by the intra-arterial route was 50 mCi, while dose limiting toxicity was not reached in the intravenous arm.

  10. A Novel Carcinoembryonic Antigen T-Cell Bispecific Antibody (CEA TCB) for the Treatment of Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacac, Marina; Fauti, Tanja; Sam, Johannes; Colombetti, Sara; Weinzierl, Tina; Ouaret, Djamila; Bodmer, Walter; Lehmann, Steffi; Hofer, Thomas; Hosse, Ralf J; Moessner, Ekkehard; Ast, Oliver; Bruenker, Peter; Grau-Richards, Sandra; Schaller, Teilo; Seidl, Annette; Gerdes, Christian; Perro, Mario; Nicolini, Valeria; Steinhoff, Nathalie; Dudal, Sherri; Neumann, Sebastian; von Hirschheydt, Thomas; Jaeger, Christiane; Saro, Jose; Karanikas, Vaios; Klein, Christian; Umaña, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    CEA TCB is a novel IgG-based T-cell bispecific (TCB) antibody for the treatment of CEA-expressing solid tumors currently in phase I clinical trials (NCT02324257). Its format incorporates bivalent binding to CEA, a head-to-tail fusion of CEA- and CD3e-binding Fab domains and an engineered Fc region with completely abolished binding to FcγRs and C1q. The study provides novel mechanistic insights into the activity and mode of action of CEA TCB. CEA TCB activity was characterized on 110 cell lines in vitro and in xenograft tumor models in vivo using NOG mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Simultaneous binding of CEA TCB to tumor and T cells leads to formation of immunologic synapses, T-cell activation, secretion of cytotoxic granules, and tumor cell lysis. CEA TCB activity strongly correlates with CEA expression, with higher potency observed in highly CEA-expressing tumor cells and a threshold of approximately 10,000 CEA-binding sites/cell, which allows distinguishing between high- and low-CEA-expressing tumor and primary epithelial cells, respectively. Genetic factors do not affect CEA TCB activity confirming that CEA expression level is the strongest predictor of CEA TCB activity. In vivo, CEA TCB induces regression of CEA-expressing xenograft tumors with variable amounts of immune cell infiltrate, leads to increased frequency of activated T cells, and converts PD-L1 negative into PD-L1-positive tumors. CEA TCB is a novel generation TCB displaying potent antitumor activity; it is efficacious in poorly infiltrated tumors where it increases T-cell infiltration and generates a highly inflamed tumor microenvironment. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3286-97. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Hookah smoking and cancer: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels in exclusive/ever hookah smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouachi Kamal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently published some work on CEA levels in hookah (also called narghile, shisha elsewhere and cigarette smokers. Hookah smokers had higher levels of CEA than non-smokers although mean levels were low compared to cigarette smokers. However some of them were also users of other tobacco products (cigarettes, bidis, etc.. Objectives To find serum CEA levels in ever/exclusive hookah smokers, i.e. those who smoked only hookah (no cigarettes, bidis, etc., prepared between 1 and 4 times a day with a quantity of up to 120 g of a tobacco-molasses mixture each (i.e. the tobacco weight equivalent of up to 60 cigarettes of 1 g each and consumed in 1 to 8 sessions. Methods Enhanced chemiluminescent immunometric technique was applied to measure CEA levels in serum samples from 59 exclusive male smokers with age ranging from 20–80 years (mean = 58.8 ± 14.7 years and 8–65 years of smoking (mean = 37.7 ± 16.8. 36 non-smokers served as controls. Subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the number of preparations; the number of sessions and the total daily smoking time: Light (1; 1; ≤ 20 minutes; Medium (1–3; 1–3; >20 min to ≤ 2 hrs and Heavy smokers (2–4; 3–8; >2 hrs to ≤ 6 hrs. Because of the nature of distribution of CEA levels among our individuals, Wilcoxon's rank sum two-sample test was applied to compare the variables. Results The overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers (mean: 3.58 ± 2.61 ng/ml; n = 59 were not significantly different (p ≤ 0.0937 from the levels in non-smokers (2.35 ± 0.71 ng/ml. Mean levels in light, medium and heavy smokers were: 1.06 ± 0.492 ng/ml (n = 5; 2.52 ± 1.15 ng/ml (n = 28 and 5.11 ± 3.08 ng/ml (n = 26 respectively. The levels in medium smokers and non-smokers were also not significantly different (p ≤ 0.9138. In heavy smokers, the CEA levels were significantly higher than in non-smokers (p ≤ 0.0001567. Conclusion Overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers were low compared to cigarette smokers. However, heavy hookah smoking substantially raises CEA levels. Low-nitrosamines smokeless tobacco of the SNUS Swedish type could be envisaged as an alternative to smoking for this category of users and also, in a broad harm reduction perspective, to the prevalent low-quality moist snuff called naswar.

  12. Monitoring different stages of breast cancer using tumour markers CA 15-3, CEA and TPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the tumour markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3), Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA), and Tissue Polypeptide Antigen (TPA) to signal progression in breast cancer patients was investigated in this study. Marker interpretation considered the analytical variation, intra-individual biologi...

  13. Comparing prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) with the oncofetal proteins glypican-3, Alpha feto protein and carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma among Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Gawad, Iman A; Mossallam, Ghada I; Radwan, Noha H; Elzawahry, Heba M; Elhifnawy, Niveen M

    2014-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually asymptomatic in the early stage and does not show elevated alpha-feto protein (AFP). AFP shows 60-80% sensitivity in diagnosing HCC. Glypican3 (GPC-3) is an oncofetal protein that is only detected in HCC cells but not in benign liver tissues, while Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in various neoplasms including HCC. Although, it is not specific for HCC. Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal prothrombin protein that is increased in the serum of HCC patients. It has higher sensitivity and specificity compared to AFP. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical utility of PIVKA-II with GPC-3, AFP and CEA in diagnosing HCC. This study included 40 patients with HCC, 10 patients with cirrhosis as a benign control group, and 10 apparently healthy volunteers as normal controls. Serum samples were subjected to routine laboratory investigations, measurement of CEA, AFP using MEIA technique (Axsym), glypican3, and PIVKA-II using ELISA technique in the sera of all patients and controls. All markers showed the highest results in the HCC group. Higher concentrations of PIVKA-II were detected in patients with splenomegaly, and in tumors with size (>3cm). Combination of Glypican-3 and PIVKA-II showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone and combination of GPC-3 and AFP showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis and normal controls. GPC-3, PIVKAII, and combination of both showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis. Glypican-3 is the only oncofetal antigen that showed comparable high diagnostic accuracy as PIVKA-II in diagnosing HCC among Egyptian patients. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Diagnostic utility of PET/CT with (18)F-DOPA and (18)F-FDG in persistent or recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: the importance of calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen cutoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Lluch, Ana Reyes; Cuenca-Cuenca, Juan Ignacio; Guerrero-Vázquez, Raquel; Martínez-Ortega, Antonio Jesús; Tirado-Hospital, Juan Luis; Borrego-Dorado, Isabel; Navarro-González, Elena

    2017-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate and compare the utility of 18-F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) and 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for identification of lesions in patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In addition, we analyzed the correlation between the calcitonin (Ct), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, each doubling time (DT), and PET positivity. We evaluated the reliability of the 150 pg/mL Ct cutoff set by the American Thyroid Association guidelines for further imaging (including (18)F-DOPA PET/CT). We prospectively recruited 18 patients with recurrent MTC, identified by elevation of Ct or CEA. Each patient underwent a (18)F-FDG PET/CT and a (18)F-DOPA PET/CT. Abnormal uptakes were detected with (18)F-DOPA (n=12) and (18)F-FDG (n=9), (sensitivity of 66.7% vs. 50%; pPET/CT (sensitivity 72.7% vs. 14.3%; p=0.025). Using a CEA cutoff of ≥5 ng/mL, detection rates of (18)F-DOPA and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 81.1% and 72.7%, respectively. No correlation between Ct-DT or CEA-DT and PET positivity was found. Histological confirmation was obtained in eight patients. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT appears to be superior to (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting and locating lesions in patients with recurrent MTC. This technique tends to be especially useful in patients with negative results in other imaging modalities and Ct≥150 pg/mL or CEA≥5 ng/mL.

  15. Cancer-germline antigen vaccines and epigenetic enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Burns, Jorge; Ditzel, Henrik Jorn

    2010-01-01

    can be achieved using epigenetic modifiers. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: We provide an overview of the potential of CG antigens as targets for cancer immunotherapy, including advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the current state of development of CG antigen vaccines, and the potential...... antigen vaccines may be a useful approach for treating cancer....

  16. CA 19-9 (Cancer Antigen 19-9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called Lewis antigen that is similar to the ABO antigens that are used in blood typing for ... Guidelines for the Use of Tumor Markers in Breast and Colorectal Cancer [On-line guidelines]. Available online at http://www. ...

  17. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... immunology approach is applied. Via in silico screening of the protein sequences, 415 peptides were predicted as HLA-A*0201 and HLA-B*0702 binders. Subsequent in vitro binding analysis in a MHC ELISA platform confirmed binding for 147 of the 415 predicted binders. The 147 peptides were evaluated for T cell...

  18. The Potential Ability of Plaster to Cause Breast Cancer as Indicated by CA15-3 and CEA Antigens in Women Working in Gypsum Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdul Hussein S. AL-Janabi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plaster is an important form of gypsum that mainly used in building construction. Breast cancer was investigated among women exposure to the dust of such material. The levels of CA15-3 and carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA as indicators for breast cancer were measured in the serum of 120 women working in a plaster factory. All of involved women showed a normal level of CEA, while 12.5% of them had moderately elevated levels of CA15-3. In conclusion; plaster dust has no significant effect to cause breast cancer in working women. Moderately high levels of CA15-3 in some of exposed women may relate to liver diseases. Key words: Breast Cancer, Plaster, CA15-3, CEA

  19. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  20. Cancer-testis antigen expression is shared between epithelial ovarian cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Soto, Arlene E; Schreiber, Taylor; Strbo, Natasa; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Miao, Feng; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Simpkins, Fiona; Nieves-Neira, Wilberto; Lucci, Joseph; Podack, Eckhard R

    2017-06-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens have been proposed as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of a panel of CT antigens in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tumor specimens, and to determine if antigen sharing occurs between tumors. RNA was isolated from EOC tumor specimens, EOC cell lines and benign ovarian tissue specimens. Real time-PCR analysis was performed to determine the expression level of 20 CT antigens. A total of 62 EOC specimens, 8 ovarian cancer cell lines and 3 benign ovarian tissues were evaluated for CT antigen expression. The majority of the specimens were: high grade (62%), serous (68%) and advanced stage (74%). 58 (95%) of the EOC tumors analyzed expressed at least one of the CT antigens evaluated. The mean number of CT antigen expressed was 4.5 (0-17). The most frequently expressed CT antigen was MAGE A4 (65%). Antigen sharing analysis showed the following: 9 tumors shared only one antigen with 62% of the evaluated specimens, while 37 tumors shared 4 or more antigens with 82%. 5 tumors expressed over 10 CT antigens, which were shared with 90% of the tumor panel. CT antigens are expressed in 95% of EOC tumor specimens. However, not a single antigen was universally expressed across all samples. The degree of antigen sharing between tumors increased with the total number of antigens expressed. These data suggest a multi-epitope approach for development of immunotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Biological function of cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannagi, R

    1996-06-01

    An important outcome of the monoclonal antibody approach for cancer-associated antigens is that cell-surface carbohydrates have been shown to be very important cancer-associated antigens. These antigens are currently classified into several groups. The first group has the sugar determinant carried by so-called type 1 chain carbohydrates, with a backbone structure composed of the Gal beta 1-->3GlcNAc beta repeating unit. The antigens in this group are utilized mainly for the diagnosis of cancers in the pancreas, biliary tract and other digestive organs. This group includes the well-known serum tumor marker, the 2 -->3 sialyl Le(a) antigen, which is detected by N19-9 and other antibodies. This group also includes DU-PAN-2, which was recently confirmed to be the sialyl Lec. The second group has the polysaccharide determinant carried by so-called type 2 chain carbohydrates, the characteristic feature of which is a backbone structure composed of the Gal beta1 -->4GlcNAc beta repeating unit. This group includes the tumor markers, sialyl SSEA-1, CSLEX-1 or sialyl Lewis X, and is used for the diagnosis of cancers originating in the lung, ovary and digestive organs. The third group has the antigenic determinant carried by the innermost core structures in O-linked carbohydrate side chains. The example of this group is the sialyl Tn antigen, which is detected in ovarian cancers. This group also includes the recently described carbohydrate determinant called Fl alpha antigen, which is frequently expressed in gastric cancer cells. Some of the antigens in the first and second groups such as sialyl Le(a) and sialyl Le(x), serve as ligands for E-selectin, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on activated human endothelial cells, and play significant roles in hematogenous metastasis of cancer.

  2. Tumour-associated antigens in systemic sclerosis patients with interstitial lung disease: association with lung involvement and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giacomo; Bosello, Silvia L; Berardi, Giorgia; Rucco, Manuela; Canestrari, Giovanni; Correra, Miriam; Mirone, Luisa; Forni, Franca; Di Mario, Clara; Danza, Francesco M; Pirronti, Tommaso; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the serum levels of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) in patients with SSc and interstitial lung disease (ILD) and to define whether their levels mirror the severity and the progression of lung damage. Data from 80 SSc patients with ILD were collected at baseline and after 2 years as well as from 40 SSc controls without ILD. The occurrence of any malignancy was recorded. At baseline, an increase of at least one TAA was present in 35 SSc patients with ILD compared with 6 SSc patients without ILD (P < 0.0001); this was associated with lower forced vital capacity (FVC) and higher interstitial and alveolar scores. Levels of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 and carcinoembryonic antigen inversely correlated with FVC and directly correlated with alveolar and interstitial scores and their levels were higher in patients who presented a progression of lung damage after 2 years. During 4 years of follow-up, a malignancy was detected in seven patients who already had an increase of at least one TAA. Values of TAAs increased over time in patients who developed cancer, while their trend remained stable in the others. At multivariate analysis, to have three or more TAAs emerged as a strong independent predictor of the development of malignancies [relative risk 24.1 (95% CI 1.8, 315.0), P = 0.02]. TAAs can be elevated in the sera of SSc patients and correlate with the degree of lung damage, suggesting a role as severity biomarkers. Close follow-up is necessary in SSc patients because of the increased cancer risk overall in patients with increased TAAs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Changes in soluble CEA and TIMP-1 levels during adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sölétormos, György

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antige...... (CEA) levels in patients with stage III colon cancer.......Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been suggested to be a valuable marker in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the effects of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels are unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of chemotherapy on TIMP-1 levels in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen...

  4. Predictive value of prostate-specific antigen for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Leah; Borges, Alvaro Humberto; Ravn, Lene

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although prostate cancer (PCa) incidence is lower in HIV+ men than in HIV- men, the usefulness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in this population is not well defined and may have higher false negative rates than in HIV- men. We aimed to describe the kinetics and predict...

  5. Tumor subtype-specific cancer-testis antigens as potential biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Weinstein, John N.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Zhao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy because of their restricted expression in immune-privileged germ cells and various malignancies. Current application of CT-based immunotherapy has been focused on CT expression-rich tumors such as melanoma and lung cancers. In this study, we surveyed CT expression using the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets for ten common cancer types. We show that, CT expression is specific and enriched within certain cancer molecul...

  6. Antibody profiling with protein antigen microarrays in early stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brian C-S; Dijohnson, Daniel A; O'Rourke, Dennis J

    2012-05-01

    Proteins not present in normal cells, that is, cancer cells, may elicit a host immune response that leads to the generation of antibodies that might react with these tumor-associated proteins. In recent years, a growing number of reports have showed that autoantibody profiling may provide an alternative approach for the detection of cancer. However, most studies of antigen-autoantibody reactivity have relied on recombinant proteins. Recombinant proteins lack the proper post-translational modifications present in native proteins. Because of this limitation, native or natural protein antigen microarrays are gaining popularity for profiling antibody responses. i) To illustrate some examples of autoantibodies as signatures for early stage cancer; ii) to briefly outline the various protein antigen microarray platforms; iii) to illustrate the use of native or natural protein microarrays in the discovery of potential biomarkers and iv) to discuss the advantages of native protein antigen microarrays over other approaches. The nature of protein microarray platforms is conducive to multiplexing, which amplifies the potential for uncovering effective biomarkers for many significant diseases. However, the major challenge will be in integrating microarray platforms into multiplexed clinical diagnostic tools, as the main drawback is the reproducibility and coefficient of variation of the results from array to array, and the transportability of the array platform to a more automatable platform.

  7. Prostate-specific antigen, prostate cancer, and disorders of hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Franchini, Massimo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2009-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in men and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Disorders of hemostasis are commonplace in patients with prostate cancer and include disseminated intravascular coagulation, venous thromboembolism, acute coronary syndrome, and postsurgical bleeding. These hemostatic disorders contribute to the mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer. The leading mechanisms proposed to underlie prostate cancer-related coagulopathies are thought to be a hyperexpression of tissue factor, cancer procoagulant, and platelet-activating factor, which is then accompanied by release of large amounts of both prothrombotic and profibrinolytic substances into the bloodstream. Given the generally accepted notion that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) represents an important biomarker in prostate cancer diagnostics, large population screenings were initiated for early detection of cancer. However, recent clinical and economic drawbacks have been recently raised, including evidence that screening exposes patients to a significant risk of both overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Nevertheless, several lines of evidence suggest that PSA may have tumor-suppressing activities. Despite being a member of the vast kallikrein family, which actively interplays with the coagulation cascade, the role of PSA in the pathogenesis of hemostatic disorders observed in prostate cancer patients remains circumstantial and speculative. However, observations that the levels of this cancer marker tend to correlate positively with those of several markers of thrombin generation, and with postsurgical bleeding as well as with coronary atherosclerosis and negative outcomes of myocardial infarction, raise a new and intriguing scenario regarding the pathophysiological role of this serine protease. (c) Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Urine antibody against human cancer antigen NY-ESO-1

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Dirk; Stockert, Elisabeth; Karbach, Julia; Herrlinger, Kristina; Atmaca, Akin; Arand, Michael; Chen, Yao-Tseng; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Knuth, Alexander; Jäger, Elke

    2002-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is one of the most immunogenic tumor antigens known to date. Spontaneous humoral and cellular immune responses against NY-ESO-1 are detected in a substantial proportion of patients with NY-ESO-1 positive cancers. NY-ESO-1 serum antibody is dependent on the presence of NY-ESO-1+ cancer cells, and antibody titers correlate with the clinical development of the disease. NY-ESO-1 serum antibody is associated with detectable NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cell reactivity. High titers of NY-ESO-1...

  9. High Plasma TIMP-1 and Serum CEA Levels during Combination Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Are Significantly Associated with Poor Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Byström, Per; Berglund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether combination chemotherapy leads to early changes in plasma TIMP-1 and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and whether such changes relate to subsequent objective response, time to progression (TTP) and ove...

  10. Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and Therapeutic Vaccination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Domchek, Susan M

    2005-01-01

    This grant supports studies to understand the potential of universal tumor antigens for cancer immunotherapy, with a particular focus on the characterization of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) as tumor antigen...

  11. Overdetection, overtreatment and costs in prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); A. der Kinderen (Arno); E.M. Wever (Elisabeth); G. Draisma (Gerrit); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has shown to reduce prostate cancer mortality in the European Randomised study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) trial. Overdetection and overtreatment are substantial unfavourable side effects with

  12. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Rights for development of Pox-virus based vaccines for bladder cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer...-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Bladder Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Liver Cancer, Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Pancreatic...

  13. Novel Thiosemicarbazones Inhibit Lysine-Rich Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (CEACAM1) Coisolated (LYRIC) and the LYRIC-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via Upregulation of N-Myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ruxing; Pun, Ivan Ho Yuen; Menezes, Sharleen V; Fouani, Leyla; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Huang, Michael L H; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Richardson, Des R; Kovacevic, Zaklina

    2017-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) plays a vital role in cancer progression as it is associated with inflammation and promotion of cancer angiogenesis and metastasis. The effects of TNFα are mediated by its downstream target, the oncogene lysine-rich CEACAM1 coisolated protein (LYRIC, also known as metadherin or astrocyte elevated gene-1). LYRIC plays an important role in activating the nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, which controls multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, etc. In contrast, the metastasis suppressor N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has the opposite effect on the NF-κB pathway, being able to inhibit NF-κB activation and reduce angiogenesis, proliferation, migration, and cancer cell invasion. These potent anticancer properties make NDRG1 an ideal therapeutic target. Indeed, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone anticancer agents that target this molecule has been developed; the lead agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, has recently entered clinical trials for advanced and resistant cancers. To further elucidate the interaction between NDRG1 and oncogenic signaling, this study for the first time assessed the effects of NDRG1 on the tumorigenic properties of TNFα and its downstream target, LYRIC. We have demonstrated that NDRG1 inhibits the TNFα-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Further, NDRG1 also potently inhibited LYRIC expression, with a negative feedback loop existing between these two molecules. Examining the mechanism involved, we demonstrated that NDRG1 inhibited phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling, leading to reduced levels of the LYRIC transcriptional activator, c-Myc. Finally, we demonstrated that novel thiosemicarbazones that upregulate NDRG1 also inhibit LYRIC expression, further highlighting their marked potential for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Cancer vaccines: an update with special focus on ganglioside antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Roberto J; Guthmann, Marcel D; Gabri, Mariano R; Carnero, Ariel J L; Alonso, Daniel F; Fainboim, Leonardo; Gomez, Daniel E

    2002-01-01

    Vaccine development is one of the most promising and exciting fields in cancer research; numerous approaches are being studied to developed effective cancer vaccines. The aim of this form of therapy is to teach the patient's immune system to recognize the antigens expressed in tumor cells, but not in normal tissue, to be able to destroy these abnormal cells leaving the normal cells intact. In other words, is an attempt to teach the immune system to recognize antigens that escaped the immunologic surveillance and are by it, therefore able to survive and, in time, disseminate. However each research group developing a cancer vaccine, uses a different technology, targeting different antigens, combining different carriers and adjuvants, and using different immunization schedules. Most of the vaccines are still experimental and not approved by the US or European Regulatory Agencies. In this work, we will offer an update in the knowledge in cancer immunology and all the anticancer vaccine approaches, with special emphasis in ganglioside based vaccines. It has been demonstrated that quantitative and qualitative changes occur in ganglioside expression during the oncogenic transformation. Malignant transformation appears to activate enzymes associated with ganglioside glycosylation, resulting in altered patterns of ganglioside expression in tumors. Direct evidence of the importance of gangliosides as potential targets for active immunotherapy has been suggested by the observation that human monoclonal antibodies against these glycolipids induce shrinkage of human cutaneous melanoma metastasis. Thus, the cellular over-expression and shedding of gangliosides into the interstitial space may play a central role in cell growth regulation, immune tolerance and tumor-angiogenesis, therefore representing a new target for anticancer therapy. Since 1993 researchers at the University of Buenos Aires and the University of Quilmes (Argentina), have taken part in a project carried out by

  15. The value of cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) during treatment and follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruijn, HWA; vanderZee, AGJ; Aalders, JG

    Although the nature of the cancer antigen 125 leaves many questions unanswered, the use of serum measurements as a means to assess the response to surgery and chemotherapy in ovarian cancer is now well documented. Good prognostic significance is attributed to a rapid decline in cancer antigen 125

  16. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

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    Niranjan J Sathianathen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting.

  17. The role of GAGE cancer/testis antigen in metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Terp, Mikkel Green; Hansen, Malene Bredahl

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in various types of malignancies and represent attractive targets for immunotherapy, however their role in cancer initiation and progression has remained elusive. GAGE proteins are expressed in normal cells during early development...... lines, which are equally tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, but differ with their ability to generate metastases in the lungs and lymph nodes. RESULTS: Although GAGE proteins were strongly upregulated in the highly metastatic clone (CL16) compared to non-metastatic (NM2C5), weakly metastatic (M4A4......) and moderately metastatic clones (LM3), stable downregulation of GAGE expression did not affect the ability of CL16 cells to establish primary tumors and form metastasis in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that GAGE proteins per se do not support metastasis and that further...

  18. Inhibiting DNA methylation activates cancer testis antigens and expression of the antigen processing and presentation machinery in colon and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenkäs, Cornelia; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Guzzetta, Angela A; Sharma, Anup; Jeschke, Jana; Vatapalli, Rajita; Baylin, Stephen B; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-01-01

    Innovative therapies for solid tumors are urgently needed. Recently, therapies that harness the host immune system to fight cancer cells have successfully treated a subset of patients with solid tumors. These responses have been strong and durable but observed in subsets of patients. Work from our group and others has shown that epigenetic therapy, specifically inhibiting the silencing DNA methylation mark, activates immune signaling in tumor cells and can sensitize to immune therapy in murine models. Here we show that colon and ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit lower expression of transcripts involved in antigen processing and presentation to immune cells compared to normal tissues. In addition, treatment with clinically relevant low doses of DNMT inhibitors (that remove DNA methylation) increases expression of both antigen processing and presentation and Cancer Testis Antigens in these cell lines. We confirm that treatment with DNMT inhibitors upregulates expression of the antigen processing and presentation molecules B2M, CALR, CD58, PSMB8, PSMB9 at the RNA and protein level in a wider range of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines and treatment time points than had been described previously. In addition, we show that DNMTi treatment upregulates many Cancer Testis Antigens common to both colon and ovarian cancer. This increase of both antigens and antigen presentation by epigenetic therapy may be one mechanism to sensitize patients to immune therapies.

  19. Brain metastasis development and poor survival associated with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a prospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Patricia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system is a common site of metastasis in NSCLC and confers worse prognosis and quality of life. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical-pathological factors (CPF, serum CEA levels, and EGFR and HER2 tissue-expression in brain metastasis (BM and overall survival (OS in patients with advanced NSCLC. Methods In a prospective manner, we studied 293 patients with NSCLC in IIIB-IV clinical stage. They received standard chemotherapy. CEA was measured prior to treatment; EGFR and HER2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. BM development was confirmed by MRI in symptomatic patients. Results BM developed in 27, and 32% of patients at 1 and 2 years of diagnosis with adenocarcinoma (RR 5.2; 95% CI, 1.002–29; p = 0.05 and CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 11.4; 95% CI, 1.7–74; p p = 0.048, poor performance status (RR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5–2.3; p = 0.002, advanced clinical stage (RR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.02–2; p = 0.04, CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.2; p = 0.014 and EGFR expression (RR 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4–1.9; p = 0.012 were independent associated factors to worse OS. Conclusion High CEA serum level is a risk factor for BM development and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC. Surface expression of CEA in tumor cells could be the physiopathological mechanism for invasion to CNS.

  20. Brain metastasis development and poor survival associated with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Saavedra-Perez, David; Kuri, Roberto; Aviles-Salas, Alejandro; Martinez, Luis; Mendoza-Posada, Daniel; Castillo, Patricia; Astorga, Alma; Guzman, Enrique; De la Garza, Jaime

    2009-04-22

    Central nervous system is a common site of metastasis in NSCLC and confers worse prognosis and quality of life. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical-pathological factors (CPF), serum CEA levels, and EGFR and HER2 tissue-expression in brain metastasis (BM) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced NSCLC. In a prospective manner, we studied 293 patients with NSCLC in IIIB-IV clinical stage. They received standard chemotherapy. CEA was measured prior to treatment; EGFR and HER2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. BM development was confirmed by MRI in symptomatic patients. BM developed in 27, and 32% of patients at 1 and 2 years of diagnosis with adenocarcinoma (RR 5.2; 95% CI, 1.002-29; p = 0.05) and CEA > or = 40 ng/mL (RR 11.4; 95% CI, 1.7-74; p or = 40 ng/mL (RR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09-2.2; p = 0.014) and EGFR expression (RR 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.9; p = 0.012) were independent associated factors to worse OS. High CEA serum level is a risk factor for BM development and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC. Surface expression of CEA in tumor cells could be the physiopathological mechanism for invasion to CNS.

  1. Serological identification of Tektin5 as a cancer/testis antigen and its immunogenicity

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    Hanafusa Tadashi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of new cancer antigens is necessary for the efficient diagnosis and immunotherapy. A variety of tumor antigens have been identified by several methodologies. Among those antigens, cancer/testis (CT antigens have became promising targets. Methods The serological identification of antigens by the recombinant expression cloning (SEREX methodology has been successfully used for the identification of cancer/testis (CT antigens. We performed the SEREX analysis of colon cancer. Results We isolated a total of 60 positive cDNA clones comprising 38 different genes. They included 2 genes with testis-specific expression profiles in the UniGene database, such as TEKT5 and a CT-like gene, A kinase anchoring protein 3 (AKAP3. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of TEKT5 was restricted to the testis in normal adult tissues. In malignant tissues, TEKT5 was aberrantly expressed in a variety of cancers, including colon cancer. A serological survey of 101 cancer patients with different cancers by ELISA revealed antibodies to TEKT5 in 13 patients, including colon cancer. None of the 16 healthy donor serum samples were reactive in the same test. Conclusion We identified candidate new CT antigen of colon cancer, TEKT5. The findings indicate that TEKT5 is immunogenic in humans, and suggest its potential use as diagnostic as well as an immunotherapeutic reagent for cancer patients.

  2. Prostate-specific antigen screening and mortality from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcella, Stephen W; Rhoads, George G; Carson, Jeffrey L; Merlino, Frances; Wilcox, Homer

    2008-03-01

    There is no available evidence from randomized trials that early detection of prostate cancer improves health outcomes, but the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is commonly used to screen men for prostate cancer. The objective of the study is to see if screening with PSA decreases mortality from prostate cancer. This is a case-control study using one-to-one matching on race, age, and time of availability of exposure to PSA screening. Decedents, 380, from New Jersey Vital Statistics 1997 to 2000 inclusive, 55-79 years of age at diagnosis were matched to living controls without metastatic prostate cancer. Medical records were obtained from all providers, and we abstracted information about PSA tests from 1989 to the time of diagnosis in each index case. Measurements consist of a comparison of screening (yes, no) between cases and controls. Measure of association was the odds ratio. Eligible cases were diagnosed each year from 1989 to 1999 with the median year being 1993. PSA screening was evident in 23.2-29.2% of cases and 21.8-26.1% of controls depending on the screening criteria. The unadjusted, matched odds ratio for dying of prostate cancer if ever screened was 1.09 (95% CI 0.76 to 1.60) for the most restrictive criteria and 1.19 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.66) for the least restrictive. Adjustment for comorbidity and education level made no significant differences in these values. There were no significant interactions by age or race. PSA screening using an ever/never tabulation for tests from 1989 until 2000 did not protect New Jersey men from prostate cancer mortality.

  3. Tumor subtype-specific cancer-testis antigens as potential biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N; Riggins, Gregory J; Strausberg, Robert L; Zhao, Qi

    2014-04-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy because of their restricted expression in immune-privileged germ cells and various malignancies. Current application of CT-based immunotherapy has been focused on CT expression-rich tumors such as melanoma and lung cancers. In this study, we surveyed CT expression using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets for ten common cancer types. We show that CT expression is specific and enriched within certain cancer molecular subtypes. For example, HORMAD1, CXorf61, ACTL8, and PRAME are highly enriched in the basal subtype of breast cancer; MAGE and CSAG are most frequently activated in the magnoid subtype of lung adenocarcinoma; and PRAME is highly upregulated in the ccB subtype of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Analysis of CT gene expression and DNA methylation indicates that some CTs are regulated epigenetically, whereas others are controlled primarily by tissue- and subtype-specific transcription factors. Our results suggest that although for some CT expression is associated with patient outcome, not many are independent prognostic markers. Thus, CTs with shared expression pattern are heterogeneous molecules with distinct activation modes and functional properties in different cancers and cancer subtypes. These data suggest a cancer subtype-orientated application of CT antigen as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets.

  4. Multiple cancer/testis antigens are preferentially expressed in hormone-receptor negative and high-grade breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Tseng Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis (CT antigens are protein antigens normally expressed only in germ cells of testis, and yet are expressed in a proportion of a wide variety of human cancers. CT antigens can elicit spontaneous immune responses in cancer patients with CT-positive cancers, and CT antigen-based therapeutic cancer vaccine trials are ongoing for "CT-rich" tumors. Although some previous studies found breast cancer to be "CT-poor", our recent analysis identified increased CT mRNA transcripts in the ER-negative subset of breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical study to investigate the protein expression of eight CT genes in 454 invasive ductal carcinomas, including 225 ER/PR/HER2-negative (triple-negative carcinomas. We found significantly more frequent expression of all eight CT antigens in ER-negative cancers, and five of them--MAGEA, CT7, NY-ESO-1, CT10 and CT45, were expressed in 12-24% of ER-negative cancers, versus 2-6% of ER-positive cancers (p2 cm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CT antigens are preferentially expressed in hormone receptor-negative and high-grade breast cancer. Considering the limited treatment options for ER/PR/HER2 triple-negative breast cancer, the potential of CT-based immunotherapy should be explored.

  5. Lack of ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 Cancer/Testis Antigen Expression in Lung and Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheswaran, Emeaga; Pedersen, Christina B; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    cancers. Staining for the well-characterized MAGE-A proteins was included for comparison. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed previous mRNA analysis demonstrating that ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 proteins are confined to testis in normal individuals. Negative tissues included plancenta, which express many...... inhibitors has been proposed as an attractive strategy to increase the expression of cancer/testis antigens in tumors before immunotargeting; however, neither ADAM2, CALR3 nor SAGE1 could be significantly induced in lung and breast cancer cell lines using this strategy. Our results suggest that ADAM2, CALR3...... and antigenic properties, but the expression patterns of most of the more than 200 identified cancer/testis antigens in various cancers remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, we investigated the expression of the cancer/testis antigens ADAM2, CALR3 and SAGE1 in lung and breast cancer, the two most...

  6. Double blind comparison of T-antigen and ABO(H) cell surface antigens in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafier, J A; Javadpour, N; Worsham, G F; O'Connell, K J

    1984-04-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is a major cause of cancer deaths. Recently, much attention has been focused on ABO(H) antigen deletion in terms of prediction of prognosis. Furthermore, several studies have shown a correlation between T-antigen (a precursor of blood MN glycoprotein) expression in carcinomas of the breast, colon, and stomach. We have studied 56 specimens from 41 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder for T-antigen expression and ABO(H) antigen deletion. Results were analyzed with respect to tumor grade, tumor stage, and clinical course. The data indicate that T-antigen expression was not completely useful prognostically; it did not correlate with grade, stage, or clinical course. ABO(H) antigen expression or deletion was found to be a better predictor of tumor behavior than tumor grade, despite a false negative rate of 20 to 30 per cent in blood group O patients. We suggest that use of immunoperoxidase techniques will increase the sensitivity in group O patients, thus making ABO(H) deletion a useful predictive parameter of tumor aggressiveness. This is currently being evaluated in our patients.

  7. Role of Antigen Spread and Distinctive Characteristics of Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, James L; Madan, Ravi A; Pachynski, Russell; Mulders, Peter; Sheikh, Nadeem A; Trager, James; Drake, Charles G

    2017-04-01

    Immunotherapy is an important breakthrough in cancer. US Food and Drug Administration-approved immunotherapies for cancer treatment (including, but not limited to, sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, and atezolizumab) substantially improve overall survival across multiple malignancies. One mechanism of action of these treatments is to induce an immune response against antigen-bearing tumor cells; the resultant cell death releases secondary (nontargeted) tumor antigens. Secondary antigens prime subsequent immune responses (antigen spread). Immunotherapy-induced antigen spread has been shown in clinical studies. For example, in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients, sipuleucel-T induced early immune responses to the immunizing antigen (PA2024) and/or the target antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase). Thereafter, most patients developed increased antibody responses to numerous secondary proteins, several of which are expressed in prostate cancer with functional relevance in cancer. The ipilimumab-induced antibody profile in melanoma patients shows that antigen spread also occurs with immune checkpoint blockade. In contrast to chemotherapy, immunotherapy often does not result in short-term changes in conventional disease progression end points (eg, progression-free survival, tumor size), which may be explained, in part, by the time taken for antigen spread to occur. Thus, immune-related response criteria need to be identified to better monitor the effectiveness of immunotherapy. As immunotherapy antitumor effects take time to evolve, immunotherapy in patients with less advanced cancer may have greater clinical benefit vs those with more advanced disease. This concept is supported by prostate cancer clinical studies with sipuleucel-T, PSA-TRICOM, and ipilimumab. We discuss antigen spread with cancer immunotherapy and its implications for clinical outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  8. Cancer/testis antigen PASD1 silences the circadian clock

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    Michael, Alicia K.; Harvey, Stacy L.; Sammons, Patrick J.; Anderson, Amanda P.; Kopalle, Hema M.; Banham, Alison H.; Partch, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The circadian clock orchestrates global changes in transcriptional regulation on a daily basis via the bHLH-PAS transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1. Pathways driven by other bHLH-PAS transcription factors have a homologous repressor that modulates activity on a tissue-specific basis, but none have been identified for CLOCK:BMAL1. We show here that the cancer/testis antigen PASD1 fulfills this role to suppress circadian rhythms. PASD1 is evolutionarily related to CLOCK and interacts with the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex to repress transcriptional activation. Expression of PASD1 is restricted to germline tissues in healthy individuals, but can be induced in cells of somatic origin upon oncogenic transformation. Reducing PASD1 in human cancer cells significantly increases the amplitude of transcriptional oscillations to generate more robust circadian rhythms. Our results describe a function for a germline-specific protein in regulation of the circadian clock and provide a molecular link from oncogenic transformation to suppression of circadian rhythms. PMID:25936801

  9. Determinação do antígeno carcinoembrionário biliar na detecção das metástases hepáticas do carcinoma colorretal Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA determination in detection of hepatic metastasis from colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Polycarpo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar, prospectivamente, os resultados da determinação do antígeno carcinoembriário (CEA na bile vesicular, relacionando-os com os aspectos morfológicos e clínicos da neoplasia e recidiva hepática. MÉTODOS: Os níveis do CEA foram estudados na bile vesicular e no sangue periférico de 44 doentes com carcinoma colorretal e 10 com colelitíase não complicada, a partir de amostras do CEA colhidas imediatamente antes da extirpação da neoplasia colo-retal e da colecistectomia (considerou-se valor normal até 5 ng/ml. RESULTADOS: Os 44 carcinomas colorretais extirpados com intenção curativa tiveram nível médio do CEA sérico de 8,5 ng/ml e CEA biliar, 74,5 ng/ml. Nas colelitíases não complicadas submetidas a colecistectomia, o nível médio do CEA sérico foi de 1,9 ng/ml e CEA biliar, 1,2 ng/ml. Quatro doentes submetidos à extirpação do carcinoma colo-retal, sem evidências de metástases hepáticas e com valor médio de CEA biliar de 213,2 ng/ml apresentaram metástases hepáticas entre três a 17 meses após a extirpação. CONCLUSÃO: o nível elevado de CEA biliar dos operados por carcinoma colo-retal pode indicar presença de metástases hepáticas e esses enfermos devem ser acompanhados com especial atenção para diagnosticar essas lesões.PURPOSE: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA determination in gallbladder bile was used in a prospective study concerning the morphological and clinical features of the neoplasm and the occurrence of hepatic metastasis. METHODS: CEA levels in the gallbladder and peripheral blood were studied in 44 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 10 patients with uncomplicated cholelithiasis from samples collected immediately before extirpating the colorectal neoplasms or cholecystectomy (values of up to 5 ng/ml were considered normal. RESULTS: In the 44 patients with colorectal carcinoma who underwent operation with curative intent, the average level of serum CEA was 8.5 ng/ml and for bile

  10. African Americans' Perceptions of Prostate-Specific Antigen Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jaimie C.; Vines, Anissa I.; Carlisle, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released a hotly debated recommendation against prostate-specific antigen testing for all men. The present research examines African Americans' beliefs about their susceptibility to prostate cancer (PCa) and the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen testing in the context of the…

  11. TISSUE POLYPEPTIDE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN - A DISCRIMINATIVE PARAMETER BETWEEN PROSTATE-CANCER AND BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARRINK, J; OOSTEROM, R; BONFRER, HMG; SCHRODER, FH; MENSINK, HJA

    1993-01-01

    The serum concentration of the cell proliferation marker TPS (tissue polypeptide-specific antigen) was compared with the tumour marker PSA (prostate specific antigen). PSA was found elevated in 50% of the benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) patients, in 88% of the patients with active prostate cancer

  12. Lewis Y Antigen as a Target for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    is noteworthy that patients thus far who developed high titers of anti-sLe antigen ILM showed no evidence of hematologic toxicity (hemolysis, anuria ...siaylated Lewis (sLe) antigen IgM showed no evidence of hematologic toxicity (hemolysis, anuria or granulocytopenia) (6). In summary, these studies

  13. Design of universal cancer vaccines using natural tumor vessel-specific antigens (SANTAVAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against endothelial cells (ECs) lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive potential cancer immunotherapy options due to its ability to prevent solid tumor growth. Using this approach, target antigens can be derived from ECs and used to develop a universal cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, direct immunization with EC preparations can elicit autoimmune vasculitis in normal tissues. Recently, tumor-induced changes to the human EC surface were described that provided a basis for designing efficient EC-based vaccines capable of eliciting immune responses that targeted the tumor endothelium directly. This review examines these data from the perspective of designing EC-based cancer vaccines for the treatment of all solid tumors, including the antigen composition of vaccine formulations, the selection ECs for antigen derivation, the production and control of antigens, and the method for estimating vaccine efficacy and safety. As the vaccine preparation requires a specifically derived set of natural cell surface antigens, a new vaccine preparation concept was formulated. Antigen compositions prepared according to this concept were named SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer).

  14. Natural history of metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients with good performance status (PS) who were treated with only best supportive care (BSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun Ho; Song, Haa-Na; Kim, Rock Bum; Oh, Sung Yong; Lim, Ho Yeong; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Se Hoon; Kim, Moon Jin; Lee, Soon Il; Ryou, Sung Hyeok; Hwang, In Gyu; Jang, Joung-Soon; Kim, Hong Jun; Choi, Jun Young; Kang, Jung-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Although chemotherapy is widely recommended for patients with metastatic biliary tract cancer, the natural course of these patients, especially those with good performance status who are indicated for chemotherapy, is not known. We retrospectively reviewed patients with metastatic or locally advanced biliary cancer who were diagnosed at six cancer centers. Patients were eligible if they had good performance (ECOG 0-2) and no history of any treatment for cancer. The primary objective was to evaluate the survival time of patients with advanced biliary cancer with good performance who were untreated. Of the 1677 patients, 204 met the inclusion criteria. The median age and overall survival were 72.0 years and 7.1 months. Overall survival (months) by location was 4.7 for intrahepatic, 9.7 for extrahepatic, 4.4 for gallbladder and 11.2 for ampulla of vater cancer. In subgroup analysis, overall survival of locally advanced biliary cancer was 13.8 months and that of patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen/carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 10.6 months. In multivariate analysis, variables that were associated with poor prognosis were metastatic biliary cancer [hazard ratio 2.19 (P = 0.001)], high baseline carcinoembryonic antigen level (defined as >4.0 ng/ml) [hazard ratio 1.51 (P = 0.024)] and high baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level (defined as >100 U/ml) [hazard ratio 1.93 (P = 0.001)]. Advanced biliary tract cancer with good performance status showed modest survival without any treatment. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that patients with normal carbohydrate antigen 19-9 or carcinoembryonic antigen level or locally advanced status had favorable survival. Further studies comparing the outcome of chemotherapy with that of best supportive care in patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer are warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A Panel of Cancer Testis Antigens and Clinical Risk Factors to Predict Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molania, Ramyar; Mahjoubi, Frouzandeh; Mirzaei, Rezvan; Khatami, Saeed-Reza; Mahjoubi, Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third common carcinoma with a high rate of mortality worldwide and several studies have investigated some molecular and clinicopathological markers for diagnosis and prognosis of its malignant phenotypes. The aim of this study is to evaluate expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer testis antigen (CTA) genes as well as some clinical risk markers to predict liver metastasis of colorectal cancer patients. The expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer/testis antigen (CTA) genes was obtained using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay in 90 colorectal tumor samples including both negative and positive liver metastasis tumors. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the association of three studied genes and clinical risk factors with CRC liver metastasis. The frequency of PAGE4 and SCP-1 genes expression was significantly higher in the primary tumours with liver metastasis when statistically compared with primary tumors with no liver metastasis (P < 0.05). Among all clinical risk factors studied, the lymph node metastasis and the depth of invasion were statistically correlated with liver metastasis of CRC patients. In addition, using multiple logistic regression, we constructed a model based on PAGE4 and lymph node metastasis to predict liver metastasis of CRC. PMID:26317029

  16. A Panel of Cancer Testis Antigens and Clinical Risk Factors to Predict Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramyar Molania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third common carcinoma with a high rate of mortality worldwide and several studies have investigated some molecular and clinicopathological markers for diagnosis and prognosis of its malignant phenotypes. The aim of this study is to evaluate expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer testis antigen (CTA genes as well as some clinical risk markers to predict liver metastasis of colorectal cancer patients. The expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer/testis antigen (CTA genes was obtained using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay in 90 colorectal tumor samples including both negative and positive liver metastasis tumors. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the association of three studied genes and clinical risk factors with CRC liver metastasis. The frequency of PAGE4 and SCP-1 genes expression was significantly higher in the primary tumours with liver metastasis when statistically compared with primary tumors with no liver metastasis (P<0.05. Among all clinical risk factors studied, the lymph node metastasis and the depth of invasion were statistically correlated with liver metastasis of CRC patients. In addition, using multiple logistic regression, we constructed a model based on PAGE4 and lymph node metastasis to predict liver metastasis of CRC.

  17. Cancer testis antigen Sperm Protein 17 as a new target for triple negative breast cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Pedretti, Elisa; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Colombo, Michela; Chapman, Caroline; Grizzi, Fabio; Patrinicola, Federica; Kast, W Martin; Nguyen, Diane D; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Daver, Naval; Ruvolo, Peter; Post, Sean M; Bresalier, Robert S; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2017-09-26

    Breast carcinoma is a major health issue for millions of women. Current therapies have serious side effects, and are only partially effective in patients with metastatic tumors. Thus, the need for novel and less toxic therapies is urgent. Moreover, hormonal and antibody therapies effective in other subtypes are not effective in Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC). Immunotherapeutic strategies directed against specific tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and mediated by specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been largely underexplored in this disease. Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are a group of TAAs displaying the ideal characteristics of promising vaccine targets, i.e. strong immunogenicity and cancer specificity. The CTA, Sperm Protein 17 (SP17), has been found to be aberrantly expressed in different neoplasms, including ovarian and esophageal cancers, nervous system tumors and multiple myeloma, and has been suggested as a candidate target for immunotherapy. Here, we evaluated SP17 expression levels in breast cancer cell lines, invasive ductal breast carcinoma, including patients with TNBC, and adjacent non-neoplastic breast tissue, and determined whether SP17 was capable of generating SP17-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vitro. We showed that SP17 is expressed in breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors and importantly in TNBC subtype, but not in adjacent non-tumoral breast tissue or unaffected tissues, except in male germinal cells. Furthermore, we detected specific anti-SP17 antibodies in patients' sera and we generated SP17-specific, HLA class I-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocytes capable of efficiently killing breast cancer cells.

  18. Clinical performance of LOCI™-based tumor marker assays for tumor markers CA 15-3, CA 125, CEA, CA 19-9 and AFP in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolscheid-Pommerich, Ramona C; Keyver-Paik, Mignon; Hecking, Thomas; Kuhn, Walther; Hartmann, Gunther; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Evidence is sparse regarding the clinical performance of luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassays-based tumor marker assays in gynecological cancer. Analyzing serum samples of 336 patients with Dimension™Vista1500, we investigated the diagnostic power of carbohydrate antigen 15-3, carbohydrate antigen 125, carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and alpha-fetoprotein in patients suffering from different types of gynecological cancer and precancerous gynecological diseases and compared findings to appropriate control groups. The cohort comprised 177 female patients with gynecological cancers (73 breast, 22 cervical, 16 endometrial, 17 vulva, and 49 ovarian cancers), 26 patients with precancerous gynecological diseases (11 vulva, 4 cervical, and 10 breast), 109 patients with benign gynecological diseases, and 24 healthy controls. Discriminative power was assessed by areas under the curve in receiver operating characteristic curves, and sensitivities were determined at a fixed specificity of 95%. Levels of biomarkers in healthy controls were in the expected ranges and a discriminative power between gynecological cancers and healthy controls was observed for several tumor markers. Established tumor type-associated markers were elevated in specific gynecological cancers and benign controls as well as within precancerous gynecological diseases and healthy control group. In ovarian cancer, carbohydrate antigen 125 and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were significantly elevated compared to the respective benign diseases. Carbohydrate antigen 125 was the most conclusive marker (area under the curve = 0.86% and 77.6% sensitivity at 95% specificity). In breast cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 15-3 were significantly higher than in the respective benign diseases. Carcinoembryonic antigen achieved the most conclusive area under the curve (0.65) with 31.5% sensitivity at 95% specificity. None of the investigated markers was found to be of

  19. Prostate specific antigen levels and prostate cancer detection rates in patients with end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Catherine J; Heldt, Jonathan P; Anderson, Kirk M; Ruckle, Herbert C; Agarwal, Gautum; Smith, Damien L; Schlaifer, Amy E; Richards, Gideon D; Arnold, Don C; Baldwin, D Duane

    2012-06-01

    Patients with end stage renal disease plus prostate cancer are ineligible to receive a renal transplant at most centers until an acceptable cancer-free period is demonstrated. To our knowledge previously established prostate specific antigen reference ranges have not been validated in patients with end stage renal disease. We determined age stratified 95th percentile prostate specific antigen reference ranges and the prostate cancer detection rate at specific prostate specific antigen intervals for patients with end stage renal disease. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 775 male patients with end stage renal disease on the waiting list for a renal transplant who had undergone a serum prostate specific antigen test. Prostate specific antigen was stratified by age at the time of the blood test and 95th percentile reference ranges were calculated for each decade. A total of 80 patients underwent prostate biopsy for increased prostate specific antigen and/or abnormal digital rectal examination. The cancer detection rate was calculated for specific prostate specific antigen reference ranges. The age specific 95th percentile prostate specific antigen references ranges were 0 to 4.0 ng/ml for ages 40 to 49 in 137 patients, 0 to 5.3 ng/ml for ages 50 to 59 in 257, 0 to 10.5 ng/ml for ages 60 to 69 in 265 and 0 to 16.6 ng/ml for ages 70 to 79 years in 69. The cancer detection rate was 44%, 38% and 67% for prostate specific antigen 2.5 to 4.0, 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml, respectively. In our study population of patients with end stage renal disease age stratified prostate specific antigen was higher than in the general population. The cancer detection rate was increased in our patients with end stage renal disease compared to that in patients with normal renal function at specific prostate specific antigen intervals. Lower prostate specific antigen cutoffs may be appropriate to recommend prostate biopsy in patients with end stage renal disease. Copyright

  20. CA 19-9 (Cancer Antigen 19-9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antigen negative (about 30% in people of African ancestry) and do not produce CA 19-9. The ... are slightly more likely to have it than women), family history, diabetes , chronic pancreatitis , and workplace exposure ...

  1. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinert, Brian T.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.; Milano, Francesca; Pedersen, Ayako W.; Claesson, Mogens H.; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2009-01-01

    Tumor antigens are the primary target of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We set out to define and compare the expression pattern of tumor antigen genes in esophagus carcinoma biopsies and in an allogeneic tumor lysate-based cancer vaccine, MelCancerVac. Cells used for vaccine production were treated

  2. Empirical estimates of prostate cancer overdiagnosis by age and prostate-specific antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Vickers (Andrew); D. Sjoberg (Daniel); D. Ulmert (David); E. Vertosick (Emily); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique); I.M. Thompson (Ian); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); H.J. de Koning (Harry); C. Atoria-Swartz (Coral); P.T. Scardino (Peter); H. Lilja (Hans)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Prostate cancer screening depends on a careful balance of benefits, in terms of reduced prostate cancer mortality, and harms, in terms of overdiagnosis and overtreatment. We aimed to estimate the effect on overdiagnosis of restricting prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing

  3. NY-ESO-1 cancer testis antigen demonstrates high immunogenicity in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademuyiwa, Foluso O; Bshara, Wiam; Attwood, Kristopher; Morrison, Carl; Edge, Stephen B; Karpf, Adam R; James, Smith A; Ambrosone, Christine B; O'Connor, Tracey L; Levine, Ellis G; Miliotto, Anthony; Ritter, Erika; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2012-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 cancer testis (CT) antigen is an attractive candidate for immunotherapy as a result of its high immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to explore the potential for NY-ESO-1 antigen directed immunotherapy in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) by determining the frequency of expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the degree of inherent immunogenicity to NY-ESO-1. 168 TNBC and 47 ER+/HER2- primary breast cancer specimens were used to determine NY-ESO-1 frequency by IHC. As previous studies have shown that patients with a robust innate humoral immune response to CT antigens are more likely to develop CD8 T-cell responses to NY-ESO-1 peptides, we evaluated the degree to which patients with NY-ESO-1 expression had inherent immunogenicity by measuring antibodies. The relationship between NY-ESO-1 expression and CD8+ T lymphocytes was also examined. The frequency of NY-ESO-1 expression in the TNBC cohort was 16% versus 2% in ER+/HER2- patients. A higher NY-ESO-1 score was associated with a younger age at diagnosis in the TNBC patients with NY-ESO-1 expression (p = 0.026). No differences in OS (p = 0.278) or PFS (p = 0.238) by NY-ESO-1 expression status were detected. Antibody responses to NY-ESO-1 were found in 73% of TNBC patients whose tumors were NY-ESO-1 positive. NY-ESO-1 positive patients had higher CD8 counts than negative patients (p = 0.018). NY-ESO-1 is expressed in a substantial subset of TNBC patients and leads to a high humoral immune response in a large proportion of these individuals. Given these observations, patients with TNBC may benefit from targeted therapies directed against NY-ESO-1.

  4. Exosomes derived from tumor cells genetically modified to express Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen: a novel vaccine for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Aya; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Inaba, Toshio; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Sugiura, Kikuya

    2016-11-01

    To examine the potential of exosomes derived from the tumor cells, which had been genetically modified to express a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen, as a cancer vaccine aimed at overcoming the weak immunogenicity of tumor antigens. We transfected B16 melanoma cells with a plasmid encoding the M. tuberculosis antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). The secreted exosomes bearing both tumor-associated antigens and the pathogenic antigen (or their epitopes) were collected. When the exosomes were injected into foot pads of mice, they significantly (p exosomes significantly suppressed (p exosomes derived from the non-transfected B16 cells showed no effect on tumor growth, although both exosomes should have similar tumor antigens. Exosomes bearing both tumor antigens and the M. tuberculosis antigen (or their epitopes) have a high potential as a candidate for cancer vaccine to overcome the immune escape by tumor cells.

  5. Turning tumour cells into antigen presenting cells: The next step to improve cancer immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Charette, Marie; Marabelle, Aurélien; Houot, Roch

    2016-11-01

    Downregulation/loss of the antigen presentation is a major immune escape mechanism in cancer. It allows tumour cells to become 'invisible' and avoid immune attack by antitumour T cells. In tumour harbouring properties of professional antigen presenting cells (i.e. tumour B cells in lymphoma), downregulation/loss of the antigen presentation may also prevent direct priming of naïve T cells by tumour cells. Here, we review treatments that may induce/restore antigen presentation by the tumour cells. These treatments may increase the generation of antitumour T cells and/or their capacity to recognise and eliminate tumour cells. By forcing tumour cells to present their antigens, these treatments may sensitise patients to T cell-based immunotherapies, including checkpoint inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antigen-specific immunotherapy in ovarian cancer and p53 as tumor antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Renee; Leffers, Ninke; Melief, Cornelis J.; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans W.

    This review discusses the results of different immunization strategies, identifies possible drawbacks in study design and provides potential solutions for augmentation of clinical efficacy. A potential target for cancer immunotherapy is p53, as approximately 50% of ovarian cancer cells carry p53

  7. Immunologic aspect of ovarian cancer and p53 as tumor antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burg SH

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer represents the fifth leading cause of death from all cancers for women. During the last decades overall survival has improved due to the use of new chemotherapy schedules. Still, the majority of patients die of this disease. Research reveals that ovarian cancer patients exhibit significant immune responses against their tumor. In this review the knowledge obtained thus far on the interaction of ovarian cancer tumor cells and the immune system is discussed. Furthermore the role of p53 as tumor antigen and its potential role as target antigen in ovarian cancer is summarized. Based on the increased knowledge on the role of the immune system in ovarian cancer major improvements are to be expected of immunotherapy based treatment of this disease.

  8. Cancer testis antigen SPAG9 is a promising marker for the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Biqiong; Wei, Xiaobin; Zou, Guoying; He, Junyu; Xu, Guofeng; Xu, Fei; Huang, Yiran; Zhu, Haowen; Li, Yong; Ma, Guoan; Yu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Cancer testis antigen sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) is highly expressed in many types of cancers. In the present study, to obtain a better understanding of the relevance of SPAG9 in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the expression of SPAG9 mRNA and protein in lung cancer specimens was evaluated by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. ELISA was used to quantify the SPAG9 autoantibody in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. The results showed that the expression of SPAG9 mRNA and protein in the lung cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues (Plung cancer patients was significantly higher than the level in the healthy controls (Plung cancer patients than these levels in the untreated patients (P=0.006, P=0.026, respectively), while no statistical difference was found between treated and untreated squamous cell carcinoma patients. Our results suggest that the SPAG9 antibody in serum is a promising marker for the diagnosis of lung cancer, and the level of the humoral immune response to this antigen appears to be related to the type of lung cancer.

  9. Cancer testis antigen vaccination affords long-term protection in a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati

    Full Text Available Sperm protein (Sp17 is an attractive target for ovarian cancer (OC vaccines because of its over-expression in primary as well as in metastatic lesions, at all stages of the disease. Our studies suggest that a Sp17-based vaccine can induce an enduring defense against OC development in C57BL/6 mice with ID8 cells, following prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. This is the first time that a mouse counterpart of a cancer testis antigen (Sp17 was shown to be expressed in an OC mouse model, and that vaccination against this antigen significantly controlled tumor growth. Our study shows that the CpG-adjuvated Sp17 vaccine overcomes the issue of immunologic tolerance, the major barrier to the development of effective immunotherapy for OC. Furthermore, this study provides a better understanding of OC biology by showing that Th-17 cells activation and contemporary immunosuppressive T-reg cells inhibition is required for vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these results indicate that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations can induce long-standing protection against OC and delay tumor growth, suggesting that this strategy may provide additional treatments of human OC and the prevention of disease onset in women with a family history of OC.

  10. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time and response to cabazitaxel in a hormone-resistant metastatic prostate cancer patient

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosn, Marwan; Dagher, Alain; El-Karak, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, who received prior treatment with docetaxel and was then given cabazitaxel as salvage therapy. The patient was monitored by prostate-specific antigen doubling time and prostate-specific antigen absolute value. The prostate-specific antigen doubling time was found to be a good response predictor in the patient.

  11. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time and response to cabazitaxel in a hormone-resistant metastatic prostate cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Marwan; Dagher, Alain; El-Karak, Fadi

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, who received prior treatment with docetaxel and was then given cabazitaxel as salvage therapy. The patient was monitored by prostate-specific antigen doubling time and prostate-specific antigen absolute value. The prostate-specific antigen doubling time was found to be a good response predictor in the patient.

  12. Tumor markers of breast cancer: New prospectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Kabel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor markers are substances produced by the tumors or by other cells of the body in response to cancer or certain benign conditions. Although most of these markers are made by the normal cells as well as by cancer cells, they are produced at much higher levels in cancerous conditions. These markers are used to evaluate the patient's response to treatment and to detect the presence of metastasis or recurrence. Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in females worldwide. The CA 27-29, CA 15-3, CA27.29, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide specific antigen, p53, cathepsin D, cyclin E, nestin and HER-2 are tumor markers that are often expressed in people with breast cancer. They play a crucial role in diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy, early detection of metastasis and determination of recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

  13. Expression of the cancer-testis antigen BORIS correlates with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Zubair; Hari-Gupta, Yukti; Kita, Georgia-Xanthi; Farrar, Dawn; Seddon, Ian; Corr, John; Klenova, Elena

    2014-02-01

    BORIS, a paralogue of the transcription factor CTCF, is a member of the cancer-testis antigen (CT) family. BORIS is normally present at high levels in the testis; however it is aberrantly expressed in various tumors and cancer cell lines. The main objectives of this study were to investigate BORIS expression together with sub-cellular localization in both prostate cell lines and tumor tissues, and assess correlations between BORIS and clinical/pathological characteristics. We examined BORIS mRNA expression, protein levels and cellular localization in a panel of human prostate tissues, cancer and benign, together with a panel prostate cell lines. We also compared BORIS levels and localization with clinical/pathological characteristics in prostate tumors. BORIS was detected in all inspected prostate cancer cell lines and tumors, but was absent in benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased levels of BORIS protein positively correlated with Gleason score, T-stage and androgen receptor (AR) protein levels in prostate tumors. The relationship between BORIS and AR was further highlighted in prostate cell lines by the ability of ectopically expressed BORIS to activate the endogenous AR mRNA and protein. BORIS localization in the nucleus plus cytoplasm was also associated with higher BORIS levels and Gleason score. Detection of BORIS in prostate tumors suggests potential applications of BORIS as a biomarker for prostate cancer diagnosis, as an immunotherapy target and, potentially, a prognostic marker of more aggressive prostate cancer. The ability of BORIS to activate the AR gene indicates BORIS involvement in the growth and development of prostate tumors. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Determination of carcinoembryonic antigen levels in peripheral and draining venous blood in patients with colorectal carcinoma Determinação dos níveis do antígeno carcinoembriônico no sangue periférico e no efluente venoso em doentes com carcinoma colorretal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaques Waisberg

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The problem of the relationship between blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels and tissue CEA content in colorectal carcinoma, and the mechanisms for CEA release from tumor cells in tissue adjacent to the neoplasm is important to understanding the biology of colorectal carcinoma. It has not been adequately explained whether CEA in the peripheral blood is drained mainly by portal system blood or by the lymphatic system, or indeed by both systems. AIM: To study the behavior of CEA levels in peripheral blood (CEA-p and venous effluent blood (CEA-d among patients with colorectal tumors, who underwent curative operation. METHOD: A total of 28 patients were studied (12 male [42.9%] and 16 female [57.1%], mean age 66.1 years [range: 43 - 84]. Immediately after laparotomy, peripheral venous blood was extracted by antecubital venous puncture and venous effluent blood was collected from the main drainage vein of the lesions. Values of CEA-p, CEA-d and the gradient between CEA-d and CEA-p that were less than 5.0 ng/mL were considered normal. RESULTS: Eight (28.6% patients were stage A in Duke's classification, nine (32.1% stage B and 11 (39.3% stage C. The neoplasm was located in the rectum of 14 patients (50.0%, in the transverse colon in five (17.9%, in the sigmoid in four (14.3%, in the cecum and/or ascending colon in three (10.7%, and in the descending colon in two (7.1%. The histopathological examination revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma in all the patients. Only one patient (3.6%, Duke's classification stage C, presented neoplasm with venous invasion. The gradient between the CEA-p and CEA-d levels were normal in 25 patients (88.3% and high in three (10.7%. The mean value for CEA-p was 3.8 ± 4.1 ng/mL (0.1-21.1 ng/mL and for the drained CEA (CEA-d it was 4.5 ± 4.3 ng/mL (0.3-20.2 ng/mL, without significant difference between these values. There was a significant difference between the mean value for CEA-p and CEA-d levels

  15. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen doubling time as prognostic factor in prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zharinov, Gennady M.; Bogomolov, Oleg A.; Neklasova, Natalia N.; Anisimov, Vladimir N.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum level commonly uses as tumor marker in diagnosis of prostate cancer, it seems that PSA doubling time (PSADT) could be more useful indicator of tumor behavior and of prognosis for patients. The results of hormone and radiation therapy were evaluated for 912 prostate cancer having at least 2 PSA tests before the treatment was started. Clustering procedure (selection of homogenous group) was performed by using PSADT as the classification marker. ...

  16. Frequent High Expression of Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen-1 (KK-LC-1) in Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Akiko; Futawatari, Nobue; Fukuyama, Takashi; Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Yoshihito; Nishi, Yatsushi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-06-01

    The tumor-associated antigen Kita-Kyushu lung cancer antigen-1 (KK-LC-1) has been reported as not being expressed in normal tissues, except for the testis, and in the setting of non-small cell lung cancer. The present study demonstrated that KK-LC-1 is expressed in gastric cancer. We analyzed the expression of KK-LC-1 and cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) in surgical specimens of 49 gastric carcinomas. The expression of KK-LC-1 and CTAs was assessed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. KK-LC-1 expression was observed in gastric carcinomas. The number of lesions with expression of KK-LC-1, Melanoma antigen gene encoding-A1 (MAGE-A1), MAGE-A3 and New York Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1) was 40 (81.6%), 17 (34.7%), 22 (44.9%) and 8 (16.3%) out of the 49 specimens, respectively. KK-LC-1 should be categorized as a CTA. The frequency of KK-LC-1 expression was higher than that of the other CTAs. KK-LC-1 might be a useful target for immunotherapy and in diagnosis of gastric cancer. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. The SSX Family of Cancer-Testis Antigens as Target Proteins for Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath A. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs represent an expanding class of tumor-associated proteins defined on the basis of their tissue-restricted expression to testis or ovary germline cells and frequent ectopic expression in tumor tissue. The expression of CTA in MHC class I-deficient germline cells makes these proteins particularly attractive as immunotherapeutic targets because they serve as essentially tumor-specific antigens for MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells. Moreover, because CTAs are expressed in many types of cancer, any therapeutic developed to target these antigens might have efficacy for multiple cancer types. Of particular interest among CTAs is the synovial sarcoma X chromosome breakpoint (SSX family of proteins, which includes ten highly homologous family members. Expression of SSX proteins in tumor tissues has been associated with advanced stages of disease and worse patient prognosis. Additionally, both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to SSX proteins have been demonstrated in patients with tumors of varying histological origin, which indicates that natural immune responses can be spontaneously generated to these antigens in cancer patients. The current review will describe the history and identification of this family of proteins, as well as what is known of their function, expression in normal and malignant tissues, and immunogenicity.

  18. Chemoresistance Is Associated with MUC1 and Lewis y Antigen Expression in Ovarian Epithelial Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danye Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation and clinical significance between the expression of Mucin-1 (MUC1 and the Lewis y antigen with chemoresistance in ovarian epithelial cancers. Methods: Ovarian cancer patients (n = 92 treated at our hospital from May 2005 to July 2009 were divided, according to their treatment and follow-up outcomes, into a resistant group (n = 37 or sensitive group (n = 55. The expression of MUC1 and Lewis y antigen in ovarian cancer tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry and correlated with chemoresistance. Results: The positive rates of MUC1 and Lewis y antigen in the resistant group were both 91.89%, significantly higher than their positive rates in the sensitive group (65.45% and 69.09%, respectively, and both p < 0.05. MUC1 or Lewis y expression and the pathological stage of the tissue were independent risk factors for chemoresistance (all p < 0.05. Conclusion: The increased expression of MUC1 and the Lewis y antigen is a significant risk factor for chemoresistance in patients with ovarian epithelial cancer.

  19. Prostate-specific antigen: does the current evidence support its use in prostate cancer screening?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Although widely used, the value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in screening asymptomatic men for prostate cancer is controversial. Reasons for the controversy relate to PSA being less than an ideal marker in detecting early prostate cancer, the possibility that screening for prostate cancer may result in the overdetection and thus overtreatment of indolent disease and the lack of clarity as to the definitive or best treatment for men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Although the results from some randomized prospective trials suggest that screening with PSA reduces mortality from prostate cancer, the overall benefit was modest. It is thus currently unclear as to whether the modest benefit of reduced mortality outweighs the harms of overdetection and overtreatment. Thus, prior to undergoing screening for prostate cancer, men should be informed of the risks and benefits of early detection. Newly emerging markers that may complement PSA in the early detection of prostate cancer include specific isoforms of PSA and PCA3.

  20. The role of GAGE cancer/testis antigen in metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Terp, Mikkel Green; Hansen, Malene Bredahl

    2016-01-01

    with migratory and invasive properties and were found to be upregulated in cancer cells with metastasizing potential in a gastric cancer model. METHODS: We have addressed the direct role of GAGE proteins in supporting metastasis using an isogenic metastasis model of human cancer, consisting of 4 isogenic cell......) and moderately metastatic clones (LM3), stable downregulation of GAGE expression did not affect the ability of CL16 cells to establish primary tumors and form metastasis in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that GAGE proteins per se do not support metastasis and that further...

  1. Cancer/Testis antigens as potential predictors of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trock Bruce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTAs are an important group of proteins that are typically restricted to the testis in the normal adult but are aberrantly expressed in several types of cancers. As a result of their restricted expression patterns, the CTAs could serve as unique biomarkers for cancer diagnosis/prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify promising CTAs that are associated with prostate cancer (PCa recurrence following radical prostatectomy (RP. Methods The expression of 5 CTAs was measured by quantitative multiplex real-time PCR using prostate tissue samples obtained from 72 patients with apparently clinically localized PCa with a median of two years follow-up (range, 1 to 14 years. Results The expression of CTAs namely, CEP55, NUF2, PBK and TTK were significantly higher while PAGE4 was significantly lower in patients with recurrent disease. All CTAs with the exception of TTK were significantly correlated with the prostatectomy Gleason score, but none were correlated with age, stage, or preoperative PSA levels. In univariate proportional hazards models, CEP55 (HR = 3.59, 95% CI: 1.50-8.60, p = 0.004; NUF2 (HR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.11-4.67, p = 0.024; and PAGE4 (HR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.93, p = 0.031 were significantly associated with the risk of PCa recurrence. However, the results were no longer significant after adjustment for prostatectomy Gleason score. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify CTAs as biomarkers that can differentiate patients with recurrent and non-recurrent disease following RP and underscores its potential impact on PCa prognosis and treatment.

  2. Towards efficient cancer immunotherapy: advances in developing artificial antigen-presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Loek J.; Paulis, Leonie E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    Active anti-cancer immune responses depend on efficient presentation of tumor antigens and co-stimulatory signals by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Therapy with autologous natural APCs is costly and time-consuming and results in variable outcomes in clinical trials. Therefore, development of artificial APCs (aAPCs) has attracted significant interest as an alternative. We discuss the characteristics of various types of acellular aAPCs, and their clinical potential in cancer immunotherapy. The size, shape, and ligand mobility of aAPCs and their presentation of different immunological signals can all have significant effects on cytotoxic T cell activation. Novel optimized aAPCs, combining carefully tuned properties, may lead to efficient immunomodulation and improved clinical responses in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24998519

  3. TanCAR: A Novel Bispecific Chimeric Antigen Receptor for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grada, Zakaria; Hegde, Meenakshi; Byrd, Tiara; Shaffer, Donald R; Ghazi, Alexia; Brawley, Vita S; Corder, Amanda; Schönfeld, Kurt; Koch, Joachim; Dotti, Gianpietro; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-07-09

    Targeted T cells are emerging as effective non-toxic therapies for cancer. Multiple elements, however, contribute to the overall pathogenesis of cancer through both distinct and redundant mechanisms. Hence, targeting multiple cancer-specific markers simultaneously could result in better therapeutic efficacy. We created a functional chimeric antigen receptor-the TanCAR, a novel artificial molecule that mediates bispecific activation and targeting of T cells. We demonstrate the feasibility of cumulative integration of structure and docking simulation data using computational tools to interrogate the design and predict the functionality of such a complex bispecific molecule. Our prototype TanCAR induced distinct T cell reactivity against each of two tumor restricted antigens, and produced synergistic enhancement of effector functions when both antigens were simultaneously encountered. Furthermore, the TanCAR preserved the cytolytic ability of T cells upon loss of one of the target molecules and better controlled established experimental tumors by recognition of both targets in an animal disease model. This proof-of-concept approach can be used to increase the specificity of effector cells for malignant versus normal target cells, to offset antigen escape or to allow for targeting the tumor and its microenvironment.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e105; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.32; published online 9 July 2013.

  4. Assessment of cancer and virus antigens for cross-reactivity in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaravine, Victor; Raffegerst, Silke; Schendel, Dolores J; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2017-01-01

    Cross-reactivity (CR) or invocation of autoimmune side effects in various tissues has important safety implications in adoptive immunotherapy directed against selected antigens. The ability to predict CR (on-target and off-target toxicities) may help in the early selection of safer therapeutically relevant target antigens. We developed a methodology for the calculation of quantitative CR for any defined peptide epitope. Using this approach, we performed assessment of 4 groups of 283 currently known human MHC-class-I epitopes including differentiation antigens, overexpressed proteins, cancer-testis antigens and mutations displayed by tumor cells. In addition, 89 epitopes originating from viral sources were investigated. The natural occurrence of these epitopes in human tissues was assessed based on proteomics abundance data, while the probability of their presentation by MHC-class-I molecules was modelled by the method of Keşmir et al. which combines proteasomal cleavage, TAP affinity and MHC-binding predictions. The results of these analyses for many previously defined peptides are presented as CR indices and tissue profiles. The methodology thus allows for quantitative comparisons of epitopes and is suggested to be suited for the assessment of epitopes of candidate antigens in an early stage of development of adoptive immunotherapy. Our method is implemented as a Java program, with curated datasets stored in a MySQL database. It predicts all naturally possible self-antigens for a given sequence of a therapeutic antigen (or epitope) and after filtering for predicted immunogenicity outputs results as an index and profile of CR to the self-antigens in 22 human tissues. The program is implemented as part of the iCrossR webserver, which is publicly available at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/icrossr/ CONTACT: d.frishman@wzw.tum.deSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press

  5. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0595 TITLE: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer ... Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0595 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Dmitri Artemov, Ph.D. 5e...excellent targeting of PSMA- expressing prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. We investigated details of the mAb and therapeutic complexes

  6. Prostataspecifikt antigen, sure fosfataser og rektaleksploration i diagnostik af cancer prostatae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B R; Knorr, U B; Brasso, K

    1997-01-01

    Eleven hundred and seven patients referred for urological evaluation including measurement of serumprostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement are reviewed. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 105 patients. PSA was found to be superior to prostatic acid phosphatase in the discrimination between...... prostate cancer and benign prostatic conditions. In 105 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer, scintigraphic evidence of osseous metastases was found in thirty-seven. No patients with a serum PSA value less than three times the upper normal limit of the assay had a positive bone scan. Isotope bone...

  7. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  8. Dietary Lycopene, Angiogenesis, and Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study in the Prostate-Specific Antigen Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of lycopene in prostate cancer prevention remains controversial. We examined the associations between dietary lycopene intake and prostate cancer, paying particular attention to the influence of prostate-specific antigen screening, and evaluated tissue biomarkers in prostate cancers in relation to lycopene intake. Methods Among 49898 male health professionals, we obtained dietary information through questionnaires and ascertained total and lethal prostate cancer cases from 1986 through January 31, 2010. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used to assess tumor biomarker expression in a subset of men. Two-sided χ2 tests were used to calculate the P values. Results Higher lycopene intake was inversely associated with total prostate cancer and more strongly with lethal prostate cancer (top vs bottom quintile: HR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.56 to 0.94; P trend = .04). In a restricted population of screened participants, the inverse associations became markedly stronger (for lethal prostate cancer: HR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.29 to 0.75; P trend = .009). Comparing different measures of dietary lycopene, early intake, but not recent intake, was inversely associated with prostate cancer. Higher lycopene intake was associated with biomarkers in the cancer indicative of less angiogenic potential. Conclusions Dietary intake of lycopene was associated with reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer and with a lesser degree of angiogenesis in the tumor. Because angiogenesis is a strong progression factor, an endpoint of lethal prostate cancer may be more relevant than an endpoint of indolent prostate cancer for lycopene in the era of highly prevalent prostate-specific antigen screening. PMID:24463248

  9. Cancer associated aberrant protein O-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation of mucins and other extracellular proteins is an important event in carcinogenesis and the resulting cancer associated glycans have been suggested as targets in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed the role of O-linked GalNAc glycosylation on antigen uptake, processing, and presentation on MHC class I and II molecules. The effect of GalNAc O-glycosylation was monitored with a model system based on ovalbumin (OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides (+/- glycosylation loaded onto dendritic cells co-cultured with IL-2 secreting OVA peptide-specific T cell hybridomas. To evaluate the in vivo response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-γ release, and antibody induction. GalNAc-glycosylation promoted presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class II molecules and the MUC1 antigen elicited specific Ab production and T cell proliferation in both Balb/c and HLA-A2 transgenic mice. In contrast, GalNAc-glycosylation inhibited the presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class I and abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells.

  10. Improving Antigenic Peptide Vaccines for Cancer Immunotherapy Using a Dominant Tumor-specific T Cell Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrman, Jonathan D.; Jordan, Kimberly R.; Munson, Daniel J.; Moore, Brandon L.; Kappler, John W.; Slansky, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines that incorporate peptide mimics of tumor antigens, or mimotope vaccines, are commonly used in cancer immunotherapy and function by eliciting increased numbers of T cells that cross-react with the native tumor antigen. Unfortunately, they often elicit T cells that do not cross-react with or that have low affinity for the tumor antigen. Using a high affinity tumor-specific T cell clone, we identified a panel of mimotope vaccines for the dominant peptide antigen from a mouse colon tumor that elicits a range of tumor protection following vaccination. The TCR from this high affinity T cell clone was rarely identified in ex vivo evaluation of tumor-specific T cells elicited by mimotope vaccination. Conversely, a low affinity clone found in the tumor and following immunization was frequently identified. Using peptide libraries, we determined if this frequently identified TCR improved the discovery of efficacious mimotopes. We demonstrated that the representative TCR identified more protective mimotopes than the high affinity TCR. These results suggest that targeting a dominant fraction of tumor-specific T cells generates potent immunity and that consideration of the available T cell repertoire is necessary for targeted T cell therapy. These results have important implications when optimizing mimotope vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24106273

  11. Luminoimmunometric Assay of Tissue Polypeptide Antigen (Tpa and Cancer Antigen 125 (Ca-125 in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. El-Ahmady

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum TPA and CA-125 were determined in 86 individuals (66 with breast cancer representing the different stages and grades of the disease and 20 normal healthy controls. TPA and CA-125 were estimated using the L1A reagents supplied by BYK Sangtec. TPA showed sensitivity rates of 31.8%, 42.4% and 51.5% while CA-125 showed sensitivities of 16.3%, 18.6% and 25.6% at specificity levels of 100%, 95% and 90% respectively. Combined determination of the two markers resulted in some improvement in sensitivity. For follow-up of breast cancer patients after surgery both markers were of value and showed near-identical patterns.

  12. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cyto...

  13. Antigen-capturing nanoparticles improve the abscopal effect and cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yuanzeng; Roche, Kyle C.; Tian, Shaomin; Eblan, Michael J.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Caster, Joseph M.; Chai, Shengjie; Herring, Laura E.; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Desimone, Joseph M.; Tepper, Joel E.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2017-09-01

    Immunotherapy holds tremendous promise for improving cancer treatment. To administer radiotherapy with immunotherapy has been shown to improve immune responses and can elicit the 'abscopal effect'. Unfortunately, response rates for this strategy remain low. Herein we report an improved cancer immunotherapy approach that utilizes antigen-capturing nanoparticles (AC-NPs). We engineered several AC-NP formulations and demonstrated that the set of protein antigens captured by each AC-NP formulation is dependent on the NP surface properties. We showed that AC-NPs deliver tumour-specific proteins to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and significantly improve the efficacy of αPD-1 (anti-programmed cell death 1) treatment using the B16F10 melanoma model, generating up to a 20% cure rate compared with 0% without AC-NPs. Mechanistic studies revealed that AC-NPs induced an expansion of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and increased both CD4+T/Treg and CD8+T/Treg ratios (Treg, regulatory T cells). Our work presents a novel strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy with nanotechnology.

  14. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Sridhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  15. Prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening: Past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Arnout R; Schoots, Ivo G; Roobol, Monique J

    2015-06-01

    Prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening remains a controversial topic. Up to now, there is worldwide consensus on the statement that the harms of population-based screening, mainly as a result of overdiagnosis (the detection of clinically insignificant tumors that would have never caused any symptoms), outweigh the benefits. However, worldwide opportunistic screening takes place on a wide scale. The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer showed a reduction in prostate cancer mortality through prostate-specific antigen based-screening. These population-based data need to be individualized in order to avoid screening in those who cannot benefit and start screening in those who will. For now, lacking a more optimal screening approach, screening should only be started after the process of shared decision-making. The focus of future research is the reduction of unnecessary testing and overdiagnosis by further research to better biomarkers and the value of the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, potentially combined in already existing prostate-specific antigen-based multivariate risk prediction models. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. 68Ga Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Uptake in Renal Cell Cancer Lymph Node Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einspieler, Ingo; Tauber, Robert; Maurer, Tobias; Schwaiger, Markus; Eiber, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-HBED-CC PET/CT in a patient with a history of both prostate cancer (PC) and renal cell cancer (RCC) shows high PSMA expression in the residual right seminal vesicle suggestive of local recurrence of PC as well as suspected PSMA-positive mediastinal, retroperitoneal, and iliac lymph nodes. Regarding the latter, biopsy revealed lymph node metastases from RCC excluding PC metastases. This case exemplarily demonstrates that high PSMA expression in RCC metastases can potentially mimic PC metastases. Thus, for accurate interpretation of imaging results in PC patients with additional primary tumors, knowledge of PSMA expression of non-PC tissue is necessary.

  17. Prostate-specific antigen and long-term prediction of prostate cancer incidence and mortality in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orsted, David D; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2012-01-01

    It is largely unknown whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at first date of testing predicts long-term risk of prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and mortality in the general population.......It is largely unknown whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at first date of testing predicts long-term risk of prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and mortality in the general population....

  18. Surface-Engineering of Red Blood Cells as Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells Promising for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Han, Xiao; Xu, Ligeng; Gao, Min; Xu, Jun; Yang, Rong; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-10-01

    The development of artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) to mimic the functions of APCs such as dendritic cells (DCs) to stimulate T cells and induce antitumor immune responses has attracted substantial interests in cancer immunotherapy. In this work, a unique red blood cell (RBC)-based aAPC system is designed by engineering antigen peptide-loaded major histocompatibility complex-I and CD28 activation antibody on RBC surface, which are further tethered with interleukin-2 (IL2) as a proliferation and differentiation signal. Such RBC-based aAPC-IL2 (R-aAPC-IL2) can not only provide a flexible cell surface with appropriate biophysical parameters, but also mimic the cytokine paracrine delivery. Similar to the functions of matured DCs, the R-aAPC-IL2 cells can facilitate the proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and increase the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. As a proof-of-concept, we treated splenocytes from C57 mice with R-aAPC-IL2 and discovered those splenocytes induced significant cancer-cell-specific lysis, implying that the R-aAPC-IL2 were able to re-educate T cells and induce adoptive immune response. This work thus presents a novel RBC-based aAPC system which can mimic the functions of antigen presenting DCs to activate T cells, promising for applications in adoptive T cell transfer or even in direct activation of circulating T cells for cancer immunotherapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A potential role for immunotherapy in thyroid cancer by enhancing NY-ESO-1 cancer antigen expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Viswanath; Frederick, Dennie T; Bernasconi, Maria J; Wargo, Jennifer A; Parangi, Sareh

    2014-08-01

    NY-ESO-1 is one of the most immunogenic members of the cancer/testis antigen family and its levels can be increased after exposure to demethylating and deacetylating agents. This cytoplasmic antigen can serve as a potent target for cancer immunotherapy and yet has not been well studied in differentiated thyroid cancer cells. We studied the baseline expression of NY-ESO-1 messenger RNA and protein before and after exposure to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) (72 hours) in a panel of thyroid cancer cell lines using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. HLA-A2+, NY-ESO-1+ thyroid cell lines were then co-cultured with peripheral blood lymphocytes transduced with NY-ESO-1 specific T-cell receptor (TCR) and assayed for interferon-gamma and Granzyme-B release in the medium. SCID mice injected orthotopically with BCPAP cells were treated with DAC to evaluate for NY-ESO-1 gene expression in vivo. None of the thyroid cancer cell lines showed baseline expression of NY-ESO-1. Three cell lines, BCPAP, TPC-1, and 8505c, showed an increase in NY-ESO-1 gene expression with DAC treatment and were found to be HLA-A2 positive. DAC-treated target BCPAP and TPC-1 tumor cells with up-regulated NY-ESO-1 levels were able to mount an appropriate interferon-gamma and Granzyme-B response upon co-culture with the NY-ESO-1-TCR-transduced peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vivo DAC treatment was able to increase NY-ESO-1 expression in an orthotopic mouse model with BCPAP cells. Our data suggest that many differentiated thyroid cancer cells can be pressed to express immune antigens, which can then be utilized in TCR-based immunotherapeutic interventions.

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Jeong

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G is known to be implicated in a tumor-driven immune escape mechanism in malignancies. The purpose of this study was to investigate HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer. HLA-G alleles were determined by direct DNA sequencing procedures from blood samples of 80 breast cancer patients and 80 healthy controls. Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from serum specimens. HLA-G expression in breast cancer lesions was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining. The presence of HLA-G 3' untranslated region (UTR 14-bp sequence was analyzed and found to be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer susceptibility based on HLA-G expression in tissues (P = 0.0407. Levels of sHLA-G were higher in the breast cancer group (median 117.2 U/mL compared to the control group (median 10.1 U/mL, P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC values of sHLA-G for differentiating breast cancer from normal controls and for detecting metastasis from other stages of breast cancer were 0.89 and 0.79, respectively. HLA-G polymorphism and expression may be involved in breast carcinogenesis and sHLA-G concentrations could be used as a diagnostic marker for detecting breast cancer.

  1. Monitoring performance of progression assessment criteria for cancer antigen 125 among patients with ovarian cancer compared by computer simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Hassan, Suher Othman; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Lund, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer antigen 125 (CA125) is used to monitor tumor burden among patients with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer. The purpose is to compare the monitoring performance of seven previously proposed criteria. MATERIALS & METHODS: The CA125 assessment criteria were applied....... For baseline concentrations below cut-off, the best performing criterion was based on a confirmed increment from ≤ cut-off to >two-times cut-off. DISCUSSION: Computer simulation models may be useful for a preclinical validation of criteria to be investigated in clinical trials....

  2. Quantitation of human mammary epithelial antigens in cells cultured from normal and cancerous breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1981-02-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay technique was developed to quantitate the level of human breast celltype specific antigens on cells from normal breast and from various established cell lines of breast and nonbreast origins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed four major proteinaceous components (150,000; 75,000; 60,000; and 48,000) in human milk fat globule membranes that were used to immunize rabbits in order to elicit antimammary epithelial cell antibody. Antisera obtained were rendered specific by absorptions and were able to recognize three specific mammary epithelial components of the breast epithelial cell. Human mammary epithelial (HME) antigen expression was highest (1290 ng/10(6) cells) in normal breast epithelial cells from primary cultures of normal breasts. Lower levels (range: 955 to 330 ng/10(6) cells) were found in breast epithelial cells from cell lines established from cancerous breast tissue. Cells of nonbreast origins as well as fibroblasts from breast gave much lower values (less than 30 ng/10(6) cells). On treatment, with trypsin, of two breast epithelial cell lines (MDA-MB-157 and MCF-7) 80 to 85% of their HME antigen expression was lost, suggesting that a majority of these breast antigens reside on the cell surface.

  3. Prognostic significance of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in surgically treated lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Nonaka, Makoto; Kadokura, Mitsutaka; Takaba, Toshihiro

    2003-04-01

    The serum concentrations of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) obtained from 124 surgically treated primary non-small cell lung cancer patients, including 75 adenocarcinomas (AD) and 49 squamous cell carcinomas (SQ), were studied. The changes in the SCC-Ag concentration, which were obtained before and one month after surgery, were analyzed. The 5-year survival rate of the patients with AD who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively (32%) was lower than that for those who were negative for SCC-Ag preoperatively (57%, p<0.05). Meanwhile, in those with SQ, the 5-year survival rate of those who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively (59%) was not different when compared with those who were negative for SCC-Ag preoperatively (73%). The 5-year survival rate of patients with AD who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively and negative postoperatively was 53% versus 17% for those who remained positive postoperatively (p<0.05). In those with SQ, the 5-year survival rate of those who were positive for SCC-Ag preoperatively and negative postoperatively was 76% while it was 0% for those who remained positive postoperatively (p<0.01). In patients with negative SCC-Ag postoperatively, 5-year survival rates were not different between the patients who had positive antigen preoperatively and the patients who had negative antigen preoperatively both in AD (53% and 57%, respectively) and SQ (76% and 75%, respectively). In conclusion, though SCC-Ag is widely used for SQ, preoperative SCC-Ag did not reflect the prognosis. In AD, the survival rate was lower in antigen-positive than antigen-negative patients. Survival rate was higher in antigen-positive patients who became antigen-negative following resection than in patients who remained antigen-positive for both AD and SQ. In the patients who were negative for SCC-Ag postoperatively, survival was the same regardless of the preoperative SCC-Ag positivity in both AD and SQ.

  4. Intrarectal vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing carcinoembronic antigen induces mucosal and systemic immunity and prevents progression of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Kim, Hong Sung; Wainstein, Alberto; Kim, Dae Won; Yang, Wein Cui; Moroziewicz, Dorota; Mong, Phyllus Y; Bereta, Michal; Taback, Bret; Wang, Qin; Kaufman, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa contains an intact immune system that protects the host from pathogens and communicates with the systemic immune system. Absorptive epithelial cells in the mucosa give rise to malignant tumors although the interaction between tumor cells and the mucosal immune system is not well defined. The pathophysiology of colorectal cancer has been elucidated through studies of hereditary syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene. Patients with FAP develop adenomas and inevitably progress to invasive carcinomas by the age of 40. To better delineate the role of mucosal immunity in colorectal cancer, we evaluated the efficacy of intrarectal recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the human carcinoembryonic Ag (CEA) in a murine FAP model in which mice are predisposed to colorectal cancer and also express human CEA in the gut. Mucosal vaccination reduced the incidence of spontaneous adenomas and completely prevented progression to invasive carcinoma. The therapeutic effects were associated with induction of mucosal CEA-specific IgA Ab titers and CD8(+) CTLs. Mucosal vaccination was also associated with an increase in systemic CEA-specific IgG Ab titers, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and resulted in growth inhibition of s.c. implanted CEA-expressing tumors suggesting communication between mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Thus, intrarectal vaccination induces mucosal and systemic antitumor immunity and prevents progression of spontaneous colorectal cancer. These results have implications for the prevention of colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

  5. Lewis Y antigen modified CD47 is an independent risk factor for poor prognosis and promotes early ovarian cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingzi; Zhu, Liancheng; Zhuang, Huiyu; Hao, Yingying; Gao, Song; Liu, Shuice; Liu, Qing; Liu, Dawo; Liu, Juanjuan; Lin, Bei

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a membrane receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily and plays an important role in the mechanisms of tumor immune escape. CD47 participates in tumor immune escape by combining with SIRPα to reduce the phagocytic activity of macrophages. There are six potential N-glycosylation sites on CD47, and glycosylation is known to be necessary for its membrane localization. However, it is still unknown to what extent glycosylation influences CD47 ligand binding properties and subsequent signaling. By using immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we showed that CD47 contains Lewis y antigen. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that both the positive expression and the overexpression of CD47 and Lewis y antigen in cancer tissues and borderline tumors were significantly higher than those in benign ovarian tumors and normal ovarian tissues (P CD47 and Lewis y antigen was evident (r = 0.47, P CD47 and Lewis y antigen showed significant correlations with the clinical pathological parameters of ovarian cancer [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) standards, lymph node metastasis, and degree of differentiation] (P CD47 was an independent adverse risk factor for the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Cases with both high CD47 and Lewis y antigen expression had poor prognoses. Our study demonstrates that Lewis y antigens of CD47 may play a crucial role in the development of ovarian cancer, and could be new targets for immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. PMID:26609483

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for cancer: a basic research-oriented perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chungyong; Kwon, Byoung S

    2018-03-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have outstanding therapeutic potential for treating blood cancers. The prospects for this technology have accelerated basic research, clinical translation and Big Pharma's investment in the field of T-cell therapeutics. This interest has led to the discovery of key factors that affect CAR T-cell efficacy and play pivotal roles in T-cell immunology. Herein, we introduce advances in adoptive immunotherapy and the birth of CAR T cells, and review CAR T-cell studies that focus on three important features: CAR constructs, target antigens and T-cell phenotypes. At last, we highlight novel strategies that overcome the tumor microenvironment and circumvent CAR T-cell side effects, and consider the future direction of CAR T-cell development.

  7. Prostate-specific antigen-positive extramammary Paget's disease--association with prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne; Hager, Henrik; Steiniche, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepidermal adenocarcinoma that primarily affects the anogenital region. Cases of EMPD reacting with PSA (prostate-specific antigen) have previously been associated with underlying prostate cancer. However, a recent case of EMPD in our department has...... led us to question the value of PSA as an indicator of underlying prostate cancer. Clinical and pathological data were obtained for 16 cases of EMPD. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from the primary skin lesions were investigated using PSA and other immunohistochemical markers. 5...... of the 16 cases of EMPD stained positive for PSA (2 women and 3 men). However, no reactivity was seen for the prostatic marker P501S. Three of the five patients had been diagnosed with internal malignant disease-two with prostate cancer, stage 1. Immunohistochemical investigations of the tumour specimens...

  8. Baseline prostate-specific antigen measurements and subsequent prostate cancer risk in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe Benzon; Brasso, Klaus; Iversen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening reduces mortality from prostate cancer, substantial over-diagnosis and subsequent overtreatment are concerns. Early screening of men for PSA may serve to stratify the male population by risk of future clinical prostate cancer. METHODS...... AND MATERIAL: Case-control study nested within the Danish 'Diet, Cancer and Health' cohort of 27,179 men aged 50-64 at enrolment. PSA measured in serum collected at cohort entry in 1993-1997 was used to evaluate prostate cancer risk diagnosed up to 14years after. We identified 911 prostate cancer cases...... in the Danish Cancer Registry through 31st December 2007 1:1 age-matched with cancer-free controls. Aggressive cancer was defined as ⩾T3 or Gleason score ⩾7 or N1 or M1. Statistical analyses were based on conditional logistic regression with age as underlying time axis. RESULTS: Total PSA and free-to-total PSA...

  9. Early gastric cancer frequently has high expression of KK-LC-1, a cancer-testis antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futawatari, Nobue; Fukuyama, Takashi; Yamamura, Rui; Shida, Akiko; Takahashi, Yoshihito; Nishi, Yatsushi; Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2017-12-14

    To assess cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) expression in gastric cancer patients and examined their associations with clinicopathological factors. Eighty-three gastric cancer patients were evaluated in this study. Gastric cancer specimens were evaluated for the gene expression of CTAs, Kitakyushu lung cancer antigen-1 (KK-LC-1), melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A1, MAGE-A3 and New York esophageal cancer-1 (NY-ESO-1), by reverse transcription PCR. Clinicopathological background information, such as gender, age, tumor size, macroscopic type, tumor histology, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and pathological stage, was obtained. Statistical comparisons between the expression of each CTA and each clinicopathological background were performed using the χ2 test. The expression rates of KK-LC-1, MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, and NY-ESO-1 were 79.5%, 32.5%, 39.8%, and 15.7%, respectively. In early stage gastric cancer specimens, the expression of KK-LC-1 was 79.4%, which is comparable to the 79.6% observed in advanced stage specimens. The expression of KK-LC-1 was not significantly associated with clinicopathological factors, while there were considerable differences in the expression rates of MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A3 with vs without lymphatic invasion (MAGE-A1, 39.3% vs 13.6%, P = 0.034; MAGE-A3, 47.5% vs 18.2%, P = 0.022) and/or vascular invasion (MAGE-A1, 41.5% vs 16.7%, P = 0.028; MAGE-A3, 49.1% vs 23.3%, P = 0.035) and, particularly, MAGE-A3, in patients with early vs advanced stage (36.5% vs 49.0%, P = 0.044), respectively. Patients expressing MAGE-A3 and NY-ESO-1 were older than those not expressing MAGE-A3 and NY-ESO-1 (MAGE-A3, 73.7 ± 7.1 vs 67.4 ± 12.3, P = 0.009; NY-ESO-1, 75.5 ± 7.2 vs 68.8 ± 11.2, P = 0.042). The KK-LC-1 expression rate was high even in patients with stage I cancer, suggesting that KK-LC-1 is a useful biomarker for early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  10. Cholesterol masks membrane glycosphingolipid tumor-associated antigens to reduce their immunodetection in human cancer biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anton; Binnington, Beth; Ngan, Bo; Chadwick, Karen; Fleshner, Neil; Lingwood, Clifford A

    2013-11-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are neoplastic and normal/cancer stem cell markers and GSL/cholesterol-containing membrane rafts are increased in cancer cell plasma membranes. We define a novel means by which cancer cells can restrict tumor-associated GSL immunoreactivity. The GSL-cholesterol complex reorients GSL carbohydrate to a membrane parallel, rather than perpendicular conformation, largely unavailable for antibody recognition. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin cholesterol extraction of all primary human tumor frozen sections tested (ovarian, testicular, neuroblastoma, prostate, breast, colon, pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma), unmasked previously "invisible" membrane GSLs for immunodetection. In ovarian carcinoma, globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3), the GSL receptor for the antineoplastic Escherichia coli-derived verotoxin, was increased throughout the tumor. In colon carcinoma, Gb3 detection was vastly increased within the neovasculature and perivascular stroma. In tumors considered Gb3 negative (neuroblastoma, Leydig testicular tumor and pheochromocytoma), neovascular Gb3 was unmasked. Tumor-associated GSL stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and globoH were unmasked according to tumor: SSEA-1 in prostate/colon; SSEA-3 in prostate; SSEA-4 in pheochromocytoma/some colon tumors; globoH in prostate/some colon tumors. In colon, anti-SSEA-1 was tumor cell specific. Within the GSL-cholesterol complex, filipin-cholesterol binding was also reduced. These results may relate to the ill-defined benefit of statins on cancer prognosis, for example, prostate carcinoma. We found novel anti-tumor GSL antibodies circulating in 3/5 statin-treated, but not untreated, prostate cancer patients. Lowering tumor membrane cholesterol may permit immune recognition of otherwise unavailable tumor-associated GSL carbohydrate, for more effective immunosurveillance and active/passive immunotherapy. Our results show standard immunodetection of tumor GSLs significantly under assesses

  11. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Tumor antigens are the primary target of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We set out to define and compare the expression pattern of tumor antigen genes in esophagus carcinoma biopsies and in an allogeneic tumor lysate-based cancer vaccine, MelCancerVac. Cells used for vaccine production were treated...... in the production of the vaccine. Quantitative PCR was used to assay 74 tumor antigen genes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. 81% (13/16) of tumors expressed more than five cancer/testis (CT) antigens. A total of 96 genes were assayed in the tumor cell clone (DDM1.7) used to make tumor cell...... lysate for vaccine preparation. Gene expression in DDM1.7 cells was compared with three normal tissues; 16 tumor antigen genes were induced more than ten-fold relative to normal tissues. Treatment with 5-aza-CdR induced expression of an additional 15 tumor antigens to a total of 31. MAGE-A protein...

  12. A new insight in chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells has emerged as a very promising approach to combating cancer. Despite its ability to eliminate tumors shown in some clinical trials, CAR-T cell therapy involves some significant safety challenges, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS and “on-target, off-tumor” toxicity, which is related to poor control of the dose, location, and timing of T cell activity. In the past few years, some strategies to avoid the side effects of CAR-T cell therapy have been reported, including suicide gene, inhibitory CAR, dual-antigen receptor, and the use of exogenous molecules as switches to control the CAR-T cell functions. Because of the advances of the CAR paradigm and other forms of cancer immunotherapy, the most effective means of defeating the cancer has become the integration therapy with the combinatorial control system of switchable dual-receptor CAR-T cell and immune checkpoint blockade.

  13. The cancer-retina antigen recoverin as a potential biomarker for renal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovastova, Marina O; Tsoy, Larisa V; Bocharnikova, Anna V; Korolev, Dmitry O; Gancharova, Olga S; Alekseeva, Ekaterina A; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina B; Savvateeva, Lyudmila V; Skorikova, Elena E; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Varshavsky, Vladimir A; Vinarov, Andrey Z; Nikolenko, Vladimir N; Glybochko, Peter V; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zamyatnin, Andrey A; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Philippov, Pavel P

    2016-07-01

    The renal cell carcinoma is the ninth most common cancer with an increasing occurrence and mortality. Recoverin is the first retina-specific photoreceptor protein that was shown to undergo aberrant expression, due to its promoter demethylation, as a cancer-retina antigen in a number of malignant tumors. In this work, we demonstrated that recoverin is indeed expressed in 68.4 % of patients with different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, and this expression has tendency to correlate with tumor size. Interestingly, 91.7 % of patients with the benign renal tumor, oncocytoma, express recoverin as well in their tumor. Epigenetic analysis of the recoverin gene promoter revealed a stable mosaic methylation pattern with the predominance of the methylated state, with the exception of -80 and 56 CpG dinucleotides (CpGs). While the recoverin expression does not correlate withoverall survival of the tumor patients, the methylation of the recoverin gene promoter at -80 position is associated with better overall survival of the patients. This work is the first report pointing towards the association of overall survival of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with promoter methylation of a cancer-retina antigen. Taken together, these data allow to consider recoverin as a potential therapeutic target and/or marker for renal tumors.

  14. Solubilized antigen of Blastocystis hominis facilitates the growth of human colorectal cancer cells, HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramathi, Samudi; Suresh, Kumar; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2010-03-01

    Blastocystis hominis is one of the most common intestinal protozoan parasites in humans, and reports have shown that blastocystosis is coupled with intestinal disorders. In the past, researchers have developed an in vitro model using B. hominis culture filtrates to investigate its ability in triggering inflammatory cytokine responses and transcription factors in human colonic epithelial cells. Studies have also correlated the inflammation by parasitic infection with cancer. The present study provides evidence of the parasite facilitating cancer cell growth through observing the cytopathic effect, cellular immunomodulation, and apoptotic responses of B. hominis, especially in malignancy. Here we investigated the effect of solubilized antigen from B. hominis on cell viability, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT116). The gene expressions of cytokines namely interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (a gene transcription factor), and proapoptotic genes namely protein 53 and cathepsin B were also studied. Results exhibited favor the fact that antigen from B. hominis, at a certain concentration, could facilitate the growth of HCT116 while having the ability to downregulate immune cell responses (PBMCs). Therefore, there is a vital need to screen colorectal cancer patients for B. hominis infection as it possesses the ability to enhance the tumor growth.

  15. NEDDylation in liver cancer: The regulation of the RNA binding protein Hu antigen R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ramos, David; Martínez-Chantar, María L

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer death. The current view of cancer progression and malignancy supports the notion that cancer cells must undergo through a post-translational modification (PTM) regulation and a metabolic switch or reprogramming in order to progress in an unfriendly environment. NEDDylation is a post-translational modification of the proteins involved in several processes such as cell growth, viability and development. A ground-breaking knowledge on a new critical aspect of HCC research has been to identify that NEDDylation plays a role in HCC by regulating the liver oncogenic driver Hu antigen R (HuR). HuR is a RNA-binding protein that stabilizes target mRNAs involved in cell dedifferentiation, proliferation, and survival, all well-established hallmarks of cancer. And importantly, HuR levels were found to be highly representative in liver and colon cancer. These findings open a completely new area of research, exploring the impact that NEDDylation plays in liver diseases and paving the way for novel therapeutical approaches. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pretreatment prostate specific antigen doubling time as prognostic factor in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharinov, Gennady M; Bogomolov, Oleg A; Neklasova, Natalia N; Anisimov, Vladimir N

    2017-01-01

    Despite the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum level commonly uses as tumor marker in diagnosis of prostate cancer, it seems that PSA doubling time (PSADT) could be more useful indicator of tumor behavior and of prognosis for patients. The results of hormone and radiation therapy were evaluated for 912 prostate cancer having at least 2 PSA tests before the treatment was started. Clustering procedure (selection of homogenous group) was performed by using PSADT as the classification marker. The rate of PSADT was estimated for different dissemination rate, age, Gleasons's score and education level. PSADT index inversely correlated with the rate of prostate cancer dissemination, Gleason's score and the level of education were directly correlated with the age of patients. Survival time was longer and PSADT index was higher in "slow" tumor growing subgroups in local, local-advanced and metastatic prostate cancer patients than these in "fast" subgroups. The study confirmed the prognostic value of pretreatment PSADT in prostate cancer patients independently of cancer progression. No significant relationship exists between the authors and the companies/organizations whose products or services may be referenced in this article.

  17. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  18. An overview of the GAGE cancer/testis antigen family with the inclusion of newly identified members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2008-01-01

    GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer. This rev......GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer....... This review describes the structure and phylogeny of the GAGE family members and presents a revised nomenclature, which will enable a more clear distinction of genes and gene products. The GAGE gene locus at chromosome X p11.23 consists of at least 16 genes, each of which is located in one of an equal number...

  19. Prostate cancer and prostate-specific antigen testing in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David P; Supramaniam, Rajah; Marshall, Villis R; Armstrong, Bruce K

    2008-09-15

    To describe trends in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, prostate cancer incidence and mortality in New South Wales. Descriptive analysis using routinely collected data of observed trends in PSA testing from 1989 to 2006, and prostate cancer cases and deaths from 1972 to 2005 in NSW. Age-standardised and age-specific rates and joinpoint regression to identify changes in trends; projected trends observed before the introduction of PSA testing to quantify its impact on incidence and mortality rates. The number of PSA tests per year more than doubled between 1994 and 2006. Age-standardised incidence of prostate cancer peaked in 1994, fell by 10.0% per year to 1998 and then increased by 4.9% per year from 2001 to 2005. An estimated 19 602 (43%) more men than expected from preceding trends were diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1989 and 2005 after PSA testing was introduced. The incidence of recorded advanced prostate cancer at diagnosis fell from 13.0 per 100,000 men in 1987-1991 to 7.0 per 100,000 men in 2002-2005. The age-standardised mortality from prostate cancer increased by 3.6% per year between 1984 and 1990 and then fell by 2.0% per year to 2005. There was a sustained increase in prostate cancer incidence in NSW after PSA testing was introduced. While falls in the incidence of advanced disease at diagnosis and mortality from prostate cancer after 1993 are consistent with a benefit from PSA testing, other explanations cannot be excluded.

  20. Cytomegalovirus and cancer after kidney transplantation: Role of the human leukocyte antigen system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Germaine; Chakera, Aron; Chapman, Jeremy R; Chadban, Steve C; Pilmore, Helen; Craig, Jonathan C; Lim, Wai H

    2017-02-01

    The role of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in cancer development after transplantation remains uncertain. We aimed to determine the association between donor and recipient CMV serological status and the risk of cancer development after kidney transplantation. Using data from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry, we assessed the association between CMV donor/recipient (D/R) serological status and the risk of solid organ cancers in primary adult deceased-donor kidney transplant patients between 1990 and 2012. Of 8140 recipients, a total of 895 (11%) recipients developed incident cancers during a follow-up time of 51 555 person-years. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches was an effect modifier between CMV serological status and cancer (P=.03 for interaction). In recipients who have received 0-2 HLA-ABDR mismatched kidneys, the adjusted hazard ratios for cancer incidence among those with CMV D-/R-, CMV D-/R+, and CMV D+/R- were 0.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24-0.91), 1.42 (95% CI: 0.97-2.07), and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.67-1.57), respectively compared with the reference of CMV D+/R+. A similar association was not observed in those with >2 HLA-ABDR mismatches. CMV D-/R- status was associated with a reduced risk of cancer in kidney transplant recipients who have received well-matched renal allografts, suggesting a potential role of HLA matching in cancer development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Polymorphisms Association With Cancer Post-Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Julieta; Goldraich, Livia; Manlhiot, Cedric; Kozuszko, Stella; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Post transplantation, a major complication is the development of malignancies. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is a molecule that inhibits the immune system and it is utilized by malignant cells to hide from the immune system. Expression of HLA-G from the donor and recipient cells in transplant patients is regulated by gene variations however, the association between genotype and cancer remains unknown. Our objective was to determine the association between genotype and outcome. Heart transplant recipients (251) and available corresponding donors (196) samples were genotyped for polymorphisms and the association of polymorphisms to outcome was evaluated with parametric hazard regression models. Risk of cancer was 22% at 10years post-transplantation. The mean follow-up was of 4.9±3.6years. In a multivariable analysis, donor-recipient SNP 3187 matching was identified as a protective factor for cancer (hazard ratio 0.43; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.93; p=0.03). While coding region allele (haplotype 6) was identified as an independent risk factor (hazard ratio 3.7; 95% confidence interval 1.36-10.06; p=0.01). In this investigation, we identified an association between cancer post-transplantation and HLA-G polymorphisms, which may reveal a pathway for potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancer post-transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands for diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Martin; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Czernin, Johannes; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-11-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has become an attractive diagnostic and therapeutic target for small molecule ligands. Radionuclide-chelating ligands can be labeled with either 68Ga for positron-emission-tomography (PET) or 177Lu for radionuclide therapy. Areas covered: In this literature review we evaluate the diagnostic value of 68Ga PSMA PET/CT and the therapeutic potential of 177Lu PSMA radioligand therapy (RLT) in patients with prostate cancer. 68Ga PSMA PET/CT is more accurate than CT for nodal staging and superior to conventional imaging in patients with biochemical recurrence, translating into major changes in clinical management. The preliminary data for 177Lu PSMA indicates >50% reduction of PSA levels in up to 59% of patients. Severe adverse events occurred <10% of patients after RLT. Expert commentary: PSMA ligands for diagnostic and therapeutic purpose will significantly impact the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  3. Cancer-testis antigen expression in synovial sarcoma: NY-ESO-1, PRAME, MAGEA4, and MAGEA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iura, Kunio; Maekawa, Akira; Kohashi, Kenichi; Ishii, Takeaki; Bekki, Hirofumi; Otsuka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Harimaya, Katsumi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-03-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is regarded as a relatively chemosensitive sarcoma, but the prognosis of advanced SSs remains poor. Here we identified highly expressed cancer-testis antigens that could be promising immunotherapy targets for SS, using a previously conducted cDNA microarray, and we assessed the clinicopathological or prognostic relationships of these antigens in SS. We compared the gene expression profiles of 11 SSs with those of 3 normal adipose tissues. Among the up-regulated cancer-testis antigens, we analyzed PRAME, MAGEA1, and MAGEA4 and another cancer-testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) together, by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction in 108 SSs. Immunohistochemically, NY-ESO-1, PRAME, MAGEA4, and MAGEA1 were positive in 66 (61%), 93 (86%), 89 (82%), and 16 (15%) of 108 SSs, respectively, and 104 (96%) of 108 SSs showed the immunohistochemical expression of at least 1 of NY-ESO-1, PRAME, and MAGEA4. Moreover, the high expression of at least 1 of these 3 antigens was observed in 83% of the SSs. High expression of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA4 was significantly correlated with the presence of necrosis and advanced clinical stage. The immunohistochemical expression of these cancer-testis antigens was not correlated with prognosis, but the coexpression of NY-ESO-1, PRAME, and MAGEA4 was significantly associated with adverse prognosis. The real-time polymerase chain reaction results were closely related to the immunohistochemical results: NY-ESO-1 (P = .0019), PRAME (P = .039), MAGEA4 (P = .0149), and MAGEA1 (P = .0766). These data support the potential utility of NY-ESO-1, PRAME, and MAGEA4 as immunotherapy targets and ancillary prognostic parameters, suggesting the possible benefit of the combined use of these cancer-testis antigens as an SS immunotherapy target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel and effective cancer immunotherapy mouse model using antigen-specific B cells selected in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Moutai

    Full Text Available Immunotherapies such as adoptive transfer of T cells or natural killer cells, or monoclonal antibody (MoAb treatment have recently been recognized as effective means to treat cancer patients. However, adoptive transfer of B cells or plasma cells producing tumor-specific antibodies has not been applied as a therapy because long-term culture and selective expansion of antigen-specific B cells has been technically very difficult. Here, we describe a novel cancer immunotherapy that uses B-cell adoptive transfer. We demonstrate that germinal-center-like B cells (iGB cells induced in vitro from mouse naïve B cells become plasma cells and produce IgG antibodies for more than a month in the bone marrow of non-irradiated recipient mice. When transferred into mice, iGB cells producing antibody against a surrogate tumor antigen suppressed lung metastasis and growth of mouse melanoma cells expressing the same antigen and prolonged survival of the recipients. In addition, we have developed a novel culture system called FAIS to selectively expand antigen-specific iGB cells utilizing the fact that iGB cells are sensitive to Fas-induced cell death unless their antigen receptors are ligated by membrane-bound antigens. The selected iGB cells efficiently suppressed lung metastasis of melanoma cells in the adoptive immunotherapy model. As human blood B cells can be propagated as iGB cells using culture conditions similar to the mouse iGB cell cultures, our data suggest that it will be possible to treat cancer-bearing patients by the adoptive transfer of cancer-antigen-specific iGB cells selected in vitro. This new adoptive immunotherapy should be an alternative to the laborious development of MoAb drugs against cancers for which no effective treatments currently exist.

  5. Early decline in cancer antigen 125 as a surrogate for progression-free survival in recurrent ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Chee K; Friedlander, Michael; Brown, Chris

    2011-01-01

    We used data from 886 patients from the CAELYX in Platinum Sensitive Ovarian Patients (CALYPSO) trial, recruited between April 2005 and September 2007, to examine the role of early decline in cancer antigen 125 (CA125) and early tumor response as prognostic factors and surrogates for superiority...... response as surrogates for CPLD treatment benefit compared with CP. All statistical tests were two-sided. Early decline (defined as rate of CA125 decrease of at least 50% per month) was associated with improved PFS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] for progression = 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.67 to 0...

  6. Transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 is an effective target for a breast cancer vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunping; Zhou, He; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Xiang, Rong

    2003-07-01

    Protection against breast cancer was achieved with a DNA vaccine against murine transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1, which is overexpressed in aggressively proliferating D2F2 murine breast carcinoma. Growth of primary s.c. tumor and dissemination of pulmonary metastases was markedly suppressed by this oral DNA vaccine, carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, encoding murine Fos-related antigen 1, fused with mutant polyubiquitin, and cotransformed with secretory murine IL-18. The life span of 60% of vaccinated mice was tripled in the absence of detectable tumor growth after lethal tumor cell challenge. Immunological mechanisms involved activation of T, natural killer, and dendritic cells, as indicated by up-regulation of their activation markers and costimulatory molecules. Markedly increased specific target cell lysis was mediated by both MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells isolated from splenocytes of vaccinated mice, including a significant release of proinflammatory cytokines IFN- and IL-2. Importantly, fluorescence analysis of fibroblast growth factor 2 and tumor cell-induced vessel growth in Matrigel plugs demonstrated marked suppression of angiogenesis only in vaccinated animals. Taken together, this multifunctional DNA vaccine proved effective in protecting against growth and metastases of breast cancer by combining the action of immune effector cells with suppression of tumor angiogenesis. vaccine | tumor | metastases | antiangiogenesis

  7. Human Cancer Antigen Globo H Is a Cell-Surface Ligand for Human Ribonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Chelcie H; Chao, Tzu-Yuan; Singarapu, Kiran K; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Yang, Guangbin; Markley, John L; Danishefsky, Samuel J; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-07-22

    Pancreatic-type ribonucleases are secretory enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of RNA. Recent efforts have endowed the homologues from cow (RNase A) and human (RNase 1) with toxicity for cancer cells, leading to a clinical trial. The basis for the selective toxicity of ribonuclease variants for cancerous versus noncancerous cells has, however, been unclear. A screen for RNase A ligands in an array of mammalian cell-surface glycans revealed strong affinity for a hexasaccharide, Globo H, that is a tumor-associated antigen and the basis for a vaccine in clinical trials. The affinity of RNase A and RNase 1 for immobilized Globo H is in the low micromolar-high nanomolar range. Moreover, reducing the display of Globo H on the surface of human breast adenocarcinoma cells with a small-molecule inhibitor of biosynthesis or a monoclonal antibody antagonist decreases the toxicity of an RNase 1 variant. Finally, heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectroscopy showed that RNase 1 interacts with Globo H by using residues that are distal from the enzymic active site. The discovery that a systemic human ribonuclease binds to a moiety displayed on human cancer cells links two clinical paradigms and suggests a mechanism for innate resistance to cancer.

  8. Functionally Active Fc Mutant Antibodies Recognizing Cancer Antigens Generated Rapidly at High Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Ilieva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies find broad application as therapy for various types of cancer by employing multiple mechanisms of action against tumors. Manipulating the Fc-mediated functions of antibodies that engage immune effector cells, such as NK cells, represents a strategy to influence effector cell activation and to enhance antibody potency and potentially efficacy. We developed a novel approach to generate and ascertain the functional attributes of Fc mutant monoclonal antibodies. This entailed coupling single expression vector (pVitro1 antibody cloning, using polymerase incomplete primer extension (PIPE polymerase chain reaction, together with simultaneous Fc region point mutagenesis and high yield transient expression in human mammalian cells. Employing this, we engineered wild type, low (N297Q, NQ, and high (S239D/I332E, DE FcR-binding Fc mutant monoclonal antibody panels recognizing two cancer antigens, HER2/neu and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4. Antibodies were generated with universal mutagenic primers applicable to any IgG1 pVitro1 constructs, with high mutagenesis and transfection efficiency, in small culture volumes, at high yields and within 12 days from design to purified material. Antibody variants conserved their Fab-mediated recognition of target antigens and their direct anti-proliferative effects against cancer cells. Fc mutations had a significant impact on antibody interactions with Fc receptors (FcRs on human NK cells, and consequently on the potency of NK cell activation, quantified by immune complex-mediated calcium mobilization and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC of tumor cells. This strategy for manipulation and testing of Fc region engagement with cognate FcRs can facilitate the design of antibodies with defined effector functions and potentially enhanced efficacy against tumor cells.

  9. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC....

  10. Utility of Digital Rectal Examination as an Adjunct to Prostate Specific Antigen in the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Joshua A; Oromendia, Clara; Shoag, Jonathan E; Mittal, Sameer; Cosiano, Michael F; Ballman, Karla V; Vickers, Andrew J; Hu, Jim C

    2017-10-20

    Guidelines from NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network®) advocate digital rectal examination screening only in men with elevated prostate specific antigen. We investigated the effect of prostate specific antigen on the association of digital rectal examination and clinically significant prostate cancer in a large American cohort. We evaluated the records of the 35,350 men who underwent digital rectal examination in the screening arm of the PLCO (Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian) Cancer Screening trial for the development of clinically significant prostate cancer (Gleason 7 or greater). Followup was 343,273 person-years. The primary outcome was the rate of clinically significant prostate cancer among men with vs without suspicious digital rectal examination. We performed competing risks regression to evaluate the interaction between time varying suspicious digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen. A total of 1,713 clinically significant prostate cancers were detected with a 10-year cumulative incidence of 5.9% (95% CI 5.6-6.2). Higher risk was seen for suspicious vs nonsuspicious digital rectal examinations. Increases in absolute risk were small and clinically irrelevant for normal (less than 2 ng/ml) prostate specific antigen (1.5% vs 0.7% risk of clinically significant prostate cancer at 10 years), clinically relevant for elevated (3 ng/ml or greater) prostate specific antigen (23.0% vs 13.7%) and modest clinical relevance for equivocal (2 to 3 ng/ml) prostate specific antigen (6.5% vs 3.5%). Digital rectal examination demonstrated prognostic usefulness when prostate specific antigen was greater than 3 ng/ml, limited usefulness for less than 2 ng/ml and marginal usefulness for 2 to 3 ng/ml. These findings support the restriction of digital rectal examination to men with higher prostate specific antigen as a reflex test to improve specificity. It should not be used as a primary screening modality to improve sensitivity. Copyright

  11. Discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen, and some proposals to optimize prostate cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokudome S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shinkan Tokudome,1 Ryosuke Ando,2 Yoshiro Koda,3 1Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 2Department of Nephro-urology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 3Department of Forensic Medicine and Human Genetics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Abstract: The discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen (PSA have been much appreciated because PSA-based screening has saved millions of lives of prostate cancer (PCa patients. Historically speaking, Flocks et al first identified antigenic properties in prostate tissue in 1960. Then, Barnes et al detected immunologic characteristics in prostatic fluid in 1963. Hara et al characterized γ-semino-protein in semen in 1966, and it has been proven to be identical to PSA. Subsequently, Ablin et al independently reported the presence of precipitation antigens in the prostate in 1970. Wang et al purified the PSA in 1979, and Kuriyama et al first applied an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PSA in 1980. However, the positive predictive value with a cutoff figure of 4.0 ng/mL appeared substantially low (~30%. There are overdiagnoses and overtreatments for latent/low-risk PCa. Controversies exist in the PCa mortality-reducing effects of PSA screening between the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC and the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening Trial. For optimizing PCa screening, PSA-related items may require the following: 1 adjustment of the cutoff values according to age, as well as setting limits to age and screening intervals; 2 improving test performance using doubling time, density, and ratio of free: total PSA; and 3 fostering active surveillance for low-risk PCa with monitoring by PSA value. Other items needing consideration may include the following: 1 examinations of cell proliferation and cell cycle markers

  12. Microsatellite instability and the association with plasma homocysteine and thymidylate synthase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Lindebjerg, Jan; Crüger, Dorthe G.

    2008-01-01

    The possible associations between microsatellite instability, homocysteine and thymidylate synthase were investigated in tumors and plasma from 130 patients with colorectal cancer. Other analyses included thymidylate synthase and 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms......, carcinoembryonic antigen, vitamin B12, and folate. Microsatellite instability of tumors was associated with higher levels of plasma homocysteine (p = 0.008) and higher protein expression of thymidylate synthase (p ... factors. CEA was not associated with neither homocysteine nor microsatellite instability. The data suggests that there is a more pronounced methyl unit deficiency in microsatellite instable tumors....

  13. The construction of cDNA library and the screening of related antigen of ascitic tumor cells of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Q; Chen, K; Shan, Z

    2015-01-01

    To construct the cDNA library of the ascites tumor cells of ovarian cancer, which can be used to screen the related antigen for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer and therapeutic targets of immune treatment. Four cases of ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma, two cases of ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and two cases of ovarian endometrial carcinoma in patients with ascitic tumor cells which were used to construct the cDNA library. To screen the ovarian cancer antigen gene, evaluate the enzyme, and analyze nucleotide sequence, serological analysis of recombinant tumor cDNA expression libraries (SEREX) and suppression subtractive hybridization technique (SSH) techniques were utilized. The detection method of recombinant expression-based serological mini-arrays (SMARTA) was used to detect the ovarian cancer antigen and the positive reaction of 105 cases of ovarian cancer patients and 105 normal women's autoantibodies correspondingly in serum. After two rounds of serologic screening and glycosides sequencing analysis, 59 candidates of ovarian cancer antigen gene fragments were finally identified, which corresponded to 50 genes. They were then divided into six categories: (1) the homologous genes which related to the known ovarian cancer genes, such as BARD 1 gene, etc; (2) the homologous genes which were associated with other tumors, such as TM4SFI gene, etc; (3) the genes which were expressed in a special organization, such as ILF3, FXR1 gene, etc; (4) the genes which were the same with some protein genes of special function, such as TIZ, ClD gene; (5) the homologous genes which possessed the same source with embryonic genes, such as PKHD1 gene, etc; (6) the remaining genes were the unknown genes without the homologous sequence in the gene pool, such as OV-189 genes. SEREX technology combined with SSH method is an effective research strategy which can filter tumor antigen with high specific character; the corresponding autoantibodies of TM4SFl, ClD, TIZ, BARDI

  14. Beyond the antigen receptor: editing the genome of T-cells for cancer adoptive cellular therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angharad eLloyd

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent early-stage clinical trials evaluating the adoptive transfer of patient CD8+ T-cells re-directed with antigen receptors recognising tumours have shown very encouraging results. These reports provide strong support for further development of the therapeutic concept as a curative cancer treatment. In this respect combining the adoptive transfer of tumour-specific T-cells with therapies that increase their anti-tumour capacity is viewed as a promising strategy to improve treatment outcome. The ex-vivo genetic engineering step that underlies T-cell re-direction offers a unique angle to combine antigen receptor delivery with the targeting of cell intrinsic pathways that restrict T-cell effector functions. Recent progress in genome editing technologies such as protein- and RNA-guided endonucleases raise the possibility of disrupting gene expression in T-cells in order to enhance effector functions or to bypass tumour immune suppression. This approach would avoid the systemic administration of compounds that disrupt immune homeostasis, potentially avoiding autoimmune adverse effects, and could improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies.

  15. Prostate-specific antigen-based population screening for prostate cancer: current status in Japan and future perspective in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhide Kitagawa; Mikio Namiki

    2014-01-01

    In Western countries, clinical trials on prostate cancer screening demonstrated a limited benefit for patient survival. In the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing remains very low compared with Western countries, and the benefits of population-based screening remain unclear. This review describes the current status of population screening and diagnosis for prostate cancer in Japan and discusses the efficacy of population screening for the ...

  16. The Basics of Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells in T Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Lillian R; Bailey, Stefanie R; Wyatt, Megan M; Bowers, Jacob S; Majchrzak, Kinga; Nelson, Michelle H; Haupt, Carl; Paulos, Chrystal M; Varela, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) can mediate objective responses in patients with advanced malignancies. There have been major advances in this field, including the optimization of the ex vivo generation of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to ample numbers for effective ACT therapy via the use of natural and artificial antigen presenting cells (APCs). Herein we review the basic properties of APCs and how they have been manufactured through the years to augment vaccine and T cell-based cancer therapies. We then discuss how these novel APCs impact the function and memory properties of T cells. Finally, we propose new ways to synthesize aAPCs to augment the therapeutic effectiveness of antitumor T cells for ACT therapy.

  17. Cancer antigen 125 after delivery in women with a normal pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal B; Andersen, Malene R; Bjørngaard, Brian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish reference intervals for cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) in women with expected normal pregnancy, delivery, and early postpartum period. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Obstetrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte...... the gestational period and around delivery. RESULTS: CA-125 was fairly stable below 35 U/mL during pregnancy but increased markedly during vaginal delivery, to a minor degree during emergency cesarean section, and only slightly during elective cesarean section. In the early postpartum period, CA-125 decreased...... it unlikely that small fluctuations in CA-125 can be clinically useful for identifying other conditions. Measuring CA-125 around the time of delivery is not recommended. Gestational age-specific reference intervals during normal pregnancy are not needed....

  18. Prostate-specific antigen velocity in a prospective prostate cancer screening study of men with genetic predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikropoulos, Christos; Selkirk, Christina G Hutten; Saya, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PSA-velocity (PSAV) have been used to identify men at risk of prostate cancer (PrCa). The IMPACT study is evaluating PSA screening in men with a known genetic predisposition to PrCa due to BRCA1/2 mutations. This analysis evaluates the utility of PS...

  19. Dialysate cancer antigen 125 concentration as marker of peritoneal membrane status in patients treated with chronic peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study reviews publications on the history of cancer antigen 125 (CA125), the background of its use as a marker of mesothelial cell mass, determination in peritoneal effluent, and its practical use in both the follow-up of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and as a marker of in vivo

  20. Prostate cancer detection and dutasteride: utility and limitations of prostate-specific antigen in men with previous negative biopsies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, P.J. van; Kolble, K.; Huland, H.; Hambrock, T.; Barentsz, J.O.; Schroder, F.H.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: We addressed the question whether the change of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in men who use 5alpha-reductase inhibitor (5-ARI) dutasteride is sensitive for the detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). OBJECTIVE: The case of a man using dutasteride diagnosed with Gleason 7

  1. Prostate Cancer Detection and Dutasteride : Utility and Limitations of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Men with Previous Negative Biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Pim J.; Koelble, Konrad; Huland, Hartwig; Hambrock, Thomas; Barentsz, Jelle; Schroder, Fritz H.

    Context: We addressed the question whether the change of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in men who use 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor (5-ARI) dutasteride is sensitive for the detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Objective: The case of a man using dutasteride diagnosed with Gleason 7

  2. Stem Cells Antigen-1 Enriches for a Cancer Stem Cell-Like Subpopulation in Mouse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Won; Park, Jung Min; Park, Dong Min; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong need to identify markers to enrich gastric cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, CSC enrichment markers for mouse gastric cancers have not yet been determined. In our previous study, we generated primary mouse gastric cancer cell line NCC-S1 (S1) established from a Villin-cre;Smad4(F/F) ;Trp53(F/F) ;Cdh1(F/wt) mouse and its metastatic variant cell line NCC-S1M (S1M). Interestingly, S1M cells exhibited CSC-like features, such as increased tumorigenic potential and chemoresistance. By comparing gene expression profiles between S1 and S1M cells, we identified Stem Cells Antigen-1 (Sca-1) as a cell surface marker, which was mostly upregulated in S1M. Sca-1 was upregulated in tumorspheres from S1 cells or after cisplatin treatment in S1 cells. Immunofluorescence (IF) analysis showed that approximately 7% of cancer cells exhibited positivity for Sca-1 in primary mouse gastric cancer tissues. An in vivo-limiting dilution assay showed that Sca-1(high) mouse gastric cancer cells demonstrated increased tumorigenicity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. The Sca-1 expression was downregulated by TGF-β pathway activation and Wnt pathway inhibition in mouse gastric cancer cells. Sca-1(high) cells showed relatively low TGF-β reporter activity and high TCF/LEF1 reporter activity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Sca-1 was a β-catenin/LEF1 target gene. Sca-1(high) allografts were more resistant to cisplatin/fluorouracil chemotherapy than Sca-1(negative) allografts, and overexpressed Bcl-xL. Eighty-five mouse genes overexpressed in Sca-1(high) S1 cells compared with Sca-1(negative) cells clustered 123 pretreatment gastric cancer patient samples according to survival following chemotherapy. Taken together, Sca-1 is a novel CSC enrichment marker that mediates TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse gastric cancer. Stem Cells 2016;34:1177-1187. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Difficulty in diagnosis and different prognoses between colorectal cancer with ovarian metastasis and advanced ovarian cancer: An empirical study of different surgical adoptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ko-Chao; Lin, Hao; ChangChien, Chan-Chao; Fu, Hung-Chun; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Wu, Chen-Hsuan; Ou, Yu-Che

    2017-02-01

    To determine the clinical manifestations and optimal management of female patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis in ovaries mimicking advanced ovarian malignancy. A retrospective medical records review of female patients with primary CRC metastasis to ovaries, which were initially diagnosed as ovarian malignancy, and treated between 2001 and 2013. Clinical presentations, pathologic findings, and treatment outcomes were analyzed. In total, 19 cases were collected in the study through a hospital tumor registry. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 45 years (range, 28-63 years). The most common symptoms were abdominal pain or increased abdominal girth (63%). None of them had rectal bleeding. The ratio of cancer antigen-125 to carcinoembryonic antigen was available in 13 out 19 patients (less than 25 in 76.9%). Barium enema or colonoscopic exam was only performed in 10 outpatients. None of them had a positive finding. All 19 patients went for surgery, all of them had ovarian metastasis but only eight of them had bilateral involvement, and 14 of them had carcinomatosis. All patients went for either optimal cytoreduction surgery or suboptimal cytoreduction surgery. The patients who received optimal cytoreduction surgery had a significant better progression-free and overall survival than those who did not. Clinical manifestations of primary CRC with ovarian metastasis may be confused with advanced ovarian cancer. Negative barium enema or colonoscopic exam cannot rule out the possibility of CRC. For patients with a cancer antigen-125 to carcinoembryonic antigen ratio less than 25, 76% are good reference of CRC metastasis to ovaries. Optimal cytoreduction surgery like that used for treating advanced ovarian cancer had a better prognosis than suboptimal cytoreduction colorectal cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. 1-D grating based SPR biosensor for the detection of lung cancer biomarkers using Vroman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teotia, Pradeep Kumar; Kaler, R. S.

    2018-01-01

    Grating based surface plasmon resonance waveguide biosensor have been reported for the detection of lung cancer biomarkers using Vroman effect. The proposed grating based multilayered biosensor is designed with high detection accuracy for Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and also analysed to show high detection accuracy with acceptable sensitivity for both cancer biomarkers. The introduction of periodic grating with multilayer metals generates a good resonance that make it possible for early detection of cancerous cells. Using finite difference time domain method, it is observed wavelength of biosensor get red-shifted on variations of the refractive index due to the presence of both the cancerous bio-markers. The reported detection accuracy and sensitivity of proposed biosensor is quite acceptable for both lung cancer biomarkers i.e. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) which further offer us label free early detection of lung cancer using these biomarkers.

  5. Autoantibody to tumor antigen, alpha 2-HS glycoprotein: a novel biomarker of breast cancer screening and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jae Kyo; Chang, Jong Wook; Han, Wonshik; Lee, Jong Won; Ko, Eunyoung; Kim, Dong Hyun; Bae, Ji-Yeon; Yu, Jonghan; Lee, Cheolju; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Noh, Dong-Young

    2009-05-01

    We sought to identify a new serum biomarker for breast cancer screening and diagnosis using stepwise proteomic analysis of sera from breast cancer patients to detect the presence of autoantibodies that react with urinary protein. Two-dimensional immunoblotting was done for screening autoimmunogenic tumor antigens in the urine of breast cancer patients. Reactive spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among urinary proteins separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, 13 spots showed strong reactivity with pooled sera from breast cancer patients or control sera. By mass spectrometry, we identified alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) as a tumor antigen. Peripheral blood was obtained from 81 women diagnosed with breast cancer before surgery and 73 female donors without evidence of any malignancy for the individual analysis. In one-dimensional Western blot analysis, AHSG autoantibody was detected in 64 of 81 breast cancer patients (79.1%) and in 7 of 73 controls (9.6%). The sensitivity of this test in breast cancer patients was 79.0%. Our results suggest that AHSG and anti-AHSG autoantibody may be useful serum biomarkers for breast cancer screening and diagnosis.

  6. Identification of Autoantibodies to Breast Cancer Antigens in Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    therapies against those targets in patients with breast cancer. Not provided. 80 Leah.Novinger@uvm.edu     Table  of...Develop  Customized  Cancer   Therapies .  UVM  Cell  and   Molecular  Biology  Seminar.  November  30,  2010.     Crossing...J,   Gout ,  I.,  Gordon,  C.  M.,  Williamson,  B.,  Stockert,  E.,  Gure,  A.  O.,  Jäger,  D.,  et  al.

  7. Natural History of Untreated Prostate Specific Antigen Radiorecurrent Prostate Cancer in Men with Favorable Prognostic Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil E. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Life expectancy data could identify men with favorable post-radiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA failure kinetics unlikely to require androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Materials and Methods. Of 206 men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer in a randomized trial of radiation versus radiation and ADT, 53 experienced a PSA failure and were followed without salvage ADT. Comorbidity, age and established prognostic factors were assessed for relationship to death using Cox regression analyses. Results. The median age at failure, interval to PSA failure, and PSA doubling time were 76.6 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 71.8–79.3, 49.1 months (IQR: 37.7–87.4, and 25 months (IQR: 13.1–42.8, respectively. After a median follow up of 4.0 years following PSA failure, 45% of men had died, none from prostate cancer and no one had developed metastases. Both increasing age at PSA failure (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.03–1.25; P=0.008 and the presence of moderate to severe comorbidity (HR: 12.5; 95% CI: 3.81–41.0; P2 years following post-radiation PSA failure appear to be good candidates for observation without ADT intervention.

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cytokine storm and tumor lysis syndrome was the shocking disappearance of the leukemia cells refractory to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. CAR therapy was reproduced in both children and adults with refractory acute lymphoid leukemia. The CAR technology is being explored for solid tumor therapy, such as glioma. Close to 30 clinical trials are underway in the related fields (www.clinicaltrials.gov). Further improvement in gene targeting, cell expansion, delivery constructs (such as using Sleeping Beauty or Piggyback transposons) will undoubtedly enhance clinical utility. It is foreseeable that CAR-engineered T cell therapy will bring targeted cancer therapy into a new era.

  9. Cancer/testis antigens: A prospective reagent as diagnostic and immunotherapeutic targets for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Domae

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous tumor antigens have so far been identified from various tumors using the serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning (SEREX method. Among them, cancer/testis (CT antigens are considered promising target molecules for immunotherapy for patients with various cancers. We performed several SEREX analyses of various cancers to identify CT antigens, including gastric adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and colon cancer, and consequently identified additional CT antigens, such as XAGE-1, CCDC62-2, GKAP1, and TEKT5. However, although SEREX analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC has been performed several times, only a few CT or HNSCC specific antigens have yet been isolated. Compared with other tumors, a small number of studies have been reported on the antigen proteins specific to HNSCC. We here reported the expression of selected CT antigens and their immunogenicity in patients with HNSCC. The results obtained suggested that CCDC62-2, GKAP1, and TEKT5 are immunogenic in HNSCC and also demonstrated their potencies as diagnostic markers for patients with HNSCC in combination with other CT antigens such as NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A3, and MAGE-A4.

  10. Prostate specific antigen level and Gleason score in predicting the stage of newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J A; Chng, W J; Hudson, E; Boon, A P; Whelan, P

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of prostate specific antigen (PSA) level and Gleason score in the prediction of disease stage in men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. 102 consecutive men, newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and candidates for radical therapy, underwent contrast enhanced pelvic CT and skeletal scintigraphy. Staging examinations used the TNM classification and were reported prospectively with the radiologist blinded to the patient's Gleason score and level of PSA. Lymph node metastasis was confirmed by CT guided biopsy, lymphadenectomy or response to therapy in some cases of massive disease. There were significant differences between the mean PSA values of 18 men with and 84 men without skeletal metastases (p = 0.01) and between men with locally confined and non-confined disease (p = 0.02). There was no difference between PSA values of 13 men with and 89 men without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.9). Only one man with CT evidence of nodal metastasis (N + ve) had a PSA value below 20 ng ml-1. Two men with Gleason scores below 6 were N + ve and both had PSA values over 20 ng ml-1. One man with skeletal metastasis had a PSA value below 20 ng ml-1 but had bone pain. For this study group if only those men with PSA values over 20 ng ml-1 had been examined, sensitivity for lymphatic and skeletal metastasis would have been 92%. Using this threshold about one-third would have been spared imaging investigation. In conclusion, pelvic CT and skeletal scintigraphy are unlikely to show metastatic disease in a man newly diagnosed with prostate cancer who has no suggestive clinical features, a PSA level below 20 ng ml-1 and a Gleason score below 6.

  11. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)) and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12 and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing anti-tumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted. PMID:22488274

  12. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Yang, Xiao Yi; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M; Smith, Jonathan; Kim Lyerly, H

    2012-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based replicon particle (VRPs) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and antitumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)), and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12, and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP-IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing antitumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than that of VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted.

  13. Systematic review: Tumor-associated antigen autoantibodies and ovarian cancer early detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Damms-Machado, Antje; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2017-11-01

    Tumor-associated autoantibodies (AAbs), produced as an immune response to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), are a novel pathway of early detection markers. We conducted a systematic review on AAbs and ovarian cancer to summarize the diagnostic performance of individual AAbs and AAb panels. A total of 29 studies including 85 AAbs were included; 27 of the studies were conducted in prevalent cases and cancer-free controls and 2 investigations included pre-diagnosis samples. The majority of studies were hypothesis-driven, evaluating AAbs to target TAAs; 10 studies used screening approaches such as serological expression cloning (SEREX) and nucleic acid-programmable protein arrays (NAPPA). The highest sensitivities for individual AAbs were reported for RhoGDI-AAbs (89.5%) and TUBA1C-AAbs (89%); however, specificity levels were relatively low (80% and 75%, respectively). High sensitivities at high specificities were reported for HOXA7-AAbs for detection of moderately differentiated ovarian tumors (66.7% sensitivity at 100% specificity) and IL8-AAbs in stage I-II ovarian cancer (65.5% sensitivity at 98% specificity). A panel of 11 AAbs (ICAM3, CTAG2, p53, STYXL1, PVR, POMC, NUDT11, TRIM39, UHMK1, KSR1, and NXF3) provided 45% sensitivity at 98% specificity for serous ovarian cancer, when at least 2 AAbs were above a threshold of 95% specificity. Twelve of the AAbs identified in this review were investigated in more than one study. Data on diagnostic discrimination by tumor histology and stage at diagnosis are sparse. Limited data suggest select AAb markers improve diagnostic discrimination when combined with markers such as CA125 and HE4. AAbs for ovarian cancer early detection is an emerging area, and large-scale, prospective investigations considering histology and stage are required for discovery and validation. However, data to date suggests panels of AAbs may eventually reach sufficient diagnostic discrimination to allow earlier detection of disease as a complement to

  14. Review of Cancer Immunotherapy: Application of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Programmed Death 1/Programmed Death-ligand 1 Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Tengfei Zhang; Ling Cao; Zhen Zhang; Dongli Yue; Yu Ping; Hong Li; Lan Huang; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy strategies based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells or antibodies against immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), achieved significant successes from bench to clinic in the past 2 years. CARs are artificial engineered receptors that can specifically target tumor cell surface antigen, activate T cell and further enhance T cell function, independent of major histocompatibility complex. CAR T ...

  15. γ-Radiation promotes immunological recognition of cancer cells through increased expression of cancer-testis antigens in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: γ-radiation is an effective treatment for cancer. There is evidence that radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. It was described that irradiation induces de novo protein synthesis and enhances antigen presentation, we therefore investigated whether γ-radiation results in increased expression of cancer-testis (CT antigens and MHC-I, thus allowing efficient immunological control. This is relevant because the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I on tumor cells is often heterogeneous. We found that the changes induced by γ-radiation promote the immunological recognition of the tumor, which is illustrated by the increased infiltration by lymphocytes after radiotherapy. METHODS/FINDINGS: We compared the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I in various cancer cell lines and fresh biopsies before and after in vitro irradiation (20 Gy. Furthermore, we compared paired biopsies that were taken before and after radiotherapy from sarcoma patients. To investigate whether the changed expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I is specific for γ-radiation or is part of a generalized stress response, we analyzed the effect of hypoxia, hyperthermia and genotoxic stress on the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I. In vitro irradiation of cancer cell lines and of fresh tumor biopsies induced a higher or de novo expression of different CT-antigens and a higher expression of MHC-I in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Importantly, we show that irradiation of cancer cells enhances their recognition by tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. The analysis of paired biopsies taken from a cohort of sarcoma patients before and after radiotherapy confirmed our findings and, in addition showed that irradiation resulted in higher infiltration by lymphocytes. Other forms of stress did not have an impact on the expression of CT-antigens or MHC-I. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that γ-radiation promotes the immunological recognition of the tumor. We therefore propose that

  16. The CA19-9 and Sialyl-TRA Antigens Define Separate Subpopulations of Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Daniel; Liu, Ying; Partyka, Katie; Huang, Ying; Tang, Huiyuan; Hostetter, Galen; Brand, Randall E; Singhi, Aatur D; Drake, Richard R; Haab, Brian B

    2017-06-22

    Molecular markers to detect subtypes of cancer cells could facilitate more effective treatment. We recently identified a carbohydrate antigen, named sTRA, that is as accurate a serological biomarker of pancreatic cancer as the cancer antigen CA19-9. We hypothesized that the cancer cells producing sTRA are a different subpopulation than those producing CA19-9. The sTRA glycan was significantly elevated in tumor tissue relative to adjacent pancreatic tissue in 3 separate tissue microarrays covering 38 patients. The morphologies of the cancer cells varied in association with glycan expression. Cells with dual staining of both markers tended to be in well-to-moderately differentiated glands with nuclear polarization, but exclusive sTRA staining was present in small clusters of cells with poor differentiation and large vacuoles, or in small and ill-defined glands. Patients with higher dual-staining of CA19-9 and sTRA had statistically longer time-to-progression after surgery. Patients with short time-to-progression (<2 years) had either low levels of the dual-stained cells or high levels of single-stained cells, and such patterns differentiated short from long time-to-progression with 90% (27/30) sensitivity and 80% (12/15) specificity. The sTRA and CA19-9 glycans define separate subpopulations of cancer cells and could together have value for classifying subtypes of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  17. Evaluation of Diagnostic Value in Using a Panel of Multiple Tumor-Associated Antigens for Immunodiagnosis of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether a panel of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs would enhance antibody detection, the diagnostic value of autoantibodies to a panel of multiple TAAs in cancer has been evaluated. The TAAs used in this study was composed of eight TAAs including Imp1, p62, Koc, p53, C-myc, Cyclin B1, Survivin, and p16 full-length recombinant proteins. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting were used to detect antibodies in 304 cancer sera and also 58 sera from normal individuals. The antibody frequency to any individual TAA in cancer was variable but rarely exceeded 20%. With the successive addition of TAAs to a final combination of total of eight antigens, there was a stepwise increase of positive antibody reactions reaching a sensitivity of 63.5% and a specificity of 86.2% in the combined cancer group. In different types of cancer, the ranges of positive and negative likelihood ratio were 4.07–4.76 and 0.39–0.51, respectively, and the ranges of positive and negative predictive values were 74.2–88.7% and 58.8–75.8%, respectively. Agreement rate and Kappa value were 67.1% and 0.51, respectively. These results further support our previous hypothesis that detection of anti-TAAs autoantibodies for diagnosis of certain type of cancer can be enhanced by using a miniarray of several TAAs.

  18. Comparison of survival outcomes after recurrence detected by cancer antigen 125 elevation versus imaging study in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, E Sun; Kim, Tae Joong; Lee, Yoo Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Byoung Gie; Bae, Duk Soo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare survival outcomes in two groups of patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with initial recurrence detection by cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) elevation or imaging, and underwent secondary cytoreductive surgery (SCS). A retrospective review of the medical records was performed on 99 recurrent EOC patients who underwent SCS at the Samsung Medical Center between January 2002 and December 2013. For follow-up after primary treatment, patients were routinely assessed by CA-125 levels every 3 months and computed tomography (CT) scan (or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) every 6 months for first 3 years, and by CA-125 every 6 months and CT scan (or MRI) every 12 months thereafter. The first recurrence was initially identified by either CA-125 elevation (n=41, 41.4%) or by imaging study (n=58, 58.6%). None of the patients showed the symptoms as initial sign of recurrence. There were higher percentages of extra-pelvic recurrence (87.8%) and multiple recurrences (78.0%) in the group diagnosed by CA-125 elevation. The proportion of no residual disease after SCS was comparably lower in the CA-125 group (22.0% vs. 72.4%). There were 19 cancer-associated deaths (19.2%) within a median follow-up period of 67 months. The group diagnosed by imaging had better overall survival from initial diagnosis (OS1), overall survival after SCS (OS2), progression-free survival after the initial treatment (PFS1) and progression-free survival after SCS compared to those of the CA-125 group (PFS2). EOC patients with recurrence initially detected by imaging study showed better survival outcomes than patients diagnosed by CA-125 elevation.

  19. REFINEMENT OF AN INDIRECT IMMUNOTOXIN ASSAY OF MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES RECOGNIZING THE HUMAN SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER CLUSTER-2 ANTIGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DERBYSHIRE, EJ; DELEIJ, L; WAWRZYNCZAK, EJ

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) from the Second International Workshop on Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Antigens that recognise the cluster 2 SCLC-associated antigen mediated potent and selective cytotoxic effects in an indirect assay of immunotoxin cytotoxicity. In this assay, the NCI-H69 cell line

  20. Serum Metabolomic Profiles for Human Pancreatic Cancer Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Itoi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the clinical use of serum metabolomics to discriminate malignant cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC from malignant diseases, such as biliary tract cancer (BTC, intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC, and various benign pancreaticobiliary diseases. Capillary electrophoresismass spectrometry was used to analyze charged metabolites. We repeatedly analyzed serum samples (n = 41 of different storage durations to identify metabolites showing high quantitative reproducibility, and subsequently analyzed all samples (n = 140. Overall, 189 metabolites were quantified and 66 metabolites had a 20% coefficient of variation and, of these, 24 metabolites showed significant differences among control, benign, and malignant groups (p < 0.05; Steel–Dwass test. Four multiple logistic regression models (MLR were developed and one MLR model clearly discriminated all disease patients from healthy controls with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.970 (95% confidential interval (CI, 0.946–0.994, p < 0.0001. Another model to discriminate PC from BTC and IPMC yielded AUC = 0.831 (95% CI, 0.650–1.01, p = 0.0020 with higher accuracy compared with tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, pancreatic cancer-associated antigen (DUPAN2 and s-pancreas-1 antigen (SPAN1. Changes in metabolomic profiles might be used to screen for malignant cancers as well as to differentiate between PC and other malignant diseases.

  1. Melanoma-associated antigen expression and the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Stefan; Brands, Roman C; Küchler, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) has been identified in a variety of types of cancer. The expression of several MAGE subgroups is correlated with poor prognosis and chemotherapeutic resistance. One target of chemotherapeutic treatment in head and neck cancer is the epidermal growth factor...... receptor (EGFR). The efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in the context of melanoma-associated antigens is discussed in the present study. Five human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were treated with the EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib. The efficacy of these agents was measured using...... a crystal violet assay. Furthermore, the expression levels of MAGE-A1, -A5, -A8, -A9, -A11 and -A12 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The association between TKI efficacy and MAGE-A expression was analyzed by linear regression. The cell lines revealed...

  2. Prognostic Significance of Digital Rectal Examination and Prostate Specific Antigen in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Joshua A; Shoag, Jonathan E; Mittal, Sameer; Oromendia, Clara; Ballman, Karla V; Hershman, Dawn L; Wright, Jason D; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Nguyen, Paul L; Hu, Jim C

    2017-02-01

    The absence of definitive data or explicit guidelines regarding the use of digital rectal examination for prostate cancer screening may lead to confusion for physicians and patients alike. We evaluated the prognostic value of abnormal digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen following the widespread dissemination of prostate specific antigen testing in the U.S. Collectively, men comprising the screening arm of the PLCO cancer screening trial who underwent digital rectal examination screening (35,350) were followed for 314,033 person-years. Adjusted analyses with competing risks regression were performed to assess the association of suspicious (nodularity, induration, asymmetry) digital rectal examination and abnormal prostate specific antigen (4 ng/ml or greater) with the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer, prostate cancer specific mortality and overall mortality. Among all screening encounters with a suspicious digital rectal examination only 15.4% had a concurrently abnormal prostate specific antigen (McNemar's test p digital rectal examination and abnormal prostate specific antigen were associated with a greater risk of clinically significant prostate cancer (HR 2.21, 95% CI 1.99-2.44 vs HR 5.48, 95% CI 5.05-5.96, p digital rectal examination and abnormal prostate specific antigen on routine screening were independently associated with clinically significant prostate cancer and prostate cancer specific mortality. However, additional research is needed to optimize screening protocols. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prostate-specific antigen bounce following stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Vu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA bounce after brachytherapy has been well-documented. This phenomenon has also been identified in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. While the parameters that predict PSA bounce have been extensively studied in prostate brachytherapy patients, this study is the first to analyze the clinical and pathologic predictors of PSA bounce in prostate SBRT patients. Materials and Methods: Our institution has maintained a prospective database of patients undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer since 2006. Our study population includes patients between May 2006 and November 2011 who have at least 18 months of follow-up. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife treatment system. The prescription dose was 3500-3625cGy in 5 fractions.Results: 120 patients were included in our study. Median PSA follow-up was 24 months (range 18-78 months. 34 (28% patients had a PSA bounce. The median time to PSA bounce was 9 months, and the median bounce size was 0.50ng/mL. On univariate analysis, only younger age (p = .011 was shown to be associated with an increased incidence of PSA bounce. Other patient factors, including race, prostate size, prior treatment by hormones, and family history of prostate cancer, did not predict PSA bounces. None of the tumor characteristics studied, including Gleason score, pre-treatment PSA, T-stage, or risk classification by NCCN guidelines, was associated with increased incidence of PSA bounces. Younger age was the only statistically significant predictor of PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (OR = 0.937, p = 0.009.Conclusion: PSA bounce, which has been reported after prostate brachytherapy, is also seen in a significant percentage of patients after CyberKnife SBRT. Close observation rather than biopsy can be considered for these patients. Younger age was the only factor that predicted PSA bounce.

  4. Human cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marcus O; Hirano, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy, where anti-tumor T cells are first prepared in vitro, is attractive since it facilitates the delivery of essential signals to selected subsets of anti-tumor T cells without unfavorable immunoregulatory issues that exist in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-tumor adoptive T-cell therapy, i.e. infusion of tumor-specific T cells, can induce clinically relevant and sustained responses in patients with advanced cancer. The goal of adoptive cell therapy is to establish anti-tumor immunologic memory, which can result in life-long rejection of tumor cells in patients. To achieve this goal, during the process of in vitro expansion, T-cell grafts used in adoptive T-cell therapy must be appropriately educated and equipped with the capacity to accomplish multiple, essential tasks. Adoptively transferred T cells must be endowed, prior to infusion, with the ability to efficiently engraft, expand, persist, and traffic to tumor in vivo. As a strategy to consistently generate T-cell grafts with these capabilities, artificial antigen-presenting cells have been developed to deliver the proper signals necessary to T cells to enable optimal adoptive cell therapy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA to Exosomal Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Filella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate specific antigen (PSA remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa, in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis.

  6. Investigating the Functional Role of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen and Its Enzymatic Activity in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    7E11-C5. Cancer Res. 50: 6423-6429. 1990. 7. Wright GL Jr., Haley C, Beckett ML, Schellhammer PF. Expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in...normal, benign, and malignant prostate tissues. Urol Oncol. 1:18-28. 1995. 8. Troyer JK, Beckett ML, Wright GL Jr. Detection and characterization of...mixed homogenates (data not shown). Thus, the aggre- gates form in intact cells, not after homogenization. Intracellular abundance of radio -labeled

  7. Prostate cancer detection rate in patients with fluctuating prostate-specific antigen levels on the repeat prostate biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yong Hyun; Lee, Jung Keun; Jung, Jin-Woo; Lee, Byung Ki; Lee, Sangchul; Jeong, Seong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the risk of prostate cancer was different according to the pattern of fluctuation in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients undergoing repeat transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx). Methods: From March 2003 to December 2012, 492 patients underwent repeat TRUS-Bx. The patients were stratified into 3 groups based on the PSA fluctuation pattern: group 1 (continuous elevation of PSA, n=169), group 2 (PSA fluctuation with PSA velocity [PSAV...

  8. Carcinoembryonic antigen measurement in gastric juice. Discovery and elimination of an inhibitory interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg

    1988-01-01

    In biological fluids containing mucus an inhibitory interference on CEA measurement was found. The interference could be eliminated.......In biological fluids containing mucus an inhibitory interference on CEA measurement was found. The interference could be eliminated....

  9. The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and proliferative activity detected by antibody MIB-1 in node-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M; Holm-Nielsen, P

    1995-01-01

    The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and tumour proliferative activity was evaluated in a retrospective series of 118 patients with low-risk breast cancer. Low risk was defined as negative axillary nodes, tumour diameter

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally

    2004-01-01

    ... variation. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) component of the immune system, encoded by highly polymorphic genes that vary across racial/ethnic groups, has been suggested to be a biologically based risk factor for breast cancer and thus...

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally L

    2005-01-01

    .... The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) component of the immune system, coded by highly polymorphic genes whose distribution varies by race/ethnicity, may be a biologically based risk factor for breast cancer and thus may explain...

  12. Immunohistochemical evaluation of a new epithelial antigen, BER-EP4 in ovarian cancer: a propos of 62 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, G; Marras, V; Battista Meloni, G; Dessole, S; Ashqar, N; Cherchi, C; Dessole, F; Cherchi, P L

    2012-01-01

    To assess the immunohistochemical expression of BerEP4, a new epithelial antigen in ovarian cancer. We studied 62 cases of ovarian cancer in which BerEP4, CEA and CA-125 were investigated by an immunohistochemical method. We evaluated the correlations among immunohistochemical positivity and the grading, histotype and stage of disease. BerEP4 was positive in 45 out of 62 cases (72.58%), CA-125 in 36 out of 62 cases (58.06%) and CEA in ten out of 62 cases (16.13%). BerEP4 was present both in serous and in mucinous tumors (80.96% vs. 80.77%). CA-125 was mainly expressed in serous vs mucinous tumors (66.67% vs. 57.69%). CEA was more prevalent in mucinous vs. serous tumors. Ber-EP4 was mainly expressed in G1 (75%) and G2 (77.27%). CA-125 was more present in G1 and G3 (both 62.50%) than G2 (50%), whereas CEA showed positivity in G1: 12.50%, G2: 22.73% and G3: 12.50%. There were no differences among the three antigens studied with regard to clinical stage. In our study Ber-EP4 was positive in 45 out of 62 cases (72.58%) of primary epithelial ovarian cancers. The presence of this antigen seemed to be related to the histotype and grading but not to clinical stage.

  13. Radioimmunoassay in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashkadamov, A.V.; Komissarenko, I.V. (Kievskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Ehndokrinologii i Obmena Veshchestv (Ukrainian SSR))

    1983-08-01

    The paper is concerned with a study of the concentration of thyrotropic hormone (TTH), thyroxine, triidothyronine, thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG), thyroglobulin (TG) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the blood plasma of 69 patients with benign and malignant thyroid tumors. It has been established that the determination of TTH and TBG level can be used as an additional criterion to define the nature of a tumor process in the thyroid gland. A study of TTH and TG levels is of diagnostic importance in patients with recurrences and metastases of thyroidal cancer to the lungs. A study of the level of CEA in the blood is an important parameter in the control over the efficacy of thyroid cancer treatment.

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens in diffuse large B-cell testicular lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kaštelan, Željko; Ilić, Ivana; Levarda-Hudolin, Katarina; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Rieken, Malte; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Juretić, Antonio; Mengus, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) is a rare and lethal disease. The most common histological subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Standard treatments are frequently ineffective. Thus, the development of novel forms of therapy is urgently required. Specific immunotherapy generating immune responses directed against antigen predominantly expressed by cancer cells such as cancer-testis antigens (CTA) may provide a valid alternative treatment for patients bearing PTL...

  15. Evidence for cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against human lung cancer: reconstitution of antigenic epitope with peptide eluted from lung adenocarcinoma MHC class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, R F; Naziruddin, B; Enriquez-Rincon, F; Duffy, B F; Ritter, J M; Sundaresan, S; Patterson, G A; Cooper, J D; Mohanakumar, T

    2000-07-01

    Cancer-associated, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted peptide antigens have been elucidated in human melanomas and ovarian, breast, and renal carcinomas; but relatively little is known about lung cancer antigens. To work toward delineation of lung cancer-associated antigens, we developed tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived cytolytic T cell lines (CTL), autologous lung cancer cell lines, and normal lung cell lines from 17 patients undergoing lung cancer resections. The TILs and CTL lines were subsequently evaluated for markers of activation and specific lysis of autologous or allogeneic lung cancer cell lines or both. Freshly isolated TILs contained a more activated T cell population compared with the patients' peripheral blood T cells as evidenced by an increased expression of HLA-DR, CD25, and CD45RO. TILs isolated from 15 patients lysed allogeneic lung cancer lines. TILs lysed autologous lung cancer but not autologous normal lung or Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cell lines (B-LCL) in 4 of 8 cases tested, suggesting tumor specificity. A CTL line (RHPBL57.1) was generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an HLA-A24(+) patient by stimulation against an established HLA-A24(+) allogeneic lung cancer cell line. RHPBL57.1 lysed the lung cancer cell line in an HLA-A24-restricted manner. Moreover, RHPBL57.1 specifically lysed autologous B-LCL pulsed with peptides, eluted from MHC class I and isolated from the HLA-A24(+) lung cancer cell line. TILs isolated from patients with lung cancer are predominantly an activated population of T cells with evidence of tumor and MHC class I-restricted lysis. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a lung cancer-associated, MHC class I-bound peptide antigen(s) that reconstitutes the epitope recognized by a lung cancer specific CD8(+) T cell line derived from a patient with lung cancer.

  16. Cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation in patients with systemic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gelun; Chen, Li; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Lu, Qiuhong; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage as well as ischemic stroke is one of the common complications among patients with cancer. Ischemic stroke could be the initial manifestation in some patients with cancer. Meanwhile, some patients with cancer also could present cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation, and further studies are required to determine whether these patients have their unique clinical features. To investigate the clinical features and underlying pathogenesis of concealed systemic cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation. The clinical data of patients with concealed systemic cancer who presented cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation registered at the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University from January 2010 to December 2015 were prospectively collected and analyzed. Seventeen systemic cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation (0.02%) were ultimately enrolled from 8,326 patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Three patients had traditional risk factors, but the other 14 patients did not. The common subtypes of malignancy were lung cancer, liver cancer, gastric carcinoma, rectal cancer and melanoma. Most patients (11/17, 64.7%) had elevated plasma levels of cancer biochemical markers, including cancer antigen (CA)125, CA153 and CA199, carcino-embryonic antigen, and alpha fetal protein. Coagulopathy was observed in 15 patients. The concealed systemic cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation may lack conventional vascular risk factors but did present coagulopathy and elevated plasma levels of cancer biochemical markers. Coagulopathy might be responsible for the cerebral hemorrhage.

  17. Breast cancer statistics and markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallika Siva Donepudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D, genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc., and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  18. Factors related to serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and cancer antigen 125 in healthy rural populations in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. K.; Yoo, K. Y.; Park, S. K.; Kang, D. H.; Kim, J. K.; Jeong, Z. K.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    This study examines the levels of carbohydrate antigen 19-9(CA 19-9) and cancer antigen 125(CA125) in serum and its related factors in healthy Korean population. Although CA19-9 and CA125 have been widely used tumor markers for gastroenteric cancers and ovarian cancer in Western countries, there are no information available on the serum levels of CA19-9 and CA125 in healthy population and the factors affecting the levels of these tumor markers in Korea. A cross-sectional study was performed to measure CA19-9 and CA125 among 76 healthy males and 95 healthy females in Korea. CA19-9 and CA125 were quantitated using solid-phase radioimmunoassay kits. Informations on the factors which might be related to the levels of these markers were collected by questionnaire(e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, menstruation, oral pill use, breast-feeding history, etc.). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean of CA19-9 concentration between men(10.4 u/ml) and women (10.1 u/ml), whereas the mean of CA125 levels (11.2 u/ml) was higher in women than that(2.5 u/ml) in men. Although there was a statistically significant association between CA19-9 and average number of cigarette consumed per day (r=0.59, p=0.026) and total number of cigarettes consumed in women (r=0.74, p=0.003), the significance disappeared by multiple regression analysis after adjusting age and body mass index. Later age of menopause(p=0.035) and longer duration of breast-feeding(p=0.050) were significant predictors for CA125 levels in women by multiple regression analysis after adjusting age and body mass index. In conclusion, CA19-9 can be used as a stable tumor marker in clinical practices, however, menstruation and breast-feeding should be considered when CA125 is used in women.

  19. The role of Cancer-Testis antigens as predictive and prognostic markers in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas John

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer-Testis Antigens (CTAs are immunogenic proteins that are poor prognostic markers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We investigated expression of CTAs in NSCLC and their association with response to chemotherapy, genetic mutations and survival. METHODS: We studied 199 patients with pathological N2 NSCLC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC; n = 94, post-operative observation (n = 49, adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 47 or unknown (n = 9. Immunohistochemistry for NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A and MAGE-C1 was performed. Clinicopathological features, response to neoadjuvant treatment and overall survival were correlated. DNA mutations were characterized using the Sequenom Oncocarta panel v1.0. Affymetrix data from the JBR.10 adjuvant chemotherapy study were obtained from a public repository, normalised and mapped for CTAs. RESULTS: NY-ESO-1 was expressed in 50/199 (25% samples. Expression of NY-ESO-1 in the NAC cohort was associated with significantly increased response rates (P = 0.03, but not overall survival. In the post-operative cohort, multivariate analyses identified NY-ESO-1 as an independent poor prognostic marker for those not treated with chemotherapy (HR 2.61, 95% CI 1.28-5.33; P = 0.008, whereas treatment with chemotherapy and expression of NY-ESO-1 was an independent predictor of improved survival (HR 0.267, 95% CI 0.07-0.980; P = 0.046. Similar findings for MAGE-A were seen, but did not meet statistical significance. Independent gene expression data from the JBR.10 dataset support these findings but were underpowered to demonstrate significant differences. There was no association between oncogenic mutations and CTA expression. CONCLUSIONS: NY-ESO-1 was predictive of increased response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Further studies investigating the relationship between these findings and immune mechanisms are warranted.

  20. A comparative study of four serological tumor markers for the detection of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Shawn R; Beason, Kevin L; Bryant, Sabrina; Johnson, James T; Jackson, Margaret; Wilson, Cynthia; Holifield, Kay; Vincent, Charlton; Hall, Margot

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer in the world. Circulating tumor antigens are often used as a minimally invasive tool for noting breast cancer progression. The objective of this study was to compare four tumor antigens (CA 15-3, CA 27.29, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]) for their diagnostic efficacy in breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that CA 15-3 would proved to be superior to CA 27.29, CEA, and AFP in assay performance. Tumor marker assays were performed according to the manufacturers' directions. Assays used in this study were CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 (Fujirebio Diagnostics/Centocor Inc.), AFP (Abbott Inc.), and CEA (Hybritech Inc.). A total of 554 patient samples were obtained from an area hospital, plus 200 healthy adult samples which were used for the determination of normal reference intervals. The patients included patients with no disease (184), with non-malignant disease (11), with breast cancer (87), and with other types of cancer (272). Diagnostic percent sensitivities for each marker were: CA 15-3 (63%), CA 27.29 (39%), CEA (22%), and AFP (22%). Diagnostic specificities for each marker were comparable, ranging from 80-88%. Analytical parameters were evaluated for the assays and compared favorably. We concluded that CA 15-3 was the best tumor antigen for use as a diagnostic aid and monitoring agent.

  1. Coordinated activation of candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens via promoter demethylation in head and neck cancer and lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Smith

    Full Text Available Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, however, proto-oncogenes activated by promoter demethylation have been sporadically reported. We used an integrative method to analyze expression in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and pharmacologically demethylated cell lines to identify aberrantly demethylated and expressed candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens in HNSCC.We noted coordinated promoter demethylation and simultaneous transcriptional upregulation of proto-oncogene candidates with promoter homology, and phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters demonstrated potential recognition sites for the transcription factor BORIS. Aberrant BORIS expression correlated with upregulation of candidate proto-oncogenes in multiple human malignancies including primary non-small cell lung cancers and HNSCC, induced coordinated proto-oncogene specific promoter demethylation and expression in non-tumorigenic cells, and transformed NIH3T3 cells.Coordinated, epigenetic unmasking of multiple genes with growth promoting activity occurs in aerodigestive cancers, and BORIS is implicated in the coordinated promoter demethylation and reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancers.

  2. Coordinated activation of candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens via promoter demethylation in head and neck cancer and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian M; Glazer, Chad A; Mithani, Suhail K; Ochs, Michael F; Sun, Wenyue; Bhan, Sheetal; Vostrov, Alexander; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Lobanenkov, Victor; Gray, Andrew; Liu, Chunyan; Chang, Steven S; Ostrow, Kimberly L; Westra, William H; Begum, Shahnaz; Dhara, Mousumi; Califano, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, however, proto-oncogenes activated by promoter demethylation have been sporadically reported. We used an integrative method to analyze expression in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and pharmacologically demethylated cell lines to identify aberrantly demethylated and expressed candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens in HNSCC. We noted coordinated promoter demethylation and simultaneous transcriptional upregulation of proto-oncogene candidates with promoter homology, and phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters demonstrated potential recognition sites for the transcription factor BORIS. Aberrant BORIS expression correlated with upregulation of candidate proto-oncogenes in multiple human malignancies including primary non-small cell lung cancers and HNSCC, induced coordinated proto-oncogene specific promoter demethylation and expression in non-tumorigenic cells, and transformed NIH3T3 cells. Coordinated, epigenetic unmasking of multiple genes with growth promoting activity occurs in aerodigestive cancers, and BORIS is implicated in the coordinated promoter demethylation and reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancers.

  3. Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) expression increases with high gleason score, advanced stage and bone metastasis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Z; Thomas, G; Yamashiro, J; Shintaku, I P; Dorey, F; Raitano, A; Witte, O N; Said, J W; Loda, M; Reiter, R E

    2000-03-02

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a recently defined homologue of the Thy-1/Ly-6 family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface antigens. PSCA mRNA is expressed in the basal cells of normal prostate and in more than 80% of prostate cancers. The purpose of the present study was to examine PSCA protein expression in clinical specimens of human prostate cancer. Five monoclonal antibodies were raised against a PSCA-GST fusion protein and screened for their ability to recognize PSCA on the cell surface of human prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of PSCA expression was performed on paraffin-embedded sections from 25 normal tissues, 112 primary prostate cancers and nine prostate cancers metastatic to bone. The level of PSCA expression in prostate tumors was quantified and compared with expression in adjacent normal glands. The antibodies detect PSCA expression on the cell surface of normal and malignant prostate cells and distinguish three extracellular epitopes on PSCA. Prostate and transitional epithelium reacted strongly with PSCA. PSCA staining was also seen in placental trophoblasts, renal collecting ducts and neuroendocrine cells in the stomach and colon. All other normal tissues tested were negative. PSCA protein expression was identified in 105/112 (94%) primary prostate tumors and 9/9 (100%) bone metastases. The level of PSCA expression increased with higher Gleason score (P=0.016), higher tumor stage (P=0.010) and progression to androgen-independence (P=0. 021). Intense, homogeneous staining was seen in all nine bone metastases. PSCA is a cell surface protein with limited expression in extraprostatic normal tissues. PSCA expression correlates with tumor stage, grade and androgen independence and may have prognostic utility. Because expression on the surface of prostate cancer cells increases with tumor progression, PSCA may be a useful molecular target in advanced prostate cancer.

  4. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    P, Talamini R, Franceschi S. Population attributable risk for breast cancer: diet , nutrition, and physical exercise. J Natl Cancer Inst 1998;90(5...human leukocyte antigen: distinct DQ and DR alleles are associated with development of gastric cancer and infection by Helicobacter pylori. Cancer Res...2001;61:2684-9. 20 Li Z, Chen D, Zhang C, Li Y, Cao B, Ning T, et al. HLA polymorphisms are associated with Helicobacter pylori infected gastric

  5. Clinicopathological characteristics of patients of certain molecular subtypes and elevated postoperative cancer antigen 15.3 levels and its correlation with menopausal status

    OpenAIRE

    Soumi Saha; Suvro Ganguly; Diptendra Kumar Sarkar; Avijit Hazra

    2016-01-01

    Context: It is well established that breast cancer subtypes differ in their outcome and treatment response. Aim: To observe tumor characteristics of different molecular subgroup and patients with postoperative (PO) raised cancer antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3) group and variation of tumor nature between pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Blood samples and tumor blocks were collected from 95 nonmetastatic female breast cancer patients. Immunohistochemical stains for...

  6. The prostate cancer immunome: In silico functional analysis of antigenic proteins from microarray profiling with IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Coronell, Johana A; Vierlinger, Klemens; Gamperl, Magdalena; Hofbauer, Johann; Berger, Ingrid; Weinhäusel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The study of the immunome of prostate cancer (PCa) and characterization of autoantibody signature from differentially reactive antigens can uncover disease stage proteins, reveal enriched networks and even expose aberrant cellular mechanisms during the disease process. By conducting plasma IgG profiling on protein microarrays presenting 5449 unique human proteins expressed in 15 417 E. coli human cDNA expression clones, we elucidated 471 (21 higher reactive in PCa) differentially reactive antigens in 50 PCa versus 49 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) at initial diagnosis. Functional analyzes show that the immune-profile of PCa compared to BPH control samples is significantly enriched in features targeting Cellular assembly, Cell death and pathways involved in Cell cycle, translation, and assembly of proteins as EIF2 signaling, PCa related genes as AXIN1 and TP53, and ribosomal proteins (e.g. RPS10). An overlap of 61 (out of 471) DIRAGs with the published 1545 antigens from the SEREX database has been found, however those were higher reactive in BPH. Clinical relevance is shown when antibody-reactivities against eight proteins were significantly (p < 0.001) correlated with Gleason-score. Herewith we provide a biological and pathophysiological characterization of the immunological layer of cancerous (PCa) versus benign (BPH) disease, derived from antibody profiling on protein microarrays. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

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    Anna Pagotto

    Full Text Available The Cancer/Testis (CT antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150 and MAGE-C1(900-1116 were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  8. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT) antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Anna; Caballero, Otavia L; Volkmar, Norbert; Devalle, Sylvie; Simpson, Andrew J G; Lu, Xin; Christianson, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150) and MAGE-C1(900-1116) were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  9. Bioimpedance and chronoamperometry as an adjunct to prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu DS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Darci Schiavon de AbreuDepartment of Urology, Hospital Unimed de Limeira, Sao Paulo, BrazilBackground: Bioimpedance is an electrical property of living tissue that has been shown to be a safe technique when used in a number of biomedical applications. The aim of this research was to assess the utility of bioimpedance measurement as a rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive adjunct to digital rectal examination and PSA in differentiating tumor from normal prostatic tissue.Methods: Three hundred men were examined for signs and symptoms of prostate disorders. 147 patients with a digital rectal examination indicating a positive result underwent a prostate-specific antigen (PSA test. A biopsy was advised for 103 of the men, of whom 50 completed the study. Before undergoing biopsy, an examination with the EIS (electro interstitial scan system using bioimpedance and chronoamperometry was performed. In reference to the biopsy results (negative or positive, a statistical analysis of the EIS data and PSA was conducted using receiver operating characteristic curves to determine the specificity and sensitivity of each test.Results: The PSA test had a sensitivity of 73.9% and specificity of 51.9% using a cutoff value >4 and a sensitivity of 52.2% and specificity of 81.5% using a cutoff value ≥5.7 and P = 0.03. The delta of the electrical conductivity (DE of the left foot-right foot pathway had a sensitivity of 62.5% and specificity of 85.2%, with a cutoff value ≤-5 and P = 0.0001. Algorithms comprising the delta of electrical conductivity and PSA showed a sensitivity of 91.5% and a specificity of 59.3%, with a cutoff value ≤-10.52 and P = 0.0003.Conclusion: The EIS system had a very good specificity of 85.2%. However, the sensitivity of 62.5% would be a problem. Using a PSA reference >4.1 ng/mL, the adjunctive use of bioimpedance and chronoamperometry provided by EIS technology could raise the sensitivity from 73.9% to 91.5% and the specificity from 51

  10. Mass screening of prostate cancer in a Chinese population: the relationship between pathological features of prostate cancer and serum prostate specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Li, Yu-Lin; Wu, Shan; Wang, Yi-Shu; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Pan, Yu-Zhuo; Zhang, Ling; Tateno, Hiroo; Sato, Ikuro; Kuwahara, Masaaki; Zhao, Xue-Jian

    2005-06-01

    To investigate the pathological features of the prostate biopsy through mass screening for prostate cancer in a Chinese cohort and their association with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA). A total of 12027 Chinese men in Changchun were screened for prostate cancer by means of the serum total prostate specific antigen tPSA test (by Elisa assay). Transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic six-sextant biopsies were performed on those whose serum tPSA value was > 4.0 ng/mL and those who had obstructive symptoms (despite their tPSA value) and were subject to subsequent pathological analysis with the aid of the statistic software SPSS 10.0 (SPSS. Inc., Chicago. USA). Of the 12027 cases, 158 (including 137 patients whose serum tPSA values were 4.0 ng/mL and 21 patients [serum tPSA sextant biopsies was established (r = 0.406, P first to conduct mass screening for prostate cancer by testing for serum tPSA values and the first to investigate the pathological features of prostate cancer in a cohort of Chinese men. Our results reveal that the moderately differentiated carcinoma is the most common type of prostate cancer. This study also has shown that the serum tPSA value in prostate cancer is associated with the Gleason score and the size of tumor.

  11. Current status of chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell-based and immune checkpoint blockade-based cancer immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Upendra P; Mukherji, Bijay

    2017-05-11

    Adoptive cell therapies with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T cells (CAR-T) and immune checkpoint inhibition (ICI)-based cancer immunotherapies have lately shown remarkable success in certain tumor types. CAR-T cell-based therapies targeting CD19 can now induce durable remissions as well as prolong disease-free survival of patients with CD19 positive treatment refractory B cell malignancies and ICI-based therapies with humanized monoclonal antibodies against the T cell inhibitory receptors CTLA-4 and PD-1 as well as against the PD-1 ligand, PD-L1, can now achieve durable remissions as well as prolongation of life of a sizeable fraction of patients with melanoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-small cell cancers. Most importantly, these immuno-therapeutic treatment modalities have raised the possibility of achieving long-term "containment" as well as "cures" for certain types of cancer. While this represents major advances in cancer immunotherapy, both modalities come with considerable toxicities, including fatalities. Although more work will be needed to bring CAR-T cell-based therapies to the bedside for most major cancers and a good deal more will be needed to make ICI-alone or in combination with other treatment modalities-work more consistently and across most major cancers, these two treatment modalities stand out as superb examples of successful translation of bench research to the bedside as well as represent real progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Prostate-specific antigen-based population screening for prostate cancer: current status in Japan and future perspective in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Namiki, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    In Western countries, clinical trials on prostate cancer screening demonstrated a limited benefit for patient survival. In the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing remains very low compared with Western countries, and the benefits of population-based screening remain unclear. This review describes the current status of population screening and diagnosis for prostate cancer in Japan and discusses the efficacy of population screening for the Asian population. Since the 1990s, screening systems have been administered by each municipal government in Japan, and decreases in the prostate cancer mortality rate are expected in some regions where the exposure rate to PSA screening has increased markedly. A population-based screening cohort revealed that the proportion of metastatic disease in cancer detected by screening gradually decreased according to the increased exposure rate, and a decreasing trend in the proportion of cancer with high serum PSA levels after population screening was started. The prognosis of the prostate cancer detected by population screening was demonstrated to be more favorable than those diagnosed outside of the population screening. Recent results in screening cohorts demonstrated the efficacy of PSA. These recent evidences regarding population-based screening in Japan may contribute to establishing the optimal prostate cancer screening system in Asian individuals.

  13. Prostate-specific antigen-based population screening for prostate cancer: current status in Japan and future perspective in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Kitagawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Western countries, clinical trials on prostate cancer screening demonstrated a limited benefit for patient survival. In the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing remains very low compared with Western countries, and the benefits of population-based screening remain unclear. This review describes the current status of population screening and diagnosis for prostate cancer in Japan and discusses the efficacy of population screening for the Asian population. Since the 1990s, screening systems have been administered by each municipal government in Japan, and decreases in the prostate cancer mortality rate are expected in some regions where the exposure rate to PSA screening has increased markedly. A population-based screening cohort revealed that the proportion of metastatic disease in cancer detected by screening gradually decreased according to the increased exposure rate, and a decreasing trend in the proportion of cancer with high serum PSA levels after population screening was started. The prognosis of the prostate cancer detected by population screening was demonstrated to be more favorable than those diagnosed outside of the population screening. Recent results in screening cohorts demonstrated the efficacy of PSA. These recent evidences regarding population-based screening in Japan may contribute to establishing the optimal prostate cancer screening system in Asian individuals.

  14. Multiplex flow cytometry barcoding and antibody arrays identify surface antigen profiles of primary and metastatic colon cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sukhdeo

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a deadly disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Current treatment challenges include management of disease burden as well as improvements in detection and targeting of tumor cells. To identify disease state-specific surface antigen signatures, we combined fluorescent cell barcoding with high-throughput flow cytometric profiling of primary and metastatic colon cancer lines (SW480, SW620, and HCT116. Our multiplexed technique offers improvements over conventional methods by permitting the simultaneous and rapid screening of cancer cells with reduced effort and cost. The method uses a protein-level analysis with commercially available antibodies on live cells with intact epitopes to detect potential tumor-specific targets that can be further investigated for their clinical utility. Multiplexed antibody arrays can easily be applied to other tumor types or pathologies for discovery-based approaches to target identification.

  15. SSX cancer testis antigens are expressed in most multiple myeloma patients: co-expression of SSX1, 2, 4, and 5 correlates with adverse prognosis and high frequencies of SSX-positive PCs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, B.J.; Reiman, T.; Pittman, J.A.; Keats, J.J.; Bruijn, D.R.H. de; Mant, M.J.; Belch, A.R.; Pilarski, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are tumor-specific antigens that may be useful targets for cancer vaccines. Here, CTA expression was examined in multiple myeloma (MM), a B-cell cancer characterized by malignant plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined

  16. The prognostic benefit of tumour-infiltrating Natural Killer cells in endometrial cancer is dependent on concurrent overexpression of Human Leucocyte Antigen-E in the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, M A C; Marchal, S; Plat, A; de Bock, G H; van Hall, T; de Bruyn, M; Hollema, H; Nijman, H W

    2017-11-01

    Human Leucocyte Antigen- E (HLA-E) has been reported as both a positive and negative prognostic marker in cancer. This apparent discrepancy may be due to opposing actions of HLA-E on tumour-infiltrating immune cells. Therefore, we evaluated HLA-E expression and survival in relation to the presence of intratumoural natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Tissue microarrays (TMAs) of endometrial tumours were used for immunohistochemical staining of parameters of interest. The combined impact of clinical, pathological and immune parameters on survival was analysed using log rank testing and Cox regression analyses. Upregulation of HLA-E was associated with an improved disease-free and disease-specific survival in univariate analysis (HR 0.58 95% CI 0.37-0.89; HR 0.42 95% CI 0.25-0.73, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the presence of NK cells predicts survival with a hazard ratio (HR) 0.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09-0.91) when HLA-E expression is upregulated; but it is associated with a worse prognosis when HLA-E expression is normal (HR 13.43, 95% CI 1.70-106.14). By contrast, the prognostic benefit of T cells was not modulated by HLA-E expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that the prognostic benefit of NK cells, but not T-cells, is influenced by HLA-E expression in endometrial cancer (EC) and propose a model to explain our observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The high prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer at autopsy: implications for epidemiology and treatment of prostate cancer in the Prostate-specific Antigen-era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J

    2015-12-15

    Widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening detects many cancers that would have otherwise gone undiagnosed. To estimate the prevalence of unsuspected prostate cancer, we reviewed 19 studies of prostate cancer discovered at autopsy among 6,024 men. Among men aged 70-79, tumor was found in 36% of Caucasians and 51% of African-Americans. This enormous prevalence, coupled with the high sensitivity of PSA screening, has led to the marked increase in the apparent incidence of prostate cancer. The impact of PSA screening on clinical practice is well-recognized, but its effect on epidemiologic research is less appreciated. Before screening, a larger proportion of incident prostate cancers had lethal potential and were diagnosed at advanced stage. However, in the PSA era, overall incident prostate cancer mainly is indolent disease, and often reflects the propensity to be screened and biopsied. Studies must therefore focus on cancers with lethal potential, and include long follow-up to accommodate the lead time induced by screening. Moreover, risk factor patterns differ markedly for potentially lethal and indolent disease, suggesting separate etiologies and distinct disease entities. Studies of total incident or indolent prostate cancer are of limited clinical utility, and the main focus of research should be on prostate cancers of lethal potential. © 2014 UICC.

  18. Initial prostate biopsy: development and internal validation of a biopsy-specific nomogram based on the prostate cancer antigen 3 assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, J.; Auprich, M.; Ahyai, S.A.; Taille, A. De La; Poppel, H. van; Marberger, M.; Stenzl, A.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Huland, H.; Fisch, M.; Abbou, C.C.; Schalken, J.A.; Fradet, Y.; Marks, L.S.; Ellis, W.; Partin, A.W.; Pummer, K.; Graefen, M.; Haese, A.; Walz, J.; Briganti, A.; Shariat, S.F.; Chun, F.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) assay in combination with established clinical risk factors improves the identification of men at risk of harboring prostate cancer (PCa) at initial biopsy (IBX). OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate internally the first IBX-specific PCA3-based

  19. Treating cancer as an infectious disease--viral antigens as novel targets for treatment and potential prevention of tumors of viral etiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Guo Wang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 20% of human cancers worldwide have an infectious etiology with the most prominent examples being hepatitis B and C virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma and human papilloma virus-associated cervical cancer. There is an urgent need to find new approaches to treatment and prevention of virus-associated cancers.Viral antigens have not been previously considered as targets for treatment or prevention of virus-associated cancers. We hypothesized that it was possible to treat experimental HPV16-associated cervical cancer (CC and Hepatitis B-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by targeting viral antigens expressed on cancer cells with radiolabeled antibodies to viral antigens. Treatment of experimental CC and HCC tumors with (188Re-labeled mAbs to E6 and HBx viral proteins, respectively, resulted in significant and dose-dependent retardation of tumor growth in comparison with untreated mice or mice treated with unlabeled antibodies.This strategy is fundamentally different from the prior uses of radioimmunotherapy in oncology, which targeted tumor-associated human antigens and promises increased specificity and minimal toxicity of treatment. It also raises an exciting possibility to prevent virus-associated cancers in chronically infected patients by eliminating cells infected with oncogenic viruses before they transform into cancer.

  20. Juzentaihoto Failed to Augment Antigen-Specific Immunity but Prevented Deterioration of Patients’ Conditions in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer under Personalized Peptide Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Yutani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Juzentaihoto (JTT is a well-known Japanese herbal medicine, which has been reported to modulate immune responses and enhance antitumor immunity in animal models. However, it is not clear whether JTT has similar effects on humans. In particular, there is little information on the effects of JTT in antigen-specific immunity in cancer patients. Here we conducted a randomized clinical study to investigate whether combined usage of JTT could affect antigen-specific immunity and clinical findings in advanced pancreatic cancer patients undergoing personalized peptide vaccination (PPV, in which HLA-matched vaccine antigens were selected based on the preexisting host immunity. Fifty-seven patients were randomly assigned to receive PPV with (n=28 or without (n=29 JTT. Unexpectedly, JTT did not significantly affect cellular or humoral immune responses specific to the vaccine antigens, which were determined by antigen-specific interferon-γ secretion in T cells and antigen-specific IgG titers in plasma, respectively. Nevertheless, JTT prevented deterioration of patients’ conditions, such as anemia, lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia, plasma IL-6 elevation, and reduction of performance status, which are frequently observed in advanced cancers. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical study that examined the immunological and clinical effects of JTT in cancer patients undergoing immunotherapy in humans.

  1. Immunogenetic Profiling for Gastric Cancers Identifies Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans as Major and Functional B Cell Antigens in Human Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroto; Komura, Daisuke; Konishi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Asami; Kakiuchi, Miwako; Sato, Reiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Shogo; Tatsuno, Kenji; Oshima, Takashi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Shumpei

    2017-08-01

    Recent successes in tumor immunotherapies have highlighted the importance of tumor immunity. However, most of the work conducted to date has been on T cell immunity, while the role of B cell immunity in cancer remains more elusive. In this study, immunogenetic repertoire profiling for tumor-infiltrating B and T cells in gastric cancers was carried out to help reveal the architecture of B cell immunity in cancer. Humoral immunity in cancer was shown to involve oligoclonal expansions of tumor-specific and private B cell repertoires. We find that B cell repertoires in cancer are shaped by somatic hypermutation (SHM) either with or without positive selection biases, the latter of which tended to be auto-reactive. Importantly, we identified sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) as major functional B cell antigens among gastric tumors. Furthermore, natural anti-sulfated GAG antibodies discovered in gastric cancer tissues showed robust growth-suppressive functions against a wide variety of human malignancies of various organs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polyaniline modified flexible conducting paper for cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Sen, Anindita; Kumar, Suveen; Augustine, Shine; Malhotra, Bansi D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com [Nanobioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Delhi 110042 (India); Yadav, Birendra K. [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, Delhi 110085 (India); Mishra, Sandeep [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-05-16

    We report results of studies relating to the fabrication of a flexible, disposable, and label free biosensing platform for detection of the cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrochemically deposited over gold sputtered paper (Au@paper) for covalent immobilization of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antibodies (anti-CEA). The bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been used for blocking nonspecific binding sites at the anti-CEA conjugated PANI/Au@Paper. The PANI/Au@Paper, anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper, and BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@Paper platforms have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results of the electrochemical response studies indicate that this BSA/anti-CEA/PANI/Au@paper electrode has sensitivity of 13.9 μA ng{sup −1} ml cm{sup 2}, shelf life of 22 days, and can be used to estimate CEA in the range of 2–20 ng ml{sup −1}. This paper sensor has been validated by detection of CEA in serum samples of cancer patients via immunoassay technique.

  3. Enhanced stimulation of anti-breast cancer T cells responses by dendritic cells loaded with poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle encapsulated tumor antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soodabeh Iranpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing safe and effective cancer vaccine formulations is a primary focus in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DC are currently employed as cellular vaccine in clinical trials of tumor immunotherapy. Recognizing the critical role of DCs in initiating anti-tumor immunity has resulted in the development of several strategies that target vaccine antigens to DCs to trigger anti-tumor T cell responses. To increase the efficiency of antigen delivery systems for anti-tumor vaccines, encapsulation of tumor-associated antigens in polymer nanoparticles (NPs has been established. Methods In this study, the effect of tumor lysate antigen obtained from three stage III breast cancer tissues encapsulated within PLGA NPs to enhance the DC maturation was investigated. The T-cell immune response activation was then fallowed up. Fresh breast tumors were initially used to generate tumor lysate antigens containing poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA NP. The encapsulation efficiency and release kinetics were profiled. The efficiency of encapsulation was measured using Bradford protein assays measuring the dissolved NPs. The stability of released antigen from NPs was verified using SDS-PAGE. To evaluate the hypothesis that NPs enhances antigen presentation, including soluble tumor lysate, tumor lysate containing NPs and control NPs the efficiency of NP-mediated tumor lysate delivery to DCs was evaluated by assessing CD3+ T-cell stimulation after T cell/and DCs co-culture. Results The rate of encapsulation was increased by enhancing the antigen concentration of tumor lysate. However, increasing the antigen concentration diminished the encapsulation efficiency. In addition, higher initial protein contenting NPs led to a greater cumulative release. All three patients released variable amounts of IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-4 in response to re-stimulation. T cells stimulated with lysate-pulsed DCs induced a substantial increase in

  4. Bioimpedance and chronoamperometry as an adjunct to prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Darci Schiavon

    2011-01-01

    Bioimpedance is an electrical property of living tissue that has been shown to be a safe technique when used in a number of biomedical applications. The aim of this research was to assess the utility of bioimpedance measurement as a rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive adjunct to digital rectal examination and PSA in differentiating tumor from normal prostatic tissue. Three hundred men were examined for signs and symptoms of prostate disorders. 147 patients with a digital rectal examination indicating a positive result underwent a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. A biopsy was advised for 103 of the men, of whom 50 completed the study. Before undergoing biopsy, an examination with the EIS (electro interstitial scan) system using bioimpedance and chronoamperometry was performed. In reference to the biopsy results (negative or positive), a statistical analysis of the EIS data and PSA was conducted using receiver operating characteristic curves to determine the specificity and sensitivity of each test. The PSA test had a sensitivity of 73.9% and specificity of 51.9% using a cutoff value >4 and a sensitivity of 52.2% and specificity of 81.5% using a cutoff value ≥5.7 and P = 0.03. The delta of the electrical conductivity (DE) of the left foot-right foot pathway had a sensitivity of 62.5% and specificity of 85.2%, with a cutoff value ≤-5 and P = 0.0001. Algorithms comprising the delta of electrical conductivity and PSA showed a sensitivity of 91.5% and a specificity of 59.3%, with a cutoff value ≤-10.52 and P = 0.0003. The EIS system had a very good specificity of 85.2%. However, the sensitivity of 62.5% would be a problem. Using a PSA reference >4.1 ng/mL, the adjunctive use of bioimpedance and chronoamperometry provided by EIS technology could raise the sensitivity from 73.9% to 91.5% and the specificity from 51.9% to 59.3% in prostate cancer screening.

  5. Tumor markers in metastatic breast cancer subtypes: frequency of elevation and correlation with outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerushalmi, R; Tyldesley, S; Kennecke, H; Speers, C; Woods, R; Knight, B; Gelmon, K A

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the correlations between tumor markers (TMs), breast cancer subtypes, site(s) of metastasis and prognosis. Women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer were included. Breast cancer subtypes were defined as LuminalA, LuminalB, LuminalHer2, Her2, Basal and non-Basal triple negative (TN). Levels of elevation of TM values [cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 125 (CA 125)] among the subtypes were analyzed. Site(s) of metastasis and outcomes were captured. Eight hundred and ten patients were included. Luminal subtypes were associated with an elevation in at least one TM: 90.8% of LuminalHer2+, 90% of LuminalB and 88.6% of LuminalA. TMs were less frequently elevated in Basal (74.1%) and non-Basal TN (71.4%) cases (P Breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was significantly worse for patients with elevated TMs (P = 0.001). TM elevation of CA 15-3, CEA and/or CA 125 was documented in the majority of patients with metastatic breast cancer with CA 15-3 occurring most commonly. Luminal subtypes expressed elevated TMs significantly more frequently compared with the non-Luminal groups. TM elevation was not different between the different sites of metastasis. Overall, elevated TMs predicted a worse BCSS.

  6. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies against Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    gene. GET FOR GATA TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS. Carlos Perez-Stable, and B. A Roos, Miami VA Med Center/GRECC, Miami, FL, and Univ of Miami Sch of #121...WR, Heston WD: Expression of the prostate- specific membrane antigen. Cancer Res 1994;54:1807-1811. 7. Silver DA, Pellicer I, Fair WR, Heston WD...Prostate: Basic and Clinical Aspects. R. K. Naz, CRC Press: 267-298. 26. Heston, W. D. W. S., D.A. Pellicer , I. Fair, W.R. Cordon-Cardo, C. (1996

  7. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses and dendritic cells expressing prostate-specific antigens is effective in eliciting CTL and suppresses tumor growth in the experimental prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Jee-Boong; Lee, Geon Kook; Chang, Jun

    2009-06-15

    Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men in the US. Immunological approaches may provide an alternative option for prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. To develop vaccine against prostate cancer using mouse model, we constructed three recombinant adenoviruses expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (rAd/PSMA), prostate stem cell antigen (rAd/PSCA) and six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate (rAd/STEAP), that were specifically up-regulated in the transgenic murine prostate cancer. Male C57BL/6 mice were immunized by intravenous injection of these recombinant adenoviruses and subsequently by subcutaneous injection of dendritic cells pulsed with TRAMP-C1 tumor lysate. After subcutaneous challenge with TRAMP-C1 cells, tumor growth was significantly delayed in the immunized mice compared to the control group. Surprisingly, significant numbers of STEAP-specific CD8 T cells were detected in the peripheral blood and the spleen of immune mice using MHC I tetramers, and injection of rAd/STEAP alone followed by pulsed DC was sufficient to inhibit tumor growth. Therapeutic vaccination also significantly delayed the growth of pre-established tumors. Our results suggest that STEAP is a good immunologic target antigen against prostate cancer and our vaccination regimen successfully elicits anti-tumor CTL responses and suppresses tumor growth. More studies will expedite the development of this vaccine toward clinical application.

  8. Dutasteride treatment over 2 years delays prostate-specific antigen progression in patients with biochemical failure after radical therapy for prostate cancer: Results from the randomised, placebo-controlled avodart after radical therapy for Prostate Cancer Study (ARTS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H. Schröder (Fritz); C.H. Bangma (Chris); A.F. Angulo; A. Alcaraz (Antonio); J.F. Colombel (Jean Frédéric); T.A. McNicholas (Tom); T.L. Tammela (Teuvo); I.M. Nandy (Indrani); R. Castro (Ramiro)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical therapy are indicative of recurrent or residual prostate cancer (PCa). This biochemical recurrence typically predates clinically detectable metastatic disease by several years. Management of patients with biochemical

  9. Relapsed Colon Cancer Patient Presenting With Hematuria 13 Years After Primary Tumor Resection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ho Huang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of postoperative colon cancer recurrence who presented with hematuria 13 years after resection of the primary colonic cancer. The patient was 72 years of age and underwent surgical resection of sigmoid colon cancer at another regional hospital in 1994. Since June 2007, this patient has complained of hematuria and bloody stool. On physical examination, tenderness and a hard, indurated mass was palpable in the lower mid-abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a metastatic tumor at the lower midline peritoneum with invasion of the adjacent abdominal wall. Her serum carcinoembryonic antigen level was elevated to 32 ng/dL. Histopathology revealed metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma in the jejunum and abdominal wall.

  10. Plasma TIMP-1 and CEA in detection of primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J; Brünner, Nils; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2011-01-01

    and independent detectors of CRC. Combining both biomarkers, independent contributions from each (TIMP-1, odds ratio (OR) = 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-2.2), p = 5 ng/ml, OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.9-2.7 (p ...Objective. The combination of plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) may be valuable biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). A prospective, population based study was performed to validate this hypothesis. Material and methods....... Plasma was obtained before endoscopy and TIMP-1 and CEA levels were determined after the inclusion of all individuals. Results. Findings were based on sigmoidoscopy in 1766 and colonoscopy in 2743 individuals. Colon cancer (CC) was detected in 184 and rectal cancer in 110 individuals. Ten individuals...

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Chemotherapy Naïve Men with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer and Low Baseline Prostate Specific Antigen Treated with Enzalutamide vs Placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Armstrong, Andrew J; Lin, Ping; Krivoshik, Andrew; Phung, De; Parli, Teresa; Tombal, Bertrand; Beer, Tomasz M

    2017-12-01

    Metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer with low baseline prostate specific antigen represents an early stage in the natural history of castration resistant prostate cancer progression (low volume disease), low prostate specific antigen producing disease or disease that is less dependent on androgen receptor biology (high volume disease). We analyzed outcomes in men with low prostate specific antigen and a high disease burden who received the oral androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide in the PREVAIL (Safety and Efficacy Study of Oral MDV3100 in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients with Progressive Metastatic Prostate Cancer) study. In this exploratory analysis low baseline prostate specific antigen was defined as less than 10 ng/ml. Post hoc analyses included radiographic progression-free and overall survival in the once daily enzalutamide and placebo arms. Patients were stratified post hoc by high volume disease, defined as more than 4 bone metastases and/or visceral disease, and low volume disease, defined as 4 or fewer bone metastases with no visceral disease. Of 1,717 patients enrolled in PREVAIL 242 (14.1%) had low baseline prostate specific antigen, including 110 with high volume disease. Enzalutamide decreased the risk of radiographic progression relative to placebo in patients with low baseline prostate specific antigen (HR 0.20, 95% CI 0.10-0.42). This decrease was irrespective of tumor burden (high volume disease HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.51 and low volume disease HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09-0.70). Median overall survival was not reached in patients with low baseline prostate specific antigen in either treatment arm. Chemotherapy naïve men with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer and low baseline prostate specific antigen irrespective of disease burden may benefit from enzalutamide. This indicates that targeting the androgen receptor signaling pathway is a therapeutic option in similar patients. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association

  12. The potential of antigen and TriMix sonoporation using mRNA-loaded microbubbles for ultrasound-triggered cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dewitte, Heleen; Van Lint, Sandra; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; De Smedt, Stefaan; Breckpot, Karine; Lentacker, Ine

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines, where the patient's own immune system is harnessed to target and destroy tumor tissue, have emerged as a potent therapeutic strategy. In the development of such DC vaccines, it is crucial to load the DCs with tumor antigens, and to simultaneously activate them to become more potent antigen-presenting cells. For this, we report on microbubbles, loaded with both antigen mRNA as well as immunomodulating TriMix mRNA, which can be used for the ultrasound-...

  13. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2013-10-08

    The unique expression pattern and immunogenic properties of cancer/testis antigens make them ideal targets for immunotherapy of cancer. The MAGE-A3 cancer/testis antigen is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and vaccination with MAGE-A3 in patients with MAGE-A3-positive NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC. Tumor biopsies from normal lung tissue and from a large cohort (n = 169) of NSCLC patients were examined for GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of these antigens was further matched to clinical and pathological features using univariate cox regression analysis. GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens were not expressed in normal lung tissue, while SP17 was expressed in ciliated lung epithelia. The frequency of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 expression in NSCLC tumors were 26.0% (44/169), 11.8% (20/169) and 4.7% (8/169), respectively, and 33.1% (56/169) of the tumors expressed at least one of these antigens. In general, the expression of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was not significantly associated with a specific histotype (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), but high-level GAGE expression (>50%) was more frequent in squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the frequency of GAGE expression was demonstrated to be significantly higher in stage II-IIIa than stage I NSCLC (17.0% vs. 35.8%; p = 0.02). Analysis of the relation between tumor expression of GAGE and NY-ESO-1 and survival endpoints revealed no significant associations. Our study demonstrates that GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigens are candidate targets for immunotherapy of NSCLC and further suggest that multi-antigen vaccines may be beneficial.

  14. Six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate as an immunotherapeutic target for renal cell and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azumi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Aoki, Naoko; Sato, Keisuke; Kimura, Shoji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Tateno, Masatoshi

    2010-05-01

    T-cell based immunotherapy for renal cell and bladder cancer is one of the most promising therapeutic approaches. STEAP is a novel cell surface protein that is over expressed in various cancers, including renal cell and bladder cancer. Recently we induced STEAP specific helper T lymphocytes that recognize the naturally processed STEAP peptide epitopes STEAP(102-116) and STEAP(192-206) arising from STEAP expressing tumor cells. Thus, STEAP may be a useful tumor associated antigen for designing T-cell based immunotherapy. We determined whether STEAP could induce anti-cellular immune responses to urological cancer. We selected 2 previously described STEAP derived epitope peptides, STEAP(102-116) and STEAP(192-206), and examined their ability to elicit helper T-lymphocyte responses by in vitro vaccination of CD4 T lymphocytes from healthy individuals and patients with cancer. STEAP peptides induced helper T-lymphocyte responses using lymphocytes from healthy individuals that directly recognized STEAP expressing, DR positive renal cell and bladder cancer cells, and autologous dendritic cells pulsed with STEAP expressing tumor cell lysates in a major histocompatibility complex class II restricted manner. These peptides also stimulated T-cell responses in patients with renal cell or bladder cancer. Each STEAP peptides behaved as a promiscuous T-cell epitope, in that they stimulated T cells in the context of multiple major histocompatibility complex class II alleles. Results show that STEAP helper T-lymphocyte epitopes could be used to optimize T-cell based immunotherapy against STEAP expressing renal cell and bladder cancer. 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid and ultrasensitive flexible palladium nano-thin film biosensing electrode development for cancer antigen HER2 detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Tzu; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Wei; Su, Chien-Hao; Hsu, Guo-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Ching

    HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) is one of the significant surface antigens of breast cancer Trace amount of HER2 protein in human serum is highly correlated to the tumor progression in breast cancers especially in the cases of recurrence. Therefore, HER2 detection of human serum is significant for early detection of cancer recurrence. Conventional HER2 detection approaches may not be sensitive enough or contain highly false positive rate or time consuming for accurate detection. Therefore, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific sensing is highly desired. By using HER2 specific binding peptide functionalized palladium thin film electrochemical electrode the HER2 protein concentration can be determined at sub-nanogram level by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) within 10 mins. The Pd nano-film is sputtered on the flexible plastics substrate and reduces the cost of this electrode. Due to the low cost of the electrode, it is designed as a disposable biosensing probe which may reduce the concern of human sample contamination. The self-management after breast cancer operation may be feasible in the near future. Keywords: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS), breast cancer, biosensor Corresponding author: ccchang01@faculty.nctu.edu.tw; Cheeshin Technology Co. Collaboration.

  16. MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen expression during human gonadal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are expressed in several cancers and during normal adult male germ cell differentiation. Little is known about their role in fetal development of human germ cells. METHODS: We examined expression of the CTAs MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 in fetal gonads...... by single and double immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: We found that GAGE was expressed in the primordial germ cells of the gonadal primordium, whereas MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1 were first detected in germ cells of both testis and ovary after sexual differentiation was initiated. The number of positive germ...... cells and the staining intensity of all three CTAs peaked during the second trimester and gradually decreased towards birth in both male and female germ cells. In oocytes, MAGE-A1 expression terminated around birth, whereas NY-ESO-1 expression persisted through the neonatal stage and GAGE expression...

  17. Understanding prostate-specific antigen dynamics in monitoring metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizokami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of novel hormonal therapies as well as docetaxel and cabazitaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has changed the outlook for this group of patients with improvements in progression-free survival and overall survival. Physicians often diagnose the progression of prostate cancer using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. However, serum PSA is not always correlated with the clinical status in CRPC. To evaluate the PSA dynamics with greater precision, understanding of the control of PSA and of the mechanisms of development of CRPC is needed. Moreover, it is necessary to use new hormonal therapies with an appropriate timing to optimally improve the prognosis and the QOL of the patients. In the present review, we ascertain the PSA dynamics and the mechanisms of the development of CRPC to assist in optimal utilization of the new treatments for mCRPC.

  18. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo-Motoyama, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Tsuchida, Akiko [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Noguchi Institute, 1-8-1 Kaga, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-0003 (Japan); Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Furukawa, Keiko [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chubu University College of Life and Health Sciences, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai 487-8501 (Japan); Urano, Takeshi [Department of Biochemistry, Shimane University School of Medicine, Izumo 693-8501 (Japan); Furukawa, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry II, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-0065 (Japan)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  19. The potential of antigen and TriMix sonoporation using mRNA-loaded microbubbles for ultrasound-triggered cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Heleen; Van Lint, Sandra; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Breckpot, Karine; Lentacker, Ine

    2014-11-28

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines, where the patient's own immune system is harnessed to target and destroy tumor tissue, have emerged as a potent therapeutic strategy. In the development of such DC vaccines, it is crucial to load the DCs with tumor antigens, and to simultaneously activate them to become more potent antigen-presenting cells. For this, we report on microbubbles, loaded with both antigen mRNA as well as immunomodulating TriMix mRNA, which can be used for the ultrasound-triggered transfection of DCs. In vivo experiments with in vitro sonoporated DCs show the effective induction of antigen-specific T cells, resulting in specific lysis of antigen-expressing cells. Especially in a therapeutic setting, sonoporation with TriMix has an important added value, resulting in a significant reduction of tumor outgrowth and a marked increase in overall survival. What is more, complete tumor regression was observed in 30% of the antigen+TriMix DC vaccinated animals, which also displayed long-term antigen-specific immunological memory. As a result, DC sonoporation using microbubbles loaded with a combination of antigen and TriMix mRNA can elicit powerful immune responses in vivo, and might serve as a potential tool for further in vivo DC vaccination applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum induces immune responses to cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1 and maturation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobergslien, Anne; Vasovic, Vlada; Mathiesen, Geir; Fredriksen, Lasse; Westby, Phuong; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Peng, Qian; Sioud, Mouldy

    2015-01-01

    Given their safe use in humans and inherent adjuvanticity, Lactic Acid Bacteria may offer several advantages over other mucosal delivery strategies for cancer vaccines. The objective of this study is to evaluate the immune responses in mice after oral immunization with Lactobacillus (L) plantarum WCFS1 expressing a cell-wall anchored tumor antigen NY-ESO-1. And to investigate the immunostimulatory potency of this new candidate vaccine on human dendritic cells (DCs). L. plantarum displaying NY-ESO-1 induced NY-ESO-1 specific antibodies and T-cell responses in mice. By contrast, L. plantarum displaying conserved proteins such as heat shock protein-27 and galectin-1, did not induce immunity, suggesting that immune tolerance to self-proteins cannot be broken by oral administration of L. plantarum. With respect to immunomodulation, immature DCs incubated with wild type or L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 upregulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secreted a large amount of interleukin (IL)-12, TNF-α, but not IL-4. Moreover, they upregulated the expression of immunosuppressive factors such as IL-10 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Although L. plantarum-matured DCs expressed inhibitory molecules, they stimulated allogeneic T cells in-vitro. Collectively, the data indicate that L. plantarum-NY-ESO-1 can evoke antigen-specific immunity upon oral administration and induce DC maturation, raising the potential of its use in cancer immunotherapies.

  1. Vaccines Targeting the Cancer Testis Antigen SSX-2 Elicit HLA-A2 Epitope-Specific Cytolytic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heath A.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer-testis antigen SSX-2 is a potentially attractive target for tumor immunotherapy based upon its tissue-restricted expression to germline cells and its frequent expression in malignancies. The goal of the current study was to evaluate a genetic vaccine encoding SSX-2 to prioritize HLA-A2-specific epitopes and determine if a DNA vaccine can elicit SSX-2-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) capable of lysing prostate cancer cells. HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were identified based on their in vitro binding affinity for HLA-A2 and by the ability of a genetic vaccine to elicit peptide-specific CTL in A2/DR1 (HLA-A2.1+/HLA-DR1+/H-2 class I-/class II-knockout) transgenic mice. We found that SSX-2 peptides p41-49 (KASEKIFYV) and p103-111 (RLQGISPKI) had high affinity for HLA-A2 and were immunogenic in vivo, however peptide p103-111 was immunodominant with robust peptide-specific immune responses elicited in mice vaccinated with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding SSX-2. Furthermore, p103-111-specific CTL were able to lyse an HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cell line. The immunodominance of this epitope was found not to be due to a putative HLA-DR1 epitope (p98-112) flanking p103-111. Finally, we demonstrated that SSX-2 epitope-specific CTL could be detected and cultured from the peripheral blood of HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients, notably patients with advanced prostate cancer. Overall, we conclude that SSX-2 peptide p103-111 is an immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope, and epitope-specific CD8+ T cells can be detected in patients with prostate cancer, suggesting that tolerance to SSX-2 can be circumvented in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that SSX-2 may be a relevant target antigen for prostate cancer vaccine approaches. PMID:21904219

  2. Detection rate of prostate cancer using prostate specific antigen in patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavan P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Need for undertaking prostate biopsies for detection of prostate cancer is often decided on the basis of serum levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA. Aim: To evaluate the case detection rate of prostate cancer among patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS on the basis of PSA levels and to assess the scope of prostate biopsy in these patients. Setting and Design: A retrospective study from a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The clinical and histopathological data of 922 patients presenting with LUTS in the last five years was obtained from the medical record section. They had been screened for prostate cancer using PSA and /or digital rectal examination examination followed by confirmation with prostate biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used: Detection rate and receiver operating characteristic curve were performed using SPSS 16 and Medcalc softwares. Results: The detection rate of prostate cancer according to the PSA levels was 0.6%, 2.3%, 2.5%, 34.1% and 54.9% in the PSA range of 0-4, 4-10, 10-20, 20-50 and> 50 ng/ml, respectively. Maximum prostate cancer cases were detected beyond a PSA value of 20 ng/ml whereas no significant difference in the detection rate was observed in the PSA range of 0-4, 4-10 and 10-20 ng/ml. Conclusion: A low detection rate of prostate cancer observed in the PSA range of 4-20 ng/ml in LUTS patients indicates the need for use of higher cutoff values of PSA in such cases. Therefore we recommend a cutoff of 20 ng/ml of PSA for evaluation of detection rate of prostate cancer among patients presenting with LUTS.

  3. Increasing level of prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer risk factors among 193 men examined in screening procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Edyta; Michalak, Anna; Stoma, Filip; Latalski, Maciej; Goniewicz, Mariusz

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men, therefore has become recently an essential problem of public health. The factors influencing cancer include: androgens metabolism disorders, diabetes mellitus, overweight and obesity, smoking, alcohol and black coffee intake, diet rich in saturated fats and poor in unsaturated, lack of physical activity, geographical zone, race, such carcinogenic substances as: cadmium, materials used in rubber, painting, printing, ship industry etc., contagious factors and also older age and a positive family history of the disease. To diagnose prostate cancer in its early stage such screening procedures as physical examination--digital rectal exam (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in blood serum are used. The aim of the study was to assess prostate cancer risk factors occurrence in the examined 193 men, aged 50-70 years, who reported to urology outpatient department at Clinical Hospital in Lublin, measure the PSA level in blood serum and examine the correlation between them. Respondents filled in a questionnaire about the presence of prostate cancer risk factors and urogenital symptoms. The questionnaire was completed with DRE and PSA measurement. The results led us to the following conclusions: 1/ in the studied population elevated PSA level is determined in 3.1% of 193 examined men, 2/ increased PSA occurs mainly in men from rural areas, with elementary education, divorced, older (>60 years), using fat-rich diet, smokers, black coffee drinkers, with overweight or obesity and non diabetic, 3/ a combination of PSA test with DRE seems to be useful and rather cheap for the detection of prostate cancer in the early stage of its development.

  4. Trends in prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Canada during the era of prostate-specific antigen screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, James; Shane, Amanda; Tonelli, Marcello; Connor Gorber, Sarah; Joffres, Michel; Singh, Harminder; Bell, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Widespread use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to screen for prostate cancer began in the early 1990s. Advocates for screening assert that this has caused a decrease in prostate cancer mortality. We sought to describe secular changes in prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Canada in relation to the onset of PSA screening. Age-standardized and age-specific prostate cancer incidence (1969-2007) and mortality (1969-2009) from Public Health Agency of Canada databases were analyzed by joinpoint regression. Changes in incidence and mortality were related to introduction of PSA screening. Prior to PSA screening, prostate cancer incidence increased from 54.2 to 99.8 per 100 000 between 1969 and 1990. Thereafter, incidence increased sharply (12.8% per year) to peak at 140.8/100 000 in 1993. After decreasing in all age groups between 1993 and 1996, incidence continued to increase for men aged less than 70 years, but decreased for older men. Age-standardized mortality was stable from 1969 to 1977, increased 1.4% per year to peak in 1995 and subsequently decreased at 3.3% per year; the decline started from 1987 in younger men (age prostate cancer mortality began before PSA screening was widely used and were larger than could be anticipated from screening alone. These findings suggest that screening caused artifactual increase in incidence, but no more than a part of reductions in prostate cancer mortality. The reduction may be due to changing treatment or certification of death.

  5. Role of Antigen Spread and Distinctive Characteristics of Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulley, J.L.; Madan, R.A.; Pachynski, R.; Mulders, P.; Sheikh, N.A.; Trager, J.; Drake, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy is an important breakthrough in cancer. US Food and Drug Administration-approved immunotherapies for cancer treatment (including, but not limited to, sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, and atezolizumab) substantially improve overall survival across multiple

  6. Identification of Threshold Prostate Specific Antigen Levels to Optimize the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer by Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Guided Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A.; George, Arvin K.; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Prostate

  7. NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 coexpression with MAGE-A cancer/testis antigens: a tissue microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolli, Martin; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Zajac, Paul; Guller, Ulrich; Feder, Chantal; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Carafa, Vincenza; Terracciano, Luigi; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Tornillo, Luigi

    2005-07-20

    The characterization of the expression pattern of different families of cancer/testis (C/T) antigens in different tumors, at the protein level, might be of relevance in the development of multiantigen vaccine preparations for active specific immunotherapy. We have used tissue microarray (TMA) technology to explore in large numbers of tumor specimens the expression of NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 C/T antigens and its correlation with MAGE-A expression by using D8.38 and 57B monoclonal antibodies (MAb). The epitopes recognized by these reagents in C/T antigens were identified by molecular mapping by using a bacterial expression system. Out of 2,052 samples, 119 (5.8%) scored positive upon staining with D8.38 NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1-specific MAb. Expression in >10% of cases was detectable in melanoma and basalioma (31.6 and 18.2%, respectively), large cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung (17.8 and 10.5%, respectively), stomach adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type (13.2%), pT2-4 bladder TCC (18.2%), nonseminomatous carcinomas of the testis (10.4%) and liposarcomas (15.4%). Simultaneous expression of NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 and MAGE-A C/T antigens was then addressed in a TMA where 101/845 and 73/845 samples (12 and 8.6%, respectively) showed evidence of MAGE-A or NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 specific staining, respectively. In 35/845 specimens (4.1%) concomitant expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 was observed (p = 0.0002). Discrepancies in the expression of NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 and MAGE-A were conspicuously detectable in squamous cell carcinomas of the skin (MAGE-A positive but NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 negative) and in liposarcomas (NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 positive, but MAGE-A negative). Taken together, these data suggest novel areas of application of C/T antigens targeted active specific immunotherapy possibly based on multiantigen vaccine preparations. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. MMP13 is potentially a new tumor marker for breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Jen; Yang, Ming-Je; Yang, Yu-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsueh, Er-Jung; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2009-11-01

    Within the past decade, the incidence of breast cancer in Taiwan has been rising year after year. Breast cancer is the first most prevalent cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in Taiwan. The early stage of breast cancer not only have a wider range of therapeutic options, but also obtain a higher success rate of therapy than those with advanced breast cancer. A test for tumor markers is the most convenient method to screen for breast cancer. However, the tumor markers currently available for breast cancer detection include carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 15.3 (CA15.3), and carbohydrate antigen 27.29 (CA27.29) exhibited certain limitations. Poor sensitivity and specificity greatly limits the diagnostic accuracy of these markers. This study aims to identify potential tumor markers for breast cancer. At first, we analyzed genes expression in infiltrating lobular carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma, and infiltrating ductal carcinoma of paired specimens (tumor and normal tissue) from breast cancer patients using microarray technology. We selected 371 overexpressed genes in all of the three cell type. In advanced breast cancer tissue, we detected four genes MMP13, CAMP, COL10A1 and FLJ25416 from 25 overexpressed genes which encoded secretion protein more specifically for breast cancer than other genes. After validation with 15 pairs of breast cancer tissue and paired to normal adjacent tissues by membrane array and quantitative RT-PCR, we found MMP13 was 100% overexpressed and confirmed to be a secreted protein by Western blot analysis of the cell culture medium. The expression level of MMP13 was also measured by immunohistochemical staining. We suggest that MMP13 is a highly overexpressed secretion protein in breast cancer tissue. It has potential to be a new tumor marker for breast cancer diagnosis.

  9. Carbohydrate structure and differential binding of prostate specific antigen to Maackia amurensis lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Chikara; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yoshikawa, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Arai, Yoichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    2004-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay is widely used for detection of prostate cancer. Because PSA is also synthesized from normal prostate, false positive diagnosis cannot be avoided by the conventional serum PSA test. To apply the cancer-associated carbohydrate alteration to the improvement of PSA assay, we first elucidated the structures of PSA purified from human seminal fluid. The predominant core structure of N-glycans of seminal fluid PSA was a complex type biantennary oligosaccharide and was consistent with the structure reported previously. However, we found the sialic acid alpha2-3 galactose linkage as an additional terminal carbohydrate structure on seminal fluid PSA. We then analyzed the carbohydrate moiety of serum PSA from the patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy using lectin affinity chromatography. Lectin binding was assessed by lectin affinity column chromatography followed by determining the amount of total and free PSA. Concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Aleuria aurantia, Sambucus nigra, and Maackia amurensis lectins were tested for their binding to the carbohydrates on PSA. Among the lectins examined, the M. amurensis agglutinin-bound fraction of free serum PSA is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to benign prostate hypertrophy patients. The binding of PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, was also confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These results suggest that the differential binding of free serum PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy could be a potential measure for diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  10. Identification of salt-inducible kinase 3 as a novel tumor antigen associated with tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenfuprasert, S; Yang, Y-Y; Lee, Y-C; Chao, K-C; Chu, P-Y; Lai, C-R; Hsu, K-F; Chang, K-C; Chen, Y-C; Chen, L-T; Chang, J-Y; Leu, S-J; Shih, N-Y

    2011-08-18

    Existence of humoral immunity has been previously demonstrated in malignant ascitic fluids. However, only a limited number of immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) were identified, and few of which are associated with ovarian cancer. Here, we identified salt-inducible kinase 3 (SIK3) as a TAA through screening of a random peptide library in the phage display system. Overexpression of SIK3 markedly promoted cell proliferation, attenuated p21(Waf/Cip1) and p27(Kip) expressions in low-grade OVCAR3 cells, and permitted the cells to grow in mice. Decrease in SIK3 expression in high-grade SK-OV3 cells consistently demonstrated its tumorigenic potency by modulating the protein levels of cell cycle regulators. When the expressions of SIK3 and CA125 were compared in cancer tissues, immunohistochemical (IHC) studies indicated that cytoplasm-localized SIK3 was highly expressed in 55% of the ovarian cancer samples. In contrast, it was rarely detected in adenomyosis, leiomyoma and normal ovary tissues, showing its higher specificity (97%) to CA125 (65%) in ovarian cancer. Moreover, experiments using pharmacological inhibitors to block SIK3-induced p21(Waf/Cip1) expression revealed that activation of c-Src and phosphoinositide-3-kinase were critically required for its biological activity, suggesting that they are the downstream signaling mediators of SIK3. These data were further supported by IHC studies, showing coexpression of c-Src with SIK3 in 85% of the ovarian tumor samples stained positive for SIK3. Collectively, our findings indicate that SIK3 is a novel ovarian TAA. Overexpression of SIK3 promotes G1/S cell cycle progression, bestows survival advantages to cancer cells for growth and correlates the clinicopathological conditions of patients with ovarian cancer.

  11. Enhancive effects of Lewis y antigen on CD44-mediated adhesion and spreading of human ovarian cancer cell line RMG-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Juanjuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to investigate the molecular structural relationship between cell adhesive molecule CD44 and Lewis y antigen, and determine the effects of Lewis y antigen on CD44-mediated adhesion and spreading of ovarian cancer cell line RMG-I and the Lewis y antigen-overexpressed cell line RMG-I-H. Methods The expression of CD44 in RMG-I and RMG-I-H cells before and after treatment of Lewis y monoclonal antibody was detected by immunocytochemistry; the expression of Lewis y antigen and CD44 was detected by Western Blot. The structural relationship between Lewis y antigen and CD44 was determined by immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The adhesion and spreading of RMG-I and RMG-I-H cells on hyaluronic acid (HA were observed. The expression of CD44 mRNA in RMG-I and RMG-I-H cells was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Results Immunocytochemistry revealed that the expression of CD44 was significantly higher in RMG-I-H cells than in RMG-I cells (P P P P P > 0.05. Conclusion Lewis y antigen strengthens CD44-mediated adhesion and spreading of ovarian cancer cells.

  12. Rising cancer antigen 125 level and the type and timing of treatment for recurrent ovarian cancer: a clinical dilemma, but what would women do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, James D; Juraskova, Ilona; Anderson, Caroline; Nattress, Kathryn; Beale, Philip; Lopez, Anna-Lena; Carter, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Clinical uncertainty currently exists for the timing of treatment for women with epithelial ovarian cancer who are under surveillance for their first recurrence and have rising cancer antigen 125 levels. This study ascertained women's preferences for this clinical scenario and the impact of regular surveillance on psychosocial well-being. Women with a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer who had completed primary treatment and were in surveillance for their first recurrence were eligible to participate. Treatment preferences were ascertained using the Prospective Measure of Preference, and psychological well-being was ascertained using a series of psychological scales. Women (n = 21) had highly variable preferences for the type and timing of second-line treatment when basing their decision on rising cancer antigen 125 levels. Around half indicated a preference against treatment and were willing to trade life expectancy (WTT) to avoid chemotherapy (WTT = 0.45) or tamoxifen (WTT = 0.50). For these women, strong preferences against treatment were reflected in high Prospective Measure of Preference utility scores (0.15 for chemotherapy and 0.19 for tamoxifen). The negative experience of chemotherapy, the uncertainty about tamoxifen's effectiveness, and remaining symptom-free influenced these decisions. The remaining women indicated they would begin chemotherapy or tamoxifen immediately. These women believed taking early steps to treatment was positive and a coping mechanism; however, some revealed unrealistic expectations of treatment. Most women reported good levels of psychological well-being and were coping with ongoing surveillance. Women in surveillance for recurrent ovarian cancer have highly variable preferences, and their reasons for their treatment choices are diverse. Therefore, although uncertainty exists for this clinical scenario, treatment preference should be ascertained on an individual basis.

  13. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    NAc-glycosylation promoted presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class II molecules and the MUC1 antigen elicited specific Ab production and T cell proliferation in both Balb/c and HLA-A2 transgenic mice. In contrast, GalNAc-glycosylation inhibited the presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class I...... and abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells......., and presentation on MHC class I and II molecules. The effect of GalNAc O-glycosylation was monitored with a model system based on ovalbumin (OVA)-MUC1 fusion peptides (+/- glycosylation) loaded onto dendritic cells co-cultured with IL-2 secreting OVA peptide-specific T cell hybridomas. To evaluate the in vivo...

  14. Cancer-testis antigens PRAME and NY-ESO-1 correlate with tumour grade and poor prognosis in myxoid liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iura, Kunio; Kohashi, Kenichi; Hotokebuchi, Yuka; Ishii, Takeaki; Maekawa, Akira; Yamada, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao

    2015-07-01

    Myxoid liposarcoma is the second most common liposarcoma. Although myxoid liposarcoma is relatively chemosensitive and thus a good candidate for chemotherapy, cases with relapsed or metastatic disease still have poor outcome. Here, we performed a gene microarray analysis to compare the gene expression profiles in six clinical myxoid liposarcoma samples and three normal adipose tissue samples, and to identify molecular biomarkers that would be useful as diagnostic markers or treatment targets in myxoid liposarcoma. This showed that the cancer-testis antigen PRAME was up-regulated in myxoid liposarcoma. We then performed immunohistochemical, western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses to quantify the expression of PRAME and another cancer-testis antigen, NY-ESO-1, in clinical samples of myxoid liposarcoma (n = 93), dedifferentiated (n = 46), well-differentiated (n = 32) and pleomorphic liposarcomas (n = 14). Immunohistochemically, positivity for PRAME and NY-ESO-1 was observed in 84/93 (90%) and 83/93 (89%) of the myxoid liposarcomas, and in 20/46 (43%) and 3/46 (7%) of the dedifferentiated, 3/32 (9%) and 1/32 (3%) of the well-differentiated and 7/14 (50%) and 3/21 (21%) of the pleomorphic liposarcomas, respectively. High immunohistochemical expression of PRAME and/or NY-ESO-1 was significantly correlated with tumour diameter, the existence of tumour necrosis, a round-cell component of >5%, higher histological grade and advanced clinical stage. High PRAME and NY-ESO-1 expression correlated significantly with poor prognosis in a univariate analysis. The myxoid liposarcomas showed significantly higher protein and mRNA expression levels of PRAME and NY-ESO-1 (CTAG1B) than the other liposarcomas. In conclusion, PRAME and NY-ESO-1 (CTAG1B) were expressed in the vast majority of myxoid liposarcomas, and their high-level expression correlated with tumour grade and poor prognosis. Our results support the potential use of PRAME and NY

  15. Simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression of melanoma antigen-A family and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens represents an independent marker for poor survival in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Simon; Atanackovic, Djordje; Luetkens, Tim; Knecht, Rainald; Busch, Chia-Jung; Freytag, Marcus; Spagnoli, Giulio; Ritter, Gerd; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Knuth, Alexander; Sauter, Guido; Wilczak, Waldemar; Blessmann, Marco; Borgmann, Kerstin; Muenscher, Adrian; Clauditz, Till S

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients remains poor. The identification of high-risk subgroups is needed for the development of custom-tailored therapies. The expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) has been linked to a worse prognosis in other cancer types; however, their prognostic value in HNSCC is unclear because only few patients have been examined and data on CTA protein expression are sparse. A tissue microarray consisting of tumor samples from 453 HNSCC patients was evaluated for the expression of CTA proteins using immunohistochemistry. Frequency of expression and the subcellular expression pattern (nuclear, cytoplasmic, or both) was recorded. Protein expression of melanoma antigen (MAGE)-A family CTA, MAGE-C family CTA and NY-ESO-1 was found in approximately 30, 7 and 4% of tumors, respectively. The subcellular expression pattern in particular had a marked impact on the patients' prognosis. Median overall survival (OS) of patients with (i) simultaneous cytoplasmic and nuclear expression compared to (ii) either cytoplasmic or nuclear expression and (iii) negative patients was 23.0 versus 109.0 versus 102.5 months, for pan-MAGE (p < 0.0001), 46.6 versus 50.0 versus 109.0 for MAGE-A3/A4 (p = 0.0074) and 13.3 versus 50.0 versus 100.2 months for NY-ESO-1 (p = 0.0019). By multivariate analysis, these factors were confirmed as independent markers for poor survival. HNSCC patients showing protein expression of MAGE-A family members or NY-ESO-1 represent a subgroup with an extraordinarily poor survival. The development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeting these CTA may, therefore, be a promising approach to improve the outcome of HNSCC patients. © 2014 UICC.

  16. Increased Avidity of the Sambucus nigra Lectin-Reactive Antibodies to the Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen as a Potential Biomarker for Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kurtenkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine whether the naturally occurring Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF antigen-specific antibodies differ in avidity between cancer patients and controls to find a novel biomarker for stomach cancer. Methods. Serum samples were taken from patients with cancer and controls. The level of TF-specific antibodies and their sialylation were determined using ELISA with synthetic TF-polyacrylamide conjugate as antigen and sialic acid-specific Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA. The avidity was determined using ammonium thiocyanate as a chaotrope. Results. A significantly higher SNA lectin binding to anti-TF antibodies was found in cancer patients irrespective of disease stage. The avidity of only IgM TF-specific antibodies was significantly higher in cancer patients compared to controls. The SNA-positive anti-TF antibodies of cancer patients showed a significantly higher avidity, P<0.001. The sensitivity and specificity of this increase for gastric cancer were 73.53% and 73.08%, respectively, with a 73.2% diagnostic accuracy. The higher avidity of SNA-reactive anti-TF antibodies was associated with a benefit in survival of stage 3 cancer patients. Conclusion. The SNA-reactive TF-specific antibodies display a significantly higher avidity in gastric cancer patients compared to controls, which can be used as a potential serologic biomarker for gastric cancer. It appears that IgM is the main target responsible for the above changes.

  17. Transient human anti-mouse antibody generated with immune enhancement in a carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunoassay after surgical resection of recurrent cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Keiichi; Yasuda, Keiko; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Moriyama, Takanori; Kahata, Kaoru; Shimizu, Chikara

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of transient human anti-mouse antibody from a 64-year-old man in a carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunoassay using an AIA 1800 analyser that generated immune enhancement after surgical resection of recurrent cancer. The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 concentration was measured using an AIA 1800 analyser and a UniCel Dxl 800. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography was carried out on a Superose 12 column to estimate the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elution profile using an AIA 1800 analyser. To determine whether IgM in the patient contributed to the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunoassay, immunoprecipitation was performed. Furthermore, mouse immunoglobulins were added to the patient's serum to verify that the patient's IgM reacted with it. The carbohydrate antigen 19-9 concentration was >400 and 9.5 kU/L using an AIA 1800 analyser and using a UniCel Dxl 800, respectively. In the single carbohydrate antigen 19-9 peak, the molecular weight corresponded to IgM by size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography on a Superose 12 column. In the immunoprecipitation reaction and addition of mouse immunoglobulins, there was interference for anti-human IgM and mouse immunoglobulins whose recoveries were 3.2 and 14.2%, respectively. These results indicated that IgM in the patient's serum interfered with the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunoassay using an AIA 1800 analyser. A novel transient human anti-mouse antibody generated with immune activation in a carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunoassay using an AIA 1800 analyser was identified in a patient with rectal cancer after surgical resection. These findings demonstrate the importance of monitoring tumour markers in patients after treatment with mouse monoclonal antibody. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Relationship between apoptosis and immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, N; Jinn, Y; Tsukada, Y; Inase, N; Ichioka, M; Yoshizawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between apoptosis and cellular proliferative activity in human non-small cell lung cancer (25 cases) was investigated using the in situ DNA nick-end labeling method and immunohistochemistry for both proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67 antigen. Comparison of the distribution of Ki-67-positive cells to that of apoptotic cells shows an inverse correlation in semi-serial sections. The PCNA labeling rates were closely correlated with Ki-67 labeling rates in non-small cell lung cancer. It was concluded that the immunostainings of PCNA and Ki-67 were almost equally valuable for assessing the proliferative activity in paraffin-embedded tissue from non-small cell lung cancer and that apoptosis may be related with the cell cycle in this cancer.

  19. Evaluation of urinary prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG score changes when starting androgen-deprivation therapy with triptorelin 6-month formulation in patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Pineiro, L.; Schalken, J.A.; Cabri, P.; Maisonobe, P.; Taille, A. De La; Study, G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess prostate cancer antigen-3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2-ERG scores in patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer at baseline and after 6 months of treatment with triptorelin 22.5 mg, and analyse these scores in patient-groups defined by different disease characteristics.

  20. Identification of Anti-tumor Cells Carrying Natural Killer (NK Cell Antigens in Patients With Hematological Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Krzywinska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46, natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA+RO+ phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA+RO− phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA+RO+ cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias.

  1. Cancer Antigen 72-4 for the Monitoring of Advanced Tumors of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Lung, Breast and Ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariampillai, Anusiyanthan Isaac; Cruz, Josephine Pineda Dela; Suh, Jason; Sivapiragasam, Abirami; Nevins, Kyle; Hindenburg, Alexander A

    2017-07-01

    Cancer antigen CA72-4 is a tumor marker found to be elevated in a variety of human adenocarcinomas. Using the DRG TM-CA72-4, we quantified the elevation of CA72-4 compared to current United States Food And Drug Administration-approved tumor markers in various cancer types. We conducted a prospective, single-center study enrolling 96 patients between March 2013 and August 2016 with different locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic cancer known to express CA72-4. Quantification of CA72-4 was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions using the DRG TM-CA72-4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and the positivity rates were calculated. CA72-4 expression varied with tumoral site of origin, with the highest positivity rates found in pancreatic and ovarian malignancies. Correlation with clinical activity was also noted in some patients. CA72-4 may have a potential role as an adjunct to conventional biomarkers in disease monitoring of pancreatic, ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Prostate specific antigen only androgen independent prostate cancer: natural history, challenges in management and clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Charles J; Beer, Tomasz M

    2007-09-01

    There is no current standard of care for patients with nonmetastatic androgen independent prostate cancer, a condition defined by increasing serum prostate specific antigen despite anorchid testosterone levels and no radiographic evidence of metastases. A consensus panel was convened to review data and propose a strategy for trial design and prioritization. Published literature on the natural history of nonmetastatic androgen independent prostate cancer was reviewed. A panel discussion was held, focusing on reviewing current and past trials, and the development of research priorities for patients in this disease state. Based on 1 report the natural history of nonmetastatic androgen independent prostate cancer is relatively long but heterogeneous. External validation of these published findings has not been performed. Clinical trial design in this setting is impeded by heterogeneity and lack of knowledge about the natural history, prolonged time to clinical end points, such as the development of metastases or death, and a lack of knowledge about how intermediate end points, eg the development of bone metastases, are related to the long-term outcome, eg survival. In clinical practice a reluctance to use therapies with substantial toxicity as well as a lack of outcome data on such patients leaves a vacuum in which there is no standard of care, although secondary hormonal manipulations are widely used. Further research is needed to define the natural history of this disease state, educate patients and clinicians about its distinct natural history and develop informative clinical trial designs suited to this patient population.

  3. Profiling the humoral immune response in colon cancer patients: diagnostic antigens from Streptococcus bovis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjalsma, H.; Scholler-Guinard, M.; Lasonder, E.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Willems, H.L.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    The human bowel contains a large and dynamic bacterial population that is not only essential for intestinal health, but also critical for the development of diseases such as cancer. In this respect, the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus bovis has been associated with colon cancer for many years.

  4. Definition and scope of the surgical treatment in patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Ahmedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in lungs is a relatively new trend of modern oncology. In this connection, still there are no clearly formulated criteria for patient selection for this type of intervention, approaches to repeated resections and scope of the surgical operation in case of multiple lesions. Established key prognostic factors include lesion of intrathoracic lymph nodes, timing of the development of metastatic disease, baseline level of carcinoembryonic antigen, number of foci and the volume of metastatic lesion, stage of the disease. Options for surgical access include lateral thoracotomy, sternotomy, thoracoscopy and thoracoscopy combined with additional minithoracotomy.If a patient has a single peripheral metastatic lesions, physician should prefer thoracoscopic operations. One of their advantages include minimum development of adhesions and possibility of subsequent re-thoracoscopy. Resection of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (R0 resection rate allows to achieve persistent healing of the tumor process in a significant number of patients.

  5. Penile Metastasis from Prostate Cancer Presenting as Malignant Priapism Detected Using Gallium-68 Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Balasundararaj, Barani Kumar Pollachi; Jose, Raghi; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2018-01-01

    Gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography (Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT) is a promising diagnostic tool for patients with prostate cancer. Penile metastasis from prostate cancer is a rare phenomenon that infrequently manifests as malignant priapism. We present a case of 79-year-old patient diagnosed as a case of adenocarcinoma prostate presenting with penile metastases imaged using Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT.

  6. NY-ESO-1 autoantibody as a tumor-specific biomarker for esophageal cancer: screening in 1969 patients with various cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yoko; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Nanami, Tatsuki; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Nomura, Fumio; Kainuma, Osamu; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Soda, Hiroaki; Ueda, Takeshi; Iizasa, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoto; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nagata, Matsuo; Yokoi, Sana; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Ohtsuka, Seiko; Kuwajima, Akiko; Murakami, Akihiro; Kaneko, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Although serum NY-ESO-1 antibodies (s-NY-ESO-1-Abs) have been reported in patients with esophageal carcinoma, this assay system has not been used to study a large series of patients with various other cancers. Serum samples of 1969 cancer patients [esophageal cancer (n = 172), lung cancer (n = 269), hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 91), prostate cancer (n = 358), gastric cancer (n = 313), colorectal cancer (n = 262), breast cancer (n = 365)] and 74 healthy individuals were analyzed using an originally developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system for s-NY-ESO-1-Abs. The optical density cut-off value, determined as the mean plus three standard deviations for serum samples from the healthy controls, was fixed at 0.165. Conventional tumor markers were also evaluated in patients with esophageal carcinoma. The positive rate of s-NY-ESO-1-Abs in patients with esophageal cancer (31 %) was significantly higher than that in the other groups: patients with lung cancer (13 %), patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (11 %), patients with prostate cancer (10 %), patients with gastric cancer (10 %), patients with colorectal cancer (8 %), patients with breast cancer (7 %), and healthy controls (0 %). The positive rate of s-NY-ESO-1-Abs was comparable to that of serum p53 antibodies (33 %), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (36 %), carcinoembryonic antigen (26 %), and CYFRA 21-1 (18 %) and gradually increased with the tumor stage. The positive rate of s-NY-ESO-1-Abs was significantly higher in patients with esophageal cancer than in patients with the other types of cancers. On the basis of its high specificity and sensitivity, even in patients with stage I tumors, s-NY-ESO-1-Abs may be one of the first choices for esophageal cancer.

  7. Long-term Prostate-specific Antigen Velocity in Improved Classification of Prostate Cancer Risk and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E; Kamstrup, Pia R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It remains unclear whether adding long-term prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV) to baseline PSA values improves classification of prostate cancer (PCa) risk and mortality in the general population. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether long-term PSAV improves classification of PCa risk...... classification was assessed using the net reclassification index (NRI). RESULTS: Age-adjusted hazard ratios for PCa risk and mortality were 2.7-5.3 and 2.3-3.4, respectively, for long-term PSAV when added to models already including baseline PSA values. For PCa risk and mortality, adding long-term PSAV to models....... Correspondingly, inappropriately reclassified were 49 of 10 000 men with PCa and 1658 of 10 000 men with no PCa. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term PSAV in addition to baseline PSA value improves classification of PCa risk and mortality. Applying long-term PSAV nationwide, the ratio of appropriately to inappropriately...

  8. Tumor-specific immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer with butanol-extracted antigens and ethylchlorformate polymerized tumor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, M G; Sarosdy, M F; Pickett, S H; Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L

    1988-09-01

    Successful treatment of superficial bladder cancer using nonspecific immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been well documented. Investigation of two potential tumor-specific immunotherapeutic agents using a murine transitional-cell carcinoma model (MBT-2) is reported. The survival of mice immunized with tumor proteins obtained by treating tumor cells with either 1-butanol or ethylchlorformate was compared to the survival of animals immunized with BCG. Long-term immunity conferred by each of these agents was also assessed. Significant protection by both agents was noted in all treatment groups compared to controls. Long-term immunity was also found to result from treatment with both investigational agents as well as with BCG. Butanol-extracted antigens and ethylchlorformate polymerized tumor protein may be useful as immunotherapeutic alternatives to BCG.

  9. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45.

  10. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with early-stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esajas, MD; Duk, JM; de Bruijn, HWA; Aalders, JG; Willemse, PHB; Sluiter, W; Pras, B; ten Hoor, K; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the contribution to recurrence detection and survival of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) analysis in the follow-up of early-stage cervical cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Follow-up data were evaluated in patients with early-stage squamous cell cervical

  11. Towards personalized treatment of prostate cancer: PSMA I&T, a promising prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted theranostic agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L.S. Chatalic (Kristell); S. Heskamp (S.); M. Konijnenberg (Mark); Molkenboer-Kuenen, J.D.M. (Janneke D.M.); G.M. Franssen (Gerben); M.C. Clahsen-van Groningen (Marian); Schottelius, M. (Margret); Wester, H.-J. (Hans-Jürgen); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); O.C. Boerman (Otto); M. de Jong (Marcel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractProstate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-established target for nuclear imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Radiolabeled small-molecule PSMA inhibitors are excellent candidates for PCa theranostics-they rapidly and efficiently localize in tumor lesions. However, high

  12. Towards Personalized Treatment of Prostate Cancer: PSMA I&T, a Promising Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Theranostic Agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatalic, K.L.S.; Heskamp, S.; Konijnenberg, M.; Molkenboer-Kuenen, J.D.; Franssen, G.M.; Clahsen-van Groningen, M.C.; Schottelius, M.; Wester, H.J.; Weerden, W.M. van; Boerman, O.C.; Jong, M. de

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-established target for nuclear imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Radiolabeled small-molecule PSMA inhibitors are excellent candidates for PCa theranostics-they rapidly and efficiently localize in tumor lesions. However, high tracer

  13. Impact of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing by Dutch general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, Saskia; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Hirdes, Willem H.; Steffens, Martijn G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; Nijman, Rien M.; Blanker, Marco H.

    Objective To determine the impact of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) publication in 2009 on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level testing by Dutch general practitioners (GPs) in men aged 40 years. Materials and Methods Retrospective study with a Dutch insurance

  14. Prostate-specific Antigen Decline After 4 Weeks of Treatment with Abiraterone Acetate and Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rescigno, P.; Lorente, D.; Bianchini, D.; Ferraldeschi, R.; Kolinsky, M.P.; Sideris, S.; Zafeiriou, Z.; Sumanasuriya, S.; Smith, A.D.; Mehra, N.; Jayaram, A.; Perez-Lopez, R.; Mateo, J.; Parker, C.; Dearnaley, D.P.; Tunariu, N.; Reid, A.; Attard, G.; Bono, J.S. de

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of multiple new treatments for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) mandates earlier treatment switches in the absence of a response. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely used to monitor treatment response, but is not validated as an

  15. Survival of ovarian cancer patients overexpressing the tumour antigen p53 is diminished in case of MHC class I down-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Lambeck, Annechien J. A.; de Graeff, Pauline; Bijlsma, Astrid Y.; Daemen, Toos; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Nijman, Hans W.

    Objectives. The adaptive immune system seems to play an essential role in the natural course of ovarian cancer. Aim of this study was to establish whether disease-specific survival for patients expressing the tumour antigen p53 is influenced by MHC class I expression or the presence of p53

  16. Prostate cancer screening by prostate-specific antigen (PSA); a relevant approach for the small population of the Cayman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Shravana Kumar; Blacke, Camille; Patil, Pallavi; Amblihalli, Vibha P; Nicholson, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    The common tool for diagnosing prostate cancer is prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but the high sensitivity and low specificity of PSA testing are the problems in clinical practice. There are no proper guidelines to investigate the suspected prostate cancer in the Cayman Islands. We correlated PSA levels with the incidence of prostate cancers by tissue diagnosis and proposed logical protocol for prostate screening by using PSA test in this small population. A total of 165 Afro Caribbean individuals who had prostate biopsy done after the investigations for PSA levels from year 2005 to 2015 were studied retrospectively. The patients were divided into subgroups by baseline PSA levels as follows: 100 ng/mL and were correlated to the age and presence of cancer. Benign lesions had lower PSA levels compared to cancer which generally had higher values. Only three cases that had less than 4 ng/mg were turned out to be malignant. When PSA value was more than 100 ng/mL, all the cases were malignant. Between PSA values of 4-100 ng/mL, the probability of cancer diagnosis was 56.71% (76 cancers out of 134 in this range). Limitation of PSA testing has the risk of over diagnosis and the resultant negative biopsies owing to poor specificity. Whereas the cutoff limit for cancer diagnosis still remains 4 ng/mL from our study, most of the patients can be assured of benign lesion below this level and thus morbidity associated with the biopsy can be prevented. When the PSA value is greater than 100 ng, biopsy procedure was mandatory as there were 100% cancers above this level. On the background of vast literature linking PSA to prostate cancer and its difficulty in implementing in clinical practice, we studied literature of this conflicting and complex topic and tried to bring relevant protocols to the small population of Cayman Islands for the screening of prostate cancer. In this study, a total of 165 Afro Caribbean individuals who had prostate biopsy done after the

  17. Danish General Practitioners' Use of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Opportunistic Screening for Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kasper; Søndergaard, Jens; Larsen, Pia Veldt

    2013-01-01

    Background. The use of prostate-specific antigen test has markedly increased in Danish general practice in the last decade. Despite the national guidelines advice against PSA screening, opportunistic screening is supposed to be the primary reason for this increased number of PSA tests performed...... be potential reasons for measuring PSA for asymptomatic patients. Almost all GPs stated that a PSA measurement is indicated for symptomatic 49- and 78-year-old men, respectively, 98.9% and 93.8%. Conclusion. Opportunistic PC screening is being performed in general practice to a high degree. Hence, current...

  18. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test On This Page What ... the PSA test for prostate cancer screening? Detecting prostate cancer early may not reduce the chance of ...

  19. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer.

  20. The cancer-germline antigen SSX2 causes cell cycle arrest and DNA damage in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2011-01-01

    , we show that SSX2 is involved in regulation of cancer cell growth. We found that ectopic expression of SSX2 in melanoma and colon cancer cells strongly reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis in vitro. Importantly, in a xenograft mouse model, the growth of tumors derived from SSX2 overexpressing...... dependent. The growth reduction was similar in isogenic colon cancer cells with and without p53, indicating that SSX2 is able to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, even in absence of functional p53. Our results show that SSX2 acts as an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation, possibly through replicative...... stress, and therefore have important implications for the use of SSX2 as a target for cancer therapy....

  1. Prostate-specific antigen-activated thapsigargin prodrug as targeted therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Jakobsen, Carsten M; Janssen, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    Standard anti-proliferative chemotherapy is relatively ineffective against slowly proliferating androgen-independent prostate cancer cells within metastatic sites. In contrast, the lipophilic cytotoxin thapsigargin, which causes apoptosis by disrupting intracellular free Ca2+ levels, is effective...

  2. NY-BR-1 Antigen Expression and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients: Clinicopathological and Prognostic Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Nazar, Salma Y; Ghazy, Amany A; Ghoneim, Hossam E; Zoheir, Malak; Ahmed, Ahmed S; Sorour, Sally S; Abouelella, Amira M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the world. In Egypt, it ranks the first among female malignancies with incidence of 37.7%. Over the last decades, the integration of prognostic and predictive markers in treatment decisions has led to more individualized and optimized therapy. NY-BR-1 antigen has been shown to be frequently expressed in breast cancers. The study aimed to assess the tissue expression of NY-BR-1 antigen and serum IgG antibody to this antigen in Egyptian breast cancer females. The study was conducted on 60 females (10 healthy, 10 having benign breast lesions, 40 with malignant breast cancer). NY-BR-1 Ag expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG was assessed by ELISA. Results revealed a significant difference in NY-BR-1 Ag expression between benign and malignant breast cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between NY-BR-1 antigen expression and estrogen receptor's status (P = 0.019), stage of the disease (P = 0.008), menopausal status (P = 0.008), lymph node involvement (P = 0.022) and anti-NY-BR-1 IgG (P = 0.032) among the studied individuals. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in anti-NY-BR-1 IgG O.D. results among malignant breast cancer group. It is correlated with tumor type (P 1) and progesterone receptor status (P = 0.038). In conclusion, our work may represent a step towards identification of a new prognostic marker specific for breast cancer.

  3. The role of serum testosterone to prostate-specific antigen ratio as a predictor of prostate cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Gurbuz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the ratio of serum total testosterone (sTT to prostate-specific antigen (PSA as a predictor of prostate cancer risk. One-hundred-four consecutive men with a normal digital rectal examination and a serum PSA level of 2.5–10 ng/ml underwent transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy using a 10-core scheme. The sTT level was determined before the procedure using a chemiluminescent assay, and the ratio of sTT to PSA (sTT/PSA was calculated after transforming sTT measurements from ng/dL to ng/mL. The overall cancer detection rate was 17.3%. The median sTT level was 332 ng/dl in men with cancer and 413 ng/dL in those without (p = 0.032. The median sTT/PSA ratio in these groups was 0.55 and 0.74, respectively (p = 0.035. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC method was used to evaluate the properties of the sTT/PSA ratio, with testosterone and PSA as predictors of prostate cancer risk. The accuracy of the sTT/PSA ratio in prostate cancer diagnosis, represented by the area under the curve (AUC, was 0.739 (95% CI 0.640–0.823, p < 0.05. Optimizing the sensitivity and specificity of the sTT/PSA ratio using the ROC provided a cutoff point of 0.60, which corresponded to 82% sensitivity and 62% specificity. When the patients were divided into normal- and low-sTT level groups according to testosterone value (300 ng/dl, the probability of detecting prostate cancer was 3.3-fold higher in hypogonadal men as compared with eugonadal men. These results support the use of the sTT-to-PSA ratio for predicting the risk of prostate cancer and increasing the specificity of PSA measurement.

  4. Using X-ray Crystallography, Biophysics, and Functional Assays to Determine the Mechanisms Governing T-cell Receptor Recognition of Cancer Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, Bruce J; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Mason, Georgina H; Schauenburg, Andrea J; Bianchi, Valentina; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Sewell, Andrew K; Fuller, Anna; Cole, David K

    2017-02-06

    Human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are known to play an important role in tumor control. In order to carry out this function, the cell surface-expressed T-cell receptor (TCR) must functionally recognize human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted tumor-derived peptides (pHLA). However, we and others have shown that most TCRs bind sub-optimally to tumor antigens. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms that define this poor recognition could aid in the development of new targeted therapies that circumnavigate these shortcomings. Indeed, present therapies that lack this molecular understanding have not been universally effective. Here, we describe methods that we commonly employ in the laboratory to determine how the nature of the interaction between TCRs and pHLA governs T-cell functionality. These methods include the generation of soluble TCRs and pHLA and the use of these reagents for X-ray crystallography, biophysical analysis, and antigen-specific T-cell staining with pHLA multimers. Using these approaches and guided by structural analysis, it is possible to modify the interaction between TCRs and pHLA and to then test how these modifications impact T-cell antigen recognition. These findings have already helped to clarify the mechanism of T-cell recognition of a number of cancer antigens and could direct the development of altered peptides and modified TCRs for new cancer therapies.

  5. Evaluation of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for distinguishing malignant ascites from benign ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Chang, Yan-Xiang; Niu, Chun-Yan

    2017-11-01

    The overexpression of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G is associated with malignant tumours. The purpose of our study was to detect soluble human leukocyte antigen-G concentrations in ascites and to evaluate the value of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for the diagnosis of malignant ascites. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect soluble human leukocyte antigen-G levels in 64 patients with malignant ascites and 30 patients with benign ascites. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for the detection of malignant ascites. Ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G levels were significantly higher in the malignant ascites group than in the benign ascites group (20.718 ± 3.215 versus 12.467 ± 3.678 µg/L, t = 7.425, p human leukocyte antigen-G was 0.957 (95% confidence interval, 0.872-0.992). At a cut-off value of 19.60 µg/L, the sensitivity and specificity of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G were 87.5% (95% confidence interval, 71.0%-96.5%) and 100% (95% confidence interval, 88.4%-100%), respectively. With respect to area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity, ascitic carcinoembryonic antigen (0.810, 68.75% and 83.33%, respectively) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (0.710, 65.63% and 70%, respectively) significantly differed (all p human leukocyte antigen-G was 75%, which was higher than the corresponding rates for ascitic carcinoembryonic antigen (31.25%) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (6.25%; both p human leukocyte antigen-G exhibited good performance for diagnosing malignant ascites, and particularly those that were cytology-negative and biopsy-positive.

  6. Identification of novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer-associated antigen applicable to developing helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Junya; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Togashi, Yuji; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Nishimura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We identified novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer antigen, which are presented to both HLA-DRB1*01:01 and DQB1*06:01. The helper epitope also contained three distinct Survivin-killer epitopes presented to HLA-A*02:01 and A*24:02. This 19 amino-acids epitope peptide (SU18) induced weak responses of Survivin-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells though it contained both helper and killer epitopes. To enhance the vaccine efficacy, we synthesized a long peptide by conjugating SU18 peptide and another DR53-restricted helper epitope peptide (SU22; 12 amino-acids) using glycine-linker. We designated this artificial 40 amino-acids long peptide containing two helper and three killer epitopes as Survivin-helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide (Survivin-H/K-HELP). Survivin-H/K-HELP allowed superior activation of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) Th1 cells and CD8(+) Tc1 cells compared with the mixture of its component peptides (SU18 and SU22) in the presence of OK-432-treated monocyte-derived DC (Mo-DC). Survivin-H/K-HELP-pulsed Mo-DC pretreated with OK-432 also exhibited sustained antigen-presentation capability of stimulating Survivin-specific Th1 cells compared with Mo-DC pulsed with a mixture of SU18 and SU22 short peptides. Moreover, we demonstrated that Survivin-H/K-HELP induced a complete response in a breast cancer patient with the induction of cellular and humoral immune responses. Thus, we believe that an artificially synthesized Survivin-H/K-HELP will become an innovative cancer vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomarker Identification and Pathway Analysis by Serum Metabolomics of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death, for which no validated tumor biomarker is sufficiently accurate to be useful for diagnosis. Additionally, the metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. In this study, we investigated the construction, interaction, and pathways of potential lung cancer biomarkers using metabolomics pathway analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database and the Human Metabolome Database to identify the top altered pathways for analysis and visualization. We constructed a diagnostic model using potential serum biomarkers from patients with lung cancer. We assessed their specificity and sensitivity according to the area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves, which could be used to distinguish patients with lung cancer from normal subjects. The pathway analysis indicated that sphingolipid metabolism was the top altered pathway in lung cancer. ROC curve analysis indicated that glycerophospho-N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (GpAEA and sphingosine were potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Compared with the traditional lung cancer diagnostic biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratin 19 fragment, GpAEA and sphingosine were as good or more appropriate for detecting lung cancer. We report our identification of potential metabolic diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of lung cancer and clarify the metabolic alterations in lung cancer.

  8. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Niraj H., E-mail: nmehta@mednet.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Steinberg, Michael; Demanes, Jeffrey [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and kinetics of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces after high-dose-rate (HDR) monotherapy and determine relationships between certain clinical factors and PSA bounce. Methods and Materials: Longitudinal PSA data and various clinical parameters were examined in 157 consecutive patients treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. We used the following definition for PSA bounce: rise in PSA ≥threshold, after which it returns to the prior level or lower. Prostate-specific antigen failure was defined per the Phoenix definition (nadir +2 ng/mL). Results: A PSA bounce was noted in 67 patients (43%). The number of bounces per patient was 1 in 45 cases (67%), 2 in 19 (28%), 3 in 2 (3%), 4 in 0, and 5 in 1 (1%). The median time to maximum PSA bounce was 1.3 years, its median magnitude was 0.7, and its median duration was 0.75 years. Three patients (2%) were noted to have PSA failure. None of the 3 patients who experienced biochemical failure exhibited PSA bounce. In the fully adjusted model for predicting each bounce, patients aged <55 years had a statistically significant higher likelihood of experiencing a bounce (odds ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.38-3.57, P=.001). There was also a statistically significant higher probability of experiencing a bounce for every unit decrease in Gleason score (odds ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.04, P=.045). Conclusions: A PSA bounce occurs in a significant percentage of patients treated with HDR monotherapy, with magnitudes varying from <1 in 28% of cases to ≥1 in 15%. The median duration of bounce is <1 year. More bounces were identified in patients with lower Gleason score and age <55 years. Further investigation using a model to correlate magnitude and frequency of bounces with clinical variables are under way.

  9. Role of a serum-based biomarker panel in the early diagnosis of lung cancer for a cohort of high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hong, Qun-Ying; Hu, Jie; Li, Chun; Pan, Bai-Shen; Wang, Qun; Ding, Fei-Hong; Ou, Jia-Xian; Liu, Fang-Lei; Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Jie-Bai; Song, Yuan-Lin; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2015-09-01

    This study applied a combined cancer biomarker panel to clinically identify small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a high-risk population. The serum levels of 4 biomarkers (progastrin-releasing peptide [ProGRP], carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], squamous cell carcinoma antigen [SCC], and cytokeratin 19 fragment [CYFRA21-1]) were determined in 153 patients with a high risk of lung cancer (12 with a new diagnosis of SCLC, 52 with NSCLC, and 89 without lung cancer). Information about diagnosis delays was collected through interviews of all participants. Significantly higher serum levels of ProGRP (P lung cancer patients with a false-negative computed tomography (CT) result, the diagnostic panel detected 8 additional cancers. This panel increased the diagnostic specificity for high-risk subjects (those with renal failure being excluded), and auxiliary to a CT scan, it increased the sensitivity for patients with lung cancer. These results might be applied to shorten the diagnosis delay at health care institutions in China. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  10. DNA vaccine coding for the rhesus prostate specific antigen delivered by intradermal electroporation in patients with relapsed prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Fredrik; Tötterman, Thomas; Maltais, Anna-Karin; Pisa, Pavel; Yachnin, Jeffrey

    2013-08-20

    We tested safety, clinical efficacy and immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine coding for rhesus prostate specific antigen (PSA) delivered by intradermal injection and skin electroporation. Fifteen patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer without macroscopic disease participated in this phase I study. Patients were started on a 1 month course of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to treatment. Vaccine doses ranged from 50 to 1,600 μg. Study subjects received five vaccinations at four week intervals. All patients have had at least one year of follow-up. No systemic toxicity was observed. Discomfort from electroporation did not require analgesia or topical anesthetic. No clinically significant changes in PSA kinetics were observed as all patients required antiandrogen therapy shortly after completion of the 5 months of vaccination due to rising PSA. Immunogenicity, as measured by T-cell reactivity to the modified PSA peptide and to a mix of overlapping PSA peptides representing the full length protein, was observed in some patients. All but one patient had pre-study PSA specific T-cell reactivity. ADT alone resulted in increases in T-cell reactivity in most patients. Intradermal vaccination with skin electroporation is easily performed with only minor discomfort for the patient. Patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer are a good model for testing immune therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of Prostate Specific Antigen Gene Expression and Telomerase in Breast Cancer Patients: Relationship to Steroid Hormone Receptors

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    N. Zarghami

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Breast cancer is the most common disease in women. In the expansion and progression of breast tumors combination of tumor markers including prostate specific antigen (PSA and telomerase are engaged. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationship between telomerase activity and prostate specific antigen gene expression with steroid hormone receptors in breast cancer patients. Materials & Methods: This study was a case-control and consisted of 50 women diagnosed with breast benign tumors as control and 50 women having malignant tumors as cases. Telomerase activity was measured in tumor cytosol of samples by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay. PSA protein was measured using ultra sensitive immunoflourometric assay and PSA mRNA expression was carried out using RT-PCR technique in all tumor tissues. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were stained using immunohistochemistry technique in tumor tissues. Data analysis was carried out by using SPSS software version 11.6 and paired t-student test. Results: Using TRAP assay, presence of the telomerase activity was positive in all of the breast cancer patients. The difference of relative telomerase activity (RTA values between stages and also all grades were more statistically significant (p<0.05. The mRNA of PSA was detected only in benign tumors and stage I and grade I malignant tumor cytosols. Difference of tumor cytosol PSA levels between the cases and control groups and also between all grades and stages of diseases were significant (p <0.05. In all, there was an inverse significant correlation between the RTA and PSA protein levels in the case groups. (r=-0.42, p<0.05.There was a statistically difference between steroid hormone receptors (ER and PR positive and negative on PSA and telomerase gene expression in breast tumor tissues (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is speculated that differential expression of PSA and telomerase genes in breast tumors are under

  12. Phenotype of dendritic cells generated in the presence of non-small cell lung cancer antigens - preliminary report.

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    Dariusz Sagan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic outcomes of definitively treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC are unacceptably poor. It has been proposed that the manipulation of dendritic cells (DCs as a "natural" vaccine adjuvant may prove to be a particularly effective way to stimulate antitumor immunity. Presently, there is no standardized methodology for preparing vaccines and many questions concerning the optimal source and type of antigens as well as maturation state and activity of DCs are still unsolved. The study population comprised of ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC (mean age: 67.63 +/- 6.15 years. Resected small tumor pieces were placed in tissue culture dishes containing different growth factors in order to obtain pure cancer cells. Seven days after the operation, the PBMC were collected and monocytes were purified by the adherence to culture dishes. Monocytes were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% of autologous plasma in the presence of rhIL-4 and rhGM-CSF to generate immature autologous (DCs. TNF-alpha with or without tumor cells' lysate were added to maturation of DCs. After 7 days of culture, DCs were harvested and the expression of CD1a, CD83, CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR antigens were analyzed by flow cytometry. We discovered higher (p=0.07 percentage of semimature DCs in tumor cell lysate culture in comparison with TNF-alpha culture (21.22 +/- 16.82% versus 11.27 +/- 11.64%. The expression of co-stimulatory and maturation markers (CD86, CD83 and HLA-DR was higher on DCs from the culture with tumor cell lysate compared with TNF-alpha culture as a control. Specimen of NSCLC's culture prepared in this way could generate differences in DCs phenotype, which may have an influence on the therapeutic and protective antitumor immunity of the vaccine. Our research seems to be the next step in the development of DC-based vaccine. We are going to continue the investigation to start the preparation of a pattern of immunological vaccine

  13. Carbohydrate antigen 549 in metastatic breast cancer during cytostatic treatment and follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the serum tumour marker CA 549 gave early and reliable information about disease activity among metastatic breast cancer patients during cytostatic treatment and follow-up. 50 females with metastatic breast cancer were monitored clinically...... among 91% by marker progression. Clinical progression was excluded among 93% without marker progression. In conclusion, monitoring of metastatic breast cancer patients could include CA 549 if standardised criteria for marker evaluation are used....... and with the tumour marker CA 549. Response evaluation was based upon clinical (World Health Organization) and elaborated CA 549 criteria, respectively. In 113 blindly and matched evaluations, concordance appeared in 73/113 and discordance in 40/113 evaluations. In 27, discordance concerned degree of response, in 2...

  14. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and biomarkers for early treatment response evaluation in metastatic colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil E.; Loft, Annika; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for metastatic colon cancer (mCC) are widening. We prospectively evaluated serial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measurements of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), carcinoembryonic antigen...... (CEA), and liberated domain I of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR(I)) for early assessment of treatment response in mCC patients. METHODS: Thirty-three mCC patients scheduled for first-line chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) and bevacizumab participated; 27 were...... evaluated by PET/CT before treatment, after one and four treatment series. Morphological and metabolic response was independently assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer PET criteria. Plasma TIMP-1, plasma u...

  15. Soluble Human Leukocyte Antigen-G in the Bronchoalveolar Lavage of Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, Dayana; Pérez, Mario; Borges, Lérida; Bianchi, Guillermo; Cova, José-Angel

    2016-08-01

    The main function of the HLA-G molecule in its membrane-bound and soluble forms is to inhibit the immune response by acting on CD4+ T cells, cytotoxic T cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and annual incidence is high in both women and men. Some studies have reported an increase of HLA-G serum levels in lung cancer, probably generated by tumor cells escaping the antitumor immune response. In this study the concentration of soluble HLA-G in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with primary and metastatic lung cancer was measured to determine its relation with tumor histological type and overall patient status according to the Karnofsky scale. Thirty-one lung cancer patients were included. A tumor biopsy was obtained by bronchoscopy and the tumor type was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining. BAL samples were obtained to measure soluble HLA-G concentrations in an ELISA sandwich assay. The average value of soluble HLA-G was 49.04ng/mL. No correlation between soluble HLA-G levels and age, gender or smoking was observed. A highly significant difference was observed in the levels of soluble HLA-G in BAL from patients with different histological types of lung cancer, especially in metastatic tumors. The Karnofsky index showed a significant and inverse correlation with soluble HLA-G levels in BAL. Soluble HLA-G protein is significantly associated with metastatic tumors and patients with lower Karnofsky index and may be useful as a prognostic marker in lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of Lewisa, Sialyl Lewisa, Lewisx, Sialyl Lewisx, Antigens as Prognostic Factors in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Nakagoe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered expression of blood group-related carbohydrate antigens such as sialyl Lewis (Lex antigen in tumours is associated with tumour progression behaviour and subsequent prognosis. However, the prognostic value of the expression of Le-related antigens in colorectal tumours remains unclear.

  17. Can Prostate Specific Antigen Be Used as New Biomarker for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer?

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    Seyed Mostafa Shiryazdi

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Plasma PSA level is not a reliable biomarker to diagnose breast cancer, though regarding existing scientific evidence, more comprehensive studies are required to consider other features of malignant samples so as to evaluate the role of PSA in differentiating breast neoplastic lesions in a more meticulous way based on the degree of tumor differentiation.

  18. Meanings of prostate-specific antigen testing as narrated by men with localized prostate cancer after primary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedestig, Oliver; Sandman, Per-Olof; Widmark, Anders; Rasmussen, Birgit H

    2008-01-01

    To illuminate the meanings of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing as narrated by men with localized prostate cancer (LPC) after primary treatment. Fifteen men were interviewed in their homes. The narrative interview text was analyzed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. Life after treatment for LPC means feeling unsafe because of being affected by a life-threatening and unpredictable disease, characterized by a lack of early signs of progression. In this situation, PSA testing is ascribed as providing a sense of control to enable one to achieve a feeling of safety. Thus one meaning of PSA testing is receiving a message about the status of the body; another is a tense waiting related to fear of the results. A low, stable PSA value is interpreted as a sense of being safe based on confidence in the PSA tests and a sense of having control over the LPC via regular PSA testing. A rising value of the PSA blood test is understood as an indication of progression of the disease, but confidence in PSA testing also means that when the PSA value rises there is a sense of catching the cancer in good time. The comprehensive understanding of the meaning of PSA testing can be understood in terms of a lifeline to cling to when wondering whether the cancer is still in progress in the body or whether the treatment has been curative. This lifeline creates a feeling of security in a post-treatment life situation which is experienced as being unsafe.

  19. Utility of free prostate specific antigen serum level and its related parameters in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi A Haroun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the role of free prostate specific antigen (f-PSA serum level and its related parameters in detecting prostate cancer. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2006 and March 2008. Trans-rectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy was performed for 107 patients who had total PSA (t-PSA level of either >4 ng/mL with or without palpable nodule or ≤4 ng/mL with palpable nodule on digital rectal examination. The perfor-mance measurements for f-PSA, percent free PSA (%f-PSA and free PSA density (f-PSAD were determined and compared with those for t-PSA and total PSA density (t-PSAD. Descriptive statistics for all variables of interest were calculated, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. Nine patients (8.4% had normal histology, 69 patients (64.4% had benign disease and 29 patients (27.1% had prostate cancer. The performance of f-PSA in PCa detection was better than other evaluated parameters. The largest area under the curve for patients in the gray area (t-PSA range 4.1-10 ng/mL was for f-PSA, with a value of 0.64 and a sensitivity and specificity of 44% and 87%, respectively. For %f-PSA, these values were 0.59, 63% and 62%, respectively. For patients with a t-PSA level of 10.1-20 ng/mL, they were 0.68, 67%, and 81%, respectively, for f-PSA, and 0.64, 67%, and 76%, respectively, for %f-PSA. In conclusion, f-PSA serum levels performed better than free to total PSA ratio and t-PSA for prostate cancer screening. It is of clinical value which could affect the biopsy decision avoiding unnecessary interventions.

  20. Utility of free prostate specific antigen serum level and its related parameters in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroun, Azmi A; Hadidy, Azmy S; Awwad, Ziad M; Nimri, Caramella F; Mahafza, Waleed S; Tarawneh, Emad S

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the role of free prostate specific antigen (f-PSA) serum level and its related parameters in detecting prostate cancer. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2006 and March 2008. Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy was performed for 107 patients who had total PSA (t-PSA) level of either >4 ng/mL with or without palpable nodule or ≤4 ng/mL with palpable nodule on digital rectal examination. The performance measurements for f-PSA, percent free PSA (%f-PSA) and free PSA density (f-PSAD) were determined and compared with those for t-PSA and total PSA density (t-PSAD). Descriptive statistics for all variables of interest were calculated, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. Nine patients (8.4%) had normal histology, 69 patients (64.4%) had benign disease and 29 patients (27.1%) had prostate cancer. The performance of f-PSA in PCa detection was better than other evaluated parameters. The largest area under the curve for patients in the gray area (t-PSA range 4.1-10 ng/mL) was for f-PSA, with a value of 0.64 and a sensitivity and specificity of 44% and 87%, respectively. For %f-PSA, these values were 0.59, 63% and 62%, respectively. For patients with a t-PSA level of 10.1-20 ng/mL, they were 0.68, 67%, and 81%, respectively, for f-PSA, and 0.64, 67%, and 76%, respectively, for %f-PSA. In conclusion, f-PSA serum levels performed better than free to total PSA ratio and t-PSA for prostate cancer screening. It is of clinical value which could affect the biopsy decision avoiding unnecessary interventions.

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified natural killer cell-based immunotherapy and immunological synapse formation in cancer and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfang; Tian, Shuo; Zhang, Kai; Xiong, Wei; Lubaki, Ndongala Michel; Chen, Zhiying; Han, Weidong

    2017-12-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the body's immune defenses. Current chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cell immunotherapy shows strong promise for treating various cancers and infectious diseases. Although CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy is rapidly gaining attention, its clinical applications are mainly focused on preclinical investigations using the NK92 cell line. Despite recent advances in CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, cost and severe toxicity have hindered its widespread use. To alleviate these disadvantages of CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, additional cytotoxic cell-mediated immunotherapies are urgently needed. The unique biology of NK cells allows them to serve as a safe, effective, alternative immunotherapeutic strategy to CAR-modified T cells in the clinic. While the fundamental mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity and side effects of CAR-modified T and NK cell immunotherapies remain poorly understood, the formation of the immunological synapse (IS) between CAR-modified T or NK cells and their susceptible target cells is known to be essential. The role of the IS in CAR T and NK cell immunotherapies will allow scientists to harness the power of CAR-modified T and NK cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases. In this review, we highlight the potential applications of CAR-modified NK cells to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and discuss the challenges and possible future directions of CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy, as well as the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of CAR-modified T cell- or NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and side effects, with a focus on the CAR-modified NK cell IS.

  2. Differential percentage of serum prostate-specific antigen subforms suggests a new way to improve prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrats, Ariadna; Comet, Josep; Tabarés, Glòria; Ramírez, Manel; Aleixandre, R Núria; de Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the tumor marker currently used for prostate cancer (PCa) screening and diagnosis. However, its use is controversial as serum PSA levels are also increased in other non-malignant prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). PSA sialic acid content is altered in tumor situation and modifies PSA's isoelectric point (pI). Our goal has been to evaluate serum PSA subforms from PCa and BPH patients by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and to investigate whether they could be used to improve PCa diagnosis. PSA from 20 PCa and 20 BPH patients' sera was subjected to a four-step method to obtain serum PSA 2-DE subforms from free PSA (fPSA) plus PSA released from the complex with alpha-1-antichymotrypsin. Relative percentages of PSA spots were quantified and subjected to statistical analysis. Five PSA subforms (F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5) of different pI were obtained. Relative percentages of F3 (%F3) and F4 (%F4) were different between PCa and BPH groups. %F3 decreased in cancers and this decrease correlated with the cancer stage, while F4 behaved oppositely. These observations were also found when only focusing on the patients within the low total PSA (tPSA) range 2-20 ng/ml. %F3 showed a tendency of higher sensitivity and specificity than the currently used tPSA and %fPSA tests. Therefore, %F3 measurement should be investigated in a larger cohort of patients to study whether it could be introduced to improve PCa diagnosis. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of SEREX-defined antigen NUCB2 in gastric epithelium, gastritis and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Kalnina

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUCB2 is an EF-hand Ca2+ binding protein that has been implicated in various physiological processes like calcium homeostasis, hypothalamic regulation of feeding and TNF receptor shedding. In our previous study we identified NUCB2 as a potential tumour antigen eliciting autoantibody responses in 5.4% of gastric cancer patients but not in the healthy individuals. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NUCB2 immunogenicity and to gain an insight into the physiological functions of NUCB2 in the stomach. mRNA expression analysis demonstrated that NUCB2 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues, including lymphoid tissues, and downregulated in gastric tumours when compared with the adjacent relatively normal stomach tissues. The search for molecular alterations resulted in the identification of novel mRNA variants transcribed from an alternative promoter and expressed predominantly in gastric cancers. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels correspond to mRNA levels and revealed that NUCB2 is phosphorylated in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, a 55 kDa isoform, generated presumably by yet an unidentified post-translational modification was detected in gastric tumours and AGS gastric cancer cells but was absent in the relatively normal gastric mucosa and thereby might have served as a trigger for the immune response against NUCB2. Staining of stomach tissue microarray with anti-NUCB2 antibody revealed that it is expressed in the secretory granules of chief cells and in the cytoplasm of parietal cells in the functioning gastric glands which are lost in atrophic glands and tumour cells. Hence we propose that NUCB2 may be implicated in gastric secretion by establishing an agonist-releasable Ca2+ store in ER or Golgi apparatus, signalling via heterotrimeric Ga proteins and/or mediating the exocytosis of the secretory granules.

  4. The effect of artificial neural network model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yiming; Wu, Yongjun; Nie, Guangjin; Ni, Ran

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the diagnosis potential of artificial neural network (ANN) model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer, to differentiate lung cancer from lung benign disease, normal control, and gastrointestinal cancers. Serum carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), gastrin, neurone specific enolase (NSE), sialic acid (SA), Cu/Zn, Ca were measured through different experimental procedures in 117 lung cancer patients, 93 lung benign disease patients, 111 normal control, 47 gastric cancer patients, 50 patients with colon cancer and 50 esophagus cancer patients, 19 parameters of basic information were surveyed among lung cancer, lung benign disease and normal control, then developed and evaluated ANN models to distinguish lung cancer. Using the ANN model with the six serum tumor markers and 19 parameters to distinguish lung cancer from benign lung disease and healthy people, the sensitivity was 98.3%, the specificity was 99.5% and the accuracy was 96.9%. Another three ANN models with the six serum tumor markers were employed to differentiate lung cancer from three gastrointestinal cancers, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of distinguishing lung cancer from gastric cancer by the ANN model of lung cancer-gastric cancer were 100%, 83.3% and 93.5%, respectively; The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of discriminating lung cancer by lung cancer-colon cancer ANN model were 90.0%, 90.0%, and 90.0%; And which were 86.7%, 84.6%, and 86.0%, respectively, by lung cancer-esophagus cancer ANN model. ANN model built with the six serum tumor markers could distinguish lung cancer, not only from lung benign disease and normal people, but also from three common gastrointestinal cancers. And our evidence indicates the ANN model maybe is an excellent and intelligent system to discriminate lung cancer.

  5. Harnessing Raman spectroimmunoassay for detection of serological breast cancer markers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Ishan; Li, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Two critical, unmet needs in breast cancer are the early detection of cancer metastasis and recurrence, and the sensitive assessment of temporal changes in tumor burden in response to therapy. The present research is directed towards developing a non-invasive, ultrasensitive and specific tool that provides a comprehensive real-time picture of the metastatic tumor burden and provides a radically new route to address these overarching challenges. As the continuing search for better diagnostic and prognostic clues has shifted away from a singular focus on primary tumor lesions, circulating and disseminated biomarkers have surfaced as attractive candidates due to the intrinsic advantages of a non-invasive, repeatable "liquid biopsy" procedure. However, a reproducible, facile blood-based test for diagnosis and follow-up of breast cancer has yet to be incorporated into a clinical laboratory assay due to the limitations of existing assays in terms of sensitivity, extensive sample processing requirements and, importantly, multiplexing capability. Here, by architecting nano-structured probes for detection of specific molecular species, we engineer a novel plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopic platform that offers a paradigmatic shift from the capabilities of today's diagnostic test platforms. Specifically, quantitative single-droplet serum tests reveal ultrasensitive and multiplexed detection of three key breast cancer biomarkers, cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), CA27-29 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), over several order of magnitude range of biomarker concentration and clear segmentation of the sera between normal and metastatic cancer levels.

  6. Osteopoikilosis: A Sign Mimicking Skeletal Metastases in a Cancer Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasrolahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopoikilosis is a rare benign osteosclerotic bone disorder that may be misdiagnosed as skeletal metastases. Here we describe a case of coincidental breast cancer and osteopoikilosis mimicking skeletal metastases. A 41-year-old woman underwent right modified radical mastectomy in April 2007. Twenty-eight months after initial treatment,the patient complained of bilateral knee and foot pain. Plain X-rays of the feet and knees showed multiple well-defined osteosclerotic lesions. According to the radiographic appearance, the most likely differential diagnoses included skeletal metastases from breast cancer and osteopoikilosis. A whole-body bone scintigraphy showed no increase in uptake by the sclerotic lesions, and serum lactic dehydrogenase, carcinoembryonic antigen, alkaline phosphatase and cancer antigen 15-3 were not elevated. We therefore diagnosed the patient’s skeletal lesions as osteopoikilosis. This case and ourliterature review suggest that the radiographic appearance of osteopoikilosis may mimic or mask skeletal metastases, potentially leading to misdiagnosis in patients with cancer.

  7. Evaluation of serum prostate specific antigen in diagnosis of patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torizumi, Kazutami; Kumayama, Yoshitaka; Tuda, Tadaaki; Ota, Kiichiro; Morita, Teruo; Miyai, Masahiro; Hagino, Keizo; Hirano, Atuyuki; Uekado, Yasunari (Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    Serum PSA level in patients with urogenital disorders was measured by PSA kits using monoclonal antibody. Serum PSA values in 122 healthy men were 1.1 {+-} 0.3 ng/ml (mean {+-} S.D.) and upper limit of mean + 2 S.D. in healthy men was 1.7 ng/ml. Serum PSA levels in 15 male patients with prostate cancer were more increased than those in 11 male patients with prostate hypertrophy (556.9 {+-} 896.1 ng/ml vs. 8.4 {+-} 10.4 ng/ml, p < 0.001). It is our conclusion that the estimate of serum PSA level provided a useful diagnostic information of prostate cancer. (author).

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of tumor antigens MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3/4, and NY-ESO-1 in cancerous and benign prostatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudolin, Tvrtko; Juretic, Antonio; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Pasini, Josip; Bandic, Daniela; Heberer, Michael; Kosicek, Miljenko; Cacic, Mirjana

    2006-01-01

    To investigate immunohistochemical expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1, cancer testis antigens in prostate tissues showing evidence of malignant transformation or benign hyperplasia. 112 prostate samples from patients undergoing surgery at the Urology Clinic at the Zagreb Clinical Hospital Center from 1995 to 2003 were investigated in this study. Of these, 92 carcinoma samples were obtained by radical prostatectomy, and 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia samples by transvesical prostatectomy. Three monoclonal antibodies were used for immunohistochemical staining: 77B for MAGE-A1, 57B for multi-MAGE-A and D8.38 for NY-ESO-1 expression. Expression of MAGE-A1 was observed in 10.8% of carcinoma samples, whereas multi-MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 stained 85.9% and 84.8% of samples. Immunohistochemical staining was only detectable in the cytoplasm. A significant heterogeneity could be observed within a same tissue sample where areas with strong positivities coexisted with cancer testis antigens negative areas. Interestingly, a majority of 57B positive cases were also found to be D8.38 positive (correlation coefficient r=0.727 (P<0.01)). Cancer testis antigens expression was neither significantly correlated with PSA values nor with Gleason score. In benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues MAGE-A1 expression was detected in 5%, while 57B and D8.38 staining was observed in 15% samples, and in all cases percentages of positive cells were always <10%. Our data underline the peculiar relevance of cancer testis antigens expression in prostate cancers, with potential implications regarding both diagnosis and therapy. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  10. Expression, purification and characterization of the cancer-germline antigen GAGE12I: a candidate for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Besir, Hüseyin; Larsen, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    for immunotherapy and candidates for cancer vaccines. Recombinant proteins may be superior to peptides as immunogens, since they have the potential to prime both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and are not dependent on patient HLA-type. We have developed a method for production of highly pure recombinant GAGE12I...

  11. VA-INPC: Linking Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) data to assess surveillance testing among veterans with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggstrom, David A; Rosenman, Marc; Myers, Laura J; Teal, Evgenia; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2010-11-13

    The goal of this project was to provide empiric evidence about the benefit to US veterans and the VA of capturing data from a citywide clinical informatics network (INPC) to assess care received outside the VA. We identified 468 veterans diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 2000-2007 in the Indianapolis VA cancer registry. Electronic VA healthcare data were linked with electronic health records from the regional health information organization (RHIO) INPC; 341 matches were found. Both the VA and INPC systems were queried regarding receipt of surveillance tests. The proportion with additional data from INPC varied by test: colonoscopy (3%), CT scan/abdomen (13%), CT scan/chest (79%), carcinoembryonic antigen test (8%), and other laboratory tests (25%-53%). An incremental benefit of linking VA and INPC data was present and may increase when expanded beyond patients with a single condition. New, important information about care outside the VA is obtained through RHIO data linkage.

  12. Expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens is enriched in triple-negative invasive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Ashwini; Kalita-de Croft, Priyakshi; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Smart, Chanel E; Simpson, Peter T; Saunus, Jodi M; Lakhani, Sunil R

    2018-02-21

    A better understanding of the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in breast cancer might identify new immunotherapy options, especially for triple-negative (TN) tumours, which lack expression of conventional therapeutic targets ER, PR and HER2 (receptors for Oestrogen, Progesterone and Human epidermal growth factor). The aim of this study was to quantify the expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 CTAs in breast cancer, and relate this to known clinicopathologic parameters. We surveyed MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 protein expression in an unselected cohort of 367 breast tumours (out of which 65 tumours were TN), with accompanying clinical follow-up data, using immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of tissue microarrays. Relevant to their potential as vaccine targets in breast cancer, MAGE-A was expressed in 13% of cases, and NY-ESO-1 in 3.8%, with the majority of tumours exhibiting fairly homogeneous staining within individual tissue cores (~85% of cases with staining in >75% tumour cells). Most NY-ESO-1 positive cases also expressed MAGE-A (p=2.06x10 -9 ), and both were strongly associated with the TN phenotype (pESO-1 are frequently expressed in TNBC (~47% and 17% of TN cases, respectively), suggesting that targeting them could be feasible in this patient group. Expression is reasonably homogeneous in positive cases suggesting that IHC analysis of tissue biopsies would be a reliable companion biomarker. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. The trophoblast cell surface antigen 2 and miR-125b axis in urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellini, Chiara; Licini, Caterina; Lazzarini, Raffaella; Gesuita, Rosaria; Guerra, Emanuela; Tossetta, Giovanni; Castellucci, Clara; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Procopio, Antonio; Alberti, Saverio; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Olivieri, Fabiola; Marzioni, Daniela

    2017-08-29

    Human trophoblast cell surface antigen 2 (Trop-2) is a 40-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein that was first identified as a marker of human trophoblast cells. Trop-2 acts on cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration by activating a number of intracellular signalling pathways. Elevated Trop-2 expression has been demonstrated in several types of cancer and correlated with aggressiveness and poor prognosis. Since no data are available on Trop-2 in bladder cancer (BC), the purpose of the study was to determine its levels in tissue specimens from normal individuals and patients with BC at different stages. Moreover, since according to recent evidence Trop-2 is a miR-125b target, miR-125b expression was also assessed in tissue specimens. Finally, the effect of the Trop-2/miR-125b axis on the proliferation and migration of BC cells was evaluated in vitro. The Trop-2/miR-125b axis was seen to be differentially expressed in normal urothelium, non-invasive BC and invasive BC tissue. Significant miR-125b down-regulation was associated with a significant increase in Trop-2 protein levels in BC tissue and correlated with disease severity. In vitro analysis confirmed the role of miR-125b in down-modulation of Trop-2 protein levels and showed that Trop-2/miR-125b axis affects cellular proliferation in bladder tissue. In conclusion, our findings highlight a role for the Trop-2/miR-125b axis in BC progression and suggest Trop-2 and miR-125b as diagnostic/prognostic marker candidates as well as druggable targets for innovative therapeutic approaches.

  14. Clinical significance and therapeutic potential of prostate cancer antigen-1/ALKBH3 in human renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kiyohiko; Sho, Masayuki; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Shimada, Keiji; Yamato, Ichiro; Anai, Satoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Konishi, Noboru; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer antigen-1 (PCA-1)/ALKBH3 has been recently identified in human prostate cancer and its expression is correlated with disease progression and prognosis. However, the precise role and function of PCA-1/ALKBH3 in human malignancies are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the clinical significance and therapeutic potential of PCA-1/ALKBH3 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). PCA-1/ALKBH3 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in 101 RCC patients who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy. Its expression was positively correlated with advanced pathological T- and M-factors and TNM stage (T, P<0.05; M, P<0.01; TNM, P<0.01, respectively). In the prognostic analysis, PCA-1/ALKBH3-negative patients with RCC had a significantly better prognosis than PCA-1/ALKBH3-positive patients (5-year survival rate, 92.9 vs. 75.9%, respectively; P<0.05). Next, the therapeutic potential of targeting PCA-1/ALKBH3 was further evaluated by small interfering RNA method using a human RCC cell line (CAKI-1). We found that PCA-1/ALKBH3 knockdown significantly inhibited the growth of CAKI-1 cells compared with the control (P<0.001). Furthermore, knockdown of PCA-1 induced apoptosis in CAKI-1 cells, as assessed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-cleavage assays. We demonstrated for the first time that PCA-1/ALKBH3 expression has a significant prognostic impact on patient prognosis in RCC. Furthermore, its knockdown has a therapeutic efficacy on RCC. Taken together, both our clinical and experimental data strongly suggest that PCA-1/ALKBH3 may be functionally important and a novel molecular target for human RCC.

  15. Predictors of survival in prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis and extremely high prostate-specific antigen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Ki Hong; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-03-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a surrogate marker of disease progression; however, its predictive ability in the extreme ranges is unknown. We determined the predictors of survival in patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer (BMPCa) and with extremely high PSA levels. Treatment-naïve patients (n = 248) diagnosed with BMPCa between December 2002 and June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinicopathological features at diagnosis, namely age, body mass index, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and PSA levels, PSA nadir, time to PSA nadir and its maintenance period, PSA declining velocity, Gleason grade, clinical T stage, pain score, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG PS), and the number of bone metastases were assessed. The patients were stratified according to PSA ranges of bone lesions (P < 0.001). During the follow-up period (median, 39.9 months; interquartile range, 21.5-65.9 months), there were no differences between the groups in terms of the survival endpoints. High ALP levels, shorter time to PSA nadir, and pain were associated with an increased risk of progression to CRPC, and high ALP levels, ECOG PS ≥ 1, and higher PSA nadir independently predicted CSS. PSA response to androgen deprivation therapy and serum ALP are reliable predictors of survival in patients with BMPCa presenting with extremely high PSA levels. These patients should not be deterred from active treatment based on baseline PSA values.

  16. Efficient in vivo priming by vaccination with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein and CpG in antigen naive prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Julia; Neumann, Antje; Atmaca, Akin; Wahle, Claudia; Brand, Kathrin; von Boehmer, Lotta; Knuth, Alexander; Bender, Armin; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Jäger, Elke

    2011-02-15

    NY-ESO-1, one of the most immunogenic tumor antigens, is expressed in 15% to 25% of metastatic prostate cancers. The immunological and clinical effects of vaccination with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein combined with CpG as adjuvant were evaluated. In a phase I clinical study, patients with advanced prostate cancer were vaccinated with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein (100 μg) mixed with CpG 7909 (2.5 mg) every 3 weeks intradermally for 4 doses. Objectives of the study were the safety of the vaccine and changes of specific humoral and cellular immunological responses to NY-ESO-1 in relation to detectable NY-ESO-1 expression in the individual tumor. All 12 baseline sero-negative patients developed high-titer NY-ESO-1 antibody responses. B-cell epitope mapping identified NY-ESO-1 p91-110 to be recognized most frequently by vaccine-induced antibodies. Two patients developed significant antibody titers against the adjuvant CpG. NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T-cell responses were induced in 9 patients (69%). Five of these 9 patients did not express NY-ESO-1 in the autologous tumor. Postvaccine CD8+ T-cell clones recognized and lyzed HLA-matched tumor cell lines in an antigen-specific manner. Our data provide clear evidence for the capacity of NY-ESO-1 protein/CpG vaccine to induce integrated antigen-specific immune responses in vivo and to efficiently prime CD8+ T-cell responses in NY-ESO-1 antigen-negative patients. Our results may also support further clinical vaccination protocols with NY-ESO-1 protein not only focused on the treatment of existing cancer, but also to prevent further development of NY-ESO-1 positive cancers in vivo. ©2010 AACR.

  17. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict the Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    confined to germ cells in normal testis and placenta , but aberrantly expressed in several types of cancers (Scanlan et al, 2004). Unfortunately, their...qRT-PCR 4 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY Summary of Tasks in SOW Tasks Summarized aims Time Major Task 1 Subtasks 1 and 2 Year 1 CTA gene expression...cells, except by normal testis that is an immune -privileged organ. Also, they are capable of inducing an immune response and though are good targets

  18. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    normally confined to germ cells in normal testis and placenta , but aberrantly expressed in several types of cancers (Scanlan et al, 2004...Nanostring 10. qRT-PCR 4 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY Summary of Tasks in SOW Tasks Summarized aims Time Major Task 1 Subtasks 1 and 2 Year 1 CTA...obtain new TMAs for validation of our biomarkers. In an attempt to determine if CTA expression by the PCa cells can induce cellular mediated immune

  19. Enhanced therapeutic effect using sequential administration of antigenically distinct oncolytic viruses expressing oncostatin M in a Syrian hamster orthotopic pancreatic cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Bunuales, Maria; Poutou, Joanna; Gonzalez-Aparicio, Manuela; Bravo-Perez, Carlos; Quetglas, Jose I; Carte, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Larrea, Esther; Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben

    2015-12-16

    The limited efficacy of current treatments against pancreatic cancer has prompted the search of new alternatives such as virotherapy. Activation of the immune response against cancer cells is emerging as one of the main mechanisms of action of oncolytic viruses (OV). Direct oncolysis releases tumor antigens, and viral replication within the tumor microenvironment is a potent danger signal. Arming OV with immunostimulatory transgenes further enhances their therapeutic effect. However, standard virotherapy protocols do not take full advantage of OV as cancer vaccines because repeated viral administrations may polarize immune responses against strong viral antigens, and the rapid onset of neutralizing antibodies limits the efficacy of redosing. An alternative paradigm based on sequential combination of antigenically distinct OV has been recently proposed. We have developed a protocol consisting of sequential intratumor administrations of new Adenovirus (Ad) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV)-based OV encoding the immunostimulatory cytokine oncostatin M (OSM). Transgene expression, toxicity and antitumor effect were evaluated using an aggressive orthotopic pancreatic cancer model in Syrian hamsters, which are sensitive to OSM and permissive for replication of both OVs. NDV-OSM was more cytolytic, whereas Ad-OSM caused higher OSM expression in vivo. Both viruses achieved only a marginal antitumor effect in monotherapy. In addition, strong secretion of OSM in serum limited the maximal tolerated dose of Ad-OSM. In contrast, moderate doses of Ad-OSM followed one week later by NDV-OSM were safe, showed a significant antitumor effect and stimulated immune responses against cancer cells. Similar efficacy was observed when the order of virus administrations was reversed. Sequential administration of oncolytic Ad and NDV encoding OSM is a promising approach against pancreatic cancer.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of serum antibodies to human papillomavirus type 16 early antigens in the detection of human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Kristina R; Anderson, Karen S; Field, Matthew S; Chowell, Diego; Ning, Jing; Li, Nan; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M

    2017-12-15

    Because of the current epidemic of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), a screening strategy is urgently needed. The presence of serum antibodies to HPV-16 early (E) antigens is associated with an increased risk for OPC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of antibodies to a panel of HPV-16 E antigens in screening for OPC. This case-control study included 378 patients with OPC, 153 patients with nonoropharyngeal head and neck cancer (non-OPC), and 782 healthy control subjects. The tumor HPV status was determined with p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridization. HPV-16 E antibody levels in serum were identified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A trained binary logistic regression model based on the combination of all E antigens was predefined and applied to the data set. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay for distinguishing HPV-related OPC from controls were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for the association of head and neck cancer with the antibody status. Of the 378 patients with OPC, 348 had p16-positive OPC. HPV-16 E antibody levels were significantly higher among patients with p16-positive OPC but not among patients with non-OPC or among controls. Serology showed high sensitivity and specificity for HPV-related OPC (binary classifier: 83% sensitivity and 99% specificity for p16-positive OPC). A trained binary classification algorithm that incorporates information about multiple E antibodies has high sensitivity and specificity and may be advantageous for risk stratification in future screening trials. Cancer 2017;123:4886-94. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in the postoperative monitoring of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Mads Nikolaj; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Sørensen, Steen

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the pre- and postoperative plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) were associated with outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC). Pre- and postoperative plasma TIMP-1 from 280 curatively resected CRC patients and carcinoembryonic...... antigen (CEA) in corresponding serum samples were measured and correlated with patient outcome (death, local recurrence (LR) and distant metastases (DM)). The results showed that the course of plasma TIMP-1 from pre- to postoperative levels correlated with patient outcome (P=0.005). However, postoperative...... plasma TIMP-1 alone was strongly associated with patient outcome, high TIMP-1 predicting short survival (P=0.002). Combining postoperative TIMP-1 and CEA demonstrated that high TIMP-1 and CEA levels predicted poor outcome (P

  2. Tumor markers in finding recurrent disease iin colorectal cancer: a diagnostic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verberne, Charlotte; de Jong, W.H.; Grossmann, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Aim: In the search for evidence-based follow-up of patients after resection for colorectal cancer, numerous tumor markers have been proposed. This review has evaluated these markers and comments on the diagnostic accuracy in finding recurrent disease in relation to Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA......). Methods: A comprehensive literature review (1985- 2010) was performed by two independent reviewers. Sensitivity and specificity of markers mentioned in the articles were checked by recalculation. A validated quality score system was used to estimate study quality. Results: Seventeen studies focusing...... on eight different markers were included. Three markers were shown to have comparable or better accuracy than CEA: TPA, CA 242 and CA 72-4 in at least one study. These three markers, from four independent studies, showed a tu- mor marker sensitivity of > 60% in combination with an outperformance of CEA...

  3. Ectopic expression of cancer/testis antigen SSX2 induces DNA damage and promotes genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2015-01-01

    of senescence (i.e. an irregular and enlarged cell shape, enhanced β-galactosidase activity and DNA double-strand breaks). Since replication defects, DNA damage and senescence are interconnected and well-documented effects of oncogene expression, we tested the oncogenic potential of SSX2. Importantly, knockdown...... in an increased DNA content and enlargement of cell nuclei, suggestive of replication aberrations. The cells further displayed signs of DNA damage and genomic instability, associated with p53-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest and a late apoptotic response. These results suggest a model wherein SSX2-mediated...... replication stress translates into mitotic defects and genomic instability. Arrest of cell growth and induction of DNA double-strand breaks was also observed in MCF7 breast cancer cells in response to SSX2 expression. Additionally, MCF7 cells with ectopic SSX2 expression demonstrated typical signs...

  4. Adsorption according to the Langmuir-Freundlich model is the detection mechanism of the antigen p53 for early diagnosis of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Juliana Coatrini; Soares, Andrey Coatrini; Pereira, Paulo Augusto Raymundo; Rodrigues, Valquiria da Cruz; Shimizu, Flavio Makoto; Melendez, Matias Eliseo; Scapulatempo Neto, Cristovam; Carvalho, André Lopes; Leite, Fábio L; Machado, Sergio A S; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2016-03-28

    Biosensors for early detection of cancer biomarkers normally depend on specific interactions between such biomarkers and immobilized biomolecules in the sensing units. Though these interactions are expected to yield specific, irreversible adsorption, the underlying mechanism appears not to have been studied in detail. In this paper, we show that adsorption explained with the Langmuir-Freundlich model is responsible for detection of the antigen p53 associated with various types of cancers. Irreversible adsorption was proven between anti-p53 antibodies immobilized on the biosensors and the antigen p53, with the adequacy of the Langmuir-Freundlich model being confirmed with three independent experimental methods, viz. polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), nanogravimetry using a quartz crystal microbalance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The method based on this irreversible adsorption was sufficiently sensitive (limit of detection of 1.4 pg mL(-1)) for early diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma, pancreatic and colon carcinomas, and bladder, ovarian and lung cancers, and could distinguish between MCF7 cells containing the antigen p53 from Saos-2 cells that do not contain it.

  5. Highly sensitive detection of multiple tumor markers for lung cancer using gold nanoparticle probes and microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanlei; Wang, Wentao; Yao, Shihua; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Honglian; Zhang, Jishen; Jing, Fengxiang; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Cong, Hui; Jia, Chunping; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Jianlong

    2017-03-15

    Assay of multiple serum tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen (CYFRA21-1), and neuron specific enolase (NSE), is important for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a novel serological and histochemical biomarker, was recently reported to be preferentially expressed in lung cancer. Four target proteins were sandwiched by capture antibodies attached to microarrays and detection antibodies carried on modified gold nanoparticles. Optical signals generated by the sandwich structures were amplified by gold deposition with HAuCl4 and H2O2, and were observable by microscopy or the naked eye. The four tumor markers were subsequently measured in 106 lung cancer patients and 42 healthy persons. The assay was capable of detecting multiple biomarkers in serum sample at concentration of highly improved the sensitivity (to 87.74%) for diagnosis of lung cancer compared with sensitivity of single markers. A rapid, highly sensitive co-detection method for multiple biomarkers based on gold nanoparticles and microarrays was developed. In clinical use, it would be expected to improve the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer cells immunotherapy on the clinical outcome of recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuzhen Liang,1,2 Kecheng Xu,1,2 Lizhi Niu,1,2 Xiaohua Wang,1 Yingqing Liang,1 Mingjie Zhang,3 Jibing Chen,1,2 Mao Lin1,2 1Department of Central Laboratory, Fuda Cancer Hospital, Jinan University School of Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Fuda Cancer Institute, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 3Hank Bioengineering Co., Ltd, Shenzhen, China Abstract: In the present study, we aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer (NK cells immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Between July 2016 and February 2017, 36 patients who met the enrollment criteria were randomly assigned to two groups: autogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group I, n=18 and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group II, n=18. The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, circulating tumor cell (CTC level, and other related indicators were evaluated. We found that allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy has better clinical efficacy than autogeneic therapy. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells therapy improves the quality of life, reduces the number of CTCs, reduces carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 expression, and significantly enhances immune function. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy for recurrent breast cancer. Keywords: clinical outcome, autogeneic, allogeneic, natural killer cells, recurrent breast cancer

  7. Expression and significance of TSGF, CEA and AFP in patients before and after radical surgery for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Wang, Jing-Liang; Tao, Hai-Tao; Wu, Bai-Shou; Sun, Jin; Cheng, Yao; Dong, Wei-Wei; Li, Rui-Xin

    2013-01-01

    To explore the expression and significance of tumor specific growth factor (TSGF), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) in cancer tissue and serum of patients with colon cancer. Radical surgery for colon cancer was performed on 43 patients with laparoscope under conditions of general anesthesia. The Elisa method was used to detect the levels of serum TSGF, CEA and AFP before and after radical operation, and cancer tissue underwent TSGF, CEA and AFP immunohistochemistry staining after laparoscopic surgery. The decreased conditions of serum TSGF, CEA and AFP in patients with colon cancer at different levels of differentiation and clinical stagings were analyzed, and the relationships of expression rates between histological types, colon cancer morphology, lymph node metastasis and TSGF, CEA as well as AFP in cancer tissue were assessed. Compared with before radical surgery, the levels of serum TSGF, CEA and AFP decreased notably in patients after operations (pAFP was noted in patients with moderately differentiated cancer tissue (pAFP was the largest in patients at phase Dukes A (pAFP with different histological types and colon cancer morphologies (p>0.05). The positive expression rates of TSGF and CEA in patients with lymph node metastasis were significantly higher than those without lymph node metastasis (pAFP can be used to evaluate the effect of radical operation for colon cancer, and the changed levels of different markers are associated with tumor differentiation, clinical stating and presence or absence of lymph node metastasis.

  8. Ferromagnetic thermal ablation of locally recurrent prostate cancer: prostate specific antigen results and immediate/intermediate morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Viraj A; Shinohara, Katsuto; Carroll, Peter R

    2004-12-01

    Curative options for locally recurrent prostate cancer following external beam radiotherapy are limited due to the significant morbidity associated with surgical therapy. ThermoRods (Ablation Technologies, San Diego, California) are permanently implantable, 14 mm cobalt-palladium alloy rods that produce heat through oscillation of a magnetic field. The rod is designed to self-regulate the temperature to 70C by a temperature dependent magnetic transition (Curie effect). We determined whether patients with prostate cancer and local failure could be treated with thermal ablation of the prostate using this novel technology. A total of 14 men with an average age of 72 years (range 62 to 81) were enrolled in the study. All had biopsy proven prostate cancer with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) (1.0 to 10.3 ng/ml). The seminal vesicles were not routinely biopsied. Metastatic disease was assayed in all men with bone scan and in later patients with abdominopelvic computerized tomography. Patients had ThermoRods placed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, similar to brachytherapy. The pre-plan was rigorously followed to produce a 3-dimensional array with rods separated by 1 cm across the short axis. Patients were treated in a magnetic field for 1 hour. Urethral and rectal temperatures were also monitored and cooled appropriately. Serial PSA measurements and 6 month posttreatment biopsies were obtained after the procedure. Average time since radiation was 4.5 years. PSA nadir values after radiation were between 0.3 and 2.2 ng/ml. Prostatic temperatures were homogeneously increased greater than 50C, while rectal and urethral temperatures did not exceed 44C at any point. The urethral catheter was removed 2 weeks postoperatively in all cases. Six months after the procedure 8 of the 14 men (57%) had a PSA decrease to less than 0.1 ng/ml. Complications included urinary retention as well as incontinence. Incontinence was generally temporary and only 1 patient (7%) had

  9. Development of an Effective Cancer Vaccine Using Attenuated Salmonella and Type III Secretion System to Deliver Recombinant Tumor-Associated Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Guo, Linjie; Gao, Xiuhua; Courtney, Amy N.; Kurbanov, Suhrab; Liu, Daofeng; Tian, Gengwen; Manuel, Edwin R.; Diamond, Don J.; Hensel, Michael; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major limitations of modern cancer vaccine vectors is that, unlike infectious pathogens, to which the immune system has evolved to respond, they are not sufficiently effective in delivering tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in an immunogenic form to intact professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) at their anatomic location. To overcome this challenge, we exploited Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) and its type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver a TAA of choice into the cytosol of APCs in situ. We have systematically compared candidate genes from the SPI2 locus of Salmonella typhimurium in the vaccine design, using model antigens and a codon-optimized human TAA, survivin (coSVN). In a screen of 20 SPI2 promoter/effector combinations, the PsifB::sseJ pair demonstrated the maximal potency for antigen translocation in the APC cytosol, presentation to CD8 T cells, and immunogenicity in mice. Therapeutic vaccination with the PsifB::sseJ-coSVN construct (p8032) resulted in CXCR3-dependent tumor infiltration with CD8 T cells, reversal of the CD8:Treg ratio at the tumor site, and potent anti-tumor activity in a CT26 colon carcinoma model. The vaccine’s immunogenicity and anti-tumor potency were further enhanced by co-administration of an NKT-cell ligand, 7WD8-5, which strongly enhanced production of IL-12 and IFNγ in vaccinated mice. Furthermore, therapeutic vaccination with p8032/7WD8-5 resulted in complete tumor regression in an A20 lymphoma model, with the generation of protective memory. Thus, oral antigen delivery via SPI2-encoded T3SS of Salmonella may be the foundation for an effective cancer vaccine platform. PMID:25213323

  10. The TF-antigen binding lectin from Sclerotium rolfsii inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Chen, Chen; Barclays, Monica; Ingle, Aravind; Mahajan, Praveen; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2012-09-01

    Glycan array analysis of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) revealed its exquisite binding specificity to the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF) antigen and its derivatives. This study shows that SRL strongly inhibits the growth of human colon cancer HT29 and DLD-1 cells by binding to cell surface glycans and induction of apoptosis through both the caspase-8 and -9 mediated signaling. SRL showed no or very weak binding to normal human colon tissues but strong binding to cancerous and metastatic tissues. Intratumor injection of SRL at subtoxic concentrations in NOD-SCID mice bearing HT29 xenografts resulted in total tumor regression in 9 days and no subsequent tumor recurrence. As the increased expression of TF-associated glycans is commonly seen in human cancers, SRL has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer.

  11. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  12. Parasites Cryptosporidium parvum, Leishmania, Plasmodium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Parasites Cryptosporidium parvum, Leishmania, Plasmodium falciparum (malaria), Schistosoma. Cancer-associated antigens Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), melanoma-associated antigen, the MHC molecule HLA-B7.

  13. Effects of Fresh Yellow Onion Consumption on CEA, CA125 and Hepatic Enzymes in Breast Cancer Patients: A Double- Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour-Sadegh, Farnaz; Montazeri, Vahid; Adili, Ali; Esfehani, Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Mesgari, Mehran; Pirouzpanah, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) consumption has been remarked in folk medicine which has not been noted to be administered so far as an adjunct to conventional doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study aimed to investigate the effects of consuming fresh yellow onions on hepatic enzymes and cancer specific antigens compared with a low-onion containing diet among breast cancer (BC) participants treated with doxorubicin. This parallel design randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 56 BC patients whose malignancy was confirmed with histopathological examination. Subjects were assigned in a stratified-random allocation into either group received body mass index dependent 100-160 g/d of onion as high onion group (HO; n=28) or 30-40 g/d small onion in low onion group (LO; n=28) for eight weeks intervention. Participants, care givers and laboratory assessor were blinded to the assignments (IRCT registry no: IRCT2012103111335N1). The compliance of participants in the analysis was appropriate (87.9%). Comparing changes throughout pre- and post-dose treatments indicated significant controls on carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen-125 and alkaline phosphatase levels in the HO group (Ponion administration could be effective for hepatic enzyme conveying adjuvant chemotherapy relevant toxicity and reducing the tumor markers in BC during doxorubicin-based chemotherapy.

  14. MAGE-A10 cancer/testis antigen is highly expressed in high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengus, Chantal; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Coulot, Julie; Kastelan, Zeljko; Goluza, Eleonora; Coric, Marijana; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Hudolin, Tvrtko

    2013-05-15

    Bladder cancer is a common urinary malignancy and a prevalent cause of cancer-related death. Current therapies of early stage non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) are frequently associated with undesirable toxicities and recurrence. Active antigen-specific immunotherapy may provide a valid therapeutic option for patients with NMIBC. Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) expressed in various tumour types and in a limited range of healthy tissues may represent potential targets for specific immunotherapy. MAGE-A10 is probably the most immunogenic antigen of the MAGE-A family. We evaluated the expression of MAGE-A10 in NMIBC. Seventy-nine patients undergoing surgical treatment for NMIBC were enrolled in the study. MAGE-A10 gene expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin-embedded sections. MAGE-A10 gene was specifically expressed in one-third of NMIBC (n = 24: 32.43%). Gene expression was correlated with high tumour grade. MAGE-A10 protein was exclusively detectable in nuclei of tumour cells. More importantly, MAGE-A10 protein was also more frequently detectable in high-grade tumours (p = 0.0001) and in stage T1 tumours invading subepithelial tissue or lamina propria (p = 0.01). A strong correlation between MAGE-A10 staining score and tumour grade and stage could accordingly be observed. These data indicate that MAGE-A10 expression is a feature of aggressive NMIBC and might be used as a novel target for specific immunotherapy of these cancers. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  15. Biomarkers in the lung cancer diagnosis: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Asmitananda, T; Gao, L; Gai, D; Song, Z; Zhang, Y; Ren, H; Yang, T; Chen, T; Chen, M

    2012-01-01

    The propensity for tumor biomarkers to be detected in serum at an early disease stage has become an area of interest for clinicians. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of 7 tumor biomarkers, namely, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA-21-1), alpha-fetoprotein, carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA-125), carbohydrate antigen-19.9 (CA-19.9), and ferritin, independently or in combination for the diagnosis of lung cancer. Electrochemiluminescence immunization was used to determine biomarker levels expressed in 530 patients with pulmonary disease and 229 healthy subjects. The observed levels of CEA, NSE, CYFRA-21-1, CA-125, and CA-19.9 in patients with pathologically confirmed lung cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with benign pulmonary disease or control subjects. Adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and small cell carcinoma of the lung were associated with the highest observed levels of CA-125, CYFRA-21-1, and NSE, respectively. Combining biomarkers successfully led to the diagnosis of lung cancer. CEA + NSE + CA-125 showed the highest sensitivity for small cell carcinoma, at 83.33%, whereas CEA + NSE + CYFRA-21-1 + CA-125 showed 94.11% sensitivity for squamous cell carcinoma. The combination of 6 biomarkers, namely, CEA + NSE + CYFRA-21-1 + CA-125 + ferritin + CA-19.9, showed 80.49% sensitivity for adenocarcinoma. Combining biomarkers significantly aided in the diagnosis of lung cancer. However, this increased sensitivity on combination was accompanied by a decreased specificity for lung cancer subtypes. Combining biomarkers appropriately increases their sensitivity and helps with the diagnosis of lung cancer.

  16. Patterns of antigen expression in hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W J; Finlay, J L; Gilbert-Barness, E F

    1989-01-01

    Two hepatocellular carcinomas and six hepatoblastomas were examined for the presence of 13 antigens using immunoperoxidase, avidin-biotin, staining techniques. Primary antibodies were directed against alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), lysozyme (LYS), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neuron specific enolase (NSE), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), hepatitis B surface antigen (HbSA), lactoferrin (LF), desmin (DES), vimentin (VIM), and keratin (KER). Except for HbSA, the antigen staining pattern was unable to differentiate between hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Both neoplasms where positive for AFP, AAT, CEA, EMA, and KER; however, neither stained for GFAP, NSE, LYS, LF, HCG, or DES. Vimentin was weakly positive in those hepatoblastomas where mesenchymal tissue was present in the tumor. Only the tissue adjacent to hepatocellular carcinomas stained positively for HbSA and correlated with the elevated serum levels of HbSA.

  17. Comparison of cancer stem cell antigen expression by tumor cell lines and by tumor biopsies from dogs with melanoma and osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Amanda M; Deogracias, Mike; Dow, Steven W

    2014-10-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of tumor cells that play a critical role in initiating and sustaining tumor growth. However, we currently have an incomplete understanding of the expression patterns of CSC antigens in tumors of dogs, nor do we understand how expression of these antigens vary between tumor cell lines and tumor biopsy specimens. Therefore, we used flow cytometry and commonly reported CSC surface and intracellular markers to evaluate the phenotype and overall frequency of CSC subpopulations in tumor cell lines and primary tumor biopsy samples from dogs with melanoma and osteosarcoma. We found that cells expressing common CSC antigens were rare in tumor cell lines, with the exception of tumor cells expressing CD44 and CD90. In contrast, tumor cells expressing conventional CSC antigens such as CD133, CD34, CD44, CD24 and Oct3/4 were much more common in tumor biopsy samples. Notably, the frequency and types of putative CSC subpopulations were very similar in biopsy samples from dogs with either melanoma or osteosarcoma. Our results suggest that the tumor microenvironment significantly influences CSC subpopulations within tumors and that tumor cell lines may not accurately reflect the actual frequency or types of CSC subpopulations present in tumor tissues in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate-specific antigen flare induced by cabazitaxel-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelergues, Antoine; Maillet, Denis; Fléchon, Aude; Ozgüroglu, Mustafa; Mercier, Florence; Guillot, Aline; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Massard, Christophe; Fizazi, Karim; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Delanoy, Nicolas; Elaidi, Reza-Thierry; Oudard, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) flare occurs in about 15% of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients receiving docetaxel. This flare has no standard definition. Its impact on treatment efficacy is unclear. We sought to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of PSA flare on cabazitaxel, and its impact on survival. Multicentre retrospective review of consecutive patients treated with cabazitaxel second-line chemotherapy for mCRPC. Collection of baseline characteristics, disease history and PSA levels before and during cabazitaxel therapy. Overall survival (OS) and radiological/clinical progression-free survival (PFS) for patient groups corresponding to different definitions of PSA flare estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Overall, 125 patients were included. Median PFS and OS were 6.5 and 13.3 months, respectively. Depending upon the definition used, flare incidence ranged from 8.3% to 30.6%. The flare lasted <2.6 months. A PSA flare followed by a ⩾ 50% decrease was associated with a median PFS and OS of 11.2 and 25.2 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS for a ⩾ 30% rather than ⩾ 5 0% decrease were 10.4 and 16.5 months. These outcomes were not significantly different from those in patients with immediate PSA decreases of ⩾ 50% or ⩾ 30% from baseline, but were significantly better than in patients experiencing no PSA decrease (p = 0.006 and 0.015, respectively, for OS). The PSA response to cabazitaxel, with or without initial flare, was associated with a strong survival benefit. The taxane-induced flare during the first 12 weeks of therapy can be ignored when evaluating PSA response. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Reference Intervals for Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in Guangxi Zhuang Ethnic Males from the FAMHES Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xianjun; Yang, Dongmei; Mo, Zengnan; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yan; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported the reference intervals of serum AFP and CEA levels in ethnically diverse populations, but there is a lack of such reference data among Zhuang ethnic males. The aim of this study was to establish the locally validated reference intervals for AFP and CEA in the male population of the Guangxi Zhuang ethnic group. A total of 283 Zhuang ethnic males, aged 22 to 69 years, were included from the Fangchenggang Area Male Health and Examination Survey (FAMHES) project database. The one-sided upper 95th-percentile limit was used to estimate the reference intervals for serum AFP and CEA. The total non-parametric reference intervals for Zhuang ethnic males were AFP and CEA, respectively. Correlation analysis in this study showed AFP and CEA levels were significantly associated with increasing age, whereas no BMI related differences were found after adjustment for age. The present reference intervals for serum AFP and CEA values deviated from that reported in previous studies. Age-specific reference intervals should be performed in clinical laboratories to obtain more precise estimations for the clinical conditions of young adults and elderly people.

  20. SPECT- and Fluorescence Image-Guided Surgery Using a Dual-Labeled Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Targeting Antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpkema, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Bos, D.; Franssen, G.M.; Goldenberg, D.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative visualization techniques promise to significantly improve the detection and resection of tumors. In this study, we used an anti-CEA antibody (MN-14) tagged with both a radiolabel ((111)In) and a fluorophore (IRDye 800CW) for radionuclide detection and intraoperative fluorescence

  1. Serological response to Epstein-Barr virus early antigen is associated with gastric cancer and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Zambian adults: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayamba, Violet; Monze, Mwaka; Asombang, Akwi Wasi; Zyambo, Kanekwa; Kelly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer related deaths, but data from sub-Saharan Africa are very scanty. The cancer genome atlas (TCGA) initiative confirmed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) related cancer as a distinct subtype, and we set out to look for serological evidence of its role in a sub-Saharan African patient group. We used stored serum samples obtained from a gastric cancer case-control study conducted between 2010 and 2012 in Lusaka, Zambia. A total of 147 patients were included with 51 gastric adenocarcinoma cases and 96 age and sex matched controls. The presence of antibodies to EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and early antigen (EA) was determined using commercially available ELISA kits. Data were analysed in STATA Stata Corp, College Station TX. Over 90% of all the samples analysed were positive for antibodies to EBNA-1. The presence of antibodies to EBV EA was significantly higher in gastric cancer cases than in controls, (OR 4.38; 95% CI 1.53-13.06, P = 0.0027), with an attributable risk of 23%. HIV infection was also associated with EBV EA seroprevalence (OR 10.97; 95% CI 2.26 -13.06, P = 0.001) but not EBNA-1 (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.10 -38.75, P = 0.596). There was no association of EBV infection with age below 45 years, Helicobacter pylori infection, intestinal metaplasia, gastric atrophy or inflammation. We therefore conclude that EBV exposure is common among Zambian adults and that EBV EA seropositivity is associated with gastric cancer and HIV infection, but not premalignant lesions.

  2. MMC/UFT/LV in refractory colorectal cancer: phase II study and analysis of predictive variables of progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratelli, Chiara; Tampellini, Marco; Di Maio, Massimo; Ottone, Azzurra; Brizzi, Maria Pia; Forti, Laura; Alabiso, Irene; Sonetto, Cristina; Alabiso, Oscar; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio

    2017-09-27

    The treatment of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (rmCRC) and the lack of predictive variables are matters of debate. We conducted a multicentre phase II trial assessing the disease control rate (DCR) of the combination of tegafur/uracil and mitomycin C in rmCRC. The number of previous lines of chemotherapy, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, progression-free survival of the last chemotherapy regimen (PPFS), and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio at the time of study entry were evaluated as indicators of early progression. We enrolled 42 patients. The combination was well tolerated with a DCR of 26.2% and median overall survival of 6.9 months. Low CEA levels, PPFS >6 months and low NLR were significantly associated with better prognosis. The study failed its primary endpoint. However, some putative indicators of early progressive patients have been described.

  3. The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is highly expressed in myxoid and round cell subset of liposarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminger, Jessica A; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Kraybill, William G; Guttridge, Denis C; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2013-02-01

    Liposarcomas are a heterogenous group of fat-derived sarcomas, and surgery with or without chemoradiation therapy remains the main stay of treatment. NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen expressed in various cancers where it can induce both cellular and humoral immunity. Immunotherapy has shown promise in clinical trials involving NY-ESO-1-expressing tumors. Gene expression studies have shown upregulation of the gene for NY-ESO-1, CTAG1B, in myxoid and round cell liposarcomas. Herein, we evaluated the expression of NY-ESO-1 among liposarcoma subtypes by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Frozen tissue for quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis was obtained for the following liposarcoma subtypes (n=15): myxoid and round cell (n=8); well-differentiated (n=4), and dedifferentiated (n=3). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks were obtained for the following liposarcoma subtypes (n=44): myxoid and round cell (n=18); well-differentiated (n=10); dedifferentiated (n=10); and pleomorphic (n=6). Full sections were stained with monoclonal antibody NY-ESO-1, and staining was assessed for intensity (1-3+), percentage of tumor positivity, and location. In all, 7/8 (88%) and 16/18 (89%) myxoid and round cell expressed CTAG1B and NY-ESO-1 by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Western blot correlated with mRNA expression levels. By immunohistochemistry, 94% (15/16) of positive cases stained homogenously with 2-3+ intensity. Also, 3/6 (50%) pleomorphic liposarcomas demonstrated a range of staining: 1+ intensity in 50% of cells; 2+ intensity in 5% of cells; and 3+ intensity in 90% of cells. One case of dedifferentiated liposarcoma showed strong, diffuse staining (3+ intensity in 75% of cells). Our study shows that both CTAG1B mRNA and protein are overexpressed with high frequency in myxoid and round cell liposarcoma, enabling the potential use of targeted immunotherapy in the treatment of this

  4. Screening for prostate cancer using prostate-specific antigen alone as a first-line checkup parameter: results of the health checkup system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Takeshima, H; Akaza, H; Ono, Y

    2000-02-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer in Japan is not very high but it is the most increasing malignant tumor form. To decrease the mortality from cancer, detection of early cancer and early treatment are most effective. As a primary screening for prostate cancer, measurement of serum prostate-specific antigen(PSA) added to the health checkup system has not been assessed. Among males who received a health checkup during a 30-month period, serum PSA levels were measured in males who desired prostate cancer screening. The cut-off value for PSA was 4.0 ng/ml. Males with serum PSA levels exceeding this value were referred for further screening by digital rectal examination (DRE) and transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). In secondary screening, in all males with PSA levels of 10.0 ng/ml or more and in males in whom PSA levels were within the gray zone (4.0-10.0 ng/ml) and either DRE or TRUS showed abnormal findings, systematic prostate sextant needle biopsy was performed. Of 24528 males who received a health checkup, 1125 (4.6%) underwent prostate cancer screening. In 60 (5.3%) of these males, PSA levels exceeded the cut-off value. In 34 of 50 males who received further screening, prostate biopsy was performed. Seventeen males were diagnosed as having prostate cancer. Detection rates of prostate cancer were 1.53% (17/1125) in males overall and 2.1% (17/819) in males > or =50 years old. In 16 of 17 males, clinically localized cancer was suggested. In 12 of these patients, radical prostatectomy was performed. No lymph node metastasis was detected in any patient. These results suggest that prostate cancer screening using PSA as a primary screening parameter during general health checkups is very useful for efficiently detecting early-stage prostate cancer.

  5. Metastatic prostate cancer with elevated serum levels of CEA and CA19-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dar Juang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is well known as a specific tumor marker for prostate cancer, but carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA- and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9-elevating adenocarcinomas originating in the prostate gland are rare. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 in a 78-year-old man in whom prostate cancer (T3N1M1 had been diagnosed 2 years ago and who was treated with androgen deprivation therapy. He visited the emergency department because of a loss of appetite and abdominal pain. The serum CEA and CA19-9 levels were increased to 218.9 ng/mL (normal, <5 ng/mL and 212 ng/mL (normal, <27 ng/mL, respectively. The serum PSA level was slightly elevated (4.41 ng/mL. Computed tomography demonstrated multiple liver metastases, para-aortic lymph node enlargement, and lung metastases. A liver biopsy was performed and the specimen showed high-grade adenocarcinoma with focal positive staining for PSA. Despite chemotherapy with docetaxel, the patient died 3 months after treatment. Based on this case and a review of the literature, an aggressive variant of prostatic carcinoma with a high serum level of CEA and CA19-9 and a low PSA level was shown to progress rapidly with a poor prognosis.

  6. μPAD Fluorescence Scattering Immunoagglutination Assay for Cancer Biomarkers from Blood and Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Cayla; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2017-09-01

    A microfluidic paper analytical device (μPAD) was created for the sensitive quantification of cancer antigens, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), from human whole blood and serum, toward diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer. Anti-CEA and anti-CA 19-9 antibodies were covalently linked to submicron, fluorescent polystyrene particles, loaded, and then dried in the center of the μPAD channel. CEA- or CA 19-9-spiked blood or serum samples were loaded to the inlet of μPAD, and subsequent immunoagglutination changed the fluorescent scatter signals upon ultraviolet (UV) excitation. The total assay time was about 1 min. Detection limits were 1 pg/mL for CEA and 0.1 U/mL for CA 19-9 from both 10% diluted blood and undiluted serum. The use of UV excitation and subsequent fluorescence scattering enabled much higher double-normalized intensities (up to 1.28-3.51, compared with 1.067 with the elastic Mie scatter detection), successful detection in the presence of blood or serum, and distinct multiplex assays with minimum cross-reaction of antibodies. The results with undiluted serum showed the larger dynamic range and smaller standard errors, which can be attributed to the presence of serum proteins, functioning as a stabilizer or a passivating protein for the particles within paper fibers.

  7. High expressions of BCL6 and Lewis y antigen are correlated with high tumor burden and poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liancheng; Feng, Huilin; Jin, Shan; Tan, Mingzi; Gao, Song; Zhuang, Huiyu; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Huimin; Song, Zuofei; Lin, Bei

    2017-07-01

    Aberrant regulation of BCL6 plays crucial oncogenic roles in various malignant tumors; howbeit, the function of BCL6 in tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of BCL6 in ovarian cancer. The methods of immunohistochemical staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemical staining, and gene expression profile enrichment analysis were performed to identify the possible role of BCL6 in ovarian cancer. We observed that the expression of BCL6 was significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues and correlated with higher tumor burden including advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages, poor differentiation, Type II ovarian cancer, the presence of >1 cm residual tumor size, and appearance of recurrence or death (all p 1 cm, as well as high expressions of BCL6 and Lewis y antigen were independent factors of worse progression-free survival and overall survival (all p ovarian cancer and targeting BCL6 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer treatment.

  8. Prostate Cancer in Patients With High Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels but Otherwise Very-Low-Risk Disease Behaves Like Prostate Cancer in High-Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Swanson, Gregory P

    2017-08-01

    Rarely, patients with prostate cancer present with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) scores > 20 ng/mL but with otherwise very-low-risk disease. Oncologists have debated whether the malignancies in these patients behave more comparably to low-risk or high-risk disease. Our objective was to elucidate the behavior of these malignancies. A retrospective review was conducted of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation from 2000 to 2013. The inclusion criteria for very-low-risk disease included stage T1a-T1c, Gleason score ≤ 6, ≤ 3 positive cores, ≤ 50% involvement of any core, and PSA level high-grade, low-volume group consisted of patients with stage T1c-T2a, PSA level high-grade groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival at 5 years was 71.3% for the divergent group, 68.8% for the high-grade group, and 98.3% for the low-risk group. The biochemical failure rate for the divergent group differed significantly from the low-risk group (P = .021), and that for the low-risk group was significantly different from that of the high-grade group (P = .025). However, the divergent group did not appear different from the high-grade group (P = .53). The results of our study have shown that the disease prognosis for the divergent-risk group is worse than that for the very-low-risk disease group and does not appear to be different from that for the low-volume, high-grade disease group. Oncologists should be aware that the outcomes for divergent patients are similarly poor to their low-volume, classically high-risk counterparts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An adenoviral cancer vaccine co-encoding a tumor associated antigen together with secreted 4-1BBL leads to delayed tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2016-01-01

    ) in a replicative deficient adenovirus vaccine expressing the invariant chain (Ii) adjuvant fused to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). The Ii adjuvant increases and prolongs TAA specific CD8+ T cells as previously shown and local expression of 4-1BBL was chosen to avoid the toxicity associated with systemic...... presenting cells, but it did not enhance T cell responses in mice towards the Ii linked antigen. In tumor-bearing mice, our vaccine was found to decrease the frequency of TAA specific CD8+ T cells, but this difference did not alter the therapeutic efficacy. In order to reconcile our findings...... with the previous reports of increased anti-cancer efficacy using systemically delivered 4-1BB agonists, we incorporated a secreted version of 4-1BBL (Fc-4-1BBL) in our vaccine and co-expressed it with the Ii linked to TAA. In tumor bearing mice, this vaccine initially delayed tumor growth and slightly increased...

  10. Interaction of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA with c-Abl in cell proliferation and response to DNA damages in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun Zhao

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation in primary and metastatic tumors is a fundamental characteristic of advanced breast cancer. Further understanding of the mechanism underlying enhanced cell growth will be important in identifying novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a critical event in growth regulation of breast cancer cells. We found that phosphorylation of PCNA at tyrosine 211 (Y211 enhanced its association with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. We further demonstrated that c-Abl facilitates chromatin association of PCNA and is required for nuclear foci formation of PCNA in cells stressed by DNA damage as well as in unperturbed cells. Targeting Y211 phosphorylation of PCNA with a cell-permeable peptide inhibited the phosphorylation and reduced the PCNA-Abl interaction. These results show that PCNA signal transduction has an important impact on the growth regulation of breast cancer cells.

  11. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M. [West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date.

  12. All care, but whose responsibility? Community juries reason about expert and patient responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Chris; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie

    2016-09-01

    General practitioners have implicitly been given responsibility for guiding men's decisions about prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer, but patients' expectations of the bounds of this responsibility remain unclear. We sought to explore how well-informed members of the public allocate responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening decision-making. In 2014, we convened two Community juries in Sydney, Australia, to address questions related to the content and timing of information provision and respective roles of patients and general practitioners in screening decisions. Participants in the first jury were of mixed gender and of all ages (n = 15); the participants in the second jury were all male and of screening age (n = 12). Both juries were presented with balanced factual evidence on the harms and benefits of prostate-specific antigen screening and expert perspectives on ethico-legal aspects of consent in medical practice. In their deliberations, jurors agreed that general practitioners should take responsibility for informing men of the options, risks and benefits of prostate-specific antigen testing, but arrived at different positions on whether or not general practitioners should also guide screening decisions. Jurors also disagreed on how much and when general practitioners should provide detailed information about biopsies and treatments. These responses suggest that for prostate-specific antigen testing, there is a public expectation that both the allocation of responsibility between general practitioners and their male patients, and the level of information provided will be tailored to individual men. In the presence of expert uncertainty, a well-informed public may have reason to embrace or resist shared decision-making processes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Performance of the prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) gene and prostate-specific antigen in prescreened men: exploring the value of PCA3 for a first-line diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roobol, Monique J; Schröder, Fritz H; van Leeuwen, Pim; Wolters, Tineke; van den Bergh, Roderick C N; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Hessels, Daphne

    2010-10-01

    The performance characteristics of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a diagnostic test for prostate cancer (PCa) are poor. The performance of the PCa antigen 3 (PCA3) gene as a primary diagnostic is unknown. Assess the value of PCA3 as a first-line diagnostic test. Participants included men aged 63-75 who were invited for rescreening in the period from September 2007 to February 2009 within the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer, Rotterdam section. Lateral sextant biopsies were performed if the serum PSA value was > or =3.0 ng/ml and/or the PCA3 score was > or =10. Measurements included distribution and correlation of PSA value and PCA3 score and their relation to the number of cases and the characteristics of PCa detected. Additional value of PCA3 was included in men with previous negative biopsy and/or PSA or =3.0 ng/ml misses 64.7% of the total PCa that can be detected with the sextant biopsy technique and 57.9% of serious PCa (T2a or higher and/or Gleason grade > or =4, n=19), and 68.2% of biopsies could have been avoided; the respective data for PCA3 > or =35 are 32%, 26.3%, and 51.7%. Performance of PCA3 in men with low PSA (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.63) and/or previous negative biopsy (AUC: 0.68) is unclear but has limited reliability due to small numbers. PCA3 as a first-line screening test shows improvement of the performance characteristics and identification of serious disease compared with PSA in this prescreened population. Copyright 2010 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement of protein immobilization for the elaboration of tumor-associated antigen microarrays: application to the sensitive and specific detection of tumor markers from breast cancer sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhugen; Chevolot, Yann; Géhin, Thomas; Solassol, Jérôme; Mange, Alain; Souteyrand, Eliane; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2013-02-15

    There is an urgent need to identify relevant tumor markers showing high sensitivity and specificity for early diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. Protein microarrays have demonstrated to be cost-effective, high through-put and powerful tools for screening and identifying tumor markers with only minute samples. Autoantibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) were shown to be relevant tumor markers. However, due to the variability of immune response from one individual to another and depending on the type of cancer, detection of only one type of anti-TAA autoantibody is not sufficient to give a reliable and precise diagnosis. It is necessary to use a set of several TAAs for determining specific autoimmune profiles. Therefore, combining various TAAs on different surfaces could improve sensitivity and specificity for anti-TAA autoantibody detection. Herein a panel of 10 proteins, including well-known tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and potential new biomarkers of breast cancer, were immobilized onto microstructured microarray under optimized conditions (spotting pH buffer, surface chemistry, blocking procedure), in order to determine an autoimmune signature of breast cancer. Sera from 29 breast cancer patients and 28 healthy donors were screened in sandwich immunoassays on the miniaturized system to detect the eventual presence of anti-TAAs autoantibodies. Results indicated that the detection level of each anti-TAA autoantibody in a given serum sample was strongly dependant on the surface chemistry. Combining five TAAs (p53, Hsp60, Hsp70, Her2-Fc, NY-ESO-1) on two different surface chemistries (NHS and APDMES) allowed the significant detection of more than 82% breast cancer sera. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Short-term spheroid culture of primary colorectal cancer cells as an in vitro model for personalizing cancer medicine.

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    Jeppesen, Maria; Hagel, Grith; Glenthoj, Anders; Vainer, Ben; Ibsen, Per; Harling, Henrik; Thastrup, Ole; Jørgensen, Lars N; Thastrup, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatment of cancer remains a challenge due to the molecular and functional heterogeneity displayed by tumours originating from the same cell type. The pronounced heterogeneity makes it difficult for oncologists to devise an effective therapeutic strategy for the patient. One approach for increasing treatment efficacy is to test the chemosensitivity of cancer cells obtained from the patient's tumour. 3D culture represents a promising method for modelling patient tumours in vitro. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate how closely short-term spheroid cultures of primary colorectal cancer cells resemble the original tumour. Colorectal cancer cells were isolated from human tumour tissue and cultured as spheroids. Spheroid cultures were established with a high success rate and remained viable for at least 10 days. The spheroids exhibited significant growth over a period of 7 days and no difference in growth rate was observed for spheroids of different sizes. Comparison of spheroids with the original tumour revealed that spheroid culture generally preserved adenocarcinoma histology and expression patterns of cytokeratin 20 and carcinoembryonic antigen. Interestingly, spheroids had a tendency to resemble tumour protein expression more closely after 10 days of culture compared to 3 days. Chemosensitivity screening using spheroids from five patients demonstrated individual response profiles. This indicates that the spheroids maintained patient-to-patient differences in sensitivity towards the drugs and combinations most commonly used for treatment of colorectal cancer. In summary, short-term spheroid culture of primary colorectal adenocarcinoma cells represents a promising in vitro model for use in personalized medicine.

  16. Alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) detected in Mexican patients with early-stage breast cancer.

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    Fernández-Grijalva, A L; Aguilar-Lemarroy, A; Jave-Suarez, L F; Gutiérrez-Ortega, A; Godinez-Melgoza, P A; Herrera-Rodríguez, S E; Mariscal-Ramírez, I; Martínez-Velázquez, M; Gawinowicz, M A; Martínez-Silva, M G; Cruz-Ramos, J A; Hernández-Gutiérrez, R

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the serum of patients with cancer contains antibodies that react with a group of autoantigens denominated tumor-associated antigens (TAA). TAA can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis; thus, they would be ideal biomarkers for early detection of cancer, using only a few microliters of a patient's serum. In the current study, we used an immune proteomic approach, combining two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, Western blot, and matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) methods to identify TAA in the sera of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Sera were obtained from 36 newly diagnosed patients with stage II breast cancer and those from 36 healthy volunteers were evaluated for the presence of the TAA. Alpha 2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) antibodies were detected in 33 of 36 patients with breast cancer (91.7%) and in only 3 of 36 healthy patients (controls, 8.3%). Sensitivity of detection of autoantibodies against AHSG in patients with breast cancer was 91.7%. AHSG was detected in cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry. Our results strongly suggest that the presence of serum autoantibodies against AHSG protein may be useful as serum biomarkers for early-stage breast cancer screening and minimally invasive diagnosis in Mexican populations. In the present study, 2D immunoblot analysis was used to make a screening in samples of sera from patients with a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer, in order to identify some autoantibodies that react against TAA. Proteins identified in the present study, particularly alpha 2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG), might be useful as potential biomarkers for breast cancer in early stages for Mexican populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Accuracy of the prostate health index versus the urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 score to predict overall and significant prostate cancer at initial biopsy.

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    Seisen, Thomas; Rouprêt, Morgan; Brault, Didier; Léon, Priscilla; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine; Compérat, Eva; Renard-Penna, Raphaële; Mozer, Pierre; Guechot, Jérome; Cussenot, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether the Prostate Health Index (PHI) or the urinary Prostate-Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA-3) score is more accurate at screening for prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the accuracy of PHI and PCA-3 scores to predict overall and significant PCa in men undergoing an initial prostate biopsy. Double-blind assessments of PHI and PCA-3 were conducted by referent physicians in 138 patients who subsequently underwent trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy according to a 12-core scheme. Predictive accuracies of PHI and PCA-3 were assessed using AUC and compared according to the DeLong method. Diagnostic performances with usual cut-off values for positivity (i.e., PHI >40 and PCA-3 >35) were calculated, and odds ratios associated with predicting PCa overall and significant PCa as defined by pathological updated Epstein criteria (i.e., Gleason score ≥7, more than three positive cores, or >50% cancer involvement in any core) were estimated using logistic regression. Prevalences of overall and significant PCa were 44.9% and 28.3%, respectively. PCA-3 (AUC = 0.71) was the most accurate predictor of PCa overall, and significantly outperformed PHI (AUC = 0.65; P = 0.03). However, PHI (AUC = 0.80) remained the most accurate predictor when screening exclusively for significant PCa and significantly outperformed PCA-3 (AUC = 0.55; P = 0.03). Furthermore, PCA-3 >35 had the best accuracy, and positive or negative predictive values when screening for PCa overall whereas these diagnostic performances were greater for PHI >40 when exclusively screening for significant PCa. PHI > 40 combined with PCA-3 > 35 was more specific in both cases. In multivariate analyses, PCA-3 >35 (OR = 5.68; 95%CI = [2.21-14.59]; P 40 (OR = 9.60; 95%CI = [1.72-91.32]; P = 0.001) was the only independent predictor for detecting significant PCa. Although PCA-3 score is the best predictor for PCa

  18. Synchronous Carcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater and Colon Cancer

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    Anastasios J. Karayiannakis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the papilla of Vater is a relatively rare tumor and its coexistence with other primary sporadic cancers is very exceptional. Here we report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented with painless obstructive jaundice, pathologically elevated liver function tests and increased serum levels of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography revealed a large polypoid mass in the ampulla of Vater. A large tumor in the ascending colon was also incidentally detected by abdominal computed tomography. Endoscopic biopsies from both lesions showed adenocarcinomas. Metastases to the liver and to the hepatoduodenal ligament and hepatic artery lymph nodes were found during surgery. Right colectomy and a biliary bypass were performed. Histological analysis showed an ampullary adenocarcinoma with metastases to regional lymph nodes and the liver and a colonic adenocarcinoma with local invasion into the pericolic fat. Treatment with gemcitabine plus cisplatin was suggested postoperatively. The association of sporadic ampullary and colonic adenocarcinomas and the mutually increased risk of developing either a synchronous or a metachronous tumor following each other should be considered in patients with primary ampullary or colorectal cancer during the preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up of these patients.

  19. Poxvirus-based vaccine therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Kang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose An open-label Phase 1 study of recombinant prime-boost poxviruses targeting CEA and MUC-1 in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer was conducted to determine safety, tolerability and obtain preliminary data on immune response and survival. Patients and methods Ten patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were treated on a Phase I clinical trial. The vaccination regimen consisted of vaccinia virus expressing tumor antigens carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and mucin-1 (MUC-1 with three costimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1 and LFA-3 (TRICOM (PANVAC-V and fowlpox virus expressing the same antigens and costimulatory molecules (PANVAC-F. Patients were primed with PANVAC-V followed by three booster vaccinations using PANVAC-F. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF was used as a local adjuvant after each vaccination and for 3 consecutive days thereafter. Monthly booster vaccinations for up to 12 months were provided for patients without progressive disease. Peripheral blood was collected before, during and after vaccinations for immune analysis. Results The most common treatment-related adverse events were mild injection-site reactions. Antibody responses against vaccinia virus was observed in all 10 patients and antigen-specific T cell responses were observed in 5 out of 8 evaluable patients (62.5%. Median overall survival was 6.3 months and a significant increase in overall survival was noted in patients who generated anti CEA- and/or MUC-1-specific immune responses compared with those who did not (15.1 vs 3.9 months, respectively; P = .002. Conclusion Poxvirus vaccination is safe, well tolerated, and capable of generating antigen-specific immune responses in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  20. Hidden IgG Antibodies to the Tumor-Associated Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen in Gastric Cancer Patients: Lectin Reactivity, Avidity, and Clinical Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtenkov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Natural antibodies to the tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF) are related to tumor immunosurveillance and cancer patients' survival. Hidden IgG antibodies (HAbs) to TF, their lectin reactivity, avidity, and clinical relevance were studied. HAbs were present in cancer patients and controls. A decreased level of IgG HAbs was detected in cancer. The HAbs level positively correlated with the sialospecific SNA lectin binding in purified total IgG (tIgG) in donors and cancer patients, indicating that HAbs are higher sialylated. The avidity of anti-TF IgG in tIgG samples was lower in cancer patients (P = 0.025) while no difference in the avidity of free anti-TF IgG was established. A negative correlation between the avidity of anti-TF IgG in tIgG and SNA binding in both groups was observed (P IgG avidity in tIgG only in donors (P = 0.003). Changes in the level of HAbs and Abs avidity showed a rather good stage- and gender-dependent diagnostic accuracy. Cancer patients with a lower anti-TF IgG avidity in tIgG showed a benefit in survival. Thus the TF-specific HAbs represent a particular subset of anti-TF IgG that differ from free serum anti-TF IgG in SNA reactivity, avidity, diagnostic potential, and relation to survival. PMID:28316982

  1. Increased Sialylation of Anti-Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen (CD176 Antibodies in Patients with Gastric Cancer: A Diagnostic and Prognostic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kurtenkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study whether alterations in the sialylation of antibodies (Ab specific to the Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF glycotope have a diagnostic and prognostic potential in gastric cancer. Methods. Serum samples were taken from patients with gastric carcinoma (n=142 and controls (n=61. The level of TF-specific antibodies and their sialylation was detected using ELISA with synthetic TF-polyacrylamide conjugate as antigen and sialic acid-specific Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA. Results. The level of TF-specific IgM was significantly decreased in cancer compared with controls (P≤0.001. Cancer patients showed a higher level of SNA binding to anti-TF IgM and IgA (P≤0.001 irrespective of disease stage, tumor morphology, and gender. Changes in the SNA/Ab index demonstrated moderate sensitivity (66–71% and specificity (60–73% for stomach cancer. The best diagnostic accuracy (100% was achieved in 29% patients with high SNA binding and low anti-TF IgM level. This subset of patients demonstrated the poorest survival. Conclusion. Our findings are the first evidence that the increased sialylation of TF-specific Abs combined with a low level of anti-TF IgM is strongly linked to gastric cancer and patients survival, which can be used as a novel biomarker for cancer detection and prognosis.

  2. The differential impact of microsatellite instability as a marker of prognosis and tumour response between colon cancer and rectal cancer.

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    Hong, Sung Pil; Min, Byung So; Kim, Tae Il; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Won Ho

    2012-05-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a distinct molecular phenotype of colorectal cancer related to prognosis and tumour response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. We investigated the differential impact of MSI between colon and rectal cancers as a marker of prognosis and chemotherapeutic response. PCR-based MSI assay was performed on 1125 patients. Six hundred and sixty patients (58.7%) had colon cancer and 465 patients (41.3%) had rectal cancer. Among 1125 patients, 106 (9.4%) had high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) tumours. MSI-H colon cancers (13%) had distinct phenotypes including young age at diagnosis, family history of colorectal cancer, early Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) stage, proximal location, poor differentiation, and high level of baseline carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), while MSI-H rectal cancers (4.3%) showed similar clinicopathological characteristics to MSS/MSI-L tumours except for family history of colorectal cancer. MSI-H tumours were strongly correlated with longer disease free survival (DFS) (P=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.009) than MSS/MSI-L tumours in colon cancer, while these positive correlations were not observed in rectal cancers. The patients with MSS/MSI-L tumours receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy showed good prognosis (P=0.013), but this positive association was not observed in MSI-H (P=0.104). These results support the use of MSI status as a marker of prognosis and response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with colon cancers. Further study is mandatory to evaluate the precise role of MSI in patients with rectal cancers and the effect of 5-FU-based chemotherapy in MSI-H tumours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between human leukocyte antigen-G 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yu-Zheng; Ge, Qian; Li, Ming-Hao; Shi, Guo-Mei; Xu, Xiao; Xu, Lu-Wei; Xu, Zheng; Lu, Tian-Ze; Wu, Ran; Zhou, Liu-Hua; Wu, Jian-Ping; Liang, Kai; Dou, Quan-Liang; Zhu, Jia-Geng; Li, Wen-Cheng; Jia, Rui-Peng

    2014-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is involved in the development and progression of human cancers, and numerous molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to explore the potential relationship of HLA-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism with cancer risk. However, results from published studies were inconclusive. Both PUBMED and EMBASE databases were searched comprehensively to identify eligible studies investigating the association of HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism with cancer risk. Statistical analysis was performed by using STATA 12.0 and Review Manager 5.0. Fourteen eligible studies with 2340 cancer patients and 3967 controls were included and analyzed with odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). Overall, no significant association between HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism and overall cancer risk was detected in all comparison models. Further subgroup analyses based on ethnicity and cancer types demonstrated the significant association among Asians (ins/del vs. del/del: OR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.66-0.95; ins/ins+ins/del vs. del/del: OR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.65-0.97) and for breast cancer (ins allele vs. del allele: OR = 0.76, 95% CI, 0.61-0.96; ins/ins vs. del/del: OR = 0.57, 95% CI, 0.37-0.87; and ins/ins vs. ins/del+del/del: OR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.42-0.87). This study suggested that HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism might contribute to breast cancer susceptibility and overall cancer risk among Asians. Further well-designed studies with larger sample size are warranted to validate our conclusion. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T; Livermore, Karen E; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I; Robson, Craig N; Leung, Hing Y; Harries, Lorna W; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G; Elliott, David J

    2015-10-27

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, beingsignificantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression.

  5. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T.; Livermore, Karen E.; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I.; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Robson, Craig N.; Leung, Hing Y.; Harries, Lorna W.; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G.; Elliott, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, being significantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression. PMID:26452038

  6. Comparison of 6- and 12-core prostate biopsy in Taiwanese men: impact of total prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific antigen density and prostate volume on prostate cancer detection.

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    Chiang, I-Ni; Chang, Shang-Jen; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Kuo-How; Yu, Hong-Jen; Huang, Chao-Yaun

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively compared 6- and 12-core prostate biopsies in Taiwanese men and evaluated the impact of prostate volume (PV), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and PSA density (PSAD) on the prostate cancer detection rate (PCDR). 1,086 consecutive patients with a total PSA of 4.1-20.0 ng/ml and/or abnormal digital rectal examination undergoing first-time transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy were included. Group I patients (n = 562) underwent sextant biopsy and group II patients (n = 524) underwent sextant biopsy with an extra three lateral cores on both sides. The patients were further stratified into subgroups according to PV (cut-off: 35 ml), PSA (cut-off: 10.0 ng/ml), and PSAD (cut-off: 0.2). Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 228/1,086 (21.0%) patients. The PCDR was higher in group II (23.7%) than group I (18.5%). 12-Core biopsy yielded a significantly higher PCDR than 6-core biopsies in patients with PV >35 ml, PSA 4.1-10.0 ng/ml, PSAD 0.20. 12-Core biopsy yielded a significantly higher PCDR in Taiwanese men with a total PSA of 4.1-20.0 ng/ml, especially in patients with PSA 4.1-10.0 ng/ml, PSAD 35 ml. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule: a Novel Biomarker for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasingam, Vathany; Zheng, Yingye; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Leon, Antonette E.; Gion, Massimo; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2013-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Our goal was to examine the levels of ALCAM, in addition to the classical breast cancer tumor markers carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), in serum by quantitative ELISA for diagnosis in breast cancer patients. The three proteins were measured in serum of 100 healthy women, 50 healthy men and 150 breast carcinoma patients. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the tests were calculated and the association of serum marker concentrations with various clinicopathologic variables was examined using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the biomarkers. ALCAM, with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.78 [95% CI: 0.73, 0.84] outperformed CA15-3 (AUC= 0.70 [95% CI: 0.64, 0.76]) and CEA (AUC= 0.63 [95% CI: 0.56, 0.70]). The incremental values of AUC for ALCAM over that for CA15-3 were statistically significant (Delong test, p breast cancer and may have value for disease diagnosis. PMID:19322904

  8. Detection of cancer biomarkers in serum using a hybrid mechanical and optoplasmonic nanosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, P. M.; Pini, V.; Ruz, J. J.; da Silva, R. A.; González, M. U.; Ramos, D.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Blood contains a range of protein biomarkers that could be used in the early detection of disease. To achieve this, however, requires sensors capable of detecting (with high reproducibility) biomarkers at concentrations one million times lower than the concentration of the other blood proteins. Here, we show that a sandwich assay that combines mechanical and optoplasmonic transduction can detect cancer biomarkers in serum at ultralow concentrations. A biomarker is first recognized by a surface-anchored antibody and then by an antibody in solution that identifies a free region of the captured biomarker. This second antibody is tethered to a gold nanoparticle that acts as a mass and plasmonic label; the two signatures are detected by means of a silicon cantilever that serves as a mechanical resonator for ‘weighing’ the mass of the captured nanoparticles and as an optical cavity that boosts the plasmonic signal from the nanoparticles. The capabilities of the approach are illustrated with two cancer biomarkers: the carcinoembryonic antigen and the prostate specific antigen, which are currently in clinical use for the diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of colon and prostate cancer, respectively. A detection limit of 1 × 10-16 g ml-1 in serum is achieved with both biomarkers, which is at least seven orders of magnitude lower than that achieved in routine clinical practice. Moreover, the rate of false positives and false negatives at this concentration is extremely low, ˜10-4.

  9. Microencapsulation of therapeutic bispecific antibodies producing cells: immunotherapeutic organoids for cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz del Burgo, Laura; Compte, Marta; Aceves, Mónica; Hernández, Rosa María; Sanz, Laura; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Pedraz, Jose Luis

    2015-02-01

    Regardless of the important therapeutic advances developed over the last years for the management of cancer, the fact is that many patients still suffer from a tremendous reduction on their quality of life due to lack of complete selectivity of conventionally administered chemotherapeutic drugs. In the search of more efficacious tumor-targeted therapies, the use of bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) capable of simultaneous binding to tumor-associated antigens and to an activating receptor, such as CD3, has emerged as a promising approach. With the intention to complementing and improving this cancer immunotherapy, human HEK-293 cells have been genetically modified ex vivo to secrete a recombinant anti-CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) × anti-CD3 bsAb. After encapsulation in alginate-poly-l-lysine microcapsules, bsAb-secreting HEK-293 cells were monitorized for several weeks. This system has proved to be feasible for the maintenance of cell growth and recombinant antibody production giving proof-of-concept of its use as immunotherapeutic organoids in cancer treatment.

  10. Expression and immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya; Song, Ruifeng; Li, Xinqiang; Xu, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Serum assays of NY-ESO-1 antibodies provide a guide to discriminate between patients who suffer from different types of cancer. In the present study, the expression of NY-ESO-1 was detected with the aim to identify a novel tumor antigen in colorectal cancer (CRC). Sera were obtained from 89 healthy individuals and 236 patients with CRC with stage I, II, III and IV tumors. The NY-ESO-1 autoantibody levels were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of NY-ESO-1 were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in 60 CRC and paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. NY-ESO-1 antibody was detected in 40 of the 236 (16.9%) patients with CRC. The NY-ESO-1 antibody combined with carcinoembryonic antigen enhanced the sensitivity, from 52.1 to 62.7%, of the diagnosis of CRC. The frequency of antibody positivity increased with the TNM cancer stage (8.8 vs. 28.3% in stages I+II and III+IV, respectively). The mRNA and protein expression levels of NY-ESO-1 were significantly higher in CRC tissue than in adjacent non-tumor tissue. In conclusion, NY-ESO-1 is frequently expressed in CRC with the capacity of inducing a humoral immune response in CRC patients, exhibiting the potential to be a promising biomarker for CRC.

  11. Exacerbation of Dermatomyositis with Recurrence of Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Nagano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dermatomyositis (DM is a rare idiopathic inflammatory myopathy characterized by cutaneous and muscle manifestations. The association between DM and malignancy has been well recognized for many years. The clinical course of paraneoplastic DM may be affected by malignancies, although the cause and effect relationship between exacerbation of DM and cancer progression is uncertain. Herein, we report a 44-year-old woman who presented with progressive DM associated with rectal cancer. After curative resection of rectal cancer, DM symptoms resolved. Three months after surgery, blood test surveillance showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, although the patient remained asymptomatic. One month later she had a DM flare-up, and multiple lung and liver metastases were found. She immediately underwent cancer chemotherapy with prednisolone therapy for DM. However, her condition deteriorated and she was unable to swallow. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was constructed, allowing alimentation and oral delivery, which made it possible to keep her on chemotherapy. She had remarkable response for unresectable metastases 8 weeks after the administration of chemotherapy. Seven months after onset of recurrence, her condition improved considerably and she had stable disease. Moreover, she can now eat food of soft consistency. Our case provides further support for the clinical importance of cancer chemotherapy for patients who have progressive DM and unresectable rectal cancer.

  12. Histological inflammation and risk of subsequent prostate cancer among men with initially elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration in the Finnish prostate cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yli-Hemminki, Tytti H; Laurila, Marita; Auvinen, Anssi; Määttänen, Liisa; Huhtala, Heini; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Kujala, Paula M

    2013-10-01

    To assess whether histological signs of inflammation are associated with an increased risk of subsequent prostate cancer (PCa) in men with elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations and benign initial biopsy. Study subjects were men aged 54-67 years with an elevated PSA (≥4 ng/mL or 3-4 ng/mL and free to total PSA ratio ≤0.16 or positive digital rectal examination), but a benign biopsy result within the Finnish population-based randomised screening trial for PCa, which started in 1996. A total of 293 prostate biopsies without PCa or suspicion of malignancy from the first screening round in the Tampere centre were re-evaluated by a uropathologist to assess histological inflammation. Results of the subsequent screening rounds were obtained from the trial database and PCa diagnoses made outside the screening were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. The median length of follow-up was 10.5 years. Cox regression analysis was used to assess PCa risk after the initial benign biopsy. Histological inflammation was found in 66% of the biopsies. Subjects with inflammation at the biopsy had a slightly lower PCa risk in the second screening round (18 vs 27%, rate ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-1.34) relative to men without inflammation. In further follow-up, the PCa risk remained nonsignificantly lower (hazard ratio [HR] 0.71, CI 0.46-1.10; P = 0.13). The risk was not appreciably affected by adjustment for age, PSA, prostate volume and family history of PCa (HR 0.67, CI 0.42-1.07; P = 0.092). Histological inflammation in a prostate biopsy among men with an initial false-positive screening test was not associated with an increased risk of subsequent PCa, but instead with a decreased risk which was of borderline significance. Inflammation in prostate biopsy is not a useful risk indicator in PCa screening. © 2013 BJU International.

  13. The effect of bile acids and piroxicam on MHC antigen expression in rat colonocytes during colon cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, B; Tsioulias, G J; Allan, C; Wali, R K; Brasitus, T A

    1994-10-01

    The effect of bile acids and piroxicam on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in colonocytes was evaluated in rats treated with the colonic carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Male Fischer-344 rats were fed a basal diet (AIN-76) supplemented with 0.4% cholic acid, 0.4% ursodeoxycholic acid, 0.2% ursodeoxycholic acid plus 0.2% cholic acid, or 75 p.p.m. piroxicam. Rats were injected subcutaneously once a week for 2 weeks with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight/week) or vehicle, after being fed their respective diets for two weeks. The rats were killed at 16 weeks, while parallel identical groups of rats were killed at 28 weeks, and colon tumours were counted. None of the rats treated with AOM-vehicle developed tumours at 28 weeks, while in the AOM-treated rats the frequency of colonic tumours was as follows: AOM alone 50%, cholic acid 74%, ursodeoxycholic acid 17%, piroxicam 28%, ursodeoxycholic plus cholic acid 46%. The expression of RT1A, RT1B and RT1D was determined in isolated colonocytes by immune fluocytometry. Normal rat colonocytes express all three MHC antigens strongly. Neither the bile acids nor piroxicam affected MHC antigen expression in AOM-vehicle-treated rats. AOM did not effect MHC antigen expression compared to normal controls. Cholic acid had no significant effect on the expression of MHC antigens in AOM-treated rats. Ursodeoxycholic acid alone or in combination with cholic acid increased the expression of RT1A compared to normal controls, of RT1B compared to AOM-treated rats, and of RT1D compared to controls or AOM-treated rats. Piroxicam increased the expression of all three antigens compared to either control or AOM-treated rats. These findings indicate that (1) ursodeoxycholic acid and piroxicam up-regulate colonic MHC antigen expression in the AOM model of colonic carcinogenesis; (2) the colon of rats exposed to AOM responds differently than the normal colon with respect to MHC regulation; and (3) the protective effect of

  14. The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and proliferative activity detected by antibody MIB-1 in node-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V; Ladekarl, M; Holm-Nielsen, P

    1995-01-01

    The prognostic value of oncogenic antigen 519 (OA-519) expression and tumour proliferative activity was evaluated in a retrospective series of 118 patients with low-risk breast cancer. Low risk was defined as negative axillary nodes, tumour diameter ... of invasion of skin or deep fascia (= T1N0M0 and T2N0M0). The median follow-up time was 104 months (range 5-143 months). Immunohistochemical analysis of OA-519 expression was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. The proliferative activity was estimated using a Ki-67 equivalent monoclonal...... analysis, both the MIB-1 index and OA-519 expression were of independent prognostic value (2p cancer who might benefit from adjuvant therapy....

  15. A different method of evaluation of the ERSPC trial confirms that prostate-specific antigen testing has a significant impact on prostate cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Marco; Puliti, Donella; Hugosson, Jonas; Schröder, Fritz H; van Leeuwen, Pim J; Kranse, Ries; Auvinen, Anssi; Carlsson, Sigrid; Kwiatkowski, Maciej; Nelen, Vera; Paez Borda, Alvaro; Roobol, Monique J; Villers, Arnauld

    2014-09-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of two different methods of analyzing the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) trial with respect to the effect of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening on prostate cancer (PCa) mortality (ie, disease-specific mortality analysis and excess mortality analysis) are discussed in depth. The traditional disease-specific mortality is the best end point, but it could be biased by misclassification of causes of death, and it does not take into account the possible effect of the screening process on other causes of death. Excess mortality analysis overcomes these problems, but the results could be biased if the expected mortality is not corrected for attendance status. Both methods, when applied to the ERSPC trials, demonstrate that no increase in non-PCa mortality occurred in the screening group and confirm that PSA screening decreases PCa mortality. Copyright © 2013 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biochemical markers for assessment of bone metastases in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, M F; Tsai, L Y; Tsai, S M; Huang, C J; Huang, Y S; Hsieh, J S; Chan, H M; Wang, J Y; Chuang, C H; Chen, F M; Huang, T J

    1999-08-01

    Breast cancer commonly metastasizes to bones, producing both osteolytic and osteoblastic deposits. Different markers for quantitative determination of bone turnover have been developed to evaluate bone metastases of breast cancer. The urinary deoxypyridinoline (Dpd), a crosslink product of collagen molecules found in bone and excreted in urine during bone degradation, and bone specific alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP), an isoenzyme localized in the membrane of osteoblasts and released in circulation during bone formation, were recently described as a group of markers of bone turnover in metastatic cancer. The urinary Dpd/creatinine (Cre) ratios and the serum B-ALP activity were determined in the samples from 148 patients who suffered from breast cancer (BC patients) with or without bone metastases, and 42 healthy women. For comparison, other biochemical markers, e.g. carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA15-3, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA), tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPSA), and total alkaline phosphatase (T-ALP) in these samples were also evaluated. The results showed that there was a significant difference in urinary Dpd/Cre ratio between the control group and the patients with breast cancer (BC group) (mean +/- S.D., 5.69 +/- 1.26 vs. 8.19 +/- 3.95 nM/mM, P markers, the best diagnostic efficiency of biochemical markers, analyzed by step wise discriminate analysis, was provided by CEA followed by Dpd/Cre ratio, CA15-3, TPA, TPSA, B-ALP and T-ALP. We conclude that showed the urinary Dpd/Cre ratio was a useful tumor marker to evaluate breast cancer with bone metastases.

  17. Serum microRNA-135a-5p as an auxiliary diagnostic biomarker for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinjun; Zhang, Hongchun; Shen, Xianjuan; Ju, Shaoqing

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore serum miR-135a-5p expression in colorectal cancer and examine the potential usefulness of this molecule as a biomarker for diagnosis in colorectal cancer. Methods Serum samples were collected from 60 patients with primary colorectal cancer, 40 patients with colorectal polyps and 50 healthy controls. Serum miR-135a-5p expression levels were detected by reverse transcription quantitative real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 199 concentrations were detected by MODULAR ANALYTICS E170. Results The relative expression level of serum miR-135a-5p in colorectal cancer patients, colorectal polyps patients and healthy controls was 2.451 (1.107, 4.413), 0.946 (0.401, 1.942) and 0.949 (0.194, 1.415), respectively, indicating that it was significantly higher in colorectal cancer patients than that in the other two groups ( U = 351.0, 313.0, both P colorectal cancer patients. Compared with colorectal polyps group, AUCROC of serum miR-135a-5p in colorectal cancer group was 0.832 with 95% CI 0.73-0.93; compared with healthy control group, AUCROC was 0.875 with 95% CI 0.80-0.95. Conclusion Serum miR-135a-5p expression in colorectal cancer patients was higher than that in patients with colorectal polyps and healthy controls, suggesting that serum miR-135a-5p may prove to be an important biomarker for auxiliary diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  18. Expression and clinical significance of MAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Johannes A; Heine, Daniela; Thierauf, Julia; Lennerz, Jochen; Shetty, Subasch; Schuler, Patrick J; Whiteside, Theresa; Beutner, Dirk; Meyer, Moritz; Grünewald, Inga; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Sikora, Andrew G; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Laban, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck is a rare but highly malignant tumor. Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) represent an immunogenic family of cancer-specific proteins and thus represent an attractive target for immunotherapy. Eighty-four cases of ACC were identified, the CTAs pan-Melanoma antigen (pan-MAGE; M3H67) and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (NY-ESO-1; E978) were detected immunohistochemically (IHC) and correlated with clinical data. Expression of NY-ESO-1 was found in 48 of 84 patients (57.1%) and of pan-MAGE in 28 of 84 patients (31.2%). Median overall survival (OS) in NY-ESO-1 positive versus negative patients was 130.8 and 282.0 months (p = .223), respectively. OS in pan-MAGE positive versus negative patients was 105.3 and 190.5 months, respectively (p = .096). Patients expressing both NY-ESO-1 and pan-MAGE simultaneously had significantly reduced OS with a median of 90.5 months compared with 282.0 months in negative patients (p = .047). A significant fraction of patients with ACC show expression of the CTAs NY-ESO-1 and/or pan-MAGE with promising immunotherapeutic implications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1008-1016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effective adoptive immunotherapy of triple-negative breast cancer by folate receptor-alpha redirected CAR T cells is influenced by surface antigen expression level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Gang Song

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor prognosis and the limited efficacy of targeted therapy in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have raised the need for alternative therapies. Recent studies have demonstrated that folate receptor-alpha (FRα may represent an ideal tumor-associated marker for immunotherapy for TNBC. Methods The aim of the present study was to apply a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR approach for the targeting of FRα expressed on TNBC cells and evaluate the antitumor activity of CAR-engineered T cells in vitro and in vivo. Results We found that human T cells expressing a FRα-specific CAR were potent and specific killers of TNBC cells that express moderate levels of FRα in vitro and significantly inhibited tumor outgrowth following infusion into immunodeficient mice bearing an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft. However, the antitumor activity of the FRα CAR T cells was modest when compared to the same CAR T cells applied in an ovarian tumor xenograft model where FRα expression is more abundant. Notably, FRα CAR T cells induced superior tumor regression in vivo against MDA-MB-231 that was engineered for overexpression of FRα. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that FRα CAR T cells can mediate antitumor activity against established TNBC tumor, particularly when FRα is expressed at higher levels. These results have significant implications for the pre-selection of patients with high antigen expression levels when utilizing CAR-based adoptive T cell therapies of cancer in future clinical trials.

  20. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens in diffuse large B-cell testicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kastelan, Zeljko; Ilic, Ivana; Levarda-Hudolin, Katarina; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina; Rieken, Malte; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Juretic, Antonio; Mengus, Chantal

    2013-05-16

    Primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) is a rare and lethal disease. The most common histological subtype is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Standard treatments are frequently ineffective. Thus, the development of novel forms of therapy is urgently required. Specific immunotherapy generating immune responses directed against antigen predominantly expressed by cancer cells such as cancer-testis antigens (CTA) may provide a valid alternative treatment for patients bearing PTL, alone or in combination with current therapies. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 77B recognizing MAGE-A1, 57B recognizing an epitope shared by multiple MAGE-A CTA (multi-MAGE-A specific) and D8.38 recognizing NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 were used for immunohistochemical staining of 27 PTL, including 24 DLBCL. Expression of MAGE-A1 was infrequently detectable in DLBCL specimens (12.50%), whereas multi-MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 specific reagents stained the cytoplasms of tumor cells in DLBCL specimens with higher frequencies (54.17% and 37.50%, respectively) with different expression levels. These results suggest that MAGE-A and NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1, possibly in combination with other CTA, might be used as targets for specific immunotherapy in DLBCL.

  1. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies against ganglioside antigens and their applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, M. [Dept. of Tumor Cell Biology, Div. of Cancer Biology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)]|[Dept. of Research and Development, Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana (Cuba); Zeuthen, J. [Dept. of Tumor Cell Biology, Div. of Cancer Biology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1996-10-01

    Different approaches to generating human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against tumor-associated ganglioside antigens have been carried out in several laboratories. A specific goal addressed by our laboratory is to produce human MAbs to several ganglioside antigens of relevance as therapeutic targets, such as the GM2, GD2, GD3 and GM3 gangliosides in melanoma. In vitro immunization of human B lymphocytes from normal donors was performed using liposomes containing gangliosides as the immunizing antigen combined with either complete tetanus toxoid or a synthetic peptide corresponding to a T helper epitope to stimulate in vitro immunization. Specific human anti-ganglioside antibodies were obtained, indicating that the antibdoy response found in vitro was antigen-driven. To overcome the widely reported problems concerning stability of immunoglobulin production by the antibody-secreting cell lines, a method of positive selection using GM3-coated magnetic beads has been developed in order to rescue unstable clones. Development of new methods to reproducibly generate ganglioside-specific human MAbs will amplify the possibilities for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. (orig.).

  2. Value of detection of serum human epididymis secretory protein 4 and carbohydrate antigen 125 in diagnosis of early endometrial cancer of different pathological subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingui; Zhao, Fengting; Hu, Linli; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the value of detection of human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) from serum in diagnosis of early endometrial cancer of different pathological subtypes and discussed the mechanism of HE4 and CA125 in diagnosis. In this study, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescent immunoassay were used to detect HE4 and CA125 from serum in endometrial cancer and control groups. Besides, the concentration of HE4 and CA125 was compared in these two groups, and the expression of CA125 and HE4 and clinicopathological characteristics in patients with endometrial cancer were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the expression of HE4 was much higher in serum of patients with endometrial cancer, while there was no obvious change in the expression of CA125. The threshold detection value was acquired by receiver operating characteristic analysis method, that is, 141.5 pmol/L and 54.5 U/L, respectively. When comparing the concentration of HE4 in patients with endometrial cancer at the early stage (stage I) with healthy people, the difference therein had statistical significance, but there was no obvious difference in CA125. HE4 and CA125 in diagnosis of endometrial cancer in the stages I and II were found with no statistically significant difference. The difference of HE4 in the stages II and III had statistical significance while the difference of CA125 had no statistical significance. The specificity of both HE4 and CA125 was 95%, and the sensitivity of HE4 to uterine papillary serous carcinomas was higher than that to endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Thus, the serum HE4 is much better than CA125 in detecting the endometrial cancer at an early stage.

  3. Tumor cryoablation in combination with natural killer cells therapy and Herceptin in patients with HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuzhen; Niu, Lizhi; Xu, Kecheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Yingqing; Zhang, Mingjie; Chen, Jibing; Lin, Mao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the clinical benefits of a combination of tumor cryoablation with natural killer (NK) cells therapy and Herceptin for human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. From May 2015 to May 2016, 48 patients who met the enrollment criteria were assigned to three groups (n=16): cryoablation group (group I), cryoablation-NK cells therapy group (group II) and cryoablation-NK cells therapy-Herceptin group (group III). Safety and short-term effects were evaluated. All the adverse effects were manageable and acceptable. The three-therapy combination treatment not only yielded good clinical efficacy, it also improved the quality of life; reduced levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs); reduced carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) expression; enhanced immune function significantly. Furthermore, it can resulte in significant prolongation of progression free survival (PFS). This is the first clinical study to demonstrate the benefit of the three-therapy combination of tumor cryoablation, NK cells therapy, and Herceptin for HER2-overexpressing recurrent breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Electrochemical Microfluidic Chip Combined with Multiple Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yao; Zhi, Xiao; Su, Haichuan; Wang, Kan; Yan, Zhen; He, Nongyue; Zhang, Jingpu; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis is very important to improve the survival rate of patients with gastric cancer and to understand the biology of cancer. In order to meet the clinical demands for early diagnosis of gastric cancer, we developed a disposable easy-to-use electrochemical microfluidic chip combined with multiple antibodies against six kinds of biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), Helicobacter pylori CagA protein (H.P.), P53oncoprotein (P53), pepsinogen I (PG I), and PG-II). The six kinds of biomarkers related to gastric cancer can be detected sensitively and synchronously in a short time. The specially designed three electrodes system enables cross-contamination to be avoided effectively. The linear ranges of detection of the electrochemical microfluidic chip were as follows: 0.37-90 ng mL-1 for CEA, 10.75-172 U mL-1 for CA19-9, 10-160 U L-1 for H.P., 35-560 ng mL-1 for P53, 37.5-600 ng mL-1 for PG I, and 2.5-80 ng mL-1for PG II. This method owns better sensitivity compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results of 394 specimens of gastric cancer sera. Furthermore, we established a multi-index prediction model based on the six kinds of biomarkers for predicting risk of gastric cancer. In conclusion, the electrochemical microfluidic chip for detecting multiple biomarkers has great potential in applications such as early screening of gastric cancer patients, and therapeutic evaluation, and real-time dynamic monitoring the progress of gastric cancer in near future.

  5. Immunodominant PstS1 antigen of mycobacterium tuberculosis is a potent biological response modifier for the treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böhle Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG-immunotherapy has a well-documented and successful clinical history in the treatment of bladder cancer. However, regularly observed side effects, a certain degree of nonresponders and restriction to superficial cancers remain a major obstacle. Therefore, alternative treatment strategies are intensively being explored. We report a novel approach of using a well defined immunostimulatory component of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for the treatment of bladder cancer. The phosphate transport protein PstS1 which represents the phosphate binding component of a mycobacterial phosphate uptake system is known to be a potent immunostimulatory antigen of M. tuberculosis. This preclinical study was designed to test the potential of recombinant PstS1 to serve as a non-viable and defined immunotherapeutic agent for intravesical bladder cancer therapy. Methods Mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from human peripheral blood and stimulated with PstS1 for seven days. The activation of PBMCs was determined by chromium release assay, IFN-γ ELISA and measurement of lymphocyte proliferation. The potential of PstS1 to activate monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC was determined by flow cytometric analysis of the marker molecules CD83 and CD86 as well as the release of the cytokines TNF-α and IL-12. Survival of presensitized and intravesically treated, tumor-bearing mice was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curve and log rank test. Local and systemic immune response in PstS1-immunotherapy was investigated by anti-PstS1-specific ELISA, splenocyte proliferation assay and immunohistochemistry. Results Our in vitro experiments showed that PstS1 is able to stimulate cytotoxicity, IFN-γ release and proliferation of PBMCs. Further investigations showed the potential of PstS1 to activate monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC. In vivo studies in an orthotopic murine bladder cancer model demonstrated the therapeutic

  6. Development and potential applications of microarrays based on fluorescent nanocrystal-encoded beads for multiplexed cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhnik, Kristina; Grinevich, Regina; Efimov, Anton E.; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2014-05-01

    Advanced multiplexed assays have recently become an indispensable tool for clinical diagnostics. These techniques provide simultaneous quantitative determination of multiple biomolecules in a single sample quickly and accurately. The development of multiplex suspension arrays is currently of particular interest for clinical applications. Optical encoding of microparticles is the most available and easy-to-use technique. This technology uses fluorophores incorporated into microbeads to obtain individual optical codes. Fluorophore-encoded beads can be rapidly analyzed using classical flow cytometry or microfluidic techniques. We have developed a new generation of highly sensitive and specific diagnostic systems for detection of cancer antigens in human serum samples based on microbeads encoded with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). The designed suspension microarray system was validated for quantitative detection of (1) free and total prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the serum of patients with prostate cancer and (2) carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) in the serum of patients with breast cancer. The serum samples from healthy donors were used as a control. The antigen detection is based on the formation of an immune complex of a specific capture antibody (Ab), a target antigen (Ag), and a detector Ab on the surface of the encoded particles. The capture Ab is bound to the polymer shell of microbeads via an adapter molecule, for example, protein A. Protein A binds a monoclonal Ab in a highly oriented manner due to specific interaction with the Fc-region of the Ab molecule. Each antigen can be recognized and detected due to a specific microbead population carrying the unique fluorescent code. 100 and 231 serum samples from patients with different stages of prostate cancer and breast cancer, respectively, and those from healthy donors were examined using the designed suspension system. The data were validated by comparing with the results of

  7. Case of a sigmoid colon cancer with metachronous metastases to the mesorectum and the abdominal wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjimarcou Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Sigmoid colon cancer metachronous metastases commonly occur in the liver and lungs with sporadic reports also to the spleen, stomach, thyroid gland, abdominal wall and upper urinary tract. This is a rare case of metachronous metastases invading the mesorectum and the abdominal wall. Case presentation A 72-year-old female underwent sigmoidectomy for stage I (T2N0 M0 sigmoid colon cancer in May 2008. In June 2009, an abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a tumor 2 cm in size at the lower anterior mesorectum and a second mass 2 cm in size at the anterior abdominal wall midline. Total colonoscopy showed no mucosal lesion. The serum carcinoembryonic antigen level was normal. A biopsy of the mesorectum tumor showed similar histologic characteristics with the primary tumor. Since no other site of recurrence was identified, an abdominoperineal resection was attempted. During the operation and after the removal of the incision recurrence, sinus bradycardia and signs of myocardial ischemia were noticed. A loop transverse colostomy was immediately perfomed and the operation was terminated. Postoperative cardiologic examination revealed an acute myocardium infract. Chemo-radiation of the mesorectum tumor and re-evaluation for surgical excision was decided. Conclusion Metachronous metastasis of the mesorectum from sigmoid colon cancer is extremely rare. Although patterns of lymphatic spread from rectal cancer to sigmoid colon have recently been demonstrated, there is no evidence of metachronous mesorectum invasion from sigmoid colon cancer. This could be the issue for future trials.

  8. Metastases of transverse colon cancer to bilateral ovaries (Krukenberg tumor) and the left breast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin-Yu; Wang, Jue; Zhao, Jia; Chen, Rui; Zha, Xiao-Ming

    2017-07-01

    Breast cancer has the highest rate of incidence among all types of cancer in women. Only ~0.43% of breast malignancies occur as a result of metastatic lesions from extramammary tumors. The present study reports an extremely rare case of transverse colon cancer metastasizing to the bilateral ovaries and the left breast. The patient was a 47-year old female, who had a lump in the left breast without axillary lymphadenopathy. Specimens obtained by core needle biopsy were submitted for hematoxylin and eosin examination, and results revealed that the lump was a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Since the patient had elevated levels of the carcinoembryonic antigen and a medical history of a Krukenberg tumor metastasized from colon cancer, immunohistochemical examinations were applied. Results identified that caudal-related homeobox protein 2 and cytokeratin 20 were positively stained, whilst cytokeratin 7 was negatively stained. Therefore, this patient was diagnosed as having colon cancer that had metastasized to the bilateral ovaries and the left breast. As the life expectancy of patients with cancer is increasing, types of metastases that used to be seen as rare are increasingly becoming more common. For clinicians, diagnosis should be cautious, and differential diagnosis should always be kept in mind.

  9. Vγ9Vδ2-T cells as antigen presenting cells for iNKT cell based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werter, Inge M.; Schneiders, Famke L.; Scotet, Emmanuel; Verheul, Henk M.W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) constitute an important immunoregulatory T-cell subset involved in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Here, we provide a view on the recent observation that Vγ9Vδ2-T cells, through trogocytosis of CD1d-containing membrane fragments, have the capacity to act as antigen presenting cells for iNKT. PMID:25941612

  10. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies Against Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    one of the other species for which NAALADase homology have been cloned (e.g. rat, mouse, pig ), that do exhibit NAALADase activity and therefore we do...The antigen itself was discovered by Horoszewicz et al. (28), who isolated LNCaP cell membranes and immunized mice with the mixture, producing the...tissues from kidney, liver, lung, mammary gland, pancreas, placenta , skeletal muscle, spleen, and testis. However, there was high expression in normal

  11. Artificial neural networks analysis of surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectra of serum protein pattern distinguishes colorectal cancer from healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ding; Zheng, Shu; Yu, Jie-kai; Hu, Xun

    2004-12-15

    The low specificity and sensitivity of the carcinoembryonic antigen test makes it not an ideal biomarker for the detection of colorectal cancer. We developed and evaluated a proteomic approach for the simultaneous detection and analysis of multiple proteins for distinguishing individuals with colorectal cancer from healthy individuals. We subjected serum samples (including 55 colorectal cancer patients and 92 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals) from 147 individuals, for analysis by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) mass spectrometry. Peaks were detected with Ciphergen SELDI software version 3.0. Using a multilayer artificial neural network with a back propagation algorithm, we developed a classifier for separating the colorectal cancer groups from the healthy groups. The artificial neural network classifier separated the colorectal cancer from the healthy samples, with a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 93%. Four top-scored peaks, at m/z of 5,911, 8,930, 8,817, and 4,476, were finally selected as the potential "fingerprints" for detection of colorectal cancer. The combination of SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry with the artificial neural networks in the analysis of serum protein yields significantly higher sensitivity and specificity values for the detection and diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  12. Using gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 as a novel type of biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunben; Shao, Yongfu; Zhu, Mengying; Li, Qier; Yang, Fang; Lu, Xuwen; Xu, Chunjing; Xiao, Bingxiu; Sun, Yanke; Guo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in tumorigenesis. However, the diagnostic values of most lncRNAs are largely unknown. To investigate whether gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 can be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer, 173 tissue samples and 130 gastric juice from benign lesion, gastric dysplasia, gastric premalignant lesions, and gastric cancer were collected. ABHD11-AS1 levels were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Then, the relationships between ABHD11-AS1 levels and clinicopathological factors of patients with gastric cancer were investigated. The results showed that ABHD11-AS1 levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in other tissues. Its levels in gastric juice from gastric cancer patients were not only significantly higher than those from cases of normal mucosa or minimal gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and gastric ulcers but also associated with gender, tumor size, tumor stage, Lauren type, and blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. More importantly, when using gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 as a marker, the positive detection rate of early gastric cancer patients was reached to 71.4 %. Thanks to the special origin of gastric juice, these results indicate that gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 may be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

  13. Unexpected distribution of CA19.9 and other type 1 chain Lewis antigens in normal and cancer tissues of colon and pancreas: Importance of the detection method and role of glycosyltransferase regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Adele; Avagliano, Laura; Caretti, Anna; Tosi, Delfina; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Trinchera, Marco

    2017-01-01

    CA19.9 antigen has been assumed as an abundant product of cancer cells, due to the reactivity found by immunohistochemical staining of cancer tissues with anti-CA19.9 antibody. Expression and biosynthesis of type 1 chain Lewis antigens in the colon and the pancreas were studied by immunodetection in tissue sections and lysates, quantification of glycosyltransferase transcripts, bisulfite sequencing, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CA19.9 was poorly detectable in normal colon mucosa and almost undetectable in colon cancer, while it was easily detected in the pancreatic ducts, together with Lewis b antigen, under both normal and cancer conditions. B3GALT5 transcripts were down-regulated in colon cancer, while they remained expressed in pancreatic cancer. Even ST3GAL3 transcript appeared well expressed in the pancreas but poorly in the colon, irrespective of normal or cancer conditions. CpG islands flanking B3GALT5 native promoter presented an extremely low degree of methylation in pancreatic cancer with respect to colon cancer. In a DNA region about 1kb away from the B3GALT5 retroviral promoter, a stretch of CG dinucleotides presented a methylation pattern potentially associated with transcription. Such a DNA region and the transcription factor binding site provided overlapping results by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, corroborating the hypothesis. CA19.9 appears as a physiological product whose synthesis strongly depends on the tissue specific and epigenetically-regulated expression of B3GALT5 and ST3GAL3. CA19.9 and other Lewis antigens acquire tumor marker properties in the pancreas due to mechanisms giving rise to reabsorption into vessels and elevation in circulating levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolated breast metastasis from gastric cancer in a male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Sekido, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Goro; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Akira; Sakamoto, Risa; Yamamoto, Yuji; Toyoda, Junya; Niino, Hitoshi

    2018-01-04

    A 72-year-old man underwent total gastrectomy for gastric cancer (por2, T3, N2, Stage IIIA). Eleven courses of postoperative chemotherapy with TS-1 (tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil) were administered. Five months after surgery, the serum carcinoembryonic antigen value was slightly elevated. However, computed tomography did not reveal any metastatic lesions in other organs. Two years after surgery, the patient felt a mass in the left mammary. A 2-cm tumor was palpable in the central portion of the breast. Ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic tumor, which was Class 3 on aspiration biopsy cytological examination. No mass was detected on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. The mammary gland tumor increased in size to 3 cm, and a core needle biopsy procedure was performed. Histological examination findings revealed breast metastasis of gastric cancer. No other recurrence was found, and radical mastectomy was performed 2 years and 5 months after gastrectomy. Immunohistological analysis of the resected material confirmed breast metastasis of the gastric cancer. Two courses of TS-1 + cisplatin were administered, but this treatment was subsequently terminated because the patient experienced Grade 3 diarrhea and neutropenia. Three years and 1 month after the gastrectomy, the tumor recurred in the pelvic area. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy were performed, but the patient's overall condition became progressively worse, and he died 3 years and 9 months after gastrectomy.

  15. Correlation and diagnostic performance of the prostate-specific antigen level with the diagnosis, aggressiveness, and bone metastasis of prostate cancer in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojanapiwat, Bannakij; Anutrakulchai, Wisan; Chongruksut, Wilaiwan; Udomphot, Chaichawan

    2014-09-01

    The common tool for diagnosing prostate cancer is serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examination, but the disadvantage of the high sensitivity and low specificity of PSA testing in the diagnosis of prostate cancer is a problem in clinical practice. We studied the correlation and diagnostic performance of the PSA level with cancer diagnosis, aggressiveness of prostate cancer (Gleason score>7), and bone metastasis. A total 1,116 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound and prostate biopsy were retrospectively studied. The patients were divided into subgroups by baseline PSA level as follows: ≤4, 4.1-10, 10.1-20, 20.1-50, 50.1-100, and >100 ng/mL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AuROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of each PSA level were evaluated for correlation and diagnostic performance with positive biopsy, Gleason score for aggressiveness, and bone metastasis. A positive biopsy result was found in 395 patients (35.39%). The PSA level corresponded well with the diagnosis of prostate cancer and a positive bone scan but moderately well with Gleason score as shown by AuROC for diagnosis of prostate cancer (0.82), positive bone scan (0.88), and Gleason score>7 (0.78). The specificity of a PSA level of 4.1-10, 10.1-20, 21.1-50, 50.1-100, and >100 ng/mL in the diagnosis prostate cancer was 9.3, 55.5, 87.5, 98.2, and 99.7, respectively. The data showed a strong correlation of PSA level with tumor diagnosis, tumor aggressiveness, and bone metastasis. The prevalence of prostate cancer in this cohort was 35.39%. The chance of diagnosis of prostate cancer was greater than that for benign prostatic hyperplasia when the PSA level was higher than 20 ng/mL.

  16. Retargeting of T lymphocytes to PSCA- or PSMA positive prostate cancer cells using the novel modular chimeric antigen receptor platform technology "UniCAR".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Anja; Arndt, Claudia; Bergmann, Ralf; Loff, Simon; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Dominik; Aliperta, Roberta; Hetzenecker, Mirjam; Ludwig, Florian; Albert, Susann; Ziller-Walter, Pauline; Kegler, Alexandra; Koristka, Stefanie; Gärtner, Sebastian; Schmitz, Marc; Ehninger, Armin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Pietzsch, Jens; Steinbach, Jörg; Bachmann, Michael

    2017-05-09

    New treatment options especially of solid tumors including for metastasized prostate cancer (PCa) are urgently needed. Recent treatments of leukemias with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) underline their impressive therapeutic potential. However CARs currently applied in the clinics cannot be repeatedly turned on and off potentially leading to severe life threatening side effects. To overcome these problems, we recently described a modular CAR technology termed UniCAR: UniCAR T cells are inert but can be turned on by application of one or multiple target modules (TMs). Here we present preclinical data summarizing the retargeting of UniCAR T cells to PCa cells using TMs directed to prostate stem cell- (PSCA) or/and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA). In the presence of the respective TM(s), we see a highly efficient target-specific and target-dependent activation of UniCAR T cells, secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PCa cell lysis both in vitro and experimental mice.

  17. Prostate-specific antigen testing in Tyrol, Austria: prostate cancer mortality reduction was supported by an update with mortality data up to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberaigner, Willi; Siebert, Uwe; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut; Bektic, Jasmin; Schäfer, Georg; Frauscher, Ferdinand; Schennach, Harald; Bartsch, Georg

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to update an in-depth analysis of the time trend for prostate cancer (PCA) mortality in the population of Tyrol by 5 years, namely to 2008. In Tyrol, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests were introduced in 1988/89; more than three-quarters of all men in the age group 45-74 had at least one PSA test in the past decade. We applied the same model as in a previous publication, i.e., an age-period-cohort model using Poisson regression, to the mortality data covering more than three decades from 1970 to 2008. For Tyrol from 2004 to 2008 in the age group 60+ period terms show a significant reduction in prostate cancer mortality with a risk ratio of 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.57, 0.87) for Tyrol, and for Austria excluding Tyrol a moderate reduction with a risk ratio of 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.87, 0.97), each compared to the mortality rate in the period 1989-1993. This update strengthens our previously published results, namely that PSA testing offered to a population at no charge can reduce prostate cancer mortality. The extent of mortality reduction is in line with that reported in the other recent publications. However, our data do not permit us to fully assess the harms associated with PCA screening, and no recommendation for PSA screening can be made without a careful evaluation of overdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  18. Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level correlate with growth inhibition of prostate cancer cells treated in vitro with a novel anticancer drug, irofulven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woynarowska BAHigdon, A L; Muñoz, R M; Bushong, P; Waters, S J

    2001-01-01

    Irofulven (hydroxymethylacylfulvene, HMAF, MGI 114) is a novel agent with alkylating activity and a potent inducer of apoptosis. It is currently undergoing Phase II clinical trials for several tumor types, including hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Reduction of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels has been proposed as a generally useful endpoint for evaluating the antitumor efficacy of treatments for prostate cancer. However, the utility of PSA as a marker of tumor cell burden could be compromised, if drugs directly affected PSA secretion and/or expression. In these studies, we evaluated the effects of irofulven on PSA protein and mRNA levels during the course of treatment of prostate tumor cells in vitro. The rate of PSA secretion (normalized per equal cell number) by control and drug treated cells was similar, as determined by a solid phase, two-site immunoradiometric assay. Consistent with the lack of effect of irofulven on PSA protein level, the drug does not appear to affect the expression of PSA mRNA (on a per cell basis) as assessed by RT-PCR. Thus, changes in PSA secretion and expression appear to reflect irofulven-induced cell growth inhibition rather than reflecting a direct effect of the drug on PSA. These results suggest that PSA should be a reasonable marker of tumor burden in irofulven-treated prostate cancer patients.

  19. Redirected Primary Human Chimeric Antigen Receptor Natural Killer Cells As an “Off-the-Shelf Immunotherapy” for Improvement in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Oberschmidt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary human natural killer (NK cells recognize and subsequently eliminate virus infected cells, tumor cells, or other aberrant cells. However, cancer cells are able to develop tumor immune escape mechanisms to undermine this immune control. To overcome this obstacle, NK cells can be genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs in order to improve specific recognition of cancer surface markers (e.g., CD19, CD20, and ErbB2. After target recognition, intracellular CAR domain signaling (CD3ζ, CD28, 4-1BB, and 2B4 leads to activation of PI3K or DNAX proteins (DAP10, DAP12 and finally to enhanced cytotoxicity, proliferation, and/or interferon γ release. This mini-review summarizes both the first preclinical trials with CAR-engineered primary human NK cells and the translational implications for “off-the-shelf immunotherapy” in cancer treatment. Signal transduction in NK cells as well as optimization of CAR signaling will be described, becoming more and more a focal point of interest in addition to redirected T cells. Finally, strategies to overcome off-target effects will be discussed in order to improve future clinical trials and to avoid attacking healthy tissues.